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Sample records for range bounding faults

  1. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...

  2. Tertiary Normal Faulting in the Canyon Range, Eastern Sevier Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills; Anders

    1999-11-01

    The contact between pre-Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks in the western Canyon Range, west-central Utah, has been interpreted as a large, low-angle normal fault that marks the breakaway zone of the hypothesized, basin-forming Sevier Desert detachment. Recent fieldwork suggests that the contact may in fact be depositional along much or all of its length. Deformational fabric in the supposed footwall likely traces to the Mesozoic Sevier orogeny rather than to Tertiary detachment faulting. Kinematic indicators at the range front are not generally consistent with low-angle normal-fault motion; instead, well-exposed high-angle faults are the dominant range-bounding structures. The Tertiary conglomerates of the western Canyon Range foothills, previously viewed as an evolving syntectonic deposit related to detachment faulting, are here reinterpreted as three distinct units that reflect different periods and tectonic settings. The pattern in these conglomerates, and in fault-offset gravity-slide deposits that mantle the western foothills, is consistent with block faulting and rotation along several generations of high-angle structures. Local seismic-reflection data lend qualitative support to this interpretation, and underscore the need to consider alternative working hypotheses for evolution of the Sevier Desert basin.

  3. Achieving Agreement in Three Rounds with Bounded-Byzantine Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar, R.

    2017-01-01

    A three-round algorithm is presented that guarantees agreement in a system of K greater than or equal to 3F+1 nodes provided each faulty node induces no more than F faults and each good node experiences no more than F faults, where, F is the maximum number of simultaneous faults in the network. The algorithm is based on the Oral Message algorithm of Lamport, Shostak, and Pease and is scalable with respect to the number of nodes in the system and applies equally to traditional node-fault model as well as the link-fault model. We also present a mechanical verification of the algorithm focusing on verifying the correctness of a bounded model of the algorithm as well as confirming claims of determinism.

  4. No major active backthrust bounds the Pir Panjal Range near Kashmir basin, NW Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    This research disputes the geomorphic data presented in Dar et al. (2014), and demonstrates that their data strongly conflicts with their own field evidence, and also with the previous geological observations. The authors have proposed a major ∼SW dipping frontal fault that bounds the Pir Panjal Range near Kashmir basin of NW Himalaya. However, field photographs show a very steep ∼86° dipping normal fault. This therefore, contradicts with all the morphometric indices, interpretations, and discussion presented because those are based on a major ∼SE dipping thrust fault that bounds Pir Panjal Range in Kashmir basin. The proposed fault is a major ∼SW dipping backthrust, which primarily conflicts with the previous geological observations in Kashmir basin because mostly ∼NE dipping major thrusts are mapped in this region. And presently only three major ∼NE dipping faults, the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT), the Raisi Fault (RF), and the Kashmir Basin Fault (KBF), are tectonically active. The new proposed major active thrust, as suggested by the triangular facets mapped by Dar et al. (2014), was mapped on the basis of geomorphic evidence as a ∼SW dipping thrust fault, and field evidence shows a normal fault, which utterly questions the nature, and significance of the new research work.

  5. On the range of completely bounded maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that if every bounded linear map from a C*-algebra α to a von Neumann algebra β is completely bounded, then either α is finite-dimensional or β⫅⊗Mn, where is a commutative von Neumann algebra and Mn is the algebra of n×n complex matrices.

  6. Structural analysis of the Gachsar sub-zone in central Alborz range; constrain for inversion tectonics followed by the range transverse faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaghi, A.; Naeimi, A.

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of the Gachsar structural sub-zone has been carried out to constrain structural evolution of the central Alborz range situated in the central Alpine Himalayan orogenic system. The sub-zone bounded by the northward-dipping Kandovan Fault to the north and the southward-dipping Taleghan Fault to the south is transversely cut by several sinistral faults. The Kandovan Fault that controls development of the Eocene rocks in its footwall from the Paleozoic-Mesozoic units in the fault hanging wall is interpreted as an inverted basin-bounding fault. Structural evidences include the presence of a thin-skinned imbricate thrust system propagated from a detachment zone that acts as a footwall shortcut thrust, development of large synclines in the fault footwall as well as back thrusts and pop-up structures on the fault hanging wall. Kinematics of the inverted Kandovan Fault and its accompanying structures constrain the N-S shortening direction proposed for the Alborz range until Late Miocene. The transverse sinistral faults that are in acute angle of 15° to a major magnetic lineament, which represents a basement fault, are interpreted to develop as synthetic Riedel shears on the cover sequences during reactivation of the basement fault. This overprinting of the transverse faults on the earlier inverted extensional fault occurs since the Late Miocene when the south Caspian basin block attained a SSW movement relative to the central Iran. Therefore, recent deformation in the range is a result of the basement transverse-fault reactivation.

  7. Data Structures: Sequence Problems, Range Queries, and Fault Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    The focus of this dissertation is on algorithms, in particular data structures that give provably ecient solutions for sequence analysis problems, range queries, and fault tolerant computing. The work presented in this dissertation is divided into three parts. In Part I we consider algorithms for...... to assume that the algorithms themselves are in charge for dealing with memory faults. We investigate searching, sorting and counting algorithms and data structures that provably returns sensible information in spite of memory corruptions.......The focus of this dissertation is on algorithms, in particular data structures that give provably ecient solutions for sequence analysis problems, range queries, and fault tolerant computing. The work presented in this dissertation is divided into three parts. In Part I we consider algorithms...... by the constraints. Many variants and similar problems have been proposed leading to several dierent approaches and algorithms. We consider problems where the function is the sum of the elements in the sequence and the constraints only bound the length of the subsequences considered. We give optimal algorithms...

  8. Improved Space Bounds for Cache-Oblivious Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Zeh, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    second main result shows that any cache-oblivious 2-d three-sided range reporting data structure with the optimal query bound has to use Ω(N logε N) space, thereby improving on a recent lower bound for the same problem. Using known transformations, the lower bound extends to 3-d dominance reporting and 3......We provide improved bounds on the size of cacheoblivious range reporting data structures that achieve the optimal query bound of O(logB N + K/B) block transfers. Our first main result is an O(N √ logN log logN)-space data structure that achieves this query bound for 3-d dominance reporting and 2-d...... three-sided range reporting. No cache-oblivious o(N log N/ log logN)-space data structure for these problems was known before, even when allowing a query bound of O(logO(1) 2 N + K/B) block transfers.1 Our result also implies improved space bounds for general 2-d and 3-d orthogonal range reporting. Our...

  9. Extreme hydrothermal conditions at an active plate-bounding fault

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutherland, Rupert; Townend, John; Toy, Virginia; Upton, Phaedra; Coussens, Jamie; Allen, Michael; Baratin, Laura May; Barth, Nicolas; Becroft, Leeza; Boese, Carolin; Boles, Austin; Boulton, Carolyn; Broderick, Neil G.R.; Janku-Capova, Lucie; Carpenter, Brett M.; Célérier, Bernard; Chamberlain, Calum; Cooper, Alan; Coutts, Ashley; Cox, Simon; Craw, Lisa; Doan, Mai Linh; Eccles, Jennifer; Faulkner, Dan; Grieve, Jason; Grochowski, Julia; Gulley, Anton; Hartog, Arthur; Howarth, Jamie; Jacobs, Katrina; Jeppson, Tamara; Kato, Naoki; Keys, Steven; Kirilova, Martina; Kometani, Yusuke; Langridge, Rob; Lin, Weiren; Little, Timothy; Lukacs, Adrienn; Mallyon, Deirdre; Mariani, Elisabetta; Massiot, Cécile; Mathewson, Loren; Melosh, Ben; Menzies, Catriona; Moore, Jo; Morales, Luiz; Morgan, Chance; Mori, Hiroshi; Niemeijer, Andre|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370832132; Nishikawa, Osamu; Prior, David; Sauer, Katrina; Savage, Martha; Schleicher, Anja; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Shigematsu, Norio; Taylor-Offord, Sam; Teagle, Damon; Tobin, Harold; Valdez, Robert; Weaver, Konrad; Wiersberg, Thomas; Williams, Jack; Woodman, Nick; Zimmer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Temperature and fluid pressure conditions control rock deformation and mineralization on geological faults, and hence the distribution of earthquakes. Typical intraplate continental crust has hydrostatic fluid pressure and a near-surface thermal gradient of 31 ± 15 degrees Celsius per kilometre. At

  10. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  11. Relation between properties of long-range diatomic bound states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirko, Vladimir; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Long-range states of diatomic molecules have average values of internuclear separations at least one order of magnitude larger than the equilibrium value of R. For example, the helium dimer 4He2 has a single bound state with of about 50 Å. We show that the properties of these states, such as ...>, the dissociation energy, or the s-wave scattering length, can be related by simple, yet very accurate formulas if a potential energy curve is known. By examining a range of ab initio and empirical helium dimer potentials, as well as scaling these potentials, we found that the formulas remain accurate even if very...

  12. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  13. Subsurface profiling along Banni Plains and bounding faults, Kachchh, Western India using microtremors method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, Dhananjay A.; Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Rangarajan, Govindan; Patel, Satish J.; Bhatt, Madhuri N.; Sanoop Salam, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    The present article is a maiden attempt to map shallow subsurface rheological interfaces laterally across the Banni Plains and to decode geometry of the antecedent faults associated with the Kachchh Mainland Fault using the microtremor method. We conducted microtremor data acquisition for thirty-one sites along N-S transect from Loriya in Mainland Kachchh to Bhirandiara towards Patcham Island. Results from H/V spectral ratio technique show presence of two distinct rheological interfaces characterised by the resonant frequency (fr) ranges 0.23-0.27 Hz and 0.8252-1.5931 Hz respectively. The above frequency ranges are correlated with the depths of the Mesozoic-Basement (M-B) interface and the Quaternary-Tertiary (Q-T) interface. Using either the velocity (Vs) of seismic waves at the M-B and Q-T interfaces (calculated as 1830 m/s and 411 m/s respectively) or the standard non-linear regression relationship derived for the Banni Plains (h = 110.18fr-1.97) we estimate the depth range for M-B interface to be 1442-1965 m and for Q-T interface to be 44-160 m. The subsurface profile across the Banni Plains educe cluster of four faults that develop an array of imbricate faults at the forefront of the Kachchh Mainland Fault within the Banni Footwall Syncline. The geometry of the faults suggests a 'positive flower structure' indicating step-overs and strain restraining bends displaying push-ups resulting from localized shortening between converging bends of Kachchh Mainland Fault and the South Wagad Fault. The Banni Footwall Syncline preserves evidence of two episodes of deformations. The initial deformation event led to subsidence within the Kachchh Mainland Fault Zone bringing Mesozoic sequence juxtaposed to the basement rocks, whereas the later event is dominated by an uplift developing a positive flower structure in the Kachchh Mainland Fault Zone. Finally, the present study provides a mechanism to investigate faults and fault geometries correlating surface structural grains

  14. Bounding the moment deficit rate on crustal faults using geodetic data: Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Jeremy; Segall, Paul; Bradley, Andrew M.

    2017-08-01

    The geodetically derived interseismic moment deficit rate (MDR) provides a first-order constraint on earthquake potential and can play an important role in seismic hazard assessment, but quantifying uncertainty in MDR is a challenging problem that has not been fully addressed. We establish criteria for reliable MDR estimators, evaluate existing methods for determining the probability density of MDR, and propose and evaluate new methods. Geodetic measurements moderately far from the fault provide tighter constraints on MDR than those nearby. Previously used methods can fail catastrophically under predictable circumstances. The bootstrap method works well with strong data constraints on MDR, but can be strongly biased when network geometry is poor. We propose two new methods: the Constrained Optimization Bounding Estimator (COBE) assumes uniform priors on slip rate (from geologic information) and MDR, and can be shown through synthetic tests to be a useful, albeit conservative estimator; the Constrained Optimization Bounding Linear Estimator (COBLE) is the corresponding linear estimator with Gaussian priors rather than point-wise bounds on slip rates. COBE matches COBLE with strong data constraints on MDR. We compare results from COBE and COBLE to previously published results for the interseismic MDR at Parkfield, on the San Andreas Fault, and find similar results; thus, the apparent discrepancy between MDR and the total moment release (seismic and afterslip) in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake remains.

  15. Bearing fault detection in the acoustic emission frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Massoud S.

    The effectiveness of using bearing fault detection in the acoustic-emission frequency range is demonstrated using a vertical milling machine as the testbed. The experimental testbed is monitored by an accelerometer and an acoustic emission sensor, and the signals are demodulated by rms enveloping and then fast-Fourier-transformed. The analytical computation of the defect characteristic frequency is explained, and the time histories are given of the enveloped signal and its spectrum. The method is shown to be useful for extracting the repetition rate of the repetitive component of the general signal, and the signal generated by the bearing defect is identified in the frequency ranges of mechanical vibration and acoustic emission. The signal in the acoustic-emission frequency range is shown to be helpful for detecting bearing defects because it not affected by repetitive mechanical noise.

  16. Parallel Track Initiation for Optical Space Surveillance Using Range and Range Rate Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, P.; Roscoe, C.; Wilkins, M.

    2013-09-01

    rate hypotheses are assigned, the IOD problem is embarrassingly parallelizable. In this paper, a type of admissible-region analysis is proposed, based on bounds for range and range rate for a given orbital element partition, which can be used to limit the size of the hypothesis set. Specifically, given a bounded region of semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and right ascension, several inequalities are found that must be satisfied simultaneously, based on geometric and kinematic constraints such minimum (perigee) and maximum (apogee) orbit radius. For the angles-only case, additional constraints on range, implied by orientations of the possible orbit planes and by special solutions of Lambert's problem, are found for pairs of observations. The net range-range rate hypothesis set is then taken to be the most restrictive superposition of the different conditions. Initial orbit determination results will be presented for sets of perfect and noisy simulated data as well for real-world observations. When errors are introduced into the observations, the ability to derive accurate angle rates will suffer and this will affect the results. Therefore, we also include an analysis of the sensitivity of the range-range rate bounds with respect to errors in derived angle rates.

  17. Analytic Confusion Matrix Bounds for Fault Detection and Isolation Using a Sum-of-Squared- Residuals Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Given a system which can fail in 1 or n different ways, a fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm uses sensor data in order to determine which fault is the most likely to have occurred. The effectiveness of an FDI algorithm can be quantified by a confusion matrix, which i ndicates the probability that each fault is isolated given that each fault has occurred. Confusion matrices are often generated with simulation data, particularly for complex systems. In this paper we perform FDI using sums of squares of sensor residuals (SSRs). We assume that the sensor residuals are Gaussian, which gives the SSRs a chi-squared distribution. We then generate analytic lower and upper bounds on the confusion matrix elements. This allows for the generation of optimal sensor sets without numerical simulations. The confusion matrix bound s are verified with simulated aircraft engine data.

  18. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of serpentinite and the Coast Range Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Ponce, David A.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    While an enormous amount of research has been focused on trying to understand the geologic history and neotectonics of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault (SAF-CF) junction, fundamental questions concerning fault geometry and mechanisms for slip transfer through the junction remain. We use potential-field, geologic, geodetic, and seismicity data to investigate the 3-D geologic framework of the SAF-CF junction and identify potential slip-transferring structures within the junction. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras fault zones dip away from each other within the northern portion of the junction, bounding a triangular-shaped wedge of crust in cross section. This wedge changes shape to the south as fault geometries change and fault activity shifts between fault strands, particularly along the Calaveras fault zone (CFZ). Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity suggest that the Paicines and San Benito strands of the CFZ dip 65° to 70° NE and form the southwest boundary of a folded 1 to 3 km thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) within the Vallecitos syncline. We identify and characterize two steeply dipping, seismically active cross structures within the junction that are associated with serpentinite in the subsurface. The architecture of the SAF-CF junction presented in this study may help explain fault-normal motions currently observed in geodetic data and help constrain the seismic hazard. The abundance of serpentinite and related CRO in the subsurface is a significant discovery that not only helps constrain the geometry of structures but may also help explain fault behavior and the tectonic evolution of the SAF-CF junction.

  19. Low-angle normal faults in the south-central Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, R.R.; Oldow, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    A north-south structural transect through the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska, exposes three lithologically distinct, fault-bounded packages of rock, all regionally metamorphosed during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous contractional deformation that formed much of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. These are, from south to north and structurally highest to lowest, (1) the prehnite-pumpellyite facies ophiolitic rocks of the Angayucham terrane, (2) the low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Rosie Creek allochthon, and (3) pumpellyite-actinolite to glaucophane-epidote facies metamorphic rocks of the schist belt. The presence of rocks metamorphosed and deformed at shallow levels of the fold and thrust belt (the Angayucham terrane and Rosie Creek allochthon) lying structurally above rocks representing the deepest exposed levels of the fold and thrust belt (the schist belt) indicates that the imbricate stack is disrupted by south-dipping, low-angle normal faults along the southern margin of the Brooks Range. The authors propose that normal faults developed in response to the uplift of the schist belt and the overlying metasedimentary and ophiolitic allochthons by north-directed thrusting in the late Early Cretaceous. Thrusting resulting in the oversteepening of the imbricate stack, causing compensatory normal faulting along the southern flank of the ramp structure. Normal faults may have provided at least local structural control of the locus of Albian and younger sedimentation in the Koyukuk basin. 34 references.

  20. Long Valley caldera and the UCERF depiction of Sierra Nevada range-front faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Long Valley caldera lies within a left-stepping offset in the north-northwest-striking Sierra Nevada range-front normal faults with the Hilton Creek fault to the south and Hartley Springs fault to the north. Both Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF) 2 and its update, UCERF3, depict slip on these major range-front normal faults as extending well into the caldera, with significant normal slip on overlapping, subparallel segments separated by ∼10  km. This depiction is countered by (1) geologic evidence that normal faulting within the caldera consists of a series of graben structures associated with postcaldera magmatism (intrusion and tumescence) and not systematic down-to-the-east displacements consistent with distributed range-front faulting and (2) the lack of kinematic evidence for an evolving, postcaldera relay ramp structure between overlapping strands of the two range-front normal faults. The modifications to the UCERF depiction described here reduce the predicted shaking intensity within the caldera, and they are in accord with the tectonic influence that underlapped offset range-front faults have on seismicity patterns within the caldera associated with ongoing volcanic unrest.

  1. Dislocation model for aseismic fault slip in the transverse ranges of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A.; Jackson, D. D.; Matsuura, M.

    1985-01-01

    Geodetic data at a plate boundary can reveal the pattern of subsurface displacements that accompany plate motion. These displacements are modelled as the sum of rigid block motion and the elastic effects of frictional interaction between blocks. The frictional interactions are represented by uniform dislocation on each of several rectangular fault patches. The block velocities and fault parameters are then estimated from geodetic data. Bayesian inversion procedure employs prior estimates based on geological and seismological data. The method is applied to the Transverse Ranges, using prior geological and seismological data and geodetic data from the USGS trilateration networks. Geodetic data imply a displacement rate of about 20 mm/yr across the San Andreas Fault, while the geologic estimates exceed 30 mm/yr. The prior model and the final estimates both imply about 10 mm/yr crustal shortening normal to the trend of the San Andreas Fault. Aseismic fault motion is a major contributor to plate motion. The geodetic data can help to identify faults that are suffering rapid stress accumulation; in the Transverse Ranges those faults are the San Andreas and the Santa Susana.

  2. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  3. Bounding the Failure Probability Range of Polynomial Systems Subject to P-box Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliability analysis framework for systems subject to multiple design requirements that depend polynomially on the uncertainty. Uncertainty is prescribed by probability boxes, also known as p-boxes, whose distribution functions have free or fixed functional forms. An approach based on the Bernstein expansion of polynomials and optimization is proposed. In particular, we search for the elements of a multi-dimensional p-box that minimize (i.e., the best-case) and maximize (i.e., the worst-case) the probability of inner and outer bounding sets of the failure domain. This technique yields intervals that bound the range of failure probabilities. The offset between this bounding interval and the actual failure probability range can be made arbitrarily tight with additional computational effort.

  4. Scaling and universality in two dimensions: three-body bound states with short-ranged interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, F F; Frederico, T [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, DCTA, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Yamashita, M T [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, CP 70532-2, CEP 01156-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T, E-mail: zinner@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy-Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, bygn. 1520, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark)

    2011-10-28

    The momentum space zero-range model is used to investigate universal properties of three interacting particles confined to two dimensions. The pertinent equations are first formulated for a system of two identical and one distinct particle and the two different two-body subsystems are characterized by two-body energies and masses. The three-body energy in units of one of the two-body energies is a universal function of the other two-body energy and the mass ratio. We derive convenient analytical formulae for calculations of the three-body energy as a function of these two independent parameters and exhibit the results as universal curves. In particular, we show that the three-body system can have any number of stable bound states. When the mass ratio of the distinct to identical particles is greater than 0.22, we find that at most two stable bound states exist, while for two heavy and one light mass an increasing number of bound states is possible. The specific number of stable bound states depends on the ratio of two-body bound state energies and on the mass ratio, and we map out an energy-mass phase diagram of the number of stable bound states. Realizable systems of both fermions and bosons are discussed in this framework.

  5. Bounds on Correlation Decay for Long-Range Vector Spin Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, Aernout C.D. van

    1985-01-01

    We give upper bounds on the decay of correlation functions for long-range SO(N)-symmetric spin-glass models in one and two dimensions using McBryan-Spencer techniques. In doing so we extend other's recent results.

  6. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2004 to 2008 field seasons, approximately 200 hand samples of fault and polymetallic vein-related rocks were collected for geochemical and mineralogical analyses. The samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Evolution of Brittle Structures Task under the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) of the Mineral Resources Program (http://minerals.cr.usgs.gov/projects/colorado_assessment/index.html). The purpose of this work has been to characterize the relation between epithermal, polymetallic mineral deposits, paleostress, and the geological structures that hosted fluid flow and localization of the deposits. The data in this report will be used to document and better understand the processes that control epithermal mineral-deposit formation by attempting to relate the geochemistry of the primary structures that hosted hydrothermal fluid flow to their heat and fluid sources. This includes processes from the scale of the structures themselves to the far field scale, inclusive of the intrusive bodies that have been thought to be the sources for the hydrothermal fluid flow. The data presented in this report are part of a larger assessment effort on public lands. The larger study area spans the region of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado from the Wyoming to New Mexico borders and from the eastern boundary of the Front Range to approximately the longitude of Vail and Leadville, Colorado. Although the study area has had an extensive history of geological mapping, the mapping has resulted in a number of hypotheses that are still in their infancy of being tested. For example, the proximity of polymetallic veins to intrusive bodies has been thought to reflect a genetic relation between the two features; however, this idea has not been well tested with geochemical indicators. Recent knowledge regarding the coupled nature of stress, strain, fluid flow, and geochemistry warrant new investigations and approaches to test a variety of

  7. Localization of Intraplate Deformation through Fluid-Assisted Fault Reactivation in the Lower-Crust: The Flinders Ranges, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Cummins, P. R.; Pilia, S.; Love, D.

    2014-12-01

    Within the stable continental region of Australia, the Flinders Ranges stands out as experiencing concentrated and prolonged seismic activity. Previous studies have shown that strain rates inferred from seismicity of 10-16 —10-15 s-1 are similar to neotectonic slip rates inferred for range-bounding faults. It is also an area of relatively pronounced topography up to 1700 m and high heat flow averaging 90 mW/m2. For these reasons the Flinders Ranges have been the subject of many studies trying to understand why deformation of the Australian continent appears to be localized there, with explanations including erosion-driven isostatic rebound, lithospheric flexure, stress concentration due to change in lithospheric strength, and thermal weakening. We present a hypothesis for localized, intraplate deformation in the continental crust of south-central Australia that involves fluid-assisted reactivation of faults in the mid- to lower crust. This study utilizes data from a temporary seismometer deployment in the Flinders Ranges from 2003—2005. We show that earthquakes in the region extend to depths of 20 km and are clustered in elongated low Vp/Vs anomalies. These anomalies suggest a highly fractured or deformed zone that is aligned with the axis of the Flinders Ranges and extends to the lower crust. We argue that the compressive earthquake focal mechanisms are consistent with the regional stress field, that there is no evidence for stress concentration, and that the occurrence of earthquakes at mid- to lower crustal depth in an area of high heat flow can only be explained by high pore fluid pressure in the lower crust. These data reveal important constraints on structure, rheology, and stress that are crucial for understanding intraplate deformation in the Flinders Ranges, with possible implications for high-seismicity zones in stable continental regions elsewhere.

  8. Three-body bound states with zero-range interaction in the Bethe-Salpeter approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydrefors, E.; Alvarenga Nogueira, J. H.; Gigante, V.; Frederico, T.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    The Bethe-Salpeter equation for three bosons with zero-range interaction is solved for the first time. For comparison the light-front equation is also solved. The input is the two-body scattering length and the outputs are the three-body binding energies, Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes and light-front wave functions. Three different regimes are analyzed: (i) For weak enough two-body interaction the three-body system is unbound. (ii) For stronger two-body interaction a three-body bound state appears. It provides an interesting example of a deeply bound Borromean system. (iii) For even stronger two-body interaction this state becomes unphysical with a negative mass squared. However, another physical (excited) state appears, found previously in light-front calculations. The Bethe-Salpeter approach implicitly incorporates three-body forces of relativistic origin, which are attractive and increase the binding energy.

  9. Kinematic Analysis of Fault-Slip Data in the Central Range of Papua, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyamin Sapiie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.1.1-16Most of the Cenozoic tectonic evolution in New Guinea is a result of obliquely convergent motion that ledto an arc-continent collision between the Australian and Pacific Plates. The Gunung Bijih (Ertsberg Mining District(GBMD is located in the Central Range of Papua, in the western half of the island of New Guinea. This study presentsthe results of detailed structural mapping concentrated on analyzing fault-slip data along a 15-km traverse of theHeavy Equipment Access Trail (HEAT and the Grasberg mine access road, providing new information concerning thedeformation in the GBMD and the Cenozoic structural evolution of the Central Range. Structural analysis indicatesthat two distinct stages of deformation have occurred since ~12 Ma. The first stage generated a series of en-echelonNW-trending (π-fold axis = 300° folds and a few reverse faults. The second stage resulted in a significant left-lateralstrike-slip faulting sub-parallel to the regional strike of upturned bedding. Kinematic analysis reveals that the areasbetween the major strike-slip faults form structural domains that are remarkably uniform in character. The changein deformation styles from contractional to a strike-slip offset is explained as a result from a change in the relativeplate motion between the Pacific and Australian Plates at ~4 Ma. From ~4 - 2 Ma, transform motion along an ~ 270°trend caused a left-lateral strike-slip offset, and reactivated portions of pre-existing reverse faults. This action had aprofound effect on magma emplacement and hydrothermal activity.

  10. Uplift and tilting of the Shackleton Range in East Antarctica driven by glacial erosion and normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxman, Guy J. G.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Bentley, Michael J.; Forsberg, Rene; Ross, Neil; Watts, Anthony B.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Jordan, Tom A.

    2017-03-01

    Unravelling the long-term evolution of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital for understanding past ice sheet dynamics and stability, particularly in marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. Here we model the evolution of the bedrock topography beneath the Recovery catchment, a sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet characterized by fast-flowing ice streams that occupy overdeepened subglacial troughs. We use 3-D flexural models to quantify the effect of erosional unloading and mechanical unloading associated with motion on border faults in driving isostatic bedrock uplift of the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains, which are flanked by the Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams. Inverse spectral (free-air admittance) and forward modeling of topography and gravity anomaly data allow us to constrain the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (Te) in the Shackleton Range region to 20 km. Our models indicate that glacial erosion, and the associated isostatic rebound, has driven 40-50% of total peak uplift in the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains. A further 40-50% can be attributed to motion on normal fault systems of inferred Jurassic and Cretaceous age. Our results indicate that the flexural effects of glacial erosion play a key role in mountain uplift along the East Antarctic margin, augmenting previous findings in the Transantarctic Mountains. The results suggest that at 34 Ma, the mountains were lower and the bounding valley floors were close to sea level, which implies that the early ice sheet in this region may have been relatively stable.

  11. Spatial variations in focused exhumation along a continental-scale strike-slip fault: The Denali fault of the eastern Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, J.A.; Layer, P.W.; Armstrong, P.; Perry, S.E.; Haeussler, P.J.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological techniques were used to determine the Neogene exhumation history of the topographically asymmetric eastern Alaska Range. Exhumation cooling ages range from ~33 Ma to ~18 Ma for 40Ar/39Ar biotite, ~18 Ma to ~6 Ma for K-feldspar minimum closure ages, and ~15 Ma to ~1 Ma for apatite fission-track ages, and apatite (U-Th)/He cooling ages range from ~4 Ma to ~1 Ma. There has been at least ~11 km of exhumation adjacent to the north side of Denali fault during the Neogene inferred from biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. Variations in exhumation history along and across the strike of the fault are influenced by both far-field effects and local structural irregularities. We infer deformation and rapid exhumation have been occurring in the eastern Alaska Range since at least ~22 Ma most likely related to the continued collision of the Yakutat microplate with the North American plate. The Nenana Mountain region is the late Pleistocene to Holocene (~past 1 Ma) primary locus of tectonically driven exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range, possibly related to variations in fault geometry. During the Pliocene, a marked increase in climatic instability and related global cooling is temporally correlated with an increase in exhumation rates in the eastern Alaska Range north of the Denali fault system.

  12. Determining the bounds of skilful forecast range for probabilistic prediction of system-wide wind power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Dirk; Brayshaw, David; Methven, John; Drew, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    State-of-the-art wind power forecasts beyond a few hours ahead rely on global numerical weather prediction models to forecast the future large-scale atmospheric state. Often they provide initial and boundary conditions for nested high resolution simulations. In this work, both upper and lower bounds on forecast range are identified within which global ensemble forecasts provide skilful information for system-wide wind power applications. An upper bound on forecast range is associated with the limit of predictability, beyond which forecasts have no more skill than predictions based on climatological statistics. A lower bound is defined at the lead time beyond which the resolved uncertainty associated with estimating the future large-scale atmospheric state is larger than the unresolved uncertainty associated with estimating the system-wide wind power response to a given large-scale state. The bounds of skillful ensemble forecast range are quantified for three leading global forecast systems. The power system of Great Britain (GB) is used as an example because independent verifying data is available from National Grid. The upper bound defined by forecasts of GB-total wind power generation at a specific point in time is found to be 6-8 days. The lower bound is found to be 1.4-2.4 days. Both bounds depend on the global forecast system and vary seasonally. In addition, forecasts of the probability of an extreme power ramp event were found to possess a shorter limit of predictability (4.5-5.5 days). The upper bound on this forecast range can only be extended by improving the global forecast system (outside the control of most users) or by changing the metric used in the probability forecast. Improved downscaling and microscale modelling of the wind farm response may act to decrease the lower bound. The potential gain from such improvements have diminishing returns beyond the short-range (out to around 2 days).

  13. The role of thrust faulting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range: Thermochronological constraints from the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault region of the intracontinental strike-slip Denali Fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Steven J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Benowitz, Jeff A.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal-slip along restraining bends of strike-slip faults is often partitioned into a vertical component via splay faults. The active Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault (SGTF), as shown by its initiation of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, lies south of, and intersects the dextral strike-slip Denali Fault. Geochronology and thermochronology data from samples across the SGTF constrain the region's tectonic history and the role of thrusting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range south of the Denali fault. U-Pb zircon ages indicate intrusion of plutons in the footwall (~57 Ma) and hanging wall (~98 Ma). These U-Pb zircon ages correlate to those from the Ruby Batholith/Kluane Terrane ~400 km east along the Denali Fault, supporting geologic correlations and hence constraints on long-term slip rates. 40Ar/39Ar mica and K-feldspar data from footwall and hanging wall samples (~54 to ~46 Ma) reflect cooling following magmatism and/or regional Eocene metamorphism related to ridge subduction. Combined with apatite fission track data (ages 43-28 Ma) and thermal models, both sides of the SGTF acted as a coherent block during the Eocene and early Oligocene. Contrasting apatite (U-Th)/He ages across the Susitna Glacier (~25 Ma footwall, ~15 Ma hanging wall) suggest initiation of faulting during the middle Miocene. Episodic cooling and exhumation is related to thrusting on known or hypothesized faults that progressively activate due to varying partition of strain along the Denali Fault associated with changing kinematics and plate interaction (Yakutat microplate collision, flat-slab subduction and relative plate motion change) at the southern Alaskan plate margin.

  14. Evaluation of thrusting and folding of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault, Sangre de Cristo range, Saguache County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Jacob F., II

    The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault was mapped in a structural window on the west side of the Sangre de Cristo Range. The study area, located in southern Colorado, is a two square mile area halfway between the town of Crestone and the Great Sand Dunes National Park. The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault is the center of this study because it delineates the fold structure in the structural window. The fault is a northeast-directed low-angle thrust folded by subsequent additional compression. This study was directed at understanding the motion of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault as affected by subsequent folding, and the driving mechanism behind the folding of the Pole Creek Anticline as part of a broader study of Laramide thrust faulting in the range. This study aids in the interpretation of the geologic structure of the San Luis Valley, which is being studied by staff of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), to understand Rio Grande Rift basin evolution by focusing on rift and pre-rift tectonic activity. It also provides a geologic interpretation for the Saguache County Forest Service, Great Sand Dunes National Park, and its visitors. The Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range has undergone tectonic events in the Proterozoic, Pennsylvanian (Ancestral Rocky Mountains), Cretaceous-Tertiary (Laramide Orogeny) and mid-Tertiary (Rio Grande Rift). During the Laramide Orogeny the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault emplaced Proterozoic gneiss over Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and Proterozoic granodiorite in the area. Continued deformation resulted in folding of the fault to form the Pole Creek Anticline. The direction of motion of both the fault and fold is northeastward. A self-consistent net of cross-sections and stereonet plots generated from existing and new field data show that the anticline is an overturned isoclinal fold in Pole Creek Canyon, which shows an increasing inter-limb angle and a more vertical axial surface northwestward toward Deadman Creek Canyon. Southwest-directed apparent

  15. Stable Stacking Faults Bounded by Frank Partial Dislocations in Al7075 Formed through Precipitate and Dislocation Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Through high-resolution electron microscopy, stacking faults (SFs due to Frank partial dislocations were found in an aluminum alloy following deformation with low strain and strain rate, while also remaining stable during artificial aging. Extrinsic stacking faults were found surrounded by dislocation areas and precipitates. An intrinsic stacking fault was found between two Guinier-Preston II (GP II zones when the distance of the two GP II zones was 2 nm. Defects (precipitates and dislocations are considered to have an influence on the formation of the SFs, as their appearance may cause local strain and promote the gathering of vacancies to lower the energy.

  16. Determining the bounds of skilful forecast range for probabilistic prediction of system-wide wind power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Cannon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art wind power forecasts beyond a few hours ahead rely on global numerical weather prediction models to forecast the future large-scale atmospheric state. Often they provide initial and boundary conditions for nested high resolution simulations. In this paper, both upper and lower bounds on forecast range are identified within which global ensemble forecasts provide skilful information for system-wide wind power applications. An upper bound on forecast range is associated with the limit of predictability, beyond which forecasts have no more skill than predictions based on climatological statistics. A lower bound is defined at the lead time beyond which the resolved uncertainty associated with estimating the future large-scale atmospheric state is larger than the unresolved uncertainty associated with estimating the system-wide wind power response to a given large-scale state.The bounds of skilful ensemble forecast range are quantified for three leading global forecast systems. The power system of Great Britain (GB is used as an example because independent verifying data is available from National Grid. The upper bound defined by forecasts of GB-total wind power generation at a specific point in time is found to be 6–8 days. The lower bound is found to be 1.4–2.4 days. Both bounds depend on the global forecast system and vary seasonally. In addition, forecasts of the probability of an extreme power ramp event were found to possess a shorter limit of predictability (4.5–5.5 days. The upper bound on this forecast range can only be extended by improving the global forecast system (outside the control of most users or by changing the metric used in the probability forecast. Improved downscaling and microscale modelling of the wind farm response may act to decrease the lower bound. The potential gain from such improvements have diminishing returns beyond the short-range (out to around 2 days.

  17. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  18. Western frontal fault of the Canyon Range: is it the breakaway zone of the Sevier Desert detachment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Geologic evidence developed from surface exposures demonstrates that the western frontal fault of the Canyon Range is a major structure representing the eastern Breakaway zone of the Sevier Desert detachment. Maximum upper plate displacement for the entire Sevier Desert detachment cannot be determined from these breakaway-zone exposures. -from Author

  19. Spatial/temporal patterns of Quaternary faulting in the southern limb of the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic parabola, northeastern Basin and Range margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCalpin, J.P. (GEO-HAZ Consultants, Estes Park, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    During the period 1986--1991, 11 backhoe trenches were excavated across six Quaternary faults on the northeastern margin of the Basin and Range province. These faults comprise the southern limb of a parabola of Quaternary faults and historic moderate-magnitude earthquakes which is roughly symmetrical about the Snake River Plain, and heads at the Yellowstone hot spot. Fifteen Holocene paleoseismic events have been bracketed by radiocarbon or thermoluminescence ages. On the six central faults, the latest rupture event occurred in a relatively short time interval between 3 ka and 6 ka. The period between 6 ka and the end of the latest glaciation (ca. 15 ka) was a period of relative tectonic quiescence on the central faults, but not on the two end faults with higher slip rates (Wasatch and Teton faults). Southward-younging of events in the 3--6 ka period may indicate that temporally-clustered faulting was initiated at the Yellowstone hot spot. Faults at the same latitude, such as the Star Valley-Grey's River pair of faults, or the East Cache-Bear Lake-Rock Creek system of faults, show nearly identical timing of latest rupture events within the pairs or systems. Faults at common latitudes probably sole into the same master decollement, and thus are linked mechanically like dominoes. The timing of latest ruptures indicates that faulting on the westernmost fault preceded faulting on successively more eastern faults by a few hundred years. This timing suggests that slip on the westernmost faults mechanically unloaded the system, causing tectonic instabilities farther east.

  20. Fault-related dolomitization in the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain): reactive transport simulations and field data constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Martin-Martin, J. D.; Corbella, M.; Teixell, A.

    2009-04-01

    The relationships between hydrothermal fluid circulation and fracturing that lead to mineral dissolution and/or precipitation in carbonate rocks have direct impacts on the evolution and final distribution of hydrocarbon reservoir permeability. Understanding the coupling between these processes is important for predicting permeability and improving hydrocarbon recovery. We present a case study of dolomitization processes in Cretaceous limestone from the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain). Extending over part of the Maestrat Cretaceous Basin, the Orpesa area is deformed by extensional faults. These faults accommodated thick sequences of shallow marine limestone, mainly during Aptian times. The syn-rift carbonates are partially dolomitized due to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids along normal faults and bedding. Both Aptian and later Neogene extensional faults must have served as conduits for the circulation of fluids. MVT deposits of Paleocene age are well documented in the Maestrat basin and may also be related to dolomitization. Samples of host rocks and vein fillings have been collected along strike and analyzed in different fault sections to characterize fluid and rock composition, track flow pathways and map the relationships of fluid flow with respect to the main normal faults in the area. Using field and geochemical data from the Orpesa Ranges carbonates, we have developed reactive-transport models to study the influence of different parameters in the dolomitization of carbonates related to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids at the outcrop scale. We present results from models that were run with constant and non-constant permeability. The main parameters analyzed include: initial porosity and permeability of layers and fractures, composition of fluids, groundwater and brines flux, composition of layers, reactive surface of minerals, differences in vertical and horizontal permeability, and presence or absence of stratigraphic

  1. Normal Fault Growth on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. P.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Ferrill, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Displacement versus length relationships of faults on Earth and Mars have been used to describe and interpret the evolution of faults and fault systems, infer differences in the relative strengths of strata, and evaluate variations in fault-system response to differences in gravity from planet to planet. In this presentation, we focus on maximum throw versus trace length (Dmax/L) of continuously mappable faults and Dmax/L of individual fault segments. Fault analyses on Mars have the advantage of a planetary surface devoid of vegetation and largely unaffected by weathering and erosion. Areas on the flanks of Alba Patera, Mars, were chosen because they are well imaged by all generations of data coverage, contain fault systems that have a range of developmental characteristics, and formed in a relatively simple tectonic setting dominated by extension. Footwall and hanging wall cutoff traces of more than 300 faults were interpreted using Viking imagery and ArcGIS software. Throw was obtained by calculating the elevation difference between adjacent footwall and hanging wall points using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data. Throw versus along-strike trace length plots were constructed for each interpreted fault. Single fault segments are defined as having one well-defined displacement maximum bounded by two near-zero displacement minima. Segments within a multi-segment fault were identified by counting displacement maxima along the fault trace. The number of segments incorporated into multi-segment faults is positively correlated with the fault trace length. In a plot of Dmax versus L, whole faults are distributed approximately along a locus of Dmax = K × Ln, where K = 5 × 10-4 to 5 × 10-2 and n = 1. This is in agreement with previous studies of faults on Mars. Single fault segments form a distinct population whose distribution is described approximately by the same equation but where K = 1.7 × 10-3. Dmax/L ratios for multi-segment faults represent an apparently self

  2. Localization of intraplate deformation through fluid-assisted faulting in the lower-crust: The Flinders Ranges, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N. J.; Cummins, P. R.; Pilia, S.; Love, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present a hypothesis for localized, intraplate deformation in the continental crust of south-central Australia that involves fluid-assisted reactivation of faults in the mid- to lower crust. Using data from a temporary seismometer deployment in the Flinders Ranges, we show that earthquakes, relocated in a 3D velocity model, cluster in elongated low vp/vs anomalies that extend to depths exceeding 20 km, and are aligned with the axis of the Flinders Ranges. In the northern Flinders Ranges these low vp/vs anomalies can be interpreted as fractured Neoproterozoic to Cambrian sediments that separate two cratonic blocks, the Gawler Craton to the west and the Curnamona Province in the east. Previous studies of Helium isotopes in springs to the north of the area provide evidence of mantle-derived fluids that may influence faulting at depth. Our focal mechanism and stress inversion results show a regionally compressive stress field that provides no evidence for stress concentration. We also argue that mechanisms for localized faulting such as thermal weakening and isostatic rebound also fail to account for the occurrence of earthquakes at mid- to lower crustal depth in this area of high heat flow and that the focused seismicity can only be explained by high pore fluid pressure in the lower crust.

  3. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  4. Orthogonal Range Reporting: Query Lower Bounds, Optimal Structures in 3-d, and Higher Dimensional Improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Dalgaard

    2010-01-01

    , this is not the case in higher dimensions. In this paper we provide a space optimal pointer machine data structure for 3-d orthogonal range reporting that answers queries in O(log n + k) time. Thus we settle the complexity of the problem in 3-d. We use this result to obtain improved structures in higher dimensions...... data structure for the d-dimensional orthogonal range reporting problem in the pointer machine model of computation that uses S(n) space must spend Ω((log n/ log(S(n)/n))⌊d/2⌋--1) time to answer queries. Thus, if S(n)/n is poly-logarithmic, then the query time is at least Ω((log n/ log log n)⌊d/2......Orthogonal range reporting is the problem of storing a set of n points in d-dimensional space, such that the k points in an axis-orthogonal query box can be reported efficiently. While the 2-d version of the problem was completely characterized in the pointer machine model more than two decades ago...

  5. Unified one-dimensional model of bounded plasma with nonzero ion temperature in a broad pressure range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional model for steady state plasmas bounded either between large parallel walls, or by a cylinder or a sphere, valid in a wide range of gas pressures, is considered. The model includes nonzero ion temperature, inertial terms in the ion momentum equations, and allows one to calculate the plasma electron temperature and ion current density reaching the wall, as well as the spatial distributions of the ion fluid velocity, plasma density, and plasma potential in the plasma bulk. In addition, the effect of electron inertia is analyzed. The model includes as particular cases several earlier models that were based on a similar set of differential equations, but that are restricted to a specific pressure regime (low, intermediate, or high). Analytical solution is found in planar geometry, and numerical solution is given in cylindrical and spherical geometry. The results obtained are compared with those of earlier models and the differences are analyzed.

  6. Testing of ground fault relay response during the energisation of megawatt range electric boilers in thermal power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth; Davidsen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Large controllable loads may support power systems with an increased penetration of fluctuating renewable energy, by providing a rapid response to a change in the power production. Megawatt range electric boilers are an example of such controllable loads, capable of change rapidly, with the advan......Large controllable loads may support power systems with an increased penetration of fluctuating renewable energy, by providing a rapid response to a change in the power production. Megawatt range electric boilers are an example of such controllable loads, capable of change rapidly...... for the testing of two ground fault protection relays, in order to assure that they are not triggered by the energisation of the boiler. The test is performed via an OMICRON CMC 256 with Advanced TransPlay SW, which generates the signals that would be present at the secondary of the instrumentation transformers......, resulting in a realistic simulation environment. The test of different cases demonstrates that the relays will not present unwanted triggering....

  7. Carbon monoxide degassing from seismic fault zones in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutao; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Guodong; Li, Jing; Shi, Hongyu; Guo, Zhengfu; Du, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Degassing of carbon monoxide (CO), which plays a significant role in the contribution of deep carbon to the atmosphere, commonly occurs within active fault zones. CO degassing from soil to the atmosphere in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing (BRPB), China, was investigated by in-situ field measurements in the active fault zones. The measured concentrations of CO in soil gas in the BRPB ranged from 0.29 × 10-6 to 1.1 × 10-6 with a mean value of 0.6 × 10-6, which is approximately twice as large as that in the atmosphere. Net fluxes of CO degassing ranged from -48.6 mg m-2 d-1 to 12.03 mg m-2 d-1. The diffusion of CO from soil to the atmosphere in the BRPB was estimated to be at least 7.6 × 103 ton/a, which is comparable to the corresponding result of about 1.2 × 104 ton/a for CO2. CO concentrations were spatially heterogeneous with clearly higher concentrations along the NE-SW trending in the BRPB. These elevated values of CO concentrations were also coincident with the region with low-velocity and high conductivity in deep mantle, and high Poisson's ratio in the crust, thereby suggesting that CO degassing from the soil might be linked to upwelling of the asthenospheric mantle. Other sources of CO in the soil gas are suggested to be dominated by chemical reactions between deep fluids and carbonate minerals (e.g., dolomite, limestone, and siderite) in country rocks. Biogenic processes may also contribute to the CO in soil gas. The spatial distribution patterns of CO concentrations are coincident with the stress field, suggesting that the concentrations of CO could be a potential indicator for crustal stress field and, hence is potential useful for earthquake monitoring in the BRPB.

  8. Basin geometry and cumulative offsets in the Eastern Transverse Ranges, southern California: Implications for transrotational deformation along the San Andreas fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, V.E.; Powell, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Eastern Transverse Ranges, adjacent to and southeast of the big left bend of the San Andreas fault, southern California, form a crustal block that has rotated clockwise in response to dextral shear within the San Andreas system. Previous studies have indicated a discrepancy between the measured magnitudes of left slip on through-going east-striking fault zones of the Eastern Transverse Ranges and those predicted by simple geometric models using paleomagnetically determined clockwise rotations of basalts distributed along the faults. To assess the magnitude and source of this discrepancy, we apply new gravity and magnetic data in combination with geologic data to better constrain cumulative fault offsets and to define basin structure for the block between the Pinto Mountain and Chiriaco fault zones. Estimates of offset from using the length of pull-apart basins developed within left-stepping strands of the sinistral faults are consistent with those derived by matching offset magnetic anomalies and bedrock patterns, indicating a cumulative offset of at most ???40 km. The upper limit of displacements constrained by the geophysical and geologic data overlaps with the lower limit of those predicted at the 95% confidence level by models of conservative slip located on margins of rigid rotating blocks and the clockwise rotation of the paleomagnetic vectors. Any discrepancy is likely resolved by internal deformation within the blocks, such as intense deformation adjacent to the San Andreas fault (that can account for the absence of basins there as predicted by rigid-block models) and linkage via subsidiary faults between the main faults. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  9. Faulting and Mud Volcano Eruptions Inside of the Coastal Range During the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Chengkung Earthquake in Eastern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jang Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations following the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Chengkung earthquake in eastern Taiwan revealed some interesting observations of surface geological processes closely related to the co-seismic deformation. We discovered that the Tama Fault, which is about 15 km east of the causative Chihshang Fault, underwent shortening of about 15.5 mm locally in 2001 - 2006, particularly during the 2003 earthquake. This shows that ESE-WNW compression affects the upper crust of the Coastal Range and produces significant shortening in addition to that of the major Chihshang Fault. On the hanging wall of the Chihshang Fault, we also found vigorous activities of the two major mud volcanoes during the main shock, lasting several days. To the north, the Luoshan Mud Volcano, a large mud basin, erupted noisily with water and gases during the earthquake. To the south, in the Leikunghuo Mud Volcano, two sets of fractures, one aligned with the N16¢XE right-lateral fault and the other with the N80¢XE left-lateral fault, occurred during the earthquake. This conjugate system revealed a strike-slip stress regime with NE-SW compression and NW-SE extension. We interpret it to be the result of local stress permutation rather than regional tectonic stress. We conclude that deformation did occur inside of the Coastal Range, especially during the co-seismic event. Therefore, a better understanding of the internal deformation of the Coastal Range is an important target for future studies, particularly across three mapped faults: the Yungfeng, Tuluanshan and Tama faults. We also want to draw attention to the stress analysis in the mud volcanoes area, where the local stress perturbation plays an important role.

  10. Kinematics of long lived faults in intraplate settings: case study of the Río Grío Fault (Iberian Range).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, Marcos; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Casas, Antonio; Calvín-Ballester, Pablo; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; García-Lasanta, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    This study is based on the comparison of structural analysis and AMS data of Río Grío Fault, associated with the Datos Fault System, in the Iberian Chain (Northeastern Iberian Plate, Spain). The Río Grío Fault, with NW-SE strike, has a tectonic evolution of probably Mesozoic extension and Tertiary transpressive dextral movement, and it is characterized by the presence of a well-developed cataclastic zone 200m width. The structure of the core is characterized by elongated along strike and narrow lenses separated by subvertical fault planes with well-developed fault breccias and gouges. The lenses usually conserve intact stratification, and it may be recognized several lithologies, including Ordovician quartzites, slates and clay, and red-colored Permo-triassic clay and sandstones. The internal structure of these lenses shows folds, brechified zones, and localized foliation in clay lenses. Cinematic indicators (striations, S/C structures…) show strong reverse dip-slip and dextral strike-slip components, indicating strain partitioning between the different lenses, and it is interpreted as the result of the reactivation of previous normal faults, like a strike-slip shear, during the NNE-SSW to NE-SW Cenozoic compression of the NE Iberian Plate. Samples of AMS study were collected from two areas (SG and RG) of the fault zone, separated by 4.5km along strike. Samples provide a magnetic susceptibility highly dependent on lithology, between ±5*10-5 [SI] in the white fault gouge and ±20*10-5 [SI] in red-colored clay. The low susceptibility in several sites results in high imprecise AMS measurements. AMS results for the first area (SG), obtained in red and black colored clays, show the same magnetic fabric in all sites. K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds to the pole of the fault planes measured in the outcrop, and the magnetic lineation is nearly horizontal, probably related to strike-slip movements. In the second area (RG), the AMS shows a grater

  11. What do fault patterns reveal about the latest phase of extension within the Northern Snake Range metamorphic core complex, Nevada, USA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismat, Zeshan; Riley, Paul; Lerback, Jory

    2016-08-01

    The Northern Snake Range is a classic example of a metamorphic core complex, Basin-and-Range province, United States. It is composed of a plastically deformed footwall and a brittlely deformed hanging wall, separated by the Northern Snake Range low-angle detachment (NSRD). Brittle deformation, however, is not confined to the hanging wall. This paper focuses on exposures in Cove Canyon, located on the SE flank of the Northern Snake Range, where penetrative, homogeneous faults are well exposed throughout the hanging wall, footwall and NSRD, and overprint early plastic deformation. These late-stage fault sets assisted Eocene-Miocene extension. Detailed analysis of the faults reveals the following: (1) The shortening direction defined by faults is similar to the shortening direction defined by the stretching lineation in the footwall mylonites, indicating that the extensional kinematic history remained unchanged as the rocks were uplifted into the elastico-frictional regime. (2) After ∼17 Ma, extension may have continued entirely within elastic-frictional regime via cataclastic flow. (3) This latest deformation phase may have been accommodated by a single, continuous event. (3) Faults within NSRD boudins indicate that deformation within the detachment zone was non-coaxial during the latest phase of extension.

  12. Bounding the $\

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2003-01-01

    A bound on the nu /sup tau / magnetic moment is calculated through the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ to nu nu gamma at the Z/sub 1/-pole, and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model at LEP energies. We find that the bound is almost independent of the mixing angle phi of the model in the allowed experimental range for this parameter. (31 refs).

  13. Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Wernicke, B.P. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1996-03-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

  14. Minimax lower bound for kink location estimators in a nonparametric regression model with long-range dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Wishart, Justin Rory

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a lower bound is determined in the minimax sense for change point estimators of the first derivative of a regression function in the fractional white noise model. Similar minimax results presented previously in the area focus on change points in the derivatives of a regression function in the white noise model or consider estimation of the regression function in the presence of correlated errors.

  15. Constraining the range of Yukawa gravity interaction from S2 star orbits II: Bounds on graviton mass

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, Alexander F; Borka, Dusko; Jovanovic, Vesna Borka

    2016-01-01

    Recently LIGO collaboration discovered gravitational waves \\cite{Abbott_16} predicted 100 years ago by A. Einstein. Moreover, in the key paper reporting about the discovery, the joint LIGO \\& VIRGO team presented an upper limit on graviton mass such as $m_g < 1.2 \\times 10^{-22} eV$ (Abbott et al. (LIGO collaboration) PRL 116 (2016) 061102). Since the graviton mass limit is so small the authors concluded that their observational data do not show violations of classical general relativity. We consider another opportunity to evaluate a graviton mass from phenomenological consequences of massive gravity and show that an analysis of bright star trajectories could bound graviton mass with a comparable accuracy with accuracies reached with gravitational wave interferometers and expected with forthcoming pulsar timing observations for gravitational wave detection. It gives an opportunity to treat observations of bright stars near the Galactic Center as a wonderful tool not only for an evaluation specific para...

  16. Detachment Faulting in the Western Basin and Range: New Geometric, Thermal, and Temporal Constraints From the Bare Mountain Region in Southwestern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, D. A.; Stamatakos, J. A.; Morris, A. P.; Donelick, R. A.; Blythe, A. E.

    2001-12-01

    Zircon and apatite fission-track cooling ages for 50 samples taken from Bare Mountain and surrounding areas of southern Nevada, analyzed in conjunction with structural and paleomagnetic data and calcite deformation geothermometry data, provide new constraints on the timing and distribution of detachment faulting in the western Basin and Range. Our results show that: (i) Bare Mountain was tilted to the east or northeast, probably during Middle Miocene extension, prior to development of the Bullfrog Hills detachment system. (ii) Bare Mountain cooled through the fission-track closure temperature for fluorine-rich apatite (115-125 C) more or less as a unit at 8 to 17 Ma. (iii) Northwest Bare Mountain cooled through the zircon closure temperature (250 C) at 8 to 17 Ma, whereas the rest of the mountain cooled through this temperature between the Late Paleozoic and the Eocene. The combination of tilting at Bare Mountain and the apatite and zircon fission-track cooling ages indicates the presence of a west-dipping breakaway fault at Bare Mountain at around 15 Ma. New apatite fission-track cooling ages from Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Mount Sterling, the Striped Hills, the Resting Springs Range, and the Funeral Mountains, when combined with published apatite ages, constrain the regional position of a west-dipping breakaway fault and exhumed footwall. The current position of the trailing edge of the hanging wall of this system is the Death Valley - Furnace Creek fault system. Migration rates of the cooling front in the footwall of this system range from 4.0 mm/yr at the latitude of Bare Mountain to 7.3 mm/yr at the latitude of central Death Valley. * Work performed at the CNWRA for the U.S. NRC under contract number NRC-02-97-009. This is an independent product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the views or regulatory position of the NRC.

  17. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e-r12 and erfc (0.11 ṡr12 ) /r12], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  18. Gravity and Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations and 2.5D Cross-Section Models over the Border Ranges Fault System and Aleutian Subduction Zone, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankhemthong, N.; Doser, D. I.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G.; Jones, S.; Eslick, B. E.; Budhathoki, P.

    2011-12-01

    Quaternary glacial covers and lack of dense geophysical data on the Kenai Peninsula cause a location and geometry of the Border Ranges fault system (BRFS) within a recent forearc-accretionary boundary of Aleutian subduction zone in southern Alaska are unclear. Using new ~1,300 gravity collections within the Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula regions complied with prior 1997 gravity and aeromagnetic data help us better imaging these fault and the subduction structures. Cook Inlet forearc basin is corresponded by deep gravity anomaly lows; basin boundaries are characterized by a strong gravity gradient, where are considered to be traces of Border Ranges fault system on the east and Castle Mountain and Bruin Bay fault system on the west and northwest of the forearc basin respectively. Gravity anomaly highs over accreted rocks generally increase southeastward to the Aleutian trench, but show a gravity depression over the Kenai Mountains region. The lineament between gravity high and low in the same terrenes over the Kenai Peninsula is may be another evidence to determine the Southern Edge of the Yakutat Microplate (SEY) as inferred by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2006). Our 2.5-D models illustrate the main fault of the BRFS dips steeply toward the west with a downslip displacement. Gravity and Magnetic anomaly highs, on the east of the BRFS, probably present a slice of the ultramafic complex emplaced by faults along the boundary of the forearc basin and accretionary wedge terranes. Another magnetic high beneath the basin in the southern forearc basin support a serpentiznied body inferred by Saltus et al. (2001), with a decreasing size toward the north. Regional density-gravity models show the Pacific subducting slab beneath the foreacre-arc teranes with a gentle and flatted dip where the subducting plate is located in north of SEY and dips more steeply where it is located on the south of SEY. The gravity depression over the accreted terrene can be explained by a density low

  19. Measuring Relative Motions Across a Fault Using Seafloor Transponders Installed at Close Range to each Other Based on Differential GPS/Acoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Ashi, J.; Tsuji, T.; Tomita, F.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy based on acoustic ranging technique is getting popular means to reveal crustal deformation beneath the ocean. GPS/acoustic technique can be applied to monitoring regional deformation or absolute position, while direct-path acoustic ranging can be applied to detecting localized strain or relative motion in a short distance ( 1-10 km). However the latter observation sometimes fails to keep the clearance of an acoustic path between the seafloor transponders because of topographic obstacle or of downward bending nature of the path due to vertical gradient of sound speed in deep-ocean. Especially at steep fault scarp, it is almost impossible to keep direct path between the top and bottom of the fault scarp. Even in such a situation, acoustic path to the sea surface might be always clear. Then we propose a new approach to monitor the relative motion of across a fault scarp using "differential" GPS/acoustic measurement, which account only for traveltime differences among the transponders. The advantages of this method are that: (1) uncertainty in sound speed in shallow water is almost canceled; (2) possible GPS error is also canceled; (3) picking error in traveltime detection is almost canceled; (4) only a pair of transponders can fully describe relative 3-dimensional motion. On the other hand the disadvantages are that: (5) data is not continuous but only campaign; (6) most advantages are only effective only for very short baseline (< 100-300 m). Our target being applied this method is a steep fault scarp near the Japan trench, which is expected as a surface expression of back thrust, in where time scale of fault activity is still controversial especially after the Tohoku earthquake. We have carefully installed three transponders across this scarp using a NSS system, which can remotely navigate instrument near the seafloor from a mother vessel based on video camera image. Baseline lengths among the transponders are 200-300 m at 3500 m depth. Initial

  20. The Point Sal–Point Piedras Blancas correlation and the problem of slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault, central California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Existing models for large-magnitude, right-lateral slip on the San Gregorio–Hosgri fault system imply much more deformation of the onshore block in the Santa Maria basin than is supported by geologic data. This problem is resolved by a model in which dextral slip on this fault system increases gradually from 0–10 km near Point Arguello to ∼150 km at Cape San Martin, but such a model requires abandoning the cross-fault tie between Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas, which requires 90–100 km of right-lateral slip on the southern Hosgri fault. We collected stratigraphic and detrital zircon data from Miocene clastic rocks overlying Jurassic basement at both localities to determine if either section contained unique characteristics that could establish how far apart they were in the early Miocene. Our data indicate that these basins formed in the early Miocene during a period of widespread transtensional basin formation in the central Coast Ranges, and they filled with sediment derived from nearby pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. Although detrital zircon data do not indicate a unique source component in either section, they establish the maximum depositional age of the previously undated Point Piedras Blancas section to be 18 Ma. We also show that detrital zircon trace-element data can be used to discriminate between zircons of oceanic crust and arc affinity of the same age, a potentially useful tool in future studies of the California Coast Ranges. Overall, we find no characteristics in the stratigraphy and provenance of the Point Sal and Point Piedras Blancas sections that are sufficiently unique to prove whether they were far apart or close together in the early Miocene, making them of questionable utility as piercing points.

  1. Structure and flow properties of syn-rift border faults: The interplay between fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration (Dombjerg Fault, Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Rotevatn, Atle; Peacock, David C. P.; Henstra, Gijs A.; Midtkandal, Ivar; Grundvåg, Sten-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Structurally controlled, syn-rift, clastic depocentres are of economic interest as hydrocarbon reservoirs; understanding the structure of their bounding faults is of great relevance, e.g. in the assessment of fault-controlled hydrocarbon retention potential. Here we investigate the structure of the Dombjerg Fault Zone (Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland), a syn-rift border fault that juxtaposes syn-rift deep-water hanging-wall clastics against a footwall of crystalline basement. A series of discrete fault strands characterize the central fault zone, where discrete slip surfaces, fault rock assemblages and extreme fracturing are common. A chemical alteration zone (CAZ) of fault-related calcite cementation envelops the fault and places strong controls on the style of deformation, particularly in the hanging-wall. The hanging-wall damage zone includes faults, joints, veins and, outside the CAZ, disaggregation deformation bands. Footwall deformation includes faults, joints and veins. Our observations suggest that the CAZ formed during early-stage fault slip and imparted a mechanical control on later fault-related deformation. This study thus gives new insights to the structure of an exposed basin-bounding fault and highlights a spatiotemporal interplay between fault damage and chemical alteration, the latter of which is often underreported in fault studies. To better elucidate the structure, evolution and flow properties of faults (outcrop or subsurface), both fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration must be considered.

  2. Complex Paleotopography and Faulting near the Elsinore Fault, Coyote Mountains, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, M. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Coyote Mountains of southern California are bounded on the southwest by the Elsinore Fault, an active dextral fault within the San Andreas Fault zone. According to Axen and Fletcher (1998) and Dorsey and others (2011), rocks exposed in these mountains comprise a portion of the hanging wall of the east-vergent Salton Detachment Fault, which was active from the late Miocene-early Pliocene to Ca. 1.1-1.3 Ma. Detachment faulting was accompanied by subsidence, resulting in deposition of a thick sequence of marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks. Regional detachment faulting and subsidence ceased with the inception of the Elsinore Fault, which has induced uplift of the Coyote Mountains. Detailed geologic mapping in the central Coyote Mountains supports the above interpretation and adds some intriguing details. New discoveries include a buttress unconformity at the base of the Miocene/Pliocene section that locally cuts across strata at an angle so high that it could be misinterpreted as a fault. We thus conclude that the syn-extension strata were deposited on a surface with very rugged topography. We also discovered that locally-derived nonmarine gravel deposits exposed near the crest of the range, previously interpreted as part of the Miocene Split Mountain Group by Winker and Kidwell (1996), unconformably overlie units of the marine Miocene/Pliocene Imperial Group and must therefore be Pliocene or younger. The presence of such young gravel deposits on the crest of the range provides evidence for its rapid uplift. Additional new discoveries flesh out details of the structural history of the range. We mapped just two normal faults, both of which were relatively minor, thus supporting Axen and Fletcher's assertion that the hanging wall block of the Salton Detachment Fault had not undergone significant internal deformation during extension. We found abundant complex synthetic and antithetic strike-slip faults throughout the area, some of which offset Quaternary alluvial

  3. Determining on-fault earthquake magnitude distributions from integer programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Tom

    2018-02-01

    Earthquake magnitude distributions among faults within a fault system are determined from regional seismicity and fault slip rates using binary integer programming. A synthetic earthquake catalog (i.e., list of randomly sampled magnitudes) that spans millennia is first formed, assuming that regional seismicity follows a Gutenberg-Richter relation. Each earthquake in the synthetic catalog can occur on any fault and at any location. The objective is to minimize misfits in the target slip rate for each fault, where slip for each earthquake is scaled from its magnitude. The decision vector consists of binary variables indicating which locations are optimal among all possibilities. Uncertainty estimates in fault slip rates provide explicit upper and lower bounding constraints to the problem. An implicit constraint is that an earthquake can only be located on a fault if it is long enough to contain that earthquake. A general mixed-integer programming solver, consisting of a number of different algorithms, is used to determine the optimal decision vector. A case study is presented for the State of California, where a 4 kyr synthetic earthquake catalog is created and faults with slip ≥3 mm/yr are considered, resulting in >106 variables. The optimal magnitude distributions for each of the faults in the system span a rich diversity of shapes, ranging from characteristic to power-law distributions.

  4. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Daniel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Geothermal plays in extensional and transtensional tectonic environments have long been a major target in the exploration of geothermal resources and the Dixie Valley area has served as a classic natural laboratory for this type of geothermal plays. In recent years, the interactions between normal faults and strike-slip faults, acting either as strain relay zones have attracted significant interest in geothermal exploration as they commonly result in fault-controlled dilational corners with enhanced fracture permeability and thus have the potential to host blind geothermal prospects. Structural ambiguity, complications in fault linkage, etc. often make the selection for geothermal exploration drilling targets complicated and risky. Though simplistic, the three main ingredients of a viable utility-grade geothermal resource are heat, fluids, and permeability. Our new geological mapping and fault kinematic analysis derived a structural model suggest a two-stage structural evolution with (a) middle Miocene N -S trending normal faults (faults cutting across the modern range), - and tiling Olio-Miocene volcanic and sedimentary sequences (similar in style to East Range and S Stillwater Range). NE-trending range-front normal faulting initiated during the Pliocene and are both truncating N-S trending normal faults and reactivating some former normal faults in a right-lateral fashion. Thus the two main fundamental differences to previous structural models are (1) N-S trending faults are pre-existing middle Miocene normal faults and (2) these faults are reactivated in a right-later fashion (NOT left-lateral) and kinematically linked to the younger NE-trending range-bounding normal faults (Pliocene in age). More importantly, this study provides the first constraints on transient fluid flow through the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He thermochronometry in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area in Nevada.

  5. Paleoseismologic evidence for large-magnitude (Mw 7.5-8.0) earthquakes on the Ventura blind thrust fault: Implications for multifault ruptures in the Transverse Ranges of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Lee J.; Dolan, James F.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Hubbard, Judith; Shaw, John H.; Pratt, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analysis of continuously cored boreholes and cone penetrometer tests (CPTs), high-resolution seismic-reflection data, and luminescence and 14C dates from Holocene strata folded above the tip of the Ventura blind thrust fault constrain the ages and displacements of the two (or more) most recent earthquakes. These two earthquakes, which are identified by a prominent surface fold scarp and a stratigraphic sequence that thickens across an older buried fold scarp, occurred before the 235-yr-long historic era and after 805 ± 75 yr ago (most recent folding event[s]) and between 4065 and 4665 yr ago (previous folding event[s]). Minimum uplift in these two scarp-forming events was ∼6 m for the most recent earthquake(s) and ∼5.2 m for the previous event(s). Large uplifts such as these typically occur in large-magnitude earthquakes in the range of Mw7.5–8.0. Any such events along the Ventura fault would likely involve rupture of other Transverse Ranges faults to the east and west and/or rupture downward onto the deep, low-angle décollements that underlie these faults. The proximity of this large reverse-fault system to major population centers, including the greater Los Angeles region, and the potential for tsunami generation during ruptures extending offshore along the western parts of the system highlight the importance of understanding the complex behavior of these faults for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment.

  6. Performance assessments for radioactive waste repositories; the rate of movement of faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Newell J.

    1982-01-01

    Performance assessments of mined repositories for radioactive waste require estimates of the likelihood of fault movements and earthquakes that may affect the repository and its surrounding ground water flow system. Some previous assessments have attempted to estimate the rate of formation of new faults; some have relied heavily on historic seismicity or the time of latest movement on faults. More appropriate emphasis is on the identification of faults that have been active or may have been active under the present teconic regime in a broad region and on estimates of the long-term rate of movement of such faults. Faults that have moved under the current stress field, even at low rates, are likely to move again during the time the wastes will remain toxic. A continuum exists for the present rate of movement of faults which ranges from 10 mm per year for obviously active faults along the western margin of the North American plate to as low as 10 -4 mm per year for recently documented faults in the Atlantic Coast province. On the basis of regional consistency in movement rates and constraints imposed by geomorphology, I derive upper bounds for the rates of occurrence of fault offsets for various crustal stress provinces in the conterminous United States. These upper bounds are not meant to substitute for detailed studies of specific faults and seismicity at specific sites. They can help to reduce the considerable uncertainty that attaches to all estimates of future tectonic activity. The principal uncertainty in their estimation is the manner in which total slip across faults is distributed among discrete events especially in regions in which the rate of movement is very low.

  7. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Breaks in Pavement and Pipes as Indicators of Range-Front Faulting Resulting from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake near the Southwest Margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Peterson, David M.; Phelps, Geoffery A.

    1995-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provide indicators for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California. The spatial distribution of 1284 sites of such damage documents the extent and distribution of detectable ground deformation. Damage was concentrated in four zones, three of which are near previously mapped faults. The zone through Los Gatos showed the highest concentration of damage, as well as evidence for pre- and post-earthquake deformation. Damage along the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains reflected shortening that is consistent with movement along reverse faults in the region and with the hypothesis that tectonic strain is distributed widely across numerous faults in the California Coast Ranges.

  9. Faults Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  10. Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting in the East Alborz, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Walker, R.; Jackson, J.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Eshraghi, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    The East Alborz mountains of NE Iran are actively deforming as a result of Arabia-Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made using high resolution satellite, topographic and field data, with historical and recent seismicity to map major active faults in this poorly studied region. Deformation on the north side of the range occurs by range-normal shortening on the Khazar thrust fault, which separates Central Iran from the South Caspian. South of the range, deformation involves both left-lateral slip on the previously undocumented Shahrud fault system, which comprises several range-bounding fault segments, and shortening on (probably minor) thrust faults. Faulting south of the range is responsible for major historical earthquakes at Damghan (856AD) and Shahrud (1890). Deformation accommodated across the East Alborz is estimated from the difference in GPS velocities north and south of the range. South of the Alborz, northward GPS velocities across Central Iran decrease eastwards and the strike of the deforming belt changes to become more sub-parallel to the direction of South Caspian- Iran relative motion. This reduces the shortening component across the East Alborz, resulting in lower elevations between 54--57°E. West of 55.5°E, the more arc-normal shortening is achieved by partitioning of deformation onto the Khazar thrust (~1 mm/yr) and the Astaneh and Firuzkuh strike-slip faults (~3 mm/yr). East of 55.5°E, the Khazar fault ends and East Alborz deformation is accommodated primarily on the left-lateral Shahrud fault system, which may slip up to 3~mm/yr. Due to the long gap in seismicity along the eastern Shahrud fault system, the city of Jajarm (15,000 pop.) is considered at high risk from future earthquakes.

  11. Bounded Rationality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballester Pla, Coralio; Hernández, Penélope

    2012-01-01

    The observation of the actual behavior by economic decision makers in the lab and in the field justifies that bounded rationality has been a generally accepted assumption in many socio-economic models...

  12. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  13. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  14. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  15. Recency of Faulting and Neotechtonic Framework in the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field and Other Geothermal Fields of the Basin and Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Wesnousky; S. John Caskey; John W. Bell

    2003-02-20

    We studied the role that earthquake faults play in redistributing stresses within in the earths crust near geothermal fields. The geographic foci of our study were the sites of geothermal plants in Dixie Valley, Beowawe, and Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada. Our initial results show that the past history of earthquakes has redistributed stresses at these 3 sites in a manner to open and maintain fluid pathways critical for geothermal development. The approach developed here during our pilot study provides an inexpensive approach to (1) better define the best locations to site geothermal wells within known geothermal fields and (2) to define the location of yet discovered geothermal fields which are not manifest at the surface by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable conditions for hydrothermal activity in two ways. We conclude that an understanding of the spatial distribution of active faults and the past history of earthquakes on those faults be incorporated as a standard tool in geothermal exploration and in the siting of future boreholes in existing geothermal fields.

  16. Finding faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Duke, J. [Surpac Minex Group (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    The Surpac Minex Group has been building a geologic model to represent the coal seam structure at the Carbones del Cerrejon LLC mine in north eastern Colombia which is bonded by major reserve and normal faults. This is being achieved through a new software faulting tool. The tool combines existing Minex modelling with new fault interpretation tools. New software that permits 3-D photogrammetry and seismic data can also be incorporated. 6 figs.

  17. Late Quaternary Deformation Along the Wairarapa Fault, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, E. R.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Wairarapa fault, one of the largest active faults in the hanging wall of the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand, averaged 16m dextral slip during the M >8.1 1855 earthquake. Previous workers inferred that uplift of 2.7m at the coast, observed by a surveyor in 1855, occurred on the southern continuation of the Wairarapa fault, the Wharekauhau (WH) thrust. New mapping, stratigraphic, and paloseismologic results from the WH thrust suggest the pattern of surface rupture in 1855 and earlier earthquakes was significantly different than previously inferred, requiring a more complex model for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution of the region. Detailed mapping indicates that the coastal segment of the WH thrust did not rupture the surface in 1855. The thrust, a major range-bounding fault, emplaces Mesozoic graywacke over ~80-100 ka last- interglacial marine, and lacustrine rocks, and in part coeval to younger alluvial gravels. Fault activity is indicated by facies and thickness changes. This older sequence is tilted and overlapped unconformably by a silt layer and much less deformed alluvial fan gravels that range in age from >22ka to ages record a period of fault inactivity from 14 - 9 ka (calib yrs BP). The abandoned, overlapping fan surface is slightly deformed across the fault (15 m of folding- related throw). We infer that the thrust has propagated eastward in the subsurface, uplifting the abandoned WH fault, an inference that is supported by the pattern of Holocene incision. The only recent faulting consists of subvertical en echelon segments that have undergone minor dip-slip and dextral slip. A trench excavated across the fault scarp in late Holocene gravels suggests that the only fault along the trace of the WH thrust that broke within 3 m of the surface in 1855 was a minor strike-slip fault splay. New14C ages are consistent with the most recent event occurring in 1855 and suggest one earlier event. The range-bounding trace of the WH thrust appears to

  18. Mountain building, strike-slip faulting, and landscape evolution in the Marlborough Fault System, NZ: Insights from new low-temperature thermochronology and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, A. R.; Collett, C.; Flowers, R. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Upton, P.

    2016-12-01

    The 150 km wide Marlborough Fault System (MFS) and adjacent dextral-reverse Alpine Fault accommodate oblique convergence of the Australian and Pacific plates in a broad transform boundary that extends for much of the South Island New Zealand. Understanding the deformation history of the Marlborough region offers the opportunity to study topographic evolution in a strike-slip setting and a fuller picture of the evolving New Zealand plate boundary as the MFS lies at the transition from oceanic Pacific plate subduction to oblique continental collision. Here we present low-temperature thermochronology from the MFS to place new limits on the timing and style of mountain building. We sampled a range of elevations spanning 2 km within and adjacent to the Kaikoura Mountains, which stand high as topographic anomalies above active strike-slip faults. Young apatite (U-Th)/He ages ( 2-5 Ma) on both sides of range-bounding faults are consistent with regional distributed deformation since the Pliocene initiation of strike-slip faulting. However, large differences in both zircon helium and apatite fission track ages, from Paleogene/Neogene ages within hanging walls to unreset >100 Ma ages in footwalls, indicate an early phase of fault-related vertical exhumation. Thermal modeling using the QTQt program reveals two phases of exhumation within the Kaikoura Ranges: rapid cooling at 15-12 Ma localized to hanging wall rocks and regional rapid cooling reflected in all samples starting at 4-5 Ma. These results and landscape evolution models suggest that, despite the presence of active mountain front faults, much of the topographic relief in this region may predate the onset of strike-slip faulting and that portions of the Marlborough Faults are re-activated thrusts that coincide with the early development of the transpressive plate boundary. Regional exhumation after 5 Ma likely reflects increased proximity to the migrating Pacific plate subduction zone and the buoyant Chatham Rise.

  19. Systematic assessment of fault stability in the Northern Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects and increased seismicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, E. O.; Healy, D.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate information on fault networks, the full stress tensor, and pore fluid pressures are required for quantifying the stability of structure-bound hydrocarbon prospects, carbon dioxide sequestration, and drilling prolific and safe wells, particularly fluid injections wells. Such information also provides essential data for a proper understanding of superinduced seismicities associated with areas of intensive hydrocarbon exploration and solid minerals mining activities. Pressure and stress data constrained from wells and seismic data in the Northern Niger Delta Basin (NNDB), Nigeria, have been analysed in the framework of fault stability indices by varying the maximum horizontal stress direction from 0° to 90°, evaluated at depths of 2 km, 3.5 km and 4 km. We have used fault dips and azimuths interpreted from high resolution 3D seismic data to calculate the predisposition of faults to failures in three faulting regimes (normal, pseudo-strike-slip and pseudo-thrust). The weighty decrease in the fault stability at 3.5 km depth from 1.2 MPa to 0.55 MPa demonstrates a reduction of the fault strength by high magnitude overpressures. Pore fluid pressures > 50 MPa have tendencies to increase the risk of faults to failure in the study area. Statistical analysis of stability indices (SI) indicates faults dipping 50°-60°, 80°-90°, and azimuths ranging 100°-110° are most favourably oriented for failure to take place, and thus likely to favour migrations of fluids given appropriate pressure and stress conditions in the dominant normal faulting regime of the NNDB. A few of the locally assessed stability of faults show varying results across faulting regimes. However, the near similarities of some model-based results in the faulting regimes explain the stability of subsurface structures are greatly influenced by the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) direction and magnitude of pore fluid pressures.

  20. Deep Fault Drilling Project—Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Sutherland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, constitutes a globally significant natural laboratory for research into how active plate-bounding continental faults work and, in particular, how rocks exposed at the surface today relate to deep-seated processes of tectonic deformation, seismogenesis, and mineralization. The along-strike homogeneity of the hanging wall, rapid rate of dextral-reverse slip on an inclined fault plane, and relatively shallow depths to mechanical and chemical transitions make the Alpine Fault and the broader South Island plate boundary an important international site for multi-disciplinary research and a realistic target for an ambitious long-term program of scientific drilling investigations.

  1. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  2. The physical limits of metal reduction by long-range extracellular electron transfer, and the role of cytochrome-bound flavins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, K.; Sanford, R. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals and radionuclides in the subsurface plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycling of micronutrients and the remediation of contaminated groundwater. While recent advances in the field have improved our ability to understand and predict bioreduction in these environments, the contribution of long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET) by electron shuttling or reduction along conductive pili remains elusive. Long-range EET is implicated in the reduction of radionuclides like uranium that are reversibly sorbed in clay nanopores and exist as persistant sources of contamination. In regions of low hydraulic conductivity, electron shuttles and conductive pili may increase physical mixing beyond what is possible by advection and diffusion, resulting in reduction over a larger area than predicted by current models. We present a novel microfluidic platform that allows us to study long-range EET to the exclusion of other mechanisms, directly observe these phenomena under a controlled environment representative of groundwater conditions, monitor the metabolic activity and redox state of bacteria, and determine the presence of reduced products in-situ. Using Geobacter sulfurreducens as a model metal-reducing bacteria, insoluble manganese dioxide as an electron acceptor, and Escherichia coli K-12 as a reductant and redox buffer, we demonstate that 1) long-range EET by conductive pili requires the presence of flavins 2) Reduction by direct contact only requires the presence of a lowered electric potential 3) The limit of reduction by conductive pili is on the order of 15-20 microns. We are actively exploring the influence of hydrological conditions on the expression of different mechanisms of long-range EET, and the importance of extracellular cytochromes and pili conductivity on metal reduction.

  3. Fault Tolerant External Memory Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Mølhave, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    bound on the number of I/Os required for any deterministic dictionary that is resilient to memory faults. We design a static and a dynamic deterministic dictionary with optimal query performance as well as an optimal sorting algorithm and an optimal priority queue. Finally, we consider scenarios where......Algorithms dealing with massive data sets are usually designed for I/O-efficiency, often captured by the I/O model by Aggarwal and Vitter. Another aspect of dealing with massive data is how to deal with memory faults, e.g. captured by the adversary based faulty memory RAM by Finocchi and Italiano....... However, current fault tolerant algorithms do not scale beyond the internal memory. In this paper we investigate for the first time the connection between I/O-efficiency in the I/O model and fault tolerance in the faulty memory RAM, and we assume that both memory and disk are unreliable. We show a lower...

  4. The Noble Gas Dimers as a Probe of the Energetic Contributions of Dispersion and Short-Range Electron Correlation in Weakly-Bound Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Housden, Michael Philip; Pyper, Nicholas Charles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The binding of the noble gas dimers is examined using a theory in which the Hartree-Fock interaction energy is augmented with both a short-range correlation term derived from the theory of a uniform electron-gas plus a dispersion energy damped according to the theory of Jabobi and Csanak. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental binding energies and equilibrium inter-nuclear separations confirms that this approach captures the essential physics of the int...

  5. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene.

  6. H infinity Integrated Fault Estimation and Fault Tolerant Control of Discrete-time Piecewise Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    . Sufficient conditions for the existence of robust fault estimator and fault tolerant controller are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Upper bounds on the H∞ performance can be minimized by solving convex optimization problems with linear matrix inequality constraints. The efficiency...... of the method is demonstrated by means of a numerical example....

  7. Tectonic reversal of the western Doruneh Fault System: Implications for Central Asian tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid Reza; Esterabi Ashtiani, Marzieh; Guest, Bernard; Yassaghi, Ali; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza; Shahpasandzadeh, Majid; Naeimi, Amir

    2015-10-01

    The left-lateral Doruneh Fault System (DFS) bounds the north margin of the Central Iranian microplate and has played an important role in the structural evolution of the Turkish-Iranian plateau. The western termination of the DFS is a sinistral synthetic branch fault array that shows clear kinematic evidence of having undergone recent slip sense inversion from a dextral array to a sinistral array in the latest Neogene or earliest Quaternary. Similarly, kinematic evidence from the Anarak Metamorphic complex suggests that this complex initially developed at a transpressive left-stepping termination of the DFS and that it was inverted in the latest Neogene to a transtensional fault termination. The recognition that the DFS and other faults in NE Iran were inverted from dextral to sinistral strike slip in the latest Neogene and the likely connection between the DFS and the Herat Fault of Afghanistan suggests that prior to the latest Miocene, all of the north Iranian and northern Afghan ranges were part of a distributed dextral fault network that extended from the west Himalayan syntaxes to the western Alborz. Also, the recognition that regional slip sense inversion occurred across northern and northeastern Iran after the latest Miocene invalidates tectonic models that extrapolate Pleistocene to recent fault slip kinematics and rates back beyond this time.

  8. Bounded Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballester Pla, Coralio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The observation of the actual behavior by economic decision makers in the lab and in the field justifies that bounded rationality has been a generally accepted assumption in many socio-economic models. The goal of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties involved in providing a correct definition of what a rational (or irrational agent is. In this paper we describe two frameworks that employ different approaches for analyzing bounded rationality. The first is a spatial segregation set-up that encompasses two optimization methodologies: backward induction and forward induction. The main result is that, even under the same state of knowledge, rational and non-rational agents may match their actions. The second framework elaborates on the relationship between irrationality and informational restrictions. We use the beauty contest (Nagel, 1995 as a device to explain this relationship.

    La observación del comportamiento de los agentes económicos tanto en el laboratorio como en la vida real justifica que la racionalidad acotada sea un supuesto aceptado en numerosos modelos socio-económicos. El objetivo de este artículo es ilustrar las dificultades que conlleva una correcta definición de qué es un agente racional (irracional. En este artículo se describen dos marcos que emplean diferentes metodologías para analizar la racionalidad acotada. El primero es un modelo de segregación espacial donde se contrastan dos metodologías de optimización: inducción hacia atrás y hacia adelante. El resultado principal es que, incluso con el mismo nivel de conocimiento, tanto agentes racionales como irracionales podrían coincidir en sus acciones. El segundo marco trabaja sobre la relación entre irracionalidad y restricción de información. Se utiliza el juego llamado “beauty contest” (Nagel 1995 como mecanismo para explicar dicha relación.

  9. Seismic evidence of conjugate normal faulting: The 1994 Devil Canyon earthquake sequence near Challis, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Suzette M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Aftershock hypocenters of the 1984 Devil Canyon, Idaho earthquake indicate the sequence was associated with conjugate normal faulting on two northwest-striking normal faults that bound the Warm Spring Creek graben.

  10. Fault estimation - A standard problem approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, J.; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis problems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem set-up introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  11. The high resolution structures of free and inhibitor-bound Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase and its comparison with T. cruzi trans-sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Maria Fernanda; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Nguyen, Tong; Alzari, Pedro M

    2003-01-24

    The structure of the recombinant Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase (TrSA) has been determined at 1.6A resolution, and the structures of its complexes with the transition state analog inhibitor 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (DANA), Neu-5-Ac-thio-alpha(2,3)-galactoside (NATG) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) have been determined at 1.64A, 2.1A and 2.85A, respectively. The 3D structure of TrSA is essentially identical to that of the natural enzyme, except for the absence of covalently attached sugar at five distinct N-glycosylation sites. The protein exhibits a topologically rigid active site architecture that is unaffected by ligand binding. The overall binding of DANA to the active site cleft is similar to that observed for other viral and bacterial sialidases, dominated by the interactions of the inhibitor carboxylate with the conserved arginine triad. However, the interactions of the other pyranoside ring substituents (hydroxyl, N-acetyl and glycerol moieties) differ between trypanosomal, bacterial and viral sialidases, providing a structural basis for specific inhibitor design. Sialic acid is found to bind the enzyme with the sugar ring in a distorted (half-chair or boat) conformation and the 2-OH hydroxyl group at hydrogen bonding distance of the carboxylate of Asp60, substantiating a direct catalytic role for this residue. A detailed comparison of TrSA with the closely related structure of T.cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS) reveals a highly conserved catalytic center, where subtle structural differences account for strikingly different enzymatic activities and inhibition properties. The structure of TrSA in complex with NATG shows the active site cleft occupied by a smaller compound which could be identified as DANA, probably the product of a hydrolytic side reaction. Indeed, TrSA (but not TcTS) was found to cleave O and S-linked sialylated substrates, further stressing the functional differences between trypanosomal sialidases and trans-sialidases.

  12. Stability of stacking faults in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dranova, Z.I.; Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul' ko, V.B.; Mikhailovskii, I.M.

    1979-12-01

    The atomic configuration of planar lattice defects in tungsten was investigated by field-ion microscopy and thermal etching. Stable stacking faults were observed throughout the investigated temperature range 78--1700/sup 0/K. These faults were studied by field-ion microscopy and mathematical modeling methods. It was found that the existence of stacking faults in bcc crystals was not associated with the action of strong omnidirectional tensile stresses. The crystallographic characteristics of the faults were determined.

  13. Fault Detection for Quantized Networked Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Che

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault detection problem in the finite frequency domain for networked control systems with signal quantization is considered. With the logarithmic quantizer consideration, a quantized fault detection observer is designed by employing a performance index which is used to increase the fault sensitivity in finite frequency domain. The quantized measurement signals are dealt with by utilizing the sector bound method, in which the quantization error is treated as sector-bounded uncertainty. By using the Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov (GKYP Lemma, an iterative LMI-based optimization algorithm is developed for designing the quantized fault detection observer. And a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  15. Adaptive robust fault tolerant control design for a class of nonlinear uncertain MIMO systems with quantization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wei; Song, Yongdong; Wen, Changyun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the adaptive control problem for a class of nonlinear uncertain MIMO systems with actuator faults and quantization effects. Under some mild conditions, an adaptive robust fault-tolerant control is developed to compensate the affects of uncertainties, actuator failures and errors caused by quantization, and a range of the parameters for these quantizers is established. Furthermore, a Lyapunov-like approach is adopted to demonstrate that the ultimately uniformly bounded output tracking error is guaranteed by the controller, and the signals of the closed-loop system are ensured to be bounded, even in the presence of at most m-q actuators stuck or outage. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to verify and illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive schemes. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quasi-bounded sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proved in [1] & [2] that a set bounded in an inductive limit E=indlim En of Fréchet spaces is also bounded in some En iff E is fast complete. In the case of arbitrary locally convex spaces En every bounded set in a fast complete indlim En is quasi-bounded in some En, though it may not be bounded or even contained in any En. Every bounded set is quasi-bounded. In a Fréchet space every quasi-bounded set is also bounded.

  17. Comparison of upwards splaying and upwards merging segmented normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, U. A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Lonergan, L.; Bevan, T. G.

    2017-07-01

    A common model for normal fault growth involves a single fault at depth splaying upwards into a series of en-echelon segments. This model is applied to faults as well as a range of extension fractures, including veins, joints and igneous dykes. Examples of splaying growth fault systems in the Columbus Basin, offshore Trinidad, are presented. They include the commonly described upwards splaying type, but also one fault zone with an upward change from disconnected overlapping synthetic faults to a continuous fault. One fault zone with high-displacement fault segments is separated by a relay ramp at depth, becomes breached higher up, developing into a continuous fault at its upper part, where displacements are least. This example suggests that whilst kinematic linkage typically precedes geometric linkage in the evolution of relay ramps, low-displacement parts of a fault system may be geometrically linked whereas higher displacement areas are only kinematically linked.

  18. Regional Survey of Structural Properties and Cementation Patterns of Fault Zones in the Northern Part of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico - Implications for Ground-Water Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    of cement within fault zones. Cements fill some extension fractures and, to a lesser degree, are concentrated along shear fractures and deformation bands within inner damage zones. Cements are commonly concentrated in mixed zones and inner damage zones on one side of a fault and thus are asymmetrically distributed within a fault zone, but cement does not consistently lie on the basinward side of faults. From observed spatial patterns of asymmetrically distributed fault zone cements, we infer that ancient ground-water flow was commonly localized along, and bounded by, faults in the basin. It is apparent from our study that the Albuquerque Basin contains a high concentration of faults. The geometry of, internal structure of, and cement and clay distribution in fault zones have created and will continue to create considerable heterogeneity of permeability within the basin aquifers. The characteristics and statistical range of fault zone features appear to be predictable and consistent throughout the basin; this predictability can be used in ground-water flow simulations that consider the influence of faults.

  19. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  20. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers—An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard; Crone, Anthony J.; Duross, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4–1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  1. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers-An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony J.; DuRoss, Christopher B.

    2017-11-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4-1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  2. ESR dating of the fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs, grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Ulzin nuclear reactor. ESR signals of quartz grains separated from fault rocks collected from the E-W trend fault are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of these faults had occurred before the quaternary period. ESR dates from the NW trend faults range from 300ka to 700ka. On the other hand, ESR date of the NS trend fault is about 50ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity near the Ulzin nuclear reactor continued into the pleistocene.

  3. Late Quaternary paleoearthquakes along the northern segment of the Nantinghe fault on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoyue; He, Honglin; Wei, Zhanyu; Shi, Feng; Gao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    The strong earthquake behaviors of faults are significant for learning crustal deformation mechanisms and for assessing regional seismic risk. To date, faults that bound tectonic blocks have attracted considerable concern and many studies; however, scant attention has been paid to faults within blocks that can also host devastating earthquakes. The Nantinghe fault is a left-lateral strike-slip fault within the Southwestern Yunnan Block, and it slips at ∼4 mm/yr suggesting strong activity in the late Quaternary. Nevertheless, no earthquake greater than 6 has ever been recorded along it, except for the 1941 M ∼7 earthquake near the Myanmar-China border region. In contrast, many earthquakes have occurred in the near region, delineating a seismic gap near the Nantinghe fault. Although several studies have been conducted upon it, the activity of its northern segment is confusing, and whether this fault segment has loaded sufficient stress to fail remains debatable. Furthermore, previous work failed to conduct any paleoseismological studies bringing out great uncertainty in learning its activity and faulting behavior, as well as in assessing the regional seismic risk. To solve these problems, we mapped the fault traces utilizing high-resolution satellite images and aerial photographs, and conducted three paleoseismological trenches along the northern segment of the Nantinghe fault. The trench excavations revealed a ∼45,000-year incomplete paleoearthquake history and confirmed that this fault segment has been active since the late Pleistocene but was not ruptured during the 1941 earthquake. Additionally, at least five paleoearthquakes are identified with their respective age ranges of before 39,030 BCE; 38,500-37,220 BCE; 28,475-5445 BCE; 3535 BCE-800 CE; and 1320-1435 CE based on radiocarbon dating. Among the paleoearthquakes, the latest is suggested to have generated a surface rupture much longer than 14 km with a magnitude likely up to Ms 7.0. Furthermore, based

  4. Analogue modelling of different angle thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosas, F.M.; Duarte, João C.; Schellart, W. P.; Tomás, R.; Grigorova, V.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-01-01

    Analogue modelling experiments of thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium are presented and discussed. Simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults bounding a (corner) zone of interference defined by the angle between the two fault systems is simulated, instead

  5. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    5200 yr for past earthquakes along the different segments of the western Bogd Fault. This suggests that the three western segments of the Bogd Fault and the Gurvan Bulag thrust fault (a reverse fault bounding the southern side of the Ih Bogd range that ruptured during the 1957 earthquake) have similar average recurrence times, and therefore may have ruptured together in previous earthquakes as they did in 1957. These results suggest that the western part of the Bogd Fault system, including the Gurvan Bulag thrust fault, usually behaves in a ‘characteristic earthquake’ mode.

  6. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  7. Diagnosis of Constant Faults in Read-Once Contact Networks over Finite Bases using Decision Trees

    KAUST Repository

    Busbait, Monther I.

    2014-05-01

    We study the depth of decision trees for diagnosis of constant faults in read-once contact networks over finite bases. This includes diagnosis of 0-1 faults, 0 faults and 1 faults. For any finite basis, we prove a linear upper bound on the minimum depth of decision tree for diagnosis of constant faults depending on the number of edges in a contact network over that basis. Also, we obtain asymptotic bounds on the depth of decision trees for diagnosis of each type of constant faults depending on the number of edges in contact networks in the worst case per basis. We study the set of indecomposable contact networks with up to 10 edges and obtain sharp coefficients for the linear upper bound for diagnosis of constant faults in contact networks over bases of these indecomposable contact networks. We use a set of algorithms, including one that we create, to obtain the sharp coefficients.

  8. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  9. Evidence for early miocene wrench faulting in the Marlborough fault system, New Zealand: structural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audru, Jean-Christophe; Delteil, Jean

    1998-10-01

    In New Zealand, the Marlborough strike-slip faults link the Hikurangi subduction zone to the Alpine fault collision zone. Stratigraphic and structural analysis in the Marlborough region constrain the inception of the current strike-slip tectonics. Six major Neogene basins are investigated. Their infill is composed of marine and freshwater sediments up to 3 km thick; they are characterised by coarse facies derived from the basins bounding relief, high sedimentation rates and asymmetric geometries. Proposed factors that controlled the basins' generation are the initial geometry of the strike-slip faults and the progressive strike-slip motion. Two groups of basins are presented: the early Miocene (23 My) basins were generated under wrench tectonics above releasing-jogs between basement faults. The late Miocene (11 My) basins were initiated by halfgrabens tilted along straighter faults during a transtensive stage. Development of faults during Cretaceous to Oligocene times facilitated the following propagation of wrench tectonics. The Pliocene (5 My) to current increasing convergence has shortened the basins and distorted the Miocene array of faults. This study indicates that the Marlborough Fault System is an old feature that connected part of the Hikurangi margin to the Alpine fault since the subduction and collision initiation.

  10. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    An energetic sequence of shallow earthquakes that began in early March 2011 in western Nevada, near the community of Hawthorne, has slowly decreased in intensity through mid-2011. To date about 1300 reviewed earthquake locations have been compiled; we have computed moment tensors for the larger earthquakes and have developed a set of high-precision locations for all reviewed events. The sequence to date has included over 50 earthquakes ML 3 and larger with the largest at Mw 4.6. Three 6-channel portable stations configured with broadband sensors and accelerometers were installed by April 20. Data from the portable instruments is telemetered through NSL's microwave backbone to Reno where it is integrated with regional network data for real-time notifications, ShakeMaps, and routine event analysis. The data is provided in real-time to NEIC, CISN and the IRIS DMC. The sequence is located in a remote area about 15-20 km southwest of Hawthorne in the footwall block of the Wassuk Range fault system. An initial concern was that the sequence might be associated with volcanic processes due to the proximity of late Quaternary volcanic flows; there have been no volcanic signatures observed in near source seismograms. An additional concern, as the sequence has proceeded, was a clear progression eastward toward the Wassuk Range front fault. The east dipping range bounding fault is capable of M 7+ events, and poses a significant hazard to the community of Hawthorne and local military facilities. The Hawthorne Army Depot is an ordinance storage facility and the nation's storage site for surplus mercury. The sequence is within what has been termed the 'Mina Deflection' of the Central Walker Lane Belt. Faulting along the Whiskey Flat section of the Wassuk front fault would be primarily down-to-the-east, with an E-W extension direction; moment tensors for the 2011 earthquake show a range of extension directions from E-W to NW-SE, suggesting a possible dextral component to the Wassuk

  11. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  12. Moderate deviations for bounded subsequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stoica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study Davis' series of moderate deviations probabilities for Lp-bounded sequences of random variables (p>2. A certain subseries therein is convergent for the same range of parameters as in the case of martingale difference or i.i.d. sequences.

  13. Diagnostics Tools Identify Faults Prior to Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Through the SBIR program, Rochester, New York-based Impact Technologies LLC collaborated with Ames Research Center to commercialize the Center s Hybrid Diagnostic Engine, or HyDE, software. The fault detecting program is now incorporated into a software suite that identifies potential faults early in the design phase of systems ranging from printers to vehicles and robots, saving time and money.

  14. Reverse fault growth and fault interaction with frictional interfaces: insights from analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    The association of faulting and folding is a common feature in mountain chains, fold-and-thrust belts, and accretionary wedges. Kinematic models are developed and widely used to explain a range of relationships between faulting and folding. However, these models may result not to be completely appropriate to explain shortening in mechanically heterogeneous rock bodies. Weak layers, bedding surfaces, or pre-existing faults placed ahead of a propagating fault tip may influence the fault propagation rate itself and the associated fold shape. In this work, we employed clay analogue models to investigate how mechanical discontinuities affect the propagation rate and the associated fold shape during the growth of reverse master faults. The simulated master faults dip at 30° and 45°, recalling the range of the most frequent dip angles for active reverse faults that occurs in nature. The mechanical discontinuities are simulated by pre-cutting the clay pack. For both experimental setups (30° and 45° dipping faults) we analyzed three different configurations: 1) isotropic, i.e. without precuts; 2) with one precut in the middle of the clay pack; and 3) with two evenly-spaced precuts. To test the repeatability of the processes and to have a statistically valid dataset we replicate each configuration three times. The experiments were monitored by collecting successive snapshots with a high-resolution camera pointing at the side of the model. The pictures were then processed using the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.), in order to extract the displacement and shear-rate fields. These two quantities effectively show both the on-fault and off-fault deformation, indicating the activity along the newly-formed faults and whether and at what stage the discontinuities (precuts) are reactivated. To study the fault propagation and fold shape variability we marked the position of the fault tips and the fold profiles for every successive step of deformation. Then we compared

  15. Paleoseismology of Crack-in-the-Ground Fault, Central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, S. R.; Mackey, B. H.; Weldon, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Central Oregon exhibits both extensive active faulting and Quaternary volcanism, yet the relations between them are complex and poorly constrained. The N15W striking North Christmas Valley fault system is a Basin and Range type structure offsetting High Lava Plains volcanics forming a ~3 km wide graben that bounds Christmas Lake. Several young volcanic vents, including Green Mountain (GM), Four Craters (4C), and East Lava Field, are aligned parallel with and bounded by the graben. We focus on Crack-in-the-Ground (CITG) fault which vertically displaces the GM and FC basalts. The GM basalt is dated at 740 +/- 59 ka by 40Ar/39Ar (Jordan, 2002). Our preliminary dating of the 4C basalt yields an average age of 12 +/- 2 ka, determined by cosmogenic 3He exposure dating of olivine from flow surfaces. Since emplacement of the GM basalts, the fault has developed a ~10 m hanging wall monocline and a vertical hinge crack which yields the 0.013 mm/yr slip rate suggested in Jordan (2002). The 4C basalt has also been cracked by the CITG fault, producing a 30 +/-10 cm vertical offset. A trench excavated across a section of CITG exposed the stratigraphy of the upper 2.25 m. The upper 1.25 m is a modern soil developed on ~7 ka Mt. Mazama ash. The whole unit is offset ~12 cm as the result of a presumed co-seismic graben structure in the crack. The lower one meter is a palesol developed on windblown sandy silt. The 4C cinder cones may have produced a basaltic tephra that is not seen in the trench, therefore we think the lower unit is post-4C. The paleo-surface has a shallow east dip caused by co-seismic deformation. The two events seen in the trench are likely post-4C, suggesting the 4C offset is cumulative between two events, yielding a slip rate of 0.025 mm/yr. Comparison of the two slip rates suggests an increased slip rate post-4C. Our results are consistent with a potential volcano-tectonic relationship in which slip rate increased during the Late Pleistocene associated with

  16. Plate boundary behaviour, recent uplift, and seismic hazard along the Central Alpine Fault near the Whataroa River, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, G. P.; Davies, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding plate boundary behaviour is a major objective in seismotectonics to better understand and mitigate seismic hazards. Field- and light detection and ranging (lidar)-derived topographic mapping, geological characterisation, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of on-fault sediments were used to better constrain rangefront deformation of the Southern Alps at the Alpine Fault near the Whataroa River. The Alpine Fault, which forms the plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand, is thought to rupture in large to great earthquakes (most recently in 1717 AD). Here the fault is dextral-reverse, although primarily strike-slip with clear fault traces cutting across older surfaces of varying elevations and ages. Deformational bulges are observed along these traces that are likely thrust-bounded. A terrace of Whataroa River sediments on the hanging wall of the fault approximately ~ 55-75 m (when considering uncertainties) above the floodplain of the Whataroa. OSL ages for hanging wall sediments of ~ 11 ka in this terrace, ~ 2.8 ka for Whataroa River terrace deposits in a deformational bulge, and ~ 11.1 ka for a rangefront-derived fan and aggradation along the rangefront and Holocene hanging wall uplift rates of ~6.0 + or - 1 mm/yr at the fault. These Whataroa River-sourced terrace deposits suggest that the adjacent bounding faults are steeply-dipping, with no geometries in the shallow subsurface that would tend to cause rotation and tilting. Because GPS-derived "interseismic" vertical uplift rates are new outcrop mapping that demonstrates other important sources of seismic hazard exist near this plate boundary.

  17. Active faulting, 3-D geological architecture and Plio-Quaternary structural evolution of extensional basins in the central Apennine chain, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Ladina, Chiara; Marzorati, Simone; Galadini, Fabrizio

    2017-03-01

    The general basin and range Apennine topographic characteristic is generally attributed to the presently active normal fault systems, whose long-term activity (throughout the Quaternary) is supposed to have been responsible for the creation of morphological/structural highs and lows. By coupling field geological survey and geophysical investigations, we reconstructed the 3-D geological model of an inner tectonic basin of the central Apennines, the Subequana Valley, bounded to the northeast by the southern segment of one of the major active and seismogenic normal faults of the Apennines, known as the Middle Aterno Valley-Subequana Valley fault system. Our analyses revealed that, since the late Pliocene, the basin evolved in a double half-graben configuration through a polyphase tectonic development. An early phase, Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene in age, was controlled by the ENE-WSW-striking and SSE-dipping Avezzano-Bussi fault, that determined the formation of an early depocentre towards the N-NW. Subsequently, the main fault became the NW-SE-striking faults, which drove the formation during the Quaternary of a new fault-related depocentre towards the NE. By considering the available geological information, a similar structural evolution has likely involved three close tectonic basins aligned along the Avezzano-Bussi fault, namely the Fucino Basin, the Subequana Valley, and the Sulmona Basin, and it has been probably experienced by other tectonic basins of the chain. The present work therefore points out the role of pre-existing transverse tectonic structures, inherited by previous tectonic phases, in accommodating the ongoing tectonic deformation and, consequently, in influencing the structural characteristics of the major active normal faults. This has implications in terms of earthquake fault rupture propagation and segmentation. Lastly, the morpho-tectonic setting of the Apennine chain results from the superposition of deformation events whose geological

  18. Passive Fault-tolerant Control of Discrete-time Piecewise Affine Systems against Actuator Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Seyed Mojtaba; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    for the exis- tence of a passive fault-tolerant controller is derived and formulated as the feasibility of a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The upper bound on the performance cost can be minimized using a convex optimization problem with LMI constraints which can be solved efficiently. The approach...... is illustrated on a numerical example and a two degree of freedom helicopter....

  19. Influence of fault asymmetric dislocation on the gravity changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Hurong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fault is a planar fracture or discontinuity in a volume of rock, across which there has been significant displacement along the fractures as a result of earth movement. Large faults within the Earth’s crust result from the action of plate tectonic forces, with the largest forming the boundaries between the plates, energy release associated with rapid movement on active faults is the cause of most earthquakes. The relationship between unevenness dislocation and gravity changes was studied on the theoretical thought of differential fault. Simulated observation values were adopted to deduce the gravity changes with the model of asymmetric fault and the model of Okada, respectively. The characteristic of unevennes fault momentum distribution is from two end points to middle by 0 according to a certain continuous functional increase. However, the fault momentum distribution in the fault length range is a constant when the Okada model is adopted. Numerical simulation experiments for the activities of the strike-slip fault, dip-slip fault and extension fault were carried out, respectively, to find that both the gravity contours and the gravity variation values are consistent when either of the two models is adopted. The apparent difference lies in that the values at the end points are 17. 97% for the strike-slip fault, 25. 58% for the dip-slip fault, and 24. 73% for the extension fault.

  20. How fault evolution changes strain partitioning and fault slip rates in Southern California: Results from geodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian

    2017-08-01

    In Southern California, the Pacific-North America relative plate motion is accommodated by the complex southern San Andreas Fault system that includes many young faults (western Transverse Ranges and along the dextral faults across the Mojave Desert, where numerous damaging earthquakes occurred in recent years.

  1. Detachment Faults and Grooved Footwalls in Diverse Magmatic and Tectonic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    Grooved slip surfaces produced in diverse geologic settings over an enormous range of scales possibly result from the same basic physical process. Subaerial extrusion of viscous magma in 'squeeze-ups' has produced striated surfaces, as has submarine flow of basaltic magma from beneath seafloor lava-lake crusts. Striations range from mm to cm in wavelength, and decimeters to meters in length. The geologic process of producing linear forms in cooling and solidifying magmas adjacent to a slip surface is imitated in the widely used industrial process of continuous casting. Similar but much larger grooves were possibly produced by continuous casting at tectonic rates. Grooves in continental metamorphic core complexes and their bounding low-angle normal faults have wavelengths of 1-15 km and groove lengths of up to 50 km. Levels of crustal exposure change greatly along some groove axes, with shallow crustal levels indicated by non-mylonitic rocks and pre-exhumation K-Ar mica dates grading laterally into intermediate crustal levels indicated by syn-exhumation mylonitic petrofabrics and K-Ar mica dates. Grooves developed in upper crustal crystalline rocks reflect the irregular shape of the normal fault along which extension began, and are the tilted and exhumed footwalls of such faults. However, where grooves are tens of kilometers long, as in some complexes, either the fault and its down-dip continuation as a mid-crustal mylonitic shear zone formed simultaneously with a grooved form, or the most deeply exhumed rocks were molded into grooves as they flowed laterally and upward into contact with the colder and stronger, grooved underside of the hanging-wall block. In the former option, it remains unexplained why grooved shear zones would develop with identical form to a brittle fault tens of kilometers up dip. In the latter case, the grooves were produced by continuous casting at tectonic rates and scales. Deep-sea metamorphic core complexes show remarkably grooved forms

  2. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  3. Influence of host lithofacies on fault rock variation in carbonate fault zones: A case study from the Island of Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, E. A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Relatively few studies have examined fault rock microstructures in carbonates. Understanding fault core production helps predict the hydraulic behaviour of faults and the potential for reservoir compartmentalisation. Normal faults on Malta, ranging from fracture networks that develop into breccias. Alternatively, this lithofacies is commonly recrystallised. In contrast, in the coarse-grained, heterogeneous grain-dominated carbonates the development of faulting is characterised by localised deformation, creating protocataclasite and cataclasite fault rocks. Cementation also occurs within some grain-dominated carbonates close to and on slip surfaces. Fault rock variation is a function of displacement as well as juxtaposed lithofacies. An increase in fault rock variability is observed at higher displacements, potentially creating a more transmissible fault, which opposes what may be expected in siliciclastic and crystalline faults. Significant heterogeneity in the fault rock types formed is likely to create variable permeability along fault-strike, potentially allowing across-fault fluid flow. However, areas with homogeneous fault rocks may generate barriers to fluid flow.

  4. The relationship between normal and strike-slip faults in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, and its implications for stress rotation and partitioning of deformation in the east-central Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atilla; de Joussineau, Ghislain

    2014-06-01

    This study expands on our earlier studies of the evolution of fracturing and faulting in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed over a large area in the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada. Based on a nearly three-dimensional data set collected from 200-m-high cliff-face exposures with stair-case morphology composed of steep and flat parts, we find that a series of inclined, relatively low-angle normal faults and their splay fractures are precursors of the strike-slip fault network that we previously documented. We discuss the significance of this finding in terms of the tectonics of the broader area, stress rotation, partitioning of deformation, and the development of fracture clusters with compartmentalization of the structures as a function of spatial, depositional and deformational domains.

  5. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we derive aggregate separation bounds, named after Davenport-Mahler-Mignotte (DMM), on the isolated roots of polynomial systems, specifically on the minimum distance between any two such roots. The bounds exploit the structure of the system and the height of the sparse (or toric) re...... bound on the number of steps that subdivision-based algorithms perform in order to isolate all real roots of a polynomial system. This leads to the first complexity bound of Milne's algorithm [22] in 2D....

  6. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...

  7. Iowa Bedrock Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This fault coverage locates and identifies all currently known/interpreted fault zones in Iowa, that demonstrate offset of geologic units in exposure or subsurface...

  8. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  9. The pulsed migration of hydrocarbons across inactive faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Harris

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Geological fault zones are usually assumed to influence hydrocarbon migration either as high permeability zones which allow enhanced along- or across-fault flow or as barriers to the flow. An additional important migration process inducing along- or across-fault migration can be associated with dynamic pressure gradients. Such pressure gradients can be created by earthquake activity and are suggested here to allow migration along or across inactive faults which 'feel' the quake-related pressure changes; i.e. the migration barriers can be removed on inactive faults when activity takes place on an adjacent fault. In other words, a seal is viewed as a temporary retardation barrier which leaks when a fault related fluid pressure event enhances the buoyancy force and allows the entry pressure to be exceeded. This is in contrast to the usual model where a seal leaks because an increase in hydrocarbon column height raises the buoyancy force above the entry pressure of the fault rock. Under the new model hydrocarbons may migrate across the inactive fault zone for some time period during the earthquake cycle. Numerical models of this process are presented to demonstrate the impact of this mechanism and its role in filling traps bounded by sealed faults.

  10. Software fault tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kazinov, Tofik Hasanaga; Mostafa, Jalilian Shahrukh

    2009-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce errorfree software, software fault tolerance is and will contiune to be an important consideration in software system. The root cause of software design errors in the complexity of the systems. This paper surveys various software fault tolerance techniquest and methodologies. They are two gpoups: Single version and Multi version software fault tolerance techniques. It is expected that software fault tolerance research will benefit from this research...

  11. Cross-fault pressure depletion, Zechstein carbonate reservoir, Weser-Ems area, Northern German Gas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, F.V.; Brauckmann, F.; Beckmann, H.; Gobi, A.; Grassmann, S.; Neble, J.; Roettgen, K. [ExxonMobil Production Deutschland GmbH (EMPG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    A cross-fault pressure depletion study in Upper Permian Zechstein Ca2 carbonate reservoir was undertaken in the Weser-Ems area of the Northern German Gas Basin. The primary objectives are to develop a practical workflow to define cross-fault pressures scenarios for Zechstein Ca2 reservoir drillwells, to determine the key factors of cross-fault pressure behavior in this platform carbonate reservoir, and to translate the observed cross-fault pressure depletion to fault transmissibility for reservoir simulation models. Analysis of Zechstein Ca2 cross-fault pressures indicates that most Zechstein-cutting faults appear to act as fluid-flow baffles with some local occurrences of fault seal. Moreover, there appears to be distinct cross-fault baffling or pressure depletion trends that may be related to the extent of the separating fault or fault system, degree of reservoir flow-path tortuosity, and quality of reservoir juxtaposition. Based on the above observations, a three-part workflow was developed consisting of (1) careful interpretation and mapping of faults and fault networks, (2) analysis of reservoir juxtaposition and reservoir juxtaposition quality, and (3) application of the observed cross-fault pressure depletion trends. This approach is field-analog based, is practical, and is being used currently to provide reliable and supportable pressure prediction scenarios for subsequent Zechstein fault-bounded drill-well opportunities.

  12. Do mesoscale faults near the tip of an active strike-slip fault indicate regional or local stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Fault-slip analysis is used in Japan after the Great Tohoku Earthquake (2011) to judge the stability of fractures in the foundations of nuclear power plants. In case a fault-slip datum from a fracture surface is explained by the present stress condition, the fracture is thought to have a risk to be activated as a fault. So, it is important to understand the relative significance of regional and local stresses. To answer the question whether mesoscale faults indicate regional or local stress, fault-slip data were collected from the walls of a trenching site of the Nojima Fault in central Japan—an active, dextral, strike-slip fault. The fault gave rise to the 1995 Kobe earthquake, which killed more than 6000 people. The trench was placed near the fault tip, which produced compressional and extensional local stress conditions on the sides of the fault near the tip. A segment of the fault, which ruptured the surface in 1995, bounded Cretaceous granite and latest Pliocene sediments in the trench. As a result, the stress inversion of the data from the mesoscale faults observed in the trench showed both the local stresses. The present WNW-ESE regional compression was found from the compressive side, but was not in the extensional side, probably because local extension surpassed the regional compression. Instead, the regional N-S compression of the Early Pleistocene was found from the extensional side. From this project, we got the lesson that fault-slip analysis reveals regional and local stresses, and that local stress sometimes masks regional one. This work was supported by a science project of "Drilling into Fault Damage Zone" (awarded to A. Lin) of the Secretariat of Nuclear Regulation Authority (Japan).

  13. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  14. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  15. Bounded Parikh Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Cadilhac

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Parikh finite word automaton model (PA was introduced and studied by Klaedtke and Ruess in 2003. Here, by means of related models, it is shown that the bounded languages recognized by PA are the same as those recognized by deterministic PA. Moreover, this class of languages is the class of bounded languages whose set of iterations is semilinear.

  16. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...

  17. Fault diagnosis in sparse multiprocessor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blough, Douglas M.; Sullivan, Gregory F.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of fault diagnosis in multiprocessor systems is considered under a uniformly probabilistic model in which processors are faulty with probability p. This work focuses on minimizing the number of tests that must be conducted in order to correctly diagnose the state of every processor in the system with high probability. A diagnosis algorithm that can correctly diagnose the state of every processor with probability approaching one in a class of systems performing slightly greater than a linear number of tests is presented. A nearly matching lower bound on the number of tests required to achieve correct diagnosis in arbitrary systems is also proven. The number of tests required under this probabilistic model is shown to be significantly less than under a bounded-size fault set model. Because the number of tests that must be conducted is a measure of the diagnosis overhead, these results represent a dramatic improvement in the performance of system-level diagnosis technique.

  18. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  19. Information Based Fault Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2008-01-01

    Fault detection and isolation, (FDI) of parametric faults in dynamic systems will be considered in this paper. An active fault diagnosis (AFD) approach is applied. The fault diagnosis will be investigated with respect to different information levels from the external inputs to the systems....... These inputs are disturbance inputs, reference inputs and auxilary inputs. The diagnosis of the system is derived by an evaluation of the signature from the inputs in the residual outputs. The changes of the signatures form the external inputs are used for detection and isolation of the parametric faults....

  20. Reactivation of normal faults as high-angle reverse faults due to low frictional strength: Experimental data from the Moonlight Fault Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Tesei, T.; Scott, J. M.; Collettini, C.

    2017-12-01

    Large normal faults are frequently reactivated as high-angle reverse faults during basin inversion. Elevated fluid pressure is commonly invoked to explain high-angle reverse slip. Analogue and numerical modeling have demonstrated that frictional weakening may also promote high-angle reverse slip, but there are currently no frictional strength measurements available for fault rocks collected from large high-angle reverse faults. To test the hypothesis that frictional weakening could facilitate high-angle reverse slip, we performed single- and double-direct friction experiments on fault rocks collected from the Moonlight Fault Zone in New Zealand, a basin-bounding normal fault zone that was reactivated as a high-angle reverse fault (present-day dip angle 60°-75°). The fault core is exposed in quartzofeldspathic schists exhumed from c. 4-8 km depth and contains a <20 m thick sequence of breccias, cataclasites and foliated cataclasites that are enriched in chlorite and muscovite. Friction experiments on water-saturated, intact samples of foliated cataclasite at room temperature and normal stresses up to 75 MPa yielded friction coefficients of 0.19<μ < 0.25. On the assumption of horizontal maximum compressive stress, reactivation analysis indicates that a friction coefficient of <0.25 will permit slip on high-angle reverse faults at hydrostatic (or even sub-hydrostatic) fluid pressures. Since foliated and phyllosilicate-rich fault rocks are common in large reactivated fault zones at basement depths, long-term frictional weakening is likely to act in concert with episodic build-ups of fluid pressure to promote high-angle reverse slip during basin inversion.

  1. Fault isolability conditions for linear systems with additive faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...... can occur simultaneously, whereas faults belonging to different fault sets appear disjoint in time. The proposed fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme consists of three steps. A fault detection (FD) step is followed by a fault set isolation (FSI) step. Here the fault set is isolated wherein...... the faults have occurred. The last step is a fault isolation (FI) of the faults occurring in a specific fault set, i.e. equivalent with the standard FI step....

  2. Ground-Truth On The CSUEB Campus: Results From Integrating Geophysical, Geological And Geospatial Methods And Fault Trench Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abimbola, A.; Strayer, L. M.; McEvilly, A.

    2015-12-01

    A major (>M6) earthquake on the Hayward fault would be catastrophic, resulting in wide-ranging structural damage and potential loss of life. California State University, East Bay (CSUEB), in Hayward lies within the Hayward fault zone and is home to student residents. The campus is bound to the west by the Hayward and on the east by Chabot (CF) fault and is pervasively cut by anastomosing secondary splay faults. In June 2015 three exploratory trenches were opened on CSUEB campus to evaluate faulting within the proposed construction area of new student housing. Previous work by Dibblee found minor faulting in this area that we consider to be splays of the CF. We took the opportunity to conduct an active seismic survey, coincident with two of these three trenches. The purpose of our survey was to compare the results of these two methods, to further assess seismic hazard on campus, and to contribute to the ongoing effort to create a 3D model of the campus area. P-waves were generated by plate and 3.5kg sledgehammer, recorded on a 48-channel single component array for P-wave tomography and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Line 1 was 141m long with 3m receiver spacing and 9m shot spacing, and Line 2 was 188m long with 4m receivers spacing and 12m spacing. Initial P-wave tomography models show two velocity structures. To a depth of 25m, velocities ranged from 750-3000 m/s. At depths below 25m, we recorded P-wave velocities up to 6500 m/s, flanked by lower velocities, suggesting a bedrock unit bound by tectonically sheared material. Trench results indicate that faults and shears are indeed present in the top 2m. Additional near-surface seismic surveys are planned for the fall of 2015 to extend the trace of these faults, as they appear to cut across the entire campus. Furthermore, additional analysis of current and future seismic surveys will provide data on strong ground motion and offer insight into seismic hazards on the CSUEB campus. These new data will be

  3. Connecting depth limits of interseismic locking, microseismicity, and large earthquakes in models of long-term fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junle; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-08-01

    Thickness of the seismogenic zone is commonly determined based on the depth of microseismicity or the fault locking depth inferred from geodetic observations. The relation between the two estimates and their connection to the depth limit of large earthquakes remain elusive. Here we explore the seismic and geodetic observables in models of faults governed by laboratory-based friction laws that combine quasi-static rate-and-state friction and enhanced dynamic weakening. Our models suggest that the transition between the locked and fully creeping regions can occur over a broad depth range. The effective locking depth, Delock, associated with concentrated loading and promoting microseismicity, is located at the top of this transition zone; the geodetic locking depth, Dglock, inverted from surface geodetic observations, corresponds to the depth of fault creeping with approximately half of the long-term rate. Following large earthquakes, Delock either stays unchanged or becomes shallower due to creep penetrating into the shallower locked areas, whereas Dglock deepens as the slip deficit region expands, compensating for the afterslip. As the result, the two locking depths diverge in the late interseismic period, consistent with available seismic and geodetic observations from several major fault segments in Southern California. We find that Dglock provides a bound on the depth limit of large earthquakes in our models. However, the assumed layered distribution of fault friction and simple depth estimates are insufficient to characterize more heterogeneous faults, e.g., ones with significant along-strike variations. Improved observations and models are needed to illuminate physical properties and seismic potential of fault zones.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of fault slip and distributed off-fault deformation, Santa Cruz Mountains, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, E. M.; Graymer, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains of central California record a lengthy history of deformation, including slip on the dextral San Andreas Fault (SAF) system and off-fault deformation manifested by both slip on secondary faults as well as distributed strain. This complex history provides insight into regional deformation processes operating both before and after initiation of the SAF. We focus here on deformation SW of the SAF, where several distinct, fault-bounded crustal blocks record different histories. We evaluate the magnitude and significance of off-fault deformation SW of the SAF by considering spatial and temporal relationships between slip on secondary faults and distributed deformation. To conduct the analysis we combine a synthesis of the slip histories of five important regional faults with a new dataset constraining spatial and temporal variation of regional deformation magnitude. This new dataset is based on shortening measurements of several major unconformities compiled from more than 60 cross sections from the region. To estimate strain magnitude recorded by older surfaces, we progressively subtract shortening magnitude of young markers from older markers. Because uncertainties grow for older surfaces, this method is most reliable for younger surfaces. Results of the analysis demonstrate that strain magnitude recorded by several unconformity-bound sedimentary packages of different ages is largest within about 5 km of the SAF, providing evidence of long-term deformation partitioning near this major structure. This pattern of distributed deformation partitioning near faults is also apparent but less pronounced near the secondary faults SW of the SAF. When considering spatial and temporal ties between regional deformation and slip on secondary faults, no simple pattern emerges. Fault activity is highly variable in both space and time. Additionally, fault activity at any one time is highly localized; one fault may be active while a nearby structure is inactive

  5. Caldera ring-fault intrusion through repeated sheet capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2014-12-01

    The subsurface structure of caldera-bounding ring faults remains a contentious issue, with geometries often inferred from numerical and analogue models as well as from geophysical studies. All of these inferred structures need to be compared with actual ring-faults so as to test the model implications. Here we present field observations of a deeply eroded and uniquely well exposed section of caldera ring fault in a Tertiary central volcano in south-western Iceland. The Hafnarfjall ring fault represents the outermost fault complex of an elliptical caldera with an original diameter of approximately 5 km. Vertical displacement is estimated to be > 200 m on the steeply inward-dipping ring fault. Several thin (software COMSOL, we offer a mechanical explanation for the deflection of inclined sheets into sub-vertical dikes at a mechanically stratified fault damage zone and core. A model is proposed whereby ring faults can act as a barrier for the propagation of inclined sheets away from a magma chamber within the caldera. Our findings provide an alternative mechanical explanation for magma channelling along caldera ring-faults, which is a process likely to be fundamental in controlling the location of post-caldera volcanism.

  6. Pore fluid chemistry of the North Anatolian Fault Zone in the Sea of Marmara: A diversity of sources and processes

    OpenAIRE

    Tryon, M. D.; Henry, P.; Cagatay, M. N.; Zitter, T. A. C.; Geli, Louis; Gasperini, L.; Burnard, P.; Bourlange, S.; Grall, Celine

    2010-01-01

    As part of the 2007 Marnaut cruise in the Sea of Marmara, an investigation of the pore fluid chemistry of sites along the Main Marmara Fault zone was conducted. The goal was to define the spatial relationship between active faults and fluid outlets and to determine the sources and evolution of the fluids. Sites included basin bounding transtensional faults and strike-slip faults cutting through the topographic highs. The basin pore fluids are dominated by simple mixing of bottom water with a ...

  7. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  8. Bounds in the generalized Weber problem under locational uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1981-01-01

    An existing analysis of the bounds on the Weber problem solution under uncertainty is incorrect. For the generalized problem with arbitrary measures of distance, we give easily computable ranges on the bounds and state the conditions under which the exact values of the bounds can be found...

  9. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  10. Diagnosis of three types of constant faults in read-once contact networks over finite bases

    KAUST Repository

    Busbait, Monther I.

    2016-03-24

    We study the depth of decision trees for diagnosis of three types of constant faults in read-once contact networks over finite bases containing only indecomposable networks. For each basis and each type of faults, we obtain a linear upper bound on the minimum depth of decision trees depending on the number of edges in networks. For bases containing networks with at most 10 edges, we find sharp coefficients for linear bounds.

  11. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  12. Geological analysis of paleozoic large-scale faulting in the south-central Pyrenees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, A.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed structural and sedimentological analysis reveals the existence of an east-west directed fundamental fault zone in the south-central Pyrenees, which has been intermittently active from (at least) the Devonian on. Emphasis is laid on the stUdy of fault-bounded post-Variscan

  13. GHGT-10 : Assessing the integrity of fault- and top seals at CO2 storage sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Heege J.H. ter; Wassing, B.

    2011-01-01

    Induced stress changes due to CO2 injection into geological reservoirs can mechanically damage bounding fault- and top seals creating preferential pathways for CO2 migration from the containment or trigger existing faults causing seismic activity at storage sites. In this paper we present

  14. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  15. Early seismogenic faults of the 2016 Accumoli-Amatrice seismic sequence (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicco, Jessica; Pierantoni, Pietro Paolo; Centamore, Ernesto; Costa, Mario

    2017-04-01

    The seismic sequence which caused numerous deaths and extensive damage in the area between Amatrice and Norcia (Central Apennine, Italy) started the 24th August, 2016 with a MW = 6.0 earthquake near Accumuli village and is ongoing. The earthquake area is strongly dissected by quaternary NW/NNW-SE/SSE (Apennine) and NE/NNE-SW/SSW (Antiapennine) fault systems. The Central Apennines main structure is the NNW-SSE Cittareale-Celano Fault System (CCFS); it extends from the Marsica Range to Cittareale-Norcia and further north; Pierantoni et al. (2015) identified it as an high-angle and NE-dipping, deeply rooted in the crust (> 15 km), shear zone. During the Pleistocene/Holocene it had extensional and left transtensive kinematic. The area of the 2016 seismic sequence is bounded on the W by a NE-dipping fault (CCFS Norcia branch) and on the E by the SW-dipping Mt Vettore (VF) and Mt. Gorzano (GF) fault system. Between these main fault systems other NW-SE striking, NE or SW-dipping, faults are present. The NW/NNW-SE/SSE fault systems are locally displaced by quaternary transversal (NE/ENE-SW/WSW) fault systems. The focal mechanism of the main shock and of the main aftershock (MW=5.4 near Norcia town, to N of Accumoli) are extensional with NNW-SSE/NW-SE axes and 45°/ 50° nodal plans. According to initial seismic assessment, macroseismic and INSAR/DPGS data many specialists felt from the first days after the main shock this seismic sequence was caused by activation of the NW-SE, SW-dipping VF and GF faults. Instead recent publications of Michele et al (2016) based on high precision seismological data showed clearly that the early sequence was caused at least by two opposing faults; one NE-dipping, deeply rooted (>15 km) is located at the western edge of Norcia depression; the other shallowest, SW-dipping, is placed on the Mt Vettore western slope. To try to detect which of the two faults was at the origin of this sequence were selected and taken into account the earthquakes

  16. Stable Bound States of Asymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Mark B.; Zhang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The simplest renormalizable effective field theories with asymmetric dark matter bound states contain two additional gauge singlet fields one being the dark matter and the other a mediator particle that the dark matter annihilates into. We examine the physics of one such model with a Dirac fermion as the dark matter and a real scalar mediator. For a range of parameters the Yukawa coupling of the dark matter to the mediator gives rise to stable asymmetric dark matter bound states. We derive pr...

  17. Constraining Basin Geometry and Fault Kinematics on the Santo Tomas Segment of the Agua Blanca Fault Through a Combined Geophysical and Structural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A.; Wetmore, P.; Fletcher, J.; Connor, C. B.; Callihan, S.; Beeson, J.; Wilson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Santo Tomas basin, located in northern Baja California, formed at a right step in the dextral Agua Blanca fault (ABF). The ABF extends for more than 120km east from Punta Banda, with an east-west strike, and represents the southernmost fault in the San Andreas system of faulting. The basin is located roughly 40km south of Ensenada where the Agua Blanca fault intersects the Maximos fault. A detailed geophysical analysis defines the basin geometry, and helps to constrain the distribution and offset of mapped and concealed faults. Geophysical and structural data sets are combined to constrain the kinematic evolution of the Santo Tomas basin, including determining the relative amount of dip-slip and strike-slip motion on basin-bounding faults. Gravity data was collected over seven transects across and along the axis of the basin at 500 meter intervals, with 200 meter intervals at locations of known or inferred faults. Magnetic data were taken over the same lines, and are used in conjunction with gravity data to constrain the locations, geometries and displacements of intrabasinal faults. The combined gravity and magnetic data are modeled using Geosoft Oasis montaj software to create 2 3/4D models along profiles across the study area. Modeling of the geophysical data combined with structural mapping indicates that the Santo Tomas basin is bound by two major strike-slip faults, the ABF on the northeastern side and the Maximos fault on south, Based on offset markers, most of the strike-slip motion appears to be concentrated on the ABF on the north side of the basin. The ABF fault is characterized by multiple subparallel fault strands that appear to coalesce into single strands to the northwest and southeast of the basin. The Maximos is characterized by a single strand throughout the basin and it exhibits a minor dip-slip component. Basin sediments thicken slightly against the Maximos fault to as much as 1km. A third fault, cutting across the basin southeast of the

  18. Secondary Normal Faulting Near the Terminus of a Strike-Slip Fault Segment in the Lake Mead Fault System, SE Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The 95 km long Lake Mead Fault System (LMFS), located about 50 km east of Las Vegas and about 100 km west of the relatively undeformed Colorado Plateau, consists of a group of NE/SW-trending Miocene left-lateral strike-slip faults with a total offset of 65-110 km. Previous work suggests that the LMFS acted as a transform zone to accommodate differential extension between the southern Basin and Range to the north and the metamorphic core complexes of the Colorado River extensional corridor to the south. Studies of individual faults of the LMFS have shown that strike-slip faulting was the dominant mode of deformation while normal faulting, pull-apart basins, and push up structures formed as localized secondary structures related to strike-slip faults. This study focuses on the portion of the LMFS west of the Overton Arm of Lake Mead, which consists of the Bitter Spring Valley Fault (BSVF) and the Hamblin Bay Fault (HBF). Both faults have estimated offsets of 20-60 km, but past mapping efforts have been inconsistent with respect to the BSVF trace locations and degree of fault complexity. In order to demonstrate that the apparent complexity of the BSVF is the result of segmentation and secondary normal faults associated with individual segments, we focused field mapping efforts on an apparent segment of the BSVF near Pinto Ridge, located southwest of the Echo Hills and about 5 km NW of the more prominent HBF. We have identified nine normal faults that initiate near the SW tip of a segment of the BSVF and die out to the south before reaching the HBF. The offset on all these faults is a maximum at their northern intersection with the BSVF, then steadily decreases to zero away from the BSVF. These normal faults range from 0.6 km-2.25 km in length and have variable fault trace patterns. The normal fault originating closest to the SW tip of the BSVF segment curves with increasing distance away towards parallelism with the BSVF. The eight other normal faults are all oriented

  19. Validation of EMP bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derr, W. [Derr Enterprises, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  20. Late Pleistocene dip-slip faulting along the Dunajec Fault, West Carpathians: Insights from alluvial sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Janusz

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents vertical movement along the Dunajec Fault during the Late Pleistocene and suggests Quaternary tectonic reactivation of diagonal strike-slip faults and their transformation into dip-slip faults in the West Carpathians. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of Pleistocene alluvial sediments of the Dunajec and the Ochotnica rivers was employed to determine the time range of deposition of these sediments. Vertical and spatial distribution of the obtained OSL ages imply that the alluvial sediments were affected by the Dunajec Fault, which appears to have acted as a scissor fault during the Late Pleistocene. The results contribute to the discussion on the recent evolution of the Carpathians, and may support the concept of extensional collapse of the orogen.

  1. Cenozoic extension along the reactivated Aurora Fault System in the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Maggi, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The East Antarctic Craton is characterized by major intracontinental basins and highlands buried under the 34 Ma East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their formation remains a major open question. Paleozoic to Cenozoic intraplate extensional tectonic activity has been proposed for their development and in this work the latter hypothesis is supported. Here we focus on the Aurora Trench (AT) within the Aurora Subglacial Basin (latitude 75°-77°S, longitude 117°-118°E) whose origin is still poorly constrained. The AT is an over 150-km-long, 25-km-wide subglacial trough, elongated in the NNW-SSE direction. Geophysical campaigns allowed better definition of the AT physiography showing typical half-graben geometry. The rounded morphology of the western flank of the AT was simulated through tectonic numerical modelling. We consider the subglacial landscape to primarily reflect the locally preserved relict morphology of the tectonic processes affecting the interior of East Antarctica in the Cenozoic. The bedrock morphology was replicated through the activity of the listric Aurora Trench Fault, characterized by a basal detachment at 34 km (considered the base of the crust according to available geophysical interpretations) and vertical displacements ranging between 700 and 300 m. The predicted displacement is interpreted as the (partial) reactivation of a weaker zone along a major Precambrian crustal-scale tectonic boundary. We propose that the Aurora Trench Fault is the southern continuation of the > 1000 km long Aurora Fault independently recognized by previous studies. Together they form the Aurora Fault System, a long lived tectonic boundary with poly-phased tectonic history within the EAC that bounds the eastern side of the Aurora Subglacial Basin. The younger Cenozoic reactivation of the investigated segment of the Aurora Fault System relates to the intraplate propagation of far-field stresses associated to the plate-scale kinematics in the Southern Ocean.

  2. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    a bounded tamper and leakage resilient CCA secure public key cryptosystem based on the DDH assumption. We first define a weaker CPA-like security notion that we can instantiate based on DDH, and then we give a general compiler that yields CCA-security with tamper and leakage resilience. This requires...... a public tamper-proof common reference string. Finally, we explain how to boost bounded tampering and leakage resilience (as in 1. and 2. above) to continuous tampering and leakage resilience, in the so-called floppy model where each user has a personal hardware token (containing leak- and tamper...

  3. Uncovering dynamic fault trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junges, Sebastian; Guck, Dennis; Katoen, Joost P.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    Fault tree analysis is a widespread industry standard for assessing system reliability. Standard (static) fault trees model the failure behaviour of systems in dependence of their component failures. To overcome their limited expressive power, common dependability patterns, such as spare management,

  4. Ground Motions Due to Earthquakes on Creeping Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Abrahamson, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the peak ground motions from the largest well-recorded earthquakes on creeping strike-slip faults in active-tectonic continental regions. Our goal is to evaluate if the strong ground motions from earthquakes on creeping faults are smaller than the strong ground motions from earthquakes on locked faults. Smaller ground motions might be expected from earthquakes on creeping faults if the fault sections that strongly radiate energy are surrounded by patches of fault that predominantly absorb energy. For our study we used the ground motion data available in the PEER NGA-West2 database, and the ground motion prediction equations that were developed from the PEER NGA-West2 dataset. We analyzed data for the eleven largest well-recorded creeping-fault earthquakes, that ranged in magnitude from M5.0-6.5. Our findings are that these earthquakes produced peak ground motions that are statistically indistinguishable from the peak ground motions produced by similar-magnitude earthquakes on locked faults. These findings may be implemented in earthquake hazard estimates for moderate-size earthquakes in creeping-fault regions. Further investigation is necessary to determine if this result will also apply to larger earthquakes on creeping faults. Please also see: Harris, R.A., and N.A. Abrahamson (2014), Strong ground motions generated by earthquakes on creeping faults, Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 41, doi:10.1002/2014GL060228.

  5. Fault Tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S.A.

    failures. It is often feasible to increase availability for these control loops by designing the control system to perform on-line detection and reconfiguration in case of faults before the safety system makes a close-down of the process. A general development methodology is given in the thesis......This thesis considered the development of fault tolerant control systems. The focus was on the category of automated processes that do not necessarily comprise a high number of identical sensors and actuators to maintain safe operation, but still have a potential for improving immunity to component...... that carried the control system designer through the steps necessary to consider fault handling in an early design phase. It was shown how an existing control loop with interface to the plant wide control system could be extended with three additional modules to obtain fault tolerance: Fault detection...

  6. Solar system fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  7. Fault Diagnosis for Actuators in a Class of Nonlinear Systems Based on an Adaptive Fault Detection Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runxia Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of actuators’ fault diagnosis is pursued for a class of nonlinear control systems that are affected by bounded measurement noise and external disturbances. A novel fault diagnosis algorithm has been proposed by combining the idea of adaptive control theory and the approach of fault detection observer. The asymptotical stability of the fault detection observer is guaranteed by setting the adaptive adjusting law of the unknown fault vector. A theoretically rigorous proof of asymptotical stability has been given. Under the condition that random measurement noise generated by the sensors of control systems and external disturbances exist simultaneously, the designed fault diagnosis algorithm is able to successfully give specific estimated values of state variables and failures rather than just giving a simple fault warning. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is very simple and concise and is easy to be applied to practical engineering. Numerical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the fault diagnosis algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed diagnostic strategy has a satisfactory estimation effect.

  8. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  9. Born Level Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  10. A Self-Stabilizing Hybrid Fault-Tolerant Synchronization Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a strategy for solving the Byzantine general problem for self-stabilizing a fully connected network from an arbitrary state and in the presence of any number of faults with various severities including any number of arbitrary (Byzantine) faulty nodes. The strategy consists of two parts: first, converting Byzantine faults into symmetric faults, and second, using a proven symmetric-fault tolerant algorithm to solve the general case of the problem. A protocol (algorithm) is also present that tolerates symmetric faults, provided that there are more good nodes than faulty ones. The solution applies to realizable systems, while allowing for differences in the network elements, provided that the number of arbitrary faults is not more than a third of the network size. The only constraint on the behavior of a node is that the interactions with other nodes are restricted to defined links and interfaces. The solution does not rely on assumptions about the initial state of the system and no central clock nor centrally generated signal, pulse, or message is used. Nodes are anonymous, i.e., they do not have unique identities. A mechanical verification of a proposed protocol is also present. A bounded model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV). The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the bounded model of the protocol as well as confirming claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period.

  11. Algorithms for Multiple Fault Diagnosis With Unreliable Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Mojdeh; Raghavan, Vijaya; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing optimal and near-optimal multiple fault diagnosis (MFD) in bipartite systems with unreliable (imperfect) tests. It is known that exact computation of conditional probabilities for multiple fault diagnosis is NP-hard. The novel feature of our diagnostic algorithms is the use of Lagrangian relaxation and subgradient optimization methods to provide: (1) near optimal solutions for the MFD problem, and (2) upper bounds for an optimal branch-and-bound algorithm. The proposed method is illustrated using several examples. Computational results indicate that: (1) our algorithm has superior computational performance to the existing algorithms (approximately three orders of magnitude improvement), (2) the near optimal algorithm generates the most likely candidates with a very high accuracy, and (3) our algorithm can find the most likely candidates in systems with as many as 1000 faults.

  12. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  13. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleis...

  14. Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferebee, C.D.; Tapp, J.B. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40 mi, with vertical displacement on the order of 10,000 ft. Samples collected from traverses across the Washita Valley fault have been analyzed. The traverses cross the fault at different stratigraphic levels from Proterozoic igneous basement, through the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Ordovician Simpson and Viola Groups, to the Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group. Several types of fracture systems are documented that reflect mechanical stratigraphy, burial depth during deformation, and episodic movement on the fault. The fractures in the study area include open fracture systems, calcite-filled fractures, tension gashes, and fractures related to pressure solution. The samples were cut parallel to the strike of the fault, vertical-normal to the fault, and horizontal-normal to the fault. These cuts allow examination of the total fracture strain, characterization of the fractures, and statistical analysis of fracture density. From these data, fracture density is shown to decrease exponentially moving away from the primary fault zone. The increased understanding of fracture patterns and characteristics will assist future exploration and development programs involving carbonate reservoirs associated with strike-slip systems.

  15. Fault Management Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  16. Fault-tolerant design

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This textbook serves as an introduction to fault-tolerance, intended for upper-division undergraduate students, graduate-level students and practicing engineers in need of an overview of the field.  Readers will develop skills in modeling and evaluating fault-tolerant architectures in terms of reliability, availability and safety.  They will gain a thorough understanding of fault tolerant computers, including both the theory of how to design and evaluate them and the practical knowledge of achieving fault-tolerance in electronic, communication and software systems.  Coverage includes fault-tolerance techniques through hardware, software, information and time redundancy.  The content is designed to be highly accessible, including numerous examples and exercises.  Solutions and powerpoint slides are available for instructors.   ·         Provides textbook coverage of the fundamental concepts of fault-tolerance; ·         Describes a variety of basic techniques for achieving fault-toleran...

  17. Fault tolerant control for uncertain systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2006-01-01

    A fault tolerant control (FTC) architecture based on active fault diagnosis (AFD) and the YJBK (Youla, Jarb, Bongiorno and Kucera)parameterization is applied in this paper. Based on the FTC architecture, fault tolerant control of uncertain systems with slowly varying parametric faults...

  18. The Evergreen basin and the role of the Silver Creek fault in the San Andreas fault system, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachens, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Graymer, Russell W.; Williams, Robert; Ponce, David A.; Mankinen, Edward A.; Stephenson, William J.; Langenheim, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The Evergreen basin is a 40-km-long, 8-km-wide Cenozoic sedimentary basin that lies mostly concealed beneath the northeastern margin of the Santa Clara Valley near the south end of San Francisco Bay (California, USA). The basin is bounded on the northeast by the strike-slip Hayward fault and an approximately parallel subsurface fault that is structurally overlain by a set of west-verging reverse-oblique faults which form the present-day southeastward extension of the Hayward fault. It is bounded on the southwest by the Silver Creek fault, a largely dormant or abandoned fault that splays from the active southern Calaveras fault. We propose that the Evergreen basin formed as a strike-slip pull-apart basin in the right step from the Silver Creek fault to the Hayward fault during a time when the Silver Creek fault served as a segment of the main route by which slip was transferred from the central California San Andreas fault to the Hayward and other East Bay faults. The dimensions and shape of the Evergreen basin, together with palinspastic reconstructions of geologic and geophysical features surrounding it, suggest that during its lifetime, the Silver Creek fault transferred a significant portion of the ∼100 km of total offset accommodated by the Hayward fault, and of the 175 km of total San Andreas system offset thought to have been accommodated by the entire East Bay fault system. As shown previously, at ca. 1.5–2.5 Ma the Hayward-Calaveras connection changed from a right-step, releasing regime to a left-step, restraining regime, with the consequent effective abandonment of the Silver Creek fault. This reorganization was, perhaps, preceded by development of the previously proposed basin-bisecting Mount Misery fault, a fault that directly linked the southern end of the Hayward fault with the southern Calaveras fault during extinction of pull-apart activity. Historic seismicity indicates that slip below a depth of 5 km is mostly transferred from the Calaveras

  19. Fault Analysis in Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Joye, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s researchers noticed that radioactive particles produced by elements naturally present in packaging material could cause bits to flip in sensitive areas of electronic chips. Research into the effect of cosmic rays on semiconductors, an area of particular interest in the aerospace industry, led to methods of hardening electronic devices designed for harsh environments. Ultimately various mechanisms for fault creation and propagation were discovered, and in particular it was noted that many cryptographic algorithms succumb to so-called fault attacks. Preventing fault attacks without

  20. Bound Exciton Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B. K.

    In the preceding chapter, we concentrated on the properties of free excitons. These free excitons may move through the sample and hit a trap, a nonradiative or a radiative recombination center. At low temperatures, the latter case gives rise to either deep center luminescence, mentioned in Sect. 7.1 and discussed in detail in Chap. 9, or to the luminescence of bound exciton complexes (BE or BEC). The chapter continues with the most prominent of these BECs, namely A-excitons bound to neutral donors. The next aspects are the more weakly BEs at ionized donors. The Sect. 7.4 treats the binding or localization energies of BEC from a theoretical point of view, while Sect. 7.5 is dedicated to excited states of BECs, which contain either holes from deeper valence bands or an envelope function with higher quantum numbers. The last section is devoted to donor-acceptor pair transitions. There is no section devoted specifically to excitons bound to neutral acceptors, because this topic is still partly controversially discussed. Instead, information on these A0X complexes is scattered over the whole chapter, however, with some special emphasis seen in Sects. 7.1, 7.4, and 7.5.

  1. How segmented is your fault? Deciphering fault relationships from low resolution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramham, Emma; Paton, Douglas; Wright, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Current understanding of the maximum displacement/length (Dmax/L) relationship of faults results from the consolidation of numerous published studies. Many of these studies attempt to constrain the power law exponent, n, where Dmax ∝ Ln, and provide rationale to the spread in results in the cumulative published data. Variations in n across studies are widely acknowledged as being due to differences in rock type, tectonic environment and limitations on fault size range and sample size, both of which can be affected by the acquisition resolution. The extent of the contribution of data resolution to the spread in Dmax/L results is not currently constrained. This study examines the effect of varying data resolution on the length-displacement relationship to determine this contribution. We have created a 0.5 m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Krafla fissure swarm, NE Iceland, using airborne LiDAR and measured the displacement/length profiles of 775 faults, with lengths ranging from 10s to 1000s of metres. The LiDAR data was additionally downsampled to create 10 m and 30 m resolution DEMs from which we measured the displacement/length profiles of 90 and 40 faults respectively. Additionally we selected three major fault systems, measured as single faults at 30 m resolution, measuring all the component faults observed at 10 m and 0.5 m resolution. We suggest that the variation in resolution can account for a substantial amount of the spread observed in the published dataset. Additionally we propose that it is possible to establish whether a measured fault is likely to be a single fault, without segmentation, regardless of the resolution it has been measured at, based on its location within the distribution of the published Dmax/L dataset.

  2. Fault Diagnosis of an Advanced Wind Turbine Benchmark using Interval-based ARRs and Observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa; Puig, Vicenc

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based fault diagnosis (FD) approach for wind turbines and its application to a realistic wind turbine FD benchmark. The proposed FD approach combines the use of analytical redundancy relations (ARRs) and interval observers. Interval observers consider an unknown...... but bounded description of the model parametric uncertainty and noise using the the so-called set-membership approach. This approach leads to formulate the fault detection test by means of checking if the measurements fall inside the estimated output interval, obtained from the mathematical model of the wind...... turbine and noise/parameter uncertainty bounds. Fault isolation is based on considering a set of ARRs obtained from the structural analysis of the wind turbine model and a fault signature matrix that considers the relation of ARRs and faults. The proposed FD approach has been validated on a 5-MW wind...

  3. The timing of fault motion in Death Valley from Illite Age Analysis of fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, E. A.; Haines, S. H.; Van der Pluijm, B.

    2014-12-01

    We constrained the timing of fluid circulation and associated fault motion in the Death Valley region of the US Basin and Range Province from Illite Age Analysis (IAA) of fault gouge at seven Low-Angle Normal Fault (LANF) exposures in the Black Mountains and Panamint Mountains, and in two nearby areas. 40Ar/39Ar ages of neoformed, illitic clay minerals in these fault zones range from 2.8 Ma to 18.6 Ma, preserving asynchronous fault motion across the region that corresponds to an evolving history of crustal block movements during Neogene extensional deformation. From north to south, along the western side of the Panamint Range, the Mosaic Canyon fault yields an authigenic illite age of 16.9±2.9 Ma, the Emigrant fault has ages of less than 10-12 Ma at Tucki Mountain and Wildrose Canyon, and an age of 3.6±0.17 Ma was obtained for the Panamint Front Range LANF at South Park Canyon. Across Death Valley, along the western side of the Black Mountains, Ar ages of clay minerals are 3.2±3.9 Ma, 12.2±0.13 Ma and 2.8±0.45 Ma for the Amargosa Detachment, the Gregory Peak Fault and the Mormon Point Turtleback detachment, respectively. Complementary analysis of the δH composition of neoformed clays shows a primarily meteoric source for the mineralizing fluids in these LANF zones. The ages fall into two geologic timespans, reflecting activity pulses in the Middle Miocene and in the Upper Pliocene. Activity on both of the range front LANFs does not appear to be localized on any single portion of these fault systems. Middle Miocene fault rock ages of neoformed clays were also obtained in the Ruby Mountains (10.5±1.2 Ma) to the north of the Death Valley region and to the south in the Whipple Mountains (14.3±0.19 Ma). The presence of similar, bracketed times of activity indicate that LANFs in the Death Valley region were tectonically linked, while isotopic signatures indicate that faulting pulses involved surface fluid penetration.

  4. Distributing Earthquakes Among California's Faults: A Binary Integer Programming Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.; Parsons, T.

    2016-12-01

    Statement of the problem is simple: given regional seismicity specified by a Gutenber-Richter (G-R) relation, how are earthquakes distributed to match observed fault-slip rates? The objective is to determine the magnitude-frequency relation on individual faults. The California statewide G-R b-value and a-value are estimated from historical seismicity, with the a-value accounting for off-fault seismicity. UCERF3 consensus slip rates are used, based on geologic and geodetic data and include estimates of coupling coefficients. The binary integer programming (BIP) problem is set up such that each earthquake from a synthetic catalog spanning millennia can occur at any location along any fault. The decision vector, therefore, consists of binary variables, with values equal to one indicating the location of each earthquake that results in an optimal match of slip rates, in an L1-norm sense. Rupture area and slip associated with each earthquake are determined from a magnitude-area scaling relation. Uncertainty bounds on the UCERF3 slip rates provide explicit minimum and maximum constraints to the BIP model, with the former more important to feasibility of the problem. There is a maximum magnitude limit associated with each fault, based on fault length, providing an implicit constraint. Solution of integer programming problems with a large number of variables (>105 in this study) has been possible only since the late 1990s. In addition to the classic branch-and-bound technique used for these problems, several other algorithms have been recently developed, including pre-solving, sifting, cutting planes, heuristics, and parallelization. An optimal solution is obtained using a state-of-the-art BIP solver for M≥6 earthquakes and California's faults with slip-rates > 1 mm/yr. Preliminary results indicate a surprising diversity of on-fault magnitude-frequency relations throughout the state.

  5. Relationship between displacement and gravity change of Uemachi faults and surrounding faults of Osaka basin, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Kusumoto, S.; Itoh, Y.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Osaka basin surrounded by the Rokko and Ikoma Ranges is one of the typical Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan. The Osaka basin has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The Uemachi faults have been investigated for countermeasures against earthquake disaster. It is important to reveal the detailed fault parameters, such as length, dip and recurrence interval, so on for strong ground motion simulation and disaster prevention. For strong ground motion simulation, the fault model of the Uemachi faults consist of the two parts, the north and south parts, because of the no basement displacement in the central part of the faults. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started the project to survey of the Uemachi faults. The Disaster Prevention Institute of Kyoto University is carried out various surveys from 2009 to 2012 for 3 years. The result of the last year revealed the higher fault activity of the branch fault than main faults in the central part (see poster of "Subsurface Flexure of Uemachi Fault, Japan" by Kitada et al., in this meeting). Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the similar basement relief without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. We performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. The dislocation and gravity change were calculated based on the Okada et al. (1985) and Okubo et al. (1993) respectively. The results show the similar basement displacement pattern to the

  6. Quaternary Fault Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains locations and information on faults and associated folds in the United States that are believed to be sources of M>6 earthquakes during the...

  7. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  8. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved.

  9. Multi-link faults localization and restoration based on fuzzy fault set for dynamic optical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Xin; Li, Huadong; Wang, Xinbo; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Shanguo

    2013-01-28

    Based on a distributed method of bit-error-rate (BER) monitoring, a novel multi-link faults restoration algorithm is proposed for dynamic optical networks. The concept of fuzzy fault set (FFS) is first introduced for multi-link faults localization, which includes all possible optical equipment or fiber links with a membership describing the possibility of faults. Such a set is characterized by a membership function which assigns each object a grade of membership ranging from zero to one. OSPF protocol extension is designed for the BER information flooding in the network. The BER information can be correlated to link faults through FFS. Based on the BER information and FFS, multi-link faults localization mechanism and restoration algorithm are implemented and experimentally demonstrated on a GMPLS enabled optical network testbed with 40 wavelengths in each fiber link. Experimental results show that the novel localization mechanism has better performance compared with the extended limited perimeter vector matching (LVM) protocol and the restoration algorithm can improve the restoration success rate under multi-link faults scenario.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Western Eger rift: a tale of two faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, Jan; Kley, Jonas; Fischer, Tomáš; Štěpančíková, Petra

    2017-04-01

    The Eger Rift and Cheb basin in northwestern Bohemia are part of the European Cenozoic Rift System. They are associated with earthquake swarms, voluminous CO2 outgassing and Quaternary mantle-derived volcanism. The Eger Graben, of which the Cheb basin is traditionally considered a subbasin, contains a Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary record no thicker than 500 m. The structure of the extensional system is dominated by two large faults: (1) the ENE-striking Krušné Hory Fault (KHF), which delimits the northwestern shoulder of the Eger rift and has accommodated tilting and uplift of the Erzgebirge, creating a present day elevation difference of 700 m; (2) the NNW-striking Mariánské Lázně Fault (MLF), which is the master fault of the Cheb basin. First-order structural relationships indicate that the MLF has cross-cut the Eger rift at right angle and offset it with dominantly normal sense of motion. These relationships suggest that activity on the MLF was accentuated late in the history of the rift, around early Pliocene time, reflecting a fundamental change of the governing stress field. We aim to constrain, in conjunction with a Czech companion project focussing on tectonic geomorphology and seismology, the tectonic evolution of the two basins, and in particular the kinematics and timing of the Krušné Hory (Erzgebirge) and Mariánské Lázně bounding faults over Late Cenozoic time. This will be done by modelling the subsidence of the basins from stratigraphic and structural data. Rift shoulder uplift, exhumation and fault offsets will be constrained by low-T thermochronology, especially (U-Th)/He on apatite (AHe). 2D cross-sections and restorable structural 3D models will delimit the range of possible fault geometries and constrain the magnitude of fault displacements, their gradients and the deep architecture of the large faults. The Cheb basin forms an approximate semi-ellipse in map view, suggesting it is a half-graben bounded by a listric, WSW-dipping MLF

  11. Simulation of secondary fault shear displacements - method and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fälth, Billy; Hökmark, Harald; Lund, Björn; Mai, P. Martin; Munier, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    We present an earthquake simulation method to calculate dynamically and statically induced shear displacements on faults near a large earthquake. Our results are aimed at improved safety assessment of underground waste storage facilities, e.g. a nuclear waste repository. For our simulations, we use the distinct element code 3DEC. We benchmark 3DEC by running an earthquake simulation and then compare the displacement waveforms at a number of surface receivers with the corresponding results obtained from the COMPSYN code package. The benchmark test shows a good agreement in terms of both phase and amplitude. In our application to a potential earthquake near a storage facility, we use a model with a pre-defined earthquake fault plane (primary fault) surrounded by numerous smaller discontinuities (target fractures) representing faults in which shear movements may be induced by the earthquake. The primary fault and the target fractures are embedded in an elastic medium. Initial stresses are applied and the fault rupture mechanism is simulated through a programmed reduction of the primary fault shear strength, which is initiated at a pre-defined hypocenter. The rupture is propagated at a typical rupture propagation speed and arrested when it reaches the fault plane boundaries. The primary fault residual strength properties are uniform over the fault plane. The method allows for calculation of target fracture shear movements induced by static stress redistribution as well as by dynamic effects. We apply the earthquake simulation method in a model of the Forsmark nuclear waste repository site in Sweden with rock mass properties, in situ stresses and fault geometries according to the description of the site established by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). The target fracture orientations are based on the Discrete Fracture Network model developed for the site. With parameter values set to provide reasonable upper bound estimates of target fracture

  12. Assessing the fugitive emission of CH4 via migration along fault zones - Comparing potential shale gas basins to non-shale basins in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, I M; Almond, S; Worrall, F; Davies, R J

    2017-02-15

    This study considered whether faults bounding hydrocarbon-bearing basins could be conduits for methane release to the atmosphere. Five basin bounding faults in the UK were considered: two which bounded potential shale gas basins; two faults that bounded coal basins; and one that bounded a basin with no known hydrocarbon deposits. In each basin, two mobile methane surveys were conducted, one along the surface expression of the basin bounding fault and one along a line of similar length but not intersecting the fault. All survey data was corrected for wind direction, the ambient CH4 concentration and the distance to the possible source. The survey design allowed for Analysis of Variance and this showed that there was a significant difference between the fault and control survey lines though a significant flux from the fault was not found in all basins and there was no apparent link to the presence, or absence, of hydrocarbons. As such, shale basins did not have a significantly different CH4 flux to non-shale hydrocarbon basins and non-hydrocarbon basins. These results could have implications for CH4 emissions from faults both in the UK and globally. Including all the corrected fault data, we estimate faults have an emissions factor of 11.5±6.3tCH4/km/yr, while the most conservative estimate of the flux from faults is 0.7±0.3tCH4/km/yr. The use of isotopes meant that at least one site of thermogenic flux from a fault could be identified. However, the total length of faults that penetrate through-basins and go from the surface to hydrocarbon reservoirs at depth in the UK is not known; as such, the emissions factor could not be multiplied by an activity level to estimate a total UK CH4 flux. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dromions bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, Attilio

    2003-03-01

    The asymptotic perturbation (AP) method is applied to the study of the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in 3+1 dimensions with harmonic potential and external periodic excitation supposed to be in primary resonance with the frequency of a generic mode. The AP method uses two different procedures for the solutions: introducing an asymptotic temporal rescaling and balancing of the harmonic terms with a simple iteration. Standard quantum mechanics can be used to derive the lowest order approximate solution and amplitude and phase modulation equations are obtained. External force-response and frequency-response curves are found and the existence of dromions trapped in bound states is demonstrated.

  14. Numerical reconstruction of Late-Cenosoic evolution of normal-fault scarps in Baikal Rift Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzov, Leonid; San'kov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Numerical landscape development modeling has recently become a popular tool in geo-logic and geomorphic investigations. We employed this technique to reconstruct Late-Cenosoic evolution of Baikal Rift Zone mountains. The objects of research were Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland. These structures are formed under conditions of crustal extension and bounded by active normal faults. In our experiments we used instruments, engineered by Greg Tucker (University of Colo-rado) - CHILD (Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development) and 'Bedrock Fault Scarp'. First program allowed constructing the complex landscape model considering tectonic uplift, fluvial and hillslope processes; second program is used for more accurate simulating of triangular facet evolution. In general, our experiments consisted in testing of tectonic parameters, and climatic char-acteristic, erosion and diffusion properties, hydraulic geometry were practically constant except for some special runs. Numerous experiments, with various scenarios of development, showed that Barguzin range and Svyatoy Nos Upland has many common features. These structures characterized by internal differentiation, which appear in height and shape of slopes. At the same time, individual segments of these objects are very similar - this conclusion refers to most developing parts, with pronounced facets and V-shaped valleys. Accordingly modelling, these landscapes are in a steady state and are undergoing a uplift with rate 0,4 mm/yr since Early Pliocene (this solution accords with AFT-dating). Lower segments of Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland also have some general fea-tures, but the reasons of such similarity probably are different. In particular, southern segment of Svyatoy Nos Upland, which characterized by relative high slope with very weak incision, may be formed as result very rapid fault movement or catastrophic landslide. On the other hand, a lower segment of Barguzin Range (Ulun segment, for example

  15. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  16. Late Quaternary Surface Rupture and Associated Transpressive Uplift on a Section of the State Line Fault in the south-central Amargosa Desert Basin, Southwestern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, C. M.; Fridrich, C.; Blakely, R. J.; Thompson, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    New geomorphic, geophysical, and structural data indicate that a section of the Pahrump-Stewart Valley (State Line) fault on the northern piedmont of the Resting Spring Range is associated with late Quaternary surface rupture and related transpressive domal uplift. Detailed aeromagnetic and gravity data clearly image this northwest-trending strike-slip fault in the subsurface as a continuous multi-strand fault system that continues >35 km further northwest into the south-central Amargosa Desert basin than previously established. This continuation of the fault consists of a sigmoidal bend characterized by a constraining bend on the north flank of the Resting Spring Range, paired with a releasing bend on the north flank of the southeastern Funeral Mountains. Bedrock mapping in the Amargosa Desert indicates a cumulative late Cenozoic right-lateral displacement of ˜15 km across the entire fault zone. In the Resting Spring area, the major central strand of the State Line fault zone is inactive but offsets playa facies of the Artists Drive Formation (equivalent), internally folded into a giant southeast-plunging chevron syncline, against fluvial and playa margin facies of the same formation that are folded into a broad northwest-plunging anticline. These deformed Tertiary strata are exposed in the core of a large (10 x 18 km) domal Quaternary uplift, centered on the northern piedmont of the range, that coincides with a major transpressive left-step in the adjoining active trace of the fault zone. The domal uplift is indicated by persistent incision into Tertiary bedrock (1-5+ m deep) beneath stepped sequences of straths capped by thin and locally warped mid-Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial-gravel veneers. Quaternary activity on the fault zone in this area is now focused on a strand along the northern and eastern border of the uplifted area marked by a discontinuous, 8-10 km long series of aligned, en-echelon, or anastomosing fault scarps that commonly bound linear

  17. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  18. Active faults and related Late Quaternary deformation along the Northwestern Himalayan Frontal Zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nakata

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous newly-identified traces of active faults in the Himalayan foothill zone along the HFF around Chandigarh, in Pinjore Dun, along the piedmont zone of the Lower Siwalik hill front and within the Lower Tertiary hill range reveal the pattern of thrust and strike-slip faulting, striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNW-SSE of the orogenic belt. The active Chandigarh Fault, Pinjore Garden Fault and Barsar thrust have vertically dislocated, warped and backtilted fluvial and alluvial-fan surfaces made up of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments. West- and southwest-facing fault scarplets with heights ranging from 12 to 50 m along these faults suggest continued tectonic movement through Late Pleistocene to recent times. Gentle warping and backtilting of the terraces on the hanging wall sides of the faults indicate fault-bend folding. These active faults are the manifestation of north-dipping imbricated thrust faults branching out from the major fault systems like the Main Boundary Fault (MBF and Himalayan Frontal Fault (HFF, probably merging down northward into a décollement. The Taksal Fault, striking NNW-SSE, shows prominent right-lateral movement marked by lateral offset of streams and younger Quaternary terraces and occupies a narrow deep linear valley along the fault trace. Right stepping along this fault has resulted in formation of a small pull-apart basin. Fault scarplets facing ENE and WSW are the manifestation of dip-slip movement. This fault is an example of slip-partitioning between the strike-slip and thrust faults, suggesting ongoing oblique convergence of the Indian plate and northward migration of a tectonic sliver. Slip rate along the Taksal Fault has been calculated as 2.8 mm/yr. Preliminary trench investigation at the base of the Chandigarh Fault Scarp has revealed total displacement of 3.5 m along a low angle thrust fault with variable dip of 20° to 46° due northeast, possibly the result of one

  19. Active Fault Isolation in MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    isolation is based directly on the input/output s ignals applied for the fault detection. It is guaranteed that the fault group includes the fault that had occurred in the system. The second step is individual fault isolation in the fault group . Both types of isolation are obtained by applying dedicated......Active fault isolation of parametric faults in closed-loop MIMO system s are considered in this paper. The fault isolation consists of two steps. T he first step is group- wise fault isolation. Here, a group of faults is isolated from other pos sible faults in the system. The group-wise fault...

  20. Inferring earthquake mechanics from exhumed faults (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Toro, G.; Griffith, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Bistacchi, A.; Mittempergher, S.

    2009-12-01

    Destructive earthquakes nucleate at 7-15 km depth; therefore monitoring active faults at the Earth's surface or interpretation of seismic waves yields limited information regarding earthquake mechanics. A complementary approach involves the integration of field studies of fossil seismic sources now exhumed at the Earth's surface with laboratory friction experiments that reproduce deformation conditions typical of seismic slip. Microstructural and geochemical comparison of the natural and experimental fault rock materials can be used to constrain boundary conditions for theoretical earthquake models. Here we will discuss the preliminary results of a project that takes such an integrated approach. In particular, rock friction experiments, including experiments in a cutting-edge high-velocity-rock-friction apparatus recently installed in Italy, suggest coseismic fault lubrication at seismogenic depths for a variety of host lithologies and tectonic settings. This result is consistent with estimates from field observations and theoretical analysis of rock friction at seismic slip rates. Moreover, experimental and natural fault products have strikingly similar microstructural and geochemical features, suggesting that experiments reproduce natural deformation processes. High velocity friction experiments were performed on smooth surfaces and under low normal stress, so direct extrapolation to seismogenic depths should be performed with caution. For instance, the presence of bumps along natural faults might impede the smooth sliding observed in the experiments. To resolve this scaling issue we measured the fault surface roughness of natural seismogenic faults exposed in large glacially polished outcrops over a range of scales (from 102 to 10-5 m) using (1) terrestrial laser-scanning (LIDAR), (2) orthorectified mosaics of high-resolution digital photographs and, (3) scans of thin sections from cores of the slipping zones. LIDAR scans and photomosaics were georeferenced in 3

  1. Faults in Linux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palix, Nicolas Jean-Michel; Thomas, Gaël; Saha, Suman

    2011-01-01

    a major problem? To answer these questions, we have transported the experiments of Chou et al. to Linux versions 2.6.0 to 2.6.33, released between late 2003 and early 2010. We find that Linux has more than doubled in size during this period, but that the number of faults per line of code has been......In 2001, Chou et al. published a study of faults found by applying a static analyzer to Linux versions 1.0 through 2.4.1. A major result of their work was that the drivers directory contained up to 7 times more of certain kinds of faults than other directories. This result inspired a number...... decreasing. And, even though drivers still accounts for a large part of the kernel code and contains the most faults, its fault rate is now below that of other directories, such as arch (HAL) and fs (file systems). These results can guide further development and research efforts. To enable others...

  2. G-frames with bounded linear operators

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xiang-chun; Zhu, Yu-can; Shu, Zhi-biao; Ding, Ming-ling

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the more general g-frame which is called a $K$-g-frame by combining a g-frame with a bounded linear operator $K$ in a Hilbert space. We give several equivalent characterizations for $K$-g-frames and discuss the stability of perturbation for $K$-g-frames. We also investigate the relationship between a $K$-g-frame and the range of the bounded linear operator $K$. In the end, we give two sufficient conditions for the remainder of a $K$-g-frame after an erasure to stil...

  3. Fault Detection for Industrial Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fault-relevant KPCA algorithm is proposed. Then the fault detection approach is proposed based on the fault-relevant KPCA algorithm. The proposed method further decomposes both the KPCA principal space and residual space into two subspaces. Compared with traditional statistical techniques, the fault subspace is separated based on the fault-relevant influence. This method can find fault-relevant principal directions and principal components of systematic subspace and residual subspace for process monitoring. The proposed monitoring approach is applied to Tennessee Eastman process and penicillin fermentation process. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. What is Fault Tolerant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Frei, C. W.; Kraus, K.

    2000-01-01

    availability and reduce the risk of safety hazards. Its aim is to prevent that simple faults develop into serious failure. Fault-tolerant control merges several disciplines to achieve this goal, including on-line fault diagnosis, automatic condition assessment and calculation of remedial actions when a fault......Faults in automated processes will often cause undesired reactions and shut-down of a controlled plant, and the consequences could be damage to the plant, to personnel or the environment. Fault-tolerant control is the synonym for a set of recent techniques that were developed to increase plant...

  5. Crustal structure of norther Oaxaca terrane; The Oaxaca and caltepec faults, and the Tehuacan Valley. A gravity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Ramón, V. M.; Belmonte, S.

    2014-12-01

    Northern Oaxaca terrane, southern Mexico, is bound by the Caltepec and Oaxaca faults to the west and east, respectively. These faults juxtapose the Oaxaca terrane against the Mixteca and Juarez terranes, respectively. The Oaxaca Fault also forms the eastern boundary of the Cenozoic Tehuacan depression. Several gravity profiles across these faults and the Oaxaca terrane (including the Tehuacan Valley) enables us to establish the upper crustal structure of this region. Accordingly, the Oaxaca terrane is downward displaced to the east in two steps. First the Santa Lucia Fault puts into contact the granulitic basamental rocks with Phanerozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Finally, the Gavilan Fault puts into contact the Oaxaca terrane basement (Oaxaca Complex) into contact with the volcano-sedimentary infill of the valley. This gravity study reveals that the Oaxaca Fault system gives rise to a series of east tilted basamental blocks (Oaxaca Complex?). A structural high at the western Tehuacan depression accomadates the east dipping faults (Santa Lucia and Gavilan faults) and the west dipping faults of the Oaxaca Fault System. To the west of this high structural we have the depper depocenters. The Oaxaca Complex, the Caltepec and Santa Lucia faults continue northwestwards beneath Phanerozoic rocks. The faults are regional tectonic structures. They seem to continue northwards below the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A major E-W to NE-SW discontinuity on the Oaxaca terrane is inferred to exist between profiles 1 and 2. The Tehuacan Valley posses a large groundwater potential.

  6. The Quaternary Silver Creek Fault Beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Williams, Robert A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Graymer, Russell W.; Stephenson, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The northwest-trending Silver Creek Fault is a 40-km-long strike-slip fault in the eastern Santa Clara Valley, California, that has exhibited different behaviors within a changing San Andreas Fault system over the past 10-15 Ma. Quaternary alluvium several hundred meters thick that buries the northern half of the Silver Creek Fault, and that has been sampled by drilling and imaged in a detailed seismic reflection profile, provides a record of the Quaternary history of the fault. We assemble evidence from areal geology, stratigraphy, paleomagnetics, ground-water hydrology, potential-field geophysics, and reflection and earthquake seismology to determine the long history of the fault in order to evaluate its current behavior. The fault formed in the Miocene more than 100 km to the southeast, as the southwestern fault in a 5-km-wide right step to the Hayward Fault, within which the 40-km-long Evergreen pull-apart basin formed. Later, this basin was obliquely cut by the newly recognized Mt. Misery Fault to form a more direct connection to the Hayward Fault, although continued growth of the basin was sufficient to accommodate at least some late Pliocene alluvium. Large offset along the San Andreas-Calaveras-Mt Misery-Hayward Faults carried the basin northwestward almost to its present position when, about 2 Ma, the fault system was reorganized. This led to near abandonment of the faults bounding the pull-apart basin in favor of right slip extending the Calaveras Fault farther north before stepping west to the Hayward Fault, as it does today. Despite these changes, the Silver Creek Fault experienced a further 200 m of dip slip in the early Quaternary, from which we infer an associated 1.6 km or so of right slip, based on the ratio of the 40-km length of the strike-slip fault to a 5-km depth of the Evergreen Basin. This dip slip ends at a mid-Quaternary unconformity, above which the upper 300 m of alluvial cover exhibits a structural sag at the fault that we interpret as

  7. Refining Multivariate Value Set Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luke Alexander

    Over finite fields, if the image of a polynomial map is not the entire field, then its cardinality can be bounded above by a significantly smaller value. Earlier results bound the cardinality of the value set using the degree of the polynomial, but more recent results make use of the powers of all monomials. In this paper, we explore the geometric properties of the Newton polytope and show how they allow for tighter upper bounds on the cardinality of the multivariate value set. We then explore a method which allows for even stronger upper bounds, regardless of whether one uses the multivariate degree or the Newton polytope to bound the value set. Effectively, this provides an alternate proof of Kosters' degree bound, an improved Newton polytope-based bound, and an improvement of a degree matrix-based result given by Zan and Cao.

  8. Equivalence principle and bound kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger; Wiringa, R B

    2013-10-11

    We consider the role of the internal kinetic energy of bound systems of matter in tests of the Einstein equivalence principle. Using the gravitational sector of the standard model extension, we show that stringent limits on equivalence principle violations in antimatter can be indirectly obtained from tests using bound systems of normal matter. We estimate the bound kinetic energy of nucleons in a range of light atomic species using Green's function Monte Carlo calculations, and for heavier species using a Woods-Saxon model. We survey the sensitivities of existing and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle, and report new constraints at the level of between a few parts in 10(6) and parts in 10(8) on violations of the equivalence principle for matter and antimatter.

  9. Wind turbine fault detection and fault tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Johnson, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    In this updated edition of a previous wind turbine fault detection and fault tolerant control challenge, we present a more sophisticated wind turbine model and updated fault scenarios to enhance the realism of the challenge and therefore the value of the solutions. This paper describes...... the challenge model and the requirements for challenge participants. In addition, it motivates many of the faults by citing publications that give field data from wind turbine control tests....

  10. Constraining fault growth rates and fault evolution in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarche, G.; Bull, J. M.; Barnes, P.M.; Taylor, S.K.; Horgan, H.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how faults propagate, grow and interact in fault systems is important because they are primarily responsible for the distribution of strain in the upper crust. They localise deformation and stress release, often producing surface displacements that control sedimentation and fluid flow either by acting as conduits or barriers. Identifying fault spatial distribution, quantifying activity, evaluating linkage mechanism, and estimating fault growth rates are key components in seismic...

  11. A proposed test area for the spaceborne geodynamic ranging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Precise geodetic measurements are proposed in which an orbiting laser obtains intersite distance between retroreflectors 25 to 100 km apart on the ground. The recommended area is a rectangle 200 by 400 km in southern California and adjacent Nevada, trending northeast. It includes the entire width of the San Andreas fault zone, the Garlock fault, the thrust faults of the Transverse Ranges, and the active strike-slip faults of the Mojave Desert.

  12. Synthetic seismicity for the San Andreas fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Ward

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Because historical catalogs generally span only a few repetition intervals of major earthquakes, they do not provide much constraint on how regularly earthquakes recur. In order to obtain better recurrence statistics and long-term probability estimates for events M ? 6 on the San Andreas fault, we apply a seismicity model to this fault. The model is based on the concept of fault segmentation and the physics of static dislocations which allow for stress transfer between segments. Constraints are provided by geological and seismological observations of segment lengths, characteristic magnitudes and long-term slip rates. Segment parameters slightly modified from the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities allow us to reproduce observed seismicity over four orders of magnitude. The model yields quite irregular earthquake recurrence patterns. Only the largest events (M ? 7.5 are quasi-periodic; small events cluster. Both the average recurrence time and the aperiodicity are also a function of position along the fault. The model results are consistent with paleoseismic data for the San Andreas fault as well as a global set of historical and paleoseismic recurrence data. Thus irregular earthquake recurrence resulting from segment interaction is consistent with a large range of observations.

  13. Computer hardware fault administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  14. Fault Tolerant Computer Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Sorin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    For many years, most computer architects have pursued one primary goal: performance. Architects have translated the ever-increasing abundance of ever-faster transistors provided by Moore's law into remarkable increases in performance. Recently, however, the bounty provided by Moore's law has been accompanied by several challenges that have arisen as devices have become smaller, including a decrease in dependability due to physical faults. In this book, we focus on the dependability challenge and the fault tolerance solutions that architects are developing to overcome it. The two main purposes

  15. Universal bounds in even-spin CFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, Joshua D. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University,Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    We prove using invariance under the modular S− and ST−transformations that every unitary two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) having only even-spin primary operators (with no extended chiral algebra and with right- and left-central charges c,c̃>1) contains a primary operator with dimension Δ{sub 1} satisfying 0<Δ{sub 1}<((c+c̃)/24)+0.09280…. After deriving both analytical and numerical bounds, we discuss how to extend our methods to bound higher conformal dimensions before deriving lower and upper bounds on the number of primary operators in a given energy range. Using the AdS{sub 3}/CFT{sub 2} dictionary, the bound on Δ{sub 1} proves the lightest massive excitation in appropriate theories of 3D matter and gravity with cosmological constant Λ<0 can be no heavier than 1/8G{sub N}+O(√(−Λ)); the bounds on the number of operators are related via AdS/CFT to the entropy of states in the dual gravitational theory. In the flat-space approximation, the limiting mass is exactly that of the lightest BTZ black hole.

  16. Active fault systems of the Kivu rift and Virunga volcanic province, and implications for geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zal, H. J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Wood, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; d'Oreye, N.; Carn, S. A.; Rutagarama, U.

    2013-12-01

    H Zal, C Ebinger, D. Wood, C. Scholz, N. d'Oreye, S. Carn, U. Rutagarama The weakly magmatic Western rift system, East Africa, is marked by fault-bounded basins filled by freshwater lakes that record tectonic and climatic signals. One of the smallest of the African Great Lakes, Lake Kivu, represents a unique geohazard owing to the warm, saline bottom waters that are saturated in methane, as well as two of the most active volcanoes in Africa that effectively dam the northern end of the lake. Yet, the dynamics of the basin system and the role of magmatism were only loosely constrained prior to new field and laboratory studies in Rwanda. In this work, we curated, merged, and analyzed historical and digital data sets, including spectral analyses of merged Shuttle Radar Topography Mission topography and high resolution CHIRP bathymetry calibrated by previously mapped fault locations along the margins and beneath the lake. We quantitatively compare these fault maps with the time-space distribution of earthquakes located using data from a temporary array along the northern sector of Lake Kivu, as well as space-based geodetic data. During 2012, seismicity rates were highest beneath Nyiragongo volcano, where a range of low frequency (1-3 s peak frequency) to tectonic earthquakes were located. Swarms of low-frequency earthquakes correspond to periods of elevated gas emissions, as detected by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Earthquake swarms also occur beneath Karisimbi and Nyamuragira volcanoes. A migrating swarm of earthquakes in May 2012 suggests a sill intrusion at the DR Congo-Rwanda border. We delineate two fault sets: SW-NE, and sub-N-S. Excluding the volcano-tectonic earthquakes, most of the earthquakes are located along subsurface projections of steep border faults, and intrabasinal faults calibrated by seismic reflection data. Small magnitude earthquakes also occur beneath the uplifted rift flanks. Time-space variations in seismicity patterns provide a baseline

  17. Fault tolerant control based on active fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2005-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis (AFD) method will be considered in this paper in connection with a Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) architecture based on the YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing controllers. The architecture consists of a fault diagnosis (FD) part and a controller reconfiguration (CR) ...

  18. ROBUS-2: A Fault-Tolerant Broadcast Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Miner, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    The Reliable Optical Bus (ROBUS) is the core communication system of the Scalable Processor-Independent Design for Enhanced Reliability (SPIDER), a general-purpose fault-tolerant integrated modular architecture currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center. The ROBUS is a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast communication system with medium access control by means of time-indexed communication schedule. ROBUS-2 is a developmental version of the ROBUS providing guaranteed fault-tolerant services to the attached processing elements (PEs), in the presence of a bounded number of faults. These services include message broadcast (Byzantine Agreement), dynamic communication schedule update, clock synchronization, and distributed diagnosis (group membership). The ROBUS also features fault-tolerant startup and restart capabilities. ROBUS-2 is tolerant to internal as well as PE faults, and incorporates a dynamic self-reconfiguration capability driven by the internal diagnostic system. This version of the ROBUS is intended for laboratory experimentation and demonstrations of the capability to reintegrate failed nodes, dynamically update the communication schedule, and tolerate and recover from correlated transient faults.

  19. Statistical analysis of submarine fault populations associated with oceanic transform boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K.; Soule, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic transform boundaries exhibit fault populations with strikingly different morphologies. Statistical analysis of these fault populations is a useful tool for investigating crustal strain, fault growth, and the regional stress field of the lithosphere (i.e., transpressional, transtensional, or strike slip). Achieving reliable statistics, however, requires the identification of numerous fault traces followed by accurate and precise measurements of the length, throw, and heave along each member of the fault set. Current methodologies for fault measurement from bathymetric data often require picking the tops and bottoms of digitized fault scarps by hand. This method is time-consuming for large fault populations and may be subject to expectation bias in measurements; consequently, it is difficult to make consistent interpretations of fault lineaments, particularly when dealing with large fault populations. Another method for gathering fault statistics from the seafloor uses binarized sidescan sonar data to identify fault traces and to measure fault heave. Fault throw is then calculated using a regional average fault dip, assuming that local variations in fault geometries are small. Sidescan methods are limited by the instrument's look direction, which can place fault scarps in shadow, producing significant variability in the apparent heave. We present a new computational method that measures observable fault heave and throw from high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data. The code first constructs a series of linear bathymetric transects orthogonal to fault strike. The top and bottom of each fault scarp are defined along these transects as the nearest local minima in the absolute value of the bathymetric gradient. Finally, a median filter is applied to the locations of the resulting fault bounding points to remove noise and erroneous values. Our method improves on previous techniques by allowing an automated, unbiased measure of heave and throw along every

  20. Internal structure, fault rocks, and inferences regarding deformation, fluid flow, and mineralization in the seismogenic Stillwater normal fault, Dixie Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Bruhn, R.L.; Forster, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Outcrop mapping and fault-rock characterization of the Stillwater normal fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada are used to document and interpret ancient hydrothermal fluid flow and its possible relationship to seismic deformation. The fault zone is composed of distinct structural and hydrogeological components. Previous work on the fault rocks is extended to the map scale where a distinctive fault core shows a spectrum of different fault-related breccias. These include predominantly clast-supported breccias with angular clasts that are cut by zones containing breccias with rounded clasts that are also clast supported. These are further cut by breccias that are predominantly matrix supported with angular and rounded clasts. The fault-core breccias are surrounded by a heterogeneously fractured damage zone. Breccias are bounded between major, silicified slip surfaces, forming large pod-like structures, systematically oriented with long axes parallel to slip. Matrix-supported breccias have multiply brecciated, angular and rounded clasts revealing episodic deformation and fluid flow. These breccias have a quartz-rich matrix with microcrystalline anhedral, equant, and pervasively conformable mosaic texture. The breccia pods are interpreted to have formed by decompression boiling and rapid precipitation of hydrothermal fluids whose flow was induced by coseismic, hybrid dilatant-shear deformation and hydraulic connection to a geothermal reservoir. The addition of hydrothermal silica cement localized in the core at the map scale causes fault-zone widening, local sealing, and mechanical heterogeneities that impact the evolution of the fault zone throughout the seismic cycle. ?? 2010.

  1. Fault diagnosis of induction motors

    CERN Document Server

    Faiz, Jawad; Joksimović, Gojko

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, structural approach to fault diagnosis strategy. The different fault types, signal processing techniques, and loss characterisation are addressed in the book. This is essential reading for work with induction motors for transportation and energy.

  2. Fault management and systems knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Pilots are asked to manage faults during flight operations. This leads to the training question of the type and depth of system knowledge required to respond to these faults. Based on discussions with multiple airline operators, there is agreement th...

  3. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can...

  4. Fault Tolerant Wind Farm Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years the wind turbine industry has focused on optimizing the cost of energy. One of the important factors in this is to increase reliability of the wind turbines. Advanced fault detection, isolation and accommodation are important tools in this process. Clearly most faults are deal...... scenarios. This benchmark model is used in an international competition dealing with Wind Farm fault detection and isolation and fault tolerant control....

  5. Geodynamics of the Dead Sea Fault: Do active faulting and past earthquakes determine the seismic gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    The ~1000-km-long North-South trending Dead Sea transform fault (DSF) presents structural discontinuities and includes segments that experienced large earthquakes (Mw>7) in historical times. The Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley, the Lebanese restraining bend, the Missyaf and Ghab fault segments in Syria and the Ziyaret Fault segment in Turkey display geometrical complexities made of step overs, restraining and releasing bends that may constitute major obstacles to earthquake rupture propagation. Using active tectonics, GPS measurements and paleoseismology we investigate the kinematics and long-term/short term slip rates along the DSF. Tectonic geomorphology with paleoseismic trenching and archeoseismic investigations indicate repeated faulting events and left-lateral slip rate ranging from 4 mm/yr in the southern fault section to 6 mm/yr in the northern fault section. Except for the northernmost DSF section, these estimates of fault slip rate are consistent with GPS measurements that show 4 to 5 mm/yr deformation rate across the plate boundary. However, recent GPS results showing ~2.5 mm/yr velocity rate of the northern DSF appears to be quite different than the ~6 mm/yr paleoseismic slip rate. The kinematic modeling that combines GPS and seismotectonic results implies a complex geodynamic pattern where the DSF transforms the Cyprus arc subduction zone into transpressive tectonics on the East Anatolian fault. The timing of past earthquake ruptures shows the occurrence of seismic sequences and a southward migration of large earthquakes, with the existence of major seismic gaps along strike. In this paper, we discuss the role of the DSF in the regional geodynamics and its implication on the identification of seismic gaps.

  6. The engine fuel system fault analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Song, Hanqiang; Yang, Changsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    For improving the reliability of the engine fuel system, the typical fault factor of the engine fuel system was analyzed from the point view of structure and functional. The fault character was gotten by building the fuel system fault tree. According the utilizing of fault mode effect analysis method (FMEA), several factors of key component fuel regulator was obtained, which include the fault mode, the fault cause, and the fault influences. All of this made foundation for next development of fault diagnosis system.

  7. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be

  8. Structural setting and kinematics of Nubian fault system, SE Western Desert, Egypt: An example of multi-reactivated intraplate strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakran, Shawky; Said, Said Mohamed

    2018-02-01

    Detailed surface geological mapping and subsurface seismic interpretation have been integrated to unravel the structural style and kinematic history of the Nubian Fault System (NFS). The NFS consists of several E-W Principal Deformation Zones (PDZs) (e.g. Kalabsha fault). Each PDZ is defined by spectacular E-W, WNW and ENE dextral strike-slip faults, NNE sinistral strike-slip faults, NE to ENE folds, and NNW normal faults. Each fault zone has typical self-similar strike-slip architecture comprising multi-scale fault segments. Several multi-scale uplifts and basins were developed at the step-over zones between parallel strike-slip fault segments as a result of local extension or contraction. The NNE faults consist of right-stepping sinistral strike-slip fault segments (e.g. Sin El Kiddab fault). The NNE sinistral faults extend for long distances ranging from 30 to 100 kms and cut one or two E-W PDZs. Two nearly perpendicular strike-slip tectonic regimes are recognized in the NFS; an inactive E-W Late Cretaceous - Early Cenozoic dextral transpression and an active NNE sinistral shear.

  9. Formal fault tree semantics

    OpenAIRE

    Schellhorn, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    Formal fault tree semantics / G. Schellhorn, A. Thums, and W. Reif. - In: IDPT : Proceedings of the Sixth World Conference on Integrated Design and Process Technology : June 23 - 27, 2003, Pasadena, California / SDPS, Society for Design & Process Science. - 2002. - 1CD-ROM

  10. Diagnosing Intermittent Faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gemund, A.J.C.; Abreu, R.F.; Zoeteweij, P.

    2008-01-01

    In this working report we outline how to determine the intermittency parameters gj from the activity matrix A (context: DX’08 paper Abreu, Zoeteweij, Van Gemund). We start with the single fault (SF) case and show that averaging over the error vector e is the exact way. We also show that in this way

  11. Network Power Fault Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Siviero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Network power fault detection. At least one first network device is instructed to temporarily disconnect from a power supply path of a network, and at least one characteristic of the power supply path of the network is measured at a second network device connected to the network while the at least one first network device is temporarily disconnected from the network

  12. Detecting Faults from Encoded Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fault detection for linear continuous-time systems via encoded information is considered. The encoded information is received at a remote location by the monitoring deiice and assessed to infer the occurrence of the fault. A class of faults is considered which allows to use a simple

  13. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  14. The fluid budget of a continental plate boundary fault: Quantification from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Catriona D.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Niedermann, Samuel; Cox, Simon C.; Craw, Dave; Zimmer, Martin; Cooper, Matthew J.; Erzinger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Fluids play a key role in modifying the chemical and physical properties of fault zones, which may prime them for repeated rupture by the generation of high pore fluid pressures and precipitation of commonly weak, secondary minerals. Fluid flow paths, sources and fluxes, and the permeability evolution of fault zones throughout their seismic cycles remain poorly constrained, despite their importance to understanding fault zone behaviour. Here we use geochemical tracers of fluid-rock exchange to determine budgets for meteoric, metamorphic and mantle fluids on a major compressional tectonic plate boundary. The Alpine Fault marks the transpressional Pacific-Australian plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand and appears to fail in regular (329 ± 68 yrs) large earthquakes (Mw ∼ 8) with the most recent event in 1717 AD. Significant convergent motion has formed the Southern Alps and elevated geothermal gradients in the hangingwall, which drive crustal fluid flow. Along the Alpine Fault the Alpine Schist of the Pacific Plate is thrust over radiogenic metasedimentary rocks on the Australian plate. The absence of highly radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr > 0.7200) strontium isotope ratios of hangingwall hot springs and hydrothermal minerals formed at a range of depths in the Alpine Fault damage zone indicates that the fluid flow is restricted to the hangingwall by a cross-fault fluid flow barrier throughout the seismogenic crust. Helium isotope ratios measured in hot springs near to the Alpine Fault (0.15-0.81 RA) indicate the fault is a crustal-scale feature that acts as a conduit for fluids from the mantle. Rock-exchanged oxygen, but meteoric water-like hydrogen isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins indicate that partially rock-exchanged meteoric fluids dominate down to the top of the brittle to ductile transition zone at ∼6 km. Geochemical tracer transport modelling suggests only ∼0.02 to 0.05% of total rainfall west of the Main Divide penetrates to depth, yet this

  15. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the

  16. Boosting the trench: Paleoseimic Record of Three Holocene Earthquakes Rupturing the Issyk-Ata Fault near Bishkek, North Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyniak, Magda; Landgraf, Angela; Dzhumabaeva, Atyrgul; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek; Rosenwinkel, Swenja; Strecker, Manfred; Korup, Oliver; Arrowsmith, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of thrust paleoearthquakes and associated fault scarps is often hampered by the size of their cumulative fault scarps and interaction with sedimentary processes during interseismic periods. This is especially true if these events occur in areas undergoing low strain accumulation with long recurrence intervals. Furthermore, the earthquakes might occur in environments that provide limited datable material, rendering an event chronology difficult to develop. Here we present a paleoseismological study from one site (Belek) along the Issyk-Ata fault, a major range-bounding fault that constitutes the northern edge of the Central Tien Shan. The historic and paleoseismic record of this fault is limited, although it defines the southern boundary of Bishkek, the Kyrgyz capital. The only historically known earthquake ruptured along the Issyk-Ata fault in 1885 AD (M6.9). We use a range of tools, including photogrammetry, differential GPS, and 3D visualization and modeling, combined with different chronometers (IRSL, Radiocarbon) to boost the production of an event chronology from the trench stratigraphy and fault geometry. Our age control from both trench walls shows consistent age data in stratigraphic order irrespective of the chronometer. We were able to distinguish three different surface rupturing paleoearthquakes that affected the area at 8.9 ± 0.3 cal kyr BP; 4.7 ± 2.0 cal kyr BP; and 700 ± 80 cal yr BP, and interpret an extended episode of loess accumulation against the scarp between the oldest identified and penultimate events. Associated paleomagnitudes for the last two earthquakes range between M6.7 - M7.4 with a cumulative slip rate of 0.7 ± 0.2 mm/a. We did not find evidence for the 1885 AD event at Belek. Combined our results underline two major points: first, the historic and paleoseismic catalogue is incomplete; second, single ruptures do not necessarily involve the entire extend of the Issyk-Ata fault but point to segmented rupture behavior

  17. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  18. 3D seismic analysis of the AK Fault, Orange Basin, South Africa: Implications for hydrocarbon leakage and offshore neotectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiaka, Ahmed I.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Manzi, Musa S. D.; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2017-11-01

    A high-resolution 3D reflection seismic dataset was used to achieve a detailed description of the half-graben bounded AK Fault in the Ibhubesi gas field of the offshore Orange Basin. Seismic analysis of the fault involved the combination of both the conventional seismic interpretation and seismic attributes. The main objective of the study was to provide insights into hydrocarbon leakage and neotectonic activity along the west coast shelf of South Africa. The AK Fault is among the several half-graben bounded faults that formed in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous during the separation of the South American and the African continents. The AK Fault consists of five seismically detectable segments, whose evolution reflects characteristics of both the ;coherent; and the ;isolated; end-members model of segmented fault origin. Diapiric structures that are direct indicators of vertical fluid movement were also observed along the AK Fault system, providing evidence of significant roles that the fault plays in promoting the vertical migration of hydrocarbon in the Orange Basin. Recent reactivation of the fault has also occurred along an oblique extensional regime that is dominated by normal dip-slip faulting, with minor shear components along the tips.

  19. with Bounded Failure Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Wanti Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Bayes prediction of the future failures of a deteriorating repairable mechanical system subject to minimal repairs and periodic overhauls. To model the effect of overhauls on the reliability of the system a proportional age reduction model is assumed and the 2-parameter Engelhardt-Bain process (2-EBP is used to model the failure process between two successive overhauls. 2-EBP has an advantage over Power Law Process (PLP models. It is found that the failure intensity of deteriorating repairable systems attains a finite bound when repeated minimal repair actions are combined with some overhauls. If such a data is analyzed through models with unbounded increasing failure intensity, such as the PLP, then pessimistic estimates of the system reliability will arise and incorrect preventive maintenance policy may be defined. On the basis of the observed data and of a number of suitable prior densities reflecting varied degrees of belief on the failure/repair process and effectiveness of overhauls, the prediction of the future failure times and the number of failures in a future time interval is found. Finally, a numerical application is used to illustrate the advantages from overhauls and sensitivity analysis of the improvement parameter carried out.

  20. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  1. Pliocene transpressional modification of depositional basins by convergent thrusting adjacent to the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault: An example from Lockwood Valley, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault in the western Transverse Ranges of southern California is a left stepping flexure in the dextral fault system and has long been recognized as a zone of relatively high transpression compared to adjacent regions. The Lockwood Valley region, just south of the Big Bend, underwent a profound change in early Pliocene time (???5 Ma) from basin deposition to contraction, accompanied by widespread folding and thrusting. This change followed the recently determined initiation of opening of the northern Gulf of California and movement along the southern San Andreas fault at about 6.1 Ma, with the concomitant formation of the Big Bend. Lockwood Valley occupies a 6-km-wide, fault-bounded structural basin in which converging blocks of Paleoproterozoic and Cretaceous crystalline basement and upper Oligocene and lower Miocene sedimentary rocks (Plush Ranch Formation) were thrust over Miocene and Pliocene basin-fill sedimentary rocks (in ascending order, Caliente Formation, Lockwood Clay, and Quatal Formation). All the pre-Quatal sedimentary rocks and most of the Pliocene Quatal Formation were deposited during a mid-Tertiary period of regional transtension in a crustal block that underwent little clockwise vertical-axis rotation as compared to crustal blocks to the south. Ensuing Pliocene and Quaternary transpression in the Big Bend region began during deposition of the poorly dated Quatal Formation and was marked by four converging thrust systems, which decreased the areal extent of the sedimentary basin and formed the present Lockwood Valley structural basin. None of the thrusts appears presently active. Estimated shortening across the center of the basin was about 30 percent. The fortnerly defined eastern Big Pine fault, now interpreted to be two separate, oppositely directed, contractional reverse or thrust faults, marks the northwestern structural boundary of Lockwood Valley. The complex geometry of the Lockwood Valley basin is similar

  2. Pliocene transpressional modification of depositional basins by convergent thrusting adjacent to the ``Big Bend'' of the San Andreas fault: An example from Lockwood Valley, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Karl S.; Minor, Scott A.

    2005-02-01

    The "Big Bend" of the San Andreas fault in the western Transverse Ranges of southern California is a left stepping flexure in the dextral fault system and has long been recognized as a zone of relatively high transpression compared to adjacent regions. The Lockwood Valley region, just south of the Big Bend, underwent a profound change in early Pliocene time (˜5 Ma) from basin deposition to contraction, accompanied by widespread folding and thrusting. This change followed the recently determined initiation of opening of the northern Gulf of California and movement along the southern San Andreas fault at about 6.1 Ma, with the concomitant formation of the Big Bend. Lockwood Valley occupies a 6-km-wide, fault-bounded structural basin in which converging blocks of Paleoproterozoic and Cretaceous crystalline basement and upper Oligocene and lower Miocene sedimentary rocks (Plush Ranch Formation) were thrust over Miocene and Pliocene basin-fill sedimentary rocks (in ascending order, Caliente Formation, Lockwood Clay, and Quatal Formation). All the pre-Quatal sedimentary rocks and most of the Pliocene Quatal Formation were deposited during a mid-Tertiary period of regional transtension in a crustal block that underwent little clockwise vertical-axis rotation as compared to crustal blocks to the south. Ensuing Pliocene and Quaternary transpression in the Big Bend region began during deposition of the poorly dated Quatal Formation and was marked by four converging thrust systems, which decreased the areal extent of the sedimentary basin and formed the present Lockwood Valley structural basin. None of the thrusts appears presently active. Estimated shortening across the center of the basin was about 30 percent. The formerly defined eastern Big Pine fault, now interpreted to be two separate, oppositely directed, contractional reverse or thrust faults, marks the northwestern structural boundary of Lockwood Valley. The complex geometry of the Lockwood Valley basin is similar

  3. Simultaneous Robust Fault and State Estimation for Linear Discrete-Time Uncertain Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feten Gannouni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of robust simultaneous fault and state estimation for linear uncertain discrete-time systems with unknown faults which affect both the state and the observation matrices. Using transformation of the original system, a new robust proportional integral filter (RPIF having an error variance with an optimized guaranteed upper bound for any allowed uncertainty is proposed to improve robust estimation of unknown time-varying faults and to improve robustness against uncertainties. In this study, the minimization problem of the upper bound of the estimation error variance is formulated as a convex optimization problem subject to linear matrix inequalities (LMI for all admissible uncertainties. The proportional and the integral gains are optimally chosen by solving the convex optimization problem. Simulation results are given in order to illustrate the performance of the proposed filter, in particular to solve the problem of joint fault and state estimation.

  4. Fuzzy model-based observers for fault detection in CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Moncada, Hazael; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Anzurez-Marín, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Under the vast variety of fuzzy model-based observers reported in the literature, what would be the properone to be used for fault detection in a class of chemical reactor? In this study four fuzzy model-based observers for sensor fault detection of a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor were designed and compared. The designs include (i) a Luenberger fuzzy observer, (ii) a Luenberger fuzzy observer with sliding modes, (iii) a Walcott-Zak fuzzy observer, and (iv) an Utkin fuzzy observer. A negative, an oscillating fault signal, and a bounded random noise signal with a maximum value of ±0.4 were used to evaluate and compare the performance of the fuzzy observers. The Utkin fuzzy observer showed the best performance under the tested conditions. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ExtremeBounds: Extreme Bounds Analysis in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Hlavac

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the R package ExtremeBounds to perform extreme bounds analysis (EBA, a sensitivity test that examines how robustly the dependent variable of a regression model is related to a variety of possible determinants. ExtremeBounds supports Leamer's EBA that focuses on the upper and lower extreme bounds of regression coefficients, as well as Sala-i-Martin's EBA which considers their entire distribution. In contrast to existing alternatives, it can estimate models of a variety of user-defined sizes, use regression models other than ordinary least squares, incorporate non-linearities in the model specification, and apply custom weights and standard errors. To alleviate concerns about the multicollinearity and conceptual overlap of examined variables, ExtremeBounds allows users to specify sets of mutually exclusive variables, and can restrict the analysis to coefficients from regression models that yield a variance inflation factor within a prespecified limit.

  6. Fluid flow and permeabilities in basement fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinsworth, Allan; Koehn, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Fault zones are important sites for crustal fluid flow, specifically where they cross-cut low permeability host rocks such as granites and gneisses. Fluids migrating through fault zones can cause rheology changes, mineral precipitation and pore space closure, and may alter the physical and chemical properties of the host rock and deformation products. It is therefore essential to consider the evolution of permeability in fault zones at a range of pressure-temperature conditions to understand fluid migration throughout a fault's history, and how fluid-rock interaction modifies permeability and rheological characteristics. Field localities in the Rwenzori Mountains, western Uganda and the Outer Hebrides, north-west Scotland, have been selected for field work and sample collection. Here Archaean-age TTG gneisses have been faulted within the upper 15km of the crust and have experienced fluid ingress. The Rwenzori Mountains are an anomalously uplifted horst-block located in a transfer zone in the western rift of the East African Rift System. The north-western ridge is characterised by a tectonically simple western flank, where the partially mineralised Bwamba Fault has detached from the Congo craton. Mineralisation is associated with hydrothermal fluids heated by a thermal body beneath the Semliki rift, and has resulted in substantial iron oxide precipitation within porous cataclasites. Non-mineralised faults further north contain foliated gouges and show evidence of leaking fluids. These faults serve as an analogue for faults associated with the Lake Albert oil and gas prospects. The Outer Hebrides Fault Zone (OHFZ) was largely active during the Caledonian Orogeny (ca. 430-400 Ma) at a deeper crustal level than the Ugandan rift faults. Initial dry conditions were followed by fluid ingress during deformation that controlled its rheological behaviour. The transition also altered the existing permeability. The OHFZ is a natural laboratory in which to study brittle fault

  7. Analysis of a New Marlborough Fault System Lidar Dataset: The Wairau and Hope faults, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenader, J.; Dolan, J. F.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Zinke, R. W.; McGuire, C. P.; Nicol, A.

    2014-12-01

    Newly acquired lidar digital topographic data acquired early 2014 from the four major faults of the Marlborough Fault System in northern South Island New Zealand allow measurement of fault offsets ~1 m to 100s of meters in unprecedented detail. The lidar dataset, acquired for us by the US National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) and New Zealand Aerial Mapping (NZAM), comprises 254 km of fault-parallel imagery in 1.2-to-1.5-km-wide swaths. These high-resolution data have an average shot density of ≥12 shots/m2, and encompass the central Wairau, central and eastern Awatere, western and eastern Clarence, and eastern Hope fault segments. In this study, we focus on detailed measurements of small (3-25 m) and large (10s-100s of meters) geomorphic offsets at multiple sites along the central Wairau and eastern Hope faults. In addition to showing compilations of these offset observations, we present examples of the lidar data at several key study sites where offsets at multiple scales are discernable. The precise fault offsets we measure at these sites, combined with post-IR IRSL (225°C) single-grain K-feldspar dating of fluvial terrace sediments, will provide the basis for determining incremental slip rates on these faults at a range of latest Pleistocene to late Holocene timescales. This project is part of a broader effort to generate incremental slip rates and paleoearthquake ages from all four of the main faults that comprise the Marlborough Fault System with the goal of further understanding how mechanically complementary faults work together to accommodate relative plate motions.

  8. Geological modeling of a fault zone in clay rocks at the Mont-Terri laboratory (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, M.; Guglielmi, Y.; Nussbaum, C.; Valley, B.

    2016-12-01

    Clay-rich formations are considered to be a natural barrier for radionuclides or fluids (water, hydrocarbons, CO2) migration. However, little is known about the architecture of faults affecting clay formations because of their quick alteration at the Earth's surface. The Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory provides exceptional conditions to investigate an un-weathered, perfectly exposed clay fault zone architecture and to conduct fault activation experiments that allow explore the conditions for stability of such clay faults. Here we show first results from a detailed geological model of the Mont Terri Main Fault architecture, using GoCad software, a detailed structural analysis of 6 fully cored and logged 30-to-50m long and 3-to-15m spaced boreholes crossing the fault zone. These high-definition geological data were acquired within the Fault Slip (FS) experiment project that consisted in fluid injections in different intervals within the fault using the SIMFIP probe to explore the conditions for the fault mechanical and seismic stability. The Mont Terri Main Fault "core" consists of a thrust zone about 0.8 to 3m wide that is bounded by two major fault planes. Between these planes, there is an assembly of distinct slickensided surfaces and various facies including scaly clays, fault gouge and fractured zones. Scaly clay including S-C bands and microfolds occurs in larger zones at top and bottom of the Mail Fault. A cm-thin layer of gouge, that is known to accommodate high strain parts, runs along the upper fault zone boundary. The non-scaly part mainly consists of undeformed rock block, bounded by slickensides. Such a complexity as well as the continuity of the two major surfaces are hard to correlate between the different boreholes even with the high density of geological data within the relatively small volume of the experiment. This may show that a poor strain localization occurred during faulting giving some perspectives about the potential for

  9. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  10. Luminescence chronometry and geomorphic evidence of active fold growth along the Kachchh Mainland Fault (KMF), Kachchh, India: Seismotectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, George; Singhvi, Ashok K.; Karanth, Rama V.

    2006-08-01

    The Kachchh region of Western India is a pericratonic basin experiencing periodic high magnitude earthquakes events. In 2001 a catastrophic seismic event occurred at Bhuj measuring Mw = 7.7. The epicenters of both the 1956 and 2001 earthquakes were along the Kachchh Mainland Fault (KMF), proximal to the eastern end of the Northern Hill Range (NHR). The latter is a topographic expression of an active fault related fold on the hanging wall, and is controlled by a south dipping blind thrust. The present study deals with the eastern sector of NHR and uses optical dating to reconstruct the chronology of tectonically caused incisions. Along the backlimb of the NHR, incision ages on, channel fills and valley fill terraces progressively decrease from ˜ 12 ka to 4.3 ka. This age progression along with geomorphic evidences (decrease in topographic relief, drainage capture and drainage migration across the fold nose) suggests an active vertical and lateral fold growth along the KMF. Optical ages suggest that during the Late Holocene, the average uplift rate along the eastern NHR was 10 ± 1 mm/a. Recent GPS based estimates on crustal shortening are ˜ 12 mm/a. The KMF and the South Wagad Fault (SWF) represent the bounding faults of a transtensional basin that formed during the initial rifting. This basin is termed as the Samakhiali basin. The compressive stresses on account of structural inversion from normal to reverse phase resulted in lobate-shaped anticlines along KMF and SWF zone. These anticlines subsequently coalesced and formed linked and overlap segments. The present study suggests that eastward lateral deformation across the eastern portion of KMF has continued and has now resulted in its interaction with a left step over transfer fault called the South Wagad Master Fault (SWMF). This implies an increasing transpersional deformation of the Samakhiali basin. We therefore, suggest that the eastward NHR ridge propagation along KMF resulted in the thrust faulting on

  11. Hadron-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    A new type of nuclear spectroscopy to study hadron-nucleus bound states is described. The first successful experiment was to search for deeply bound pi sup - states in heavy nuclei using the sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb(d, sup 3 He) reaction at GSI, in which a narrow peak arising from the 2p pi sup - orbital coupled with the neutron-hole states was observed at 135 MeV excitation energy. An improved experiment has just been carried out to separately identify the 1s and 2p pi sup - states. These experiments provide important information on the local potential strength, from which the effective mass of pi sup - is deduced to be 20 MeV. This method will be extended to search for eta and omega bound states as well as for K sup - bound states. The advantage of the bound-state spectroscopy versus invariant mass spectroscopy is emphasized.

  12. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive......WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and long...

  13. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive......WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and longterm...

  14. Subsurface Constraints on Late Cenozoic Basin Geometry in Northern Fish Lake Valley and Displacement Transfer Along the Northern Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone, Western Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, N.; Kerstetter, S. R.; Katopody, D. T.; Oldow, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The NW-striking, right-oblique Fish Lake Valley fault zone (FLVFZ) forms the northern segment of the longest active structure in the western Great Basin; the Death Valley - Furnace Creek - Fish Lake Valley fault system. Since the mid-Miocene, 50 km of right-lateral displacement is documented on the southern FLVFZ and much of that displacement was and is transferred east and north on active WNW left-lateral faults. Prior to the Pliocene, displacement was transferred east and north on a low-angle detachment. Displacement on the northern part of the FLVFZ continues and is transferred to a fanned array of splays striking (west to east) WNW, NNW, ENE and NNE. To determine the displacement budget on these structures, we conducted a gravity survey to determine subsurface basin morphology and its relation to active faults. Over 2450 stations were collected and combined with existing PACES and proprietary data for a total of 3388 stations. The data were terrain corrected and reduced to a 2.67 g/cm3 density to produce a residual complete Bouguer anomaly. The eastern part of northern Fish Lake Valley is underlain by several prominent gravity lows forming several sub-basins with maximum RCBA values ranging from -24 to -28 mGals. The RCBA was inverted for depth using Geosoft Oasis Montaj GM-SYS 3D modeling software. Density values for the inversion were constrained by lithologic and density logs from wells that penetrate the entire Cenozoic section into the Paleozoic basement. Best fitting gravity measurements taken at the wellheads yielded an effective density of 2.4 g/cm3 for the basin fill. Modeled basement depths range between 2.1 to 3 km. The sub-basins form an arc opening to the NW and are bounded by ENE and NNE faults in the south and NS to NNW in the north. At the northern end of the valley, the faults merge with ENE left-lateral strike slip faults of the Mina deflection, which carries displacement to NW dextral strike-slip faults of the central Walker Lane.

  15. Fault structure, frictional properties and mixed-mode fault slip behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Smith, S.A.F.; Marone, C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent high-resolution GPS and seismological data reveal that tectonic faults exhibit complex, multi-modeslipbehavior including earthquakes, creep events, slow and silent earthquakes, low-frequency events and earthquake afterslip. The physical processes responsible for this range of behavior and the

  16. Comparison of control strategies for Doubly fed induction generator under recurring grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zhu, Nan

    2014-01-01

    The new grid codes demand the wind turbine systems to ride through recurring grid faults. Many control strategies have been proposed for the Doubly Fed Induction Generator under single grid fault, but their performance under recurring grid faults have not been studied yet. In this paper, five...... different control strategies for DFIG to ride through single grid faults are presented, and their performance under recurring grid faults are analyzed. The controllable range, stator time constant and torque fluctuations of the DFIG with different control strategies are compared. The results are verified...

  17. Absolute age determination of quaternary fault and formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Kwang Sik; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating results for the fault rocks suggest the occurrence of recurrent fault activity around 80-95 Ma, 70 Ma, 50 Ma, 30 Ma and 23 Ma along the Yangsan fault zone. The apparent K-Ar ages tend to be older than Rb-Sr ages, probably indicating the effect of excess radiogenic Ar, which will be furthur investigated by Ar-Ar method. The OSL SAR protocol using 220 .deg. C cut-heat yields reproducible and stratigraphically consistent OSL ages ranging from 71 ka to 48 ka for beach deposits of the marine terrace No 2. The apparent OSL ages for the marine terrace No 3 range from 92 ka to 61 ka. These ages constrain the minimum age of the platform considering the underestimation effect resulted from deposition underwater. Therefore we regard the formation age of the terrace No 3 as MIS(Marine Isotopic Stage) 5c or 5e. Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating results for the fault rocks suggest the occurrence of recurrent fault activity around 40 Ma, 30 Ma and 23 Ma along the Ulsan fault zone. Relatively young (< 10 Ma) fault activities are recognized in the Oesa, Janghangri and Wonwonsa sites.

  18. Geomorphic evidence of Quaternary tectonics within an underlap fault zone of southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giano, Salvatore Ivo; Pescatore, Eva; Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo

    2018-02-01

    A composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley Fault zone, located in the axial sector of the fold-and-thrust belt of southern Apennines, Italy, is investigated. This composite source is made up of a series of nearly parallel, NW-striking normal fault segments which caused many historical earthquakes. Two of these fault segments, known as the San Gregorio Magno and Pergola-Melandro, and the fault-related mountain fronts, form a wedge-shaped, right-stepping, underlap fault zone. This work is aimed at documenting tectonic geomorphology and geology of this underlap fault zone. The goal is to decipher the evidence of surface topographic interaction between two bounding fault segments and their related mountain fronts. In particular, computation of geomorphic indices such as mountain front sinuosity (Smf), water divide sinuosity (Swd), asymmetry factor (AF), drainage basin elongation (Bs), relief ratio (Rh), Hypsometry (HI), normalized steepness (Ksn), and concavity (θ) is integrated with geomorphological analysis, the geological mapping, and structural analysis in order to assess the recent activity of the fault scarp sets recognized within the underlap zone. Results are consistent with the NW-striking faults as those showing the most recent tectonic activity, as also suggested by presence of related slope deposits younger than 38 ka. The results of this work therefore show how the integration of a multidisciplinary approach that combines geomorphology, morphometry, and structural analyses may be key to solving tectonic geomorphology issues in a complex, fold-and-thrust belt configuration.

  19. Orion GN&C Fault Management System Verification: Scope And Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denise; Weiler, David; Flanary, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term ability to meet mission goals and to provide for the safety of the public, ground personnel, and any crew members, nearly all spacecraft include a fault management (FM) system. For a manned vehicle such as Orion, the safety of the crew is of paramount importance. The goal of the Orion Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) fault management system is to detect, isolate, and respond to faults before they can result in harm to the human crew or loss of the spacecraft. Verification of fault management/fault protection capability is challenging due to the large number of possible faults in a complex spacecraft, the inherent unpredictability of faults, the complexity of interactions among the various spacecraft components, and the inability to easily quantify human reactions to failure scenarios. The Orion GN&C Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) team has developed a methodology for bounding the scope of FM system verification while ensuring sufficient coverage of the failure space and providing high confidence that the fault management system meets all safety requirements. The methodology utilizes a swarm search algorithm to identify failure cases that can result in catastrophic loss of the crew or the vehicle and rare event sequential Monte Carlo to verify safety and FDIR performance requirements.

  20. Modelling earthquake ruptures with dynamic off-fault damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Kurama; Bhat, Harsha S.; Klinger, Yann; Rougier, Esteban

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake rupture modelling has been developed for producing scenario earthquakes. This includes understanding the source mechanisms and estimating far-field ground motion with given a priori constraints like fault geometry, constitutive law of the medium and friction law operating on the fault. It is necessary to consider all of the above complexities of a fault systems to conduct realistic earthquake rupture modelling. In addition to the complexity of the fault geometry in nature, coseismic off-fault damage, which is observed by a variety of geological and seismological methods, plays a considerable role on the resultant ground motion and its spectrum compared to a model with simple planer fault surrounded by purely elastic media. Ideally all of these complexities should be considered in earthquake modelling. State of the art techniques developed so far, however, cannot treat all of them simultaneously due to a variety of computational restrictions. Therefore, we adopt the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM), which can effectively deal with pre-existing complex fault geometry such as fault branches and kinks and can describe coseismic off-fault damage generated during the dynamic rupture. The advantage of FDEM is that it can handle a wide range of length scales, from metric to kilometric scale, corresponding to the off-fault damage and complex fault geometry respectively. We used the FDEM-based software tool called HOSSedu (Hybrid Optimization Software Suite - Educational Version) for the earthquake rupture modelling, which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. We firstly conducted the cross-validation of this new methodology against other conventional numerical schemes such as the finite difference method (FDM), the spectral element method (SEM) and the boundary integral equation method (BIEM), to evaluate the accuracy with various element sizes and artificial viscous damping values. We demonstrate the capability of the FDEM tool for

  1. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  2. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Faults and fractures in central West Greenland: onshore expression of continental break-up and sea-floor spreading in the Labrador – Baffin Bay Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmers, James A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex Ungava fault zone lies in the Davis Strait and separates failed spreading centres in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. This study focuses on coastal exposures east of the fault-bound Sisimiut basin, where the onshore expressions of these fault systems and the influence of pre-existing basement are examined. Regional lineament studies identify five main systems: N–S, NNE–SSW, ENE–WSW, ESE–WNW and NNW–SSE. Field studies reveal that strike-slip movements predominate, and are consistent with a ~NNE–SSW-oriented sinistral wrench system. Extensional faults trending N–S and ENE–WSW (basement-parallel, and compressional faults trending E–W, were also identified. The relative ages of these fault systems have been interpreted using cross-cutting relationships and by correlation with previously identified structures. A two-phase model for fault development fits the development of both the onshore fault systems observed in this study and regional tectonic structures offshore. The conclusions from this study show that the fault patterns and sense of movement on faults onshore reflect the stress fields that govern the opening of the Labrador Sea – Davis Strait – Baffin Bay seaway, and that the wrench couple on the Ungava transform system played a dominant role in the development of the onshore fault patterns

  3. Real-time fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiwei; Ding, Steven X.; Cecati, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This "Special Section on Real-Time Fault Diagnosis and Fault-Tolerant Control" of the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics is motivated to provide a forum for academic and industrial communities to report recent theoretic/application results in real-time monitoring, diagnosis, and fault-tolerant design, and exchange the ideas about the emerging research direction in this field. Twenty-three papers were eventually selected through a strict peer-reviewed procedure, which represent the mo...

  4. Direct Observation of Depth Variation in Fault Zone Structure Through and Below the Seismogenic Crust: Preliminary Results From the SEMP Fault System in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E. K.; Dolan, J.; Sammis, C.; Hacker, B.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2004-12-01

    One of the most exciting and important frontiers in earthquake science is the linkage between the internal structure and the mechanical behavior of fault zones. In particular, little is known about how fault-zone structure varies as a function of depth, from near-surface conditions down through the seismogenic crust and into the ductile lower crust. Such understanding is vital if we are to understand the mechanical instabilities that control the nucleation and propagation of seismic ruptures. This imperative has led us to the Oligo-Miocene Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone in Austria. The SEMP system is an extremely rare example of a major strike-slip fault that has been exhumed differentially such that it exposes a continuum of structural levels along strike. This exhumed fault system thus provides a unique opportunity to systematically examine depth-dependent changes in fault-zone geometry and structure along a single fault. Our ongoing field studies focus on structural transects across the SEMP fault zone at exhumation levels ranging from the near-surface at the eastern end of the fault (Vienna pull-apart basin), within the seismogenic crust (central Austria), and down into the ductile lower crust exposed in the Tauern window of western Austria. In addition to detailed field mapping of structural fabrics, fluid-rock interactions, relative timing relationships, and variations in fault geometry, we are also conducting detailed analyses of fault-zone rocks designed to explore deformation at a wide range of scales using petrographic microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, fluid-inclusion studies, scanning-electron microscopy, and transmission/analytical-electron microscopy. Preliminary results from one of our first detailed study sites, at Gesäuse in central Austria, reveal strikingly asymmetric damage across the fault. The limestones exposed south of the fault are fractured, but relatively coherent to within a few meters of the main fault

  5. Fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency in presence of sub-patch geometric complexity

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that faults are not planar surfaces. Instead they exhibit self-similar or self-affine properties that span a wide range of spatial (sub-micrometer to tens-of-kilometer). This geometric fault roughness has a distinct impact on amount and distribution of stresses/strains induced in the medium and on other portions of the fault. However, when numerically simulated (for example in multi-cycle EQ rupture simulations or Coulomb failure stress calculations) this roughness is largely ignored: individual fault patches --the incremental elements that build the fault surface in the respective computer models-- are planar and fault roughness at this and lower spatial scales is not considered. As a result, the fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency may be systematically too large in those numerical simulations with respect to the "actual" efficiency level. Here, we investigate the effect of sub-patch geometric complexity on fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency. For that, we sub-divide a fault patch (e.g., 1x1km) into a large number of sub-patches (e.g., 20x20m) and determine amount of induced stresses at selected positions around that patch for different levels and realizations of fault roughness. For each fault roughness level, we compute mean and standard deviation of the induced stresses, enabling us to compute the coefficient of variation. We normalize those values with stresses from the corresponding single (planar) fault patch, providing scaling factors and their variability for stress transfer efficiency. Given a certain fault roughness that is assumed for a fault, this work provides the means to implement the sub-patch fault roughness into investigations based on fault-patch interaction schemes.

  6. Imaging of Subsurface Faults using Refraction Migration with Fault Flooding

    KAUST Repository

    Metwally, Ahmed Mohsen Hassan

    2017-05-31

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  7. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  8. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  9. Fault seal analysis to predict the compartmentalization of gas reservoir: Case study of Steenkool formation Bintuni Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanjar, W. C. B.; Haris, A.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    This study is aimed to analyze the mechanism of hydrocarbons trapping in the field on a relatively new play in the Bintuni basin particularly Steenkool formation. The first well in this field has been drilled with a shallow target in the Steenkool formation and the drilling is managed to find new gas reserves in the shale-sandstone layer. In the structure of this gas discovery, there is the potential barrier for compartmentalization that draws attention to analyze how the patterns of structural of fault become a part of reservoir compartment. In order to measure the risk associated with prospects on a field bounded by faults, it is important to understand the processes that contribute to fault seal. The method of Fault Seal Analysis (FSA) is one of the methods used for the analysis of the nature of a fault whether the fault is sealing or leaking the fluid flow in the reservoir. Trapping systems that are limited by faults play an important role in creating a trap of hydrocarbon. The ability of a fault to seal fluid is quantitatively reflected by the value of Shale Gouge Ratio (SGR). SGR is the calculation of the amount of fine-grained material that fills fault plane (fault gouge) as a result of the movement mechanism of fault. The result of this study is a valuable resource for the systematic evaluation of the analysis of hydrocarbon prospects in the field.

  10. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  11. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  12. Engineering the coupling between Majorana bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z. C.; Shao, X. Q.; Xia, Y.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-09-01

    We study the coupling between Majorana bound states (CMBS), which is mediated by a topologically trivial chain in the presence of pairing coupling and long-range coupling. The results show that CMBS can be enhanced by the pairing coupling and long-range coupling of the trivial chain. When driving the trivial chain by periodic driving field, we deduce the analytical expressions of CMBS in the high-frequency limit, and demonstrate that CMBS can be modulated by the frequency and amplitude of driving field. Finally we exhibit the application of tunable CMBS in realizing quantum logic gates.

  13. Oblique strike-slip faulting of the Cascadia submarine forearc: The Daisy Bank fault zone off central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Chris; Kulm, LaVerne D.; Yeats, Robert S.; Hummon, Cheryl; Huftile, Gary J.; Niem, Alan R.; McNeill, Lisa C.

    The Cascadia submarine forearc off Oregon and Washington is deformed by numerous active WNW-trending, left-lateral strike-slip faults. The kinematics of this set of sub-parallel left-lateral faults suggests clockwise block rotation of the forearc driven by oblique subduction. One major left-lateral strike-slip fault, the 94 km-long Daisy Bank fault, located off central Oregon, was studied in detail using high-resolution AMS 150 kHz and SeaMARC-lA sidescan sonar, swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic reflection profiles and a submersible. The Daisy Bank fault zone cuts the sediments and basaltic basement of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and the overriding North American plate, extending from the abyssal plain to the upper slope-outer shelf region. The Daisy Bank fault, a near-vertical left-lateral fault striking 292°, is a wide structural zone with multiple scarps observed in high-resolution sidescan images. From a submersible, we observe that these scarps offset late Pleistocene gray clay and overlying olive green Holocene mud, dating fault activity as post-12 ka on the upper slope. Vertical separation along individual fault scarps ranges from a few centimeters to 130 meters. Using a retrodeformation technique with multichannel reflection records, we calculate a net slip of 2.2±0.5 km. Fault movement commenced at about 380±50 ka near the western fault tip, based upon an analysis of growth strata and correlation with deep-sea drill hole biostratigraphy. We calculate a slip rate of 5.7±2.0 mm/yr. for the Daisy Bank fault at its western end on the Juan de Fuca plate. The motion of the set of oblique faults, including the Daisy Bank fault, may accommodate a significant portion of the oblique component of plate motion along the central Cascadia margin. We propose a block rotation model by which the seawardmost part of the forearc rotates clockwise and translates northward.

  14. Direct observation of fault zone structure and mechanics in three-dimensions: A study of the SEMP fault system, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Erik Karl

    Outcrops of the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system exhumed from depths of ˜4--17 km allow for the direct observation of fault zone structures throughout the crust, and provide insights into the way this fault, and perhaps others, distributes strain in three dimensions. At Gstatterboden, exhumed from ˜4--8 km, grain size distributions and small fault data reveal the presence of a 10-m-wide high-strain core towards which strain localized during fault evolution. Brittle fracture was accommodated via constrained comminution, which only occurs in strain-weakening rheologies and favors localization. Exposures of the SEMP at Lichtensteinklamm and Kitzlochklamm, exhumed from ˜12 km depth, bracket the brittle ductile transition. At these outcrops, the SEMP is characterized by a ˜70-m-wide, cataclastic fault core that has been altered to clays that transitions downward into a wide, ductile shear zone that has accommodated only minor amounts of strain, placing the majority of displacement on the razor-sharp fault contact. Deformation mechanisms transition from cataclasis and minor amounts of dislocation creep in calcite, to dislocation creep in quartz and calcite occurring against a background of fault-normal solution mass transfer. The ductile/ductile-brittle Rinderkarsee shear zone, exhumed from ˜17 km, marks the SEMP's continuation into the Tauern Window and is composed of three distinct shear zones. The southern, 100-m-wide shear zone has accommodated the most strain, and shows evidence for creep-accommodated grain boundary sliding in feldspar and quartz, while incipient shear zones contain ductile quartz and brittle-feldspars that undergo dislocation creep as fluids alter Kspar to muscovite, which localizes strain along felspar grain boundaries, encouraging ductility. These findings are compared to results from other faults exhumed from similar depth ranges, highlighting fundamental fault zone structures and characteristics.

  15. Diagnosis of constant faults in read-once contact networks over finite bases

    KAUST Repository

    Busbait, Monther I.

    2015-03-01

    We study the depth of decision trees for diagnosis of constant 0 and 1 faults in read-once contact networks over finite bases containing only indecomposable networks. For each basis, we obtain a linear upper bound on the minimum depth of decision trees depending on the number of edges in the networks. For bases containing networks with at most 10 edges we find coefficients for linear bounds which are close to sharp. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Unraveling the deformational history of faults from AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvín, Pablo; Casas-Sainz, Antonio; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Oliva-Urcía, Belén; García-Lasanta, Cristina; Pocoví, Andrés; Gil-Imaz, Andrés; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Osácar, Cinta; José Villalaín, Juan; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Antolín-Tomás, Borja

    2014-05-01

    related to vertical movements in some sites as well as horizontal movements in other, suggesting strain partitioning of the dextral, transpressional movement and compressional jogs in areas with strike changes along the fault. Temperature versus susceptibility curves (from 40 to 700ºC) were carried out to determine the magnetic carriers of the bulk susceptibility and to ensure the reliability of the AMS results. In the Daroca Fault the paramagnetic behavior dominates and hematite is seldom evidenced as the main ferromagnetic carrier. In the Datos Fault the main magnetic carriers are hematite, magnetite and pyrrotite. In the Cameros-Demanda Thrust the main magnetic carrier is magnetite.Temperature dependent clay minerals and vitrinite reflectance data suggest that deformation for the Daroca Fault occurred at shallow crustal levels consistent with early diagenetic conditions in contrast to that observed for the Cameros-Demanda Thrust where deeper conditions are indicated by long-range ordered mixed layer I-S. Relatively shallow conditions for Daroca Fault are confirmed also by fluid inclusion petrography from syn-kinematic veins where immiscible liquid and vapor phases are entrapped. More complex is the interpretation of the Datos Fault where two populations of mixed layer I-S and widespread decrepitated fluid inclusions are present.

  17. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  18. Large‐displacement, hydrothermal frictional properties of DFDP‐1 fault rocks, Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Implications for deep rupture propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, C.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate‐bounding fault that accommodates 65–75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Here we present data on the hydrothermal frictional properties of Alpine Fault rocks that surround the principal slip zones (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and those comprising the PSZ itself. The samples were retrieved from relatively shallow depths during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP‐1) at Gaunt Creek. Simulated fault gouges were sheared at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600°C in order to determine the friction coefficient as well as the velocity dependence of friction. Friction remains more or less constant with changes in temperature, but a transition from velocity‐strengthening behavior to velocity‐weakening behavior occurs at a temperature of T = 150°C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity as well as temperature, with the velocity‐weakening region restricted to higher velocity for higher temperatures. Friction was substantially lower for low‐velocity shearing (V < 0.3 µm/s) at 600°C, but no transition to normal stress independence was observed. In the framework of rate‐and‐state friction, earthquake nucleation is most likely at an intermediate temperature of T = 300°C. The velocity‐strengthening nature of the Alpine Fault rocks at higher temperatures may pose a barrier for rupture propagation to deeper levels, limiting the possible depth extent of large earthquakes. Our results highlight the importance of strain rate in controlling frictional behavior under conditions spanning the classical brittle‐plastic transition for quartzofeldspathic compositions. PMID:27610290

  19. Large-displacement, hydrothermal frictional properties of DFDP-1 fault rocks, Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Implications for deep rupture propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; Boulton, C.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2016-02-01

    The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate-bounding fault that accommodates 65-75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Here we present data on the hydrothermal frictional properties of Alpine Fault rocks that surround the principal slip zones (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and those comprising the PSZ itself. The samples were retrieved from relatively shallow depths during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) at Gaunt Creek. Simulated fault gouges were sheared at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600°C in order to determine the friction coefficient as well as the velocity dependence of friction. Friction remains more or less constant with changes in temperature, but a transition from velocity-strengthening behavior to velocity-weakening behavior occurs at a temperature of T = 150°C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity as well as temperature, with the velocity-weakening region restricted to higher velocity for higher temperatures. Friction was substantially lower for low-velocity shearing (V rate-and-state friction, earthquake nucleation is most likely at an intermediate temperature of T = 300°C. The velocity-strengthening nature of the Alpine Fault rocks at higher temperatures may pose a barrier for rupture propagation to deeper levels, limiting the possible depth extent of large earthquakes. Our results highlight the importance of strain rate in controlling frictional behavior under conditions spanning the classical brittle-plastic transition for quartzofeldspathic compositions.

  20. Geometry and kinematics of the eastern Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains, Nevada and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Campagna, David J.; Anderson, R. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    The Lake Mead fault system is a northeast-striking, 130-km-long zone of left-slip in the southeast Great Basin, active from before 16 Ma to Quaternary time. The northeast end of the Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains of southeast Nevada and northwest Arizona forms a partitioned strain field comprising kinematically linked northeast-striking left-lateral faults, north-striking normal faults, and northwest-striking right-lateral faults. Major faults bound large structural blocks whose internal strain reflects their position within a left step-over of the left-lateral faults. Two north-striking large-displacement normal faults, the Lakeside Mine segment of the South Virgin–White Hills detachment fault and the Piedmont fault, intersect the left step-over from the southwest and northeast, respectively. The left step-over in the Lake Mead fault system therefore corresponds to a right-step in the regional normal fault system.Within the left step-over, displacement transfer between the left-lateral faults and linked normal faults occurs near their junctions, where the left-lateral faults become oblique and normal fault displacement decreases away from the junction. Southward from the center of the step-over in the Virgin Mountains, down-to-the-west normal faults splay northward from left-lateral faults, whereas north and east of the center, down-to-the-east normal faults splay southward from left-lateral faults. Minimum slip is thus in the central part of the left step-over, between east-directed slip to the north and west-directed slip to the south. Attenuation faults parallel or subparallel to bedding cut Lower Paleozoic rocks and are inferred to be early structures that accommodated footwall uplift during the initial stages of extension.Fault-slip data indicate oblique extensional strain within the left step-over in the South Virgin Mountains, manifested as east-west extension; shortening is partitioned between vertical for extension-dominated structural

  1. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  2. Bounded Rationality in Transposition Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2014-01-01

    perspective may affect the commonly employed explanatory factors of administrative capacities, misfit and the heterogeneity of preferences among veto players. To prevent retrospective rationalisation of the transposition process, this paper traces this process as it unfolded in Denmark and the Netherlands....... As bounded rationality is apparent in the transposition processes in these relatively well-organised countries, future transposition studies should devote greater consideration to the bounded rationality perspective....

  3. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  4. SEISMOLOGY: Watching the Hayward Fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R W

    2000-08-18

    The Hayward fault, located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, represents a natural laboratory for seismologists, because it does not sleep silently between major earthquakes. In his Perspective, Simpson discusses the study by Bürgmann et al., who have used powerful new techniques to study the fault. The results indicate that major earthquakes cannot originate in the northern part of the fault. However, surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in the area, suggesting that they originated to the north or south of the segment studied by Bürgmann et al. Fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanism by which plate tectonic stresses are transferred to the Hayward fault.

  5. Advanced cloud fault tolerance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumangali, K.; Benny, Niketa

    2017-11-01

    Cloud computing has become a prevalent on-demand service on the internet to store, manage and process data. A pitfall that accompanies cloud computing is the failures that can be encountered in the cloud. To overcome these failures, we require a fault tolerance mechanism to abstract faults from users. We have proposed a fault tolerant architecture, which is a combination of proactive and reactive fault tolerance. This architecture essentially increases the reliability and the availability of the cloud. In the future, we would like to compare evaluations of our proposed architecture with existing architectures and further improve it.

  6. Physical fault tolerance of nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani P; Antoniadis, Dimitri A; Damoulakis, John N

    2011-04-29

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of gates into the most efficient known fault-tolerant architecture is characterized by a subexponential suppression of error rate with electron number, and incurs significant overhead in wiring and complexity. We conclude that it is more efficient to prevent logical errors with physical fault tolerance than to correct logical errors with fault-tolerant architecture.

  7. An Overview of Transmission Line Protection by Artificial Neural Network: Fault Detection, Fault Classification, Fault Location, and Fault Direction Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary power systems are associated with serious issues of faults on high voltage transmission lines. Instant isolation of fault is necessary to maintain the system stability. Protective relay utilizes current and voltage signals to detect, classify, and locate the fault in transmission line. A trip signal will be sent by the relay to a circuit breaker with the purpose of disconnecting the faulted line from the rest of the system in case of a disturbance for maintaining the stability of the remaining healthy system. This paper focuses on the studies of fault detection, fault classification, fault location, fault phase selection, and fault direction discrimination by using artificial neural networks approach. Artificial neural networks are valuable for power system applications as they can be trained with offline data. Efforts have been made in this study to incorporate and review approximately all important techniques and philosophies of transmission line protection reported in the literature till June 2014. This comprehensive and exhaustive survey will reduce the difficulty of new researchers to evaluate different ANN based techniques with a set of references of all concerned contributions.

  8. Simulating Earthquake Rupture and Off-Fault Fracture Response: Application to the Safety Assessment of the Swedish Nuclear Waste Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Falth, B.

    2014-12-09

    To assess the long-term safety of a deep repository of spent nuclear fuel, upper bound estimates of seismically induced secondary fracture shear displacements are needed. For this purpose, we analyze a model including an earthquake fault, which is surrounded by a number of smaller discontinuities representing fractures on which secondary displacements may be induced. Initial stresses are applied and a rupture is initiated at a predefined hypocenter and propagated at a specified rupture speed. During rupture we monitor shear displacements taking place on the nearby fracture planes in response to static as well as dynamic effects. As a numerical tool, we use the 3Dimensional Distinct Element Code (3DEC) because it has the capability to handle numerous discontinuities with different orientations and at different locations simultaneously. In tests performed to benchmark the capability of our method to generate and propagate seismic waves, 3DEC generates results in good agreement with results from both Stokes solution and the Compsyn code package. In a preliminary application of our method to the nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, southern Sweden, we assume end-glacial stress conditions and rupture on a shallow, gently dipping, highly prestressed fault with low residual strength. The rupture generates nearly complete stress drop and an M-w 5.6 event on the 12 km(2) rupture area. Of the 1584 secondary fractures (150 m radius), with a wide range of orientations and locations relative to the fault, a majority move less than 5 mm. The maximum shear displacement is some tens of millimeters at 200 m fault-fracture distance.

  9. Constructing an Alpine Fault Paleoseismicity Record from Slumped Lacustrine Deposits in the Cascade River Valley, South Westland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, G.; Moy, C. M.; Toy, V. G.; Ohneiser, C.; Howarth, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is a major structure in New Zealand capable of producing earthquakes of magnitude 7 or greater, which delineates the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Paleoseismic records of these earthquakes indicate recurrence intervals of 300 - 400 years over the last 1,300 years. However, there are no pre-Holocene records. Documenting the late Pleistocene record of magnitude, timing, and frequency of earthquakes would significantly reduce uncertainty in hazard analyses. The tectonically complex Cascade River Valley follows the Southern Alpine Fault, where the fault dominantly accommodates strike-slip motion. Two ~7m outcrops of proglacial lacustrine silt are exposed along the river in which, deformed rhythmites bounded by planar laminated rhythmites have been identified. These exhibit a variety of fold geometries in outcrop and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, all of which show some degree of asymmetry. Initial radiocarbon ages of 14,400 and 13,300 14C yr BP have been obtained from terrestrial plant material isolated from samples near the base of one outcrop. Given the age range and laminae density, these dates suggest that the rhythmites are varves, but additional radiocarbon dates and CT-scans will be used to confirm this. The deformed horizons are interpreted to be seismites formed by slumping. Earthquake shaking triggers an increase in pore fluid pressure, which destabilises the sublacustrine slope causing failure and the release of silt into the sedimentary system. As silt is transported by downslope shear it is deformed in distinct layers. Displacement of volumes of silt also causes the formation of seiche waves that apply shear stress to lake floor sediments causing further deformation. Deviations in magnetic susceptibility and the declination of magnetic remanence observed underneath and within deformed horizons are interpreted to be a response of earthquake shaking. Data from these different proxies will be presented and

  10. Fault Tolerant Distributive Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnell, Harris

    1982-12-01

    A fault tolerant design used to enhanced the survivability of a distributive processing system is described. Based on physical limitations, mission duration and maintenance support, the approach has emphasized functional redundancy in place of the traditional hardware or software level redundancy. A top down architecture within the system's hierarchy allows sharing of common resources. Various techniques used to enhance the survivability of the hardware at the equipment, module and component level were analyzed. The intent of the on going work is to demonstrate the ability of a distributive processing system to maintain itself for a long period of time.

  11. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed

  12. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr−1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr−1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr−1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting. PMID:28290529

  13. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Niemi, N A

    2017-03-14

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr-1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr-1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr-1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  14. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr-1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr-1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr-1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  15. Fault structure, damage and acoustic emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresen, G. H.; Göbel, T.; Stanchits, S.; Kwiatek, G.; Charalampidou, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of faulting-related damage and acoustic emission activity in experiments performed on granite, quartzite and sandstone samples with 40-50 mm diameter and 100-125 mm length. Experiments were performed in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame in triaxial compression at confining pressures ranging from 20-140 MPa. We performed a series of fracture and stick-slip sliding experiments on prefractured samples. Acoustic emissions (AE) and ultrasonic velocities were monitored using up to 14 P-wave sensors glued to the cylindrical surface of the rock. Full waveforms were stored in a 16 channel transient recording system (Daxbox, PRÖKEL, Germany). Full moment tensor analysis and polarity of AE first motions were used to discriminate source types associated with tensile, shear and pore-collapse cracking. To monitor strain, two pairs of orthogonally oriented strain-gages were glued onto the specimen surface. Fracture nucleation and growth occurred from a nucleation patch mostly located at the specimen surface or at the tip of prefabricated notches inside the specimens. Irrespective of the rock type, fracture propagation is associated with formation of a damage zone surrounding the fracture surface as revealed by distribution of cracks and AE hypocenters displaying a logarithmic decay in microcrack damage with distance normal to the fault trace. The width of the damage zone varies along the fault. After fracturing, faults were locked by increasing confining pressure. Subsequent sliding was mostly induced by driving the piston at a constant displacement rate producing large single events or multiple stick-slips. With increasing sliding distance a corrugated and rough fault surface formed displaying displacement-parallel lineations. Microstructural analysis of fault surfaces and cross-sections revealed formation of multiple secondary shears progressively merging into an anastomosing 3D-network controlling damage evolution and AE activity in the fault

  16. Fault Monitooring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to line breakage...... and risky abortion of an oil-loading operation. With signicant drift forces from waves, non-Gaussian elements dominate in residuals and fault diagnosis need be designed using dedicated change detection for the type of distribution encountered. In addition to dedicated diagnosis, an optimal position...... algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Detection properties and fault-tolerant control are demonstrated by high delity simulations...

  17. Behavior of Repeating Earthquake Sequences in Central California and the Implications for Subsurface Fault Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, D C; Nadeau, R; Burgmann, R

    2007-07-09

    Repeating earthquakes (REs) are sequences of events that have nearly identical waveforms and are interpreted to represent fault asperities driven to failure by loading from aseismic creep on the surrounding fault surface at depth. We investigate the occurrence of these REs along faults in central California to determine which faults exhibit creep and the spatio-temporal distribution of this creep. At the juncture of the San Andreas and southern Calaveras-Paicines faults, both faults as well as a smaller secondary fault, the Quien Sabe fault, are observed to produce REs over the observation period of March 1984-May 2005. REs in this area reflect a heterogeneous creep distribution along the fault plane with significant variations in time. Cumulative slip over the observation period at individual sequence locations is determined to range from 5.5-58.2 cm on the San Andreas fault, 4.8-14.1 cm on the southern Calaveras-Paicines fault, and 4.9-24.8 cm on the Quien Sabe fault. Creep at depth appears to mimic the behaviors seen of creep on the surface in that evidence of steady slip, triggered slip, and episodic slip phenomena are also observed in the RE sequences. For comparison, we investigate the occurrence of REs west of the San Andreas fault within the southern Coast Range. Events within these RE sequences only occurred minutes to weeks apart from each other and then did not repeat again over the observation period, suggesting that REs in this area are not produced by steady aseismic creep of the surrounding fault surface.

  18. Fault Management Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  19. Analysis of high-resolution lidar digital topographic data along the Marlborough Fault System: The Awatere and Clarence faults, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Grenader, J.; McGuire, C. P.; Nicol, A.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze newly acquired lidar high-resolution digital topographic data to measure offset geomorphic markers along the Awatere and Clarence faults in the Marlborough Fault System, northern South Island, New Zealand. With an average shot density of ≥ 12 shots/m2, these lidar data, which were acquired for us by the US National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) and New Zealand Aerial Mapping, offer a uniquely detailed view of the topography along ~90 km of the Awatere fault and ~160 km of the Clarence fault, allowing us to measure geomorphic offsets ranging in size from ~1 m to 100s of meters. In this specific study, we examine offset river terraces at the well-known Saxton River site on the Awatere fault, and at Tophouse Road on the Clarence fault. By constraining the ages of those river terraces using post-IR IRSL (225 °C) single-grain K-feldspar dating protocols, we determine latest Pleistocene to late-Holocene slip histories of the Awatere and Clarence faults at those locations. This project is part of a broader effort to generate incremental slip rates and paleoearthquake ages from the four main faults that comprise the Marlborough Fault System with the goal of further understanding how mechanically complementary faults work together to accommodate relative plate motions.

  20. Logs and paleoseismic interpretations from trenches 14C and 14D on the Bow Ridge fault, northeastern Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menges, C.M.; Taylor, E.M.; Vadurro, G.; Oswald, J.A.; Cress, R.; Murray, M.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Paces, J.B.; Mahan, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    Detailed studies of trenches 14D and 14C on the Bow Ridge fault indicate two to three displacements and long recurrence intervals during the middle to late Quaternary. The main trace of the fault is marked by a thick (20--40 centimeters wide) subvertical shear zone coated with multiple carbonate-silica laminae and several generations of fine-grained fissure-fill debris. Exposed in the trenches is a vertically stacked sequence of thin (0.3--1.5 meters thick) fine-grained colluvial, alluvial, and eolian deposits that commonly contain smaller wedge-shaped units or several weakly to strongly developed buried paleosols, or both. The two to three surface-rupture events are recognized at discrete stratigraphic intervals in the sequence based on (1) incremental up-section decreases in offset of marker horizons, (b) upward terminations of shear zones, fissure fills, and fractures, and (c) the position of small scarp-derived colluvial wedges deposited adjacent to the fault above downfaulted marker horizons. Preferred estimates of the vertical displacement per event are 12 and 40 centimeters. Left-oblique striations are observed on carbonate fault laminae, which, if tectonic in origin, increase the vertical displacement by factors of 1.1 to 1.7, yielding preferred net slip displacements per event of 13 to 70 centimeters. Thermoluminescence ages of 48 {+-} 20 and 132 {+-} 23 thousand years bracket the ages of the events, which probably occurred near the bounding ages of the time interval. These age constraints suggest long, average recurrence intervals between the three events of 75 to 210 ky; the preferred values range between 100 to 140 ky. The small net cumulative displacement of two dated reference horizons yield very low fault slip rates of 0.002 to 0.007 millimeters per year; the preferred value is 0.003 millimeters per year.

  1. The San Andreas Fault 'Supersite' (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    An expanded and permanent Supersite has been proposed to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for the San Andreas Fault system, based upon the successful initial Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Geohazard Supersite for the Los Angeles region from 2009-2013. As justification for the comprehensive San Andreas Supersite, consider the earthquake history of California, in particular the devastating M 7.8 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which occurred along the San Andreas Fault, as did an earthquake of similar magnitude in 1857 in southern California. Los Angeles was only a small town then, but now the risk exposure has increased for both of California's megacities. Between the San Francisco and Los Angeles urban areas lies a section of the San Andreas Fault known to creep continually, so it has relatively less earthquake hazard. It used to be thought of as capable of stopping earthquakes entering it from either direction. Transitional behavior at either end of the creeping section is known to display a full range of seismic to aseismic slip events and accompanying seismicity and strain transient events. Because the occurrence of creep events is well documented by instrumental networks such as CISN and PBO, the San Andreas Supersite can be expected to be especially effective. A good baseline level of geodetic data regarding past events and strain accumulation and release exists. Many prior publications regarding the occurrence of geophysical phenomena along the San Andreas Fault system mean that in order to make novel contributions, state-of-the-art science will be required within this Supersite region. In more recent years, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck adjacent to the San Andreas Fault and caused the most damage along the western side of the San Francisco Bay Area. More recently, the concern has focused on the potential for future events along the Hayward Fault along the eastern side of San Francisco Bay. In Southern California, earthquakes

  2. Bimaterial interfaces at the Karadere segment of the North Anatolian Fault, northwestern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdahmadi, B.; Bohnhoff, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We image velocity contrast (bimaterial) interfaces along the Karadere Fault of the North Anatolian Fault Zone, toward the eastern part of the 1999 Izmit Mw 7.4 rupture in NW Turkey, using waveforms recorded by a local seismic network. Applying an automatic procedure for identification and picking of fault zone head waves (FZHW) and direct P arrivals, and manually revising the picks through particle motion analysis, we identify two different groups of FZHW as well as fault zone reflected waves (FZRW). The first group of FZHW has a moveout with respect to the direct P arrivals with distance traveled along the fault, indicating a deep bimaterial interface down to the base of the seismogenic crust with an average velocity contrast of ~3.4%. The second group of FZHW has a constant time difference from the direct P arrivals and is associated with a shallow local interface bounding a low-velocity damage zone or basin structure that extends to a depth of 4-5 km. While the first group of FZHW exists on the slower crustal block, the second group of FZHW and the FZRW are present generally on both sides of the fault. These phases add to the richness and complexity of the early P waveforms observed at stations close to a large fault. The relatively low velocity contrast across the Karadere Fault compared to values to the west may have helped stopping the Izmit rupture.

  3. Fault tolerance in "multiprocessor systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    puter architecture; [multiprocessor systems; reconfiguration; system- level diagnosis; VLSI processor arrays. 1. Introduction. Fault-tolerant computing can be defined as the ability to execute specified algorithms correctly inspite of the presence of faults. The complexity of supersystems and the increasing use of such computer ...

  4. The evolution of faults formed by shearing across joint zones in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rodrick; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    The evolution of strike-slip and normal faults formed by slip along joint zones is documented by detailed field studies in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA. Zones of closely spaced planar sub-parallel joints arranged en échelon are sheared, forming faults. Fracturing occurs as a result of shearing, forming new joints. Later shearing along these joints leads to successively formed small faults and newer joints. This process is repeated through many generations of fracturing with increasing fault slip producing a hierarchical array of structures. Strain localization produced by shearing of joint zones at irregularities in joint traces, fracture intersections, and in the span between adjacent sheared joints results in progressive fragmentation of the weakened sandstone, which leads to the formation of gouge along the fault zone. The length and continuity of the gouge and associated slip surfaces is related to the slip magnitude and fault geometry with slip ranging from several millimeters to about 150 m. Distributed damage in a zone surrounding the gouge core is related to the original joint zone configuration (step sense, individual sheared joint overlaps and separation), shear sense, and slip magnitude. Our evolutionary model of fault development helps to explain some outstanding issues concerning complexities in faulting such as, the variability in development of fault rock and fault related fractures, and the failure processes in faults.

  5. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    be filled in mostly by sedimentary and erosional material deposited from above. Comparisons between faults on Europa and Earth may generate ideas useful in the study of terrestrial faulting. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. The tidal tension opens the fault; subsequent tidal stress causes it to move lengthwise in one direction. Then the tidal forces close the fault up again. This prevents the area from moving back to its original position. If it moves forward with the next daily tidal cycle, the result is a steady accumulation of these lengthwise offset motions. Unlike Europa, here on Earth, large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas are set in motion not by tidal pull, but by plate tectonic forces from the planet's mantle. North is to the top of the picture. The Earth picture (left) shows a LandSat Thematic Mapper image acquired in the infrared (1.55 to 1.75 micrometers) by LandSat5 on Friday, October 20th 1989 at 10:21 am. The original resolution was 28.5 meters per picture element. The Europa picture (right)is centered at 66 degrees south latitude and 195 degrees west longitude. The highest resolution frames, obtained at 40 meters per picture element with a spacecraft range of less than 4200 kilometers (2600 miles), are set in the context of lower resolution regional frames obtained at 200 meters per picture element and a range of 22,000 kilometers (13,600 miles). The images were taken on September 26, 1998 by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL HTTP://www.j

  6. Structure of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Sills, D. W.; Heron, B.; Almeida, R. V.; Guillemette, R. N.

    2010-12-01

    clay- and serpentinite, 2) microscale particle fracture, inter-particle slip, and abrasive wear are important deformation processes in the gouge layer at this depth, and 3) the contrast in cohesion between the incohesive foliated gouge of the SDZ and the bounding foliated cataclasite reflects a marked contrast in strain-rate and strain. All spot-core taken during Phases 1 and 3, except that capturing the CDZ, have been oriented in the geographic reference frame by aligning fractures and layering observed in the spot-core with that imaged in geophysical logs. Kinematic indicators in the SDZ gouge, including the shape preferred orientation of mesoscopic clasts and striated slip-surfaces, are consistent with almost pure strike-slip movement. Fabrics in the foliated cataclasite and damaged arkosic sandstone host rocks indicate nearly fault-normal contraction with strike- and dip-parallel extension. The contacts of the gouge with bounding units display variable orientations consistent with a mesoscopic and macroscopic corrugated fault surface morphology. Compared to exhumed traces of the SAF and other drilled seismic faults, the structure at SAFOD is unique in that it contains thick layers of incohesive foliated gouge that record distributed flow at the mesoscopic scale.

  7. The study of characteristics of Longitude Valley Fault derived from the dense continuous GPS array, southeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Chien, Tsai; Tzay-Chyn, Shin; Shui-Beih, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan is situated at the junction between the southeast-facing Ryukyu arc-trench system and the western-facing Luzon arc-Manila Trench system. The 150 km long, NNE-striking Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF) in eastern Taiwan is an extremely active high-angle thrust fault. It bounds the Coastal Range and the Longitudinal Valley, which is considered a collision boundary between the Philippine Sea and the Eurasian plates. The Central Range is quite different geology structure from the Coastal Range. The Central Range is composed of the pre-Tertiary metamorphic basement and weakly metamorphosed Cenozoic argillite-slate series. The Coastal Range consist of Neogene andesitic volcanic units and associated turbidite sediments. The difference of those two geological provinces make LVF presents different characteristics in five different area. There are Hualien, Ruisui, Yuli, Chihshang, and Taitung area. In this study, we collect the continuous GPS data from a very dense array in the Longitudinal Valley area from 2009 to 2015 utilized to study the spatial variation of crustal motion along the LVF. With respect to Penghu station (S01R) in the Chinese continental margin, velocities for stations on the western side of the LVF (Longitudinal Valley and eastern Central Range) are 17-37 mm/yr in directions 280-312°, whereas those on the eastern side of the LVF, the Coastal Range, are 25-68 mm/yr in directions 300-325°. A major velocity discontinuity of about 20-25 mm/yr across the Longitudinal Valley is attributed to the aseismic slip along the LVF as revealed by trilateration data previously. The south of Fengping area, the velocity of Coastal Range is 30-40 mm/yr in 315-332° relative to the Central Range, while the near-fault motions are about 13-33 mm/yr in 309-336°. Various partitions on the left-lateral strike-slip and convergent components along the LVF are found. In the southern Longitudinal Valley crustal motion is mainly accommodated on the LVF and the Luyeh Fault. In

  8. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured properties of the wake of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, N = 5), flying at 6-10 m s- 1 in a variable speed wind tunnel as well as flow around taxidermically prepared specimens (N = 4) mounted on a sting instrumented with force transducers. For the specimens, we varied air velocity from 2 to 12 m s- 1 and body angle from -15∘ to 50∘. The wake of bounding birds and mounted specimens consisted of a pair of counterrotating vortices shed into the wake from the tail, with induced downwash in the sagittal plane and upwash in parasagittal planes lateral to the bird. This wake structure was present even when the tail was entirely removed. We observed good agreement between force measures derived from PIV and force transducers over the range of body angles typically used by zebra finch during forward flight. Body lift:drag (L:D) ratios averaged 1.4 in live birds and varied between 1 and 1.5 in specimens at body angles from 10∘ to 30∘. Peak (L:D) ratio was the same in live birds and specimens (1.5) and was exhibited in specimens at body angles of 15∘ or 20∘, consistent with the lower end of body angles utilized during bounds. Increasing flight velocity in live birds caused a decrease in CL and CD from maximum values of 1.19 and 0.95 during flight at 6 m s- 1 to minimum values of 0.70 and 0.54 during flight at 10 m s- 1. Consistent with delta-wing theory as applied to birds with a graduated-tail shape, trimming the tail to 0 and 50% of normal length reduced L:D ratios and extending tail length to 150% of normal increased L:D ratio. As downward induced velocity is present in the

  9. Fault tolerant control for switched linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Dongsheng; Shi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This book presents up-to-date research and novel methodologies on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for switched linear systems. It provides a unified yet neat framework of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control of switched systems. It can therefore serve as a useful textbook for senior and/or graduate students who are interested in knowing the state-of-the-art of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control areas, as well as recent advances in switched linear systems.  

  10. On Lower Bounds for Statistical Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ling Loh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tools from information theory have played an increasingly prevalent role in statistical machine learning. In addition to developing efficient, computationally feasible algorithms for analyzing complex datasets, it is of theoretical importance to determine whether such algorithms are “optimal” in the sense that no other algorithm can lead to smaller statistical error. This paper provides a survey of various techniques used to derive information-theoretic lower bounds for estimation and learning. We focus on the settings of parameter and function estimation, community recovery, and online learning for multi-armed bandits. A common theme is that lower bounds are established by relating the statistical learning problem to a channel decoding problem, for which lower bounds may be derived involving information-theoretic quantities such as the mutual information, total variation distance, and Kullback–Leibler divergence. We close by discussing the use of information-theoretic quantities to measure independence in machine learning applications ranging from causality to medical imaging, and mention techniques for estimating these quantities efficiently in a data-driven manner.

  11. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  12. Space-bounded communication complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brody, Joshua Eric; Chen, Shiteng; Papakonstantinou, Periklis A.

    2013-01-01

    -obliviousness shows up. For this model we also introduce new techniques through which certain limitations of space-bounded computation are revealed. One of the main motivations of this work is in understanding the difference in the use of space when computing the following functions: Equality (EQ), Inner Product (IP......In the past thirty years, Communication Complexity has emerged as a foundational tool to proving lower bounds in many areas of computer science. Its power comes from its generality, but this generality comes at a price---no superlinear communication lower bound is possible, since a player may...... communicate his entire input. However, what if the players are limited in their ability to recall parts of their interaction? We introduce memory models for 2-party communication complexity. Our general model is as follows: two computationally unrestricted players, Alice and Bob, each have s(n) bits of memory...

  13. Fault Current Characteristics of the DFIG under Asymmetrical Fault Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During non-severe fault conditions, crowbar protection is not activated and the rotor windings of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG are excited by the AC/DC/AC converter. Meanwhile, under asymmetrical fault conditions, the electrical variables oscillate at twice the grid frequency in synchronous dq frame. In the engineering practice, notch filters are usually used to extract the positive and negative sequence components. In these cases, the dynamic response of a rotor-side converter (RSC and the notch filters have a large influence on the fault current characteristics of the DFIG. In this paper, the influence of the notch filters on the proportional integral (PI parameters is discussed and the simplified calculation models of the rotor current are established. Then, the dynamic performance of the stator flux linkage under asymmetrical fault conditions is also analyzed. Based on this, the fault characteristics of the stator current under asymmetrical fault conditions are studied and the corresponding analytical expressions of the stator fault current are obtained. Finally, digital simulation results validate the analytical results. The research results are helpful to meet the requirements of a practical short-circuit calculation and the construction of a relaying protection system for the power grid with penetration of DFIGs.

  14. Constraining fault growth rates and fault evolution in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Bull, Jonathan M.; Barnes, Phil M.; Taylor, Susanna K.; Horgan, Huw

    2000-10-01

    Understanding how faults propagate, grow, and interact in fault systems is important because they are primarily responsible for distributing strain in the upper crust. They localize deformation and stress release, often producing surface displacements that control sedimentation and fluid flow, either by acting as conduits or barriers. Identifying fault spatial distribution, quantifying activity, evaluating linkage mechanisms, and estimating fault growth rates are key components in seismic risk evaluation. Scientists from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand, and the Southampton Oceanography Centre, United Kingdom, are working on a collaborative project that aims to improve understanding of faulting processes in the Earth's crust.The program comprises two research cruises to survey the Whakatane Graben, New Zealand, which is a zone of intense seismicity active extensional faulting, and rapid subsidence within the back-arc region of the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone (Figure 1). Few places in the world offer the same opportunity to study the mechanisms by which major crustal faults have grown from small- to large-scale structures capable of generating moderate to large-magnitude earthquakes.

  15. Active fault traces along Bhuj Fault and Katrol Hill Fault, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    observed on the left bank of a stream cutting the terrace. Faulting is well revealed by 10–30 cm thick gouge. Lack of any corroborating evidence show- ing displacement of Quaternary deposits makes it difficult to decipher the active nature of the fault. However, the probability cannot be ruled- out. In the outlet of the small ...

  16. Dynamics of Earthquake Faults

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J M; Shaw, B E

    1993-01-01

    We present an overview of our ongoing studies of the rich dynamical behavior of the uniform, deterministic Burridge--Knopoff model of an earthquake fault. We discuss the behavior of the model in the context of current questions in seismology. Some of the topics considered include: (1) basic properties of the model, such as the magnitude vs. frequency distribution and the distinction between small and large events; (2) dynamics of individual events, including dynamical selection of rupture propagation speeds; (3) generalizations of the model to more realistic, higher dimensional models; (4) studies of predictability, in which artificial catalogs generated by the model are used to test and determine the limitations of pattern recognition algorithms used in seismology.

  17. Bound states in the strong coupling limit

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1972-01-01

    The author shows that the number of bound states of a particle in a short-range potential in n dimensions is given asymptotically by N=g /sup n/2/S/sub n//(2 pi )/sup n/ integral mod 2MV/sup -//h(cross)/sup 2/ mod /sup n/2/d/sup n/x+0(g/sup n/2-g/) for g to infinity , where gV /sup -/ is the attractive part of the potential, and S/sub /n is the volume of the n dimensional sphere with unit radius. (10 refs).

  18. Imaging the Alpine Fault: preliminary results from a detailed 3D-VSP experiment at the DFDP-2 drill site in Whataroa, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Vera; Bodenburg, Sascha; Buske, Stefan; Townend, John; Kellett, Richard; Savage, Martha; Schmitt, Douglas; Constantinou, Alexis; Eccles, Jennifer; Lawton, Donald; Hall, Kevin; Bertram, Malcolm; Gorman, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The plate-bounding Alpine Fault in New Zealand is an 850 km long transpressive continental fault zone that is late in its earthquake cycle. The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to deliver insight into the geological structure of this fault zone and its evolution by drilling and sampling the Alpine Fault at depth. Previously analysed 2D reflection seismic data image the main Alpine Fault reflector at a depth of 1.5-2.2 km with a dip of approximately 48° to the southeast below the DFDP-2 borehole. Additionally, there are indications of a more complex 3D fault structure with several fault branches which have not yet been clearly imaged in detail. For that reason we acquired a 3D-VSP seismic data set at the DFDP-2 drill site in January 2016. A zero-offset VSP and a walk-away VSP survey were conducted using a Vibroseis source. Within the borehole, a permanently installed "Distributed Acoustic Fibre Optic Cable" (down to 893 m) and a 3C Sercel slimwave tool (down to 400 m) were used to record the seismic wavefield. In addition, an array of 160 three-component receivers with a spacing of 10 m perpendicular and 20 m parallel to the main strike of the Alpine Fault was set up and moved successively along the valley to record reflections from the main Alpine Fault zone over a broad depth range and to derive a detailed 3D tomographic velocity model in the hanging wall. We will show a detailed 3D velocity model derived from first-arrival traveltime tomography. Subsets of the whole data set were analysed separately to estimate the corresponding ray coverage and the reliability of the observed features in the obtained velocity model. By testing various inversion parameters and starting models, we derived a detailed near-surface velocity model that reveals the significance of the old glacial valley structures. Hence, this new 3D model improves the velocity model derived previously from a 2D seismic profile line in that area. Furthermore, processing of the dense 3C data

  19. Using a Geophysical Model to Estimate the Static Coefficient of Friction and Cohesion on a Central Portion of the North Anatolian Fault East of the Marmara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, B.; McQuarrie, N.

    2012-12-01

    On August 17th, 1999, a magnitude 7.4 earthquake shook Kocaeli (Izmit), Turkey killing over 17,000 people. The epicenter was 100-km east of Turkey's largest city, Istanbul, along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system. This 1600-km long, strike-slip boundary divides the Anatolian plate and the Eurasian plate. The NAF slips at an average rate of 2-3-cm/y, and has an estimated earthquake recurrence interval of approximately 300 years. To further understand the NAF system and its dynamics, a simplified 2-D mesh model was developed to evaluate the fault friction coefficient for various low cohesion values along an ~85-km stretch of the NAF system east of the Marmara Sea containing the Mudurnu valley between the cities of Izmit and Bolu (where the NAF splits). The NAF, in the region of interest, exhibits shorter recurrence intervals of 100-150 years over the last four centuries. In this region, two sets of faults within the NAF system converge and then diverge; one set diverges to the NW to bound the northern rim of the Marmara Sea, while the second set continues to the SW along the southern rim of the Marmara Sea. A 100 year seismic record of earthquakes between M3.0 and M9.0 supports the claim that the two sets of strike-slip faults near one another in the center of the region of interest, but do not intersect, thus defining three distinct geology provinces. A representational 2-D mesh separates the study area into three geologic provinces separated by these faults. The mesh was processed using PyLith, a finite element code tectonic deformation software. The PyLith software allows us to assign rock physics parameters of the surface geology, and relative plate motions as velocity boundary conditions. Surface geology was simplified into the three rock types, and rock physics parameters were assigned using general physical parameters for each rock type and extrapolating further data from the Canadian Rock Physics Database. An average value for density and P-wave velocity

  20. Absolute age determination of quaternary faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Seok Hoon; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-03-15

    To constrain the age of neotectonic fault movement, Rb-Sr, K-Ar, U-series disequilibrium, C-14 and Be-10 methods were applied to the fault gouges, fracture infillings and sediments from the Malbang, Ipsil, Wonwonsa faults faults in the Ulsan fault zone, Yangsan fault in the Yeongdeog area and southeastern coastal area. Rb-Sr and K-Ar data imply that the fault movement of the Ulan fault zone initiated at around 30 Ma and preliminary dating result for the Yang san fault is around 70 Ma in the Yeongdeog area. K-Ar and U-series disequilibrium dating results for fracture infillings in the Ipsil fault are consistent with reported ESR ages. Radiocarbon ages of quaternary sediments from the Jeongjari area are discordant with stratigraphic sequence. Carbon isotope data indicate a difference of sedimentry environment for those samples. Be-10 dating results for the Suryum fault area are consistent with reported OSL results.

  1. Bounded Densities and Their Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozine, Igor; Krymsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how one can compute interval-valued statistical measures given limited information about the underlying distribution. The particular focus is on a bounded derivative of a probability density function and its combination with other available statistical evidence for computing ...

  2. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclear physics changed drastically as the new generation of accelerators started providing more and more rare isotopes, which are away from the line of stability. These weakly bound nuclei are found to exhibit new forms of nuclear matter and unprecedented exotic behaviour. The low breakup thresholds of these rare ...

  3. Distance bounds on quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Zanardi, Paolo; Khodjasteh, Kaveh

    2008-07-01

    We derive rigorous upper bounds on the distance between quantum states in an open-system setting in terms of the operator norm between Hamiltonians describing their evolution. We illustrate our results with an example taken from protection against decoherence using dynamical decoupling.

  4. Architecture of thrust faults with alongstrike variations in fault-plane dip: anatomy of the Lusatian Fault, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coubal, Miroslav; Adamovič, Jiří; Málek, Jiří; Prouza, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2014), s. 183-208 ISSN 1802-6222 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : fault architecture * fault plane geometry * drag structures * thrust fault * sandstone * Lusatian Fault Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  5. Fault Monitoring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to mooring line...... breakage and a high-risk abortion of an oil-loading operation. With significant drift forces from waves, non-Gaussian elements dominate forces and the residuals designed for fault diagnosis. Hypothesis testing need be designed using dedicated change detection for the type of distribution encountered....... In addition to dedicated diagnosis, an optimal position algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Furthermore, even in the case of line breakage, this optimal position strategy could be utilised to avoid breakage of a second mooring line...

  6. Multi-method Feasibility Study of Geophysical Methods to Accurately Delineate the Mt. General Fault in Hinkley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J. J.; Grannell, R.; Martin, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Barstow, California is in the immediate vicinity of the dextral Mt. General, Lenwood and Harper Lake faults.These faults exhibit a lack of surface expression common to faults in the Central Mojave, in which the faults are occluded by Quaternary alluvial fill resulting in large sections of the fault strand to be inferred near high risk localities. The three quaternary right-lateral strike slip faults belong to the Lenwood-Lockhart and Harper Lake fault zones. These fault zones associated with the Eastern California Shear Zone, a predominantly discontinuous northwest striking dextral shear zone that accommodates approximately 25% of interplate motion along the Pacific and North American plate boundary from the San Andreas bend on the south and Walker Lane shear zone to the northwest. The proximity of the inferred fault to high density population centers and critical infrastructure pose considerable risk to the inhabitants of Southern California, where precise knowledge of fault locations is critical. A feasibility study using various complementary geophysical methods was conducted to assess which, if any, provide the highest likelihood in accurately delineating a fault trace in the subsurface. The study focused on the Mt. General fault in Hinkley, CA. Two-dimensional gravity, magnetic, seismic refraction, and electrical resistivity along the same bounded location were collected, modeled, and interpreted. Gravity and magnetic results revealed anomalies across the inferred fault. Likewise, a seismic refraction model show a clear velocity contrast. Additionally, the electrical resistivity model showed a decrease in resistivity across the fault zone implying a groundwater barrier, complementing results from the other methods. Furthermore, overlaying the profiles shows clear evidence of a fault scarp. The success of the feasibility study in delineating the Mt. General fault zone shows that adopting a multi-method approach to the Lenwood-Lockhart and Harper Lake fault zone

  7. Method of locating ground faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L. (Inventor); Rose, Allen H. (Inventor); Cull, Ronald C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  8. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults — Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault\\'s rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault\\'s offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of

  9. Map and Database of Probable and Possible Quaternary Faults in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruleman, C.A.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Haller, K.M.; Rukstales, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    conjugate shear system in a transpressional region of the Trans-Himalayan orogenic belt. The general patterns and orientations of faults and the styles of deformation that we interpret from the imagery are consistent with the styles of faulting determined from focal mechanisms of historical earthquakes. Northwest-trending strike-slip fault zones are cut and displaced by younger, southeast-verging thrust faults; these relations define the interaction between northwest-southeast-oriented contraction and northwest-directed extrusion in the western Himalaya, Pamir, and Hindu Kush regions. Transpression extends into north-central Afghanistan where north-verging contraction along the east-west-trending Alburz-Marmul fault system interacts with northwest-trending strike-slip faults. Pressure ridges related to thrust faulting and extensional basins bounded by normal faults are located at major stepovers in these northwest-trending strike-slip systems. In contrast, young faulting in central and western Afghanistan indicates that the deformation is dominated by extension where strike-slip fault zones transition into regions of normal faults. In addition to these initial observations, our digital map and database provide a foundation that can be expanded, complemented, and modified as future investigations provide more detailed information about the location, characteristics, and history of movement on Quaternary faults in Afghanistan.

  10. Assessment and geomodelling of site effects along the eastern Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault Zone in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulysse, S. M. J.; Havenith, H. B.; Boisson, D.

    2016-12-01

    The last 2010 earthquake which hits Haiti killed more than 230,000 people, caused nearly 300,000 wounded and material damage of more than 8 billion dollars. This event whose epicenter was located in Léogâne, to the west of Port-au-Prince was triggered by a north dipping fault, the "Léogâne fault", near and to the north of the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF), a very hazardous fault system crossing the southern part of the country. Several large international projects were carried out in Port-au-Prince and Léogâne. Our work which is done in the frame of a Belgian-Haitian collaboration project rather focused on an eastern region of Port-au-Prince, Fonds-Parisien and a site called Gros-Morne in the southeast of the city. The Fonds-Parisien area is crossed by the eastern part of EPGF. The north of the area is bordered by a sedimentary basin hosting the Azuei Lake and to the south it is bounded by the foothills of a mountain range, the "Massif de la Selle". The Gros-Morne zone is also situated nearby the EPGF and is limited to the north by the Cul-de-Sac plain, a sedimentary basin and to the south, by the foothills of the "Massif de la Selle". We performed local geophysical investigations to assess site effects 1) in areas relatively far from the epicenter, not intensively hit by the 2010 event, to see if they may fit for future construction projects, 2) on a hill in the southeastern part of Port-au-Prince that was affected by important destruction and secondary effects. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) measurements as well as some Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) were applied. The results were integrated to outline areas that are affected by site amplification and then combined into a 3D geomodel. For Fonds-Parisien, HVSR recordings show sharp and double amplitude peaks for sites located in the northern sedimentary basin along the shores of Azuei Lake, and consequently denotes a high

  11. Rapid Response Fault Drilling Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian M. Saffer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available New information about large earthquakes can be acquired by drilling into the fault zone quickly following a large seismic event. Specifically, we can learn about the levels of friction and strength of the fault which determine the dynamic rupture, monitor the healing process of the fault, record the stress changes that trigger aftershocks and capture important physical and chemical properties of the fault that control the rupture process. These scientific and associated technical issues were the focus of a three-day workshop on Rapid Response Fault Drilling: Past, Present, and Future, sponsored by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. The meeting drewtogether forty-four scientists representing ten countries in Tokyo, Japan during November 2008. The group discussed the scientific problems and how they could be addressed through rapid response drilling. Focused talks presented previous work on drilling after large earthquakes and in fault zones in general, as well as the state of the art of experimental techniques and measurement strategies. Detailed discussion weighed the tradeoffs between rapid drilling andthe ability to satisfy a diverse range of scientific objectives. Plausible drilling sites and scenarios were evaluated. This is a shortened summary of the workshop report that discusses key scientific questions, measurement strategies, and recommendations. This report can provide a starting point for quickly mobilizing a drilling program following future large earthquakes. The full report can be seen at http://www.pmc.ucsc.edu/~rapid/.

  12. Fault Features Extraction and Identification based Rolling Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, B.; SUN, G. D.; ZHANG, L. Y.; WANG, J. G.; HU, J.

    2017-05-01

    For the fault classification model based on extreme learning machine (ELM), the diagnosis accuracy and stability of rolling bearing is greatly influenced by a critical parameter, which is the number of nodes in hidden layer of ELM. An adaptive adjustment strategy is proposed based on vibrational mode decomposition, permutation entropy, and nuclear kernel extreme learning machine to determine the tunable parameter. First, the vibration signals are measured and then decomposed into different fault feature models based on variation mode decomposition. Then, fault feature of each model is formed to a high dimensional feature vector set based on permutation entropy. Second, the ELM output function is expressed by the inner product of Gauss kernel function to adaptively determine the number of hidden layer nodes. Finally, the high dimension feature vector set is used as the input to establish the kernel ELM rolling bearing fault classification model, and the classification and identification of different fault states of rolling bearings are carried out. In comparison with the fault classification methods based on support vector machine and ELM, the experimental results show that the proposed method has higher classification accuracy and better generalization ability.

  13. Active faulting on the Wallula fault within the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament (OWL), eastern Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, B. L.; Lasher, J. P.; Barnett, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies over the last 40 years focused on a segment of the Wallula fault exposed in a quarry at Finley, Washington. The Wallula fault is important because it is part of the Olympic-Wallowa lineament (OWL), a ~500-km-long topographic and structural lineament extending from Vancouver Island, British Columbia to Walla Walla, Washington that accommodates Basin and Range extension. The origin and nature of the OWL is of interest because it contains potentially active faults that are within 50 km of high-level nuclear waste facilities at the Hanford Site. Mapping in the 1970's and 1980's suggested the Wallula fault did not offset Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits and is therefore inactive. New exposures of the Finley quarry wall studied here suggest otherwise. We map three main packages of rocks and sediments in a ~10 m high quarry exposure. The oldest rocks are very fine grained basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (~13.5 Ma). The next youngest deposits include a thin layer of vesicular basalt, white volcaniclastic deposits, colluvium containing clasts of vesicular basalt, and indurated paleosols. A distinct angular unconformity separates these vesicular basalt-bearing units from overlying late Pleistocene flood deposits, two colluvium layers containing angular clasts of basalt, and Holocene tephra-bearing loess. A tephra within the loess likely correlates to nearby outcrops of Mazama ash. We recognize three styles of faults: 1) a near vertical master reverse or oblique fault juxtaposing very fine grained basalt against late Tertiary-Holocene deposits, and marked by a thick (~40 cm) vertical seam of carbonate cemented breccia; 2) subvertical faults that flatten upwards and displace late Tertiary(?) to Quaternary(?) soils, colluvium, and volcaniclastic deposits; and 3) flexural slip faults along bedding planes in folded deposits in the footwall. We infer at least two Holocene earthquakes from the quarry exposure. The first Holocene earthquake deformed

  14. Active fault diagnosis by temporary destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis method for parametric or multiplicative faults is proposed. The method periodically adds a term to the controller that for a short period of time renders the system unstable if a fault has occurred, which facilitates rapid fault detection. An illustrative example is given....

  15. Fault isolatability conditions for linear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...

  16. Active Fault Diagnosis by Temporary Destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis method for parametric or multiplicative faults is proposed. The method periodically adds a term to the controller that for a short period of time renders the system unstable if a fault has occurred, which facilitates rapid fault detection. An illustrative example is given....

  17. Fault Detection for Diesel Engine Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Bøgh, S.A.; Jørgensen, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Feedback control systems are vulnerable to faults in control loop sensors and actuators, because feedback actions may cause abrupt responses and process damage when faults occur.......Feedback control systems are vulnerable to faults in control loop sensors and actuators, because feedback actions may cause abrupt responses and process damage when faults occur....

  18. Advanced Seismic Imaging Techniques Characterize the Alpine Fault at Whataroa (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, V.; Buske, S.; Lukács, A.; Gorman, A. R.; Bannister, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The plate-bounding Alpine Fault in New Zealand is a large transpressive continental fault zone that is late in its earthquake cycle. The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to deliver insight into the geological structure of this fault zone and its evolution by drilling and sampling the Alpine Fault at depth. We have acquired and processed reflection seismic data to image the subsurface around the drill site. The resulting velocity models and seismic images of the upper 5 km show complex subsurface structures around the Alpine Fault zone. The most prominent feature is a strong reflector at depths of 1.2-2.2 km with a dip of ~40° to the southeast below the DFDP-2 borehole, which we assume to be the main trace of the Alpine Fault. The reflector exhibits varying lateral reflectivity along its extent. Additionally, subparallel reflectors are imaged that we interpret as secondary branches of the main fault zone. The derived P-wave velocity models reveal a 400-600 m thick sedimentary layer with velocities of ~2.3 km/s above a schist basement with velocities of 4.5-5.5 km/s. A pronounced low-velocity layer with velocities of approximately 3.5 km/s can be observed within the basement at 0.8-2 km depth. Small-scale low-velocity anomalies appear at the top of the basement and can be correlated to the fault zone. The results provide a reliable basis for a seismic site characterization at the DFDP-2 drill site that can be used for further structural and geological investigations of the architecture of the Alpine Fault in this area.

  19. Scientific drilling into the San Andreas Fault Zone - an overview of SAFOD's first five years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, Mark; Hickman, Stephen; Ellsworth, William; ,

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled to study the physical and chemical processes controlling faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD is located near Parkfield, California and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving due to a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. Geophysical logs define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~200 m), containing several discrete zones only 2–3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3192 m and 3302 m. Cores from both deforming zones contain a pervasively sheared, cohesionless, foliated fault gouge that coincides with casing deformation and explains the observed extremely low seismic velocities and resistivity. These cores are being now extensively tested in laboratories around the world, and their composition, deformation mechanisms, physical properties, and rheological behavior are studied. Downhole measurements show that within 200 m (maximum) of the active fault trace, the direction of maximum horizontal stress remains at a high angle to the San Andreas Fault, consistent with other measurements. The results from the SAFOD Main Hole, together with the stress state determined in the Pilot Hole, are consistent with a strong crust/weak fault model of the San Andreas. Seismic instrumentation has been deployed to study physics of faulting—earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest—in order to test how laboratory-derived concepts scale up to earthquakes occurring in nature.

  20. Adaptive Fuzzy Output-Constrained Fault-Tolerant Control of Nonlinear Stochastic Large-Scale Systems With Actuator Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongming; Ma, Zhiyao; Tong, Shaocheng

    2017-09-01

    The problem of adaptive fuzzy output-constrained tracking fault-tolerant control (FTC) is investigated for the large-scale stochastic nonlinear systems of pure-feedback form. The nonlinear systems considered in this paper possess the unstructured uncertainties, unknown interconnected terms and unknown nonaffine nonlinear faults. The fuzzy logic systems are employed to identify the unknown lumped nonlinear functions so that the problems of structured uncertainties can be solved. An adaptive fuzzy state observer is designed to solve the nonmeasurable state problem. By combining the barrier Lyapunov function theory, adaptive decentralized and stochastic control principles, a novel fuzzy adaptive output-constrained FTC approach is constructed. All the signals in the closed-loop system are proved to be bounded in probability and the system outputs are constrained in a given compact set. Finally, the applicability of the proposed controller is well carried out by a simulation example.

  1. Eastern Denali Fault surface trace map, eastern Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Adrian M.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2017-05-04

    We map the 385-kilometer (km) long surface trace of the right-lateral, strike-slip Denali Fault between the Totschunda-Denali Fault intersection in Alaska, United States and the village of Haines Junction, Yukon, Canada. In Alaska, digital elevation models based on light detection and ranging and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data enabled our fault mapping at scales of 1:2,000 and 1:10,000, respectively. Lacking such resources in Yukon, we developed new structure-from-motion digital photogrammetry products from legacy aerial photos to map the fault surface trace at a scale of 1:10,000 east of the international border. The section of the fault that we map, referred to as the Eastern Denali Fault, did not rupture during the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake (moment magnitude 7.9). Seismologic, geodetic, and geomorphic evidence, along with a paleoseismic record of past ground-rupturing earthquakes, demonstrate Holocene and contemporary activity on the fault, however. This map of the Eastern Denali Fault surface trace complements other data sets by providing an openly accessible digital interpretation of the location, length, and continuity of the fault’s surface trace based on the accompanying digital topography dataset. Additionally, the digitized fault trace may provide geometric constraints useful for modeling earthquake scenarios and related seismic hazard.

  2. The effectiveness of undergraduate teaching of the identification of radiographic film faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, V E; Hirschmann, P N; Bearn, D R

    2005-11-01

    To see if there were any differences in the ability of final year dental students at two UK dental schools, who were within 4 months of graduation, to identify radiographic film faults. The two groups of undergraduates were shown 11 dental radiographs using a slide format. The 11 radiographs included 8 films with film faults, 2 films without technical or processing errors and a film with minimal faults. Each student was asked to assess each film for the presence/absence of film fault(s), to detail how to correct the fault (if appropriate) and to give a subjective quality rating of each film. The range of marks obtained by both groups of students was low. All students found the identification of panoramic film faults more challenging than faults associated with intraoral films. 15% of students from University B scored more than half the possible marks compared with 2% from University A. Both groups of students had the necessary knowledge of how to correct faults once identified. However, the marked difference in competency in identifying faults between the two groups of students has implications for the future teaching and development of the radiology curriculum.

  3. Study on Fault Diagnosis of Rolling Bearing Based on Time-Frequency Generalized Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition monitoring technology and fault diagnosis technology of mechanical equipment played an important role in the modern engineering. Rolling bearing is the most common component of mechanical equipment which sustains and transfers the load. Therefore, fault diagnosis of rolling bearings has great significance. Fractal theory provides an effective method to describe the complexity and irregularity of the vibration signals of rolling bearings. In this paper a novel multifractal fault diagnosis approach based on time-frequency domain signals was proposed. The method and numerical algorithm of Multi-fractal analysis in time-frequency domain were provided. According to grid type J and order parameter q in algorithm, the value range of J and the cut-off condition of q were optimized based on the effect on the dimension calculation. Simulation experiments demonstrated that the effective signal identification could be complete by multifractal method in time-frequency domain, which is related to the factors such as signal energy and distribution. And the further fault diagnosis experiments of bearings showed that the multifractal method in time-frequency domain can complete the fault diagnosis, such as the fault judgment and fault types. And the fault detection can be done in the early stage of fault. Therefore, the multifractal method in time-frequency domain used in fault diagnosis of bearing is a practicable method.

  4. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  5. Diagnosis and fault-tolerant control

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Mogens; Lunze, Jan; Staroswiecki, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Fault-tolerant control aims at a gradual shutdown response in automated systems when faults occur. It satisfies the industrial demand for enhanced availability and safety, in contrast to traditional reactions to faults, which bring about sudden shutdowns and loss of availability. The book presents effective model-based analysis and design methods for fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control. Architectural and structural models are used to analyse the propagation of the fault through the process, to test the fault detectability and to find the redundancies in the process that can be used to ensure fault tolerance. It also introduces design methods suitable for diagnostic systems and fault-tolerant controllers for continuous processes that are described by analytical models of discrete-event systems represented by automata. The book is suitable for engineering students, engineers in industry and researchers who wish to get an overview of the variety of approaches to process diagnosis and fault-tolerant contro...

  6. Online sequential prediction of bearings imbalanced fault diagnosis by extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wentao; He, Ling; Yan, Yunju; Wang, Jinwan

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of bearings generally plays an important role in fault diagnosis of mechanical system, and machine learning has been a promising tool in this field. In many real applications of bearings fault diagnosis, the data tend to be online imbalanced, which means, the number of fault data is much less than the normal data while they are all collected in online sequential way. Suffering from this problem, many traditional diagnosis methods will get low accuracy of fault data which acts as the minority class in the collected bearing data. To address this problem, an online sequential prediction method for imbalanced fault diagnosis problem is proposed based on extreme learning machine. This method introduces the principal curve and granulation division to simulate the flow distribution and overall distribution characteristics of fault data, respectively. Then a confident over-sampling and under-sampling process is proposed to establish the initial offline diagnosis model. In online stage, the obtained granules and principal curves are rebuilt on the bearing data which are arrived in sequence, and after the over-sampling and under-sampling process, the balanced sample set is formed to update the diagnosis model dynamically. A theoretical analysis is provided and proves that, even existing information loss, the proposed method has lower bound of the model reliability. Simulation experiments are conducted on IMS bearing data and CWRU bearing data. The comparative results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the fault diagnosis accuracy with better effectiveness and robustness than other algorithms.

  7. Late Quaternary slip rate determination by CRN dating on the Haiyuan fault, China, and implication for complex geometry fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrau, Rémi; Klinger, Yann; Van der Woerd, Jérôme; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Li, Zhanfei; Xu, Xiwei

    2017-04-01

    Late Quaternary slip rate determination by CRN dating on the Haiyuan fault, China, and implication for complex geometry fault systems Matrau Rémi, Klinger Yann, Van der Woerd Jérôme, Liu-Zeng Jing, Li Zhanfei, Xu Xiwei The Haiyuan fault in Gansu Province, China, is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault forming the northeastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and accommodating part of the deformation from the India-Asia collision. Geomorphic and geodetic studies of the Haiyuan fault show slip rates ranging from 4 mm/yr to 19 mm/yr from east to west along 500 km of the fault. Such discrepancy could be explained by the complex geometry of the fault system, leading to slip distribution on multiple branches. Combining displacement measurements of alluvial terraces from high-resolution Pléiades images and 10Be - 26Al cosmogenic radionuclides (CRN) dating, we bracket the late Quaternary slip rate along the Hasi Shan fault segment (37°00' N, 104°25' E). At our calibration site, terrace riser offsets for 5 terraces ranging from 6 m to 227 m and CRN ages ranging from 6.5±0.6 kyr to 41±4 kyr - yield geological left-lateral slip rates from 2.0 mm/yr to 4.4 mm/yr. We measured consistent terrace riser offset values along the entire 25 km-long segment, which suggests that some external forcing controls the regional river-terrace emplacement, regardless of each specific catchment. Hence, we extend our slip rate determination to the entire Hasi Shan fault segment to be 4.0±1.0 mm/yr since the last 40 kyr. This rate is consistent with other long-term rates of 4 mm/yr to 5 mm/yr east and west of Hasi Shan - as well as geodetic rates of 4 mm/yr to 6 mm/yr west of Hasi Shan. However, Holocene terraces and moraines offsets have suggested higher rates of 15 to 20 mm/yr further west. Such disparate rates may be explained by slip distribution on multiple branches. In particular, the Zhongwei fault splay in the central part of the Haiyuan fault, with a slip rate of 4-5 mm/yr could

  8. A Spectrum Detection Approach for Bearing Fault Signal Based on Spectral Kurtosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the similarity between Morlet wavelet and fault signal and the sensitive characteristics of spectral kurtosis for the impact signal, a new wavelet spectrum detection approach based on spectral kurtosis for bearing fault signal is proposed. This method decreased the band-pass filter range and reduced the wavelet window width significantly. As a consequence, the bearing fault signal was detected adaptively, and time-frequency characteristics of the fault signal can be extracted accurately. The validity of this method was verified by the identifications of simulated shock signal and test bearing fault signal. The method provides a new understanding of wavelet spectrum detection based on spectral kurtosis for rolling element bearing fault signal.

  9. Faulted terrace risers place new constraints on the late Quaternary slip rate for the central Altyn Tagh fault, northwest Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R.D.; Cowgill, E.; Arrowsmith, J.R.; Chen, X.; Sharp, W.D.; Cooper, K.M.; Wang, X.-F.

    2011-01-01

    The active, left-lateral Altyn Tagh fault defines the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in western China. To clarify late Quaternary temporal and spatial variations in slip rate along the central portion of this fault system (85??-90??E), we have more than doubled the number of dated offset markers along the central Altyn Tagh fault. In particular, we determined offset-age relations for seven left-laterally faulted terrace risers at three sites (Kelutelage, Yukuang, and Keke Qiapu) spanning a 140-km-long fault reach by integrating surficial geologic mapping, topographic surveys (total station and tripod-light detection and ranging [T-LiDAR]), and geochronology (radiocarbon dating of organic samples, 230Th/U dating of pedogenic carbonate coatings on buried clasts, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide exposure age dating applied to quartz-rich gravels). At Kelutelage, which is the westernmost site (37.72??N, 86.67??E), two faulted terrace risers are offset 58 ?? 3 m and 48 ?? 4 m, and formed at 6.2-6.1 ka and 5.9-3.7 ka, respectively. At the Yukuang site (38.00??N, 87.87??E), four faulted terrace risers are offset 92 ?? 12 m, 68 ?? 6 m, 55 ?? 13 m, and 59 ?? 9 m and formed at 24.2-9.5 ka, 6.4-5.0 ka, 5.1-3.9 ka, and 24.2-6.4 ka, respectively. At the easternmost site, Keke Qiapu (38.08??N, 88.12??E), a faulted terrace riser is offset 33 ?? 6 m and has an age of 17.1-2.2 ka. The displacement-age relationships derived from these markers can be satisfied by an approximately uniform slip rate of 8-12 mm/yr. However, additional analysis is required to test how much temporal variability in slip rate is permitted by this data set. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  10. Fault Tolerance for Industrial Actuators in Absence of Accurate Models and Hardware Redundancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    to describe the system over a frequency range. Two methods based on the Kalman Filter and Statistical Change Detection techniques are proposed for detecting degradation faults and component failures, respectively. Finally, a reference correction setup is used to compensate for degradation faults....

  11. Multiple Generations of Faulting: A Kinematic Analysis of the Lagarfljót Region, Northeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, K.; Karson, J. A.; Fiorentino, A. J., II

    2014-12-01

    The North American/Eurasian plate boundary in Iceland is structurally diverse with oblique rifts, volcanic fissure swarms, and transform zones. Lagarfljót is a lake located in the Tertiary flood basalts of East Iceland that range in age from ~7 to 3 Ma. The lake is approximately 50 km E of the actively spreading, NS-trending, Northern Rift Zone (NVZ), and occupies a northeast-trending depression in an area of strong NS lineaments. A flexure zone runs N-S across the southern part of the lake, and predates an angular unconformity in the regional lava pile. Exposures in cliffs along the lakeshore and stream cuts above unveil a series of dikes and faults that can be correlated with the lineaments, and indicate a complicated tectonic history. Fault zones are characterized by fault breccia, cataclasite and gouge with well-developed slickenlines and clear shear-sense indicators. Fault gouge in individual shear zones ranges from centimeters to meters in thickness. Cross cutting relationships define the relative ages of 2 families of structures, with both post-dating the flexure. The older generation of faults are NS-striking, dextral, strike-slip faults. These are cut by NE-striking, normal faults. The normal faults are almost exclusively located along or near the margins of large dikes or swarms of dikes ranging from 1 - 5 m wide. Displacements along individual normal faults range from centimeters up to 8 m. Some faults cut the lavas above the unconformity and locally rotated structures suggest that limited tilting of the lava pile occurred during faulting. These findings may be related to larger scale processes of propagation and relocation of the NVZ.

  12. Strain partitioning and stress perturbation around stepovers and bends of strike-slip faults: Numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Mian; Ye, Jiyang; Cao, Jianling; Jing, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Stepovers and bends along strike-slip faults are where push-up ranges and pull-apart basins are formed. They are also commonly where fault ruptures terminate. Field study and analogue models suggest that the configuration of faults plays a key role in crustal deformation around bends and stepovers, but the related mechanics of stress perturbation, strain partitioning, and fault evolution remains poorly understood. Here we present results of systematical mechanical models of stress changes and strain partitioning around simple stepovers and bends, using three-dimensional viscoelasto-plastic finite element code. Our model predicts elevated deviatoric stress around all stepovers and bends, with higher stresses around the restraining ones. Narrow stepovers localize strain between the fault gaps to form connecting faults, whereas wide stepovers localize strain on the tips of fault segments so the stepovers may evolve into subparallel faults. We explored how various configurations of stepovers and bends change the stress field and strain distribution, and show that these results can help explain some key differences between the pull-apart basins in the Dead Sea Trough and Death Valley, and the push-up ranges along the San Andreas Fault.

  13. Delineation of Urban Active Faults Using Multi-scale Gravity Analysis in Shenzhen, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    In fact, many cities in the world are established on the active faults. As the rapid urban development, thousands of large facilities, such as ultrahigh buildings, supersized bridges, railway, and so on, are built near or on the faults, which may change the balance of faults and induce urban earthquake. Therefore, it is significant to delineate effectively the faults for urban planning construction and social sustainable development. Due to dense buildings in urban area, the ordinary approaches to identify active faults, like geological survey, artificial seismic exploration and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides a more efficient and convenient method to delineate urban faults. The present study is an attempt to propose a novel gravity method, multi-scale gravity analysis, for identifying urban active faults and determining their stability. Firstly, the gravity anomalies are decomposed by wavelet multi-scale analysis. Secondly, based on the decomposed gravity anomalies, the crust is layered and the multilayer horizontal tectonic stress is inverted. Lastly, the decomposed anomalies and the inverted horizontal tectonic stress are used to infer the distribution and stability of main active faults. For validating our method, a case study on active faults in Shenzhen City is processed. The results show that the distribution of decomposed gravity anomalies and multilayer horizontal tectonic stress are controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to infer depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4km to 20km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  14. Lower bounds in differential privacy

    OpenAIRE

    De, Anindya

    2011-01-01

    This is a paper about private data analysis, in which a trusted curator holding a confidential database responds to real vector-valued queries. A common approach to ensuring privacy for the database elements is to add appropriately generated random noise to the answers, releasing only these {\\em noisy} responses. In this paper, we investigate various lower bounds on the noise required to maintain different kind of privacy guarantees.

  15. Geometry of Homogeneous Bounded Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Vesentini, E

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: S.G. Gindikin, I.I. Pjateckii-Sapiro, E.B. Vinberg: Homogeneous Kahler manifolds; S.G. Greenfield: Extendibility properties of real submanifolds of Cn; W. Kaup: Holomorphische Abbildungen in Hyperbolische Raume; A. Koranyi: Holomorphic and harmonic functions on bounded symmetric domains; J.L. Koszul: Formes harmoniques vectorielles sur les espaces localement symetriques; S. Murakami: Plongements holomorphes de domaines symetriques; and E.M. Stein: The analogues of Fatous' theorem and estimates for maximal functions.

  16. Wronskian method for bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Francisco M, E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [INIFTA (UNLP, CONICET), Division Quimica Teorica, Boulevard 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-05-15

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider an exactly solvable model, the Gaussian potential well, and a two-well potential proposed earlier for the interpretation of the infrared spectrum of ammonia.

  17. Cyclotron transitions of bound ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Pavlov, George G.

    2017-06-01

    A charged particle in a magnetic field possesses discrete energy levels associated with particle rotation around the field lines. The radiative transitions between these levels are the well-known cyclotron transitions. We show that a bound complex of particles with a nonzero net charge displays analogous transitions between the states of confined motion of the entire complex in the field. The latter bound-ion cyclotron transitions are affected by a coupling between the collective and internal motions of the complex and, as a result, differ from the transitions of a "reference" bare ion with the same mass and charge. We analyze the cyclotron transitions for complex ions by including the coupling within a rigorous quantum approach. Particular attention is paid to comparison of the transition energies and oscillator strengths to those of the bare ion. Selection rules based on integrals of collective motion are derived for the bound-ion cyclotron transitions analytically, and the perturbation and coupled-channel approaches are developed to study the transitions quantitatively. Representative examples are considered and discussed for positive and negative atomic and cluster ions.

  18. Fault Trends and the Evolution of the Pacific-North America Transform in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, M. R.; Kamerling, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific-North America (PAC-NOAM) transform boundary evolved during the past 30 Ma, lengthening more than 1000 km and spanning a zone exceeding 200-km across southern California. The relative plate motion vector has been estimated using seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns. Orientations of major transform fault segments within this boundary provide direct evidence of the relative motion at the time these faults formed, where the faults preserve their original orientations. Avoiding areas of known vertical-axis block rotations, we find at least three major fault trends that document past and present tectonic kinematics. A northwest trend of 330 degrees is related to subduction trends in the forearc region that defined the late Mesozoic and early Tertiary coastline and has subsequently controlled the orientation of oblique rifting during the Neogene initiation and growth of the PAC-NOAM transform. This trend is manifest in the San Diego Trough and adjacent coastal rifts and associated fault zones including the Coronado Bank and Newport-Inglewood. The middle Miocene transform orientation appears to be 300-310 degrees, which imparted extensional character to faults reactivated with older subduction trends. Major faults inferred to represent Neogene transform fault segments with this trend include the Whittier, Palos Verdes Hills, Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, Catalina Escarpment, and possibly the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault. In late Miocene time, the plate motion vector rotated clockwise eventually achieving its modern orientation of about 320 degrees. Active faulting showing pure strike-slip character on the San Clemente - San Isidro fault zone and the Imperial Fault show this trend, as do transform faults in the northern Gulf of California. An intermediate trend is apparent in some areas along the San Clemente fault zone in the Borderland, and along the Elsinore and San Jacinto fault zones, which transect the Peninsular Ranges. The intermediate trends may

  19. A Low Velocity Zone along the Chaochou Fault in Southern Taiwan: Seismic Image Revealed by a Linear Seismic Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chieh Pu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chaochou fault is one of the major boundary faults in southern Taiwan where strong convergence has taken place between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates. The surface fault trace between the Pingtung plain and the Central Range follows a nearly N-S direction and stretches to 80 km in length. In order to examine the subsurface structures along the Chaochou fault, a linear seismic array with 14 short-period stations was deployed across the fault to record seismic data between August and December 2001. Detailed examination of seismic data generated by 10 local earthquakes and recorded by the linear array has shown that the incidence angles of the first P-waves recorded by several seismic stations at the fault zone were significantly larger than those located farther away from the fault zone. This difference might reflect the lateral variation of velocity structures across the Chaochou fault. Further examination of ray-paths of seismic wave propagation indicates that a low-velocity zone along the Chaochou fault is needed to explain the significant change in incidence angles across the fault zone. Although we do not have adequate information to calculate the exact geometry of the fault zone well, the variation in incidence angles across the fault can be explained by the existence of a low-velocity zone that is about 3 km in width on the surface and extends downward to a depth of 5 km. The low-velocity zone along the Chaochou fault might imply that the fault system consists of several splay faults on the hanging wall in the Central Range.

  20. San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The 1,200-kilometer (800-mile)San Andreas is the longest fault in California and one of the longest in North America. This perspective view of a portion of the fault was generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew on NASA's Space Shuttle last February, and an enhanced, true-color Landsat satellite image. The view shown looks southeast along the San Andreas where it cuts along the base of the mountains in the Temblor Range near Bakersfield. The fault is the distinctively linear feature to the right of the mountains. To the left of the range is a portion of the agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley. In the background is the snow-capped peak of Mt. Pinos at an elevation of 2,692 meters (8,831 feet). The complex topography in the area is some of the most spectacular along the course of the fault. To the right of the fault is the famous Carrizo Plain. Dry conditions on the plain have helped preserve the surface trace of the fault, which is scrutinized by both amateur and professional geologists. In 1857, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in the United States occurred just north of the Carrizo Plain. With an estimated magnitude of 8.0, the quake severely shook buildings in Los Angeles, caused significant surface rupture along a 350-kilometer (220-mile) segment of the fault, and was felt as far away as Las Vegas, Nev. This portion of the San Andreas is an important area of study for seismologists. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60

  1. Active Faults, Modern Seismicity And Block Structure Of Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatinsky, Y.; Rundquist, D.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of on active faults and seismicity shows that the only a northern part of Eurasia should be regarded as an indivisible lithosphere unit. We defined it as the North Eurasian plate (Gatinsky, Rundquist, 2004) unlike the Eurasian plate s.l., which can be used only for paleotectonic reconstructions. The North Eurasian plate is bordered by zones of seismic activity traced along the Gakkel ridge, the Chersky and Stanovoi ranges, the Baikal rift, Altai--Sayany region, northern Tien Shan, Pamir, Hindu Kush and Kopet Dagh, Great Caucasus, northern Anatolia, Rhodopes, Carpathians, eastern and central Alps. Relationships between this plate and Europe west of the Rhine grabens remain ambiguous. The satellite measurements for them seem to be similar (Nocquet, Calais, 2003), but structural and seismic evidences allow suggesting their incipient division. Wide zones between this plate and neighboring ones can be distinguished outside north Eurasia. These zones consist of numerous blocks of various sizes. Block boundaries are mainly characterized by the high seismicity and development of active wrench faults, thrusts or modern rifts. Some of such zones were named earlier as "diffuse plate boundaries" (Stein et al., 2002; Bird et al, 2003). We suggest to name them as "transit zones" because they are situated between large lithosphere plates and as if transfer the stress field of one of them to other. Blocks within the transit zones reveal local divergences in GPS vectors of their displacements in the ITRF system and especially with respect to fixed Eurasia. At the same time data of satellite measurements emphasize the unity of the North Eurasian plate, which moves eastward in absolute coordinates with some clockwise rotation. The stress distribution in inner parts of the continent is being affected by the interaction with different plates and blocks. It can be more effectively illustrated by a «triangle» of the maximal seismic activity of Eurasia in the central Asia

  2. Post 4 Ma initiation of normal faulting in southern Tibet. Constraints from the Kung Co half graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahéo, G.; Leloup, P. H.; Valli, F.; Lacassin, R.; Arnaud, N.; Paquette, J.-L.; Fernandez, A.; Haibing, L.; Farley, K. A.; Tapponnier, P.

    2007-04-01

    The timing of E-W extension of the Tibetan plateau provides a test of mechanical models of the geodynamic evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone. In this work we focus on the Kung Co half graben (Southern Tibet, China), bounded by an active N-S normal fault with a minimum vertical offset of 1600 m. To estimate the onset of normal faulting we combined high and medium temperature (U-Pb, Ar/Ar) and low temperature ((U-Th)/He) thermochronometry of the Kung Co pluton, a two-mica granite of the northern Himalayan granitic belt that outcrop in the footwall of the fault. Biotite and muscovite Ar/Ar ages , are close from each other [˜ 16 Ma ± 0.2 (Ms) and ˜ 15 ± 0.4 Ma (Bt)], which is typical of fast cooling. The zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He ages range from 11.3 to 9.6 Ma and 9.9 to 3.7 Ma respectively. These He ages are indicative of (1) fast initial cooling, from 11.3 to ˜ 9 Ma, gradually decreasing with time and (2) a high geothermal gradient (˜ 400 °C/km), close to the surface at ˜ 10 Ma. The Kung Co pluton was emplaced at about 22 Ma (U-Pb on zircon) at less than 10 km depth and 520-545 °C. Subsequent to its shallow emplacement, the pluton underwent fast thermal re-equilibration ending around 7.5 Ma, followed by a period of slow cooling caused either by the end of the thermal re-equilibration or by very slow exhumation (0.02-0.03 mm/yr) from ˜ 7.5 Ma to at least 4 Ma. In either case the data suggest that the exhumation rate increased after 4 Ma. We infer this increase to be related to the initiation of the Kung Co normal fault. A critical examination of previously published data show that most ˜ N-S Tibetan normal faults may have formed less than 5 Ma ago rather than in the Miocene as assumed by several authors. Such a young age implies that E-W extension is not related to the Neogene South Tibetan magmatism (25 to 8 Ma). Consequently, models relating E-W extension to magmatism, such as convective removal of the lower lithosphere, may be inappropriate

  3. Ionically Bound Peroxidase from Peach Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Valdir Augusto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble, ionically bound peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO were extracted from the pulp of peach fruit during ripening at 20°C. Ionically bound form was purified 6.1-fold by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The purified enzyme showed only one peak of activity on Sephadex G-100 and PAGE revealed that the enzyme was purified by the procedures adopted. The purified enzyme showed a molecular weight of 29000 Da, maximum activity at pH 5.0 and at 40ºC. The calculated apparent activation energy (Ea for the reaction was10.04 kcal/mol. The enzyme was heat-labile in the temperature range of 60 to 75ºC with a fast inactivation at 75ºC. Measurement of residual activity showed a stabilizing effect of sucrose at various temperature/sugar concentrations (0, 10, 20 %, w/w, with an activation energy (Ea for inactivation increasing with sucrose concentration from 0 to 20% (w/w. The Km and Vmax values were 9.35 and 15.38 mM for 0-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The bound enzyme was inhibited competitively by ferulic, caffeic and protocatechuic acids with different values of Ki,. L-cysteine, p-coumaric and indolacetic acid and Fe++ also inhibited the enzyme but at a lower grade. N-ethylmaleimide and p-CMB were not effective to inhibit the enzyme demonstrating the non-essentiality of SH groups.

  4. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  5. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  6. Ductile bookshelf faulting: A new kinematic model for Cenozoic deformation in northern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been long recognized that the most dominant features on the northern Tibetan Plateau are the >1000 km left-slip strike-slip faults (e.g., the Atyn Tagh, Kunlun, and Haiyuan faults). Early workers used the presence of these faults, especially the Kunlun and Haiyuan faults, as evidence for eastward lateral extrusion of the plateau, but their low documented offsets--100s of km or less--can not account for the 2500 km of convergence between India and Asia. Instead, these faults may result from north-south right-lateral simple shear due to the northward indentation of India, which leads to the clockwise rotation of the strike-slip faults and left-lateral slip (i.e., bookshelf faulting). With this idea, deformation is still localized on discrete fault planes, and 'microplates' or blocks rotate and/or translate with little internal deformation. As significant internal deformation occurs across northern Tibet within strike-slip-bounded domains, there is need for a coherent model to describe all of the deformational features. We also note the following: (1) geologic offsets and Quaternary slip rates of both the Kunlun and Haiyuan faults vary along strike and appear to diminish to the east, (2) the faults appear to kinematically link with thrust belts (e.g., Qilian Shan, Liupan Shan, Longmen Shan, and Qimen Tagh) and extensional zones (e.g., Shanxi, Yinchuan, and Qinling grabens), and (3) temporal relationships between the major deformation zones and the strike-slip faults (e.g., simultaneous enhanced deformation and offset in the Qilian Shan and Liupan Shan, and the Haiyuan fault, at 8 Ma). We propose a new kinematic model to describe the active deformation in northern Tibet: a ductile-bookshelf-faulting model. With this model, right-lateral simple shear leads to clockwise vertical axis rotation of the Qaidam and Qilian blocks, and left-slip faulting. This motion creates regions of compression and extension, dependent on the local boundary conditions (e.g., rigid

  7. Rectifier Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerance of a Doubly Fed Brushless Starter Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Liwei Shi; Zhou Bo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rectifier fault diagnosis method with wavelet packet analysis to improve the fault tolerant four-phase doubly fed brushless starter generator (DFBLSG) system reliability. The system components and fault tolerant principle of the high reliable DFBLSG are given. And the common fault of the rectifier is analyzed. The process of wavelet packet transforms fault detection/identification algorithm is introduced in detail. The fault tolerant performance and output voltage experi...

  8. Seismic and geodetic signatures of fault slip at the Slumgullion Landslide Natural Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Schulz, W.; Bodin, P.; Kean, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the Slumgullion landslide is a useful natural laboratory for observing fault slip, specifically that slip along its basal surface and side-bounding strike-slip faults occurs with comparable richness of aseismic and seismic modes as along crustal- and plate-scale boundaries. Our study provides new constraints on models governing landslide motion. We monitored landslide deformation with temporary deployments of a 29-element prism array surveyed by a robotic theodolite and an 88-station seismic network that complemented permanent extensometers and environmental instrumentation. Aseismic deformation observations show that large blocks of the landslide move steadily at approximately centimeters per day, possibly punctuated by variations of a few millimeters, while localized transient slip episodes of blocks less than a few tens of meters across occur frequently. We recorded a rich variety of seismic signals, nearly all of which originated outside the monitoring network boundaries or from the side-bounding strike-slip faults. The landslide basal surface beneath our seismic network likely slipped almost completely aseismically. Our results provide independent corroboration of previous inferences that dilatant strengthening along sections of the side-bounding strike-slip faults controls the overall landslide motion, acting as seismically radiating brakes that limit acceleration of the aseismically slipping basal surface. Dilatant strengthening has also been invoked in recent models of transient slip and tremor sources along crustal- and plate-scale faults suggesting that the landslide may indeed be a useful natural laboratory for testing predictions of specific mechanisms that control fault slip at all scales.

  9. Lower bounds for randomized Exclusive Write PRAMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    In this paper we study the question: How useful is randomization in speeding up Exclusive Write PRAM computations? Our results give further evidence that randomization is of limited use in these types of computations. First we examine a compaction problem on both the CREW and EREW PRAM models, and we present randomized lower bounds which match the best deterministic lower bounds known. (For the CREW PRAM model, the lower bound is asymptotically optimal.) These are the first non-trivial randomized lower bounds known for the compaction problem on these models. We show that our lower bounds also apply to the problem of approximate compaction. Next we examine the problem of computing boolean functions on the CREW PRAM model, and we present a randomized lower bound, which improves on the previous best randomized lower bound for many boolean functions, including the OR function. (The previous lower bounds for these functions were asymptotically optimal, but we improve the constant multiplicative factor.) We also give an alternate proof for the randomized lower bound on PARITY, which was already optimal to within a constant additive factor. Lastly, we give a randomized lower bound for integer merging on an EREW PRAM which matches the best deterministic lower bound known. In all our proofs, we use the Random Adversary method, which has previously only been used for proving lower bounds on models with Concurrent Write capabilities. Thus this paper also serves to illustrate the power and generality of this method for proving parallel randomized lower bounds.

  10. Fault detection and isolation for complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Shi; Bayuaji, Luhur; Samad, R.; Mustafa, M.; Abdullah, N. R. H.; Zain, Z. M.; Pebrianti, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) is a method to monitor, identify, and pinpoint the type and location of system fault in a complex multiple input multiple output (MIMO) non-linear system. A two wheel robot is used as a complex system in this study. The aim of the research is to construct and design a Fault Detection and Isolation algorithm. The proposed method for the fault identification is using hybrid technique that combines Kalman filter and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The Kalman filter is able to recognize the data from the sensors of the system and indicate the fault of the system in the sensor reading. Error prediction is based on the fault magnitude and the time occurrence of fault. Additionally, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is another algorithm used to determine the type of fault and isolate the fault in the system.

  11. Structural Attributes of Major Faults in Kachchh,Western India: Seismotectonic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, J.; Mathew, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Kachchh basin is a western margin pericratonic rift basin of India. This area is known for its recent recurrent earthquake episodes. The area is presently undergoing structural inversion from an earlier extension to presently compressional regime. The rift is bound by Nagar Parkar uplift in the north and Kathiawar uplift (Saurashtra horst) in the south respectively along Nagar Parkar and North Kathiawar faults. The basin is characterized three main uplifts along four major faults, Nagar Parkar, Island Belt, Kachchh Mainland and Katrol Hill uplifts, wherein the hinterland depressions forms linear E-W valleys. The major ongoing debate of the uplifts is the nature of the fault bound uplifts. It has been argued by many workers that the fault scarp on the mountain front represent a normal fault feature. However, based on field evidences we infer that the fault scarp is represented as fault line scarp. The main fault bounding these uplift are reverse in nature and the topographical uplift features are the fault related folds on account of the blind thrust below. The field data is further supported geomorphic features such as, the drainage migrations, capture and incision and formation of paired terraces wherein the drainage have been able to carve through the uplift. Field investigations indicate that in the region bounded by KMF and SWF, beds dip towards each other, with characteristic forelimb showing narrow deformation zones. This step over zone thus provides an evidence of a convergent transfer zone. The work reports the structural evidences, which prove KMF and SWF to be reverse in nature. The faults are expressed as E-W linear ridges, where the beddings are south dipping and become steeper as it moves towards the crest of the ridge. On the crest the beds suddenly get terminated and a valley appears. As a consequence earlier workers have identified them to be normal faults. Here we report two important observations, a) presence of oppositely dipping beds along

  12. Search for a bound K− pp system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camerini P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the K− absorption reaction on 6,7Li, 9Be, 13C and 16O have recently been collected by FINUDA at the DAΦNE φ-factory (Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati-INFN, following an earlier lower statitics run on 12C and some other targets. FINUDA is a high acceptance magnetic spectrometer which performed a wide range of studies by detecting the charged particles and neutrons exiting the targets after the absorption event. In this paper it is discussed about the study of the A(K− , Λp reaction in the context of the search for deeply bound $ar{K}$ - nuclear states. The observation of a bump in the Λp invariant mass distribution is discussed in terms of a possible signature of a deeply bound K− pp kaonic cluster as well as of more conventional physics. An overview of the experimental situation in this field will be given.

  13. Detailed mapping and rupture implications of the 1 km releasing bend in the Rodgers Creek Fault at Santa Rosa, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Suzanne; Langenheim, Victoria; Williams, Robert; Hitchcock, Christopher S.; DeLong, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) topography reveals for the first time the trace of the Rodgers Creek fault (RCF) through the center of Santa Rosa, the largest city in the northern San Francisco Bay area. Vertical deformation of the Santa Rosa Creek floodplain expresses a composite pull‐apart basin beneath the urban cover that is part of a broader 1‐km‐wide right‐releasing bend in the fault. High‐resolution geophysical data illuminate subsurface conditions that may be responsible for the complex pattern of surface faulting, as well as for the distribution of seismicity and possibly for creep behavior. We identify a dense, magnetic basement body bounded by the RCF beneath Santa Rosa that we interpret as a strong asperity, likely part of a larger locked patch of the fault to the south. A local increase in frictional resistance associated with the basement body appears to explain (1) distributed fault‐normal extension above where the RCF intersects the body; (2) earthquake activity around the northern end of the body, notably the 1969 ML 5.6 and 5.7 events and aftershocks; and (3) creep rates on the RCF that are higher to the north of Santa Rosa than to the south. There is a significant probability of a major earthquake on the RCF in the coming decades, and earthquakes associated with the proposed asperity have the potential to release seismic energy into the Cotati basin beneath Santa Rosa, already known from damaging historical earthquakes to produce amplified ground shaking.

  14. The 2014 Kefalonia Doublet ( M W6.1 and M W6.0), Central Ionian Islands, Greece: Seismotectonic Implications along the Kefalonia Transform Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Mesimeri, Maria; Gkarlaouni, Charikleia; Paradisopoulou, Parthena

    2015-02-01

    The 2014 Kefalonia earthquake sequence started on 26 January with the first main shock ( M W6.1) and aftershock activity extending over 35 km, much longer than expected from the causative fault segment. The second main shock ( M W6.0) occurred on 3 February on an adjacent fault segment, where the aftershock distribution was remarkably sparse, evidently encouraged by stress transfer of the first main shock. The aftershocks from the regional catalog were relocated using a 7-layer velocity model and station residuals, and their distribution evidenced two adjacent fault segments striking almost N-S and dipping to the east, in full agreement with the centroid moment tensor solutions, constituting segments of the Kefalonia Transform Fault (KTF). The KTF is bounded to the north by oblique parallel smaller fault segments, linking KTF with its northward continuation, the Lefkada Fault.

  15. Robust fault detection of linear systems using a computationally efficient set-membership method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeipour, Mojtaba; Bak, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computationally efficient set-membership method for robust fault detection of linear systems is proposed. The method computes an interval outer-approximation of the output of the system that is consistent with the model, the bounds on noise and disturbance, and the past measureme...... is trivially parallelizable. The method is demonstrated for fault detection of a hydraulic pitch actuator of a wind turbine. We show the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing our results with two zonotope-based set-membership methods....

  16. Crossing the Logarithmic Barrier for Dynamic Boolean Data Structure Lower Bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Weinstein, Omri; Yu, Huacheng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proves the first super-logarithmic lower bounds on the cell probe complexity of dynamic boolean (a.k.a. decision) data structure problems, a long-standing milestone in data structure lower bounds. We introduce a new method for proving dynamic cell probe lower bounds and use it to prove a $\\tilde{\\Omega}(\\log^{1.5} n)$ lower bound on the operational time of a wide range of boolean data structure problems, most notably, on the query time of dynamic range counting over $\\mathbb{F}_2$ ...

  17. Where's the Hayward Fault? A Green Guide to the Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes self-guided field trips to one of North America?s most dangerous earthquake faults?the Hayward Fault. Locations were chosen because of their easy access using mass transit and/or their significance relating to the natural and cultural history of the East Bay landscape. This field-trip guidebook was compiled to help commemorate the 140th anniversary of an estimated M 7.0 earthquake that occurred on the Hayward Fault at approximately 7:50 AM, October 21st, 1868. Although many reports and on-line resources have been compiled about the science and engineering associated with earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, this report has been prepared to serve as an outdoor guide to the fault for the interested public and for educators. The first chapter is a general overview of the geologic setting of the fault. This is followed by ten chapters of field trips to selected areas along the fault, or in the vicinity, where landscape, geologic, and man-made features that have relevance to understanding the nature of the fault and its earthquake history can be found. A glossary is provided to define and illustrate scientific term used throughout this guide. A ?green? theme helps conserve resources and promotes use of public transportation, where possible. Although access to all locations described in this guide is possible by car, alternative suggestions are provided. To help conserve paper, this guidebook is available on-line only; however, select pages or chapters (field trips) within this guide can be printed separately to take along on an excursion. The discussions in this paper highlight transportation alternatives to visit selected field trip locations. In some cases, combinations, such as a ride on BART and a bus, can be used instead of automobile transportation. For other locales, bicycles can be an alternative means of transportation. Transportation descriptions on selected pages are intended to help guide fieldtrip planners or participants choose trip

  18. Fault Recoverability Analysis via Cross-Gramian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    with feedback control. Fault recoverability provides important and useful information which could be used in analysis and design. However, computing fault recoverability is numerically expensive. In this paper, a new approach for computation of fault recoverability for bilinear systems is proposed......Engineering systems are vulnerable to different kinds of faults. Faults may compromise safety, cause sub-optimal operation and decline in performance if not preventing the whole system from functioning. Fault tolerant control (FTC) methods ensure that the system performance maintains within...

  19. An architecture for fault tolerant controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    A general architecture for fault tolerant control is proposed. The architecture is based on the (primary) YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing compensators and uses the dual YJBK parameterization to quantify the performance of the fault tolerant system. The approach suggested can be applied...... for additive faults, parametric faults, and for system structural changes. The modeling for each of these fault classes is described. The method allows to design for passive as well as for active fault handling. Also, the related design method can be fitted either to guarantee stability or to achieve graceful...

  20. Fault Isolation for Shipboard Decision Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran; Blanke, Mogens; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2010-01-01

    Fault detection and fault isolation for in-service decision support systems for marine surface vehicles will be presented in this paper. The stochastic wave elevation and the associated ship responses are modeled in the frequency domain. The paper takes as an example fault isolation of a containe......Fault detection and fault isolation for in-service decision support systems for marine surface vehicles will be presented in this paper. The stochastic wave elevation and the associated ship responses are modeled in the frequency domain. The paper takes as an example fault isolation...

  1. Fault structure, stress, or pressure control of the seismicity in shale? Insights from a controlled experiment of fluid-induced fault reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Barros, Louis; Daniel, Guillaume; Guglielmi, Yves; Rivet, Diane; Caron, Hervé; Payre, Xavier; Bergery, Guillaume; Henry, Pierre; Castilla, Raymi; Dick, Pierre; Barbieri, Ernesto; Gourlay, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    Clay formations are present in reservoirs and earthquake faults, but questions remain on their mechanical behavior, as they can vary from ductile (aseismic) to brittle (seismic). An experiment, at a scale of 10 m, aims to reactivate a natural fault by fluid pressure in shale materials. The injection area was surrounded by a dense monitoring network comprising pressure, deformation, and seismicity sensors, in a well-characterized geological setting. Thirty-two microseismic events were recorded during several injection phases in five different locations within the fault zone. Their computed magnitude ranged between -4.3 and -3.7. Their spatiotemporal distribution, compared with the measured displacement at the injection points, shows that most of the deformation induced by the injection is aseismic. Whether the seismicity is controlled by the fault architecture, mineralogy of fracture filling, fluid, and/or stress state is then discussed. The fault damage zone architecture and mineralogy are of crucial importance, as seismic slip mainly localizes on the sealed-with-calcite fractures which predominate in the fault damage zone. As no seismicity is observed in the close vicinity of the injection areas, the presence of fluid seems to prevent seismic slips. The fault core acts as an impermeable hydraulic barrier that favors fluid confinement and pressurization. Therefore, the seismic behavior seems to be strongly sensitive to the structural heterogeneity (including permeability) of the fault zone, which leads to a heterogeneous stress response to the pressurized volume.

  2. Towards Automatic Resource Bound Analysis for OCaml

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Jan; Das, Ankush; Weng, Shu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a resource analysis system for OCaml programs. This system automatically derives worst-case resource bounds for higher-order polymorphic programs with user-defined inductive types. The technique is parametric in the resource and can derive bounds for time, memory allocations and energy usage. The derived bounds are multivariate resource polynomials which are functions of different size parameters that depend on the standard OCaml types. Bound inference is fully automatic...

  3. Distance hijacking attacks on distance bounding protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, Cas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bonne; Čapkun, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    Distance bounding protocols are typically analyzed with respect to three types of attacks: Distance Fraud, Mafia Fraud, and Terrorist Fraud. We define and analyze a fourth main type of attack on distance bounding protocols, called Distance Hijacking. We show that many proposed distance bounding protocols are vulnerable to this type of attack, and we propose solutions to make these protocols resilient to Distance Hijacking. We further show that verifying distance bounding protocols using exist...

  4. Purity- and Gaussianity-bounded uncertainty relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilara, A.; Karpov, E.; Cerf, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bounded uncertainty relations provide the minimum value of the uncertainty assuming some additional information on the state. We derive analytically an uncertainty relation bounded by a pair of constraints, those of purity and Gaussianity. In a limiting case this uncertainty relation reproduces the purity-bounded derived by Man’ko and Dodonov and the Gaussianity-bounded one (Mandilara and Cerf 2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 030102R).

  5. Fault2SHA- A European Working group to link faults and Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment communities in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Oona; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The key questions we ask are: What is the best strategy to fill in the gap in knowledge and know-how in Europe when considering faults in seismic hazard assessments? Are field geologists providing the relevant information for seismic hazard assessment? Are seismic hazard analysts interpreting field data appropriately? Is the full range of uncertainties associated with the characterization of faults correctly understood and propagated in the computations? How can fault-modellers contribute to a better representation of the long-term behaviour of fault-networks in seismic hazard studies? Providing answers to these questions is fundamental, in order to reduce the consequences of future earthquakes and improve the reliability of seismic hazard assessments. An informal working group was thus created at a meeting in Paris in November 2014, partly financed by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, with the aim to motivate exchanges between field geologists, fault modellers and seismic hazard practitioners. A variety of approaches were presented at the meeting and a clear gap emerged between some field geologists, that are not necessarily familiar with probabilistic seismic hazard assessment methods and needs and practitioners that do not necessarily propagate the "full" uncertainty associated with the characterization of faults. The group thus decided to meet again a year later in Chieti (Italy), to share concepts and ideas through a specific exercise on a test case study. Some solutions emerged but many problems of seismic source characterizations with people working in the field as well as with people tackling models of interacting faults remained. Now, in Wien, we want to open the group and launch a call for the European community at large to contribute to the discussion. The 2016 EGU session Fault2SHA is motivated by such an urgency to increase the number of round tables on this topic and debate on the peculiarities of using faults in seismic hazard

  6. Soil gas radon concentration across faults near Caracas, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Flores, N.; Urbani, F. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Dept. de Geologia, Caracas (Venezuela); Carreno, R. [Sociedad Venezolana de Espeleologia, Apdo. 47334, Caracas 1041A (Venezuela)

    2001-09-01

    SSNTD were used across tectonic features of different degree of activity and lithology in four localities north of Caracas, Venezuela. The homemade dosimeters with LR115 film were buried 20-30 cm in the ground. This cheap and low- tech method proved very useful to understand the tectonic features involved, measuring higher Radon concentration above traces of active faults while in old and sealed faults the results only show the effect of the surrounding lithology. Radon concentration range is 4.3 - 27.2 kB/m{sup 3}. (Author)

  7. Resistivity Structures of the Chelungpu Fault in the Taichung Area, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hu Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted magnetotelluric prospecting in the Taichung area to investigate subsurface resistivity structures of the Chelungpu fault and the resistivity of rock formations. The results indicate that the Chelungpu fault is a complex fault system consisting of two major fault zones, several fracture zones, and back thrust. The two major fault zones, the basal and the Chi-Chi fault zone are about 800 m apart on the ground and converge to a narrow band at a depth of 3000 m. The fault zones are not smooth, composed of ramps and platforms with an average eastward dipping angle of 35° - 37° within the depth of 3000 m. In the shallower region, the basal fault zone has developed along the boundary of the Toukoshan Formation (resistivity: 200 - 400 Ω-m at the footwall and the Neogene formations on the hanging wall, where the Cholan Formation, the Chinshiu Shale, and the Kueichulai Formation have respective resistivity mainly in the ranges: 40 - 100, 8 - 60, and 50 - 150 Ω-m. While the Chi-Chi fault zone has developed along the weak layers of the Cholan Formation where resistivity is lower than the unsheared block.

  8. Thrust geometries in unconsolidated Quaternary sediments around the Eupchon fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, H. C.

    2003-04-01

    It had been considered that Korean Peninsula is located in a relatively stable continental platform. Over ten Quaternary faults have recently been discovered, however, in the south-eastern part of the Korean Peninsula. The Eupchon Fault was discovered at the construction site of a primary school, close to a nuclear power plant. In order to understand the characteristics of the Eupchon fault, we carried out two trench surveys near the first finding site. The orientations of trench sites are 150o and 170o, the widths are 1.3 m and 1.5 m, and the maximum depths are 2.8 m and 5.5 m, respectively. The trenches are in Quaternary unconsolidated marine terrace sediments, which have horizontal bedding planes, are well sorted, and range from pebbles to muds The fault system includes one main reverse fault (N20o E/40o SE) with about 4m displacement and a series of branches. Structures in the fault system include synthetic and antithetic faults, hanging wall anticlines, drag folds, back thrusts, pop-up structures, flat-ramp geometries and duplexes, i.e. very similar to thrust systems in consolidated rocks. In the upper part of the fault system, several tip damage zone patterns are observed, indicating that the fault system terminates in the upper part of the section. Pebbles along the main fault plane show preferred orientation of long axes indicating the fault trace. The orientation of the slickenside striea is E-W, indicating the movement direction. The unconformity between the Quaternary deposits and the underlying Tertiary andesites and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks is displaced in a reverse sense. A normal displacement was reported lower in the section, indicating the fault had a normal displacement and was reverse reactivated during the Quaternary.

  9. Insights in Fault Flow Behaviour from Onshore Nigeria Petroleum System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woillez Marie-Noëlle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Faults are complex geological features acting either as permeability barrier, baffle or drain to fluid flow in sedimentary basins. Their role can be crucial for over-pressure building and hydrocarbon migration, therefore they have to be properly integrated in basin modelling. The ArcTem basin simulator included in the TemisFlow software has been specifically designed to improve the modelling of faulted geological settings and to get a numerical representation of fault zones closer to the geological description. Here we present new developments in the simulator to compute fault properties through time as a function of available geological parameters, for single-phase 2D simulations. We have used this new prototype to model pressure evolution on a siliciclastic 2D section located onshore in the Niger Delta. The section is crossed by several normal growth faults which subdivide the basin into several sedimentary units and appear to be lateral limits of strong over-pressured zones. Faults are also thought to play a crucial role in hydrocarbons migration from the deep source rocks to shallow reservoirs. We automatically compute the Shale Gouge Ratio (SGR along the fault planes through time, as well as the fault displacement velocity. The fault core permeability is then computed as a function of the SGR, including threshold values to account for shale smear formation. Longitudinal fault fluid flow is enhanced during periods of high fault slip velocity. The method allows us to simulate both along-fault drainages during the basin history as well as overpressure building at present-day. The simulated pressures are at first order within the range of observed pressures we had at our disposal.

  10. Bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations in macroeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massaro, D.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of individual bounded rationality on aggregate macroeconomic dynamics. Boundedly rational agents are specified as using simple heuristics in their decision making. An important aspect of the type of bounded rationality described in this thesis is that the population of

  11. Labeling schemes for bounded degree graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjiashvili, David; Rotbart, Noy Galil

    2014-01-01

    graphs. Our results complement a similar bound recently obtained for bounded depth trees [Fraigniaud and Korman, SODA 2010], and may provide new insights for closing the long standing gap for adjacency in trees [Alstrup and Rauhe, FOCS 2002]. We also provide improved labeling schemes for bounded degree...

  12. Upper bound on quantum stabilizer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Xing, Li-Juan

    2009-03-01

    By studying sets of operators having constant weight, we present an analytical upper bound on the pure quantum stabilizer codes whose underlying quantum system can be of arbitrary dimension, which outperforms the well-known quantum Hamming bound, the optimal analytical upper bound so far for small code length.

  13. Fault-tolerant Supervisory Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    of this work has been to develop and employ concepts and methods that are suitable for use in different automation processes, with applicability in various industrial fields. The requirements for high productivity and quality has resulted in employing additional instrumentation and use of more sophisticated...... control algorithms. The drawback is, however, that these control systems have become more vulnerable to even simple faults in instrumentation. On the other hand, due to cost-optimality requirements, an extensive use of hardware redundancy has been prohibited. Nevertheless, the dependency and availability...... could be increased through enhancing control systems' ability to on-line perform fault detection and reconfiguration when a fault occurs and before a safety system shuts-down the entire process. The main contributions of this research effort are development and experimentation with methodologies...

  14. A Self-Stabilizing Hybrid-Fault Tolerant Synchronization Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2014-01-01

    In this report we present a strategy for solving the Byzantine general problem for self-stabilizing a fully connected network from an arbitrary state and in the presence of any number of faults with various severities including any number of arbitrary (Byzantine) faulty nodes. Our solution applies to realizable systems, while allowing for differences in the network elements, provided that the number of arbitrary faults is not more than a third of the network size. The only constraint on the behavior of a node is that the interactions with other nodes are restricted to defined links and interfaces. Our solution does not rely on assumptions about the initial state of the system and no central clock nor centrally generated signal, pulse, or message is used. Nodes are anonymous, i.e., they do not have unique identities. We also present a mechanical verification of a proposed protocol. A bounded model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV). The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the bounded model of the protocol as well as confirming claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period. We believe that our proposed solution solves the general case of the clock synchronization problem.

  15. Obtaining the size distribution of fault gouges with polydisperse bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Pedro G; Baram, Reza M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2008-02-01

    We generalize a recent study of random space-filling bearings to a more realistic situation, where the spacing offset varies randomly during the space-filling procedure, and show that it reproduces well the size distributions observed in recent studies of real fault gouges. In particular, we show that the fractal dimensions of random polydisperse bearings sweep predominantly the low range of values in the spectrum of fractal dimensions observed along real faults, which strengthen the evidence that polydisperse bearings may explain the occurrence of seismic gaps in nature. In addition, the influence of different distributions on the offset is studied and we find that a uniform distribution is the best choice for reproducing the size distribution of fault gouges.

  16. Knowledge-driven board-level functional fault diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Fangming; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Gu, Xinli

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive set of characterization, prediction, optimization, evaluation, and evolution techniques for a diagnosis system for fault isolation in large electronic systems. Readers with a background in electronics design or system engineering can use this book as a reference to derive insightful knowledge from data analysis and use this knowledge as guidance for designing reasoning-based diagnosis systems. Moreover, readers with a background in statistics or data analytics can use this book as a practical case study for adapting data mining and machine learning techniques to electronic system design and diagnosis. This book identifies the key challenges in reasoning-based, board-level diagnosis system design and presents the solutions and corresponding results that have emerged from leading-edge research in this domain. It covers topics ranging from highly accurate fault isolation, adaptive fault isolation, diagnosis-system robustness assessment, to system performance analysis and evalua...

  17. Love waves in coal seams disturbed by faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwasnicka, B. (Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland))

    1988-01-01

    Describes application of Love waves to exploration of rock body structures lying in front of working faces, in order to obtain early information on disturbances present in a deposit structure, especially on faults. Models of a vertical fault, a fault with a throw as high as the seam thickness or with an inclined throw of half the seam thickness were constructed. Theoretical seismograms and amplitude spectra are presented and discussed. Observation times were 25-40 ms. Maxima in amplitude spectra were within the frequency range of 150-300 Hz. Investigation of amplitude distribution using models allows the actual amplitude distribution to be foreseen which in turn facilitates wave identification when microtectonics of coal seams is investigated. 6 refs.

  18. Effect of fluid viscosity on fault frictional behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio, Chiara; Violay, Marie; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Fluids play an important role in fault zone and in earthquakes generation. Fluid pressure reduces the normal effective stress, lowering the frictional strength of the fault, potentially triggering earthquake ruptures. Fluid injection induced earthquakes, such as in geothermal reservoir, are direct evidence of the effect of fluid pressure on the fault strength. However, the frictional fault strength may also vary due to the chemical and physical characteristics of the fluid as discussed here. Here we performed two series of experiments on precut samples of Westerly granite to investigate the role of fluid viscosity on fault frictional behavior. In the first series, we performed 20 rotary shear experiments with the machine SHIVA (INGV, Rome) on cylindrical (50 mm external diameter), at slip rate (V) ranging from 10 μ m/s to 1 m/s effective normal stress (P) of 10 MPa and pore pressure varying from 0 ( i.e., dry conditions) to 2 MPa. Three different fluid viscosities were tested using pure distilled water (η=1 mPa\\cdot s), 40{%}water/60{%}glycerol (η =10.5 mPa\\cdot s) and 15{%}water/85{%}glycerol (η=109 mPa\\cdot s) mixtures (all reported viscosities at 20 rC). In agreement with theoretical argumentations (Stribeck curve) we distinguished three lubrication regimes. At low product of slip-rate per fluid viscosity (S= η\\cdot V/P

  19. From coseismic offsets to fault-block mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Tom

    2017-09-01

    In the Basin and Range extensional province of the western United States, coseismic offsets, under the influence of gravity, display predominantly subsidence of the basin side (fault hanging wall), with comparatively little or no uplift of the mountainside (fault footwall). A few decades later, geodetic measurements [GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)] show broad (˜100 km) aseismic uplift symmetrically spanning the fault zone. Finally, after millions of years and hundreds of fault offsets, the mountain blocks display large uplift and tilting over a breadth of only about 10 km. These sparse but robust observations pose a problem in that the coesismic uplifts of the footwall are small and inadequate to raise the mountain blocks. To address this paradox we develop finite-element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift, which is predicted to take place within one to two decades after each large earthquake. Thus, the best-preserved topographic signature of earthquakes is expected to occur early in the postseismic period.

  20. From coseismic offsets to fault-block mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    In the Basin and Range extensional province of the western United States, coseismic offsets, under the influence of gravity, display predominantly subsidence of the basin side (fault hanging wall), with comparatively little or no uplift of the mountainside (fault footwall). A few decades later, geodetic measurements [GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)] show broad (∼100 km) aseismic uplift symmetrically spanning the fault zone. Finally, after millions of years and hundreds of fault offsets, the mountain blocks display large uplift and tilting over a breadth of only about 10 km. These sparse but robust observations pose a problem in that the coesismic uplifts of the footwall are small and inadequate to raise the mountain blocks. To address this paradox we develop finite-element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift, which is predicted to take place within one to two decades after each large earthquake. Thus, the best-preserved topographic signature of earthquakes is expected to occur early in the postseismic period.

  1. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults - Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Olaf; Klinger, Yann; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault's rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault's offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of the

  2. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  3. Fault-tolerant system for catastrophic faults in AMR sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are widely used in automotive applications considered to be safety-critical applications. Therefore dependability is an important requirement and fault-tolerant strategies must be used to guarantee the correct operation of the sensors even in case of

  4. Characterization of earthquake fault by borehole experiments; Koseinai sokutei ni yoru jishin danso no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishizawa, O.; Kuwahara, Y.; Kiguchi, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    A borehole was excavated to penetrate the Nojima fault at the Hirabayashi area, to investigate the underground structures of the fault by observation of the cores and well logging. The borehole was excavated from 74.6m east of the fault surface. Soil is of granodiorite from the surface, and fault clay at a depth in a range from 624.1 to 625.1m. Observation of the cores, collected almost continuously, indicates that the fault fracture zone expands in a depth range from 557 to 713.05m. The well logging experiments are natural potential, resistivity, density, gamma ray, neutron, borehole diameter, microresistivity and temperature. They are also for DSI- and FMI-observation, after expansion of the borehole. The well logging results indicate that resistivity, density and elastic wave velocity decrease as distance from fault clay increases, which well corresponds to the soil conditions. The BHTV and FMI analyses clearly detect the fault clay demarcations, and show that elastic wave velocity and BHTV results differ at above and below the fault. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Relations between shallow cataclastic faulting and cementation in porous sandstones: First insight from a groundwater environmental context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philit, Sven; Soliva, Roger; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude; Wibberley, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between fault zone cataclasis and cementation is important since both processes can drastically reduce the permeability of faults in porous sandstones. Yet the prediction of fault cementation in high-porosity sandstone reservoirs remains elusive. Nevertheless, this process has rarely been investigated in shallowly buried faults (<2 km; T°<80 °C) where its sealing capacity could be acquired early in the geological history of a reservoir. In this paper, the macro- and microscopic analysis of a fault zone in the porous Cenomanian quartz arenite sands of Provence (France) shows that silica diagenesis occurs in the most intensely-deformed cataclastic parts of the fault zone. This fault zone shows 19-48% of its total thickness occupied by low-porosity quartz-cemented cataclastic shear bands whose porosities range from 0 - ca. 5%. The analysis of the weathering profile around the fault zone reveals the presence of groundwater silcretes in the form of tabular, tightly silicified concretions cross-cut by the fault. Detailed transmitted light, cold-cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses of the silica cements (from the fault and the silcrete) reveal that all the silica cements originate from groundwater diagenetic processes. This study therefore shows that silica cementation can occur specifically in fault zones and as groundwater silcrete in the shallow context of a groundwater system, generated at the vicinity of an erosional unconformity.

  6. Deep geothermal processes acting on faults and solid tides in coastal Xinzhou geothermal field, Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; Wang, Xiao; Li, Fusi; Xu, Fangyiming; Wang, Yanxin; Qi, Shihua; Yuen, David

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigated the deep fault thermal flow processes in the Xinzhou geothermal field in the Yangjiang region of Guangdong Province. Deep faults channel geothermal energy to the shallow ground, which makes it difficult to study due to the hidden nature. We conducted numerical experiments in order to investigate the physical states of the geothermal water inside the fault zone. We view the deep fault as a fast flow path for the thermal water from the deep crust driven up by the buoyancy. Temperature measurements at the springs or wells constrain the upper boundary, and the temperature inferred from the Currie temperature interface bounds the bottom. The deepened boundary allows the thermal reservoir to revolve rather than to be at a fixed temperature. The results detail the concept of a thermal reservoir in terms of its formation and heat distribution. The concept also reconciles the discrepancy in reservoir temperatures predicted from both quartz and Na-K-Mg. The downward displacement of the crust increases the pressure at the deep ground and leads to an elevated temperature and a lighter water density. Ultimately, our results are a first step in implementing numerical studies of deep faults through geothermal water flows; future works need to extend to cases of supercritical states. This approach is applicable to general deep-fault thermal flows and dissipation paths for the seismic energy from the deep crust.

  7. Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone in Jamaica: paleoseismology and seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, R.D.; Mann, P.; Prentice, Carol S.; Brown, L.; Benford, B.; Grandison-Wiggins, M.

    2013-01-01

    The countries of Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic all straddle the Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone ( EPGFZ), a major left-lateral, strike-slip fault system bounding the Caribbean and North American plates. Past large earthquakes that destroyed the capital cities of Kingston, Jamaica (1692, 1907), and Port-au-Prince, Haiti (1751, 1770), as well as the 2010 Haiti earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people, have heightened awareness of seismic hazards in the northern Caribbean. We present here new geomorphic and paleoseismic information bearing on the location and relative activity of the EPGFZ, which marks the plate boundary in Jamaica. Documentation of a river bank exposure and several trenches indicate that this fault is active and has the potential to cause major destructive earthquakes in Jamaica. The results suggest that the fault has not ruptured the surface in at least 500 yr and possibly as long as 28 ka. The long period of quiescence and subdued geomorphic expression of the EPGFZ indicates that it may only accommodate part of the ∼7–9 mm=yr plate deformation rate measured geodetically and that slip may be partitioned on other undocumented faults. Large uncertainties related to the neotectonic framework of Jamaica remain and more detailed fault characterization studies are necessary to accurately assess seismic hazards.

  8. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  9. Finite Fault Database (ANSS ComCat)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A Finite Fault is a modeled representation of the spatial extent, amplitude and duration of fault rupture (slip) of an earthquake, and is generated via the inversion...

  10. Quantifying Fault Networks on Alba Patera, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, D. Y.; Ferrill, D. A.; Morris, A. P.; Sims, D. W.; Franklin, N. M.

    2005-03-01

    Newly developed terrestrial approaches were applied to martian fault networks to quantify the extent and degree of fault network connectivity. These techniques will provide key constraints for martian hydrological models.

  11. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges

  12. Stellar Evolution Bounds on the ALP-Photon Coupling: new Results and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Giannotti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Stellar evolution considerations are of fundamental importance in our understanding of the axion/ALP-photon coupling, g_{a\\gamma}. Helium burning stars are the best laboratories to study this coupling. Here, we will review the bounds from massive and low mass helium burning stars, and present a new analysis of the bound from the horizontal branch stars. The analysis provides the strongest bound to date on g_{a\\gamma} in a wide mass range.

  13. Capacity Bounds for Parallel Optical Wireless Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-01-01

    A system consisting of parallel optical wireless channels with a total average intensity constraint is studied. Capacity upper and lower bounds for this system are derived. Under perfect channel-state information at the transmitter (CSIT), the bounds have to be optimized with respect to the power allocation over the parallel channels. The optimization of the lower bound is non-convex, however, the KKT conditions can be used to find a list of possible solutions one of which is optimal. The optimal solution can then be found by an exhaustive search algorithm, which is computationally expensive. To overcome this, we propose low-complexity power allocation algorithms which are nearly optimal. The optimized capacity lower bound nearly coincides with the capacity at high SNR. Without CSIT, our capacity bounds lead to upper and lower bounds on the outage probability. The outage probability bounds meet at high SNR. The system with average and peak intensity constraints is also discussed.

  14. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we

  15. Fault segmentation: New concepts from the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, Christopher; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Olig, Susan S.; Hylland, Michael D.; Lund, William R.; Schwartz, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether structural segment boundaries along multisegment normal faults such as the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) act as persistent barriers to rupture is critical to seismic hazard analyses. We synthesized late Holocene paleoseismic data from 20 trench sites along the central WFZ to evaluate earthquake rupture length and fault segmentation. For the youngest (segment boundaries, especially for the most recent earthquakes on the north-central WFZ, are consistent with segment-controlled ruptures. However, broadly constrained earthquake times, dissimilar event times along the segments, the presence of smaller-scale (subsegment) boundaries, and areas of complex faulting permit partial-segment and multisegment (e.g., spillover) ruptures that are shorter (~20–40 km) or longer (~60–100 km) than the primary segment lengths (35–59 km). We report a segmented WFZ model that includes 24 earthquakes since ~7 ka and yields mean estimates of recurrence (1.1–1.3 kyr) and vertical slip rate (1.3–2.0 mm/yr) for the segments. However, additional rupture scenarios that include segment boundary spatial uncertainties, floating earthquakes, and multisegment ruptures are necessary to fully address epistemic uncertainties in rupture length. We compare the central WFZ to paleoseismic and historical surface ruptures in the Basin and Range Province and central Italian Apennines and conclude that displacement profiles have limited value for assessing the persistence of segment boundaries but can aid in interpreting prehistoric spillover ruptures. Our comparison also suggests that the probabilities of shorter and longer ruptures on the WFZ need to be investigated.

  16. Examining the links between Slow Slip Events, crustal faults and subduction interface in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, A.; Manighetti, I.; Vergnolle, M.; Campillo, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed the tectonic structures, active and more ancient, that dissect the upper plate, the subducting plate and the trench in Central Mexico, and examined the links between these structures, the historical and instrumental seismicity, and the SSEs and tremors (as described in Radiguet et al., 2012). We show that the tectonic architecture of the upper plate controls the location of the SSEs and of a large part of the instrumental seismicity. The large historical subduction ruptures do not extend further below than ≈ 30 km depth. The broken areas are underlined by a zone of dense instrumental seismicity that extends confined between the broken patches and a vertical WSW-trending fault that cuts across the upper plate down to the interface, with its trace halfway between Acapulco and Chilpancingo (AC fault). This fault shows no morphological evidence of recent activity. Another similar, parallel WNW-trending fault exists north of Chilpancingo (NC fault). Though it shows no morphological evidence of recent activity, it is underlined by a dense instrumental seismicity confined in the range 40-70 km of depth, whose focal mechanisms are all extensional. No instrumental seismicity is recorded between the two faults. By contrast, the slip zones of the 2002, 2006 and 2010 major SSEs appear confined exactly in between the two vertical fault planes, while the major zone of reported tremors extend immediately north of the NC fault plane. The occurrence of each SSE induces a slight increase in the density of instrumental seismicity related to the NC fault, and a marked increase in the density of instrumental seismicity recorded south of the AC fault. In details, the seismicity increases at the northern tips of the NE-trending faults that dissect the trench and hence also likely the down-going oceanic plate below. Simple static Coulomb stress transfer models confirm that each SSE likely increased the static stresses by ≈ 0.1 bars on both the shallower portion of the

  17. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal

  18. Performance Bounds of Quaternion Estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Nitta, Tohru; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-12-01

    The quaternion widely linear (WL) estimator has been recently introduced for optimal second-order modeling of the generality of quaternion data, both second-order circular (proper) and second-order noncircular (improper). Experimental evidence exists of its performance advantage over the conventional strictly linear (SL) as well as the semi-WL (SWL) estimators for improper data. However, rigorous theoretical and practical performance bounds are still missing in the literature, yet this is crucial for the development of quaternion valued learning systems for 3-D and 4-D data. To this end, based on the orthogonality principle, we introduce a rigorous closed-form solution to quantify the degree of performance benefits, in terms of the mean square error, obtained when using the WL models. The cases when the optimal WL estimation can simplify into the SWL or the SL estimation are also discussed.

  19. On order bounded subsets of locally solid Riesz spaces | Hong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a topological Riesz space there are two types of bounded subsets: order bounded subsets and topologically bounded subsets. It is natural to ask (1) whether an order bounded subset is topologically bounded and (2) whether a topologically bounded subset is order bounded. A classical result gives a partial answer to (1) ...

  20. Seismic hazard in low slip rate crustal faults, estimating the characteristic event and the most hazardous zone: study case San Ramón Fault, in southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estay, Nicolás P.; Yáñez, Gonzalo; Carretier, Sebastien; Lira, Elias; Maringue, José

    2016-11-01

    Crustal faults located close to cities may induce catastrophic damages. When recurrence times are in the range of 1000-10 000 or higher, actions to mitigate the effects of the associated earthquake are hampered by the lack of a full seismic record, and in many cases, also of geological evidences. In order to characterize the fault behavior and its effects, we propose three different already-developed time-integration methodologies to define the most likely scenarios of rupture, and then to quantify the hazard with an empirical equation of peak ground acceleration (PGA). We consider the following methodologies: (1) stream gradient and (2) sinuosity indexes to estimate fault-related topographic effects, and (3) gravity profiles across the fault to identify the fault scarp in the basement. We chose the San Ramón Fault on which to apply these methodologies. It is a ˜ 30 km N-S trending fault with a low slip rate (0.1-0.5 mm yr-1) and an approximated recurrence of 9000 years. It is located in the foothills of the Andes near the large city of Santiago, the capital of Chile (> 6 000 000 inhabitants). Along the fault trace we define four segments, with a mean length of ˜ 10 km, which probably become active independently. We tested the present-day seismic activity by deploying a local seismological network for 1 year, finding five events that are spatially related to the fault. In addition, fault geometry along the most evident scarp was imaged in terms of its electrical resistivity response by a high resolution TEM (transient electromagnetic) profile. Seismic event distribution and TEM imaging allowed the constraint of the fault dip angle (˜ 65°) and its capacity to break into the surface. Using the empirical equation of Chiou and Youngs (2014) for crustal faults and considering the characteristic seismic event (thrust high-angle fault, ˜ 10 km, Mw = 6.2-6.7), we estimate the acceleration distribution in Santiago and the hazardous zones. City domains that are under

  1. Touhuanping Fault, an active wrench fault within fold-and-thrust belt in northwestern Taiwan, documented by spatial analysis of fluvial terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yoko; Lin, Yu-Nung Nina; Chen, Yue-Gau; Matsuta, Nobuhisa; Watanuki, Takuya; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2009-09-01

    This study aims at the recent activity and development of an active wrench fault, the Touhuanping Fault in northwestern Taiwan. Northwestern Taiwan has been proposed in a current situation between the mature to waning collision in terms of tectonic evolution. The main drainage in this area, the Chungkang River, flows close to the trace of the fault mentioned above. We examined various types of deformation of fluvial terraces along the Chungkang River as a key to understanding the nature and rate of the late Quaternary tectonics. The E-W trending Touhuanping Fault has long been mapped as a geological boundary fault, but its recent activity was suspected. Field survey revealed that its late Quaternary activity is recorded in the offset fluvial terraces. Our result shows dextral slip and vertical offset with upthrown side on the south, and activated at least twice since the emergence of terrace 4 (older terrace 3 with OSL date of ca. 80 ka). Total amount of offset recorded in the Touhuanping terrace sequence is 15 m for dextral and 10 m for vertical offset. Estimated recurrence time of earthquake rupture may be a few tens of thousand years. Uplift on the upthrown side of the Touhuanping Fault also resulted in the formation of drowned valleys which were graded to terrace 4. Other deformation features, such as back-tilting, westward warping, and a range-facing straight scarp, were also identified. A second-order anticline roughly parallel to the Touhuanping Fault is suggested to be the origin of the northward tilting on terrace 3; it could have resulted from a flower structure on the Touhuanping Fault at shallow depth. This may demonstrate that the buried segment of the Touhuanping Fault has also been active since 80 ka. In the northern study area, the westward warping at terrace 2 probably represents late Quaternary activity of another NE-SW trending Hsincheng Fault.

  2. Fault Detection for Nonlinear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a general method for designing fault detection and isolation (FDI) systems for nonlinear processes. For a rich class of nonlinear systems, a nonlinear FDI system can be designed using convex optimization procedures. The proposed method is a natural extension of methods based...

  3. Fault Tolerance Using Group Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaashoek, M.F.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    We propose group communication as an efficient mechanism to support fault tolerance. Our approach is based on an efficient reliable broadcast protocol that requires on average only two messages per broadcast. To illustrate our approach we will describe how the task bag model can be made

  4. Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Fault detection using (PI) observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, J.; Shafai, B.

    The fault detection and isolation (FDI) problem in connection with Proportional Integral (PI) Observers is considered in this paper. A compact formulation of the FDI design problem using PI observers is given. An analysis of the FDI design problem is derived with respectt to the time domain...... properties. A method for design of PI observers applied to FDI is given....

  6. Actuator Fault Detection and Diagnosis for Quadrotors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, P.; Van Kampen, E.J.; Yu, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fault detection and diagnosis of actuator loss of effectiveness for a quadrotor helicopter. This paper not only considers the detection of the actuator loss of effectiveness faults, but also addresses the diagnosis of the faults. The detection and estimation of the

  7. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  8. Engine gearbox fault diagnosis using empirical mode ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiran Vernekar

    A LabVIEW software Virtual Instrument (VI) program was developed to ... study. Artificial faults were generated at different locations of the bearing and they are bearing outer race, inner race, inner and outer race together fault and rolling element (ball) fault. ... validation information of original signal were decom- posed using ...

  9. On the "stacking fault" in copper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransens, J.R.; Pleiter, F

    2003-01-01

    The results of a perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlations experiment on In-111 implanted into a properly cut single crystal of copper show that the defect known in the literature as "stacking fault" is not a planar faulted loop but a stacking fault tetrahedron with a size of 10-50 Angstrom.

  10. Active fault detection in MIMO systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on active fault detection (AFD) for MIMO systems with parametric faults. The problem of design of auxiliary inputs with respect to detection of parametric faults is investigated. An analysis of the design of auxiliary inputs is given based on analytic transfer functions...

  11. The minimum scale of grooving on faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candela, T.; Brodsky, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    At the field scale, nearly all fault surfaces contain grooves generated as one side of the fault slips past the other. Grooves are so common that they are one of the key indicators of principal slip surfaces. Here, we show that at sufficiently small scales, grooves do not exist on fault surfaces. A

  12. Fundamental problems in fault detection and identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saberi, A.; Stoorvogel, A. A.; Sannuti, P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of different fundamental problems in fault detection and fault identification are formulated in this paper. The fundamental problems include exact, almost, generic and class-wise fault detection and identification. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability of the fundamental...

  13. Exact, almost and delayed fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Saberi, Ali; Stoorvogel, Anton A.

    1999-01-01

    Considers the problem of fault detection and isolation while using zero or almost zero threshold. A number of different fault detection and isolation problems using exact or almost exact disturbance decoupling are formulated. Solvability conditions are given for the formulated design problems....... The l-step delayed fault detection problem is also considered for discrete-time systems....

  14. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control based on adaptive control approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Qikun; Shi, Peng

    2017-01-01

    This book provides recent theoretical developments in and practical applications of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for complex dynamical systems, including uncertain systems, linear and nonlinear systems. Combining adaptive control technique with other control methodologies, it investigates the problems of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for uncertain dynamic systems with or without time delay. As such, the book provides readers a solid understanding of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control based on adaptive control technology. Given its depth and breadth, it is well suited for undergraduate and graduate courses on linear system theory, nonlinear system theory, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control techniques. Further, it can be used as a reference source for academic research on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control, and for postgraduates in the field of control theory and engineering. .

  15. Segmentation and step-overs along strike-slip fault systems in the inner California borderlands: Implications for fault architecture and basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Brothers, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessed, industry multichannel seismic reflection data and high resolution Chirp data were examined to characterize the geometry and recency of faulting in the inner California borderlands (ICB). Two end-member models have been proposed to explain the deformation observed in the ICB. One model invokes reactivation of detachment faults by the Oceanside Blind Thrust (OBT) to explain the deformation and margin architecture (e.g., San Mateo/Carlsbad Trend). In contrast, the other model explains the deformation by step-overs along the strike-slip fault systems. Several observations in both the southern and central portions of the ICB are more consistent with the step-over model than the regional blind thrust model. For example, regions in the ICB exhibit both tensional and compressional structures across the margin, which are more readily explained by the strike-slip model. Localized compression and extension occurs as predicted at fault bends and step-overs. Furthermore, strike slip fault systems that bound extensional regions (i.e., San Diego Bay) exhibit localized normal deformation as they approach the releasing step-overs. In addition, onlapping turbidites reveal that the deformation becomes younger toward the east, an observation not consistent with a westward verging blind thrust fault system. Finally, rotational deformation previously attributed to a splay off the OBT instead appears to be a southward transported gravitational slide deposit. In summary, the nested high-resolution Chirp and MCS data have provided new constraints on ICB tectonic deformation and margin architecture, which are best explained by step-overs on strike slip fault systems.

  16. Resistance of Soil-Bound Prions to Rumen Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Samuel E.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Bartz, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Before prion uptake and infection can occur in the lower gastrointestinal system, ingested prions are subjected to anaerobic digestion in the rumen of cervids and bovids. The susceptibility of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion has not been evaluated previously. In this study, prions from infectious brain homogenates as well as prions bound to a range of soils and soil minerals were subjected to in vitro rumen digestion, and changes in PrP levels were measured via western blot. Binding to clay appeared to protect noninfectious hamster PrPc from complete digestion, while both unbound and soil-bound infectious PrPSc proved highly resistant to rumen digestion. In addition, no change in intracerebral incubation period was observed following active rumen digestion of unbound hamster HY TME prions and HY TME prions bound to a silty clay loam soil. These results demonstrate that both unbound and soil-bound prions readily survive rumen digestion without a reduction in infectivity, further supporting the potential for soil-mediated transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) and scrapie in the environment. PMID:22937149

  17. Resistance of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    Full Text Available Before prion uptake and infection can occur in the lower gastrointestinal system, ingested prions are subjected to anaerobic digestion in the rumen of cervids and bovids. The susceptibility of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion has not been evaluated previously. In this study, prions from infectious brain homogenates as well as prions bound to a range of soils and soil minerals were subjected to in vitro rumen digestion, and changes in PrP levels were measured via western blot. Binding to clay appeared to protect noninfectious hamster PrP(c from complete digestion, while both unbound and soil-bound infectious PrP(Sc proved highly resistant to rumen digestion. In addition, no change in intracerebral incubation period was observed following active rumen digestion of unbound hamster HY TME prions and HY TME prions bound to a silty clay loam soil. These results demonstrate that both unbound and soil-bound prions readily survive rumen digestion without a reduction in infectivity, further supporting the potential for soil-mediated transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie in the environment.

  18. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  19. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  20. Illuminating Northern California’s Active Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Furlong, Kevin P.; Philips, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google EarthTM and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2)

  1. Robust Fault Diagnosis Design for Linear Multiagent Systems with Incipient Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a robust fault estimation observer is studied for linear multiagent systems subject to incipient faults. By considering the fact that incipient faults are in low-frequency domain, the fault estimation of such faults is proposed for discrete-time multiagent systems based on finite-frequency technique. Moreover, using the decomposition design, an equivalent conclusion is given. Simulation results of a numerical example are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  2. Large-scale hydraulic structure of a seismogenic fault at 10 km depth (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Mittempergher, Silvia; Garofalo, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The definition of hydraulic properties of fault zones is a major issue in structural geology, seismology, and in several applications (hydrocarbons, hydrogeology, CO2 sequestration, etc.). The permeability of fault rocks can be measured in laboratory experiments, but its upscaling to large-scale structures is not straightforward. For instance, typical permeability of fine-grained fault rock samples is in the 10-18-10-20 m2 range, but, according to seismological estimates, the large-scale permeability of active fault zones can be as high as 10-10 m2. Solving this issue is difficult because in-situ measurements of large-scale permeability have been carried out just at relatively shallow depths - mainly in oil wells and exceptionally in active tectonic settings (e.g. SAFOD at 3 km), whilst deeper experiments have been performed only in the stable continental crust (e.g. KTB at 9 km). In this study, we apply discrete fracture-network (DFN) modelling techniques developed for shallow aquifers (mainly in nuclear waste storage projects like Yucca Mountain) and in the oil industry, in order to model the hydraulic structure of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps). This fault, now exposed in world-class glacier-polished outcrops, has been exhumed from ca. 8 km, where it was characterized by a well-documented seismic activity, but also by hydrous fluid flow evidenced by alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and along cataclasites. The GLFZ does not show a classical seal structure that in other fault zones corresponds to a core zone characterized by fine-grained fault rocks. However, permeability is heterogeneous and the permeability tensor is strongly anisotropic due to fracture preferential orientation. We will show with numerical experiments that this hydraulic structure results in a channelized fluid flow (which is consistent with the observed hydrothermal alteration pattern). This results in a counterintuitive situation

  3. Using tolerance bounds in scientific investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Assessment of the variability in population values plays an important role in the analysis of scientific data. Analysis of scientific data often involves developing a bound on a proportion of a population. Sometimes simple probability bounds are obtained using formulas involving known mean and variance parameters and replacing the parameters by sample estimates. The resulting bounds are only approximate and fail to account for the variability in the estimated parameters. Tolerance bounds provide bounds on population proportions which account for the variation resulting from the estimated mean and variance parameters. A beta content, gamma confidence tolerance interval is constructed so that a proportion beta of the population lies within the region bounded by the interval with confidence gamma. An application involving corrosion measurements is used to illustrate the use of tolerance bounds for different situations. Extensions of standard tolerance intervals are applied to generate regression tolerance bounds, tolerance bounds for more general models of measurements collected over time, and tolerance intervals for varying precision data. Tolerance bounds also provide useful information for designing the collection of future data.

  4. Temporal evolution of fault systems in the Upper Jurassic of the Central German Molasse Basin: case study Unterhaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budach, Ingmar; Moeck, Inga; Lüschen, Ewald; Wolfgramm, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of faults in foreland basins is linked to a complex basin history ranging from extension to contraction and inversion tectonics. Faults in the Upper Jurassic of the German Molasse Basin, a Cenozoic Alpine foreland basin, play a significant role for geothermal exploration and are therefore imaged, interpreted and studied by 3D seismic reflection data. Beyond this applied aspect, the analysis of these seismic data help to better understand the temporal evolution of faults and respective stress fields. In 2009, a 27 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was conducted around the Unterhaching Gt 2 well, south of Munich. The main focus of this study is an in-depth analysis of a prominent v-shaped fault block structure located at the center of the 3D seismic survey. Two methods were used to study the periodic fault activity and its relative age of the detected faults: (1) horizon flattening and (2) analysis of incremental fault throws. Slip and dilation tendency analyses were conducted afterwards to determine the stresses resolved on the faults in the current stress field. Two possible kinematic models explain the structural evolution: One model assumes a left-lateral strike slip fault in a transpressional regime resulting in a positive flower structure. The other model incorporates crossing conjugate normal faults within a transtensional regime. The interpreted successive fault formation prefers the latter model. The episodic fault activity may enhance fault zone permeability hence reservoir productivity implying that the analysis of periodically active faults represents an important part in successfully targeting geothermal wells.

  5. A Framework For Evaluating Comprehensive Fault Resilience Mechanisms In Numerical Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Peng, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronevetsky, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-09

    As HPC systems approach Exascale, their circuit feature will shrink, while their overall size will grow, all at a fixed power limit. These trends imply that soft faults in electronic circuits will become an increasingly significant problem for applications that run on these systems, causing them to occasionally crash or worse, silently return incorrect results. This is motivating extensive work on application resilience to such faults, ranging from generic techniques such as replication or checkpoint/restart to algorithm-specific error detection and resilience techniques. Effective use of such techniques requires a detailed understanding of (1) which vulnerable parts of the application are most worth protecting (2) the performance and resilience impact of fault resilience mechanisms on the application. This paper presents FaultTelescope, a tool that combines these two and generates actionable insights by presenting in an intuitive way application vulnerabilities and impact of fault resilience mechanisms on applications.

  6. Inverse S-Transform Based Decision Tree for Power System Faults Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srikanth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a decision tree based identification of power system faults has been proposed. The key input values to the decision tree are the performance indices calculated from the maximum values of unfiltered inverse Stockwell transform (MUNIST technique. A wide range of techniques including Stockwell transform (ST have been used for the identification of power system faults. However, the signatures produced by these techniques are not unique and sometimes lead to misinterpretation of faults. Consequently, a decision tree based on the inverse Stockwell transform method is proposed in the present paper to automatically identify both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical power system faults. The method is able to determine both sudden and gradual changes in the signal caused by different power system faults. The technique is very accurate and produces unique signatures compared to the existing techniques. The results obtained show the efficacy of the proposed technique.

  7. Chaotic Extension Neural Network-Based Fault Diagnosis Method for Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Nan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the solar photovoltaic system is extensively used. However, once a fault occurs, it is inspected manually, which is not economical. In order to remedy the defect of unavailable fault diagnosis at any irradiance and temperature in the literature with chaos synchronization based intelligent fault diagnosis for photovoltaic systems proposed by Hsieh et al., this study proposed a chaotic extension fault diagnosis method combined with error back propagation neural network to overcome this problem. It used the nn toolbox of matlab 2010 for simulation and comparison, measured current irradiance and temperature, and used the maximum power point tracking (MPPT for chaotic extraction of eigenvalue. The range of extension field was determined by neural network. Finally, the voltage eigenvalue obtained from current temperature and irradiance was used for the fault diagnosis. Comparing the diagnostic rates with the results by Hsieh et al., this scheme can obtain better diagnostic rates when the irradiances or the temperatures are changed.

  8. Faulted Tell and ancient road by the Dead Sea Transform in southern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunel, E.; Meghraoui, M.; Akyuz, S.; Karabacak, V.; Bertrand, S.; Yalciner, C.; Ferry, M.; Munschy, M.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the northern end of the Dead Sea Transform Fault (DSTF) in the Amik Basin using paleoseismology, archeoseismology and geophysical prospecting. The DSFZ is one of the major continental faults where large historical earthquakes occurred, some of them were associated with surface ruptures. The Amik Basin has a large number of archaeological sites where some ancient man-made structures are located on the fault zone. The fault appears as a prominent scarp located immediately south of the basin and offsets large and small streams showing a range of 650 +-10 m to 14 +-0.5 m of left-lateral displacement. Aerial photographs and field observations indicate that the fault also affects Holocene lacustrine deposits of the basin and form a North-South trending morphological scarp. Archeological sites are largely spread in the area and the fault crosses the approximately 6500 BC old Sicantarla Tell and related walls. A total left-lateral offset of 40 +-5 m measured from the detailed morphology of the Tell and 43 +-1.5 m from a magnetic survey illustrates the cumulative left-lateral movement along the fault and provide with an average 5 mm/yr slip rate for the late Holocene. Field studies also showed that an ancient road with nearby Hittites inscriptions (around 2000 BC) is left-laterally offset by 25 +-2 m along the DSTF and provide with an average 6.2 mm/yr slip rate. In addition, paleoseismic trenching at three locations between the Tell and the southern fault trace expose the fault zone and successive most recent faulting events including the AD 1408 large earthquake. The faulted archeological sites and geomorphology offer the possibility to document successive coseismic ruptures and constitute a real archive of large earthquakes along the DSTF.

  9. Evolution of dilatant fracture networks in a normal fault — Evidence from 4D model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marc; van Gent, Heijn; Bazalgette, Loïc; Yassir, Najwa; Hoogerduijn Strating, Eilard H.; Urai, Janos L.

    2011-04-01

    Dilatant fractures in normal fault zones are widely recognized as major pathways of fluid flow in the upper crust where the ratio of rock strength and effective stress is suitable for their formation, but the structure of these fracture networks in 3D, their connectivity and their temporal evolution is poorly known. Here we build on 2D studies of scaled models of fracture networks in dilatant normal fault zones, using a series of X-ray computer tomographic scans of a physical model. We show how the dilatant fracture network evolves in 3D, as a complex self-organizing system with self-similar geometry. We processed the CT-scan data using a threshold filter to identify the open fracture volume, to allow visual and quantitative analysis of the evolving fracture system in 3D. Dilatant jogs initiated along the evolving fault plane coalesce into a self-similar percolating volume (Fd = 1.91). The fracture volume increases non-linearly with progressive displacement as the velocity of the fault blocks diverges from the master fault orientation and we infer that the normal stress on the fault decreases correspondingly. This process continues until the system triggers the formation of antithetic faults, with a corresponding increase in normal stress on the master fault and a decrease in the rate of fracture volume creation. We infer that although parameters like the width of the fractures are not scaled with the same ratio as length and stress, the processes and evolution of fracture geometries in our model are robust and apply to a wide range of normal fault zones in nature. Since our physical model does not involve chemical processes such as cementation or fault healing, the experiment suggests that fault systems can show a non-linear change of fracture network properties caused by a geometric evolution only.

  10. Fault creep and strain partitioning in Trinidad-Tobago: Geodetic measurements, models, and origin of creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, Halldór; Weber, John; La Femina, Peter; Latchman, Joan L.; Robertson, Richard; Higgins, Machel; Miller, Keith; Churches, Chris; Shaw, Kenton

    2017-04-01

    We studied active faults in Trinidad and Tobago in the Caribbean-South American (CA-SA) transform plate boundary zone using episodic GPS (eGPS) data from 19 sites and continuous GPS (cGPS) data from 8 sites, then modeling these data using a series of simple screw dislocation models. Our best-fit model for interseismic fault slip requires: 12-15 mm/yr of right-lateral movement and very shallow locking (0.2 ± 0.2 km; essentially creep) across the Central Range Fault (CRF); 3.4 +0.3/-0.2 mm/yr across the Soldado Fault in south Trinidad, and 3.5 +0.3/-0.2 mm/yr of dextral shear on fault(s) between Trinidad and Tobago. The upper-crustal faults in Trinidad show very little seismicity (1954-current from local network) and do not appear to have generated significant historic earthquakes. However, paleoseismic studies indicate that the CRF ruptured between 2710 and 500 yr. B.P. and thus it was recently capable of storing elastic strain. Together, these data suggest spatial and/or temporal fault segmentation on the CRF. The CRF marks a physical boundary between rocks associated with thermogenically generated petroleum and overpressured fluids in south and central Trinidad, from rocks containing only biogenic gas to the north, and a long string of active mud volcanoes align with the trace of the Soldado Fault along Trinidad's south coast. Fluid (oil and gas) overpressure may thus cause the CRF fault creep that we observe and the lack of seismicity, as an alternative or addition to weak mineral phases on the fault.

  11. Slip deficit and location of seismic gaps along the Dead Sea Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha; Toussaint, Renaud; Ferry, Matthieu; Nguema-Edzang, Parfait

    2015-04-01

    The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a ~ 1000-km-long North-South trending transform fault presents structural discontinuities and includes segments that experienced large earthquakes (Mw>7) in historical times. The Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley, the Lebanese restraining bend, the Missyaf and Ghab fault segments in Syria and the Ziyaret Fault segment in Turkey display geometrical complexities made of step overs, restraining and releasing bends that may constitute major obstacles to earthquake rupture propagation. Using active tectonics, GPS measurements and paleoseismology we investigate the kinematics and long-term/short-term slip rates along the Dead Sea fault. Tectonic geomorphology with paleoseismic trenching and archeoseismic investigations indicate repeated faulting events and left-lateral slip rate ranging from 4 mm/yr in the southern fault section to 6 mm/yr in the northern fault section. Except for the northernmost DSF section, these long-term estimates of fault slip rate are consistent with GPS measurements that show 4 to 5 mm/yr deformation rate across the plate boundary. Indeed, recent GPS results showing 3 +-0.5 mm/yr velocity rate of the northern DSF appear to be in contradiction with the ~6 mm/yr paleoseismic slip rate. The kinematic modeling that combines GPS and seismotectonic results implies a complex geodynamic pattern with the DSF transforms the Cyprus arc subduction zone into transpressive tectonics on the East Anatolian fault. The timing of past earthquake ruptures shows the occurrence of seismic sequences and a southward migration of large earthquakes, with the existence of major seismic gaps along strike. In this contribution, we present the calculated seismic slip deficit along the fault segments and discuss the identification of seismic gaps and the implication for the seismic hazard assessment.

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Lodo Formation and kinematic evolution of the Vallecitos Syncline, Coast Ranges, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K.; Rieth, J. A.; Pluhar, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The WNW-ESE-striking Vallecitos Syncline spans part of the California Coast Ranges, and is bounded by the Calaveras-San Andreas Fault System in the west and the Great Valley in the east. A northwest bend is observed as the syncline approaches the Calaveras and San Andreas Faults to the west, possibly a result of localized clockwise tectonic rotation. We present new paleomagnetic data from four sites across the syncline in an east-west transect to test this hypothesis. We sampled shale, sandstone, and siltstone from the Lodo Formation at Tumey Hills, Griswold Hills, New Idria, and Paicines. Using standard paleomagnetic methods, we conducted low temperature and thermal demagnetization. Data from some localities were generally scattered and difficult to interpret, suffering a major secondary chemical remanent magnetization. However the eastern end of the Vallecitos Syncline exhibited interpretable results. About a third of samples showed a strong reverse polarity at Griswold Hills and New Idria Mine, indicating that magnetization of the samples pre-date tilting of the outcrop and a secondary magnetization was acquired post deformation. Characteristic remanent magnetizations also exhibit inclination shallowing at three sites, likely the effect of compaction rather than poleward transport, since the fourth in the Tumey Hills exhibits minimal shallowing. Furthermore, results from Tumey Hills, and Griswold Hills indicate no localized tectonic rotation. Based on these findings, we tentatively conclude that the eastern end of the Vallecitos Syncline experienced no rotation, within error. Results from the western end remain inconclusive.

  13. General bounds in Hybrid Natural Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Sussman, Roberto A.; Tapia, José

    2017-12-01

    Recently we have studied in great detail a model of Hybrid Natural Inflation (HNI) by constructing two simple effective field theories. These two versions of the model allow inflationary energy scales as small as the electroweak scale in one of them or as large as the Grand Unification scale in the other, therefore covering the whole range of possible energy scales. In any case the inflationary sector of the model is of the form V(phi)=V0 (1+a cos(phi/f)) where 0<= a<1 and the end of inflation is triggered by an independent waterfall field. One interesting characteristic of this model is that the slow-roll parameter epsilon(phi) is a non-monotonic function of phi presenting a maximum close to the inflection point of the potential. Because the scalar spectrum Script Ps(k) of density fluctuations when written in terms of the potential is inversely proportional to epsilon(phi) we find that Script Ps(k) presents a minimum at phimin. The origin of the HNI potential can be traced to a symmetry breaking phenomenon occurring at some energy scale f which gives rise to a (massless) Goldstone boson. Non-perturbative physics at some temperature Tbounded by the symmetry breaking scale, Δ≡ VH1/4 bounds for the inflationary energy scale Δ and for the tensor-to-scalar ratio r.

  14. Comparative investigation of vibration and current monitoring for prediction of mechanical and electrical faults in induction motor based on multiclass-support vector machine algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangsar, Purushottam; Tiwari, Rajiv

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation of vibration and current monitoring for effective fault prediction in induction motor (IM) by using multiclass support vector machine (MSVM) algorithms. Failures of IM may occur due to propagation of a mechanical or electrical fault. Hence, for timely detection of these faults, the vibration as well as current signals was acquired after multiple experiments of varying speeds and external torques from an experimental test rig. Here, total ten different fault conditions that frequently encountered in IM (four mechanical fault, five electrical fault conditions and one no defect condition) have been considered. In the case of stator winding fault, and phase unbalance and single phasing fault, different level of severity were also considered for the prediction. In this study, the identification has been performed of the mechanical and electrical faults, individually and collectively. Fault predictions have been performed using vibration signal alone, current signal alone and vibration-current signal concurrently. The one-versus-one MSVM has been trained at various operating conditions of IM using the radial basis function (RBF) kernel and tested for same conditions, which gives the result in the form of percentage fault prediction. The prediction performance is investigated for the wide range of RBF kernel parameter, i.e. gamma, and selected the best result for one optimal value of gamma for each case. Fault predictions has been performed and investigated for the wide range of operational speeds of the IM as well as external torques on the IM.

  15. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  16. Numerical modelling of the mechanical and fluid flow properties of fault zones - Implications for fault seal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.; Giger, S.B.; Clennell, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Existing fault seal algorithms are based on fault zone composition and fault slip (e.g., shale gouge ratio), or on fault orientations within the contemporary stress field (e.g., slip tendency). In this study, we aim to develop improved fault seal algorithms that account for differences in fault zone

  17. Quorums Systems as a Method to Enhance Collaboration for Achieving Fault Tolerance in Distributed System

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan PETRI

    2009-01-01

    A system that implements the byzantine agreement algorithm is supposed to be very reliable and robust because of its fault tolerating feature. For very realistic environments, byzantine agreement protocols becomes inadequate, because they are based on the assumption that failures are controlled and they have unlimited severity. The byzantine agreement model works with a number of bounded failures that have to be tolerated. It is never concerned to identify these failures or to exclude them fr...

  18. Synthesis of Fault-Tolerant Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eles, Petru; Izosimov, Viacheslav; Pop, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of design optimization for fault- tolerant hard real-time systems. In particular, our focus is on the handling of transient faults using both checkpointing with rollback recovery and active replication. Fault tolerant schedules are generated based on a conditional...... process graph representation. The formulated system synthesis approaches decide the assignment of fault-tolerance policies to processes, the optimal placement of checkpoints and the mapping of processes to processors, such that multiple transient faults are tolerated, transparency requirements...

  19. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  20. Lower Bounds for Number-in-Hand Multiparty Communication Complexity, Made Easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Jeff; Verbin, Elad; Zhang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove lower bounds on randomized multiparty communication complexity, both in the blackboard model (where each message is written on a blackboard for all players to see) and (mainly) in the message-passing model, where messages are sent player-to-player. We introduce a new......; the technique seems applicable to a wide range of other problems as well. The obtained communication lower bounds imply new lower bounds in the functional monitoring model [11] (also called the distributed streaming model). All of our lower bounds allow randomized communication protocols with two-sided error...

  1. Structural analysis of three extensional detachment faults with data from the 2000 Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission provided geologists with a detailed digital elevation model of most of Earth's land surface. This new database is used here for structural analysis of grooved surfaces interpreted to be the exhumed footwalls of three active or recently active extensional detachment faults. Exhumed fault footwalls, each with an areal extent of one hundred to several hundred square kilometers, make up much of Dayman dome in eastern Papua New Guinea, the western Gurla Mandhata massif in the central Himalaya, and the northern Tokorondo Mountains in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Footwall curvature in profile varies from planar to slightly convex upward at Gurla Mandhata to strongly convex upward at northwestern Dayman dome. Fault curvature decreases away from the trace of the bounding detachment fault in western Dayman dome and in the Tokorondo massif, suggesting footwall flattening (reduction in curvature) following exhumation. Grooves of highly variable wavelength and amplitude reveal extension direction, although structural processes of groove genesis may be diverse.

  2. Instanton bound states in ABJM theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    The partition function of the ABJM theory receives non-perturbative corrections due to instanton effects. We study these non-perturbative corrections, including bound states of worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons, in the Fermi-gas approach. We require that the total non-perturbative correction should be always finite for arbitrary Chern-Simons level. This finiteness is realized quite non-trivially because each bound state contribution naively diverges at some levels. The poles of each contribution should be canceled out in total. We use this pole cancellation mechanism to find unknown bound state corrections from known ones. We conjecture a general expression of the bound state contribution. Summing up all the bound state contributions, we find that the effect of bound states is simply incorporated into the worldsheet instanton correction by a redefinition of the chemical potential in the Fermi-gas system. Analytic expressions of the 3- and 4-membrane instanton corrections are also proposed.

  3. Coulomb stress changes imparted by simulated M>7 earthquakes to major fault surfaces in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, J. C.; Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    To study static stress interactions between faults in southern California and identify cases where one large earthquake could trigger another, we select fourteen M>7 events simulated by the SCEC/CME CyberShake project and calculate the Coulomb stress changes those events impart to major fault surfaces in the UCERF2 fault model for the region. CyberShake simulates between 6 and 32 slip distributions for each event at a slip sampling resolution of 1 km, and we calculate stress changes on fault surfaces at the same resolution, a level of detail which is unprecedented in studies of stress transfer and which allows us to study the way that variabilities in slip on the source can affect imparted stress changes. We find that earthquakes rupturing the southern San Andreas fault generally decrease Coulomb stress on right-lateral faults in the Los Angeles basin, while M>7 events on the San Jacinto, Elsinore, Newport-Inglewood and Palos Verdes faults generally decrease stress on parallel right-lateral faults but increase Coulomb stress on the Mojave or San Bernardino sections of the San Andreas. Stress interactions between strike-slip and thrust faults and between the San Andreas and Garlock faults depend on the rupture area of the source. Coulomb stress changes imparted by simulated SAF events to locations on the San Jacinto and Garlock faults within ~8 km of the San Andreas appear to be influenced more by the nearby distribution of high and low slip on the San Andreas than by the overall slip distribution across the entire rupture. Using a simplified model, we calculate that an area of no slip surrounded by high slip on a rupture imparts strong Coulomb stress increases ≤7 km to either side of the source fault, possibly explaining the apparent ~8-km range of influence of local slip on the San Andreas. Additionally, we devise a method for evaluating uncertainty values in Coulomb stress changes caused by uncertainties in the strike, dip and rake of the receiver fault. These

  4. Minimum System Sensitivity Study of Linear Discrete Time Systems for Fault Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection is a critical step in the fault diagnosis of modern complex systems. An important notion in fault detection is the smallest gain of system sensitivity, denoted as ℋ− index, which measures the worst fault sensitivity. This paper is concerned with characterizing ℋ− index for linear discrete time systems. First, a necessary and sufficient condition on the lower bound of ℋ− index in finite time horizon for linear discrete time-varying systems is developed. It is characterized in terms of the existence of solution to a backward difference Riccati equation with an inequality constraint. The result is further extended to systems with unknown initial condition based on a modified ℋ− index. In addition, for linear time-invariant systems in infinite time horizon, based on the definition of the ℋ− index in frequency domain, a condition in terms of algebraic Riccati equation is developed. In comparison with the well-known bounded real lemma, it is found that ℋ− index is not completely dual to ℋ∞ norm. Finally, several numerical examples are given to illustrate the main results.

  5. Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faunt, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. A Quaternary fault database for central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd Alan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stübner, Konstanze; Strube, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic, and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments, and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault traces and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 123 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. All data are accessible for viewing and download via http://www.geo.uni-tuebingen.de/faults/. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  7. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  8. Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

    2013-07-01

    Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

  9. The 2015 M w 6.0 Mt. Kinabalu earthquake: an infrequent fault rupture within the Crocker fault system of East Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wei, Shengji; Wang, Xin; Lindsey, Eric O.; Tongkul, Felix; Tapponnier, Paul; Bradley, Kyle; Chan, Chung-Han; Hill, Emma M.; Sieh, Kerry

    2017-12-01

    The M w 6.0 Mt. Kinabalu earthquake of 2015 was a complete (and deadly) surprise, because it occurred well away from the nearest plate boundary in a region of very low historical seismicity. Our seismological, space geodetic, geomorphological, and field investigations show that the earthquake resulted from rupture of a northwest-dipping normal fault that did not reach the surface. Its unilateral rupture was almost directly beneath 4000-m-high Mt. Kinabalu and triggered widespread slope failures on steep mountainous slopes, which included rockfalls that killed 18 hikers. Our seismological and morphotectonic analyses suggest that the rupture occurred on a normal fault that splays upwards off of the previously identified normal Marakau fault. Our mapping of tectonic landforms reveals that these faults are part of a 200-km-long system of normal faults that traverse the eastern side of the Crocker Range, parallel to Sabah's northwestern coastline. Although the tectonic reason for this active normal fault system remains unclear, the lengths of the longest fault segments suggest that they are capable of generating magnitude 7 earthquakes. Such large earthquakes must occur very rarely, though, given the hitherto undetectable geodetic rates of active tectonic deformation across the region.

  10. Active fault diagnosis by controller modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Two active fault diagnosis methods for additive or parametric faults are proposed. Both methods are based on controller reconfiguration rather than on requiring an exogenous excitation signal, as it is otherwise common in active fault diagnosis. For the first method, it is assumed that the system...... in a way that guarantees the continuity of transition and global stability using a recent result on observer parameterization. An illustrative example inspired by a field study of a drag racing vehicle is given. For the second method, an active fault diagnosis method for parametric faults is proposed...... considered is controlled by an observer-based controller. The method is then based on a number of alternate observers, each designed to be sensitive to one or more additive faults. Periodically, the observer part of the controller is changed into the sequence of fault sensitive observers. This is done...

  11. Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Kinnaert, Michel; Lunze, Jan

    The book presents effective model-based analysis and design methods for fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control. Architectural and structural models are used to analyse the propagation of the fault through the process, to test the fault detectability and to find the redundancies in the process...... the applicability of the presented methods. The theoretical results are illustrated by two running examples which are used throughout the book. The book addresses engineering students, engineers in industry and researchers who wish to get a survey over the variety of approaches to process diagnosis and fault...... that can be used to ensure fault tolerance. Design methods for diagnostic systems and fault-tolerant controllers are presented for processes that are described by analytical models, by discrete-event models or that can be dealt with as quantised systems. Four case studies on pilot processes show...

  12. Distance hijacking attacks on distance bounding protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, Cas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bonne; Čapkun, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    Distance bounding protocols are typically analyzed with respect to three types of attacks: Distance Fraud, Mafia Fraud, and Terrorist Fraud. We define a fourth main type of attacks on distance bounding protocols, called Distance Hijacking attacks. We show that many proposed distance bounding protocols are vulnerable to these attacks, and we propose solutions to make these protocols resilient to Distance Hijacking. Additionally, we generalize Distance Hijacking to Location Hijacking, to which ...

  13. Boundedly UC spaces: characterisations and preservation | Jain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A metric space (X, d) is called a boundedly UC space if every closed and bounded subset of X is a UC space. A metric space (X, d) is called a UC space if each real-valued continuous function on (X, d) is uniformly continuous. In this paper, we study twenty-two equivalent conditions for a metric space to be a boundedly UC ...

  14. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  15. Bounded cohomology of discrete groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frigerio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The author manages a near perfect equilibrium between necessary technicalities (always well motivated) and geometric intuition, leading the readers from the first simple definition to the most striking applications of the theory in 13 very pleasant chapters. This book can serve as an ideal textbook for a graduate topics course on the subject and become the much-needed standard reference on Gromov's beautiful theory. -Michelle Bucher The theory of bounded cohomology, introduced by Gromov in the late 1980s, has had powerful applications in geometric group theory and the geometry and topology of manifolds, and has been the topic of active research continuing to this day. This monograph provides a unified, self-contained introduction to the theory and its applications, making it accessible to a student who has completed a first course in algebraic topology and manifold theory. The book can be used as a source for research projects for master's students, as a thorough introduction to the field for graduate student...

  16. L∞-gain adaptive fuzzy fault accommodation control design for nonlinear time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huai-Ning; Qiang, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Lei

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy fault accommodation (FA) control design with a guaranteed L(∞)-gain performance is developed for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with persistent bounded disturbances. Using the Lyapunov technique and the Razumikhin-type lemma, the existence condition of the L(∞) -gain adaptive fuzzy FA controllers is provided in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In the proposed FA scheme, a fuzzy logic system is employed to approximate the unknown term in the derivative of the Lyapunov function due to the unknown fault function; a continuous-state feedback control strategy is adopted for the control design to avoid the undesirable chattering phenomenon. The resulting FA controllers can ensure that every response of the closed-loop system is uniformly ultimately bounded with a guaranteed L(∞)-gain performance in the presence of a fault. Moreover, by the existing LMI optimization technique, a suboptimal controller is obtained in the sense of minimizing an upper bound of the L(∞)-gain. Finally, the achieved simulation results on the FA control of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) show the effectiveness of the proposed design procedure.

  17. Bounded sets in fast complete inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Let E1⊂E2⊂… be a sequence of locally convex spaces with all identity maps: En→En+1 continuous and E=indlim En fast complete. Then each set bounded in E is also bounded in some En iff for any Banach disk B bounded in E and n∈N, the closure of B⋂En in B is bounded in some Em. This holds, in particular, if all spaces En are webbed.

  18. Valuation models and Simon's bounded rationality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandra Strommer de Farias Godoi

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims at reconciling the evidence that sophisticated valuation models are increasingly used by companies in their investment appraisal with the literature of bounded rationality, according...

  19. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Martin, E-mail: marlohmann@gmail.com [Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  20. A strongly quasiconvex PAC-Bayesian bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiemann, Niklas; Igel, Christian; Wintenberger, Olivier

    We propose a new PAC-Bayesian bound and a way of constructing a hypothesis space, so that the bound is convex in the posterior distribution and also convex in a trade-off parameter between empirical performance of the posterior distribution and its complexity. The complexity is measured by the Ku......We propose a new PAC-Bayesian bound and a way of constructing a hypothesis space, so that the bound is convex in the posterior distribution and also convex in a trade-off parameter between empirical performance of the posterior distribution and its complexity. The complexity is measured...

  1. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  2. Upper and lower bounds of ground-motion variabilities: implication for source properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Fabrice; Reddy-Kotha, Sreeram; Bora, Sanjay; Bindi, Dino

    2017-04-01

    One of the key challenges of seismology is to be able to analyse the physical factors that control earthquakes and ground-motion variabilities. Such analysis is particularly important to calibrate physics-based simulations and seismic hazard estimations at high frequencies. Within the framework of the development of ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) developments, ground-motions residuals (differences between recorded ground motions and the values predicted by a GMPE) are computed. The exponential growth of seismological near-source records and modern GMPE analysis technics allow to partition these residuals into between- and a within-event components. In particular, the between-event term quantifies all those repeatable source effects (e.g. related to stress-drop or kappa-source variability) which have not been accounted by the magnitude-dependent term of the model. In this presentation, we first discuss the between-event variabilities computed both in the Fourier and Response Spectra domains, using recent high-quality global accelerometric datasets (e.g. NGA-west2, Resorce, Kiknet). These analysis lead to the assessment of upper bounds for the ground-motion variability. Then, we compare these upper bounds with lower bounds estimated by analysing seismic sequences which occurred on specific fault systems (e.g., located in Central Italy or in Japan). We show that the lower bounds of between-event variabilities are surprisingly large which indicates a large variability of earthquake dynamic properties even within the same fault system. Finally, these upper and lower bounds of ground-shaking variability are discussed in term of variability of earthquake physical properties (e.g., stress-drop and kappa_source).

  3. Chronology of last earthquake on Firouzkuh Fault using by C14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Walker, R.; Alimohammadian, H.; Salamati, R.; Shahidi, A.; Patnaik, R.; Talebian, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Firouzkuh fault with about 70 km length extending from east of Mosha fault in Aminabad village to Gadok in north east of Firouzkuh and easily is traceable on satellite images and aerial photographs (Nazari, 2006). Geologically this fault bounded between Jurassic - Cretaceous deposits in east (hanging wall) and Plio-Quaternary sediments in the west (foot wall) fault, (Aghanabati and Hamedi, 1994). This fault with NE-SW trend, located at northern part of south Firouzkuh high lands, and is partially compatible with F-16 magnetism (Yossefi and Firedburg, 1977). This fault initially was known as south trending thrust fault (Berberian et al., 1996), then included as left-lateral dextral fault (Jackson et al., 2002) and after all as sinstral-normal fault (Nazari et al., 2005) However, due to dispersal pattern of deformation on different faults, make sit difficult to fully understand the geometry and mechanism of the latest activity of Firouzkuh fault. In bigger scale, presence of eastern mountains and pattern of younger deformation in fault plain, especially in Firouzkuh domain, there is an evidence of left-Lateral dextral fault with vertical component for Firouzkuh fault. In a compressed structural regim, the vertical component can be consider as a thrust component that has caused the formation and general morphology of the area or a fault plain with south - west dipping. There is no palaeoseismic data or recorded large scale seismic activity related to Firouzkuh fault. Although historically, Firouzkuh fault is located in komes seismic zone (856 AD, Io= X, Ms= 7.9), but since Firouzkuh is an intermountain area, no historic seismic activity is reported from that area. There are number of recorded seismic activity such as 1969, 1973, 1975, 1979, 1985, 1989, 1990, and 2008 with magnitude of less than 4.8 except Gadok earthquake in 1990 which its magnitude was 5.8 and this is the greatest recorded seismic activity of Firouzkuh area, the morphotectonic and palaeoseismic

  4. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  5. Coseismic paleomagnetic signal in fault pseudotachylytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre, E.; Geissman, J. W.; Zechmeister, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    The 59 Ma-old fault-related pseudotachylytes of the Peninsular Ranges of California have been investigated from the microstructural and magnetic point of view. These veins have a 30-fold increase in magnetic susceptibility compared to their tonalitic host-rock. The increase results from the breakdown of mafic silicates during frictional melting and subsequent formation of abundant fine grained magnetite grains. Upon rapid cooling of the pseudotachylyte melt in the Earth's magnetic field the rocks acquire a strong thermoremanent magnetization. In addition to this dominant process some samples exhibit a "lightning-induced" remanent magnetization acquired during seismic slip in the presence of a high magnetic field. This unusual remanence component is anomalous in direction and tends to be at high angle to the pseudotachylyte vein plane. We propose that the coseismic lightning-induced magnetization is caused by electrical currents possibly similar to those responsible for earthquake lightnings.

  6. Afterslip, tremor, and the Denali fault earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie; Ruppert, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that afterslip should be accompanied by tremor using observations of seismic and aseismic deformation surrounding the 2002 M 7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake (DFE). Afterslip happens more frequently than spontaneous slow slip and has been observed in a wider range of tectonic environments, and thus the existence or absence of tremor accompanying afterslip may provide new clues about tremor generation. We also searched for precursory tremor, as a proxy for posited accelerating slip leading to rupture. Our search yielded no tremor during the five days prior to the DFE or in several intervals in the three months after. This negative result and an array of other observations all may be explained by rupture penetrating below the presumed locked zone into the frictional transition zone. While not unique, such an explanation corroborates previous models of megathrust and transform earthquake ruptures that extend well into the transition zone.

  7. Controller modification applied for active fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    with the result that the detection and isolation time can be long. In this paper it will be shown, that this problem can be handled by using a modification of the feedback controller. By applying the YJBK-parameterization (after Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno and Kucera) for the controller, it is possible to modify...... the feedback controller with a minor effect on the external output in the fault free case. Further, in the faulty case, the signature of the auxiliary input can be optimized. This is obtained by using a band-pass filter for the YJBK parameter that is only effective in a small frequency range where...... the frequency for the auxiliary input is selected. This gives that it is possible to apply an auxiliary input with a reduced amplitude. An example is included to show the results....

  8. Image processing of 2D resistivity data for imaging faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, F.; Garambois, S.; Jongmans, D.; Pirard, E.; Loke, M. H.

    2005-07-01

    A methodology to locate automatically limits or boundaries between different geological bodies in 2D electrical tomography is proposed, using a crest line extraction process in gradient images. This method is applied on several synthetic models and on field data set acquired on three experimental sites during the European project PALEOSIS where trenches were dug. The results presented in this work are valid for electrical tomographies data collected with a Wenner-alpha array and computed with an l 1 norm (blocky inversion) as optimization method. For the synthetic cases, three geometric contexts are modelled: a vertical and a dipping fault juxtaposing two different geological formations and a step-like structure. A superficial layer can cover each geological structure. In these three situations, the method locates the synthetic faults and layer boundaries, and determines fault displacement but with several limitations. The estimated fault positions correlate exactly with the synthetic ones if a conductive (or no superficial) layer overlies the studied structure. When a resistive layer with a thickness of 6 m covers the model, faults are positioned with a maximum error of 1 m. Moreover, when a resistive and/or a thick top layer is present, the resolution significantly decreases for the fault displacement estimation (error up to 150%). The tests with the synthetic models for surveys using the Wenner-alpha array indicate that the proposed methodology is best suited to vertical and horizontal contacts. Application of the methodology to real data sets shows that a lateral resistivity contrast of 1:5-1:10 leads to exact faults location. A fault contact with a resistivity contrast of 1:0.75 and overlaid by a resistive layer with a thickness of 1 m gives an error location ranging from 1 to 3 m. Moreover, no result is obtained for a contact with very low contrasts (˜1:0.85) overlaid by a resistive soil. The method shows poor results when vertical gradients are greater than

  9. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Andy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nelson, Austin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chebahtah, Justin [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Wang, Trudie [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); McCarty, Michael [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  10. New lower bound for the Capacitated Arc Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wøhlk, Sanne

    2006-01-01

    We present a new lower bound, the Multiple Cuts Node Duplication Lower Bound, for the undirected Capacitated Arc Routing Problem.We prove that this new bound dominates the existing bounds for the problem. Computational results are also provided.......We present a new lower bound, the Multiple Cuts Node Duplication Lower Bound, for the undirected Capacitated Arc Routing Problem.We prove that this new bound dominates the existing bounds for the problem. Computational results are also provided....

  11. New fault tolerant matrix converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Edorta; Andreu, Jon; Kortabarria, Inigo; Ormaetxea, Enekoitz; Alegria, Inigo Martinez de; Martin, Jose Luis [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Ibanez, Pedro [TECNALIA, Energy Unit, Parque Tecnologico de Zamudio, E-48170 Bizkaia (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    The matrix converter (MC) presents a promising topology that will have to overcome certain barriers (protection systems, durability, the development of converters for real applications, etc.) in order to gain a foothold in the industry. In some applications, where continuous operation must be insured in the case of a system failure, improved reliability of the converter is of particular importance. In this sense, this article focuses on the study of a fault tolerant MC. The fault tolerance of a converter is characterized by its total or partial response in the case of a breakage of any of its components. Taking into consideration that virtually no work has been done on fault tolerant MCs, this paper describes the most important studies in this area. Moreover, a new method is proposed for detecting the breakage of MC semiconductors. Likewise, a new variation of SVM modulation with failure tolerance capacity is presented. This guarantees the continuous operation of the converter and the pseudo-optimum control of a PMSM. This paper also proposes a novel MC topology, which allows the flexible reconfiguration of this converter, when one or several of its semiconductors are damaged. In this way, the MC can continue operating at 100% of its performance without having to double its resources. In this way, it can be said that the solution described in this article represents a step forward towards the development of reliable matrix converters for real applications. (author)

  12. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and

  13. Cataclastic faults along the SEMP fault system (Eastern Alps, Austria) — A contribution to fault zone evolution, internal structure and paleo-stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, Stefan; Kurz, Walter

    2013-11-01

    In this study three different sites along the ENE-trending, sinistral Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone were investigated with respect to brittle fault zone evolution and fault re-activation. All sites crop out in Triassic carbonates (Ladinian Wetterstein limestone/-dolomite). Simultaneously (re-) activated faults were investigated with focus on fault-slip data and structural inventory of each individual fault zone. Configuration of (internal) structural elements, fault core thickness, strike direction and slip sense in addition to particle analysis of fault core cataclasites add up to three different fault types (Fault Types I, II and III). Fault Type I is classified by a complex internal fault core structure with thicknesses up to several 10s of meters and generally evolve in a strike direction of maximum shear stress (τmax). Type II faults, characterized by cataclastic fault cores with thicknesses up to 1 m, as well as Type III faults (thin solitary cataclastic layers) evolve sub-parallel to the main fault direction and in orientation according to R, R' or X shear fractures with variable (σn/τ) ratio. Progressive development from Type III to Type II and Type I faults is consistent with increasing displacement and increasing fault core width. Fault type classification and related paleostress analysis provide evidence from field observation compared to theoretical and analog models of Mohr-Coulomb fracture evolution.

  14. The role of fault zone fabric and lithification state on frictional strength, constitutive behavior, and deformation microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikari, M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Marone, C.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the frictional behavior of a range of lithified rocks used as analogs for fault rocks, cataclasites and ultracataclasites at seismogenic depths and compare them with gouge powders commonly used in experimental studies of faults. At normal stresses of ∼50 MPa, the frictional strength of

  15. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerant Control with Application on a Wind Turbine Low Speed Shaft Encoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa

    2015-01-01

    . This sensor has to be correct as blade pitch actions should be different at different azimuth angle as the wind speed varies within the rotor field due to different phenomena. A scheme detecting faults in this sensor has previously been designed for the application of a high end fault diagnosis and fault...... tolerant control of wind turbines using a benchmark model. In this paper, the fault diagnosis scheme is improved and integrated with a fault accommodation scheme which enables and disables the individual pitch algorithm based on the fault detection. In this way, the blade and tower loads are not increased...

  16. Length-displacement scaling of thrust faults on the Moon and the formation of uphill-facing scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Hiesinger, Harald; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-08-01

    Fault populations on terrestrial planets exhibit a linear relationship between their length, L, and the maximum displacement, D, which implies a constant D/L ratio during fault growth. Although it is known that D/L ratios of faults are typically a few percent on Earth and 0.2-0.8% on Mars and Mercury, the D/L ratios of lunar faults are not well characterized. Quantifying the D/L ratios of faults on the Moon is, however, crucial for a better understanding of lunar tectonics, including for studies of the amount of global lunar contraction. Here, we use high-resolution digital terrain models to perform a topographic analysis of four lunar thrust faults - Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, and Racah X-1 - that range in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km. First, we determine the along-strike variation of the vertical displacement from ≥ 20 topographic profiles across each fault. For measuring the vertical displacements, we use a method that is commonly applied to fault scarps on Earth and that does not require detrending of the profiles. The resulting profiles show that the displacement changes gradually along these faults' strike, with maximum vertical displacements ranging from 17 ± 2 m for Simpelius-1 to 192 ± 30 m for Racah X-1. Assuming a fault dip of 30° yields maximum total displacements (D) that are twice as large as the vertical displacements. The linear relationship between D and L supports the inference that lunar faults gradually accumulate displacement as they propagate laterally. For the faults we investigated, the D/L ratio is ∼2.3%, an order of magnitude higher than theoretical predictions for the Moon, but a value similar for faults on Earth. We also employ finite-element modeling and a Mohr circle stress analysis to investigate why many lunar thrust faults, including three of those studied here, form uphill-facing scarps. Our analysis shows that fault slip is preferentially initiated on planes that dip in the same direction as the topography, because

  17. Character and Implications of a Newly Identified Creeping Strand of the San Andreas fault NE of Salton Sea, Southern California