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Sample records for range backscatter efficiency

  1. Using Backscattering to Enhance Efficiency in Neutron Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kittelmann, T.; Kanaki, K.; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2017-01-01

    The principle of using strongly scattering materials to recover efficiency in detectors for neutron instruments, via backscattering of unconverted thermal neutrons, is discussed in general. The feasibility of the method is illustrated through Geant4-based simulations involving thermal neutrons...... impinging on a specific setup with a layer of polyethylene placed behind a single-layered boron-10 thin-film gaseous detector. The results show that detection efficiencies can be as much as doubled in the most ideal scenario, but with associated adverse contributions to spatial and timing resolutions of...

  2. 100 keV electron backscattered range and coefficient for silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaplewski, D.A.; Ocola, L.E. (Center for Nanoscale Materials)

    2012-01-01

    The authors have measured the range and intensity of backscattered electrons in silicon from a 100 keV source using a process independent method. Backscattered electrons contributed to the total dose of features written in a negative tone electron beam resist. Instead of measuring the height of the resist and using a contrast curve to convert the resist height to dose, the heights of the features were made equal by adjusting the backscattered contribution through dose assignments. Creating features of equal height eliminated the need to use a contrast curve to convert from resist height to total dose. Also, it allowed for measurements of the backscattered contribution from larger distances. Using a circularly symmetric torus pattern, the three-dimensional backscatter problem was reduced to a 1-dimensional Gaussian form. The authors measured the range of the backscattered electrons, {beta}, to be 31.08 {+-} 0.06 {micro}m. By varying the writing dose of the pattern, we determined the backscatter coefficient, {eta}, to be 0.63 {+-} 0.03.

  3. The range and intensity of backscattered electrons for use in the creation of high fidelity electron beam lithography patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, David A; Holt, Martin V; Ocola, Leonidas E

    2013-08-02

    We present a set of universal curves that predict the range and intensity of backscattered electrons which can be used in conjunction with electron beam lithography to create high fidelity nanoscale patterns. The experimental method combines direct write dose, backscattered dose, and a self-reinforcing pattern geometry to measure the dose provided by backscattered electrons to a nanoscale volume on the substrate surface at various distances from the electron source. Electron beam lithography is used to precisely control the number and position of incident electrons on the surface of the material. Atomic force microscopy is used to measure the height of the negative electron beam lithography resist. Our data shows that the range and the intensity of backscattered electrons can be predicted using the density and the atomic number of any solid material, respectively. The data agrees with two independent Monte Carlo simulations without any fitting parameters. These measurements are the most accurate electron range measurements to date.

  4. The range and intensity of backscattered electrons for use in the creation of high fidelity electron beam lithography patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Holt, Martin V.; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2013-08-01

    We present a set of universal curves that predict the range and intensity of backscattered electrons which can be used in conjunction with electron beam lithography to create high fidelity nanoscale patterns. The experimental method combines direct write dose, backscattered dose, and a self-reinforcing pattern geometry to measure the dose provided by backscattered electrons to a nanoscale volume on the substrate surface at various distances from the electron source. Electron beam lithography is used to precisely control the number and position of incident electrons on the surface of the material. Atomic force microscopy is used to measure the height of the negative electron beam lithography resist. Our data shows that the range and the intensity of backscattered electrons can be predicted using the density and the atomic number of any solid material, respectively. The data agrees with two independent Monte Carlo simulations without any fitting parameters. These measurements are the most accurate electron range measurements to date.

  5. Morphology and possible origins of near-range oblique HF backscatter at high and midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Pavlo, V.; Iserhienrhien, Blessing; St.-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency radars (HF, ˜10-20 MHz) forming the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) regularly observe returns from very close ranges of ≤300-400 km (near-range echoes, NREs). These echoes are conventionally attributed to backscatter from meteor trails, but other sources of NRE have been invoked, including polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE), and non-field-aligned E region irregularities leading to high-aspect ionospheric returns. In order to relate NRE to a particular mechanism, it is essential to establish beforehand their spatiotemporal trends with respect to season, local time, and latitude. Systematic information of this kind is generally lacking from the literature, so we attempt to fill the gap by performing a statistical analysis of such echoes observed by five radars covering midlatitudes to polar latitudes over all seasons and local times. We detected two major echo populations which were observed at each radar site: (i) a nightside-early morning returns representing the well-known meteor backscatter and (ii) a midsummer population centered near the local noon. At high latitudes the summer daytime echoes are usually interpreted as PMSE, but the observed population extends to much lower latitudes and is centered well above the conventional PMSE height range. We hypothesize that this population could be related to neutral turbulence in the lower E region. In addition, there was a pronounced evening population restricted to the auroral region which we provisionally attribute to irregularities generated by the precipitating energetic particles and strong electric fields.

  6. Final Technical Report "Study of Efficiency of Raman Backscattering Amplification in Plasma"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, Szymon

    2014-03-31

    General : Our major scientific achievements in Raman Backscattering (RBS) amplification and compression of short laser pulses in plasma. The laser system based on RBS steps in where the current technology of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) (extremely successful in developing ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses in last 2 decades) becomes difficult and very expensive to apply. Good base for such RBS laser was created by our recent experiments, which were supported by GPS grants. The main objective of the present grant was: improvement efficiency of energy transfer from pump to seed. The results surpassed our expectations; we improved the efficiency of energy transfer from pump to seed by a factor of 6 compared to the best of our previous results and amplified seed pulse compressed down to about 50 fsec.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Ultrasound Backscattered Waves in Cancellous Bone Using a Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method: Isolation of the Backscattered Waves From Various Ranges of Bone Depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Using a finite-difference time-domain method, ultrasound backscattered waves inside cancellous bone were numerically analyzed to investigate the backscatter mechanism. Two bone models with different thicknesses were modeled with artificial absorbing layers positioned at the back surfaces of the model, and an ultrasound pulse wave was transmitted toward the front surface. By calculating the difference between the simulated waveforms obtained using the two bone models, the backscattered waves from a limited range of depths in cancellous bone could be isolated. The results showed that the fast and slow longitudinal waves, which have previously been observed only in the ultrasound waveform transmitted through the bone, could be distinguished in the backscattered waveform from a deeper bone depth when transmitting the ultrasound wave parallel to the main orientation of the trabecular network. The amplitudes of the fast and slow backscattered waves were more closely correlated with the bone porosity [R2 = 0.84 and 0.66 (p waves [R2 = 0.48 (p waves could be regarded as the superposition of the fast and slow waves reflected from various bone depths, returning at different times.

  8. Worst-Case Efficient Range Searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan

    2009-01-01

    In this tutorial we will describe some of the recent advances in the development of worst-case efficient range search indexing structures, that is, structures for storing a set of data points such that the points in a axis-parallel (hyper-) query rectangle can be found efficiently (with as few disk...... discuss the external priority search tree [8], which solves a restricted version of the two-dimensional version of the problem where the query rectangle is unbounded on one side. This structure is then used in a range tree index structure [8, 21] that answers general two-dimensional queries in the same......, 17], as well as recent index structures for higher-dimensional range search indexing [1]. We end by mentioning various R-tree variant [7, 18, 15] that can be used to solve the extended version of range search indexing where the queries as well as the data are (hyper-) rectangles. More comprehensive...

  9. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  10. Radar efficiency and the calculation of decade-long PMSE backscatter cross-section for the Resolute Bay VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Swarnalingam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75.0° N, 95.0° W and operating at 51.5 MHz, has been used to investigate Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE since 1997. PMSE are a unique form of strong coherent radar echoes, and their understanding has been a challenge to the scientific community since their discovery more than three decades ago. While other high latitude radars have recorded strong levels of PMSE activities, the Resolute Bay radar has observed relatively lower levels of PMSE strengths. In order to derive absolute measurements of PMSE strength at this site, a technique is developed to determine the radar efficiency using cosmic (sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. VHF radars are only rarely calibrated, but determination of efficiency is even less common. Here we emphasize the importance of efficiency for determination of cross-section measurements. The significant advantage of this method is that it can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world as long as the sky noise variations are known. The radar efficiencies for two on-site radars at Resolute Bay are determined. PMSE backscatter cross-section is estimated, and decade-long PMSE strength variations at this location are investigated. It was noticed that the median of the backscatter cross-section distribution remains relatively unchanged, but over the years a great level of variability occurs in the high power tail of the distribution.

  11. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  12. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS. The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  13. Efficient external memory structures for range-aggregate queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, P.K.; Yang, J.; Arge, L.

    2013-01-01

    We present external memory data structures for efficiently answering range-aggregate queries. The range-aggregate problem is defined as follows: Given a set of weighted points in Rd, compute the aggregate of the weights of the points that lie inside a d-dimensional orthogonal query rectangle. The...

  14. I/O-Efficient Dynamic Planar Range Skyline Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper; Tsakalidis, Konstantinos; Tsichlas, Kostas

    We present the first fully dynamic worst case I/O-efficient data structures that support planar orthogonal \\textit{3-sided range skyline reporting queries} in $\\bigO (\\log_{2B^\\epsilon} n + \\frac{t}{B^{1-\\epsilon}})$ I/Os and updates in $\\bigO (\\log_{2B^\\epsilon} n)$ I/Os, using $\\bigO (\\frac....../Os, and in $\\bigO(1/B)$ amortized I/Os given that a constant number of blocks is already loaded in main memory. Finally, we show that any pointer-based static data structure that supports \\textit{dominated maxima reporting queries}, namely the difficult special case of 4-sided skyline queries, in $\\big......O(\\log^{\\bigO(1)}n +t)$ worst case time must occupy $\\Omega(n \\frac{\\log n}{\\log \\log n})$ space, by adapting a similar lower bounding argument for planar 4-sided range reporting queries....

  15. On Space Efficient Two Dimensional Range Minimum Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Davoodi, Pooya; Rao, S. Srinivasa

    2012-01-01

    The two dimensional range minimum query problem is to preprocess a static m by n matrix (two dimensional array) A of size N=m⋅n, such that subsequent queries, asking for the position of the minimum element in a rectangular range within A, can be answered efficiently. We study the trade-off betwee...... structure of optimal size O(N) bits. For the case where queries can not probe A, we give a data structure of size O(N⋅min {m,log n}) bits with O(1) query time, assuming m≤n. This leaves a gap to the space lower bound of Ω(Nlog m) bits for this version of the problem...... the space and query time of the problem. We show that every algorithm enabled to access A during the query and using a data structure of size O(N/c) bits requires Ω(c) query time, for any c where 1≤c≤N. This lower bound holds for arrays of any dimension. In particular, for the one dimensional version...

  16. On Space Efficient Two Dimensional Range Minimum Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoodi, Pooya; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rao, S. Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    The two dimensional range minimum query problem is to preprocess a static two dimensional m by n array A of size N = m · n, such that subsequent queries, asking for the position of the minimum element in a rectangular range within A, can be answered efficiently. We study the trade-off between the...... optimal O(N) bits additional space. For the case where queries can not probe A, we give a data structure of size O(N· min {m,logn}) bits with O(1) query time, assuming m ≤ n. This leaves a gap to the lower bound of Ω(Nlogm) bits for this version of the problem....... the space and query time of the problem. We show that every algorithm enabled to access A during the query and using O(N/c) bits additional space requires Ω(c) query time, for any c where 1 ≤ c ≤ N. This lower bound holds for any dimension. In particular, for the one dimensional version of the problem......, the lower bound is tight up to a constant factor. In two dimensions, we complement the lower bound with an indexing data structure of size O(N/c) bits additional space which can be preprocessed in O(N) time and achieves O(clog2 c) query time. For c = O(1), this is the first O(1) query time algorithm using...

  17. Measurements of Capture Efficiency of Range Hoods in Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2015-01-01

    mapped the pollution distribution in the room, and showed that the pollutants escape more at the sides of the cooktop. These preliminary results suggest that more measurements should be conducted investigating the capture efficiency at different pollutant source temperature, size and location...

  18. Efficient ranging-sensor navigation methods for indoor aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobers, David Michael, Jr.

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are often used for reconnaissance, search and rescue, damage assessment, exploration, and other tasks that are dangerous or prohibitively difficult for humans to perform. Often, these tasks include traversing indoor environments where radio links are unreliable, hindering the use of remote pilot links or ground-based control, and effectively eliminating Global Positioning System (GPS) signals as a potential localization method. As a result, any vehicle capable of indoor flight must be able to stabilize itself and perform all guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) tasks without dependence on a radio link, which may be available only intermittently. Stability and control of rotorcraft UAVs is usually achieved by either a passive stability system, such as a Bell stabilizer bar, or by actively measuring body accelerations and angular rates with an onboard Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and using that data for feedback control. However, neither active nor passive attitude stabilization methods provide position control by themselves. Therefore, GNC methods must either be tolerant to position drift or have some means of estimating and controlling position, which requires an external reference in order to measure and correct errors in the position estimate. GPS signals are often the most convenient method for providing this external position reference. As a result, most UAVs utilize GPS for localization and to bound error on position drift. Unfortunately, the availability of GPS signals in unknown environments is not assured, especially during indoor operation. As a result, other sensors must be used to provide position information relative to the environment. This research covers a description of different ranging sensors and methods for incorporating them into the overall guidance, navigation, and control system. Various sensors are analyzed to determine their performance characteristics and suitability for indoor navigation, including

  19. Efficient processing of 3-sided range queries with probabilistic guarantees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaporis, Alexis; Papadopoulos, Apostolos; Sioutas, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    over the O(log n) update time bound achieved by the classic Priority Search Tree of McCreight [23], as well as over the Fusion Priority Search Tree of Willard [30], which requires O(log n/log log n) time for all operations. Moreover, we externalize this solution, gaining O(logB n + t/B) worst case...... and O(logBlogn) amortized expected with high probability I/Os for query and update operations respectively, where B is the disk block size. Then, combining the Modified Priority Search Tree [27] with the Priority Search Tree [23], we achieve a query time of O(log log n + t) expected with high......This work studies the problem of 2-dimensional searching for the 3-sided range query of the form [a, b] x (-∞, c] in both main and external memory, by considering a variety of input distributions. A dynamic linear main memory solution is proposed, which answers 3-sided queries in O(log n + t) worst...

  20. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozaimi Che Hasan

    Full Text Available Multibeam echosounders (MBES are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with

  1. Efficient Wide Range Converters (EWiRaC): A new family of high efficient AC-DC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2006-01-01

    suffers a major penalty in efficiency when used at the low end of the voltage range (90VAC) in a universal voltage range application (90-270VAC). This paper addresses this problem by suggesting a new family of converters that effectively reduces the apparent voltage range with a factor of 2 by changing...... the converter topology according to the input voltage. This new converter type has been named: efficient wide range converter (EWiRaC). The performance of the EWiRaC is experimental verified in a universal input range (90-270VAC) application with an output voltage of 185VDC capable of 500W output power. The EWi...

  2. The aCORN backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. T.; Bateman, F.; Collett, B.; Darius, G.; DeAngelis, C.; Dewey, M. S.; Jones, G. L.; Komives, A.; Laptev, A.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Nico, J. S.; Noid, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stern, I.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2017-09-01

    Backscatter of electrons from a beta detector, with incomplete energy deposition, can lead to undesirable effects in many types of experiments. We present and discuss the design and operation of a backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer that was developed as part of a program to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in neutron beta decay (aCORN). An array of backscatter veto detectors surrounds a plastic scintillator beta energy detector. The spectrometer contains an axial magnetic field gradient, so electrons are efficiently admitted but have a low probability for escaping back through the entrance after backscattering. The design, construction, calibration, and performance of the spectrometer are discussed.

  3. [Backscattering Characteristics of Machining Surfaces and Retrieval of Surface Multi-Parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hui-rong; Zhang, Fu-min; Qu, Xing-hua

    2015-07-01

    For no cooperation target laser ranging, the backscattering properties of the long-range and real machined surfaces are uncertain which seriously affect the ranging accuracy. It is an important bottleneck restricting the development of no cooperation ranging technology. In this paper, the backscattering characteristics of three typical machining surfaces (vertidal milling processing method, horizontal milling processing method and plain grinding processing method) under the infrared laser irradiation with 1550 nm were measured. The relation between the surface nachining texture, incident azimuth, roughness and the backscattering distribution were analyzed and the reasons for different processing methods specific backscattering field formed were explored. The experimental results show that the distribution of backscattering spectra is greatly affected by the machined processing methods. Incident angle and roughness have regularity effect on the actual rough surface of each mode. To be able to get enough backscattering, knowing the surface texture direction and the roughness of machined metal is essential for the optimization of the non-contact measurement program in industry. On this basis, a method based on an artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed to retrieve the surface multi-parameters of the machined metal. The generalized regression neural network (GRNN) was investigated and used in this application for the backscattering modeling. A genetic algorithm was used to retrieve the multi-parameters of incident azimuth angle, roughness and processing methods of machined metal sur face. Another processing method of sample (planer processing method) was used to validate data. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in parameters retrieval tasks. This model can accurately distinguish processing methods and the relative error of incident azimuth and roughness is 1.21% and 1.03%, respectively. The inversion

  4. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have ...

  5. Initial backscatter occurrence statistics from the CUTLASS HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available A statistical study of the occurrence of ground and ionospheric backscatter within the fields-of-view of the CUTLASS HF radars, at an operating frequency of 10 MHz, during the first 20 months of operation has been undertaken. The diurnal variation of the occurrence of backscatter and the range at which such backscatter is observed is found to be highly dependent on seasonal changes of the ionospheric electron density in both the E and F region, determined from ionosonde observations. In general, ionospheric backscatter is observed at far ranges during the local day in winter months and at near ranges during the local night in summer months. The Iceland radar observes more near-range E region backscatter than the Finland radar as a consequence of its more zonal look-direction. The dependence of the occurrence of backscatter on geomagnetic activity and radar operating frequency are also investigated. The occurrence of ground and ionospheric backscatter is discussed in terms of HF propagation modes and ionospheric electron densities as well as geophysical processes. A brief assessment of the possible impact of solar cycle variations on the observations is made and frequency management is discussed. Such a study, with its focus on the `instrumental' aspect of backscatter occurrence, is essential for a full interpretation of HF coherent radar observations.

  6. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... images reproduce most of the important characteristics of the measured US image....

  7. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  8. Efficient Verifiable Range and Closest Point Queries in Zero-Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Esha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an efficient method for answering one-dimensional range and closest-point queries in a verifiable and privacy-preserving manner. We consider a model where a data owner outsources a dataset of key-value pairs to a server, who answers range and closest-point queries issued by a client and provides proofs of the answers. The client verifies the correctness of the answers while learning nothing about the dataset besides the answers to the current and previous queries. Our work yields for the first time a zero-knowledge privacy assurance to authenticated range and closest-point queries. Previous work leaked the size of the dataset and used an inefficient proof protocol. Our construction is based on hierarchical identity-based encryption. We prove its security and analyze its efficiency both theoretically and with experiments on synthetic and real data (Enron email and Boston taxi datasets.

  9. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  10. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    CERN Document Server

    Lushnikov, Pavel M

    2007-01-01

    We develop the statistical theory of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) instability of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated speckles of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged beam intensity. We identify convective and absolute instability regimes. Well above the incoherent threshold the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF) designs although current NIF bandwidth is not large enough to insure dominance of collective instability and suggests lower instability threshold due to speckle contribution. In contrast, we estimate that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be larg...

  11. Effects of regional temperature on electric vehicle efficiency, range, and emissions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Tugce; Michalek, Jeremy J

    2015-03-17

    We characterize the effect of regional temperature differences on battery electric vehicle (BEV) efficiency, range, and use-phase power plant CO2 emissions in the U.S. The efficiency of a BEV varies with ambient temperature due to battery efficiency and cabin climate control. We find that annual energy consumption of BEVs can increase by an average of 15% in the Upper Midwest or in the Southwest compared to the Pacific Coast due to temperature differences. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from BEVs vary primarily with marginal regional grid mix, which has three times the GHG intensity in the Upper Midwest as on the Pacific Coast. However, even within a grid region, BEV emissions vary by up to 22% due to spatial and temporal ambient temperature variation and its implications for vehicle efficiency and charging duration and timing. Cold climate regions also encounter days with substantial reduction in EV range: the average range of a Nissan Leaf on the coldest day of the year drops from 70 miles on the Pacific Coast to less than 45 miles in the Upper Midwest. These regional differences are large enough to affect adoption patterns and energy and environmental implications of BEVs relative to alternatives.

  12. Generalized Efficient Inference on Factor Models with Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre

    . Short-memory dynamics are allowed in the common factor structure and possibly heteroskedastic error term. In the estimation, a generalized version of the principal components (PC) approach is proposed to achieve efficiency. Asymptotics for efficient common factor and factor loading as well as long......A dynamic factor model is considered that contains stochastic time trends allowing for stationary and nonstationary long-range dependence. The model nests standard I(0) and I(1) behaviour smoothly in common factors and residuals, removing the necessity of a priori unit-root and stationarity testing...

  13. A Proportional Resonant Control Strategy for Efficiency Improvement in Extended Range Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyuan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The key to control the range extender generation system is to improve the efficiency and reduce the emissions of the electric vehicle (EV. In this paper, based on the purpose of efficiency optimization, both engine and generator are matched to get a public high efficiency region, and a partial power following control strategy was presented. The engine speed is constant in the defined power range, so the output power regulation of the range extender is only realized by the adjustment of the torque of the generator. Engine speed and generator torque were decoupled. An improved proportional resonant (PR controller is adopted to achieve fast output power regulation. In order to ensure the response characteristics of the control system and to improve the robustness, the impacts on system’s characteristics and stability caused by PR controller and parameters in the inner-current loop were analyzed via frequency response characteristics. A pre-Tustin with deviation compensation is proposed for PR controller’s discretization. A stable and robust power following control method is obtained for the range extender control system. Finally, simulation and experiment of the proposed control strategy illustrated its feasibility and correctness.

  14. An Energy-Efficient Link with Adaptive Transmit Power Control for Long Range Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaszczyk, Tomasz; Lynggaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    — A considerable amount of research is carried out to develop a reliable smart sensor system with high energy efficiency for battery operated wireless IoT devices in the agriculture sector. However, only a limited amount of research has covered automatic transmission power adjustment schemes...... and algorithms which are essential for deployment of wireless IoT nodes. This paper presents an adaptive link algorithm for farm applications with emphasis on power adjustment for long range communication networks....

  15. An Energy-Efficient Link with Adaptive Transmit Power Control for Long Range Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, P.; Blaszczyk, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    A considerable amount of research is carried out to develop a reliable smart sensor system with high energy efficiency for battery operated wireless IoT devices in the agriculture sector. However, only a limited amount of research has covered automatic transmission power adjustment schemes...... and algorithms which are essential for deployment of wireless IoT nodes. This paper presents an adaptive link algorithm for farm applications with emphasis on power adjustment for long range communication networks....

  16. CSRQ: Communication-Efficient Secure Range Queries in Two-Tiered Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, we have seen many applications of secure query in two-tiered wireless sensor networks. Storage nodes are responsible for storing data from nearby sensor nodes and answering queries from Sink. It is critical to protect data security from a compromised storage node. In this paper, the Communication-efficient Secure Range Query (CSRQ—a privacy and integrity preserving range query protocol—is proposed to prevent attackers from gaining information of both data collected by sensor nodes and queries issued by Sink. To preserve privacy and integrity, in addition to employing the encoding mechanisms, a novel data structure called encrypted constraint chain is proposed, which embeds the information of integrity verification. Sink can use this encrypted constraint chain to verify the query result. The performance evaluation shows that CSRQ has lower communication cost than the current range query protocols.

  17. Limitations in Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion, Gait, and Walking Efficiency in Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulertz, Julia; Bloch, Wilhelm; Prokop, Aram; Rustler, Vanessa; Fitzen, Christina; Herich, Lena; Streckmann, Fiona; Baumann, Freerk T

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in survival rates in pediatric oncology have resulted in a growing need to identify adverse effects and improve rehabilitation in this population. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate active ankle dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM), gait, walking efficiency, and motor performance in a mixed childhood cancer survivor population in comparison to healthy peers. Active ankle DF-ROM (goniometer), gait (Microgate Optogait 2D Gait Analysis), walking efficiency (6-minute walk test), and motor performance (German Motor Test 6-18) were assessed in a mixed childhood cancer survivor population after cessation of medical treatment (n = 13) in comparison to healthy children matched for age and gender (n = 13). Active ankle DF-ROM, gait (stance, swing, and preswing phase), and walking efficiency were significantly impaired in survivors compared with control subjects. No significant difference between groups was found in motor performance. Despite sufficient total motor performance levels, specific limitations in physical functioning were identified in a mixed childhood cancer survivor sample. This highlights the importance of the present findings. The results from this study highlight the potential significance of limited ankle DF function, inhibited gait, and reduced walking efficiency as adverse effects of various types of childhood cancer. It is hoped this enhanced recognition by pediatric cancer patients, parents, and exercise professionals will initiate specific supportive strategies and potentially prevent further limitations.

  18. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  19. Wide-Range Highly-Efficient Wireless Power Receivers for Implantable Biomedical Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Ouda, Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is the key enabler for a myriad of applications, from low-power RFIDs, and wireless sensors, to wirelessly charged electric vehicles, and even massive power transmission from space solar cells. One of the major challenges in designing implantable biomedical devices is the size and lifetime of the battery. Thus, replacing the battery with a miniaturized wireless power receiver (WPRx) facilitates designing sustainable biomedical implants in smaller volumes for sentient medical applications. In the first part of this dissertation, we propose a miniaturized, fully integrated, wirelessly powered implantable sensor with on-chip antenna, designed and implemented in a standard 0.18μm CMOS process. As a batteryless device, it can be implanted once inside the body with no need for further invasive surgeries to replace batteries. The proposed single-chip solution is designed for intraocular pressure monitoring (IOPM), and can serve as a sustainable platform for implantable devices or IoT nodes. A custom setup is developed to test the chip in a saline solution with electrical properties similar to those of the aqueous humor of the eye. The proposed chip, in this eye-like setup, is wirelessly charged to 1V from a 5W transmitter 3cm away from the chip. In the second part, we propose a self-biased, differential rectifier with enhanced efficiency over an extended range of input power. A prototype is designed for the medical implant communication service (MICS) band at 433MHz. It demonstrates an efficiency improvement of more than 40% in the rectifier power conversion efficiency (PCE) and a dynamic range extension of more than 50% relative to the conventional cross-coupled rectifier. A sensitivity of -15.2dBm input power for 1V output voltage and a peak PCE of 65% are achieved for a 50k load. In the third part, we propose a wide-range, differential RF-to-DC power converter using an adaptive, self-biasing technique. The proposed architecture doubles

  20. Measurement of backscattered 100 keV electrons on a solid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2011-11-01

    We have measured the intensity of backscattered 100 keV electrons on a silicon substrate as a function of distance up to 50 μm from the source. The intensity of backscattered electrons was determined by measuring the thickness changes in pre-exposed, isolated 100 nm crosses in a negative resist using atomic force microscopy. The electron backscattered range was measured to be 31.08 ± 0.30 μm and showed deviation from Gaussian behavior for radii larger than 30 μm. This method produces an accurate measurement of the backscattered range because it is process independent and covers a large data range.

  1. A numerical investigation on the efficiency of range extending systems using Advanced Vehicle Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnhagen, Scott; Same, Adam; Remillard, Jesse; Park, Jae Wan

    2011-03-01

    Series plug-in hybrid electric vehicles of varying engine configuration and battery capacity are modeled using Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR). The performance of these vehicles is analyzed on the bases of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions on the tank-to-wheel and well-to-wheel paths. Both city and highway driving conditions are considered during the simulation. When simulated on the well-to-wheel path, it is shown that the range extender with a Wankel rotary engine consumes less energy and emits fewer greenhouse gases compared to the other systems with reciprocating engines during many driving cycles. The rotary engine has a higher power-to-weight ratio and lower noise, vibration and harshness compared to conventional reciprocating engines, although performs less efficiently. The benefits of a Wankel engine make it an attractive option for use as a range extender in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle.

  2. Multi-angle backscatter classification and sub-bottom profiling for improved seafloor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevizos, Evangelos; Snellen, Mirjam; Simons, Dick; Siemes, Kerstin; Greinert, Jens

    2017-06-01

    This study applies three classification methods exploiting the angular dependence of acoustic seafloor backscatter along with high resolution sub-bottom profiling for seafloor sediment characterization in the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea Germany. This area is well suited for acoustic backscatter studies due to its shallowness, its smooth bathymetry and the presence of a wide range of sediment types. Backscatter data were acquired using a Seabeam1180 (180 kHz) multibeam echosounder and sub-bottom profiler data were recorded using a SES-2000 parametric sonar transmitting 6 and 12 kHz. The high density of seafloor soundings allowed extracting backscatter layers for five beam angles over a large part of the surveyed area. A Bayesian probability method was employed for sediment classification based on the backscatter variability at a single incidence angle, whereas Maximum Likelihood Classification (MLC) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were applied to the multi-angle layers. The Bayesian approach was used for identifying the optimum number of acoustic classes because cluster validation is carried out prior to class assignment and class outputs are ordinal categorical values. The method is based on the principle that backscatter values from a single incidence angle express a normal distribution for a particular sediment type. The resulting Bayesian classes were well correlated to median grain sizes and the percentage of coarse material. The MLC method uses angular response information from five layers of training areas extracted from the Bayesian classification map. The subsequent PCA analysis is based on the transformation of these five layers into two principal components that comprise most of the data variability. These principal components were clustered in five classes after running an external cluster validation test. In general both methods MLC and PCA, separated the various sediment types effectively, showing good agreement (kappa >0.7) with the Bayesian

  3. Dosimetric characteristics of backscattered electrons in lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Carmona, Vicente [Physics section, Radiation Oncology Department, ' La Fe' University Hospital, Avda Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain). E-mail: Facundo.Ballester at uv.es; Serrano, Miguel A.; Lluch, Jose L. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Casal, Emilio [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/ Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); CND, Centro Nacional de Dosimetria, Avda. Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    In electron beam therapy, tissue overdose due to electrons backscattered from lead has been profusely studied. To quantify this dose enhancement effect, an electron backscatter factor (EBF) wasdefined as the ratio of dose at the tissue-inhomogeneity interface with and without the scatterer present. The dependence of the EBF on energy at the scatterer surface is not well known for energies lower than 3 MeV which is the most frequent clinical situation. In this work, we have done Monte Carlo calculations with the GEANT code to study EBF in lead at this energy range. The applicability of this code and the developed procedure for dose estimation has been experimentally verified. The dependence of the EBF on the beam energy incident on the scatterer has been studied for different nominal beam energies incident at the phantom's surface. The results show a trend of increase of EBF with the beam energy incident on the scatterer between 0.5 and 1.5 MeV, keeping practically constant above this energy up to 3 MeV. Backscattered electron energy spectra and depth dose curves in the 'up-stream' direction have been obtained at the various energies of the primary electron beam striking on the lead scatterer. The results of this work are compared with previously published data. (author)

  4. Increasing hydro turbine operation range and efficiencies using water injection in draft tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francke, Haakon Hjort

    2010-09-15

    It is a well known fact that most Francis turbines, because of the fixed blade design, faces challenges when running at partial load operation. Especially in the operating range below approximately 50 % of the rated output, it is common to observe severe pressure pulsations and surge in the draft tube. These pressure fluctuations are believed to be related to the swirling flow exiting the runner. By using water jets in the draft tube cone directed towards the swirling flow, the swirl strength is believed to be reduced and thereby also the pressure fluctuations produced by the swirl. This system thus has a potential of increasing the turbine operating range. The system can be activated when needed, and will not affect the turbine when running at its best efficiency point.Based on the main hypothesis, a simplified swirl rig was designed and constructed in order to investigate the nozzle influence on the swirling flow and on the pressure pulsations in a simplified environment. To expand the understanding of the nozzle performance in a Francis turbine, experiments were conducted in a model turbine with a prototype of movable nozzles. To establish a link between laboratory nozzle measurements and full scale nozzle measurements, field measurements were carried out on full scale Francis turbines running at partial discharge. For this purpose the turbines installed at Skarsfjord Power Station and Skibotn Power Station were used, where full scale nozzle injection systems were installed. The test results suggested that the concept of water injection worked, but not unconditionally. A reduction in pressure fluctuations was achieved both in laboratory and field experiments, as well as a noticeable reduction regarding fluctuations in the shaft run-out at Skibotn. In addition, water injection gave a surprisingly positive effect at overload conditions in the model turbine, even though the nozzle angle was directed in the same direction as the overload swirl. Ideally, the results

  5. Dimensional ranges and rolling efficiency in a tandem cold rolling mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkiola, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, physical models and a neural network theory have been combined in order to predict the properties of a steel strip and to optimise the process parameters in cold rolling. The prediction of the deformation resistance of the material and the friction parameter is based on the physical model presented by Bland, Ford and Ellis and artificial neural network computing (ANN). The accuracy of these models has been tested and proved by using a large amount of the measured data. With the aid of these models it has been shown that (a) the small change to the relative reduction distribution can have a clear effect upon the rolling efficiency, (b) the dimensional ranges of the tandem cold roll mill can be determined and optimised and (c) the possibility to cold roll a new product of new width, strength or thickness can be determined and the parameters of the tandem cold rolling process can be optimised. (orig.) 43 refs.

  6. Flash Detection Efficiencies of Long Range Lightning Detection Networks During GRIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We flew our Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) on the NASA Global Hawk as a part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program. The GRIP program was a NASA Earth science field experiment during the months of August and September, 2010. During the program, the LIP detected lighting from 48 of the 213 of the storms overflown by the Global Hawk. The time and location of tagged LIP flashes can be used as a "ground truth" dataset for checking the detection efficiency of the various long or extended range ground-based lightning detection systems available during the GRIP program. The systems analyzed included Vaisala Long Range (LR), Vaisala GLD360, the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN). The long term goal of our research is to help understand the advantages and limitations of these systems so that we can utilize them for both proxy data applications and cross sensor validation of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) sensor when it is launched in the 2015 timeframe.

  7. A new compact, cost-efficient concept for underwater range-gated imaging: the UTOFIA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Quincoces, Iñaki; Galparsoro, Ibon; Bald, Juan; Gabiña, Gorka; Visser, Andy; Jónasdóttir, Sigrun; Haugholt, Karl Henrik; Thorstensen, Jostein; Risholm, Petter; Thielemann, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Underwater Time Of Flight Image Acquisition system (UTOFIA) is a recently launched H2020 project (H2020 - 633098) to develop a compact and cost-effective underwater imaging system especially suited for observations in turbid environments. The UTOFIA project targets technology that can overcome the limitations created by scattering, by introducing cost-efficient range-gated imaging for underwater applications. This technology relies on a image acquisition principle that can extends the imaging range of the cameras 2-3 times respect to other cameras. Moreover, the system will simultaneously capture 3D information of the observed objects. Today range-gated imaging is not widely used, as it relies on specialised optical components making systems large and costly. Recent technology developments have made it possible a significant (2-3 times) reduction in size, complexity and cost of underwater imaging systems, whilst addressing the scattering issues at the same time. By acquiring simultaneous 3D data, the system allows to accurately measure the absolute size of marine life and their spatial relationship to their habitat, enhancing the precision of fish stock monitoring and ecology assessment, hence supporting proper management of marine resources. Additionally, the larger observed volume and the improved image quality make the system suitable for cost-effective underwater surveillance operations in e.g. fish farms, underwater infrastructures. The system can be integrated into existing ocean observatories for real time acquisition and can greatly advance present efforts in developing species recognition algorithms, given the additional features provided, the improved image quality and the independent illumination source based on laser. First applications of the most recent prototype of the imaging system will be provided including inspection of underwater infrastructures and observations of marine life under different environmental conditions.

  8. Acoustic backscatter from turbulent microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seim, H.E.; Gregg, M.C.; Miyamoto, R.T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Acoustic backscatter has produced spectacular images of internal ocean processes for nearly two decades, but interpretation of the images remains ambiguous because several mechanisms can generate measurable backscatter. The authors present what is thought to be the first simultaneous measurements of calibrated acoustic returns and turbulent microstructure, collected in a set of 20-m-tall billows. The observations are from Admiralty Inlet, a salt-stratified tidal channel near Puget Sound. Scattering due to turbulent microstructure alone is strong enough to explain the measured backscatter at specific sites within the billows. Existing formulations underestimate the strength of acoustic backscatter from turbulent microstructure. Due to a misinterpretation of the high-wavenumber temperature spectrum, some previous formulations underestimate the differential scattering cross section (sigma) when scattering from the viscous-convective subrange. Also, the influence of salinity on refractive-index fluctuations can be as large as or greater than that of temperature when the density stratification is dominated by salinity. Using temperature alone to estimate sigma in coastal and estuarine waters may lead to significant underestimates. A simple formulation is derived that takes these two factors into account. Because of high ambient scattering from zooplankton in Admiralty Inlet, the acoustic data are conditionally sampled along modeled profiler trajectories to avoid using bulk statistics.

  9. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  10. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  11. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  12. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  13. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  14. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  15. Backscatter E [Swath]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  17. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  19. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  20. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  1. Enhanced compton backscattering by confocal multipath laser cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Sho; Miyamoto, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu [Himeji Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Advanced Science Technology for Industry, Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    The design considerations of a confocal multipath laser cavity to enhance Compton backscattering are presented. Laser pulses are superposed at a confocal point of the cavity and enhance laser peak filed there. Ray trace simulation results predicted that the 29 - 14-fold enhanced laser filed could be achieved with the mode locked laser pulses whose repetition rate and duration time were 89.25 MHz and 10 ps, respectively. As a result, Compton backscattered X-rays generated by interaction of this intense laser field with a relativistic electron beam, will be enhanced efficiently by a factor of more than 10 at least. (author)

  2. Comparing the Foraging Efficiency of Beaked Whales On and Off Naval Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    gathering and analyzing data on foraging performance and efficiency this project will provide detailed energetics data for modeling approaches...study will, for the first time, provide a means to examine variation in foraging efficiency and energetic costs resulting from sonar disturbance. The...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Comparing the Foraging Efficiency of Beaked Whales On and

  3. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  4. Highly efficient tandem polymer solar cells with a photovoltaic response in the visible light range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Maojie; Zhao, Kang; Ye, Long; Chen, Yu; Yang, Bei; Hou, Jianhui

    2015-02-18

    Highly efficient polymer solar cells with a tandem structure are fabricated by using two excellent photovoltaic polymers and a highly transparent intermediate recombination layer. Power conversion -efficiencies over 10% can be realized with a photovoltaic response within 800 nm. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fine Scale Measurements of Microwave Backscatter from the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-13

    Radar ( SAR ) but would form the image so rapidly that distortion due to ocean surface motion would be essentially eliminated. Following discussions...swells present throughout the day. Figure 7 is a backscatter intensity image made at a range of 300-400 m. This image was despeckled by averaging

  6. The relevance of short-range fibers to cognitive efficiency and brain activation in aging and dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Gao

    Full Text Available The integrity of structural connectivity in a functional brain network supports the efficiency of neural processing within relevant brain regions. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the short- and long-range fibers, and their differential roles in the lower cognitive efficiency in aging and dementia. Three groups of healthy young, healthy older adults and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD participated in this combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI study on prospective memory (PM. Short- and long-range fiber tracts within the PM task engaged brain networks were generated. The correlation between the fMRI signal change, PM performance and the DTI characters were calculated. FMRI results showed that the PM-specific frontal activations in three groups were distributed hierarchically along the rostrocaudal axis in the frontal lobe. In an overall PM condition generally activated brain network among the three groups, tractography was used to generate the short-range fibers, and they were found impaired in both healthy older adults and AD patients. However, the long-range fiber tracts were only impaired in AD. Additionally, the mean diffusivity (MD of short-range but not long-range fibers was positively correlated with fMRI signal change and negatively correlated with the efficiency of PM performance. This study suggests that the disintegrity of short-range fibers may contribute more to the lower cognitive efficiency and higher compensatory brain activation in healthy older adults and more in AD patients.

  7. An Efficient Topology for Wireless Power Transfer over a Wide Range of Loading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianqing Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although an inductive power transfer (IPT system can transfer power efficiently in full-load conditions, its efficiency obviously decreases in light-load conditions. To solve this problem, based on a two-coil IPT system with a series-series compensation topology, a single-ended primary-inductor converter is introduced at the secondary side. By adjusting the set effective value of the current in the primary coil, the converter input voltage changes to maintain the equivalent input resistance of the converter in an optimal condition. The system can then transfer the power efficiently with the wide load conditions. Moreover, the system operates at a constant resonance frequency with a high power factor. Both the simulation and experimentation of a prototype with a 10 W IPT system demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed topology for wireless power transfer.

  8. An Efficient Framework for Analysis of Wire-Grid Shielding Structures over a Broad Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karwowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A computationally efficient MoM-based framework for broadband electromagnetic simulation of wire-grid shielding structures is presented in the paper. Broadband capability of the approach is attained through supporting MoM by an adaptive frequency sweep combined with rational interpolation of the observable implemented via Stoer-Bulirsch algorithm. The performance increase is gained by employing CUDA-enabled CPU+GPU co-processing. For large-size problems exceeding the amount of memory available on the GPU device, a hybrid out-of-GPU memory LU decomposition algorithm is employed. The demonstration examples are provided to illustrate the the accuracy and high efficiency of the approach.

  9. Isotropic Chiral Objects With Zero Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Karilainen, Antti O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study electrically small chiral objects with isotropic response and zero backscattering. A bi-isotropic sphere is used as a simple example and its zero-backscattering conditions are studied. A theoretical model of an object composed of three orthogonal chiral particles made of conducting wire is presented as an analog of the zero-backscattering bi-isotropic sphere. A potential application of the object as a receiving antenna or a sensor with the ability to receive power from an arbitrary direction without backscattering is discussed.

  10. An Efficient Computation of Effective Ground Range Using an Oblate Earth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal A. Maturi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An effcient method is presented to calculate the ground range of a ballistic missile trajectory on a nonrotating Earth. The spherical Earth model does not provide good approximation of distance between two locations on the surface of Earth. We used oblate spheroid Earth model because it provides better approximations. The effective ground range of a ballistic missile is an arc-length of a planner elliptic (or circle curve which passes through the launch and target points on the surface of Earth model. A general formulation is presented to calculate the arc-length of an elliptic (or circle curve which is the intersection of oblate Earth model and a plane. Explicit formulas are developed to calculate the coordinates of center of the ellipse as well as major and minor axes which are necessary ingredients for the calculation of effective ground range.

  11. Rational Design of a New Trypanosoma rangeli Trans-Sialidase for Efficient Sialylation of Glycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Michalak, Malwina; Larsen, Dorte Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports rational engineering of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase to develop an effective enzyme for a potentially important type of reactivity: production of sialylated prebiotic glycans. The Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and the homologous T. rangeli sialidase has previously been used...... to investigate the structural requirements for trans-sialidase activity. We observed that the T. cruzi trans-sialidase has a seven-amino-acid motif (197–203) at the border of the substrate binding cleft. The motif differs substantially in chemical properties and substitution probability from the homologous...

  12. I/O-Efficient Planar Range Skyline and Attrition Priority Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper; Tao, Yufei; Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    We study the static and dynamic planar range skyline reporting problem in the external memory model with block size B, under a linear space budget. The problem asks for an O(n/B) space data structure that stores n points in the plane, and supports reporting the k maximal input points (a.k.a.skyli......We study the static and dynamic planar range skyline reporting problem in the external memory model with block size B, under a linear space budget. The problem asks for an O(n/B) space data structure that stores n points in the plane, and supports reporting the k maximal input points (a...

  13. Efficient integral equation-based analysis of finite periodic structures in the optical frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Nilufer A; Craeye, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    The optical response of dense finite arrays of nanoparticles can be efficiently analyzed with the help of macro basis functions obtained by employing the array scanning method. This is demonstrated by analyzing optical collimation in arrays of silver nanorods. The accuracy of the solution obtained with the proposed method has been validated by comparison with solutions obtained employing the Krylov subspace iterative method. The relative error in the electric field distribution on an observation plane above the finite array is of the order of -25 dB, while the number of unknowns is reduced by a factor of 32.

  14. Methodologies to increase the transformation efficiencies and the range of bacteria that can be transformed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Trond Erik Vee; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund

    2010-02-01

    Methods for transfer of exogenous DNA into cells are essential for genetics and molecular biology, and the lack of effective methods hampers research on many different species of bacteria which have shown to be particularly recalcitrant to transformation. This review presents the progress on the development of methods for artificial transformation of bacteria with emphasis on different methodologies and the range of bacteria that can be transformed. The methods' strengths and weaknesses are described.

  15. Exploiting short-range cooperation for energy efficient vertical handover operations

    OpenAIRE

    Foukas, Xenofon; Kontovasilis, K.; Marina, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of multiple collocated wireless networks using heterogeneous technologies and the multi-access support of contemporary mobile devices have allowed wireless connectivity optimization, enabled through vertical handover (VHO) operations. However, this comes at a high energy consumption on the mobile device, due to the inherently expensive nature of some of the involved operations. This work proposes exploiting short-range cooperation among collocated mobile devices to improve th...

  16. StereoBox: A Robust and Efficient Solution for Automotive Short-Range Obstacle Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Broggi Alberto; Medici Paolo; Porta PierPaolo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a robust method for close-range obstacle detection with arbitrarily aligned stereo cameras. System calibration is performed by means of a dense grid to remove perspective and lens distortion after a direct mapping between image pixels and world points. Obstacle detection is based on the differences between left and right images after transformation phase and with a polar histogram, it is possible to detect vertical structures and to reject noise and small objects. Found o...

  17. High Efficiency Binding Aptamers for a Wide Range of Bacterial Sepsis Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Ana Cláudia; Stets, Maria Isabel; Lopes, Ana Luisa Kalb; Schluga, Pedro Henrique Caires; Marton, Soledad; Mendes, Ieda Ferreira; Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2017-04-28

    Sepsis is a major health problem worldwide, with an extremely high rate of morbidity and mortality, partly due to delayed diagnosis during early disease. Currently, sepsis diagnosis requires bacterial culturing of blood samples over several days, whereas PCR-based molecular diagnosis methods are faster but lack sensitivity. The use of biosensors containing nucleic acid aptamers that bind targets with high affinity and specificity could accelerate sepsis diagnosis. Previously, we used the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technique to develop the aptamers Antibac1 and Antibac2, targeting the ubiquitous bacterial peptidoglycan. Here, we show that these aptamers bind to four gram-positive and seven gram-negative bacterial sepsis agents with high binding efficiency. Thus, these aptamers could be used in combination as biological recognition elements in the development of biosensors that are an alternative to rapid bacteria detection, since they could provide culture and amplification-free tests for rapid clinical sepsis diagnosis.

  18. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-11-01

    , 118° W to 26° S, 114° W, where total backscattering at 650 nm was not distinguishable from pure seawater;
    –Distributions of particulate backscattering bbp across the central gyre exhibited a broad particle peak centered ~100 m;
    –The particulate backscattering ratio typically ranged between 0.4% and 0.6% at 650 nm through the majority of the central gyre from the surface to ~210 m, indicative of "soft" water-filled particles with low bulk refractive index; and
    – bbp showed a distinct secondary deeper layer centered ~230 m that was absent in particulate attenuation cp data. The particulate backscattering ratio was significantly higher in this layer than in the rest of the water column, reaching 1.2% in some locations. This high relative backscattering, along with the pigment composition and ecological niche of this layer, appear to be consistent with the coccolithophorid Florisphaera profunda.

    Moreover, results were consistent with several expectations extrapolated from theory and previous work in oceanic and coastal regions, supporting the conclusion that particulate and total backscattering could be resolved in these extremely clear natural waters.

  19. A Two-mode Buck Converter toward High Efficiency for the Entire Load Range for Low Power Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to extend the battery life of smart cameras, it is essential to increase the efficiency of power converters, especially at light load. This thesis research investigated a power converter to supply power for the microprocessor of a smart camera. The input voltage of the converter is 5 V, and the output voltage is 1.2 V with the load ranging from 10 mA (12 mW) to 1200 mA (1440 mW). The conventional buck converter is typically optimized for high efficiency at maximum load at the cost of...

  20. A Dual Active Bridge Converter with an Extended High-Efficiency Range by DC Blocking Capacitor Voltage Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Shen, Yanfeng; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2017-01-01

    A Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter can achieve a wide high-efficiency range when its input and output voltages are equal, assuming a 1:1 turns ratio for its isolation transformer. If its input or output voltage is doubled, efficiency of the DAB will drop significantly, because of the introduction...... of hard switching and high circulating power. Thus, a new modulation scheme has been proposed, whose main idea is to introduce a voltage offset across the dc blocking capacitor connected in series with the transformer. Operational principle of the proposed modulation has been introduced, before analyzing...

  1. Water mist effect on cooling range and efficiency of casting die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Władysiak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This project is showing investigation results of cooling process of casting die in the temperature range 570÷100 °C with 0.40 MPa compressed air and water mist streamed under pressure 0.25÷0.45 MPa in air jet 0.25÷0.50 MPa using open cooling system.The character and the speed of changes of temperature, forming of the temperture’s gradient along parallel layer to cooled surface of die is shawing with thermal and derivative curves. The effect of kind of cooling factor on the temperature and time and distance from cooling nozzle is presented in the paper. A designed device for generating the water mist cooling the die and the view of sprying water stream is shown here. It’s proved that using of the water mist together with the change of heat transfer interface increases intensity of cooling in the zone and makes less the range cooling zone and reduces the porosity of cast microstructure.

  2. FORAGES AND PASTURES SYMPOSIUM: Improving efficiency of production in pasture- and range-based beef and dairy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliniks, J T; Rius, A G; Edwards, M A; Edwards, S R; Hobbs, J D; Nave, R L G

    2015-06-01

    Despite overall increased production in the last century, it is critical that grazing production systems focus on improving beef and dairy efficiency to meet current and future global food demands. For livestock producers, production efficiency is essential to maintain long-term profitability and sustainability. This continued viability of production systems using pasture- and range-based grazing systems requires more rapid adoption of innovative management practices and selection tools that increase profitability by optimizing grazing management and increasing reproductive performance. Understanding the genetic variation in cow herds will provide the ability to select cows that require less energy for maintenance, which can potentially reduce total energy utilization or energy required for production, consequently improving production efficiency and profitability. In the United States, pasture- and range-based grazing systems vary tremendously across various unique environments that differ in climate, topography, and forage production. This variation in environmental conditions contributes to the challenges of developing or targeting specific genetic components and grazing systems that lead to increased production efficiency. However, across these various environments and grazing management systems, grazable forage remains the least expensive nutrient source to maintain productivity of the cow herd. Beef and dairy cattle can capitalize on their ability to utilize these feed resources that are not usable for other production industries. Therefore, lower-cost alternatives to feeding harvested and stored feedstuffs have the opportunity to provide to livestock producers a sustainable and efficient forage production system. However, increasing production efficiency within a given production environment would vary according to genetic potential (i.e., growth and milk potential), how that genetic potential fits the respective production environment, and how the grazing

  3. Radar backscatter from plasma irregularities of the lower E region induced by neutral turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    Full Text Available Recently, one of the authors (A. V. G. developed a theory of low-frequency plasma irregularities which are created as a consequence of neutral turbulence in the D and lower E regions. In the following this theory will be applied to coherent backscatter experiments with radars in a frequency range between 5 and 150 MHz. We discuss the dependence of the backscatter cross-section on ionospheric as well as on turbulence parameters. The backscatter increases strongly with decreasing radar frequency. Above 15 MHz the effects discussed here can probably only be detected by very powerful radars with large antenna arrays.

  4. Multilevel summation methods for efficient evaluation of long-range pairwise interactions in atomistic and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of efficient algorithms for long-range pairwise interactions is central to the success of numerous applications, ranging in scale from atomic-level modeling of materials to astrophysics. This report focuses on the implementation and analysis of the multilevel summation method for approximating long-range pairwise interactions. The computational cost of the multilevel summation method is proportional to the number of particles, N, which is an improvement over FFTbased methods whos cost is asymptotically proportional to N logN. In addition to approximating electrostatic forces, the multilevel summation method can be use to efficiently approximate convolutions with long-range kernels. As an application, we apply the multilevel summation method to a discretized integral equation formulation of the regularized generalized Poisson equation. Numerical results are presented using an implementation of the multilevel summation method in the LAMMPS software package. Preliminary results show that the computational cost of the method scales as expected, but there is still a need for further optimization.

  5. Transparency Effect of Electrolyte on Light Back-Scattering in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sharifi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, a film of TiO2 particles of ~300 nm size is employed in DSCs as the back reflector film to enhance the light harvesting. In this study, two electrolytes with different transparencies, iodide-based and cobalt-based electrolytes, were used to investigate the transparency effect of electrolytes on light back-scattering from back scattering layer and also to study its effect on the performance of DSCs. The use of cobalt-based electrolyte is recommended from the view point of optical properties as due to the light absorption in electrolytes, the current density losses are 2.9mA/cm2 and 4.2 mA/cm2 in cobalt- and iodide-based electrolytes, respectively, and the transmission of 100% is observed for cobalt-based electrolyte in 500-600 nm in spite of iodide-based electrolyte. Use of light back-scattering layer, unlike iodide-based cell, causes external quantum efficiency in cobalt-base cell to increase for the wavelengths lower than 350 nm since cobalt-base electrolyte has transparency in this region. In addition, optical calculations demonstrate that in the range 400-500 nm, in which dye has a noticeable absorption, absorption loss is 40% and 30% for iodide- and cobalt-based electrolytes, respectively.

  6. An Efficiency-Optimized Isolated Bidirectional DC-DC Converter with Extended Power Range for Energy Storage Systems in Microgrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Shi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel extended-single-phase shift (ESPS control strategy of isolated bidirectional full-bridge DC-DC converters (IBDCs which are a promising alternative as a power electronic interface in microgrids with an additional function of galvanic isolation. Based on the mathematical models of ESPS control under steady-state conditions, detailed theoretical and experimental analyses of IBDC under ESPS control are presented. Compared with conventional single-phase-shift (CSPS control, ESPS control can greatly improve the efficiency of IBDCs in microgrids through decreasing current stress and backflow power considerably over a wide input and output voltage range under light and medium loads. In addition, ESPS control only needs to adjust one single phase-shift angel to control transmission power, thus it retains implementation simplicity in comparison with dual-phase-shift (DPS control for microgrid applications. Furthermore, an efficiency-optimized modulation scheme based on ESPS and CSPS control is developed in the whole power range of IBDC for power distribution in microgrids. A 10 kW IBDC prototype is constructed and the experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, showing that the proposed strategy can enhance the overall efficiency up to 30%.

  7. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  8. Backscatter enhancement in scattering from rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Robert J.; Woodworth, Margaret B.

    1989-06-01

    Stealth technology has advanced to the point where radar target cross sections are so small there is a great need to determine mean clutter cross sections and clutter variability with great accuracy. Established clutter prediction techniques result in forward scatter values that exceed backscatter. There is some new experimental data on light scattering from rough metallic surfaces which shows there is an enhancement of backscattering in the antispecular direction under some conditions. This unusual result has been addressed by several theoretical analyses with varying success at confirmation. In this report an integral form of a physical optics representation is used to simulate the experimental conditions. For a one-dimensional surface height variation this model predicts enhanced backscatter at optical frequencies. Additional calculations for the more significant radar case of microwave frequencies and a dielectric surface again predict an increase in backscatter for large or intermediate surface slope conditions.

  9. Muscle coordination limits efficiency and power output of human limb movement under a wide range of mechanical demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeling, James M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cycle frequency and workload on muscle coordination and the ensuing relationship with mechanical efficiency and power output of human limb movement. Eleven trained cyclists completed an array of cycle frequency (cadence)-power output conditions while excitation from 10 leg muscles and power output were recorded. Mechanical efficiency was maximized at increasing cadences for increasing power outputs and corresponded to muscle coordination and muscle fiber type recruitment that minimized both the total muscle excitation across all muscles and the ineffective pedal forces. Also, maximum efficiency was characterized by muscle coordination at the top and bottom of the pedal cycle and progressive excitation through the uniarticulate knee, hip, and ankle muscles. Inefficiencies were characterized by excessive excitation of biarticulate muscles and larger duty cycles. Power output and efficiency were limited by the duration of muscle excitation beyond a critical cadence (120–140 rpm), with larger duty cycles and disproportionate increases in muscle excitation suggesting deteriorating muscle coordination and limitations of the activation-deactivation capabilities. Most muscles displayed systematic phase shifts of the muscle excitation relative to the pedal cycle that were dependent on cadence and, to a lesser extent, power output. Phase shifts were different for each muscle, thereby altering their mechanical contribution to the pedaling action. This study shows that muscle coordination is a key determinant of mechanical efficiency and power output of limb movement across a wide range of mechanical demands and that the excitation and coordination of the muscles is limited at very high cycle frequencies. PMID:26445873

  10. Muscle coordination limits efficiency and power output of human limb movement under a wide range of mechanical demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Ollie M; Wakeling, James M

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of cycle frequency and workload on muscle coordination and the ensuing relationship with mechanical efficiency and power output of human limb movement. Eleven trained cyclists completed an array of cycle frequency (cadence)-power output conditions while excitation from 10 leg muscles and power output were recorded. Mechanical efficiency was maximized at increasing cadences for increasing power outputs and corresponded to muscle coordination and muscle fiber type recruitment that minimized both the total muscle excitation across all muscles and the ineffective pedal forces. Also, maximum efficiency was characterized by muscle coordination at the top and bottom of the pedal cycle and progressive excitation through the uniarticulate knee, hip, and ankle muscles. Inefficiencies were characterized by excessive excitation of biarticulate muscles and larger duty cycles. Power output and efficiency were limited by the duration of muscle excitation beyond a critical cadence (120-140 rpm), with larger duty cycles and disproportionate increases in muscle excitation suggesting deteriorating muscle coordination and limitations of the activation-deactivation capabilities. Most muscles displayed systematic phase shifts of the muscle excitation relative to the pedal cycle that were dependent on cadence and, to a lesser extent, power output. Phase shifts were different for each muscle, thereby altering their mechanical contribution to the pedaling action. This study shows that muscle coordination is a key determinant of mechanical efficiency and power output of limb movement across a wide range of mechanical demands and that the excitation and coordination of the muscles is limited at very high cycle frequencies. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Enhanced backscattering of optical vortex fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Chaim; Dogariu, Aristide

    2005-06-15

    The effect of an incident field with a phase screw dislocation (a so-called optical vortex) on the shape of the enhanced backscattering cone was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. We show that the correlation function of the incident field acts as a filter that modifies the shape of the enhanced backscattering cone. The peak value is reduced, and its width is increased as the topological charge of the phase dislocation increases.

  12. Realization of strong backscattering homogeneous regions with known backscattering coefficient in synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Kaizhi; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Xingzhao

    2017-01-01

    The strong backscattering homogeneous region, i.e., a uniform region with a high and constant backscattering coefficient, is important for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image quality assessment and SAR radiometric calibration, which, however, is difficult to realize in practice with a known backscattering coefficient. We realize a strong backscattering homogeneous region with a known backscattering coefficient in SAR images by utilizing designed metal grids. First, we propose a manmade grid-structure target and realize it with aluminum in practice, which is named the metal grid. Then, the backscattering coefficient of the designed metal grid is simulated in the computer simulation technology (CST) microwave studio and measured by a radar cross-section (RCS) measurement instrument in a microwave anechoic chamber. Both CST simulation results and RCS measurement results confirm the strong backscattering property of the designed target. In addition, by utilizing the designed target, we realize a test field consisting of several strong backscattering homogeneous regions with different sizes at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. The spaceborne experiments have been carried out by the TerraSAR-X sensor over the test field in two flight campaigns in X-band with VV polarization. Experimental results demonstrate the strong backscattering property and homogeneity of the realized regions.

  13. Depletion of eIF4G from yeast cells narrows the range of translational efficiencies genome-wide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinnebusch Alan G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G is thought to influence the translational efficiencies of cellular mRNAs by its roles in forming an eIF4F-mRNA-PABP mRNP that is competent for attachment of the 43S preinitiation complex, and in scanning through structured 5' UTR sequences. We have tested this hypothesis by determining the effects of genetically depleting eIF4G from yeast cells on global translational efficiencies (TEs, using gene expression microarrays to measure the abundance of mRNA in polysomes relative to total mRNA for ~5900 genes. Results Although depletion of eIF4G is lethal and reduces protein synthesis by ~75%, it had small effects (less than a factor of 1.5 on the relative TE of most genes. Within these limits, however, depleting eIF4G narrowed the range of translational efficiencies genome-wide, with mRNAs of better than average TE being translated relatively worse, and mRNAs with lower than average TE being translated relatively better. Surprisingly, the fraction of mRNAs most dependent on eIF4G display an average 5' UTR length at or below the mean for all yeast genes. Conclusions This finding suggests that eIF4G is more critical for ribosome attachment to mRNAs than for scanning long, structured 5' UTRs. Our results also indicate that eIF4G, and the closed-loop mRNP it assembles with the m7 G cap- and poly(A-binding factors (eIF4E and PABP, is not essential for translation of most (if not all mRNAs but enhances the differentiation of translational efficiencies genome-wide.

  14. Recommendations for improved and coherent acquisition and processing of backscatter data from seafloor-mapping sonars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Lurton, Xavier

    2017-05-01

    Multibeam echosounders are becoming widespread for the purposes of seafloor bathymetry mapping, but the acquisition and the use of seafloor backscatter measurements, acquired simultaneously with the bathymetric data, are still insufficiently understood, controlled and standardized. This presents an obstacle to well-accepted, standardized analysis and application by end users. The Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping group (Geohab.org) has long recognized the need for better coherence and common agreement on acquisition, processing and interpretation of seafloor backscatter data, and established the Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) in May 2013. This paper presents an overview of this initiative, the mandate, structure and program of the working group, and a synopsis of the BSWG Guidelines and Recommendations to date. The paper includes (1) an overview of the current status in sensors and techniques available in seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars; (2) the presentation of the BSWG structure and results; (3) recommendations to operators, end-users, sonar manufacturers, and software developers using sonar backscatter for seafloor-mapping applications, for best practice methods and approaches for data acquisition and processing; and (4) a discussion on the development needs for future systems and data processing. We propose for the first time a nomenclature of backscatter processing levels that affords a means to accurately and efficiently describe the data processing status, and to facilitate comparisons of final products from various origins.

  15. A roadmap to defining the clinical reportable ranges of chemistry analytes: Increasing automation efficiency and decreasing manual dilutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sheng-Ying; Baird, Geoffrey S; Greene, Dina N

    2015-12-07

    Proper utilization of resources is an important operational objective for clinical laboratories. To reduce unnecessary manual interventions on automated instruments, we conducted a workflow analysis that optimized dilution parameters and reporting of abnormally high chemistry results for the Beckman AU series of chemistry analyzers while maintaining clinically acceptable reportable ranges. Workflow analysis for the Beckman AU680/5812 and DxC800 chemistry analyzers was performed using historical data. Clinical reportable ranges for 53 chemistry analytes were evaluated. Optimized dilution parameters and upper limit of reportable ranges for the AU680/5812 instruments were derived and validated to meet these reportable ranges. The number of specimens that required manual dilutions before and after optimization was determined for both the AU680/5812 and DxC800, with the DxC800 serving as the reference instrument. Retrospective data analysis revealed that 7700 specimens required manual dilutions on the DxC over a 2-y period. Using our optimized AU-specific dilution and reporting parameters, the data-driven simulation analysis showed a 61% reduction in manual dilutions. For the specimens that required manual dilutions on the AU680/5812, we developed standardized dilution procedures to further streamline workflow. We provide a data-driven, practical outline for clinical laboratories to efficiently optimize their use of automated chemistry analyzers. The outcomes can be used to assist laboratories wishing to improve their existing procedures or to facilitate transitioning into a new line of instrumentation, regardless of the instrument model or manufacturer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High efficiency AlGaInN-based light emitting diode in the 360-380 nm wavelength range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hisao; Wang, Hong-Xing; Sato, Daisuke; Takaki, Ryohei; Wada, Naoki; Tanahashi, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Kenji; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mizobuchi, Takashi; Dempo, Akihiko; Morioka, Kenji; Kimura, Masahiro; Nohda, Suguru [Nitride Semiconductors Co., Ltd., 115-7 Itayajima, Akinokami, Seto-cho, Naruto, Tokushima 771-0360 (Japan); Sugahara, Tomoya [Satellite Venture Business Laboratory, The University of Tokushima (Japan); Sakai, Shiro [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2003-11-01

    High performance LEDs emitting in the wavelength range 360-380 nm, are fabricated on sapphire substrates by one-time metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) without using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) or similar techniques. By improving layer structures and growth conditions, the output power of the LEDs was much improved. The light output power of the LEDs at an injection current of 20 mA is 3.2 mW, 2.5 mW and 1 mW at wavelengths of 378 nm, 373 nm and 363 nm, which correspond to an external quantum efficiency of 4.8%, 3.8% and 1.4%, respectively. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Quantum efficiency of cesium iodide photocathodes in the 120-220 nm spectral range traceable to a primary detector standard

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G; Friese, J; Gernhäuser, R; Kastenmüller, A; Maier-Komor, P; Zeitelhack, K

    1999-01-01

    Differently prepared CsI samples have been investigated in the 120-220 nm spectral range for their quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity and the effect of radiation aging. The experiments were performed at the PTB radiometry laboratory at the Berlin synchrotron radiation facility BESSY. A calibrated GaAsP Schottky photodiode was used as transfer detector standard to establish traceability to the primary detector standard, because this type of photodiode - unlike silicon p-on-n photodiodes - proved to be of sufficiently stable response when exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The paper reviews the experimental procedures that were employed to characterize and calibrate the GaAsP photodiode and reports the results that were obtained on the investigated CsI photocathodes.

  18. Accurate and efficient long-range lightning geo-location using a VLF radio atmospheric waveform bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ryan Khalil

    2009-07-01

    On average there are ˜50 lightning flashes worldwide every second, with activity varying by region and season. Many systems currently exist that detect and locate lightning flashes for a broad range of commercial and scientific applications, including air traffic control, insurance claims, climate modeling, and the investigation of secondary atmospheric and magnetospheric electrical phenomena. These lightning detection systems have varying degrees of coverage area and location accuracy. Commercial ground-based systems that excel at locating return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning use radio detection in the LF (30-300 kHz) band to provide very accurate location data, with a typical accuracy of ˜0.5 km, but they require a dense network of receivers separated by ˜400 km and are therefore primarily limited to monitoring the land areas within the network. In addition to radiating in the LF band, each lightning strike generates a broadband electromagnetic pulse containing frequencies from a few Hz through to the optical band with a peak component at VLF (3-30 kHz). Radio waves at VLF propagate through the waveguide formed by the Earth and the ionosphere with relatively low attenuation (˜3 dB per 1000 km), enabling the detection of these pulses, called radio atmospherics, at great distances from the lightning strike. Several existing networks utilize this efficient guiding to geo-locate lightning strikes often at distances greater than 5000 km from a given receiver. However, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide also presents a complex and time-varying channel that heavily disperses the pulse as it propagates away from the strike location. These networks fail to adequately address the path-dependence of the received impulse and suffer a lower location accuracy as a result (˜20 km). A new technique of long-range global lightning location is presented that both takes advantage of the efficient propagation at VLF and addresses the path-dependence of the propagation channel

  19. Lidar Inversion of Atmospheric Backscatter and Extinction-To-Backscatter Ratios by Use of a Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Soriano, Cecilia; Comerón, Adolfo; Baldasano, José-María

    1999-05-01

    A first inversion of the backscatter profile and extinction-to-backscatter ratio from pulsed elastic-backscatter lidar returns is treated by means of an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The EKF approach enables one to overcome the intrinsic limitations of standard straightforward nonmemory procedures such as the slope method, exponential curve fitting, and the backward inversion algorithm. Whereas those procedures are inherently not adaptable because independent inversions are performed for each return signal and neither the statistics of the signals nor a priori uncertainties (e.g., boundary calibrations) are taken into account, in the case of the Kalman filter the filter updates itself because it is weighted by the imbalance between the a priori estimates of the optical parameters (i.e., past inversions) and the new estimates based on a minimum-variance criterion, as long as there are different lidar returns. Calibration errors and initialization uncertainties can be assimilated also. The study begins with the formulation of the inversion problem and an appropriate atmospheric stochastic model. Based on extensive simulation and realistic conditions, it is shown that the EKF approach enables one to retrieve the optical parameters as time-range-dependent functions and hence to track the atmospheric evolution; the performance of this approach is limited only by the quality and availability of the a priori information and the accuracy of the atmospheric model used. The study ends with an encouraging practical inversion of a live scene measured at the Nd:YAG elastic-backscatter lidar station at our premises at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona.

  20. Modeling and analysis of ultrasound backscattering by spherical aggregates and rouleaux of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, B G; Cloutier, G

    2000-01-01

    The present study concerns the modeling and analysis of ultrasound backscattering by red blood cell (RBC) aggregates, which under pathological conditions play a significant role in the rheology of blood within human vessels. A theoretical model based on the convolution between a tissue matrix and a point spread function, representing, respectively, the RBC aggregates and the characteristics of the ultrasound system, was used to examine the influence of the scatterer shape and size on the backscattered power. Both scatterers in the form of clumps of RBC aggregates and rouleaux were modeled. For all simulations, the hematocrit was kept constant at 10%, the ultrasound frequency was 10 MHz, the insonification angle was varied from 0 to 90 degrees , and the scatterer size (diameter for clumps and length for rouleaux) ranged from 4 mum to 120 mum. Under Rayleigh scattering by assuming a Poisson distribution of scatterers in space, the ultrasound backscattered power increased linearly with the particle volume. For non-Rayleigh scatterers, the intensity of the echoes diminished as the scatterer volume increased, with the exception of rouleaux at an angle of 90 degrees . As expected, the backscattered power was angularly dependent for anisotropic particles (rouleaux). The ultrasound backscattered power did not always increase with the size of the aggregates, especially when they were no longer Rayleigh scatterers. In the case of rouleaux, the anisotropy of the backscattered power is emphasized in the non-Rayleigh region.

  1. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  2. Monolayer resolution in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Science; Ohshima, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Science; Nakajima, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Science; Fujii, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Science; Mannami, M. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Engineering Science; Gossmann, H.J. [AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ 07974 (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Conditions for to obtain monolayer resolution in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy are discussed. It is shown that both high energy resolution and the grazing angle technique are essential to achieve monolayer resolution. A 90 sector magnetic spectrometer ({delta}E/E similar 0.1%) is utilized for high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). Energy spectra of scattered 300-keV He ions from single crystals are measured with the spectrometer at grazing exit angles. The ions scattered from successive atomic layers can be resolved as separated peaks in the energy spectra. Results of some applications of HRBS are presented. (orig.).

  3. The Sources That Give Rise to the Backscattering and Its Spectral Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Gray, D. J.; McKee, D.

    2016-02-01

    While the color of the ocean mainly results from the spectral absorption by particle assemblage in the ocean, it is the volume scattering, particularly, the backscattering that reflect the light, thus making the color observable. In addition, the backscattering and its spectral variations also carry information about the particles that cannot be retreived from the absorption alone. While the backscattering coefficients and its spectral signature have been empirically related to a variety of biogeochemical quantities, such as PIC, POC, SPM, or mean sizes of particulates, theoretical studies show the small particles, most in the operationally dissolved domain, are the main contributor. Thus, the question remains as to the sources of backscattering and its spectral variations, the answer to which is not only important to the sicence of ocean color but can also lead to improvements in its algorithm development and data interpretation. The challenges in addressing this question include, among many, the accurate measurements of backscattering coefficients, the interpretation of angular VSFs, and simulation of scattering by non-spherical and -homogeneous particles. Overcoming some of these challenges, we have measured the spectral VSFs in three coastal waters around US and during the SABOR experiment in North Atlantic ocean. The spectral backscattering coefficients were derived from the VSFs in a varietry of water types, ranging from turbit estuarine to open ocean, from mineral dominant tidal zone to algal bloom. We also applied the inversion technique to partition the measured VSFs into contributions by particle populations of a wide ranges of sizes and composition that are representative of oceanic particles, living and nonliving. This inversion approach allows us to examine the relative importance of various particle populations to the backscattering. Furthermore, we applied forward modeling using non-spherical particles to simulate the spectral backscattering by

  4. Fusion of range-based data and image-based datasets for efficient documentation of cultural heritage objects and sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, J. L.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays it is possible to measure accurately dense point clouds either with aerial/terrestrial laser scanning systems or with imagebased solutions (namely based on photogrammetric computer vision algorithms such as structure-from-motion (SfM)), from which highly detailed 3D models can be achieved. Besides, direct tools in the form of simple devices such as rulers, compass and plumblines are usually required in simple metric surveys, as well as high-end surveying and geodetic instruments such as robotized imagebased total stations and GNSS (probably to a lesser degree but still required) to set the archaeological/architectural recording project in a global reference frame. With all this gamut of image-based and range-based sensors and datasets (in the form of coordinates, point clouds or 3D models), in different coordinate systems (most of the times local for each device), lack of uniform scale, orientation and levelling, the fusion of data tends to be cumbersome. This paper presents an efficient way to fuse and merge different datasets in the form of point clouds/3D models and geodetic/UTM coordinates. The new developed 3DVEM - Register GEO software is able to handle datasets coming from both direct and indirect methods in order to provide unified and precise deliverables.

  5. Pascal's triangle and the simulation of backscattering spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoian, Michael

    1994-04-01

    Applying a well-known yield equation to a stack of very thin sublayers allows accurate simulations of homogeneous, thick-target, backscattering spectra. Explicit expressions, accurate to at least third degree in the areal density for the ion energy immediately before scattering and for the detected ion energy, are found. These expressions are in terms of binomial expansions of a quantity equaling the product of the areal density multiplied by a function of stopping cross section derivatives and areal density. One iterative parameter, taken as the near-surface yield, is required to properly normalize the simulation with respect to the experimental spectrum. Several thick target spectra, produced by bombarding helium ions with energies ranging over several MeV, are simulated using both Ziegler's 1977 [J.F. Ziegler, Helium Stopping Powers and Ranges in All Elements (Pergamon, New York, 1977)] and 1985 [J.F. Ziegler, J.P. Biersack and U. Littmark, The Stopping and Range of Ions in Solids (Pergamon, New York, 1985)] stopping compilations to ascertain the impact of these differing stopping cross sections on predictions of backscattering spectra.

  6. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: DCM, FSM, dead time and width controllers for a high frequency high efficiency buck DC-DC converter over a wide load range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changming, Pi; Wei, Yan; Ke, Zhang; Wenhong, Li

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a width controller, a dead time controller, a discontinuous current mode (DCM) controller and a frequency skipping modulation (FSM) controller for a high frequency high efficiency buck DC-DC converter. To improve the efficiency over a wide load range, especially at high switching frequency, the dead time controller and width controller are applied to enhance the high load efficiency, while the DCM controller and FSM controller are proposed to increase the light load efficiency. The proposed DC-DC converter controllers have been designed and fabricated in the Chartered 0.35 μm CMOS process, and the measured results show that the efficiency of the buck DC-DC converter is above 80% over a wide load current range from 8 to 570 mA, and the peak efficiency is 86% at 10 MHz switching frequency.

  8. DCM, FSM, dead time and width controllers for a high frequency high efficiency buck DC-DC converter over a wide load range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pi Changming; Yan Wei; Zhang Ke; Li Wenhong, E-mail: wenhongli@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and Systems, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents a width controller, a dead time controller, a discontinuous current mode (DCM) controller and a frequency skipping modulation (FSM) controller for a high frequency high efficiency buck DC-DC converter. To improve the efficiency over a wide load range, especially at high switching frequency, the dead time controller and width controller are applied to enhance the high load efficiency, while the DCM controller and FSM controller are proposed to increase the light load efficiency. The proposed DC-DC converter controllers have been designed and fabricated in the Chartered 0.35 {mu}m CMOS process, and the measured results show that the efficiency of the buck DC-DC converter is above 80% over a wide load current range from 8 to 570 mA, and the peak efficiency is 86% at 10 MHz switching frequency. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  14. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  16. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  17. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  19. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  20. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  1. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  3. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  4. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter D [USGS]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  9. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  10. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. Backscatter D [7125]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. Preliminary backscatter results from the hydrosweep multibeam system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hagen, R.A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    to 120 degrees, but also adds two new capabilities to the system: collection of sidescan sonar data, and the measurement of seafloor backscatter coefficients. The Hydrosweep backscatter software uses an algorithm developEd. by the Scripps Institution...

  13. Practical analytical backscatter error bars for elastic one-component lidar inversion algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Reba, M Nadzri Md; Sicard, Michaël; Comerón, Adolfo

    2010-06-10

    We present an analytical formulation to compute the total-backscatter range-dependent error bars from the well-known Klett's elastic-lidar inversion algorithm. A combined error-propagation and statistical formulation approach is used to assess inversion errors in response to the following error sources: observation noise (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio) in the reception channel, the user's uncertainty in the backscatter calibration, and in the (range-dependent) total extinction-to-backscatter ratio provided. The method is validated using a Monte Carlo procedure, where the error bars are computed by inversion of a large population of noisy generated lidar signals, for total optical depths tau < or = 5 and typical user uncertainties, all of which yield a practical tool to compute the sought-after error bars.

  14. A High-Voltage class-D power amplifier with switching frequency regulation for improved high-efficiency output power range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, H.; van der Zee, Ronan A.R.; Nauta, Bram

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the power dissipation analysis and the design of an efficiency-improved high-voltage class-D power amplifier. The amplifier adaptively regulates its switching frequency for optimal power efficiency across the full output power range. This is based on detecting the switching

  15. User expectations for multibeam echo sounders backscatter strength data-looking back into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, Vanessa; Roche, Marc; Degrendele, Koen; Malik, Mashkoor; Dolan, Margaret; Lamarche, Geoffroy

    2017-05-01

    With the ability of multibeam echo sounders (MBES) to measure backscatter strength (BS) as a function of true angle of insonification across the seafloor, came a new recognition of the potential of backscatter measurements to remotely characterize the properties of the seafloor. Advances in transducer design, digital electronics, signal processing capabilities, navigation, and graphic display devices, have improved the resolution and particularly the dynamic range available to sonar and processing software manufacturers. Alongside these improvements the expectations of what the data can deliver has also grown. In this paper, we identify these user-expectations and explore how MBES backscatter is utilized by different communities involved in marine seabed research at present, and the aspirations that these communities have for the data in the future. The results presented here are based on a user survey conducted by the GeoHab (Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping) association. This paper summarises the different processing procedures employed to extract useful information from MBES backscatter data and the various intentions for which the user community collect the data. We show how a range of backscatter output products are generated from the different processing procedures, and how these results are taken up by different scientific disciplines, and also identify common constraints in handling MBES BS data. Finally, we outline our expectations for the future of this unique and important data source for seafloor mapping and characterisation.

  16. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50 ...

  17. Efficiency of liming in controlling the mobility of lead in shooting range soils as assessed by different experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonmäki, M; Hartikainen, H

    2007-12-15

    Shooting range soils contaminated by lead (Pb) are a great environmental risk. Reducing mobility and leaching of Pb by liming, for example, has produced contradictory results. This laboratory study compares the efficiency of two liming agents differing in their reactivity, CaCO(3) and blast furnace slag (BFS), in diminishing the mobility of Pb. In a batch test, contaminated humic soil samples were incubated in closed vessels without and with liming materials added in quantities to correspond additions of 5 t ha(-1). Water soluble Pb (Pb(w)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH and substrate induced respiration (SIR) in soils were monitored for 21 days. In the experiment carried out with freely drained vessels, contaminated humic soil treated without and with liming agents was leached five times during the experimental period of 141 days. Leachates were analyzed for pH, DOC and Pb. At the end of the experiment, soil samples were analyzed for pH, DOC, Pb(w), and SIR. In both systems, CaCO(3) raised pH and DOC more than BFS. The liming agents did not significantly differ in their effect on Pb chemistry. Neither had any effect on SIR: however, liming agents markedly reduced the leaching of Pb in the open system, while in the closed system they increased rather than reduced the extractability of Pb. Incubation in a closed vessel proved not to be a suitable experimental system for Pb mobility estimation, since the ionic strength may be raised to abnormal levels, resulting from accumulated reaction products of liming agents.

  18. Three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for wind profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The development of a three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation (ABC) light detection and ranging (lidar) to measure wind characteristics for wake vortex and plume tracking applications is discussed. This is a direct detection elastic lidar that uses three laser transceivers, operating at 1030-nm wavelength with ˜10-kHz pulse repetition frequency and nanosec class pulse widths, to directly obtain three components of wind velocities. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, three-component wind speed profiles along the field-of-view of laser beams are obtained. With three 8-in. transceiver modules, placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner, the lidar measures wind speeds up to 2 km away. Optical flow algorithms have been adapted to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. Aerosol density fluctuations are cross-correlated between successive scans to obtain the displacements of the aerosol features along the three axes. Using the range resolved elastic backscatter data from each laser beam, which is scanned over the volume of interest, a three-dimensional map of aerosol density can be generated in a short time span. The performance of the ABC wind lidar prototype, validated using sonic anemometer measurements, is discussed.

  19. Backscatter Correction Algorithm for TBI Treatment Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Arrans, R.; Terron, J.A. [Dpto. Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Sánchez Pizjuán, 4. E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Errazquin, L. [Servicio Oncología Radioterápica, Hospital Univ.V. Macarena. Dr. Fedriani, s/n. E-41009, Sevilla (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The accuracy requirements in target dose delivery is, according to ICRU, ±5%. This is so not only in standard radiotherapy but also in total body irradiation (TBI). Physical dosimetry plays an important role in achieving this recommended level. The semi-infinite phantoms, customarily used for dosimetry purposes, give scatter conditions different to those of the finite thickness of the patient. So dose calculated in patient’s points close to beam exit surface may be overestimated. It is then necessary to quantify the backscatter factor in order to decrease the uncertainty in this dose calculation. The backward scatter has been well studied at standard distances. The present work intends to evaluate the backscatter phenomenon under our particular TBI treatment conditions. As a consequence of this study, a semi-empirical expression has been derived to calculate (within 0.3% uncertainty) the backscatter factor. This factor depends lineally on the depth and exponentially on the underlying tissue. Differences found in the qualitative behavior with respect to standard distances are due to scatter in the bunker wall close to the measurement point.

  20. 8.4% efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells exploiting long-range exciton energy transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cnops, Kjell; Rand, Barry P; Cheyns, David; Verreet, Bregt; Empl, Max A; Heremans, Paul

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we present a simple three-layer architecture comprising two non-fullerene acceptors and a donor, in which an energy-relay cascade enables an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process...

  1. Control of collective FSBS and backscatter SRS through plasma composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Harvey; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Nominal NIF parameters are near the collective forward SBS (FSBS) threshold (P. M. Lushnikov and H. A. Rose, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255003 (2004), ``L&R''). It will be shown that being on this instability edge can be used as a control lever: a small amount of high Z dopant may lead to qualitative change in FSBS regime at fixed laser intensity, possibly reducing backscatter instability losses (Such results have already been observed, but absent SSD, a key aspect of our theory: R. M. Stevenson et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2709 (2004); L. J. Suter et al., 2738, ib.). Ponderomotive FSBS regimes are determined by the parameter I=F^2( vosc / vosc ve . - ve )^2( ne / ne nc . - nc ) / ( ne / ne nc . - nc ) ν . - ν, with ν the dimensionless ion acoustic damping coefficient and F the optic f/#. Analytical results will be presented which show a decrease of I1pt's threshold value through the addition of high Z dopant to low Z plasma, owing to increased thermal contribution to FSBS. Alternatively, one may raise the threshold by managing the value of νby, e.g., adding He to SiO2. For nominal NIF parameters, a range of He fraction in SiO2 plasma is predicted to suppress backscatter SRS while maintaining control of forward SBS.

  2. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  3. Observations of 2D Doppler backscattering on MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D A; Freethy, S J; Huang, B K; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2015-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D Doppler backscattering (DBS) experiments on MAST. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (+-40 degrees vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-35.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24 degrees FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is an entirely novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial measurements of phenomena observed on conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch an...

  4. Backscatter and attenuation characterization of ventricular myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Allyson Ann

    2009-12-01

    This Dissertation presents quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the myocardium in fetal hearts and adult human hearts with the goal of studying the physics of sound waves incident upon anisotropic and inhomogeneous materials. Ultrasound has been used as a clinical tool to assess heart structure and function for several decades. The clinical usefulness of this noninvasive approach has grown with our understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the myocardium. In this Dissertation, integrated backscatter and attenuation analyses were performed on midgestational fetal hearts to assess potential differences in the left and right ventricular myocardium. The hearts were interrogated using a 50 MHz transducer that enabled finer spatial resolution than could be achieved at more typical clinical frequencies. Ultrasonic data analyses demonstrated different patterns and relative levels of backscatter and attenuation from the myocardium of the left ventricle and the right ventricle. Ultrasonic data of adult human hearts were acquired with a clinical imaging system and quantified by their magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter. The results were analyzing using Bayes Classification and ROC analysis to quantify potential advantages of using a combination of two features of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter over using only one or the other feature to distinguish between groups of subjects. When the subjects were classified based on hemoglobin A1c, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, differences in the magnitude and normalized time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter were observed. The cyclic variation results also suggested a trend toward a larger area under the ROC curve when information from magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation is combined using Bayes classification than when

  5. Influence of dead-time on detection efficiency and range performance of photon-counting laser radar that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijian; Lai, Jiancheng; Wang, Chunyong; Yan, Wei; Li, Zhenhua

    2017-08-10

    Dead-time has a significant influence on the detection efficiency and range performance of a photon-counting laser radar system with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode. In this paper, a rapid universal recursive model of the detection probability of discrete time under various dead-times is proposed, which is verified with controlled parameters. Our model has the advantage of fast computing speed and unifies multi-trigger, single-trigger, and zero-dead-time models. The computing speed is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than Gatt's and Zhao's models under a short dead-time condition, with relative errors less than 0.001 and 10(-14), respectively. Subsequently, the detection efficiency and range bias and precision with various dead-times are theoretically calculated and Monte Carlo simulated with different parameters. On the one hand, dead-time shorter than the end time of the target achieves better detection efficiency; however, this results in worse range performance. On the other hand, dead-time longer than the end time of the target maintains the detection efficiency at a low level but provides a better range performance. We discover that noise is the key reason for the periodic fluctuation of the detection efficiency and range performance versus different dead-times and the local optimum values of fluctuations occur when the dead-time is a few nanoseconds shorter or longer than 1, 1/2, 1/3, or even 1/4 of the end time of the target; further, this phenomenon becomes more evident when noise increases. Moreover, weaker noise level is crucial to the detection efficiency, and narrow pulse width and nearer target position in the range gate are important factors to improve precision.

  6. An Ultrasonic Backscatter Instrument for Cancellous Bone Evaluation in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic backscatter technique has shown promise as a noninvasive cancellous bone assessment tool. A novel ultrasonic backscatter bone diagnostic (UBBD instrument and an in vivo application for neonatal bone evaluation are introduced in this study. The UBBD provides several advantages, including noninvasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, portability, and simplicity. In this study, the backscatter signal could be measured within 5 s using the UBBD. Ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on 467 neonates (268 males and 199 females at the left calcaneus. The backscatter signal was measured at a central frequency of 3.5 MHz. The delay (T1 and duration (T2 of the backscatter signal of interest (SOI were varied, and the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB, frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB, zero frequency intercept of apparent backscatter (FIAB, and spectral centroid shift (SCS were calculated. The results showed that the SOI selection had a direct influence on cancellous bone evaluation. The AIB and FIAB were positively correlated with the gestational age (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. Moderate positive correlations (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. The T2 mainly introduced fluctuations in the observed correlation coefficients. The moderate correlations observed with UBBD demonstrate the feasibility of using the backscatter signal to evaluate neonatal bone status. This study also proposes an explicit standard for in vivo SOI selection and neonatal cancellous bone assessment.

  7. Investigation of Efficiency and Thermal Performance of the Y-source Converters for a Wide Voltage Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadalla, Brwene Salah Abdelkarim; Schaltz, Erik; Siwakoti, Yam Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The Y-source topology has a unique advantage of having high voltages gain with small shoot through duty cycles. Furthermore, having the advantage of high modulation index increases the power density and improves the performance of the converter. In this paper, a collective thermal and efficiency...

  8. Photosynthetic capacity and intrinsic water-use efficiency of Rhizophora mangle at its southernmost western Atlantic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.L.G. Soares; M.M.P. Tognella; E. Cuevas; E. Medina

    2015-01-01

    The southernmost presence of Rhizophora mangle in the western Atlantic coast occurs in coastal wetlands between 27 and 28ºS in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. We selected mangrove communities at the estuary of Rio Tavares, Florianopolis, and Sonho Beach, Palhosa, for measurement of photosynthetic performance and intrinsic water use efficiency of R. mangle and...

  9. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  10. Broadband high-efficiency zero-order surface grating coupler for the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Postigo, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Pérez, J. Gonzalo; Luque-González, José Manuel; Molina-Fernández, Íñigo; Cheben, Pavel; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos A.; Halir, Robert; Schmid, Jens H.; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    Efficient coupling of light from a chip into an optical fiber is a major issue in silicon photonics, as the dimensions of high-index-contrast photonic integrated waveguides are much smaller than conventional fiber diameters. Surface grating couplers address the coupling problem by radiating the optical power from a waveguide through the surface of the chip to the optical fiber, or vice versa. However, since the grating radiation angle substantially varies with the wavelength, conventional surface grating couplers cannot offer high coupling efficiency and broad bandwidth simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, for the near-infrared band we have recently proposed SOI-based zero-order grating couplers, which, making use of a subwavelength-engineered waveguide and a high-index prism, suppress the explicit dependence between the radiation angle and the wavelength, achieving a 1-dB bandwidth of 126 nm at λ = 1.55 μm. However, in the near-infrared, the bandwidth enhancement of zero-order grating couplers is limited by the effective index wavelength dispersion of the grating. In the mid-infrared spectral region, the waveguide dispersion is lower, alleviating the bandwidth limitation. Here we demonstrate numerically our zero-order grating coupler concept in the mid-infrared at λ = 3.8 μm. Several couplers for the silicon-on-insulator and the germanium-on-silicon nitride platforms are designed and compared, with subdecibel coupling efficiencies and 1-dB bandwidths up to 680 nm.

  11. Interactive computer analysis of nuclear backscattering spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Philip A.; Ziegler, J. F.

    1983-12-01

    A review will be made of a computer-based interactive nuclear backscattering analysis system. Users without computer experience can develop moderate competence with the system after only brief instruction because of the menu-driven organization. Publishable quality figures can be obtained without any computer expertise. Among the quantities which can be displayed over the data are depth scales for any element, element identification, relative concentrations and theoretical spectra. Captions and titling can made from a selection of 30 font styles. Lettering is put on the graphs under joy-stick control such that placement is exact without needing complicated commands.

  12. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  13. Seafloor backscatter signal simulation and classification

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahale, V.; El Dine, W.G.; Chakraborty, B.

    in the backscattered signal. An analysis of the signal envelope fluctuation over several pings can be used to understand the roughness characteristics of the seafloor. In this, primary effort towards classification, we have concentrated only on the normal incidence... in such situations is to use the ground truth data to derive the type of class. Most of these problems are of supervised learning type, i.e. it requires examples of known class types, for the network learning process. In a typical scenario, a neural network...

  14. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ido

    2016-01-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of $5$. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations.

  15. Modified point spread function for efficient high dynamic range LED backlight capable of high uniformity, high contrast, and smooth gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmel, Jakob; Whitehead, Lorne A

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effect of new point spread functions (PSFs) on the uniformity and contrast of high dynamic range displays that use local dimming of LEDs to yield a large dynamic range. A PSF shaped like a quadratic B-spline was hypothesized to create a uniform brightness backlight, as well as producing linear and quadratic gradients, while maintaining a very high contrast. We have found a practical optical structure to produce such a PSF, yielding a nonuniformity of only ±0.8%, while enabling a contrast ratio of 5∶1 and 33∶1 over distances of one and two unit cell spacings, respectively.

  16. Efficiencies of acid catalysts in the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over a range of combined severity factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae-Won Lee; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    Dicarboxylic organic acids have properties that differ from those of sulfuric acid during hydrolysis of lignocellulose. To investigate the effects of different acid catalysts on the hydrolysis and degradation of biomass compounds over a range of thermochemical pretreatments, maleic, oxalic and sulfuric acids were each used at the same combined severity factor (CSF)...

  17. Changes in Upper Extremity Range of Motion and Efficiency in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Due to Water Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Pamela Rae

    To determine the effects of water exercise on the movements of multiple sclerosis patients, this study utilized tests to determine changes in the linear range of motion of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist after a 45-minute period of water activities and to determine if the movement became more effective. The test used was an overhead throw with a…

  18. High-frequency attenuation and backscatter measurements of rat blood between 30 and 60 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2010-10-01

    There has recently been a great deal of interest in noninvasive high-frequency ultrasound imaging of small animals such as rats due to their being the preferred animal model for gene therapy and cancer research. Improving the interpretation of the obtained images and furthering the development of the imaging devices require a detailed knowledge of the ultrasound attenuation and backscattering of biological tissue (e.g. blood) at high frequencies. In the present study, the attenuation and backscattering coefficients of the rat red blood cell (RBC) suspensions and whole blood with hematocrits ranging from 6% to 40% were measured between 30 and 60 MHz using a modified substitution approach. The acoustic parameters of porcine blood under the same conditions were also measured in order to compare differences in the blood properties between these two animals. For porcine blood, both whole blood and RBC suspension were stirred at a rotation speed of 200 rpm. Three different rotation speeds of 100, 200 and 300 rpm were carried out for rat blood experiments. The attenuation coefficients of both rat and porcine blood were found to increase linearly with frequency and hematocrit (the values of coefficients of determination (r2) are around 0.82-0.97 for all cases). The average attenuation coefficient of rat whole blood with a hematocrit of 40% increased from 0.26 Nepers mm-1 at 30 MHz to 0.47 Nepers mm-1 at 60 MHz. The maximum backscattering coefficients of both rat and porcine RBC suspensions were between 10% and 15% hematocrits at all frequencies. The fourth-power dependence of backscatter on frequency was approximately valid for rat RBC suspensions with hematocrits between 6% and 40%. However, the frequency dependence of the backscatter estimate deviates from a fourth-power law for porcine RBC suspension with hematocrit higher than 20%. The backscattering coefficient plateaued for hematocrits higher than 15% in porcine blood, but for rat blood it was maximal around a

  19. High-frequency attenuation and backscatter measurements of rat blood between 30 and 60 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chih-Chung, E-mail: j648816n@ms23.hinet.ne [Department of Electrical Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-07

    There has recently been a great deal of interest in noninvasive high-frequency ultrasound imaging of small animals such as rats due to their being the preferred animal model for gene therapy and cancer research. Improving the interpretation of the obtained images and furthering the development of the imaging devices require a detailed knowledge of the ultrasound attenuation and backscattering of biological tissue (e.g. blood) at high frequencies. In the present study, the attenuation and backscattering coefficients of the rat red blood cell (RBC) suspensions and whole blood with hematocrits ranging from 6% to 40% were measured between 30 and 60 MHz using a modified substitution approach. The acoustic parameters of porcine blood under the same conditions were also measured in order to compare differences in the blood properties between these two animals. For porcine blood, both whole blood and RBC suspension were stirred at a rotation speed of 200 rpm. Three different rotation speeds of 100, 200 and 300 rpm were carried out for rat blood experiments. The attenuation coefficients of both rat and porcine blood were found to increase linearly with frequency and hematocrit (the values of coefficients of determination (r{sup 2}) are around 0.82-0.97 for all cases). The average attenuation coefficient of rat whole blood with a hematocrit of 40% increased from 0.26 Nepers mm{sup -1} at 30 MHz to 0.47 Nepers mm{sup -1} at 60 MHz. The maximum backscattering coefficients of both rat and porcine RBC suspensions were between 10% and 15% hematocrits at all frequencies. The fourth-power dependence of backscatter on frequency was approximately valid for rat RBC suspensions with hematocrits between 6% and 40%. However, the frequency dependence of the backscatter estimate deviates from a fourth-power law for porcine RBC suspension with hematocrit higher than 20%. The backscattering coefficient plateaued for hematocrits higher than 15% in porcine blood, but for rat blood it was

  20. Chiral Receiving Antenna With Low Backscattering Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Karilainen, Antti O

    2011-01-01

    Receiving antennas absorb power from incident waves, but they also re-radiate some power into surrounding space. If a receiving antenna is to be used as a sensor which should not disturb the object under study, it should scatter as little power as possible in the receiving direction. We propose to use a chiral element composed of two orthogonal chiral particles as a low-scattering sensor.The element can transmit and receive circular polarization in all directions with the Huygens' pattern. We derive the vector effective length for the antenna using the small dipole approximation for the chiral particles. We observe that the element does not backscatter, regardless of the polarization, when the incidence direction is normal to the plane of the particles. Scattered fields, scattered axial ratio, and the scattering cross section are presented. We show that the zero-backscattering property holds also for the antenna element when it is capable to receive all the available power with conjugate loading. The approxim...

  1. THE LOW BACKSCATTERING TARGETS CLASSIFICATION IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Polarimetric and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POLINSAR is widely used in urban area nowadays. Because of the physical and geometric sensitivity, the POLINSAR is suitable for the city classification, power-lines detection, building extraction, etc. As the new X-band POLINSAR radar, the china prototype airborne system, XSAR works with high spatial resolution in azimuth (0.1 m and slant range (0.4 m. In land applications, SAR image classification is a useful tool to distinguish the interesting area and obtain the target information. The bare soil, the cement road, the water and the building shadow are common scenes in the urban area. As it always exists low backscattering sign objects (LBO with the similar scattering mechanism (all odd bounce except for shadow in the XSAR images, classes are usually confused in Wishart-H-Alpha and Freeman-Durden methods. It is very hard to distinguish those targets only using the general information. To overcome the shortage, this paper explores an improved algorithm for LBO refined classification based on the Pre-Classification in urban areas. Firstly, the Pre-Classification is applied in the polarimetric datum and the mixture class is marked which contains LBO. Then, the polarimetric covariance matrix C3 is re-estimated on the Pre-Classification results to get more reliable results. Finally, the occurrence space which combining the entropy and the phase-diff standard deviation between HH and VV channel is used to refine the Pre-Classification results. The XSAR airborne experiments show the improved method is potential to distinguish the mixture classes in the low backscattering objects.

  2. Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/7160--17-9701 Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water January...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water Roger C. Gauss,1 Edward L. Kunz,1 Joseph M. Fialkowski...2 3 B2001 (SHALLOW WATER − NEW JERSEY SHELF) .............................. 4

  3. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  4. Over-the-horizon backscatter radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes a recently constructed over-the-horizon backscatter (OTH-B) radar system covering as many as 4,800,000 sq nautical miles over a distance of 1800 nautical miles. This HF system operates at frequencies from 5 to 28 MHz. The radar's 3630-ft-long transmitting antenna is divided into six subarrays to accommodate different operating frequencies. Three sets of these arrays are located at the east coast radar system transmit site near Moscow, Maine. The transmitter is powered by 12 10-kW tubes per sector, emitting 360 kW of radiated RF power. The signal processing software correlates the receiver radar track data with flight patterns of unknown aircraft and flight plans of friendly aircraft; twenty-nine computers perform the signal analysis and processing function of the receiver.

  5. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. This work was supported by NNSA Grant No. DE- NA0002948, AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0391, and DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  7. Hemoglobin niobate composite based biosensor for efficient determination of hydrogen peroxide in a broad pH range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lu; Gao, Qiuming

    2007-02-15

    Inorganic layered niobates (HCa2Nb3O10) were used as immobilization matrices of hemoglobin (Hb) because of their tunable interlayer spaces, large surface areas and good biocompatibilities. A pair of well-defined, quasi-reversible cycle voltammertric peaks were obtained at the Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified pyrolytic graphite electrode, suggesting that the layered niobates facilitate the electron transfer between the proteins and the electrode. Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified electrode exhibited electrocatalytic response for monitoring H2O2 with a large linear detection range from 25 microM to 3.0 mM and a relatively high sensitivity of 172 microA mM-1 cm-2. Based on the stabilizing effect of the layered niobates, Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified electrode can detect H2O2 in strongly acidic and basic solutions with pH of 1-12, which greatly expands the application fields of biosensors.

  8. CHANGES OF BACKSCATTERING PARAMETERS DURING CHILLING INJURY IN BANANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORHASHILA HASHIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in backscattering parameters during the appearance of chilling injury in bananas was investigated. Bananas were stored at a chilling temperature for two days and the degrees of the chilling injuries that appeared were measured before, during and after storage using backscattering imaging and visual assessment. Laser lights at 660 nm and 785 nm wavelengths were shot consecutively onto the samples in a dark room and a camera was used to capture the backscattered lights that appeared on the samples. The captured images were analysed and the changes of intensity against pixel count were plotted into graphs. The plotted graph provides useful information of backscattering parameters such as inflection point (IP, slope after inflection point (SA, and full width at half maximum (FWHM and saturation radius (RSAT. Results of statistical analysis indicated that there were significant changes of these backscattering parameters as chilling injury developed.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET dosimeter for electron backscatter using the GEANT4 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the body of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter in measuring the electron backscatter from lead. The electron backscatter factor (EBF), which is defined as the ratio of dose at the tissue-lead interface to the dose at the same point without the presence of backscatter, was calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using the GEANT4 code. Electron beams with energies of 4, 6, 9, and 12 MeV were used in the simulation. It was found that in the presence of the MOSFET body, the EBFs were underestimated by about 2%-0.9% for electron beam energies of 4-12 MeV, respectively. The trend of the decrease of EBF with an increase of electron energy can be explained by the small MOSFET dosimeter, mainly made of epoxy and silicon, not only attenuated the electron fluence of the electron beam from upstream, but also the electron backscatter generated by the lead underneath the dosimeter. However, this variation of the EBF underestimation is within the same order of the statistical uncertainties as the Monte Carlo simulations, which ranged from 1.3% to 0.8% for the electron energies of 4-12 MeV, due to the small dosimetric volume. Such small EBF deviation is therefore insignificant when the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is taken into account. Corresponding measurements were carried out and uncertainties compared to Monte Carlo results were within +/- 2%. Spectra of energy deposited by the backscattered electrons in dosimetric volumes with and without the lead and MOSFET were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that in both cases, when the MOSFET body is either present or absent in the simulation, deviations of electron energy spectra with and without the lead decrease with an increase of the electron beam energy. Moreover, the softer spectrum of the backscattered electron when lead is present can result in a reduction of the MOSFET response due to stronger

  10. Evaluation of Four Supervised Learning Methods for Benthic Habitat Mapping Using Backscatter from Multi-Beam Sonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquomo Monk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the distribution and extent of marine habitats is essential for the implementation of ecosystem-based management strategies. Historically this had been difficult in marine environments until the advancement of acoustic sensors. This study demonstrates the applicability of supervised learning techniques for benthic habitat characterization using angular backscatter response data. With the advancement of multibeam echo-sounder (MBES technology, full coverage datasets of physical structure over vast regions of the seafloor are now achievable. Supervised learning methods typically applied to terrestrial remote sensing provide a cost-effective approach for habitat characterization in marine systems. However the comparison of the relative performance of different classifiers using acoustic data is limited. Characterization of acoustic backscatter data from MBES using four different supervised learning methods to generate benthic habitat maps is presented. Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC, Quick, Unbiased, Efficient Statistical Tree (QUEST, Random Forest (RF and Support Vector Machine (SVM were evaluated to classify angular backscatter response into habitat classes using training data acquired from underwater video observations. Results for biota classifications indicated that SVM and RF produced the highest accuracies, followed by QUEST and MLC, respectively. The most important backscatter data were from the moderate incidence angles between 30° and 50°. This study presents initial results for understanding how acoustic backscatter from MBES can be optimized for the characterization of marine benthic biological habitats.

  11. Broadband measurements of the acoustic backscatter cross section of sand particles in suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C.; Hay, A.E. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    A method using a broadband transducer to measure the acoustic backscatter cross section of suspended sand particles is investigated. The frequencies used range from 1.3 to 2.8 MHz, and the sand sizes from 100- to 350-[mu]m diameter. The measurements are made in the transducer near field. The measured form factor is compared with the theoretical result for the movable rigid sphere model, and with previous narrow-band measurements. 29 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Realization of high-luminous-efficiency InGaN light-emitting diodes in the “green gap” range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Li, Yangfeng; Li, Yueqiao; Deng, Zhen; Lu, Taiping; Ma, Ziguang; Zuo, Peng; Dai, Longgui; Wang, Lu; Jia, Haiqiang; Wang, Wenxin; Zhou, Junming; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the wavelength region of 535–570 nm are still inefficient, which is known as the “green gap” problem. Light in this range causes maximum luminous sensation in the human eye and is therefore advantageous for many potential uses. Here, we demonstrate a high-brightness InGaN LED with a normal voltage in the “green gap” range based on hybrid multi-quantum wells (MQWs). A yellow-green LED device is successfully fabricated and has a dominant wavelength, light output power, luminous efficiency and forward voltage of 560 nm, 2.14 mW, 19.58 lm/W and 3.39 V, respectively. To investigate the light emitting mechanism, a comparative analysis of the hybrid MQW LED and a conventional LED is conducted. The results show a 2.4-fold enhancement of the 540-nm light output power at a 20-mA injection current by the new structure due to the stronger localization effect, and such enhancement becomes larger at longer wavelengths. Our experimental data suggest that the hybrid MQW structure can effectively push the efficient InGaN LED emission toward longer wavelengths, connecting to the lower limit of the AlGaInP LEDs’ spectral range, thus enabling completion of the LED product line covering the entire visible spectrum with sufficient luminous efficacy. PMID:26039353

  13. The construction of a high resolution crystal backscattering spectrometer HERMES I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larese, J.Z.

    1998-11-01

    There is a need in the United States for a state-of-the-art, cold-neutron, crystal backscattering spectrometer (CBS) designed to investigate the structure and dynamics of condensed matter systems by the simultaneous utilization of long wavelength elastic diffraction and high-energy-resolution inelastic scattering. Cold neutron spectroscopy with CBS-type instruments has already made many important contributions to the study of atomic and molecular diffusion in biomaterials, polymers, semiconductors, liquid crystals, superionic conductors and the like. Such instruments have also been invaluable for ultra high resolution investigations of the low-lying quantum tunneling processes that provide direct insight into the dynamical response of solids at the lowest energies. Until relatively recently, however, all such instruments were located at steady-state reactors. This proposal describes HERMES I (High Energy Resolution Machines I) a CBS intended for installation at the LANSCE pulsed neutron facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory. As explained in detail in the main text, the authors propose to construct an updated, high-performance CBS which incorporates neutron techniques developed during the decade since IRIS was built, i.e., improved supermirror technology, a larger area crystal analyzer and high efficiency wire gas detectors. The instrument is designed in such a way as to be readily adaptable to future upgrades. HERMES I, they believe, will substantially expand the range and flexibility of neutron investigations in the United States and open new and potentially fruitful directions for condensed matter exploration. This document describes a implementation plan with a direct cost range between $4.5 to 5.6 M and scheduled duration of 39--45 months for identified alternatives.

  14. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  15. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  16. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  17. Study on Improvement of Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    YAN Jun; ZHANG Hongmei; ZHAO Jianhu; MENG Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Because multibeam backscatter data is greatly affected by the AR (angular response) and the AR correction models are not perfect in the complex seabed, the multibeam image quality is seriously reduced...

  18. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  19. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  20. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  1. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  2. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  3. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  4. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  5. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  6. Photoelectron backscattering from silicon anodes of hybrid photodetector tubes

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of photoelectron backscattering on spectral distributions measured with hybrid photodetector tubes has been calculated. The calculations are based on the backscattering coefficient mu , the average number of photoelectrons N/sub phel/ emitted from the photocathode, and on the distribution of the fractional photoelectron energy q absorbed in silicon during the backscattering process. We obtained the following results: the average number of absorbed (measured) photoelectrons N/sub meas/ in the silicon anode amounts to ~88% of the incident N/sub phel/. Photoelectron- and gamma-absorption peaks are broadened by a factor 1.043 due to backscattering. As an example, for photomultiplier tubes, this broadening can amount to an average factor of 1.18 due to statistic and gain fluctuations on the dynode chain. (15 refs).

  7. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  8. Optical Backscattering Measured by Airborne Lidar and Underwater Glider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Churnside

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical backscattering from particles in the ocean is an important quantity that has been measured by remote sensing techniques and in situ instruments. In this paper, we compare estimates of this quantity from airborne lidar with those from an in situ instrument on an underwater glider. Both of these technologies allow much denser sampling of backscatter profiles than traditional ship surveys. We found a moderate correlation (R = 0.28, p < 10−5, with differences that are partially explained by spatial and temporal sampling mismatches, variability in particle composition, and lidar retrieval errors. The data suggest that there are two different regimes with different scattering properties. For backscattering coefficients below about 0.001 m−1, the lidar values were generally greater than the glider values. For larger values, the lidar was generally lower than the glider. Overall, the results are promising and suggest that airborne lidar and gliders provide comparable and complementary information on optical particulate backscattering.

  9. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  10. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model.

  11. Detection efficiency of microchannel plates for e(-) and π(-) in the momentum range from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, M; Meyer, S; Lüthi, M; Lasi, D; Galli, A; Desorgher, L; Hajdas, W; Karlsson, S; Kalla, L; Wurz, P

    2015-08-01

    High-energy e(-) and π(-) were measured by the multichannel plate (MCP) detector at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The measurements provide the absolute detection efficiencies for these particles: 5.8% ± 0.5% for electrons in the beam momenta range 17.5-300 MeV/c and 6.0% ± 1.3% for pions in the beam momenta range 172-345 MeV/c. The pulse height distribution determined from the measurements is close to an exponential function with negative exponent, indicating that the particles penetrated the MCP material before producing the signal somewhere inside the channel. Low charge extraction and nominal gains of the MCP detector observed in this study are consistent with the proposed mechanism of the signal formation by penetrating radiation. A very similar MCP ion detector will be used in the Neutral Ion Mass (NIM) spectrometer designed for the JUICE mission of European Space Agency (ESA) to the Jupiter system, to perform measurements of the chemical composition of the Galilean moon exospheres. The detection efficiency for penetrating radiation determined in the present studies is important for the optimisation of the radiation shielding of the NIM detector against the high-rate and high-energy electrons trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field. Furthermore, the current studies indicate that MCP detectors can be useful to measure high-energy particle beams at high temporal resolution.

  12. Simultaneous observations at different altitudes of ionospheric backscatter in the eastward electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A common feature of evening near-range ionospheric backscatter in the CUTLASS Iceland radar field of view is two parallel, approximately L-shell-aligned regions of westward flow which are attributed to irregularities in the auroral eastward electrojet region of the ionosphere. These backscatter channels are separated by approximately 100–200 km in range. The orientation of the CUTLASS Iceland radar beams and the zonally aligned nature of the flow allows an approximate determination of flow angle to be made without the necessity of bistatic measurements. The two flow channels have different azimuthal variations in flow velocity and spectral width. The nearer of the two regions has two distinct spectral signatures. The eastern beams detect spectra with velocities which saturate at or near the ion-acoustic speed, and have low spectral widths (less than 100 m s–1, while the western beams detect lower velocities and higher spectral widths (above 200 m s–1. The more distant of the two channels has only one spectral signature with velocities above the ion-acoustic speed and high spectral widths. The spectral characteristics of the backscatter are consistent with E-region scatter in the nearer channel and upper-E-region or F-region scatter in the further channel. Temporal variations in the characteristics of both channels support current theories of E-region turbulent heating and previous observations of velocity-dependent backscatter cross-section. In future, observations of this nature will provide a powerful tool for the investigation of simultaneous E- and F-region irregularity generation under similar (nearly co-located or magnetically conjugate electric field conditions.Key words. Auroral ionosphere · Ionospheric irregularities · Plasma convection

  13. Combined zero-quantum and spin-diffusion mixing for efficient homonuclear correlation spectroscopy under fast MAS: broadband recoupling and detection of long-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingyu; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is emerging as an essential analytical and structural biology technique. Large resolution and sensitivity enhancements observed under fast MAS conditions enable structural and dynamics analysis of challenging systems, such as large macromolecular assemblies and isotopically dilute samples, using only a fraction of material required for conventional experiments. Homonuclear dipolar-based correlation spectroscopy constitutes a centerpiece in the MAS NMR methodological toolbox, and is used essentially in every biological and organic system for deriving resonance assignments and distance restraints information necessary for structural analysis. Under fast MAS conditions (rotation frequencies above 35-40 kHz), dipolar-based techniques that yield multi-bond correlations and non-trivial distance information are ineffective and suffer from low polarization transfer efficiency. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a family of experiments, CORD-RFDR. These experiments exploit the advantages of both zero-quantum RFDR and spin-diffusion based CORD methods, and exhibit highly efficient and broadband dipolar recoupling across the entire spectrum, for both short-range and long-range correlations. We have verified the performance of the CORD-RFDR sequences experimentally on a U-(13)C,(15)N-MLF tripeptide and by numerical simulations. We demonstrate applications of 2D CORD-RFDR correlation spectroscopy in dynein light chain LC8 and HIV-1 CA tubular assemblies. In the CORD-RFDR spectra of LC8 acquired at the MAS frequency of 40 kHz, many new intra- and inter-residue correlations are detected, which were not observed with conventional dipolar recoupling sequences. At a moderate MAS frequency of 14 kHz, the CORD-RFDR experiment exhibits excellent performance as well, as demonstrated in the HIV-1 CA tubular assemblies. Taken together, the results indicate that CORD-RFDR experiment is beneficial in a broad range of conditions

  14. Development of the Small Package Single Particle Soot Photometer with extended range (SP2-XR) and black carbon detection efficiency compared to its predecessor, the SP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, H.; Kok, G. L.; Zanatta, M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Herber, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol is an important contributor to climate change due to its ability to very efficiently absorb solar radiation. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is an instrument that quantifies the refractory mass of individual BC-containing particles with a laser-induced incandescence method. The SP2 has been deployed on ships, at ground based sites, and on research aircraft to quantify BC's mass loadings and microphysical properties. However, the SP2's particle detection range is generally limited to 70-700 nm volume-equivalent diameter for ambient BC. Ambient air typically contains substantial number concentrations below and mass concentrations above the limits of this range. To account for the unquantified particles, it is common to fit a log-normal distribution to the measured size distributions — an approach that leaves the BC community with uncertain results, and a need to learn about the occurrence of very small particles or very large BC aggregates. The SP2 is also large and heavy enough to limit its usability for aircraft and unmanned or towed airborne vehicles. We have developed a miniaturized SP2 to dramatically extend the range of applications for which the SP2 technique can be used. This new instrument, with the additional target of an extended measurement range, has been named the SP2-XR, and incorporates a newly designed optical block with updated electronics for signal recording and on-the-fly processing (gain stitching and peak analysis). The optical block improves the light-collection of both scattered and incandescent light from sampled particles. The target measurement range is 40-1000 nm. At the same time, the SP2-XR weighs less than half of an SP2 (15 kg for the complete system), and about 1/4 the volume ( 20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm). The instrument software is designed to produce ready to use particle mass and binned size distributions or full particle trace records, according to different scientific needs. Thus, an SP2-XR may

  15. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 1: A new empirical virtual height model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping the location of ionospheric backscatter targets (density irregularities identified by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radars can be a major problem, particularly at far ranges for which the radio propagation paths are longer and more uncertain. Assessing and increasing the accuracy of the mapping of scattering locations is crucial for the measurement of two-dimensional velocity structures on the small and meso-scale, for which overlapping velocity measurements from two radars need to be combined, and for studies in which SuperDARN data are used in conjunction with measurements from other instruments. The co-ordinates of scattering locations are presently estimated using a combination of the measured range and a model virtual height, assuming a straight line virtual propagation path. By studying elevation angle of arrival information of backscatterred signals from 5 years of data (1997–2001 from the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar we have determined the actual distribution of the backscatter target locations in range-virtual height space. This has allowed the derivation of a new empirical virtual height model that allows for a more accurate mapping of the locations of backscatter targets.

  16. Effects of Spatial Sampling Interval on Roughness Parameters and Microwave Backscatter over Agricultural Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Ernesto Barber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial sampling interval, as related to the ability to digitize a soil profile with a certain number of features per unit length, depends on the profiling technique itself. From a variety of profiling techniques, roughness parameters are estimated at different sampling intervals. Since soil profiles have continuous spectral components, it is clear that roughness parameters are influenced by the sampling interval of the measurement device employed. In this work, we contributed to answer which sampling interval the profiles needed to be measured at to accurately account for the microwave response of agricultural surfaces. For this purpose, a 2-D laser profiler was built and used to measure surface soil roughness at field scale over agricultural sites in Argentina. Sampling intervals ranged from large (50 mm to small ones (1 mm, with several intermediate values. Large- and intermediate-sampling-interval profiles were synthetically derived from nominal, 1 mm ones. With these data, the effect of sampling-interval-dependent roughness parameters on backscatter response was assessed using the theoretical backscatter model IEM2M. Simulations demonstrated that variations of roughness parameters depended on the working wavelength and was less important at L-band than at C- or X-band. In any case, an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient of about 1-4 dB was observed at larger sampling intervals. As a general rule a sampling interval of 15 mm can be recommended for L-band and 5 mm for C-band.

  17. 5000 groove/mm multilayer-coated blazed grating with 33percent efficiency in the 3rd order in the EUV wavelength range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advanced Light Source; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Anderson, Erik; Cambie, Rossana; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard; Ahn, Minseung; Chang, Chih-Hao; Heilmann, Ralf; Schattenburg, Mark

    2009-07-07

    We report on recent progress in developing diffraction gratings which can potentially provide extremely high spectral resolution of 105-106 in the EUV and soft x-ray photon energy ranges. Such a grating was fabricated by deposition of a multilayer on a substrate which consists ofa 6-degree blazed grating with a high groove density. The fabrication of the substrate gratings was based on scanning interference lithography and anisotropic wet etch of silicon single crystals. The optimized fabrication process provided precise control of the grating periodicity, and the grating groove profile, together with very short anti-blazed facets, and near atomically smooth surface blazed facets. The blazed grating coated with 20 Mo/Si bilayers demonstrated a diffraction efficiency in the third order as high as 33percent at an incidence angle of 11? and wavelength of 14.18 nm.

  18. Signal Processing and Calibration of Continuous-Wave Focused CO2 Doppler Lidars for Atmospheric Backscatter Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Chambers, Diana M.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Bowdle, David A.; Jones, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Two continuous-wave(CW)focused C02 Doppler lidars (9.1 and 10.6 micrometers) were developed for airborne in situ aerosol backscatter measurements. The complex path of reliably calibrating these systems, with different signal processors, for accurate derivation of atmospheric backscatter coefficients is documented. Lidar calibration for absolute backscatter measurement for both lidars is based on range response over the lidar sample volume, not solely at focus. Both lidars were calibrated with a new technique using well-characterized aerosols as radiometric standard targets and related to conventional hard-target calibration. A digital signal processor (DSP), a surface acoustic and spectrum analyzer and manually tuned spectrum analyzer signal analyzers were used. The DSP signals were analyzed with an innovative method of correcting for systematic noise fluctuation; the noise statistics exhibit the chi-square distribution predicted by theory. System parametric studies and detailed calibration improved the accuracy of conversion from the measured signal-to-noise ratio to absolute backscatter. The minimum backscatter sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 9.1 micrometers and approximately 9 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 10.6 micrometers. Sample measurements are shown for a flight over the remote Pacific Ocean in 1990 as part of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) survey missions, the first time to our knowledge that 9.1-10.6 micrometer lidar intercomparisons were made. Measurements at 9.1 micrometers, a potential wavelength for space-based lidar remote-sensing applications, are to our knowledge the first based on the rare isotope C-12 O(2)-18 gas.

  19. Pathfinder: applying graph theory to consistent tracking of daytime mixed layer height with backscatter lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruine, Marco; Apituley, Arnoud; Donovan, David Patrick; Klein Baltink, Hendrik; Jorrit de Haij, Marijn

    2017-05-01

    The height of the atmospheric boundary layer or mixing layer is an important parameter for understanding the dynamics of the atmosphere and the dispersion of trace gases and air pollution. The height of the mixing layer (MLH) can be retrieved, among other methods, from lidar or ceilometer backscatter data. These instruments use the vertical backscatter lidar signal to infer MLHL, which is feasible because the main sources of aerosols are situated at the surface and vertical gradients are expected to go from the aerosol loaded mixing layer close to the ground to the cleaner free atmosphere above. Various lidar/ceilometer algorithms are currently applied, but accounting for MLH temporal development is not always well taken care of. As a result, MLHL retrievals may jump between different atmospheric layers, rather than reliably track true MLH development over time. This hampers the usefulness of MLHL time series, e.g. for process studies, model validation/verification and climatology. Here, we introduce a new method pathfinder, which applies graph theory to simultaneously evaluate time frames that are consistent with scales of MLH dynamics, leading to coherent tracking of MLH. Starting from a grid of gradients in the backscatter profiles, MLH development is followed using Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm (Dijkstra, 1959). Locations of strong gradients are connected under the condition that subsequent points on the path are limited to a restricted vertical range. The search is further guided by rules based on the presence of clouds and residual layers. After being applied to backscatter lidar data from Cabauw, excellent agreement is found with wind profiler retrievals for a 12-day period in 2008 (R2 = 0.90) and visual judgment of lidar data during a full year in 2010 (R2 = 0.96). These values compare favourably to other MLHL methods applied to the same lidar data set and corroborate more consistent MLH tracking by pathfinder.

  20. FRET-Mediated Long-Range Wavelength Transformation by Photoconvertible Fluorescent Proteins as an Efficient Mechanism to Generate Orange-Red Light in Symbiotic Deep Water Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollati, Elena; Plimmer, Daniel; D’Angelo, Cecilia; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pcRFPs) are a group of fluorophores that undergo an irreversible green-to-red shift in emission colour upon irradiation with near-ultraviolet (near-UV) light. Despite their wide application in biotechnology, the high-level expression of pcRFPs in mesophotic and depth-generalist coral species currently lacks a biological explanation. Additionally, reduced penetration of near-UV wavelengths in water poses the question whether light-driven photoconversion is relevant in the mesophotic zone, or whether a different mechanism is involved in the post-translational pigment modification in vivo. Here, we show in a long-term mesocosm experiment that photoconversion in vivo is entirely dependent on near-UV wavelengths. However, a near-UV intensity equivalent to the mesophotic underwater light field at 80 m depth is sufficient to drive the process in vitro, suggesting that photoconversion can occur near the lower distribution limits of these corals. Furthermore, live coral colonies showed evidence of efficient Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our simulated mesophotic light field maintained the pcRFP pool in a partially photoconverted state in vivo, maximising intra-tetrameric FRET and creating a long-range wavelength conversion system with higher quantum yield than other native RFPs. We hypothesise that efficient conversion of blue wavelengths, abundant at depth, into orange-red light could constitute an adaptation of corals to life in light-limited environments. PMID:28677653

  1. FRET-Mediated Long-Range Wavelength Transformation by Photoconvertible Fluorescent Proteins as an Efficient Mechanism to Generate Orange-Red Light in Symbiotic Deep Water Corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollati, Elena; Plimmer, Daniel; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2017-07-04

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pcRFPs) are a group of fluorophores that undergo an irreversible green-to-red shift in emission colour upon irradiation with near-ultraviolet (near-UV) light. Despite their wide application in biotechnology, the high-level expression of pcRFPs in mesophotic and depth-generalist coral species currently lacks a biological explanation. Additionally, reduced penetration of near-UV wavelengths in water poses the question whether light-driven photoconversion is relevant in the mesophotic zone, or whether a different mechanism is involved in the post-translational pigment modification in vivo. Here, we show in a long-term mesocosm experiment that photoconversion in vivo is entirely dependent on near-UV wavelengths. However, a near-UV intensity equivalent to the mesophotic underwater light field at 80 m depth is sufficient to drive the process in vitro, suggesting that photoconversion can occur near the lower distribution limits of these corals. Furthermore, live coral colonies showed evidence of efficient Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our simulated mesophotic light field maintained the pcRFP pool in a partially photoconverted state in vivo, maximising intra-tetrameric FRET and creating a long-range wavelength conversion system with higher quantum yield than other native RFPs. We hypothesise that efficient conversion of blue wavelengths, abundant at depth, into orange-red light could constitute an adaptation of corals to life in light-limited environments.

  2. Study on Improvement of Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Jun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Because multibeam backscatter data is greatly affected by the AR (angular response and the AR correction models are not perfect in the complex seabed, the multibeam image quality is seriously reduced. This paper puts forward an improved AR model and a correction method. Firstly, we average continual pings to obtain the AR curve; Secondly, we give out the extraction method of AR parameters; Thirdly, we use the parameters to establish the improved AR model of different sections of one ping; Finally, we use the model to weaken the AR effect in multibeam backscatter images. The validities of the method have been verified by the experiments of the field multibeam acoustic backscatter.

  3. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from a leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross-section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  4. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  5. Ultrasonic backscatter from elongated grains using line focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Christopher M; Arguelles, Andrea P; Turner, Joseph A

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattering from polycrystalline materials with elongated grains is investigated. A normal incident line-focus transducer is employed such that refracted longitudinal and transverse waves are focused within the polycrystal and scatter at grain boundaries back to the transducer. A ray-based scattering model is developed to explain the dependence of the statistics of scattering measurements on grain elongation. The spatial variance of measured scattered signals from Al alloy (7475-T7) is compared to the model. This work promotes the ultrasonic backscatter technique for monitoring grain elongation of metals using one transducer with access to a single sample face. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound attenuation estimation using backscattered echoes from multiple sources

    OpenAIRE

    Bigelow, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to devise an algorithm that can accurately estimate the attenuation along the propagation path (i.e., the total attenuation) from backscattered echoes. It was shown that the downshift in the center frequency of the backscattered ultrasound echoes compared to echoes obtained in a water bath was calculated to have the form Δf=mfo+b after normalizing with respect to the source bandwidth where m depends on the correlation length, b depends on the total attenuation,...

  7. Simultaneous observation of sporadic E with a rapid-run ionosonde and VHF coherent backscatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK 2 rocket campaign, ionograms were recorded every minute at the Yamagawa Radio Observatory at about 90km west of the region monitored by a VHF (very high frequency coherent backscatter radar. Sporadic E-layer parameters, which include the critical (foEs and blanketing (fbEs frequencies, the layer height (h'Es, and the width of the range spread of sporadic E-traces, were compared with RTI (range-time-intensity plots of VHF quasi-periodic (QP and continuous coherent backscatter echoes. A close relationship was found between the appearance of QP echoes in the RTI plots and the level of spatial inhomogeneity in sporadic E plasma, signified here by the difference between foEs and fbEs. During QP echo events, foEs increased while fbEs decreased, so that the difference foEs-fbEs was enhanced, indicating the development of strong spatial structuring in electron density within a sporadic E-layer. On the other hand, increases in sporadic E range spreading also correlated with the occurrence of QP echoes but the degree of correlation varied from event to event. Continuous radar echoes were observed in association with low altitude sporadic E-layers, located well below 100 km and at times as low as 90 km. During the continuous echo events, both foEs and fbEs were less variable, and the difference foEs-fbEs was small and not as dynamic as in the QP echoes. On the other hand, the Es-layer spread intensified during continuous echoes, which means that some patchiness or corrugation in those low altitude layers is also necessary for the continuous backscatter echoes to take place.

  8. Simultaneous observation of sporadic E with a rapid-run ionosonde and VHF coherent backscatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK 2 rocket campaign, ionograms were recorded every minute at the Yamagawa Radio Observatory at about 90km west of the region monitored by a VHF (very high frequency coherent backscatter radar. Sporadic E-layer parameters, which include the critical (foEs and blanketing (fbEs frequencies, the layer height (h'Es, and the width of the range spread of sporadic E-traces, were compared with RTI (range-time-intensity plots of VHF quasi-periodic (QP and continuous coherent backscatter echoes. A close relationship was found between the appearance of QP echoes in the RTI plots and the level of spatial inhomogeneity in sporadic E plasma, signified here by the difference between foEs and fbEs. During QP echo events, foEs increased while fbEs decreased, so that the difference foEs-fbEs was enhanced, indicating the development of strong spatial structuring in electron density within a sporadic E-layer. On the other hand, increases in sporadic E range spreading also correlated with the occurrence of QP echoes but the degree of correlation varied from event to event. Continuous radar echoes were observed in association with low altitude sporadic E-layers, located well below 100 km and at times as low as 90 km. During the continuous echo events, both foEs and fbEs were less variable, and the difference foEs-fbEs was small and not as dynamic as in the QP echoes. On the other hand, the Es-layer spread intensified during continuous echoes, which means that some patchiness or corrugation in those low altitude layers is also necessary for the continuous backscatter echoes to take place.

  9. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs.

  10. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  11. The effects of soil moisture and plant morphology on the radar backscatter from vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bush, T. F.; Batlivala, P. P.; Cihlar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on the backscattering properties of corn, milo, soybeans and alfalfa are presented. The measurements were made during the summer of 1973 over the 8 to 18 GHz frequency band. The data indicate that soil moisture estimation is best accomplished at incidence angles near nadir with lower frequencies, while crop discrimination is best accomplished using two frequencies at incidence angles ranging from 30 deg to 65 deg. It is also shown that temporal plant morphology variations can cause extreme variations in the values of the scattering coefficients. These morphological changes can be caused by growth, heavy rain and in the case of alfalfa, harvesting.

  12. SU-C-BRC-05: Monte Carlo Calculations to Establish a Simple Relation of Backscatter Dose Enhancement Around High-Z Dental Alloy to Its Atomic Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, S; Kushima, N; Katsura, K; Tanabe, S; Hayakawa, T; Sakai, H; Yamada, T; Takahashi, H; Abe, E; Wada, S; Aoyama, H [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around a high-Z dental alloy in head and neck radiation therapy to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code was used to calculate dose enhancement, which is quantified by the backscatter dose factor (BSDF). The accuracy of the beam modeling with PHITS was verified by comparing with basic measured data namely PDDs and dose profiles. In the simulation, a high-Z alloy of 1 cm cube was embedded into a tough water phantom irradiated by a 6-MV (nominal) X-ray beam of 10 cm × 10 cm field size of Novalis TX (Brainlab). The ten different materials of high-Z alloys (Al, Ti, Cu, Ag, Au-Pd-Ag, I, Ba, W, Au, Pb) were considered. The accuracy of calculated BSDF was verified by comparing with measured data by Gafchromic EBT3 films placed at from 0 to 10 mm away from a high-Z alloy (Au-Pd-Ag). We derived an approximate equation to determine the relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of high-Z alloy. Results: The calculated BSDF showed excellent agreement with measured one by Gafchromic EBT3 films at from 0 to 10 mm away from the high-Z alloy. We found the simple linear relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of dental alloys. The latter relation was proven by the fact that energy spectrum of backscatter electrons strongly depend on average atomic number. Conclusion: We found a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around high-Z alloys to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. This work provides a simple and useful method to estimate backscatter dose enhancement from dental alloys and corresponding optimal thickness of dental spacer to prevent mucositis effectively.

  13. Formation of Nanoporous Gold Studied by Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jeer, Leo T. H.; Gomes, Diego Ribas; Nijholt, Jorrit E.; van Bremen, Rik; Ocelik, Vaclav; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) was used to investigate the effect of dealloying on the microstructure of 140-nm thin gold foils. Statistical and local comparisons of the microstructure between the nonetched and nanoporous gold foils were made. Analyses of crystallographic

  14. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  15. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a new interest has grown in recent years as its properties have become important in electron beam lithography [8] and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) [9]. Ob- servable properties of backscattered electrons (BEs) consist of their absolute yield per incident electron (the BE coefficient η), their angular and energy ...

  16. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  17. The Growth and Decay of Equatorial Backscatter Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    spatially connected to bottomside backscatter, a feature noted in Jica- marca radar observations that led Woodman and La Hoz (1976) to speculate that...described in Section Ill-B, this pattern of plume growth resembles the "C-shaped" and "fishtail" patterns found in Jica- marca radar RTI displays of 50-MHz

  18. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  19. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar...

  20. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  1. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter from maize during water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; van de Giesen, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave backscatter from vegetated surfaces is influenced by vegetation structure and vegetation water content (VWC), which varies with meteorological conditions and moisture in the root zone. Radar backscatter observations are used for many vegetation and soil moisture monitoring applications

  2. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. Multibeam Backscatter Data for Selected U.S. Locations in the Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry for selected U.S. locations in the Pacific. The backscatter datasets include data collected using the...

  5. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Acoustic backscatter from 2013 interferometric swath bathymetry systems survey of Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the USGS data release presents acoustic backscatter data for the Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington. The acoustic backscatter data of the...

  7. BackscatterA [8210]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. Super-virtual Interferometric Separation and Enhancement of Back-scattered Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect near-surface reflectors with steep dips. A robust surface-wave migration requires the prior separation of the back-scattered surface-wave events from the data. This separation is often difficult to implement because the back-scattered surface waves are masked by the incident surface waves. We mitigate this problem by using a super-virtual interferometric method to enhance and separate the back-scattered surface waves. The key idea is to calculate the virtual back-scattered surface waves by stacking the resulting virtual correlated and convolved traces associated with the incident and back-scattered waves. Stacking the virtual back-scattered surface waves improves their signal-to-noise ratio and separates the back-scattered surface-waves from the incident field. Both synthetic and field data results validate the robustness of this method.

  11. A Monte Carlo study of backscattering effects in the photoelectron emission from CsI into CH$_{4}$ and Ar-CH$_{4}$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Escada, J; Rachinhas, P J B M; Lopes, J A M; Santos, F P; Távora, L M N; Conde, C A N; Stauffer, A D

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate photoelectron backscattering effects in the emission from a CsI photocathode into CH4 and Ar-CH4 mixtures for incident monochromatic photons with energies Eph in the range 6.8 eV to 9.8 eV (182 nm to 127 nm), and photons from a continuous VUV Hg(Ar) lamp with a spectral distribution peaked at Eph = 6.7 eV (185 nm), considering reduced applied electric fields E/N in the 0.1 Td to 40 Td range. The addition of CH4 to a noble gas efficiently increases electron transmission and drift velocity, due to vibrational excitation of the molecules at low electron energies. Results are presented for the photoelectron transmission efficiencies f, where f is the fraction of the number of photoelectrons emitted from CsI which are transmitted through the gas as compared to vacuum. The dependence of f on Eph, E/N, and mixture composition is analyzed and explained in terms of electron scattering in the different gas media, and results are compared with available measurements. Electro...

  12. Quasi-analytical determination of noise-induced error limits in lidar retrieval of aerosol backscatter coefficient by the elastic, two-component algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël; Comerón, Adolfo; Rocadenbosch, Francisco; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Constantino

    2009-01-10

    The elastic, two-component algorithm is the most common inversion method for retrieving the aerosol backscatter coefficient from ground- or space-based backscatter lidar systems. A quasi-analytical formulation of the statistical error associated to the aerosol backscatter coefficient caused by the use of real, noise-corrupted lidar signals in the two-component algorithm is presented. The error expression depends on the signal-to-noise ratio along the inversion path and takes into account "instantaneous" effects, the effect of the signal-to-noise ratio at the range where the aerosol backscatter coefficient is being computed, as well as "memory" effects, namely, both the effect of the signal-to-noise ratio in the cell where the inversion is started and the cumulative effect of the noise between that cell and the actual cell where the aerosol backscatter coefficient is evaluated. An example is shown to illustrate how the "instantaneous" effect is reduced when averaging the noise-contaminated signal over a number of cells around the range where the inversion is started.

  13. Comparison of Ultrasound Attenuation and Backscatter Estimates in Layered Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms among Three Clinical Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Backscatter and attenuation coefficient estimates are needed in many quantitative ultrasound strategies. In clinical applications, these parameters may not be easily obtained because of variations in scattering by tissues overlying a region of interest (ROI). The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of backscatter and attenuation estimates for regions distal to nonuniform layers of tissue-mimicking materials. In addition, this work compares results of these estimates for “layered” phantoms scanned using different clinical ultrasound machines. Two tissue-mimicking phantoms were constructed, each exhibiting depth-dependent variations in attenuation or backscatter. The phantoms were scanned with three ultrasound imaging systems, acquiring radio frequency echo data for offline analysis. The attenuation coefficient and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) for sections of the phantoms were estimated using the reference phantom method. Properties of each layer were also measured with laboratory techniques on test samples manufactured during the construction of the phantom. Estimates of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency slope, α0, using backscatter data from the different systems agreed to within 0.24 dB/cm-MHz. Bias in the α0 estimates varied with the location of the ROI. BSC estimates for phantom sections whose locations ranged from 0 to 7 cm from the transducer agreed among the different systems and with theoretical predictions, with a mean bias error of 1.01 dB over the used bandwidths. This study demonstrates that attenuation and BSCs can be accurately estimated in layered inhomogeneous media using pulse-echo data from clinical imaging systems. PMID:23160474

  14. High-Efficiency, High-Power Ka-Band Elliptic-Beam Traveling-Wave-Tube Amplifier for Long-Range Space RF Telecommunications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space telecommunications require amplifiers that are efficient, high-power, wideband, small, lightweight, and highly reliable. Currently, helix traveling wave tube...

  15. Drivers of ASCAT C band backscatter variability in the dry snow zone of Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, Alexander D.; Nigro, Melissa A.; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Legresy, Benoit; Inoue, Mana; Cassano, John J.; Munneke, Peter Kuipers; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Young, Neal W.; Treverrow, Adam; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Enomot, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    C band backscatter parameters contain information about the upper snowpack/firn in the dry snow zone. The wide incidence angle diversity of the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) gives unprecedented characterisation of backscatter anisotropy, revealing the backscatter response to climatic forcing. The A

  16. Polarimetric Analysis of Backscatter From the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Using L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Minchew, Brent; Jones, Cathleen E.; Holt, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the fully-polarimetric Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data acquired on June 23, 2010, from two adjacent, overlapping flight tracks that imaged the main oil slick near the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) rig site in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that radar backscatter from both clean water and oil in the slick is predominantly from a single surface scatterer, consistent with the tilted Bragg scattering mechanism, across the range of incidence angles from...

  17. An Improved Spectrum Model for Sea Surface Radar Backscattering at L-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlei Du

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available L-band active microwave remote sensing is one of the most important technical methods of ocean environmental monitoring and dynamic parameter retrieval. Recently, a unique negative upwind-crosswind (NUC asymmetry of L-band ocean backscatter over a low wind speed range was observed. To study the directional features of L-band ocean surface backscattering, a new directional spectrum model is proposed and built into the advanced integral equation method (AIEM. This spectrum combines Apel’s omnidirectional spectrum and an improved empirical angular spreading function (ASF. The coefficients in the ASF were determined by the fitting of radar observations so that it provides a better description of wave directionality, especially over wavenumber ranges from short-gravity waves to capillary waves. Based on the improved spectrum and the AIEM scattering model, L-band NUC asymmetry at low wind speeds and positive upwind-crosswind (PUC asymmetry at higher wind speeds are simulated successfully. The model outputs are validated against Aquarius/SAC-D observations under different incidence angles, azimuth angles and wind speed conditions.

  18. Digital direct electron imaging of energy-filtered electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Mingard, K. P.; Maneuski, D.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is a scanning electron microscopy technique used to obtain crystallographic information on materials. It allows the nondestructive mapping of crystal structure, texture, and strain with a lateral and depth resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs) are presently acquired using a detector comprising a scintillator coupled to a digital camera, and the crystallographic information obtainable is limited by the conversion of electrons to photons and then back to electrons again. In this article we will report the direct acquisition of energy-filtered EBSPs using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid pixel detector, Timepix. We show results from a range of samples with different mass and density, namely diamond, silicon, and GaN. Direct electron detection allows the acquisition of EBSPs at lower (≤5 keV) electron beam energies. This results in a reduction in the depth and lateral extension of the volume of the specimen contributing to the pattern and will lead to a significant improvement in lateral and depth resolution. Direct electron detection together with energy filtering (electrons having energy below a specific value are excluded) also leads to an improvement in spatial resolution but in addition provides an unprecedented increase in the detail in the acquired EBSPs. An increase in contrast and higher-order diffraction features are observed. In addition, excess-deficiency effects appear to be suppressed on energy filtering. This allows the fundamental physics of pattern formation to be interrogated and will enable a step change in the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for crystal phase identification and the mapping of strain. The enhancement in the contrast in high-pass energy-filtered EBSD patterns is found to be stronger for lighter, less dense materials. The improved contrast for such materials will enable the application of the EBSD

  19. Impact of a Stochastic Energy Backscatter Scheme on Climate and Variability across Timescales and Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, C.

    2012-12-01

    Stochastic physics is one of most widely used methods to represent model uncertainty in ensemble prediction systems of weather and climate models. These schemes aim to represent absent or poorly simulated process whose scales are below the truncation scale, they have been proven to be a skilful tool against the common underdispersiveness (lack of internal variability) of these models, as well as theoretically able to improve the mean climate through a noise-induced drift (better variability leads to a better mean climate). However, the formulation of these schemes often relies in pragmatic assumptions with limited scientific basis, and their physical realism is often challenged. The stochastic energy backscatter method is one of the main formulations of stochastic physics. It is designed to stochastically simulate upscale cascades of energy coming from numerical dissipation, convective subgrid-scale events or subgrid mountain drag. This scheme has been successfully implemented in many of the most important numerical weather prediction models across the world. It improves the ensemble skill scores, and under some configurations the mean climate too. In order to understand the impacts of the stochastic energy backscatter concept in a deterministic framework, we use the Stochastic Kinetic Energy Backscatter (SKEB2) scheme in the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM). We explore the impact of SKEB2 across timescales and resolutions in terms of usual model evaluation metrics such as biases or root mean error square, as well as some process-based techniques to diagnose the simulation of tropical and extra-tropical variability, such as cyclone tracking, Lorenz Energy Cycle or Madden Julian Oscillation diagnostics. Our results show that the extra kinetic energy added by SKEB2 can improve the representation of key processes that drive the atmospheric variability, leading to a slight improvement of climate biases. However it degrades the skill of short-range (less than 5 days

  20. WOLD decomposition of the backscatter echo in ultrasound images of soft tissue organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, F S; Georgiou, G; Halpern, E J

    1997-01-01

    Deals with a method of detecting and estimating the scatterer spacing between the regularly spaced resolvable coherent scatterers in tissue. Scatterer spacing has been successfully used in classifying tissue structure, in differentiating between normal and cirrhotic liver, and in detecting diffuse liver disease. This paper presents a WOLD decomposition of the radio frequency (RF) field into its diffused and coherent components from which maximum likelihood estimates (MLE) or minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimates of the scattering spacing are easily computed. The MLE are efficient and for relatively long record are unbiased. They result in accurate estimates in low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios. Unfortunately, they require nonlinear minimization and knowledge of the probability density associated with the RF backscatter echo. The MMSE estimates, on the other hand, are computationally simple, yield unique closed form solutions, do not require a-priori knowledge of the probability distribution function of the backscatter echo, and result in accurate estimates in low SNR ratios. This paper also presents an unbiased decision rule to detect whether or not an RF echo exhibits any specular scattering relative to the wavelength of the interrogating ultrasonic pulse. The approach has been tried on simulations as well as on in-vivo scans of liver data, and appears to perform well.

  1. Highly Efficient, Compact, Wavelength Converters for Pulsed and CW Laser Sources Used in Lidar-Based Remote Sensing and Ranging Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AdvR, Inc. proposes the development of a highly efficient, fiber pigtailed, waveguide-based UV frequency converter module. This UV module will be an important...

  2. Retrieval of Ocean Subsurface Particulate Backscattering Coefficient from Space-Borne CALIOP Lidar Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Chip; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Luckher, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; hide

    2016-01-01

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30deg off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180deg scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  3. Retrieval of ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient from space-borne CALIOP lidar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Lucker, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; Audouy, Claude; Ferrier, Christophe; Haouchine, Said; Hunt, Bill; Getzewich, Brian

    2016-12-12

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30° off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180° scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  4. A Range Resolved CO2 Backscattering Profile Measurement Technique for Ground Calibration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project involves modulating a commercial, distributed feedback, laser with a pseudo random code. It involves the optimization of laser pulse width versus the...

  5. Lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S

    2014-07-28

    Bio-optical models are used to develop a model of the lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio applicable to oceanographic lidar. The model is based on chlorophyll concentration, and is expected to be valid for Case 1 waters. The limiting cases of narrow- and wide-beam lidars are presented and compared with estimates based on in situ optical measurements. Lidar measurements are also compared with the model using in situ or satellite estimates of chlorophyll concentration. A modified lidar ratio is defined, in which the properties of pure sea water are removed. This modified ratio is shown to be nearly constant for wide-beam lidar operating in low-chlorophyll waters, so accurate inversion to derive extinction and backscattering is possible under these conditions. This ratio can also be used for lidar calibration.

  6. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  7. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Elwha River Delta, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, David P.; Miller, Ian M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Between February 22 and March 3, 2010, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from the Elwha River Delta, Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-6-10-PS. Three ancillary surveys were conducted when sea conditions were too rough for surveying outside the harbor breakwaters. The first ancillary survey was of the area surrounding the abandoned Rayonier Pier site in Port Angeles Harbor, a former log-storage facility on the southern side of Ediz Hook near the Port Angeles Coast Guard Station. Finally, several lines of bathymetry and backscatter data were collected on the outer face of Ediz Hook as the vessel transited to and from the Elwha River Delta. These data were collected to inspect failure features along the northern edge of Ediz Hook that were first observed in 2005 during USGS cruise K-1-05-PS.

  8. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  9. Sentinel-1 backscatter sensitivity to vegetation dynamics at the field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Eder, Alexander; Bauer-Marschallinger, Bernhard; Cao, Senmao; Naeimi, Vahid; Oismueller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation monitoring is pivotal to improve our understanding of the role vegetation dynamics play in the global carbon-, energy- and hydrological cycle. And with the increasing stress on food supply due to the growing world populating and changing climate, vegetation monitoring is of great importance in agricultural areas. By closely tracking crop conditions, droughts and subsequent crop losses could be mitigated. Sensors operating in the microwave domain are sensitive to several surface characteristics, including soil moisture and vegetation. Hence, spaceborne microwave remote sensing provides the means to monitor vegetation and soil conditions on different scales, ranging from field scale to global scale. However, it also presents a challenge since multiple combinations of soil and vegetation characteristics can lead to a similar measurement. Copernicus Sentinel-1 (S-1) is a series of two satellites, developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) , which carry C-band Synthetic Aperture Radars. The C-SAR sensors provide VV, HH, VH and HV backscatter at a 5 m by 20 m spatial resolution. The temporal revisit time of the two satellites is 3-6 days. With their unique capacity for temporally dense and spatially detailed data, the S-1 satellite series provides for the first time the chance to investigate vegetation dynamics at high temporal and spatial resolution. The aim of this study is to assess the sensitivity of Sentinel-1 backscatter to vegetation dynamics. The study is performed in the Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL), which is a 66 hectare large catchment located in Petzenkirchen, Austria. In the HOAL several vegetation parameters were measured during the course of the growing season (2016) at the overpass time of S-1a. Vegetation height was obtained ten times for the whole catchment, using georeferenced photos made by a motorized paraglider and a Land Surface Model. In addition, vegetation water content, Leaf Area Index and soil moisture were measured in

  10. Application of the Tor Vergata Scattering Model to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; ONeill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Gish, T.

    2010-01-01

    At the USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville, Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC/George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass the corn canopies was reached on July 24th with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg/sq m. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (ferrazzoli and Guerriero 1996). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and stimulated by the TOR Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The calibrated

  11. Ion beam polishing for three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Ubhi, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Serial sectioning by focused ion beam milling for three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction (3D-EBSD) can create surface damage and amorphization in certain materials and consequently reduce the EBSD signal quality. Poor EBSD signal causes longer data acquisition time due to signal avera.......3% of normal 3D-EBSD mapping compared to a significant increase of indexing percentage and pattern quality. The polishing performance in this investigation is discussed, and two potential methods for further improvement are presented....

  12. Myocardial ultrasonic backscatter in hypertension: relation to aldosterone and endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozàkovà, Michaela; Buralli, Simona; Palombo, Carlo; Bernini, Giampaolo; Moretti, Angelica; Favilla, Stefania; Taddei, Stefano; Salvetti, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    A disproportionate accumulation of fibrillar collagen is a characteristic feature of hypertensive heart disease, but the extent of myocardial fibrosis may differ in different models of hypertension. In experimental studies, aldosterone and endothelins emerge as important determinants of myocardial fibrosis. Changes in myocardial extracellular matrix and collagen deposition can be estimated noninvasively by analysis of the ultrasonic backscatter signal, which arises from tissue heterogeneity within the myocardium and describes myocardial texture. This study was designed to investigate the relations between myocardial integrated backscatter and circulating aldosterone and immunoreactive endothelin in human hypertension. The study population consisted of 56 subjects: 14 healthy normotensive volunteers and 42 hypertensive patients (14 with primary aldosteronism, 7 with renovascular hypertension, and 21 with essential hypertension). The patients with essential and secondary hypertension were matched for age, gender, body mass index, and blood pressure. Myocardial integrated backscatter at diastole was 19.8+/-2.0 and 20.8+/-2.9 decibels in normotensive control subjects and patients with essential hypertension and significantly higher in patients with primary aldosteronism (27.4+/-3.8 decibels, P<0.01) and renovascular hypertension (26.8+/-4.8 decibels, P<0.01). In the population as a whole, as well as in the hypertensive subpopulation, myocardial integrated backscatter was directly related to plasma aldosterone (r=0.73 and 0.71, P<0.01 for both) and immunoreactive endothelin (r=0.60 and 0.56, P<0.01 for both). The data of this study suggest that in human hypertension, circulating aldosterone and immunoreactive endothelin may induce alterations in left ventricular myocardial texture, possibly related to increased myocardial collagen content.

  13. Ion-atom interaction potential effects on the shape of energy spectra of ions backscattered by a thick target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urmanov, A.R.; Bazhukov, S.I.; Puzanov, A.A.

    1986-06-01

    Based on the general Gaudsmit-Saunderson-Lewis model for multiple scattering in a semi-infinite medium, an expression accounting for the effects of multiple scattering on the shape of the backscattering energy spectrum has been obtained. This expression is represented by a series of ion angular distribution moments. The limits of the applicability of the small-angle approximation to the description of multiple scattering are defined. It is shown that the sensitivity of the angular distribution moments of multiple scattered ions to the type of ion-atom potential increases with an increase in the moment order. The possibility of investigation of the ion-atom interaction potential experimentally over a wide range of impact parameters by the backscattering method is discussed.

  14. Measuring particle concentration in multiphase pipe flow using acoustic backscatter: generalization of the dual-frequency inversion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Hugh P; Fairweather, Michael; Hunter, Timothy N; Mahmoud, Bashar; Biggs, Simon; Peakall, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A technique that is an extension of an earlier approach for marine sediments is presented for determining the acoustic attenuation and backscattering coefficients of suspensions of particles of arbitrary materials of general engineering interest. It is necessary to know these coefficients (published values of which exist for quartz sand only) in order to implement an ultrasonic dual-frequency inversion method, in which the backscattered signals received by transducers operating at two frequencies in the megahertz range are used to determine the concentration profile in suspensions of solid particles in a carrier fluid. To demonstrate the application of this dual-frequency method to engineering flows, particle concentration profiles are calculated in turbulent, horizontal pipe flow. The observed trends in the measured attenuation and backscatter coefficients, which are compared to estimates based on the available quartz sand data, and the resulting concentration profiles, demonstrate that this method has potential for measuring the settling and segregation behavior of real suspensions and slurries in a range of applications, such as the nuclear and minerals processing industries, and is able to distinguish between homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bed-forming flow regimes.

  15. Towards broad range and highly efficient down-conversion of solar spectrum by Er{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped nano-structured glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, V.D.; Mendez-Ramos, J. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Tikhomirov, V.K.; Moshchalkov, V.V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Yanes, A.C. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The efficiency of semiconductor solar cells could be greatly increased by down-conversion processes, which efficiently split incident solar photons into couples of photons with energy over the bandgap. Here, we show new down-conversion mechanisms in Er{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass-ceramics, where the ions are hosted by fluoride nanoparticles embedded in silica glass. By this means, 350-550 nm photons, absorbed by Er{sup 3+} ions, generate pairs of photons at the range of 650-1550 nm, emitted by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, with a quantum efficiency approaching the maximum of 200%. (author)

  16. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  17. Use of acoustic backscatter to estimate continuous suspended sediment and phosphorus concentrations in the Barton River, northern Vermont, 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalie, Laura; Chalmers, Ann T.; Kiah, Richard G.; Copans, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, investigated the use of acoustic backscatter to estimate concentrations of suspended sediment and total phosphorus at the Barton River near Coventry, Vermont. The hypothesis was that acoustic backscatter—the reflection of sound waves off objects back to the source from which they came—measured by an acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) and recorded as ancillary data for the calculation of discharge, also could be used to generate a continuous concentration record of suspended sediment and phosphorus at the streamgage, thereby deriving added value from the instrument. Suspended-sediment and phosphorus concentrations are of particular interest in Vermont, where impairment of surface waters by suspended sediments and phosphorus is a major concern. Regression models for estimating suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and total phosphorus concentrations evaluated several independent variables: measured backscatter (MB), water-corrected backscatter (WCB), sediment-corrected backscatter (SCB), discharge, fluid-absorption coefficient, sediment-driven acoustic attenuation coefficient, and discharge hysteresis. The best regression equations for estimating SSC used backscatter as the predictor, reflecting the direct relation between acoustic backscatter and SSC. Backscatter was a better predictor of SSC than discharge in part because hysteresis between SSC and backscatter was less than for SSC and discharge. All three backscatter variables—MB, WCB, and SCB—performed equally as predictors of SSC and phosphorus concentrations at the Barton River site. The similar abilities to predict SSC among backscatter terms may partially be attributed to the low values and narrow range of the sediment-driven acoustic attenuation in the Barton River. The regression based on SCB was selected for estimating SSC because it removes potential bias caused by attenuation and temperature

  18. A high-efficiency low-voltage class-E PA for IoT applications in sub-1 GHz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenyi; Lu, Zhenghao; Gu, Jiangmin; Yu, Xiaopeng

    2017-10-01

    We present and propose a complete and iterative integrated-circuit and electro-magnetic (EM) co-design methodology and procedure for a low-voltage sub-1 GHz class-E PA. The presented class-E PA consists of the on-chip power transistor, the on-chip gate driving circuits, the off-chip tunable LC load network and the off-chip LC ladder low pass filter. The design methodology includes an explicit design equation based circuit components values' analysis and numerical derivation, output power targeted transistor size and low pass filter design, and power efficiency oriented design optimization. The proposed design procedure includes the power efficiency oriented LC network tuning, the detailed circuit/EM co-simulation plan on integrated circuit level, package level and PCB level to ensure an accurate simulation to measurement match and first pass design success. The proposed PA is targeted to achieve more than 15 dBm output power delivery and 40% power efficiency at 433 MHz frequency band with 1.5 V low voltage supply. The LC load network is designed to be off-chip for the purpose of easy tuning and optimization. The same circuit can be extended to all sub-1 GHz applications with the same tuning and optimization on the load network at different frequencies. The amplifier is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology with a core area occupation of 400 μm by 300 μm. Measurement results showed that it provided power delivery of 16.42 dBm at antenna with efficiency of 40.6%. A harmonics suppression of 44 dBc is achieved, making it suitable for massive deployment of IoT devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61574125) and the Industry Innovation Project of Suzhou City of China (No. SYG201641).

  19. Can X-ray spectrum imaging replace backscattered electrons for compositional contrast in the scanning electron microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2011-01-01

    The high throughput of the silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SDD-EDS) enables X-ray spectrum imaging (XSI) in the scanning electron microscope to be performed in frame times of 10-100 s, the typical time needed to record a high-quality backscattered electron (BSE) image. These short-duration XSIs can reveal all elements, except H, He, and Li, present as major constituents, defined as 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%) or higher, as well as minor constituents in the range 0.01-0.1 mass fraction, depending on the particular composition and possible interferences. Although BSEs have a greater abundance by a factor of 100 compared with characteristic X-rays, the strong compositional contrast in element-specific X-ray maps enables XSI mapping to compete with BSE imaging to reveal compositional features. Differences in the fraction of the interaction volume sampled by the BSE and X-ray signals lead to more delocalization of the X-ray signal at abrupt compositional boundaries, resulting in poorer spatial resolution. Improved resolution in X-ray elemental maps occurs for the case of a small feature composed of intermediate to high atomic number elements embedded in a matrix of lower atomic number elements. XSI imaging strongly complements BSE imaging, and the SDD-EDS technology enables an efficient combined BSE-XSI measurement strategy that maximizes the compositional information. If 10 s or more are available for the measurement of an area of interest, the analyst should always record the combined BSE-XSI information to gain the advantages of both measures of compositional contrast. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Quantifying Fish Backscattering using SONAR Instrument and Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, Henry M.

    2016-08-01

    Sonar instrument was used to study backscattering from tuna fish. Extraction of target strength, incidence angle, and frequency dependence of the backscattered signal for individual scatterer was important for biological information. For this purpose, acoustic measurement of fish backscatter was conducted in the laboratory. Characteristics and general trends of the target strength of fish with special reference to tuna fish were investigated by using a Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) model. Backscattering strength were calculated for the KRM having typical morphological and physical parameters of actual fish. Those backscattering amplitudes were shown as frequency, body length, backscattering patterns, the density and sound speed dependences, and orientation dependence. These results were compared with experimentally measured target strength data and good agreement was found. Measurement and model showed the target strength from the fish are depend on the presence of swimbladder. Target Strength increase with increasing the frequency and fish length.

  1. Absorption and backscatter of internal conversion electrons in the measurements of surface contamination of ¹³⁷Cs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, A; Kawada, Y; Yamada, T; Unno, Y; Sato, Y; Hino, Y

    2013-11-01

    We measured 4π and 2π counting efficiencies for internal conversion electrons (ICEs), gross β-particles and also β-rays alone with various source conditions regarding absorber and backing foil thickness using e-X coincidence technique. Dominant differences regarding the penetration, attenuation and backscattering properties among ICEs and β-rays were revealed. Although the abundance of internal conversion electrons of (137)Cs-(137)Ba is only 9.35%, 60% of gross counts may be attributed to ICEs in worse source conditions. This information will be useful for radionuclide metrology and for surface contamination monitoring. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lensless imaging based on coherent backscattering in random media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied lensless imaging due to coherent backscattering in random media both theoretically and experimentally. The point spread function of the lensless imaging system was derived. Parameters such as the volume fraction of the scatterer in the random scattering medium, the diameter of the scatterer, the distance between the object to be imaged and the surface of the random scattering medium were optimized to improve the image contrast and resolution. Moreover, for complicated objects, high contrast and quality images were achieved through the high-order intensity correlation measurement on the image plane, which may propel this imaging technique to practical applications.

  3. Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    one computational element assigned to each scatterer. The computational burden of this approach is set by the inversion of the fully-populated N-by-N...B(φ) is the beamformed output of the receiving array, and [B]excluding peak is the array’s average beamformed output in directions near backscatter...but excluding the ACBE peak. The independent parameters of these investigations are A, k0, σs, s, R, L, φ or ϕ, X, Y, and Z, but the current problem

  4. Oscillations in the spectrum of nonlinear Thomson-backscattered radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brau

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available When an electron beam collides with a high-intensity laser beam, the spectrum of the nonlinear Thomson scattering in the backward direction shows strong oscillations like those in the spectrum of an optical klystron. Laser gain on the backward Thomson scattering is estimated using the Madey theorem, and the results suggest that Thomson-backscatter free-electron lasers are possible at wavelengths extending to the far uv using a terawatt laser beam from a chirped-pulse amplifier and a high-brightness electron beam from a needle cathode.

  5. Bulk media assay using backscattered Pu-Be neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Csikai, J

    1999-01-01

    Spectral yields of elastically backscattered Pu-Be neutrons measured for graphite, water, polyethylene, liquid nitrogen, paraffin oil, SiO sub 2 , Al, Fe, and Pb slabs show a definite correlation with the energy dependence of the elastic scattering cross sections, sigma sub E sub L (E sub n). The C, N and O can be identified by the different structures in their sigma sub E sub L (E sub n) functions. The integrated spectral yields versus thickness exhibit saturation for each sample. The interrogated volume is limited by the presence of hydrogen in the sample. (author)

  6. A backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer for neutron decay studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)]. E-mail: few@tulane.edu; Trull, C. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Anderman, R. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Bateman, F.B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Komives, A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Balashov, S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mostovoy, Yu. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-02-11

    We describe a beta electron spectrometer for use in an upcoming experiment that will measure the beta-antineutrino correlation coefficient (a coefficient) in neutron beta decay. Electron energy is measured by a thick plastic scintillator detector. A conical array of plastic scintillator veto detectors is used to suppress events where the electron is backscattered. A Monte Carlo simulation of this device in the configuration of the a coefficient experiment is presented. The design, construction, and testing of a full-scale prototype device is described. We discuss the performance of this spectrometer with respect to its suitability for the experiment.

  7. Efficiency of prebiotics and probiotics on the performance, yield, meat quality and presence of Salmonella spp in carcasses of free-range broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SE Takahashi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Two trials were carried out in the present study. Trial I evaluated the performance, carcass yield and breast meat quality, whereas Trial II evaluated the efficacy of utilizing prebiotics + probiotics on the control of Salmonella spp incidence in the carcasses of free-range broilers. In Trial I, 688 one-day-old male chicks of the Naked Neck Label Rouge strain were used, distributed in a randomized block design arranged according to a 2 x 2 factorial: control diet or diet supplemented with probiotics and prebiotics; and two rearing systems (confined or with access to paddocks - 3m²/bird, using four replicates with 35 birds each. The birds were reared until 84 days of age following the recommendations of management and nutrition for free-range strains, and had access to paddocks after 35 days of age. Water and food were given inside the experimental poultry house. Birds fed probiotics and prebiotics in the diet and the confined birds showed better performance, carcass yield and meat quality compared to the birds of the other treatments. In Trial II, 128 one-day-old male chicks of the free-range Naked Neck Label Rouge strain were used. The birds were distributed into four treatments: NCC (non-challenged control, NCS (non-challenged supplemented, CC (challenged control and CS (challenged supplemented. There were no significant effects of adding probiotics and prebiotics in the diet in regard to Salmonella enteritidis recovery from the carcasses.

  8. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  9. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A. C.; Scifoni, E.; Kraemer, M.; Lucas, S.

    2017-06-01

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  10. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  11. Ultrasound backscatter from free-swimming fish at 1 MHz for fish identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Lundgren, Bo; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    In the frequency range well below 1 MHz, the swimbladder is often considered the most important part for acoustic fish detection. In this work a portable system was developed to not only detect but also try to identify free-swimming fish. It has been used to measure the ultrasound backscatter at 1...... indicate that at 1 MHz the surface areas (also fins and tail) of the fish can give echoes that are much stronger (up to 3 times) than the swimbladder can, therefore important for identification of fish...... MHz from fish. The system consists of a Reson TC3210 1 MHz single-element transducer, a dual-frequency, multi-beam Blueview P900-2250 sonar, and three Oregon ATC9K cameras. The Reson transducer is connected to an Olympus pulser-receiver monitored by a portable computer through a Picoscope 4226 PC...

  12. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Ruskov, E; Deng, B H; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Tuszewski, M; Douglass, J; Peebles, W A; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2014-11-01

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρs ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3-5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10(13) ≤ ne ≤ 1 × 10(14) cm(-3), and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  13. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, L., E-mail: lschmitz@ucla.edu; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ruskov, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  14. Organ Doses to Airline Passengers Screened by X-Ray Backscatter Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepusin, Elliott J; Maynard, Matthew R; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Redzovic, Sadije; Bolch, Wesley E; Hintenlang, David E; Borak, Thomas B

    2017-02-01

    Advanced imaging technologies (AIT) are being developed for passenger airline transportation. They are designed to provide enhanced security benefits by identifying objects on passengers that would not be detected by methodologies now used for routine surveillance. X-ray backscatter imaging is one AIT system being considered. Since this technology is based on scanning passengers with ionizing radiation, concern has been raised relating to the health risks associated with these exposures. Recommendations for standards of radiation safety have been proposed by the American National Standards Institute published in ANSI/HPS N43.17-2009. A Monte Carlo based methodology for estimating organ doses received from an X-ray backscatter AIT system is presented. Radiological properties of a reference scanner including beam intensity, geometry and energy spectra were modeled based on previous studies and physical measurements. These parameters were incorporated into a Monte Carlo source subroutine and validated with comparison of simulated versus measured data. One extension of this study was to calculate organ and effective dose on a wide range of potential passengers. Computational phantoms with realistic morphologies were used including adults of 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile weight, children of 5th, 50th and 95th percentile weight, and the developing fetus of 15, 25, and 38 weeks after conception. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate effects of passenger positioning within the scanner, energy spectrum and beam geometry, as well as failure mode analyses. Results for routine operations yielded a maximum effective dose to the adult and pediatric passengers of 15 and 25 nSv per screen, respectively. The developing fetus received a maximum organ dose and whole body dose of 16 nGy and 8.5 nGy per screen, respectively. The sensitivity analyses indicated that variations in positioning, energy spectra, and beam geometry yielded a range of effective

  15. Hierarchical MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunction electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction over a broad pH range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Yan, Qing; Yang, Guoyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized condition, HF-MoSP exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for HER with a low onset overpotential of 29 mV and η of 108 mV at 10 mA cm-2 in 0.5 M H2SO4 and retains its good activity for 30 h. In addition, the catalyst shows excellent activity in 1 M KOH with an onset overpotential of 42 mV and η of 119 mV at 10 mA cm-2. The catalysts also exhibit obvious activity in neutral, weak acid and weak alkaline conditions. The good performance is relative to the synergy of the MoP shell and MoS2 core and the high WF of HF-MoSP close to Pt, and the large SBET of HF-MoSP benefited from the hierarchical structure. This study represents the construction of the core-shell heterojunction and provides a new way to provide the low-cost and high-performance catalyst for HER.A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized

  16. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  17. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  18. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  19. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  20. Variation of backscatter as an indicator of boundary layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. [UMIST, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hunter, G.C. [National Power, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    In this work we have developed software to display cross-sections of the variance of backscatter over a given sampling period in addition to its absolute mean. We have analyzed a series of Lidar cross-sections of elevated plumes dispersing into a convective BL and have then derived profiles both of the mean backscatter, , as a function of height and of its relative, shot-to-shot, variation, {radical} /. The latter is a measure of the homogeneity of the aerosol. There is no cheap device for measuring BL depths so we were interested in comparing depths estimated using our Lidar with those predicted by the current ADMS atmospheric dispersion model. This is based on integrating an energy budget to predict the BL development and as such relies on values for the initial lapse rate and for the surface sensible heat flux. A major shortcoming of the model appears to be that, in the absence of measurements, it must assume a default value for the former; the latter may be estimated from surface measurements but is very sensitive to the assumed availability of surface moisture. (LN)

  1. Automated determination of crystal orientations from electron backscattering patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1994-01-01

    The electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) technique is widely accepted as being an extremely powerful tool for measuring the crystallographic orientation of individual crystallites in polycrystalline materials. Procedures which allow crystal orientations to be calculated on the bases of the posi......The electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) technique is widely accepted as being an extremely powerful tool for measuring the crystallographic orientation of individual crystallites in polycrystalline materials. Procedures which allow crystal orientations to be calculated on the bases...... be collected by this method. This thesis describes the development and implementation of a system which enables crystallographic orientations to be obtained fully automatically through the use of computerized analysis and interpretation of EBSPs. More specifically, this thesis will describe the design...... determination of crystallographic orientations from EBSPs is accurate knowledge of three calibration parameters which describe the position of the point from which the patterns are emitted relative to the phosphor screen on which they are recorded. This thesis will describe a novel method by which...

  2. Investigation of sheared liquids by neutron backscattering and reflectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, M; Hock, R; Frick, B; Zabel, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated by neutron scattering structural and dynamical properties of water solutions of the triblock copolymer P85 under shear. To this end a shear cell that suits the requirements for neutron backscattering and another for reflectivity experiments have been built. In reflectivity measurements we find the polymer concentration (nominal concentration of 33% by weight) to vary right at the surface between 12% and 52% for hydrophilic or hydrophobic coated silicon wavers, for temperatures between 18 C and 73 C and for shear rates up to 2500 s sup - sup 1. Additional structural changes deeper in the bulk are also observed. On the backscattering instrument (IN10 at ILL) we find that the liquid appears to stick to the plates of the shear cell, implying an unusual macroscopic velocity distribution that differs from that found earlier for lubrication oils. We report further on changes of the quasielastic line width in the direction of the shear gradient for different temperatures and shear rates. (orig.)

  3. Extinction and backscatter cross sections of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. E.; Hahn, D. V.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D.; Carter, C. C.; Boggs, N. T.; Jackman, J.

    2008-04-01

    Aerosol backscatter and extinction cross-sections are required to model and evaluate the performance of both active and passive detection systems. A method has been developed that begins with laboratory measurements of thin films and suspensions of biological material to obtain the complex index refraction of the biological material from the UV to the LWIR. Using that result with particle size distribution and shape information as inputs to T-matrix or discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations yields the extinction cross-section and backscatter cross section as a function of wavelength. These are important inputs to the lidar equation. In a continuing effort to provide validated optical cross-sections, measurements have been made on a number of high purity biological species in the laboratory as well as measurements of material released at recent field tests. The resulting observed differences between laboratory and field measurements aid in distinguishing between intrinsic and extrinsic effects, which can affect the characteristic signatures of important biological aerosols. A variety of biological and test aerosols are examined, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG), and Erwina, ovalbumin, silica and polystyrene.

  4. Type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum-dot intermediate band with extended optical absorption range for efficient solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustanji, Hela; Jaziri, Sihem

    2018-02-01

    GaSb/GaAs type-II quantum-dot solar cells (QD SCs) have attracted attention as highly efficient intermediate band SCs due to their infrared absorption. Type-II QDs exhibited a staggered confinement potential, where only holes are strongly confined within the dots. Long wavelength light absorption of the QDSCs is enhanced through the improved carriers number in the IB. The absorption of dots depends on their shape, material quality, and composition. Therefore, the optical properties of the GaSbGaAs QDs before and after thermal treatment are studied. Our intraband studies have shown an extended absorption into the long wavelength region 1.77 μ {m}. The annealed QDs have shown significantly more infrared response of 7.2 μ {m} compared to as-grown sample. The photon absorption and hole extraction depend strongly on the thermal annealing process. In this context, emission of holes from localized states in GaSb QDs has been studied using conductance-voltage ( G- V ) characteristics.

  5. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, Lionel [UMR, France; Klonowska, Agnieszka [UMR, France; Caroline, Bournaud [UMR, France; Booth, Kristina [University of Massachusetts; Vriezen, Jan A.C. [University of Massachusetts; Melkonian, Remy [UMR, France; James, Euan [James Hutton Institute, Dundee, United Kingdom; Young, Peter W. [University of York, United Kingdom; Bena, Gilles [UMR, France; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle [University of Massachusetts; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Riley, Monica [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  6. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  7. Effect of circuital currents on the speed and efficiency of picosecond-range switching in a GaAs avalanche transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Sergey; Yuferev, Valentin; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2005-04-01

    Ultrafast (picosecond range) switching of a GaAs-based BJT (bipolar junction transistor) in the avalanche mode has recently been demonstrated experimentally. It was found to be caused by the formation and spread of ultra-high amplitude multiple Gunn domains, which cause extremely powerful avalanching in the volume of the switching filaments. Unavoidable parasitic impedance of an external circuit limits the rate of avalanche carrier generation in the channels, however, which slows down the switching and increases the residual voltage across the switch. We present here the results of simulations which show that the switching transient can be significantly accelerated and the residual voltage reduced due to the supporting of a higher current density in the channels by the charge stored in the barrier capacitance of the non-switched part of the structure. The corresponding circuital currents are confined in low-inductance loops inside the structure and are not critically affected by the parameters of the external circuit. This provides very fast and effective reduction in the collector voltage, provided the parameters of the semiconductor layers and the geometry of the device are selected properly. Particularly significant in this process is the effect of circuital current saturation in the lightly doped collector region of the non-switched part of the transistor. The results of the simulations with the barrier capacitance included in the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Efficient delivery of large DNA from Escherichia coli to Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 by broad-host-range conjugal plasmid pUB307.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Kusakabe, Hiroko; Sato, Mitsuru; Tomita, Masaru; Sato, Rintaro

    2018-02-06

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, a cyanobacterium that uses light and carbon dioxide to grow, has a high ability to incorporate DNA by transformation. To assess the effective delivery of large DNA in plasmid form, we cloned the endogenous plasmid pANL (46.4 kbp) into a BAC vector of Escherichia coli. The plasmid p38ANL (54.3 kbp) replaced the native plasmid. To assess the delivery of larger DNA into PCC7942, p38ANL was fused to the broad-host-range conjugal transfer plasmid pUB307IP (53.5 kbp). The resulting plasmid pUB307IP501 (107.9 kbp) was transmitted from E. coli to PCC7942 by simple mixing of donor and recipient cultures. PCC7942 transcipients possessed only pUB307IP501, replacing the preexisting pANL. In contrast, the pUB307IP501 plasmid was unable to transform PCC7942, indicating that natural transformation of DNA may be restricted by size limitations. The ability to deliver large DNA by conjugation may lead to genetic engineering in PCC7942. © The Authors 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Fe-implanted SiC as a potential DMS: X-ray diffraction and rutherford backscattering and channelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupeyrat, C., E-mail: cyril.dupeyrat@etu.univ-poitiers.f [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux (PhyMat), SP2MI, teleport 2, Bvd M. et P. Curie, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Declemy, A.; Drouet, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux (PhyMat), SP2MI, teleport 2, Bvd M. et P. Curie, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Debelle, A.; Thome, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Bat 104, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2010-10-01

    Single crystalline (0 0 0 1)-oriented 6H-SiC samples were implanted at 380 {sup o}C with low-energy Fe ions (in the 100 keV range) with the aim of synthesizing so-called diluted magnetic semiconductors. X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling are used to study the microstructural changes in these Fe-implanted SiC crystals submitted to furnace annealing and laser processing, both treatments being performed in order to eliminate the implantation-induced defects.

  10. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of gypsum measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildyard, R C; Prior, D J; Mariani, E; Faulkner, D R

    2009-12-01

    An investigation by electron backscatter diffraction on gypsum shows that this technique can be used to study the microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation of gypsum. Presented here are the methods, verification tests and data obtained from a naturally deformed sample of gypsum-rich rock. The electron backscatter diffraction data show the sample has a strong crystallographic preferred orientation.

  12. A multivariate correlation analysis of high-frequency bottom backscattering strength measurements with geotechnical parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Snellen, M.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Sound backscattered from the seabed has been measured in a 10 × 10-nmi2 region of the North Sea, characterized by a variety of bottom types, including mud, sand, and gravel. The backscattering strength measurements are made by a forward-looking sonar, operating at 100 kHz and tilted at an angle of

  13. Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) Wind Profiler Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, Richard L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The SODAR (Sonic Detection and Ranging) wind profiler measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 15 meters (m) and 500 m. It operates by transmitting acoustic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. The strength of the backscattered signal is determined by the strength of temperature inhomogeneities with size on the order of 10 centimeters (cm). Assuming the scattering elements in the atmosphere are moving with the mean wind, the horizontal wind field can be derived. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) has a system developed by Scintec, Inc. that transmits a sequence of frequencies to enhance signal determination.

  14. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  15. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ion Solid Interactions and Defect Physics Dept.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  16. Back-scatter based whispering gallery mode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Joachim; Swaim, Jon D; McAuslan, David L; Brawley, George A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-10-17

    Whispering gallery mode biosensors allow selective unlabelled detection of single proteins and, combined with quantum limited sensitivity, the possibility for noninvasive real-time observation of motor molecule motion. However, to date technical noise sources, most particularly low frequency laser noise, have constrained such applications. Here we introduce a new technique for whispering gallery mode sensing based on direct detection of back-scattered light. This experimentally straightforward technique is immune to frequency noise in principle, and further, acts to suppress thermorefractive noise. We demonstrate 27 dB of frequency noise suppression, eliminating frequency noise as a source of sensitivity degradation and allowing an absolute frequency shift sensitivity of 76 kHz. Our results open a new pathway towards single molecule biophysics experiments and ultrasensitive biosensors.

  17. Remote identification of a shipwreck site from MBES backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, Giuseppe; Calder, Brian

    2012-11-30

    The method described attempts to remotely identify the shape of an anthropogenic object, such as a wreck of a modern vessel, using reflectivity data from Multi-Beam Echosounder (MBES) systems. In the beam domain, the backscatter strength values - geometrically and radiometrically corrected - are used to extract a large number of Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features with different input parameters. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied in order to achieve dimensionality reduction whilst a K-means algorithm clusters as "shipwreck site" a large number of beams for each line. After the geo-referencing process, a K-nearest-neighbors (K-NN) technique is applied as a filter for possible misclassifications. Finally, the shape of the shipwreck site is defined from the georeferenced beams using the α-shape method, constructing an output compatible with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution of atmospheric aerosols and CO2 lidar backscatter simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Deepak, A.; Farrukh, U. O.

    1985-01-01

    Development of a Global Wind Measurement Satellite System (WINDSAT) (NOAA, 1981) requires a knowledge of the global characteristics of the free tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol. In particular, there is a need to document the behavior of the aerosol backscattering function, at CO2 laser wavelengths, beta sub CO2, as a function of space and time. There is, however, a relative lack of data for the free troposphere, particularly over the remoter regions of the globe, as compared with that for the boundary layer and the stratosphere. Moreover, because of variations in concentration that occur as a function of space and time, large data sets are required to obtain meaningful averages. A recent study by Kent et al. (1985) uses three distinct tropospheric aerosol data sets in order to obtain an improved global model of the general aerosol characteristics, including variation of beta sub CO2 with latitude, season, and altitude. The more important findings are summarized.

  19. Ray-based calculations of laser backscatter in ICF targets

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Froula, D H; London, R A; Callahan, D A

    2008-01-01

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code Deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as ``plane-wave'' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pF3D. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the Omega Laser Facility show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the Deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement is given by doubling the Deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with Deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows enco...

  20. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method...... for locating the source point is a computational technique which uses the positions of a number of indexed Kikuchi bands for calculating the coordinates of the point. A serious limitation of this calibration technique is, however, that the localized bands must first be indexed, which is difficult...... by this new calibration procedure is the same crystallographic information which is used for normal indexing of EBSPs. The procedure is shown to work successfully with patterns from a simple cubic crystal, as well as with patterns from an orthorhombic BiSCCO superconductor. In the former case, four bands...

  1. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  2. Fixed time versus fixed range reverberation calculation: Analytical solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.H.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation is commonly calculated by estimating the propagation loss to and from an elementary area, defined by transmitted pulse length and beam width, and treating the resulting backscatter from the area as a function of its range. In reality reverberation is strictly a function of time and

  3. Modeling low-coherence enhanced backscattering using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Kim, Young L; Liu, Yang; Li, Xu; Backman, Vadim

    2006-08-20

    Constructive interference between coherent waves traveling time-reversed paths in a random medium gives rise to the enhancement of light scattering observed in directions close to backscattering. This phenomenon is known as enhanced backscattering (EBS). According to diffusion theory, the angular width of an EBS cone is proportional to the ratio of the wavelength of light lambda to the transport mean-free-path length l(s)* of a random medium. In biological media a large l(s)* approximately 0.5-2 mm > lambda results in an extremely small (approximately 0.001 degrees ) angular width of the EBS cone, making the experimental observation of such narrow peaks difficult. Recently, the feasibility of observing EBS under low spatial coherence illumination (spatial coherence length Lsc path lengths and thus resulting in an increase of more than 100 times in the angular width of low coherence EBS (LEBS) cones. However, a conventional diffusion approximation-based model of EBS has not been able to explain such a dramatic increase in LEBS width. We present a photon random walk model of LEBS by using Monte Carlo simulation to elucidate the mechanism accounting for the unprecedented broadening of the LEBS peaks. Typically, the exit angles of the scattered photons are not considered in modeling EBS in the diffusion regime. We show that small exit angles are highly sensitive to low-order scattering, which is crucial for accurate modeling of LEBS. Our results show that the predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Statistics of vertical backscatter profiles of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distribution of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relationship between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve located near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effects on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  5. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  6. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  7. Seafloor classification of the mound and channel provinces of the Porcupine Seabight: An application of the multibeam angular backscatter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Beyer, A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    strength. Three major parameters are utilized to classify four different seafloor provinces of the Porcupine Seabight by employing a semi-empirical method to analyse multibeam angular backscatter data. The predicted backscatter response, which has been...

  8. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: sato.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS), Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2–1Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-10-21

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He{sup +}). On the other hand, compared with that of He{sup +}, silicon-ions (Si{sup +}) and gold-ions (Au{sup 3+}) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si{sup +} and 2 MeV-Au{sup 3+}, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  9. Adapting range migration techniques for imaging with metasurface antennas: analysis and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Mancera, Laura; Fromenteze, Thomas; Sleasman, Timothy; Boyarsky, Michael; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic metasurface antennas are planar structures that exhibit remarkable capabilities in controlling electromagnetic wave-fronts, advantages which are particularly attractive for microwave imaging. These antennas exhibit strong frequency dispersion and produce diverse radiation patterns. Such behavior presents unique challenges for integration with conventional imaging algorithms. We analyze an adapted version of the range migration algorithm (RMA) for use with dynamic metasurfaces in image reconstruction. Focusing on the the proposed pre-processing step, that ultimately allows a fast processing of the backscattered signal in the spatial frequency domain from which the fast Fourier transform can efficiently reconstruct the scene. Numerical studies illustrate imaging performance using both conventional methods and the adapted RMA, demonstrating that the RMA can reconstruct images with comparable quality in a fraction of the time. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm as a fast reconstruction tool, and we analyze the limitations of the presented technique in terms of image quality.

  10. Interferometric evidence for the observation of ground backscatter originating behind the CUTLASS coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric techniques allow the SuperDARN coherent HF radars to determine the elevation angles of returned backscatter, giving information on the altitude of the scatter volume, in the case of ionospheric backscatter, or the reflection altitude, in the case of ground backscatter. Assumptions have to be made in the determination of elevation angles, including the direction of arrival, or azimuth, of the returned signals, usually taken to be the forward look-direction (north of the radars, specified by the phasing of the antenna arrays. It is shown that this assumption is not always valid in the case of ground backscatter, and that significant returns can be detected from the backward look-direction of the radars. The response of the interferometer to backscatter from behind the radar is modelled and compared with observations. It is found that ground backscatter from a field-of-view that is the mirror image of the forward-looking field-of-view is a common feature of the observations, and this interpretation successfully explains several anomalies in the received backscatter.

  11. Interferometric evidence for the observation of ground backscatter originating behind the CUTLASS coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Interferometric techniques allow the SuperDARN coherent HF radars to determine the elevation angles of returned backscatter, giving information on the altitude of the scatter volume, in the case of ionospheric backscatter, or the reflection altitude, in the case of ground backscatter. Assumptions have to be made in the determination of elevation angles, including the direction of arrival, or azimuth, of the returned signals, usually taken to be the forward look-direction (north of the radars, specified by the phasing of the antenna arrays. It is shown that this assumption is not always valid in the case of ground backscatter, and that significant returns can be detected from the backward look-direction of the radars. The response of the interferometer to backscatter from behind the radar is modelled and compared with observations. It is found that ground backscatter from a field-of-view that is the mirror image of the forward-looking field-of-view is a common feature of the observations, and this interpretation successfully explains several anomalies in the received backscatter.

  12. Relationship of Light Scattering at an Angle in the Backward Direction to the Backscattering Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Emmanuel; Pegau, W. Scott

    2001-10-01

    We revisit the problem of computing the backscattering coefficient based on the measurement of scattering at one angle in the back direction. Our approach uses theory and new observations of the volume scattering function (VSF) to evaluate the choice of angle used to estimate bb . We add to previous studies by explicitly treating the molecular backscattering of water (bbw ) and its contribution to the VSF shape and to bb . We find that there are two reasons for the tight correlation between observed scattering near 120 and the backscattering coefficient reported by Oishi [Appl. Opt. 29, 4658, (1990) , namely, that (1) the shape] of the VSF of particles (normalized to the backscattering) does not vary much near that angle for particle assemblages of differing optical properties and size, and (2) the ratio of the VSF to the backscattering is not sensitive to the contribution by water near this angle. We provide a method to correct for the water contribution to backscattering when single-angle measurements are used in the back direction (for angles spanning from near 90 to 160 ) that should provide improved estimates of the backscattering coefficient.

  13. Gas-Filled Targets to Study Laser Backscatter on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.; Suter, L. J.

    2009-11-01

    To achieve indirect drive fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), laser beams must propagate through several millimeters of high-density plasma to reach the hohlraum walls. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman backscatter could create problems with energetics and/or symmetry. Laser backscatter at NIF will be diagnosed with full aperture backscatter systems (FABS) and near backscatter imagers (NBI). Several gas-filled targets (``gas pipes'') have been designed to provide backscatter sources to commission the diagnostics. The 7-mm long gas pipes are filled with various gases, including C5H12 and CO2, and are irradiated by a NIF quad with 16 kJ of energy in 2-4 ns pulses. We describe the design of the gas pipes using hydrodynamics and laser-plasma-interaction computer codes. The relationship between the design parameters (gas composition and density and laser pulse shape) and the character of the backscatter (Brillouin versus Raman and narrow versus broad angle) are discussed. Comparisons of predicted and measured backscatter distributions and levels are discussed.

  14. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  15. Optimized parametric skin modelling for diagnosis of skin abnormalities by combining light back-scatter and laser speckle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orun, A B; Goodyer, E; Seker, H; Smith, G; Uslan, V; Chauhan, D

    2014-11-01

    Optical and parametric skin imaging methods which can efficiently identify invisible sub-skin features or subtle changes in skin layers are very important for accurate optical skin modelling. In this study, a hybrid method is introduced that helps develop a parametric optical skin model by utilizing interdisciplinary techniques including light back-scatter analysis, laser speckle imaging, image-texture analysis and Bayesian inference methods. The model aims to detect subtle skin changes and hence very early signs of skin abnormalities/diseases. Light back-scatter and laser speckle image textural analysis are applied onto the normal and abnormal skin regions (lesions) to generate set of attributes/parameters. These are then optimized by Bayesian inference method in order to build an optimized parametric model. The attributes selected by Bayesian inference method in the optimization stage were used to build an optimized model and then successfully verified. It was clearly proven that Bayesian inference based optimization process yields good results to build an optimized skin model. The outcome of this study clearly shows the applicability of this hybrid method in the analysis of skin features and is therefore expected to lead development of non-invasive and low-cost instrument for early detection of skin changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ultrasonic Backscatter Imaging by Shear-Wave-Induced Echo Phase Encoding of Target Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for ultrasound backscatter image formation wherein lateral resolution of the target is obtained by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of targets in the phase of the received echo. We demonstrate that the phase modulation as a function of shear wavenumber can be expressed in terms of a Fourier transform of the lateral component of the target echogenicity. The inverse transform, obtained by measurements of the phase modulation over a range of shear wave spatial frequencies, yields the lateral scatterer distribution. Range data are recovered from time of flight as in conventional ultrasound, yielding a B-mode-like image. In contrast to conventional ultrasound imaging, where mechanical or electronic focusing is used and lateral resolution is determined by aperture size and wavelength, we demonstrate that lateral resolution using the proposed method is independent of the properties of the aperture. Lateral resolution of the target is achieved using a stationary, unfocused, single-element transducer. We present simulated images of targets of uniform and non-uniform shear modulus. Compounding for speckle reduction is demonstrated. Finally, we demonstrate image formation with an unfocused transducer in gelatin phantoms of uniform shear modulus. PMID:21244978

  17. Fiber sensor identification based on incoherent Rayleigh backscatter measurements in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppel, Max; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Werzinger, Stefan; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a fiber identification method based on incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) measurements is introduced. The proposed method uses the characteristic interference pattern of IOFDR Rayleigh backscatter measurements with a broadband light source to unambiguously recognize different initially scanned fiber segments. The recognition is achieved by cross-correlating the spatially resolved Rayleigh backscatter profile of the fiber segment under test with a initially measured and stored backscatter profile. This profile was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature changes. It is shown that identification is possible even if the fiber segment in question is installed subsequent to 300m of lead fiber.

  18. Principal component analysis applied to multiwavelength lidar aerosol backscatter and extinction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, D P; Carswell, A I

    1997-12-20

    The use of powerful Raman backscatter lidars enables one to measure the stratospheric aerosol extinction profile independently of the backscatter, thereby obtaining additional information to aid in retrieving the physical characteristics of the sampled aerosol. We used principal component analysis to construct a self-consistent method for the retrieval of aerosol bulk physical and optical properties from multiwavelength elastic and/or inelastic Raman backscatter lidar signals. The procedure is applied to synthetic and actual lidar signals. We found that aerosol surface area and volume can be usefully estimated and that the use of Raman-derived extinction data leads to a notable improvement in the accuracy of the estimations.

  19. Laboratory evaluation of the Sequoia Scientific LISST-ABS acoustic backscatter sediment sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2017-12-18

    Sequoia Scientific’s LISST-ABS is an acoustic backscatter sensor designed to measure suspended-sediment concentration at a point source. Three LISST-ABS were evaluated at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF). Serial numbers 6010, 6039, and 6058 were assessed for accuracy in solutions with varying particle-size distributions and for the effect of temperature on sensor accuracy. Certified sediment samples composed of different ranges of particle size were purchased from Powder Technology Inc. These sediment samples were 30–80-micron (µm) Arizona Test Dust; less than 22-µm ISO 12103-1, A1 Ultrafine Test Dust; and 149-µm MIL-STD 810E Silica Dust. The sensor was able to accurately measure suspended-sediment concentration when calibrated with sediment of the same particle-size distribution as the measured. Overall testing demonstrated that sensors calibrated with finer sized sediments overdetect sediment concentrations with coarser sized sediments, and sensors calibrated with coarser sized sediments do not detect increases in sediment concentrations from small and fine sediments. These test results are not unexpected for an acoustic-backscatter device and stress the need for using accurate site-specific particle-size distributions during sensor calibration. When calibrated for ultrafine dust with a less than 22-µm particle size (silt) and with the Arizona Test Dust with a 30–80-µm range, the data from sensor 6039 were biased high when fractions of the coarser (149-µm) Silica Dust were added. Data from sensor 6058 showed similar results with an elevated response to coarser material when calibrated with a finer particle-size distribution and a lack of detection when subjected to finer particle-size sediment. Sensor 6010 was also tested for the effect of dissimilar particle size during the calibration and showed little effect. Subsequent testing revealed problems with this sensor, including an inadequate temperature

  20. Evaluating the Efficiency of Dye Removal from Textile Industry Wastewater Using the Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Process under UV-LED Light Irradiation: A Case Study, Hamadan Nakh Rang Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgari G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile industries, due to a high volume of wastewater and harmful environmental factors such as a variety of dyes, are significant industries in industrial wastewaters treatment. So, the aim of this study was to examine the efficiency of dye removal from the textile industry wastewater using the titanium dioxide photocatalytic process under UV-LED light irradiation (UV-LED/TiO2 in the treatment of the Nakh Rang factory wastewater in Hamadan City, Iran. Methods: In this experimental study, in every experiment, 100 mL sample was placed inside the LED reactor to expose to the UV light and TiO2. The effects of some parameters such as contact time, pH and dosage of TiO2 were examined, and decomposition kinetics and the synergistic effects were also determined for each process. Results: The results of the experiments showed that the UV-LED/TiO2 process can remove the dye from textile wastewater with the efficiency of 80.23% and can also remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD with the efficiency of 64.75% under the optimum conditions and during 120 minutes. Also, the reaction of dye decomposition in this wastewater was a first-order kinetic function. Conclusion: The results of this study show that the UV-LED/TiO2 can be used effectively to remove the dye and reduce the COD of the textile industry wastewater under optimal operating conditions.

  1. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  2. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, H; Nakajima, K; Suzuki, M; Sasakawa, K; Kimura, K

    2011-06-01

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. Ray-Based Calculations of Backscatter in Laser Fusion Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Froula, D H; London, R A; Callahan, D A

    2008-02-26

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as 'plane-wave' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pf3d. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, p. 495 (1997)] show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement, motivated by phase conjugation, is given by doubling the deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, p. 755 (1994)], with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows encouragingly low reflectivity. Doubling the coupling to bound the speckle enhancement suggests a less optimistic picture. Re-absorption of Raman light is seen to be significant in this design.

  4. Diffuse ultrasonic backscatter using a multi-Gaussian beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiongbing; Song, Yongfeng; Arguelles, Andrea P; Turner, Joseph A

    2017-07-01

    Diffuse ultrasonic backscatter is widely used to evaluate microstructural parameters of heterogeneous materials. Recent singly scattered response (SSR) models utilize a single-Gaussian beam (SGB) assumption which is expected to have limitations. Following a similar formalism, a model is presented using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) assumption to characterize the transducer beam for longitudinal-to-longitudinal scattering at normal incidence through an interface with arbitrary curvature. First, the Wigner transform of the transducer field is defined using conjugate double-layer MGB expressions. The theoretical analysis shows that ten groups of Gaussian beams are sufficient for convergence. Compared with the SGB-SSR curve, the shape of MGB-SSR curve is positive skewed. Differences between the MGB-SSR model and the SGB-SSR model are quantified and shown to be complex functions of frequency, sample curvature, transducer parameters, and focal depth in the material. Finally, both models are used to fit experimental spatial variance data from a 304 stainless steel pipe with planar, convex, and concave surfaces. The results show that the MGB-SSR has some characteristics suggesting a better fit to the experiments. However, both models result in grain size estimates within the uncertainty of the optical microscopy suggesting that the SGB is sufficient for normal incidence pulse-echo measurements.

  5. Taylor Dispersion Analysis of Polysaccharides Using Backscattering Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetear, Phoonthawee; Chamieh, Joseph; Kammer, Michael N; Manuel, Thomas J; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Bornhop, Darryl J; Cottet, Hervé

    2017-06-20

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) allows the determination of the molecular diffusion coefficient (D) or the hydrodynamic radius (R h ) of a solute from the peak broadening of a plug of solute in a laminar Poiseuille flow. The main limitation plaguing the broader applicability of TDA is the lack of a sensitive detection modality. UV absorption is typically used with TDA but is only suitable for UV-absorbing or derivatized compounds. In this work, we present a development of the TDA method for non-UV absorbing compounds by using a universal detector based on refractive index (RI) sensing with backscattering interferometry (BSI). BSI was interfaced to a capillary electrophoresis-UV instrument using a polyimide coated fused silica capillary and an in-house designed flow-cell assembly. Polysaccharides were selected to demonstrate the application of TDA-BSI for size characterization. Under the conditions of validity of TDA, D and R h average values and the entire R h distributions were obtained from the (poly)saccharide taylorgrams, including non-UV absorbing polymers.

  6. Characterizing Three-Dimensional Mixing Process in a River Confluence using Hydro-acoustical Backscatter and Flow Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Geunsoo; Kim, Dongsu; Kim, YoungDo; Lyu, Siwan; Kim, Seojun

    2017-04-01

    River confluences are zones where two rivers with different geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics amalgamate, resulting in rapid change in terms of flow regime, sediment entrainment and hydraulic geometry. In these confluence zones, the flow structure is basically complicated responded with concurrent mixing of physical and chemical aquatic properties, and continuous channel morphology could be changed due to erosion and sedimentation. In addition, the confluences are regions in which two rivers join and play an important role in river ecology. In order to characterize the mixing process of confluence for understanding the impacts of a river on the other river, therefore, it has been crucial to analyze the spatial mixing patterns for main streams depending on various inflow conditions of tributaries. However, most conventional studies have mostly relied upon hydraulic or water quality numerical models for understanding mixing pattern analysis of confluences, due to the difficulties to acquire a wide spatial range of in-situ data especially for characterizing this kind of mixing process. Even with intensive in-situ measurements, those researches tended to focus mainly on the hydraulic characteristics such as the flow and morphological complexity of confluence, so that very few studies comprehensively included sediment variation with flow at the same time. In this study, subsequently, flow and sediment mixing characteristics were concurrently investigated in the confluence between Nakdong and Nam river in South Korea, where it has been frequently questioned to determine how Nam river affects Nakdong river that recently have suffered various environmental problems such as green algae bloom and erosion/deposition in the confluence. We basically examined the mixing characteristics of confluence by using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) which were used to measure hydraulic factors such as flow rate and depth, as well as measuring the suspended sediment

  7. A comparison of satellite scintillation measurements with HF radar backscatter characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the correspondence between high latitude ionospheric scintillation measurements made at 250MHz with the occurrence of 10MHz HF coherent radar backscatter, on 13 and 14 December 2002. We demonstrate that when the ionospheric intersection point of the scintillation measurements is co-located with significant HF radar backscatter, the observed scintillation, quantified by the S4 index, is elevated. Conversely, when the radar indicates that backscatter is observed away from the intersection point due to movements of the auroral zone, the observed scintillation is low. This suggests that scintillation is highly location-dependent, being enhanced in the auroral zone and being lower at sub-auroral latitudes. The coexistence of scintillation and HF radar backscatter, produced by ionospheric density perturbations with scale sizes of 100s of metres and ~15 m, respectively, suggests that a broad spectrum of density fluctuations is found in the auroral zone.

  8. High-resolution multibeam backscatter data - northern Channel Islands region, southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release presents data for 5-m resolution acoustic-backscatter data of the northern Channel Islands region, southern California. The raster data files are...

  9. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    ..., and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth...

  10. Seabottom characterization using multibeam echosounder angular backscatter: An application of the composite roughness theory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.; Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.

    Composite roughness theory is used to characterize Southern Ocean bottom backscatter (multibeam) data. Spectral parameters based on Helmholtz-Kirchhof's theory (1) are determined from measured near-normal incidence values. A splicing technique using...

  11. Multi-beam backscatter image data processing techniques employed to EM 1002 system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.

    due to the presence of inherent artifacts. Generally, angular backscatter strength data show higher values towards the normal incidence angles especially for smooth seafloor compared to outer-beam angles. Therefore, off-line corrections are essential...

  12. Fine scale analyses of a coralline bank mapped using multi-beam backscatter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, A.A.A.; Naik, M.; Fernandes, W.A.; Haris, K.; Chakraborty, B.; Estiberio, S.; Lohani, R.B.

    unsupervised self-organizing maps (SOM) architecture is used to determine the existence of six classes. Thereafter, 55 segments were identified for data segmentation, employing six profiles selected from the backscatter maps, using the fuzzy c-means (FCM...

  13. NOAA TIFF Graphic- 0.5m Backscatter Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  14. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  15. Simrad em3002d Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  16. Pseudo sidescan images from backscatter amplitude data of the Hydrosweep multibean sonar system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.; Schenke, H.W.

    Using the rms (root mean square) backscatter amplitude values, a procedure was evolved to generate pseudo sidescan images. A comparison of the pseudo sidescan image with actual Hydrosweep sidescan image, from an area covering a pear shaped seamount...

  17. Assessing the contamination of SuperDARN global convection maps by non-F-region backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Global convection mapping using line-of-sight Doppler velocity data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN is now an accepted method of imaging high-latitude ionospheric convection. This mapping process requires that the flow measured by the radars is defined solely by the convection electric field. This is generally only true of radar backscatter from the ionospheric F-region. We investigate the extent to which the E-region and ground backscatter in the SuperDARN data set may be misidentified as F-region backscatter, and assess the contamination of global convection maps which results from the addition of this non-F-region backscatter. We present examples which highlight the importance of identifying this contamination, especially with regard to the mesoscale structure in the convection maps.Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection – Radio science (radio wave propagation; instruments and techniques

  18. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from the islands and banks in the Mariana archipelago, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Uracas Island in the Commonwealth...

  19. A Compact In Situ Sensor for Measurement of Absorption and Backscattering in Natural Waters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an active sensor for in situ measurement of the inherent optical properties (IOPs) absorption and backscattering at multiple wavelengths....

  20. Atmospheric aerosol load morphological classification and retrieved visibility based on lidar backscatter measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the tropospheric aerosol load morphological classification and its impact on temporal variation of visibility are investigated using a continuous 23-hour single channel CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR backscatter measurement. The trajectory...

  1. Sea Floor Topography and Backscatter Intensity of the Historic Area Remediation Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes topography and backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS), located offshore of New York and New...

  2. Correction of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering effects in H2O dial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, A.; Bosenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general method of solutions for treating effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in H2O Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements are described and discussed. Errors in vertical DIAL measuremtns caused by this laser line broadening effect can be very large and, therfore, this effect has to be accounted for accurately. To analyze and correct effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in DIAL experiments, a generalized DIAL approximation was derived starting from a lidar equation, which includes Doppler broadening. To evaluate the accuracy of H2O DIAL measurements, computer simulations were performed. It was concluded that correction of Doppler broadened Rayleigh backscattering is possible with good accuracy in most cases of tropospheric H2O DIAL measurements, but great care has to be taken when layers with steep gradients of Mie backscattering like clouds or inversion layers are present.

  3. Impact of sound attenuation by suspended sediment on ADCP backscatter calibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vermeulen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Although designed for velocity measurements, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are widely being used to monitor suspended particulate matter in rivers and in marine environments. To quantify mass concentrations of suspended matter, ADCP backscatter is generally calibrated with in situ

  4. Simrad em300 Backscatter imagery of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters. The...

  5. GLAS/ICESat L1B Global Backscatter Data (HDF5) V033

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The product includes full 532 nm and 1064 nm calibrated attenuated backscatter profiles at 5 times per second, and from 10 to -1 km, at 40 times per second. Also the...

  6. GLAS/ICESat L1B Global Backscatter Data V033

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The product includes full 532 nm and 1064 nm calibrated attenuated backscatter profiles at 5 times per second, and from 10 to -1 km, at 40 times per second. Also the...

  7. Backscattered Helium Spectroscopy in the Helium Ion Microscope: Principles, Resolution and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gastel, Raoul; Hlawacek, G.; Dutta, S.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibilities and limitations for microstructure characterization using backscattered particles from a sharply focused helium ion beam. The interaction of helium ions with matter enables the imaging, spectroscopic characterization, as well as the nanometer scale modification of

  8. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of Buck Island, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  9. Assessment of Multiple Delamination in Laminated Composites for Aircrafts using X-ray Backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Noh Yu [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    A Compton X-ray backscatter technique has been developed to quantitatively assess impact damage in quasi-isotropic laminated composites made by a drop-weight tester. X-ray backscatter imaging system with a slit-type camera is constructed to obtain a cross-sectional profile of impact-damaged laminated composites from the electron-density variation of the cross section. A nonlinear scattering model based on Boltsman equation is introduced to compute Compton X-ray backscattering field for the defect assessment. An adaptive filter is also used to reduce noises from many sources including quantum noise and irregular distributions of fibers and matrix in composites. Delaminations masked or distorted by the first delamination are detected and characterized effectively by the Compton X-ray backscatter technique, both in width and location, by application of error minimization algorithm

  10. Polarimetric Backscattering Behavior of Ground Clutter at X, Ka, and W-band

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gatesman, A. J; Goyette, T. M; Dickinson, J. C; Giles, R. H; Waldman, J; Sizemore, J; Chase, R. M; Nixon, W. E

    2005-01-01

    .... In addition to studying terrain backscatter as a function of surface roughness, the dependence on soil moisture content also was characterized by tailoring the dielectric constant of the scale models...

  11. CRED 1 meter resolution Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.These data provide coverage between 0 and 200m meters. The...

  12. P12 V ORBITING RADAR DERIVED BACKSCATTER CROSS SECTION V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of a VICAR2 format image of Venus large-angle radar backscatter cross section, from the side-looking mode of the Pioneer Venus radar mapper...

  13. Backscattering in a helical liquid induced by Rashba spin-orbit coupling and electron interactions: Locality, symmetry, and cutoff aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharitonov, Maxim; Geissler, Florian; Trauzettel, Björn

    2017-10-01

    The combination of the time-reversal-symmetric single-particle backscattering field (commonly known as Rashba spin-orbit coupling) and nonbackscattering electron interactions is generally expected to produce inelastic backscattering in one-dimensional helical electron liquids at the edge of two-dimensional topological insulators, as theoretically predicted in a number of works. An opposite conclusion of absent backscattering was reached in a recent work [H.-Y. Xie et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 086603 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.086603] for the "local" model of the backscattering field and interactions. Motivated to resolve this potential controversy, in the present work, we study backscattering effects employing fermionic perturbation theory and considering quite general forms of the backscattering field and electron interactions. We discover that backscattering effects are crucially sensitive to the locality properties of the backscattering field and electron interactions, to the symmetry of the latter, as well as to the presence or absence of the cutoff of the electron spectrum. We find that backscattering is indeed absent under the following assumptions: (i) local backscattering field; (ii.a) local or (ii.b) SU(2)-symmetric interactions; (iii) absent cutoff of the edge-state spectrum. However, violation of any of these conditions leads to backscattering. This also reconciles with the results based on the bosonization technique. We calculate the associated backscattering current, establish its low-bias scaling behavior, and predict a crossover between two different scaling regimes. The main implication of our findings is that backscattering of some magnitude is inevitable in a real system, although it could be quite suppressed for nearly local backscattering field and interactions.

  14. Compositional signatures in acoustic backscatter over vegetated and unvegetated mixed sand-gravel riverbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2017-01-01

    Multibeam acoustic backscatter has considerable utility for remote characterization of spatially heterogeneous bed sediment composition over vegetated and unvegetated riverbeds of mixed sand and gravel. However, the use of high-frequency, decimeter-resolution acoustic backscatter for sediment classification in shallow water is hampered by significant topographic contamination of the signal. In mixed sand-gravel riverbeds, changes in the abiotic composition of sediment (such as homogeneous sand to homogeneous gravel) tend to occur over larger spatial scales than is characteristic of small-scale bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and bars) or biota (such as vascular plants and periphyton). A two-stage method is proposed to filter out the morphological contributions to acoustic backscatter. First, the residual supragrain-scale topographic effects in acoustic backscatter with small instantaneous insonified areas, caused by ambiguity in the local (beam-to-beam) bed-sonar geometry, are removed. Then, coherent scales between high-resolution topography and backscatter are identified using cospectra, which are used to design a frequency domain filter that decomposes backscatter into the (unwanted) high-pass component associated with bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and sand waves) and vegetation, and the (desired) low-frequency component associated with the composition of sediment patches superimposed on the topography. This process strengthens relationships between backscatter and sediment composition. A probabilistic framework is presented for classifying vegetated and unvegetated substrates based on acoustic backscatter at decimeter resolution. This capability is demonstrated using data collected from diverse settings within a 386 km reach of a canyon river whose bed varies among sand, gravel, cobbles, boulders, and submerged vegetation.

  15. Backscattering and Polarization Properties of Marine Particles -- Instrument Development and Field Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Functions from 0.08 to 16 deg. for Randomly Shaped Terrigenous 1-21 μm Sediment Grains, Optics Express, v 17, n11, pp8805-8814. Y. C. Agrawal, E...Characterization of scattering from terrigenous size-sorted non-spherical particles; • Field observations of backscattering of marine particles;. WORK COMPLETED...shaped grains; I have completed some observations contrasting backscatter properties of random shaped sediment grains and polystyrene spheres. In

  16. Modeling the effects of laser-beam smoothing on filamentation and stimulated Brillouin backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R.L.; Kaiser, T.B.; Lasinski, B.F. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Using the three-dimensional code (F3D), the authors compute the filamentation and backscattering of laser light. The results show that filamentation can be controlled and stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) can be reduced by using random phase plates (RPP) and small f-numbers or smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with large bandwidth. An interesting result is that, for uniform plasmas, the SBBS amplification takes place over several laser axial coherence lengths (coherence length = speckle length).

  17. Characterizing biogenous sediments using multibeam echosounder backscatter data - Estimating power law parameter utilizing various models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.

    ] for multibeam- Sca Beam system Sufficient acoustic pings were collected from each area when ship was stopped for sediment sampling Backscatter and geological sample data collections are made at ocanographically important sites from Southern Oceans. Agulhas... data collection was carried out at a station when ship was stopped for sediment core sampling, and this arrangement of data collection assured the statistical homogeneity ot backscatter data. MODELS USED We present two models, namely, the composite...

  18. Seafloor classification using acoustic backscatter echo-waveform - Artificial neural network applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Mahale, V.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desai, R.G.P.

    . This SOFM generated output space is further refined by Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) an ANN supervised architecture in conjunction with the unsupervised SOFM architecture. LVQ employs reinforced supervised learning for fine-tuning of cluster.../ mixed and fine grain seafloor sediments (high to low backscatter strength and well compressed receiving pulse length). Though we have attempted to understand scattering behavior of the 33 kHz backscatter signal for different seafloor sediments...

  19. O the First-Order Amplitude Statistics of Myocardial Ultrasonic Backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Larry Arthur

    Improved understanding of ultrasonic backscatter, particularly of its statistical behavior in the presence of disease, could enhance tissue characterization methods. Historically it has been assumed that the first-order envelope statistics of ultrasonic myocardial backscatter are best described by the Rayleigh probability distribution function (PDF); this assumption has been challenged frequently in recent years, however, the relative goodness-of-fit (GOF) of competing PDFs to actual data has not been tested. This research compares the abilities of five PDFs (the Rayleigh, the Rician, the lognormal, the Nakagami-m, and the K) to describe high-frequency (2.5-15 MHz) ultrasonic backscatter from in vivo canine myocardium, in vitro human myocardium, in vivo (intraoperative) human myocardium, in vivo blood pool, tissue phantoms, and computer simulations. Ordinal GOF rankings of myocardial data from a wide variety of sources show that only in a small minority of cases is the envelope of backscatter from myocardium Rayleigh-distributed, or other than K-distributed. On the other hand, backscatter from sources expected to be Rayleigh-scattering (such as tissue phantom and blood pool) is approximately Rayleigh -distributed, confirming that non-Rayleighness is not simply a system artifact. Furthermore, signal statistics are not found to be sensitive indicators of disease under clinical operating conditions. Analysis of the influence of pulse shape on the backscatter amplitude density using classical Random Walk and probability techniques, followed by application of Monte Carlo methods to the resulting expressions, shows that backscatter statistics depend both on pulse characteristics (in a manner which can be functionally described) and on the heart's collagen microstructure (in a manner which can be approximately modeled). The observed first-order amplitude statistics of myocardial backscatter are thus characterized with new specificity and a theoretical frame offered within

  20. Compositional Signatures in Acoustic Backscatter Over Vegetated and Unvegetated Mixed Sand-Gravel Riverbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Multibeam acoustic backscatter has considerable utility for remote characterization of spatially heterogeneous bed sediment composition over vegetated and unvegetated riverbeds of mixed sand and gravel. However, the use of high-frequency, decimeter-resolution acoustic backscatter for sediment classification in shallow water is hampered by significant topographic contamination of the signal. In mixed sand-gravel riverbeds, changes in the abiotic composition of sediment (such as homogeneous sand to homogeneous gravel) tend to occur over larger spatial scales than is characteristic of small-scale bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and bars) or biota (such as vascular plants and periphyton). A two-stage method is proposed to filter out the morphological contributions to acoustic backscatter. First, the residual supragrain-scale topographic effects in acoustic backscatter with small instantaneous insonified areas, caused by ambiguity in the local (beam-to-beam) bed-sonar geometry, are removed. Then, coherent scales between high-resolution topography and backscatter are identified using cospectra, which are used to design a frequency domain filter that decomposes backscatter into the (unwanted) high-pass component associated with bedform topography (ripples, dunes, and sand waves) and vegetation, and the (desired) low-frequency component associated with the composition of sediment patches superimposed on the topography. This process strengthens relationships between backscatter and sediment composition. A probabilistic framework is presented for classifying vegetated and unvegetated substrates based on acoustic backscatter at decimeter resolution. This capability is demonstrated using data collected from diverse settings within a 386 km reach of a canyon river whose bed varies among sand, gravel, cobbles, boulders, and submerged vegetation.

  1. MEASURING THE PARTICULATE BACKSCATTERING OF INLAND WATERS: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Campbell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine whether the standard particulate backscattering IOP (Inherent Optical Properties measurement method could be simplified. IOP measurements are essential for parameterising several forms of algorithms used to estimate water quality parameters from airborne and satellite images. Field measurements of the backscattering IOPs are more difficult to make than absorption measurements as correction of the raw Hydroscat-6 backscattering sensor observations is required to allow for the systematic errors associated with the water and water quality parameter absorption. The standard approach involves making simultaneous measurement of the absorption and attenuation of the water with an absorption and attenuation meter (ac-9 or making assumptions about the particulate backscattering probability. Recently, a number of papers have been published that use an alternative method to retrieve the particulate backscattering spectrum by using laboratory measured absorption values and in situ spectroradiometric observations. The alternative method inverts a model of reflectance iteratively using non-linear least squares fitting to solve for the particulate backscattering at 532 nm (bbp0(532 and the particulate backscattering spectral slope (γ. In this paper, eleven observations made at Burdekin Falls Dam, Australia are used to compare the alternative reflectance method to the conventional corrected Hydroscat-6 observations. Assessment of the alternative reflectance method showed that the result of the inversions were highly dependent on the starting conditions. To overcome this limitation, Particle Swarm Optimisation, a stochastic search technique which includes a random element in the search approach, was used. It was found that when compared to the conventionally corrected Hydroscat-6 observations, the alternative reflectance method underestimated bbp0(532 by approximately 50% and overestimated γ by approximately 40

  2. Impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on retrieving aerosol extinction coefficient profiles from elastic-backscatter lidar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Chunsheng; Kuang, Ye; Tao, Jiangchuan; Tan, Wangshu; Bian, Yuxuan; Li, Jing; Li, Chengcai

    2017-10-01

    Light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements have been widely used to profile the ambient aerosol extinction coefficient (σext). The particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio, LR), which strongly depends on the aerosol dry particle number size distribution (PNSD) and aerosol hygroscopicity, is introduced to retrieve the σext profile from elastic-backscatter lidar signals. Conventionally, a constant column-integrated LR that is estimated from aerosol optical depth is used by the retrieving algorithms. In this paper, the influences of aerosol PNSD, aerosol hygroscopic growth and relative humidity (RH) profiles on the variation in LR are investigated based on the datasets from field measurements in the North China Plain (NCP). Results show that LR has an enhancement factor of 2.2 when RH reaches 92 %. Simulation results indicate that both the magnitude and vertical structures of the σext profiles by using the column-related LR method are significantly biased from the original σext profile. The relative bias, which is mainly influenced by RH and PNSD, can reach up to 40 % when RH at the top of the mixed layer is above 90 %. A new algorithm for retrieving σext profiles and a new scheme of LR enhancement factor by RH in the NCP are proposed in this study. The relative bias between the σext profile retrieved with this new algorithm and the ideal true value is reduced to below 13 %.

  3. A novel lobster-eye imaging system based on Schmidt-type objective for X-ray-backscattering inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Xin; Zhan, Qi; Huang, Shengling; Chen, Yifan; Mu, Baozhong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel lobster-eye imaging system for X-ray-backscattering inspection. The system was designed by modifying the Schmidt geometry into a treble-lens structure in order to reduce the resolution difference between the vertical and horizontal directions, as indicated by ray-tracing simulations. The lobster-eye X-ray imaging system is capable of operating over a wide range of photon energies up to 100 keV. In addition, the optics of the lobster-eye X-ray imaging system was tested to verify that they meet the requirements. X-ray-backscattering imaging experiments were performed in which T-shaped polymethyl-methacrylate objects were imaged by the lobster-eye X-ray imaging system based on both the double-lens and treble-lens Schmidt objectives. The results show similar resolution of the treble-lens Schmidt objective in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Moreover, imaging experiments were performed using a second treble-lens Schmidt objective with higher resolution. The results show that for a field of view of over 200 mm and with a 500 mm object distance, this lobster-eye X-ray imaging system based on a treble-lens Schmidt objective offers a spatial resolution of approximately 3 mm.

  4. Characterization of the thickness and distribution of latex coatings on polyvinylidene chloride beads by backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Clifford S; Beyer, Douglas E

    2015-04-01

    Polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) co-polymer resins are commonly formulated with a variety of solid additives for the purpose of processing or stabilization. A homogeneous distribution of these additives during handling and processing is important. The Dow Chemical Company developed a process to incorporate solid materials in latex form onto PVDC resin bead surfaces using a coagulation process. In this context, we present a method to characterize the distribution and thickness of these latex coatings. The difference in backscattered electron signal from the higher mean atomic number PVDC core and lower atomic number latex coating in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging using a range of accelerating voltages was used to characterize latex thickness and distribution across large numbers of beads quickly and easily. Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively estimate latex thickness as a function of brightness in backscatter electron images. This thickness calibration was validated by cross-sectioning using a focused ion-beam SEM. Thicknesses from 100 nm up to about 1.3 µm can be determined using this method.

  5. Permittivity and Backscattering Coefficient of Diesel Oil-Contaminated Soil at C Band (5.3 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Ahmadian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying the behavior of soil contaminated by diesel requires the measurement and calculation of electrical parameters such as permittivity and backscattering coefficient. It is also necessary to study the physical parameters such as surface roughness. The intent of this paper is to present a broad and updated overview of the diesel oil contaminated soil, emphasizing permittivity and scattering coefficient that are involved in determining and detecting the rate at which and extent to which hydrocarbons contaminate the soil and environment. The measurement of permittivity and the calculations of backscattering coefficient values were made with different amounts of diesel oil contamination and different incident angles in 5° intervals ranging from 10° to 80° for both horizontal and vertical polarization at C band. The values of scattering coefficient for different look angles (25°, 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, and 55° were calculated and are suitable for comparison with data generated from other remote sensing platforms. Accurate electrical parameter measurements of soil contamination and recognition of their dependence on physical and chemical composition are interesting and can support using microwave remote sensing instruments to observe the earth.

  6. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselovskii Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  7. Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors with Ultrafast Laser Enhanced Rayleigh Backscattering Profiles for Real-Time Monitoring of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aidong; Huang, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Chen, Rongzhang; Ohodnicki, Paul; Buric, Michael; Lee, Shiwoo; Li, Ming-Jun; Chen, Kevin P

    2017-08-24

    This paper reports a technique to enhance the magnitude and high-temperature stability of Rayleigh back-scattering signals in silica fibers for distributed sensing applications. With femtosecond laser radiation, more than 40-dB enhancement of Rayleigh backscattering signal was generated in silica fibers using 300-nJ laser pulses at 250 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced Rayleigh scattering defects were found to be stable from the room temperature to 800 °C in hydrogen gas. The Rayleigh scatter at high temperatures was correlated to the formation and modification of nanogratings in the fiber core. Using optical fibers with enhanced Rayleigh backscattering profiles as distributed temperature sensors, we demonstrated real-time monitoring of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operations with 5-mm spatial resolution at 800 °C. Information gathered by these fiber sensor tools can be used to verify simulation results or operated in a process-control system to improve the operational efficiency and longevity of SOFC-based energy generation systems.

  8. Mapping Wetlands in Zambia Using Seasonal Backscatter Signatures Derived from ENVISAT ASAR Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schlaffer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are considered a challenging environment for mapping approaches based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data due to their often complex internal structures and the diverse backscattering mechanisms caused by vegetation, soil moisture and flood dynamics contributing to the resulting imagery. In this study, a time series of >100 SAR images acquired by ENVISAT during a time period of ca. two years over the Kafue River basin in Zambia was compared to water heights derived from radar altimetry and surface soil moisture from a reanalysis dataset. The backscatter time series were analyzed using a harmonic model to characterize the seasonality in C-band backscatter caused by the interaction of flood and soil moisture dynamics. As a result, characteristic seasonal signatures could be derived for permanent water bodies, seasonal open water, persistently flooded vegetation and seasonally flooded vegetation. Furthermore, the analysis showed that the influence of local incidence angle could be accounted for by a linear shift in backscatter averaged over time, even in wetland areas where the dominant scattering mechanism can change depending on the season. The retrieved harmonic model parameters were then used in an unsupervised classification to detect wetland backscattering classes at the regional scale. A total area of 7800 km2 corresponding to 7.6% of the study area was classified as either one of the wetland backscattering classes. The results demonstrate the value of seasonality parameters extracted from C-band SAR time series for wetland mapping.

  9. Pixelated VLC-Backscattering for Self-Charging Indoor IoT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Sihua; Khreishah, Abdallah; Elgala, Hany

    2017-01-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) backscatter has been proposed as a wireless access option for Internet of Things (IoT). However, the throughput of the state-of-the-art VLC backscatter is limited by simple single-carrier pulsed modulation scheme, such as on-off keying (OOK). In this paper, a novel pixelated VLC backscatter is proposed and implemented to overcome the channel capacity limitation. In particular, multiple smaller VLC backscatters, switching on or off, are integrated to generate multi-level signals, which enables the usage of more advanced modulation schemes than OOK. Based on experimental results, rate adaptation at different communication distances can be employed to enhance the achievable data rate. Compared to OOK, the data rate can be tripled when 8-PAM is used at 2 meters. In general, $n$-fold throughput enhancement is realized by utilizing $n$ smaller VLC backscatters while incurring negligible additional energy using the same device space as that of a single large backscatter.

  10. Waterfall notch-filtering for restoration of acoustic backscatter records from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciano; Hung, Edson Mintsu; Neto, Arthur Ayres; Magrani, Fábio José Guedes

    2017-08-01

    A series of multibeam sonar surveys were conducted from 2009 to 2013 around Admiralty Bay, Shetland Islands, Antarctica. These surveys provided a detailed bathymetric model that helped understand and characterize the bottom geology of this remote area. Unfortunately, the acoustic backscatter records registered during these bathymetric surveys were heavily contaminated with noise and motion artifacts. These artifacts persisted in the backscatter records despite the fact that the proper acquisition geometry and the necessary offsets and delays were applied during the survey and in post-processing. These noisy backscatter records were very difficult to interpret and to correlate with gravity-core samples acquired in the same area. In order to address this issue, a directional notch-filter was applied to the backscatter waterfall in the along-track direction. The proposed filter provided better estimates for the backscatter strength of each sample by considerably reducing residual motion artifacts. The restoration of individual samples was possible since the waterfall frame of reference preserves the acquisition geometry. Then, a remote seafloor characterization procedure based on an acoustic model inversion was applied to the restored backscatter samples, generating remote estimates of acoustic impedance. These remote estimates were compared to Multi Sensor Core Logger measurements of acoustic impedance obtained from gravity core samples. The remote estimates and the Core Logger measurements of acoustic impedance were comparable when the shallow seafloor was homogeneous. The proposed waterfall notch-filtering approach can be applied to any sonar record, provided that we know the system ping-rate and sampling frequency.

  11. The backscatter cloud probe - a compact low-profile autonomous optical spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, K.; Baumgardner, D.; Gallagher, M.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Nedelec, P.; Wang, K.-Y.; Lance, S.

    2014-05-01

    A compact (500 cm3), lightweight (500 g), near-field, single particle backscattering optical spectrometer is described that mounts flush with the skin of an aircraft and measures the concentration and optical equivalent diameter of particles from 5 to 75 μm. The backscatter cloud probe (BCP) was designed as a real-time qualitative cloud detector primarily for data quality control of trace gas instruments developed for the climate monitoring instrument packages that are being installed on commercial passenger aircraft as part of the European Union In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System (IAGOS) program (http://www.iagos.org/). Subsequent evaluations of the BCP measurements on a number of research aircraft, however, have revealed it capable of delivering quantitative particle data products including size distributions, liquid-water content and other information on cloud properties. We demonstrate the instrument's capability for delivering useful long-term climatological, as well as aviation performance information, across a wide range of environmental conditions. The BCP has been evaluated by comparing its measurements with those from other cloud particle spectrometers on research aircraft and several BCPs are currently flying on commercial A340/A330 Airbus passenger airliners. The design and calibration of the BCP is described in this article, along with an evaluation of measurements made on the research and commercial aircraft. Preliminary results from more than 7000 h of airborne measurements by the BCP on two Airbus A340s operating on routine global traffic routes (one Lufthansa, the other China Airlines) show that more than 340 h of cloud data have been recorded at normal cruise altitudes (> 10 km) and more than 40% of the > 1200 flights were through clouds at some point between takeoff and landing. These data are a valuable contribution to databases of cloud properties, including sub-visible cirrus, in the upper troposphere and useful for validating

  12. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  13. Long-term Soil Moisture Time Series Analyses based on Active Microwave Backscatter Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Reimer, C.; Bauer-Marschallinger, B.; Enenkel, M.; Hahn, S.; Melzer, T.; Naeimi, V.; Paulik, C.; Dorigo, W.

    2015-04-01

    Active microwave sensors operating at lower microwave frequencies in the range from 1 to 10 GHz provide backscatter measurements that are sensitive to the moisture content of the soil. Thanks to a series of European C-band (5.3 GHz) scatterometers, which were first flown on board of the European Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2, and later on board of MetOp-A and MetOp -B, we are now in the possession of a long-term soil moisture time series starting in 1991. The creation of globally consistent long-term soil moisture time series is a challenging task. The TU-Wien soil moisture algorithm is adopted to tackle these challenges. In this paper we present two methodologies that were developed to ensure radiometric stability of the European C-band scatterometers. The objective of sensor intra-calibration is to monitor and correct for radiometric instabilities within one scatterometer mission, while sensor inter-calibration aims to remove radiometric differences across several missions. In addition, a novel vegetation modelling approach is presented that enables the estimation of vegetation parameters for each day across several years to account for yearly to longer-term changes in vegetation phenology and land cover.

  14. Positioning of steel rods inclusions in reinforced concrete simulant by Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldo, Emerson M.; Prestes, Ana A.P.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    Reinforced concrete is susceptible to a range of environmental degradation factors that can limit its service life. There has always been a need for test methods to measure, in situ, the properties of concrete for quality assurance and to evaluate the condition of existing structures. Compton scattering of gamma radiation is a nondestructive technique used for the detection of defects and inclusions in materials and it can be employed on reinforced concrete. The methodology allows for one-side inspection of large structures and can be implemented with a relatively inexpensive, portable apparatus. In this work, we used the Compton backscattering technique to measure both the size and depth of steel rod inclusions in plaster block samples. The samples were irradiated with gamma rays from a {phi}2 mm collimated {sup 241}Am (100 mCi) source, and the inelastically scattered photons were collected at an angle of 135 deg by a high-resolution CdTe semiconductor detector. Scanning was achieved by lateral movement of the sample blocks across the field of view of the source and detector in steps of 1 mm. The tests on plaster blocks with steel rod inclusions suggest that, for a low-energy and low-activity gamma source, beam attenuation has greater effects on the scattered intensity than does increased material density. Density contrast analysis allows determination of the size and depth of steel rods. Furthermore, the experimental results agree with theoretical data obtained through Monte Carlo simulation. (author)

  15. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry studies of 100 keV nitrogen ion implanted polypropylene polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mahak; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structure and composition in polypropylene (PP) polymer has been studied. Implantation was carried out using 100 keV N+ ions at different fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 with beam current density of ∼0.65 μA cm-2. Surface morphological changes in the pre- and post-implanted PP specimens have been studied using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and UV-Visible Spectroscopy. The spatial distribution of implantation induced modification in the form of carbonization and dehydrogenation in the near surface region of PP matrix, the projected range, retained dose of implanted nitrogen, the various elements present in the implanted layers and their differential cross-sections have been analyzed using RBS spectra. RUMP simulation yielded an increase in the concentration of carbon near the surface from 33 at.% (virgin) to 42 at.% at fluence of 1 × 1017 N+ cm-2. Further, optical absorption has been found to increase with a shift in the absorption edge from UV towards visible region with increasing fluence. UV-Vis absorption spectra also indicate a drastic decrease in optical energy gap from 4.12 eV (virgin) to 0.25 eV (1 × 1017 N+ cm-2) indicating towards the formation of carbonaceous network in the implanted region. All these changes observed using UV-Visible have been further correlated with the outcomes of the RBS characterization.

  16. Dayglow emissions of the O2 Herzberg bands and the Rayleigh backscattered spectrum of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. E.; Abrams, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that numerous fluorescent emissions from the Herzberg bands of molecular oxygen lie in the spectral region 242-300 nm. This coincides with the wavelength range used by orbiting spectrometers that observe the Rayleigh backscattered spectrum of the earth for the purpose of monitoring the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone. Model calculations suggest that Herzberg band emissions in the dayglow could provide significant contamination of the ozone measurements if the quenching rate of O2(A3Sigma) is sufficiently small. It is noted that this is especially true near 255 nm, where the most intense fluorescent emissions relative to the Rayleigh scattered signal are located and where past satellite measurements have shown a persistent excess radiance above that expected for a pure ozone absorbing and molecular scattering atmosphere. Very small quenching rates, however, are adequate to reduce the dayglow emission to negligible levels. Noting that available laboratory data have not definitely established the quenching on the rate of O2(A3Sigma) as a function of vibration level, it is emphasized that such information is required before the Herzberg band contributions can be evaluated with confidence.

  17. Derivation of capture and reaction cross sections from experimental quasi-elastic and elastic backscattering probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, V.V. [International Center for Advanced Studies, Yerevan State University (Armenia); Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V., E-mail: adamian@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    We suggest simple and useful methods to extract reaction and capture (fusion) cross sections from the experimental elastic and quasi-elastic backscattering data.The direct measurement of the reaction or capture (fusion) cross section is a difficult task since it would require the measurement of individual cross sections of many reaction channels, and most of them could be reached only by specific experiments. This would require different experimental setups not always available at the same laboratory and, consequently, such direct measurements would demand a large amount of beam time and would take probably some years to be reached. Because of that, the measurements of elastic scattering angular distributions that cover full angular ranges and optical model analysis have been used for the determination of reaction cross sections. This traditional method consists in deriving the parameters of the complex optical potentials which fit the experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and then of deriving the reaction cross sections predicted by these potentials. Even so, both the experimental part and the analysis of this latter method are not so simple. In the present work we present a much simpler method to determine reaction and capture (fusion) cross sections. It consists of measuring only elastic or quasi-elastic scattering at one backward angle, and from that, the extraction of the reaction or capture cross sections can easily be performed. (author)

  18. Continuous Bulk FeCuC Aerogel with Ultradispersed Metal Nanoparticles: An Efficient 3D Heterogeneous Electro-Fenton Cathode over a Wide Range of pH 3-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Qian, Lin; Guan, Xiaohong; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-17

    Novel iron-copper-carbon (FeCuC) aerogel was fabricated through a one-step process from metal-resin precursors and then activated with CO2 and N2 in environmentally friendly way. The activated FeCuC aerogel was applied in a heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process and exhibited higher mineralization efficiency than homogeneous EF technology. High total organic carbon (TOC) removal of organic pollutants with activated FeCuC aerogel was achieved at a wide range of pH values (3-9). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real dyeing wastewater was below China's discharge standard after 30 min of treatment, and the specific energy consumption was low (9.2 kW·h·kg(-1)COD(-1)), corresponding to a power consumption of only ∼0.34 kW·h per ton of wastewater. The enhanced mineralization efficiency of FeCuC aerogel was mostly attributable to ultradispersed metallic Fe-Cu nanoparticles embedded in 3D carbon matrix and the CO2-N2 treatment. The CO2 activation enhanced the accessibility of the aerogel's pores, and the secondary N2 activation enlarged the porosity and regenerated the ultradispersed zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) with reductive carbon. Cu(0) acted as a reduction promoter for interfacial electron transfer. Moreover, activated FeCuC aerogel presented low iron leaching (<0.1 ppm) in acidic solution and can be molded into different sizes with high flexibility. Thus, this material could be used as a low-cost cathode and efficient heterogeneous EF technology for actual wastewater treatment.

  19. Detection efficiency of microchannel plates for e{sup −} and π{sup −} in the momentum range from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulej, M., E-mail: marek.tulej@space.unibe.ch; Meyer, S.; Lüthi, M.; Lasi, D.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Space Research and Planetary Sciences, Physics Institute, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Desorgher, L.; Hajdas, W. [Laboratory of Particle Physics, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Karlsson, S.; Kalla, L. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Space Kampus 1, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    High-energy e{sup –} and π{sup –} were measured by the multichannel plate (MCP) detector at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The measurements provide the absolute detection efficiencies for these particles: 5.8% ± 0.5% for electrons in the beam momenta range 17.5–300 MeV/c and 6.0% ± 1.3% for pions in the beam momenta range 172–345 MeV/c. The pulse height distribution determined from the measurements is close to an exponential function with negative exponent, indicating that the particles penetrated the MCP material before producing the signal somewhere inside the channel. Low charge extraction and nominal gains of the MCP detector observed in this study are consistent with the proposed mechanism of the signal formation by penetrating radiation. A very similar MCP ion detector will be used in the Neutral Ion Mass (NIM) spectrometer designed for the JUICE mission of European Space Agency (ESA) to the Jupiter system, to perform measurements of the chemical composition of the Galilean moon exospheres. The detection efficiency for penetrating radiation determined in the present studies is important for the optimisation of the radiation shielding of the NIM detector against the high-rate and high-energy electrons trapped in Jupiter’s magnetic field. Furthermore, the current studies indicate that MCP detectors can be useful to measure high-energy particle beams at high temporal resolution.

  20. Dependences of the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients on the frequency and the porosity in bovine trabecular bone: application of the binary mixture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Il [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The present study aims to investigate the dependences of the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients on the frequency and the porosity in bovine trabecular bone in vitro. The frequency dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured in 22 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples over a frequency range from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz by using a pair of transducers with a diameter of 12.7 mm and a center frequency of 2.25 MHz. The binary mixture model for ultrasonic scattering in trabecular bone, in which trabecular bone is assumed to be an isotropic binary mixture composed of a bone matrix and marrow, was applied to predict the measurements. The experimental results showed that the attenuation and the backscatter coefficients increased with increasing frequency from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz and decreased with increasing porosity from 66.9 to 91.5%. The predictions of the binary mixture model showed good agreements with the measurements, suggesting that scattering may be the dominant attenuation mechanism in dense bovine trabecular bone at frequencies from 1.4 to 3.0 MHz.

  1. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 2: Assessing SuperDARN virtual height models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN network of HF coherent backscatter radars form a unique global diagnostic of large-scale ionospheric and magnetospheric dynamics in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Currently the ground projections of the HF radar returns are routinely determined by a simple rangefinding algorithm, which takes no account of the prevailing, or indeed the average, HF propagation conditions. This is in spite of the fact that both direct E- and F-region backscatter and 1½-hop E- and F-region backscatter are commonly used in geophysical interpretation of the data. In a companion paper, Chisham et al. (2008 have suggested a new virtual height model for SuperDARN, based on average measured propagation paths. Over shorter propagation paths the existing rangefinding algorithm is adequate, but mapping errors become significant for longer paths where the roundness of the Earth becomes important, and a correct assumption of virtual height becomes more difficult. The SuperDARN radar at Hankasalmi has a propagation path to high power HF ionospheric modification facilities at both Tromsø on a ½-hop path and SPEAR on a 1½-hop path. The SuperDARN radar at Þykkvibǽr has propagation paths to both facilities over 1½-hop paths. These paths provide an opportunity to quantitatively test the available SuperDARN virtual height models. It is also possible to use HF radar backscatter which has been artificially induced by the ionospheric heaters as an accurate calibration point for the Hankasalmi elevation angle of arrival data, providing a range correction algorithm for the SuperDARN radars which directly uses elevation angle. These developments enable the accurate mappings of the SuperDARN electric field measurements which are required for the growing number of multi-instrument studies of the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  2. A comparison of optical and coherent HF radar backscatter observations of a post-midnight aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available A poleward-progressing 630 nm optical feature is observed between approximately 0100 UT and 0230 UT (0400 MLT to 0530 MLT by a meridian-scanning photometer (MSP located at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. Simultaneous coherent HF radar measurements indicate a region of poleward-expanding backscatter with rapid sunward plasma flow velocity along the MSP meridian. Spatial maps of the backscatter indicate a stationary backscatter feature aligned obliquely with respect to the MSP meridian, which produces an impression of poleward-expansion as the MSP progresses to later MLT. Two interpretations of the observations are possible, depending on whether the arc system is considered to move (time-dependent or to be stationary in time and apparent motion is produced as the MSP meridian rotates underneath it (time-independent. The first interpretation is as a poleward motion of an east-west aligned auroral arc. In this case the appearance of the region of backscatter is not associated with the optical feature, though the velocities within it are enhanced when the two are co-located. The second interpretation is as a polar arc or theta aurora, common features of the polar cap under the prevailing IMF northwards conditions. In this case the backscatter appears as an approximately 150 km wide region adjacent to the optical arc. In both interpretations the luminosity of the optical feature appears related to the magnitude of the plasma flow velocity. The optical features presented here do not generate appreciable HF coherent backscatter, and are only identifiable in the backscatter data as a modification of the flow by the arc electrodynamics.

  3. Monte Carlo investigation of backscatter point spread function for x-ray imaging examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray imaging examinations, especially complex interventions, may result in relatively high doses to the patient's skin inducing skin injuries. A method was developed to determine the skin-dose distribution for non-uniform x-ray beams by convolving the backscatter point-spread-function (PSF) with the primary-dose distribution to generate the backscatter distribution that, when added to the primary dose, gives the total-dose distribution. This technique was incorporated in the dose-tracking system (DTS), which provides a real-time color-coded 3D-mapping of skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures. The aim of this work is to investigate the variation of the backscatter PSF with different parameters. A backscatter PSF of a 1-mm x-ray beam was generated by EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code for different x-ray beam energies, different soft-tissue thickness above bone, different bone thickness and different entrance-beam angles, as well as for different locations on the SK-150 anthropomorphic head phantom. The results show a reduction of the peak scatter to primary dose ratio of 48% when X-ray beam voltage is increased from 40 keV to 120 keV. The backscatter dose was reduced when bone was beneath the soft tissue layer and this reduction increased with thinner soft tissue and thicker bone layers. The backscatter factor increased about 21% as the angle of incidence of the beam with the entrance surface decreased from 90° (perpendicular) to 30°. The backscatter PSF differed for different locations on the SK-150 phantom by up to 15%. The results of this study can be used to improve the accuracy of dose calculation when using PSF convolution in the DTS.

  4. Evaluating multiple causes of persistent low microwave backscatter from Amazon forests after the 2005 drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolking, Steve; Hagen, Stephen; Braswell, Bobby; Milliman, Tom; Herrick, Christina; Peterson, Seth; Roberts, Dar; Keller, Michael; Palace, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Amazonia has experienced large-scale regional droughts that affect forest productivity and biomass stocks. Space-borne remote sensing provides basin-wide data on impacts of meteorological anomalies, an important complement to relatively limited ground observations across the Amazon's vast and remote humid tropical forests. Morning overpass QuikScat Ku-band microwave backscatter from the forest canopy was anomalously low during the 2005 drought, relative to the full instrument record of 1999-2009, and low morning backscatter persisted for 2006-2009, after which the instrument failed. The persistent low backscatter has been suggested to be indicative of increased forest vulnerability to future drought. To better ascribe the cause of the low post-drought backscatter, we analyzed multiyear, gridded remote sensing data sets of precipitation, land surface temperature, forest cover and forest cover loss, and microwave backscatter over the 2005 drought region in the southwestern Amazon Basin (4°-12°S, 66°-76°W) and in adjacent 8°x10° regions to the north and east. We found moderate to weak correlations with the spatial distribution of persistent low backscatter for variables related to three groups of forest impacts: the 2005 drought itself, loss of forest cover, and warmer and drier dry seasons in the post-drought vs. the pre-drought years. However, these variables explained only about one quarter of the variability in depressed backscatter across the southwestern drought region. Our findings indicate that drought impact is a complex phenomenon and that better understanding can only come from more extensive ground data and/or analysis of frequent, spatially-comprehensive, high-resolution data or imagery before and after droughts.

  5. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  6. Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV total ozone and profile algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhartia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the algorithm that has been applied to develop a 42 yr record of total ozone and ozone profiles from eight Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV instruments launched on NASA and NOAA satellites since April 1970. The Version 8 (V8 algorithm was released more than a decade ago and has been in use since then at NOAA to produce their operational ozone products. The current algorithm (V8.6 is basically the same as V8, except for updates to instrument calibration, incorporation of new ozone absorption cross-sections, and new ozone and cloud height climatologies. Since the V8 algorithm has been optimized for deriving monthly zonal mean (MZM anomalies for ozone assessment and model comparisons, our emphasis in this paper is primarily on characterizing the sources of errors that are relevant for such studies. When data are analyzed this way the effect of some errors, such as vertical smoothing of short-term variability, and noise due to clouds and aerosols diminish in importance, while the importance of others, such as errors due to vertical smoothing of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and other periodic and aperiodic variations, become more important. With V8.6 zonal mean data we now provide smoothing kernels that can be used to compare anomalies in SBUV profile and partial ozone columns with models. In this paper we show how to use these kernels to compare SBUV data with Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS ozone profiles. These kernels are particularly useful for comparisons in the lower stratosphere where SBUV profiles have poor vertical resolution but partial column ozone values have high accuracy. We also provide our best estimate of the smoothing errors associated with SBUV MZM profiles. Since smoothing errors are the largest source of uncertainty in these profiles, they can be treated as error bars in deriving interannual variability and trends using SBUV data and for comparing with other measurements. In the V8 and V8.6 algorithms we derive total

  7. Spectral variability of airborne ocean color data linked to variations in lidar backscattering profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Hugo, M. A.; Gould, R.; Lee, Z.; Arnone, R.; Gray, D.; Churnside, J.

    2009-08-01

    Characterization of 3-D underwater light fields from above the sea surface requires passive and active remote sensing measurements. In this work, we suggest the use of passive ocean color sensors and lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) to examine the vertical structure of optical properties in marine waters of the Northern Part of the Gulf of Alaska (NGOA). We collected simultaneous airborne remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) in the spectral range 443-780 nm (MicroSAS, Satlantic) and lidar-derived volume backscattering (β) profiles (0-20 m depth, wavelength = 532 nm) during August 17 2002 in shelf waters situated south of Kodiak Island off Alaska (57.48°-58.04° N, 152.91°-151.67° W). We evaluated the spectral response of Rrs to perturbations on vertical distribution of β by comparing the spatial variability between aggregated (250 m horizontal resolution x 1 m vertical resolution) Rrs spectral ratios and different lidar statistics per bin (Maximum β per bin, mean β per bin, βm, standard deviation of β per bin, βstd, integrated β per bin, βint) or group of bins (lidar volume extinction coefficient of β between 0 and 5 m depth). Sub-surface changes of βm, βint, and βstd were mainly correlated with Rrs (490)/Rrs (555) variability along the flight-track (Semi-partial correlation coefficients = 0.12 to 0.21). Our results evidenced linkages between above and below-sea surface optical properties that can be used to derive water optical constituents as a function of depth based on combined passive-active data.

  8. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Noh Young M.; Mueller Detlef; Shin Sungkyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica). During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section a...

  9. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...... serial sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality...... milling. For 3D‐EBSD experiments of a material such as STN, it is recommended to combine a high kV FIB milling and low kV polishing for each slice in order to optimize the data quality and acquisition time....

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Venus Radar Backscatter Data in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S. M.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing mapping of the Ganiki Planitia (V14) quadrangle of Venus and definition of material units has involved an integrated but qualitative analysis of Magellan radar backscatter images and topography using standard geomorphological mapping techniques. However, such analyses do not take full advantage of the quantitative information contained within the images. Analysis of the backscatter coefficient allows a much more rigorous statistical comparison between mapped units, permitting first order selfsimilarity tests of geographically separated materials assigned identical geomorphological labels. Such analyses cannot be performed directly on pixel (DN) values from Magellan backscatter images, because the pixels are scaled to the Muhleman law for radar echoes on Venus and are not corrected for latitudinal variations in incidence angle. Therefore, DN values must be converted based on pixel latitude back to their backscatter coefficient values before accurate statistical analysis can occur. Here we present a method for performing the conversions and analysis of Magellan backscatter data using commonly available ArcGIS software and illustrate the advantages of the process for geological mapping.

  11. Coherent Backscattering and Opposition Effects Observed in Some Atmosphereless Bodies of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugach, Zh. M.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of photometric and polarimetric observations carried out for some bright atmosphere-less bodies of the Solar system near the zero phase angle reveal the simultaneous existence of two spectacular optical phenomena, the so-called brightness and polarization opposition effects. In a number of studies, these phenomena were explained by the influence of coherent backscattering. However, in general, the interference concept of coherent backscattering can be used only in the case where the particles are in the far-field zones of each other, i.e., when the scattering medium is rather rarefied. Because of this, it is important to prove rigorously and to demonstrate that the coherent backscattering effect may also exist in densely packed scattering media like regolith surface layers of celestial bodies. From the results of the computer modeling performed with the use of numerically exact solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations for discrete random media with different packing densities of particles, we studied the origin and evolution of all the opposition phenomena predicted by the coherent backscattering theory for low-packing-density media. It has been shown that the predictions of this theory remain valid for rather high-packing densities of particles that are typical, in particular, of regolith surfaces of the Solar system bodies. The results allow us to conclude that both opposition effects observed simultaneously in some high-albedo atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system are caused precisely by coherent backscattering of solar light in the regolith layers composed of microscopic particles.

  12. Modification of Spalart-Allmaras model with consideration of turbulence energy backscatter using velocity helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangwei, E-mail: liuyangwei@126.com [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Lipeng [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Laboratoire International Associe, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Fang, Le [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69134 (France); Laboratoire International Associe, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Gao, Feng [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-06-13

    The correlation between the velocity helicity and the energy backscatter is proved in a DNS case of 256{sup 3}-grid homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. The helicity is then proposed to be employed to improve turbulence models and SGS models. Then Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model (SA) is modified with the helicity to take account of the energy backscatter, which is significant in the region of corner separation in compressors. By comparing the numerical results with experiments, it can be concluded that the modification for SA model with helicity can appropriately represent the energy backscatter, and greatly improves the predictive accuracy for simulating the corner separation flow in compressors. -- Highlights: → We study the relativity between the velocity helicity and the energy backscatter. → Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is modified with the velocity helicity. → The modified model is employed to simulate corner separation in compressor cascade. → The modification can greatly improve the accuracy for predicting corner separation. → The helicity can represent the energy backscatter in turbulence and SGS models.

  13. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  14. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet...... the requirements for analysis of these films. High‐resolution electron backscatter diffraction is inadequate for full characterization of nanotwins, but image quality maps obtained from electron backscatter diffraction at least yield a qualitative estimation of the location and number of nanotwins. Complementing...... this information with ion channelling imaging provides more representative insights into the microstructure, because it supplements the quantitative investigation of the number and width of twin lamellae with additional crystallographic orientation analysis provided by EBSD. To this end, two methods for adjusting...

  15. Improving high-intensity focused ultrasound beam imaging via a backscattering suppression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kazuhiro; Azuma, Takashi; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Hideki; Itani, Kazunori; Wang, Junchen; Iwahashi, Toshihide; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    In an ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device, a HIFU focal error may be observed in an ultrasound pulse-echo image due to the difference between the HIFU and imaging beam aberrations occurring in the heterogeneous propagative medium, which was verified by simulating the ultrasound beams passing through an abdominal wall. The HIFU focal error could reduce the accuracy of targeting the HIFU focal spot at a tumor. To measure the focal error, HIFU beam imaging based on backscattered wave reconstruction can be used; however, its image qualities deteriorate due to inhomogeneous backscattering. Hence, we proposed a novel backscattering suppression algorithm based on an inverse problem approach to retrieve HIFU beam components. The proposed algorithm was validated in ex vivo experiments in conjunction with focal spot shifts and beam width variations, demonstrating the clear improvement of HIFU beam imaging quality.

  16. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  17. Comparison of measurements and theory for backscatter from bare and snow-covered saline ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredow, Jonathan W.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad

    1990-01-01

    C-band radar backscatter measurements were made on artificially grown sea ice during the winters of 1987-1988 and 1988-1989. These measurements were made on smooth, rough, and snow-covered saline ice. The measured sigma-deg(theta) of smooth saline ice (rms height less than 0.05 cm) disagreed with small perturbation method (SPM) surface scattering predictions. Using physical parameters of the ice in a simple layer model, it us shown that this discrepancy can be explained by scattering from beneath the surface. A thin (7-cm) dry snow cover had a significant influence on backscatter from the smooth ice sheet. This influence was due to scattering from particles within the snow, and can be predicted by a commonly used empirical layer model for snow. The results of backscatter measurements of a moderately rough saline ice sheet were found to agree with SPM predictions.

  18. Measurements and analysis of acoustic backscattering by elastic cubes and irregular polyhedra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorne, P D; Sun, S; Zhang, J

    1997-01-01

    Underwater acoustic studies of backscattering by submerged targets have generally focused on bodies with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. However, there are interests in scattering by objects which may be characterized by more angular features, with surfaces that tend to be composed of facets...... and edges. To investigate the scattering properties of such bodies, the backscattering by a number of elastic cubes, and irregularly shaped polyhedra, have been studied. Data were collected by measuring the band limited impulse response of the scatterers, using a broadband transducer, which operated...... as a transceiver, both transmitting and receiving signals. To present the scattering measurements nondimensionally a form function definition has been employed to normalize the backscattered signals. The normalized frequency has been expressed as ka, where k is the acoustic wave number, and a is a characteristic...

  19. A composite L-band HH radar backscattering model for coniferous forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoquing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The radar backscattering model developed by Richards et al. (1987), has been improved and further tested in this research. The trunk term may now be calculated from the exact solution to the electromagnetic wave equations instead of the corner reflector equation. Rough surface models have been introduced into the radar model, so that the forward reflectance and the backscattering from the ground surface are now calculated from the same model and, thus, are consistent. The number of trees in an individual pixel is assumed to be Poisson distributed, with tree height in a stand log-normally distributed. The simulated results show that the match of backscattering coefficients for eight forest stands between SIR-B image data and the simulated results are satisfying, and that the trunk term now seems to be convincingly established as the dominant term in the L-band HH radar return from coniferous forest stands.

  20. Development of a global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micrometers within the free troposphere was investigated and a model to describe this variation was developed. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets used were obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series, and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained that describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season.

  1. Development of global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The improvement of an understanding of the variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micron within the free troposphere and the development model to describe this was undertaken. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets are obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained, which describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season. Most data are available and greatest consistency is found inside the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. Probing insect backscatter cross-section and melanization using kHz optical remote detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebru, Alem K.; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter

    2016-09-01

    kHz optical remote sensing system is implemented to determine melanization and backscatter cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) in situ. It is shown that backscatter cross-section in the SWIR is insensitive to melanization and absolute melanization can be derived from the ratio of backscatter cross-section in two bands (SWIR/NIR). We have shown that insects reflect more strongly in the SWIR as compared to NIR and Visible (VIS) in accordance with previous findings. This is illustrated using three different insects (Snow white moth (spilosoma genus), Fox moth (Macrothylacia) and Leather beetle (Odontotaenius genus)) and it is shown that the reflectance of the Leather beetle in the VIS and NIR is more affected by melanization as compared with snow white moth.

  3. Performance of low-power RFID tags based on modulated backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhanna, Zeinab; Sibille, Alain; Contreras, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Ultra Wideband (UWB) modulated backscattering (MBS) passive Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) systems provide a promising solution to overcome many limitations of current narrowband RFID devices. This work addresses the performance of such systems from the point of view of the radio channel between the readers and the tags. Such systems will likely combine several readers, in order to provide both the detection and localization of tags operating in MBS. Two successive measurements campaigns have been carried out in an indoor reference scenario environment. The first is intended to verify the methods and serves as a way to validate the RFID backscattering measurement setup. The second represents a real use case for RFID application and allows one to quantitatively analyze the path loss of the backscattering propagation channel. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Changes in backscatter of liver tissue due to thermal coagulation induced by focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishitani, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic imaging has advantages in its self-consistency in guiding and monitoring ultrasonic treatment such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Changes in ultrasonic backscatter of tissues due to HIFU treatment have been observed, but their mechanism is still under discussion. In this paper, ultrasonic backscatter of excised and degassed porcine liver tissue was observed before and after HIFU exposure using a diagnostic scanner, and its acoustic impedance was mapped using an ultrasonic microscope. The histology of its pathological specimen was also observed using an optical microscope. The observed decrease in backscatter intensity due to HIFU exposure was consistent with a spatial Fourier analysis of the histology, which also showed changes due to the exposure. The observed increase in acoustic impedance due to the exposure was also consistent with the histological change assuming that the increase was primarily caused by the increase in the concentration of hepatic cells.

  5. Calculation of backscatter factors for diagnostic radiology using Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoussi-Henss, N.; Zankl, M.; Drexler, G.; Panzer, W.; Regulla, D. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    Backscatter factors were determined for x-ray beams relevant to diagnostic radiology using Monte Carlo methods. The phantom size considered most suitable for calibration of dosimeters is a cuboid of 30x30cm{sup 2} front surface and 15 cm depth. This phantom size also provides a good approximation to adult patients. Three different media were studied: water, PMMA and ICRU tissue; the source geometry was a point source with varying field size and source-to-phantom distance. The variations of the backscatter factor with phantom medium and field geometry were examined. From the obtained data, a set of backscatter factors was selected and proposed for adoption as a standard set for the calibration of dosimeters to be used to measure diagnostic reference doses. (author)

  6. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  7. Introduction to Microwave Active Techniques and Backscatter Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Lidicky, L.

    2008-01-01

    The present article introduces active microwave techniques that are used for remote sensing of the European seas, focusing on RAdio Detection And Ranging (RADAR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In section 1 the ranging principle and associated topics are introduced. As an example of this

  8. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  9. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac integrated backscatter analysis in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lijian; Wang, Renjian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Yongwei; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Tingting

    2016-01-12

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that affects the coronary arteries. However, the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and Kawasaki disease has been completely unknown until now. We aimed to provide quantitative information about myocardial fibrosis using cardiac integrated backscatter in Han race Kawasaki disease patients. Ninety Kawasaki disease patients and 90 healthy control subjects were recruited. Based on Kawasaki disease status, the patients were categorized into 3 groups: acute, subacute, and convalescence phase. Based on coronary artery status, the Kawasaki disease patients were categorized into 3 groups: without coronary artery lesions, with coronary artery dilation, and with coronary artery aneurysms. All subjects underwent two-dimensional and Doppler examinations to measure clinical echocardiographic parameters. Myocardial fibrosis was detected with calibrated integrated backscatter imaging. Left ventricle systolic functions were normal in both the Kawasaki disease and control participants. The myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values of the left ventricles of the acute (p Kawasaki disease patients were significantly greater than those of the healthy controls. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values were significantly smaller in the Kawasaki disease patients without coronary artery lesions than in the Kawasaki disease patients with coronary artery dilations and coronary artery aneurysms in different phases. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter results were positively correlated with coronary artery status in the acute (r = 0.331, p Kawasaki disease. Our findings may suggest that myocardial fibrosis occurs during early episodes of Kawasaki disease given uncertainties that exist regarding correlations of calibrated integrated backscatter and myocardial fibrosis.

  10. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki, E-mail: takahira@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki, E-mail: oga@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Naoto, E-mail: su101064@edu.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Moe [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai-shi, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  11. Long Wavelength SAR Backscatter Modelling Trends as a Consequence of the Emergent Properties of Tree Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brolly

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the novel use of a macroecological plant and forest structure model in conjunction with a Radiative Transfer (RT model to better understand interactions between microwaves and forest canopies. Trends predicted by the RT model, resulting from interactions with mixed age, mono and multi species forests, are analysed in comparison to those predicted using a simplistic structure based scattering model. This model relates backscatter to scatterer cross sectional or volume specifications, dependent on the size. The Spatially Explicit Reiterative Algorithm (SERA model is used to provide a widely varied tree size distribution while maintaining allometric consistency to produce a natural-like forest representation. The RT model is parameterised using structural information from SERA and microwave backscatter simulations are used to analyse the impact of changes to the forest stand. Results show that the slope of the saturation curve observed in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR backscatter-biomass relationship is sensitive to thinning and therefore forest basal area. Due to similarities displayed between the results of the RT and simplistic model, it is determined that forest SAR backscatter behaviour at long microwave wavelengths may be described generally using equations related to total stem volume and basal area. The nature of these equations is such that they describe saturating behaviour of forests in the absence of attenuation in comparable fashion to the trends exhibited using the RT model. Both modelled backscatter trends predict a   relationship to forest basal area from an early age when forest volume is increasing. When this is not the case, it is assumed to be a result of attenuation of the dominant stem-ground interaction due to the presence of excessive numbers of stems. This work shows how forest growth models can be successfully incorporated into existing independent scattering models and reveals, through the RT

  12. Experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations of a landmine localization device using the neutron backscattering method

    CERN Document Server

    Datema, C P; Eijk, C W E

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the possible use of neutron backscattering for the detection of landmines buried in the soil. Several landmines, buried in a sand-pit, were positively identified. A series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the complexity of the neutron backscattering process and to optimize the geometry of a future prototype. The results of these simulations indicate that this method shows great potential for the detection of non-metallic landmines (with a plastic casing), for which so far no reliable method has been found.

  13. The laser-backscattering equations and their application to the study of the atmospheric structure

    CERN Document Server

    Castrejon, R; Castrejon, J; Morales, A

    2002-01-01

    In this work a method for interpreting backscattering signals acquired by a lidar is described. The method is based on the elastic scattering of laser radiation due to gases and particles suspended in the atmosphere (bulk effects). We propose a space-time diagram which helps to evaluate the arguments of the equation that serves to calculate the lidar signal in terms of the backscattering coefficient. We describe how the system detects gradients on this coefficient, along the laser optical path. To illustrate the method, we present some typical lidar results obtained in the neighborhood of Mexico City. (Author)

  14. Computation of Nonlinear Backscattering Using a High-Order Numerical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) is the standard model for propagation of intense laser beams in Kerr media. The NLS is derived from the nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. In this study we use a fourth-order finite-difference method supplemented by special two-way artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) to solve the NLH as a boundary value problem. Our numerical methodology allows for a direct comparison of the NLH and NLS models and for an accurate quantitative assessment of the backscattered signal.

  15. Boundary effects on backscattering by a solid aluminum cylinder: experiment and finite element model comparisons (L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Follett, Jon R; Williams, Kevin L; Marston, Philip L

    2011-08-01

    Backscattering of sound by a solid aluminum cylinder was measured in the free field and with the cylinder near a flat surface. The target was suspended just below the surface of a water tank to simulate some aspects of backscattering when resting on the seabed. Measurements were compared with predictions made by an approximate hybrid approach based on multiple two-dimensional finite element calculations and the use of images. Many of the spectral features present in the tank data were present in the model. Comparing numerical model predictions with experimental data serves to build credibility for the modeling approach and can assist in developing insight into the underlying physical processes.

  16. Iodine vapor staining for atomic number contrast in backscattered electron and X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan; Mccorkell, Fergus A; Taylor, Graham K; Bomphrey, Richard J; Doube, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Iodine imparts strong contrast to objects imaged with electrons and X-rays due to its high atomic number (53), and is widely used in liquid form as a microscopic stain and clinical contrast agent. We have developed a simple technique which exploits elemental iodine's sublimation-deposition state-change equilibrium to vapor stain specimens with iodine gas. Specimens are enclosed in a gas-tight container along with a small mass of solid I2 . The bottle is left at ambient laboratory conditions while staining proceeds until empirically determined completion (typically days to weeks). We demonstrate the utility of iodine vapor staining by applying it to resin-embedded tissue blocks and whole locusts and imaging them with backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) or X-ray microtomography (XMT). Contrast is comparable to that achieved with liquid staining but without the consequent tissue shrinkage, stain pooling, or uneven coverage artefacts associated with immersing the specimen in iodine solutions. Unmineralized tissue histology can be read in BSE SEM images with good discrimination between tissue components. Organs within the locust head are readily distinguished in XMT images with particularly useful contrast in the chitin exoskeleton, muscle and nerves. Here, we have used iodine vapor staining for two imaging modalities in frequent use in our laboratories and on the specimen types with which we work. It is likely to be equally convenient for a wide range of specimens, and for other modalities which generate contrast from electron- and photon-sample interactions, such as transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy. © 2014 The Authors. Microscopy Research Technique published by Wiley Periodocals, Inc.

  17. Singular spectrum analysis applied to backscattered ultrasound signals from in vitro human cancellous bone specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wagner C A; Bridal, S Lori; Coron, Alain; Laugier, Pascal

    2004-03-01

    Mean scatterer spacing (MSS) holds particular promise for the detection of changes in quasiperiodic tissue microstructures such as may occur during development of disease in the liver, spleen, or bones. Many techniques that may be applied for MSS estimation (temporal and spectral autocorrelation, power spectrum and cepstrum, higher order statistics, and quadratic transformation) characterize signals that contain a mixture of periodic and nonperiodic contributions. In contrast, singular spectrum analysis (SSA), a method usually applied in nonlinear dynamics, first identifies components of signals corresponding to periodic structures and, second, identifies dominant periodicity. Thus, SSA may better separate periodic structures from nonperiodic structures and noise. Using an ultrasound echo simulation model, we previously demonstrated SSA's potential to identify MSS of structures in quasiperiodic scattering media. The current work aims to observe the behavior of MSS estimation by SSA using ultrasound measurements in phantom materials (two parallel, nylon-line phantoms and four foam phantoms of different densities). The SSA was able to estimate not only the nylon-line distances but also nylon-line thickness. The method also was sensitive to the average pore-size differences of the four sponges. The algorithms then were applied to characterize human cancellous bone microarchitectures. Using 1-MHz center-frequency, radio-frequency ultrasound signals, MSS was measured in 24 in vitro bone samples and ranged from 1.0 to 1.7 mm. The SSA MSS estimates correlate significantly to MSS measured independently from synchrotron microtomography, r2 = 0.68. Thus, application of SSA to backscattered ultrasound signals seems to be useful for providing information linked to tissue microarchitecture that is not evident from clinical images.

  18. Distributed optical fibre temperature measurements in a low dose rate radiation environment based on Rayleigh backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, A.; Gussarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Liokumovich, L. B.; Kotov, O. I.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Deschoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2012-04-01

    On-line monitoring of environmental conditions in nuclear facilities is becoming a more and more important problem. Standard electronic sensors are not the ideal solution due to radiation sensitivity and difficulties in installation of multiple sensors. In contrast, radiation-hard optical fibres can sustain very high radiation doses and also naturally offer multi-point or distributed monitoring of external perturbations. Multiple local electro-mechanical sensors can be replaced by just one measuring fibre. At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world 1. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of major NPP components can threaten plant safety and also plant life. Among those elements, cables are vital components of I&C systems in NPPs. To ensure their safe operation and predict remaining life, environmental monitoring is necessary. In particular, temperature and radiation dose are considered to be the two most important parameters. The aim of this paper is to assess experimentally the feasibility of optical fibre temperature measurements in a low doserate radiation environment, using a commercially available reflectometer based on Rayleigh backscattering. Four different fibres were installed in the Sub-Pile Room of the BR2 Material testing nuclear reactor in Mol, Belgium. This place is man-accessible during the reactor shut-down, allowing easy fibre installation. When the reactor operates, the dose-rates in the room are in a range 0.005-5 Gy/h with temperatures of 40-60 °C, depending on the location. Such a surrounding is not much different to some "hot" environments in NPPs, where I&C cables are located.

  19. The Origin of Graphic Granite: New Insights from Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Wu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Graphic granite, found predominantly in granitic pegmatite, is a leucocratic granitic rock consisting of an intimate intergrowth of alkali feldspar and quartz with a distinctive texture as ancient cuneiform writing when viewed in certain cross sections. Deciphering the graphic texture is important for understanding its origin and the crystallization process of granitic rocks. In this study, we present investigations on petrology, mineral composition, crystallographic relationship and topotaxy of quartz and alkali feldspar in graphic granites from the Fangshan adakitic pluton, Beijing, north China and the Luotian dome in the Northern Dabie Mountains, central China. The euhedral to subhedral coarse-grained feldspar host in graphic granite can be alkali feldspar or plagioclase. Microscopically, the feldspar host is usually a perthite, which is decomposed into irregular intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar. The volume content of quartz usually ranges from 20% to 45%, and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite depends greatly on the formation conditions. However, the quartz-feldspar ratio and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite are relatively stable in coeval graphic granites in the same area. The majority of the quartz grains undergrown with host feldspar are in the form of sub-parallel tabular, long rods and unconnected dendritic crystals, which only shows a distinctive graphic texture in certain cross sections. Under cross polarized light microscopy, multiple domains of quartz grains exhibit a nearly simultaneous extinction within a single crystal of feldspar. The crystallographic orientations of the quartz grains and the host feldspar were measured using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Statistical analyses indicate a definite crystallographic orientation relationship between the majority of graphic quartz grains and the host feldspar in that [11-23]Quartz parallel to [001]Feldspar. Moreover, Dauphiné twin of quartz

  20. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  1. Attenuation of Bragg backscattering of electromagnetic waves from density fluctuations near the region of polarization degeneracy in magnetoactive plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gospodchikov, E. D., E-mail: egos@appl.sci-nnov.ru; Khusainov, T. A.; Shalashov, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Specific features of Bragg backscattering under conditions of strong polarization degeneracy near the cutoff surface in an anisotropic medium are studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that the linear interaction of normal waves can substantially affect wave scattering by suppressing the amplification of Bragg backscattering near the cutoff region in the case of weak coupling between normal waves.

  2. Comparison of CO2 Lidar Backscatter with Particle Size Distribution and GOES-7 Data in Hurricane Juliette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, Maurice; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, Vandana; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Cutten, Dean R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Backscatter measurements using 9.1 and 10.6 micron continuous wave lidars were obtained along with particle size distributions in 1995 Hurricane Juliette at altitude approximately 11.7 km. Agreement between lidar backscatter and cloud particle size distribution was excellent. Measurements also correlated well with concurrent GOES-7 infrared images of cloud top height.

  3. Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric S. Kasischke; Laura L. Bourgeau-Chavez; Allison R. Rober; Kevin H. Wyatt; James M. Waddington; Merritt R. Turetsky

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary investigation of the response of ERS C-band SAR backscatter to variations in soil moisture and surface inundation in wetlands of interior Alaska. Data were collected from 5 wetlands over a three-week period in 2007. Results showed a positive correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in sites dominated by herbaceous vegetation cover (r...

  4. Experimental Determination of Dual-Wavelength Mie Lidar Geometric form Factor Combining Side-Scatter and Back-Scatter Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In theory, lidar overlap factor can be derived from the difference between the particle backscatter coefficient retrieved from lidar elastic signal without overlap correction and the actual particle backscatter coefficient, which can be obtained by other measured techniques. The side-scatter signal using a CCD camera is testified to be a powerful tool to detect the particle backscatter coefficient in near ground layer during night time. In experiment, by combining side-scatter and backscatter signals the geometric form factor for vertically-pointing Mie lidar in 532 nm channel is determined successfully, which is corrected by an iteration algorithm combining the retrieved particle backscatter coefficient using CCD sidescatter method and Fernald method. In this study, the method will be expanded to 1064 nm channel in dual-wavelength Mie lidar during routine campaigns. The experimental results in different atmosphere conditions demonstrated that the method present in this study is available in practice.

  5. The sensitivity studies of a landmine explosive detection system based on neutron backscattering using Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hamda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a Monte Carlo simulation of a landmine detection system, using the MCNP5 code, for the detection of concealed explosives such as trinitrotoluene and cyclonite. In portable field detectors, the signal strength of backscattered neutrons and gamma rays from thermal neutron activation is sensitive to a number of parameters such as the mass of explosive, depth of concealment, neutron moderation, background soil composition, soil porosity, soil moisture, multiple scattering in the background material, and configuration of the detection system. In this work, a detection system, with BF3 detectors for neutrons and sodium iodide scintillator for g-rays, is modeled to investigate the neutron signal-to-noise ratio and to obtain an empirical formula for the photon production rate Ri(n,γ= SfGfMf(d,m from radiative capture reactions in constituent nuclides of trinitrotoluene. This formula can be used for the efficient landmine detection of explosives in quantities as small as ~200 g of trinitrotoluene concealed at depths down to about 15 cm. The empirical formula can be embedded in a field programmable gate array on a field-portable explosives' sensor for efficient online detection.

  6. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter using internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% ± 2.1% (CALIOP lower at night and within 2.9% ± 3.9% (CALIOP lower during the day, demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3.01 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential biases and uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 4.5% ± 3.2% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared with prior assessments of the CALIOP 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration.

  7. Lidar monitoring of regions of intense backscatter with poorly defined boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir A. Kovalev; Alexander Petkov; Cyle Wold; WeiMin Hao

    2011-01-01

    The upper height of a region of intense backscatter with a poorly defined boundary between this region and a region of clear air above it is found as the maximal height where aerosol heterogeneity is detectable, that is, where it can be discriminated from noise. The theoretical basis behind the retrieval technique and the corresponding lidar-data-processing procedures...

  8. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  9. Free-solution, label-free molecular interactions studied by back-scattering interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornhop, D.J.; Latham, J.C.; Kussrow, A.

    2007-01-01

    Free-solution, label-free molecular interactions were investigated with back-scattering interferometry in a simple optical train composed of a helium-neon laser, a microfluidic channel, and a position sensor. Molecular binding interactions between proteins, ions and protein, and small molecules...

  10. Dominant Channel Occupancy for Wi-Fi Backscatter Uplink in Industrial Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyok Kwon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dominant channel occupancy (DCO mechanism for the Wi-Fi backscatter uplink in the industrial Internet of things (IIoT. The DCO provides high-priority channel access and reliable burst transmission to the Wi-Fi backscatter devices, thereby enabling the Wi-Fi backscatter tag to deliver its tag information to the Wi-Fi reader without interference from neighboring legacy Wi-Fi devices to guarantee the timeliness and reliability of the IIoT system. For the former, we consider three types of medium access control (MAC configurations: “carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA starting with short inter-frame space (SIFS”, “freezing of the backoff period”, and “reduced CWmin.” In addition, the DCO uses the SIFS between burst packets to guarantee reliable burst transmission. To verify the effectiveness of DCO and determine a proper value for MAC parameters, we conduct experimental simulations under IEEE 802.11n PHY/MAC environments. The simulation results show that the reduced CWmin has the most significant effect on the channel occupancy. The Wi-Fi backscatter devices achieve much higher throughput than the separate cases when two or more configurations are used simultaneously. Moreover, the results exhibit that the use of SIFS between consecutive packets supports reliable burst transmission regardless of the transmission of the legacy Wi-Fi devices in the vicinity.

  11. A compact Compton backscatter X-ray source for mammography and coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Weber, M.E.; Volz, S.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gierman, S.M.; Hayes, K.; Vernon, W. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Goldstein, D.J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective is to generate a large flux of tunable, monochromatic x-rays for use in mammography and coronary angiography. The approach is based on Compton backscattering of an ultraviolet solid-state laser beam against the high-brightness 20-MeV electron beams from a compact linear accelerator. The direct Compton backscatter approach failed to produce a large flux of x-rays due to the low photon flux of the scattering solid-state laser. The authors have modified the design of a compact x-ray source to the new Compton backscattering geometry with use of a regenerative amplifier free-electron laser. They have successfully demonstrated the production of a large flux of infrared photons and a high-brightness electron beam focused in both dimensions for performing Compton backscattering in a regenerative amplifier geometry.

  12. Sensitivity of Multi-Source SAR Backscatter to Changes in Forest Aboveground Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of forest aboveground biomass (AGB after anthropogenic disturbance could reduce uncertainties in the carbon budget of terrestrial ecosystems and provide critical information to policy makers. Yet, the loss of carbon due to forest disturbance and the gain from post-disturbance recovery have not been sufficiently assessed. In this study, a sensitivity analysis was first conducted to investigate: (1 the influence of incidence angle and soil moisture on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR backscatter; (2 the feasibility of cross-image normalization between multi-temporal and multi-sensor SAR data; and (3 the possibility of applying normalized backscatter data to detect forest biomass changes. An empirical model was used to reduce incidence angle effects, followed by cross-image normalization procedure to lessen soil moisture effect. Changes in forest biomass at medium spatial resolution (100 m were mapped using both spaceborne and airborne SAR data. Results indicate that (1 the effect of incidence angle on SAR backscatter could be reduced to less than 1 dB by the correction model for airborne SAR data; (2 over 50% of the changes in SAR backscatter due to soil moisture could be eliminated by the cross-image normalization procedure; and (3 forest biomass changes greater than 100 Mg·ha−1 or above 50% of 150 Mg·ha−1 are detectable using cross-normalized SAR data.

  13. Probing insect backscatter cross section and melanization using kHz optical remote detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebru, Alem; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    A kHz optical remote sensing system is implemented to determine insect melanization features. This is done by measuring the backscatter signal in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) in situ. It is shown that backscatter cross section in the SWIR is insensitive to melanization and absolute melanization can be derived from the ratio of backscatter cross section of different bands (SWIR/VIS-NIR). We have shown that reflectance from insect is stronger in the SWIR as compared to NIR and VIS. This reveals that melanization plays a big role to determine backscatter cross section. One can use this feature as a tool to improve insect species and age classification. To support the findings, we illustrated melanization feature using three different insects [dead, dried specimens of snow white moth (Spilosoma genus), fox moth (Macrothylacia), and leather beetle (Odontotaenius genus)]. It is shown that reflectance from the leather beetle in the VIS and NIR is more affected by melanization as compared with snow white moth.

  14. The energy loss of medium-energy He+ ions backscattered from a Cu(100) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Weg, W.F. van der

    A model is presented for the shape of the surface peak in the energy spectrum of backscattered ions in a channeling and blocking experiment. The elastic energy loss distribution of the ions is calculated by use of Monte Carlo simulation. The inelastic energy loss distribution is calculated by use of

  15. Relationships of S-Band Radar Backscatter and Forest Aboveground Biomass in Different Forest Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Ningthoujam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR signals respond to the interactions of microwaves with vegetation canopy scatterers that collectively characterise forest structure. The sensitivity of S-band (7.5–15 cm backscatter to the different forest types (broadleaved, needleleaved with varying aboveground biomass (AGB across temperate (mixed, needleleaved and tropical (broadleaved, woody savanna, secondary forests is less well understood. In this study, Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS-I radiative transfer model simulations showed strong volume scattering returns from S-band SAR for broadleaved canopies caused by ground/trunk interactions. A general relationship between AirSAR S-band measurements and MIMICS-I simulated radar backscatter with forest AGB up to nearly 100 t/ha in broadleaved forest in the UK was found. Simulated S-band backscatter-biomass relationships suggest increasing backscatter sensitivity to forest biomass with a saturation level close to 100 t/ha and errors between 37 t/ha and 44 t/ha for HV and VV polarisations for tropical ecosystems. In the near future, satellite SAR-derived forest biomass from P-band BIOMASS mission and L-band ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 in combination with S-band UK NovaSAR-S and the joint NASA-ISRO NISAR sensors will provide better quantification of large-scale forest AGB at varying sensitivity levels across primary and secondary forests and woody savannas.

  16. A Laboratory Experiment on EM Backscatter from Farley-Buneman and Gradient Drift Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alport, M. J.; D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans

    1981-01-01

    Results are reported of a laboratory experiment on Bragg backscatter of 3-cm microwaves by turbulent waves driven by the Farley-Buneman and gradient drift instabilities. The present work is the third in a series of laboratory experiments performed to test, under controlled conditions, prevalent i...... ideas on EM scattering by equatorial and high-latitude ionospheric waves and irregularities....

  17. Investigation of the relationship between optical auroral forms and HF radar E region backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The SuperDARN HF radars have been employed in the past to investigate the spectral characteristics of coherent backscatter from L-shell aligned features in the auroral E region. The present study employs all-sky camera observations of the aurora from Husafell, Iceland, and the two SuperDARN radars located on Iceland, Þykkvibær and Stokkseyri, to determine the optical signature of such backscatter features. It is shown that, especially during quiet geomagnetic conditions, the backscatter region is closely associated with east-west aligned diffuse auroral features, and that the two move in tandem with each other. This association between optical and radar aurora has repercussions for the instability mechanisms responsible for generating the E region irregularities from which radars scatter. This is discussed and compared with previous studies investigating the relationship between optical and VHF radar aurora. In addition, although it is known that E region backscatter is commonly observed by SuperDARN radars, the present study demonstrates for the first time that multiple radars can observe the same feature to extend over at least 3 h of magnetic local time, allowing precipitation features to be mapped over large portions of the auroral zone.Key words: Ionosphere (particle precipitation; plasma waves and instabilities

  18. Super-resolved time-frequency analysis of wideband backscattered data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, John; Ling, H.

    1995-01-01

    A time-frequency super-resolution procedure is presented for processing wideband backscattered data containing both scattering center and natural resonance information. In this procedure, Prony's method is first applied in the frequency domain to locate scattering centers. The data is processed one...

  19. Acoustic backscatter by suspended cohesive sediments: Field observations, Seine Estuary, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cihan; Verney, Romaric; Sheremet, Alexandru; Voulgaris, George

    2017-02-01

    Observations of suspended sediment size and concentration, flow and acoustic backscatter intensity collected on the Seine Estuary (France) are used to study the acoustic response in cohesive-sediment dominated environments. Estimates of suspended sediment concentration based on optical backscatter sensors and water samples are used to calibrate the acoustic backscatter intensity. The vertical structure of suspended sediment concentration is then estimated from acoustic backscatter information. To our knowledge, this is the first field application of the recently proposed model of acoustic scattering by flocculating suspensions based on the variation of particle density (floc-scattering model). The estimates of sediment concentration reproduce well the observations under different tidal (neap/spring) conditions, confirming the applicability of the new model in the field when detailed particle size measurements are available. When particle size measurements are not available, using estimated floc sizes based on the turbulence intensities may provide reasonable SSC profiles. During spring tide events (associated with strong currents, small flocs and large concentrations), the performances of the new floc-scattering model and the previous models given for solid particle-scattering are comparable. The floc-scattering model increases the quality of the SSC estimates especially during low-energy conditions characterized with larger flocs.

  20. The effect of backscattering on the beta dose absorbed by individual quartz grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autzen, Martin; Guérin, G.; Murray, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the effect on dose rates and over-dispersion (OD) of changing the spectrum of energies to which grains of various shapes and volumes are exposed during beta irradiation, either by changing the backscattering medium or attenuating the incident spectrum. Dose rates are found to increase...

  1. Characteristics of CALIOP attenuated backscatter noise: implication for cloud/aerosol detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Wu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A research algorithm is developed for noise evaluation and feature detection of the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization Level 1 (L1 backscatter data with an emphasis on cloud/aerosol features in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. CALIOP measurement noise of the version v2.01 and v2.02 L1 backscatter data aggregated to (5 km horizontal resolution is analyzed with two approaches in this study. One is to compare the observed and modeled molecular scatter profiles by scaling the modeled profile (with a fitted scaling factor α to the observed clear-sky backscatter profiles. This scaling α value is sensitive to errors in the calibrated backscatter and the atmospheric model used. Most of the nighttime 532-nm α values are close to unity, as expected, but an abrupt drop occurred in October 2008 in the daytime 532-nm α, which is likely indicative of a problem in the v2.02 daytime calibrated data. The 1064-nm night α is generally close to 2 while its day α is ~3. The other approach to evaluate the lidar measurement noise is to use the calibrated lidar backscatter data at altitudes above 19 km. With this method, the 532-nm and 1064-nm measurement noises are analyzed and characterized individually for each profile in terms of the mean (μ and standard deviation (σ, showing larger σ values in general over landmasses or bright surfaces during day and in radiation-hard regions during night. A significant increasing trend is evident in the nighttime 1064-nm σ, which is likely responsible for the increasing difference between the feature occurrence frequencies (532-nm vs. 1064-nm derived from this study. For feature detection with the research algorithm, we apply a σ–based method to the aggregated L1 data. The derived morphology of feature occurrence frequency is in general agreement with that obtained from the Level 2 (L2 05 km_CLAY+05 km_ALAY products at 5 km horizontal resolution. Finally, a normalized

  2. Vortex Lattice UXO Mobility Model for Reef-Type Range Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Technologies Roundtable GIS Geographic Information System GPS Global Positioning System LIDAR Light Detection and Ranging MBBS MultiBeam BackScatter MCC...Kokee Highlands, remnant of a shield volcano that is dissected on its western side by numerous small intermittent streams and outwash areas. Drainage

  3. 3D leaf water content mapping using terrestrial laser scanner backscatter intensity with radiometric correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Niemann, K. Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Leaf water content (LWC) plays an important role in agriculture and forestry management. It can be used to assess drought conditions and wildfire susceptibility. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data have been widely used in forested environments for retrieving geometrically-based biophysical parameters. Recent studies have also shown the potential of using radiometric information (backscatter intensity) for estimating LWC. However, the usefulness of backscatter intensity data has been limited by leaf surface characteristics, and incidence angle effects. To explore the idea of using LiDAR intensity data to assess LWC we normalized (for both angular effects and leaf surface properties) shortwave infrared TLS data (1550 nm). A reflectance model describing both diffuse and specular reflectance was applied to remove strong specular backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle. Leaves with different surface properties were collected from eight broadleaf plant species for modeling the relationship between LWC and backscatter intensity. Reference reflectors (Spectralon from Labsphere, Inc.) were used to build a look-up table to compensate for incidence angle effects. Results showed that before removing the specular influences, there was no significant correlation (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05) between the backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle and LWC. After the removal of the specular influences, a significant correlation emerged (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.05). The agreement between measured and TLS-derived LWC demonstrated a significant reduction of RMSE (root mean square error, from 0.008 to 0.003 g/cm2) after correcting for the incidence angle effect. We show that it is possible to use TLS to estimate LWC for selected broadleaved plants with an R2 of 0.76 (significance level α = 0.05) at leaf level. Further investigations of leaf surface and internal structure will likely result in improvements of 3D LWC mapping for studying physiology and ecology in vegetation.

  4. Multi-Polarization ASAR Backscattering from Herbaceous Wetlands in Poyang Lake Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Sang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are one of the most important ecosystems on Earth. There is an urgent need to quantify the biophysical parameters (e.g., plant height, aboveground biomass and map total remaining areas of wetlands in order to evaluate the ecological status of wetlands. In this study, Environmental Satellite/Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT/ASAR dual-polarization C-band data acquired in 2005 is tested to investigate radar backscattering mechanisms with the variation of hydrological conditions during the growing cycle of two types of herbaceous wetland species, which colonize lake borders with different elevation in Poyang Lake region, China. Phragmites communis (L. Trin. is semi-aquatic emergent vegetation with vertical stem and blade-like leaves, and the emergent Carex spp. has rhizome and long leaves. In this study, the potential of ASAR data in HH-, HV-, and VV-polarization in mapping different wetland types is examined, by observing their dynamic variations throughout the whole flooding cycle. The sensitivity of ASAR backscattering coefficients to vegetation parameters of plant height, fresh and dry biomass, and vegetation water content is also analyzed for Phragmites communis (L. Trin. and Carex spp. The research for Phragmites communis (L. Trin. shows that HH polarization is more sensitive to plant height and dry biomass than HV polarization. ASAR backscattering coefficients are relatively less sensitive to fresh biomass, especially in HV polarization. However, both are highly dependent on canopy water content. In contrast, the dependence of HH- and HV- backscattering from Carex community on vegetation parameters is poor, and the radar backscattering mechanism is controlled by ground water level.

  5. Novel X-ray backscatter technique for detection of dangerous materials: application to aviation and port security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, S.; Wrobel, N.; Osterloh, K.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2013-09-01

    Radiological inspections, in general, are the nondestructive testing (NDT) methods to detect the bulk of explosives in large objects. In contrast to personal luggage, cargo or building components constitute a complexity that may significantly hinder the detection of a threat by conventional X-ray transmission radiography. In this article, a novel X-ray backscatter technique is presented for detecting suspicious objects in a densely packed large object with only a single sided access. It consists of an X-ray backscatter camera with a special twisted slit collimator for imaging backscattering objects. The new X-ray backscatter camera is not only imaging the objects based on their densities but also by including the influences of surrounding objects. This unique feature of the X-ray backscatter camera provides new insights in identifying the internal features of the inspected object. Experimental mock-ups were designed imitating containers with threats among a complex packing as they may be encountered in reality. We investigated the dependence of the quality of the X-ray backscatter image on (a) the exposure time, (b) multiple exposures, (c) the distance between object and slit camera, and (d) the width of the slit. At the end, the significant advantages of the presented X-ray backscatter camera in the context of aviation and port security are discussed.

  6. Skin dose mapping for non-uniform x-ray fields using a backscatter point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    Beam shaping devices like ROI attenuators and compensation filters modulate the intensity distribution of the xray beam incident on the patient. This results in a spatial variation of skin dose due to the variation of primary radiation and also a variation in backscattered radiation from the patient. To determine the backscatter component, backscatter point spread functions (PSF) are generated using EGS Monte-Carlo software. For this study, PSF's were determined by simulating a 1 mm beam incident on the lateral surface of an anthropomorphic head phantom and a 20 cm thick PMMA block phantom. The backscatter PSF's for the head phantom and PMMA phantom are curve fit with a Lorentzian function after being normalized to the primary dose intensity (PSFn). PSFn is convolved with the primary dose distribution to generate the scatter dose distribution, which is added to the primary to obtain the total dose distribution. The backscatter convolution technique is incorporated in the dose tracking system (DTS), which tracks skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures and provides a color map of the dose distribution on a 3D patient graphic model. A convolution technique is developed for the backscatter dose determination for the nonuniformly spaced graphic-model surface vertices. A Gafchromic film validation was performed for shaped x-ray beams generated with an ROI attenuator and with two compensation filters inserted into the field. The total dose distribution calculated by the backscatter convolution technique closely agreed with that measured with the film.

  7. Estimation of the particle size distribution slope with 3 methods: implications for the optical backscattering ratio and the bulk refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgis, A. P.; Drakopoulos, P. G.; Chaikalis, S.; Spyridakis, N.; Psarra, S.

    2017-09-01

    Within the framework of Perseus and AegeanMarTech projects, multidisciplinary bio-optics experiments were conducted in the optically complex, permanently stratified waters of the NE Aegean Sea. We were able to obtain the particle size distribution (PSD) slope, using different optical sensors: (a) WET Labs ECO-B3B backscattering sensor measuring VSF at three wavelengths (470, 532, and 650 nm); (b) WET Labs C-Star transmissometer (660 nm) and Chelsea ALPHAtracka MKII (470 nm); and (c) Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry - LISST-Deep. Values of the PSD slope estimated by all three methods were found to be within the ranges predicted by Mie theory and the literature. The optical backscattering ratio, bbp, was calculated from bbp(660) and cp(660) and subsequently the bulk index of refraction (np) was estimated as a function of the backscattering ratio and the PSD slope. In July 2014, the values of np varied between 1.01 and >1.24 (mean 1.12+/-0.08), which fall between phytoplankton- and mineral-dominated waters. According to the spatial distribution of np two water layers could be identified, associated with different particle composition: (a) Black Sea water (BSW) and Levantine waters (LW) (from the surface to 65 m depth) that appear to be dominated by material with mean index of refraction 1.13; and (b) the near-bottom layer which exhibited high np, >1.24, the latter attributed to mineral particles with high bulk index of refraction resuspended from the sea floor.

  8. OPO DIAL lidar for remote measurements of atmospheric gases in the IR range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Shumskii, V. K.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Applicability of a KTA crystal-based laser system with optical parametric oscillators (OPO) generation to lidar sounding of the atmosphere in the spectral range 3-4 μm is studied in this work. A technique developed for lidar sounding of trace atmospheric gases (TAG) is based on differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The new technique uses broadband radiation and a CCD detector, which ensures measurement of backscattering signals with simultaneous altitude and wavelength resolution. The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested to estimate its efficiency for lidar sounding of atmospheric trace gases. The numerical simulation performed shows that a KTA-based OPO laser is a promising source of radiation for remote DIAL-DOAS sounding of the TAGs under study along surface tropospheric paths. The laser system design provides a possibility of narrowing the laser line within the 0.01-5 cm-1 limits. This possible improvement along with a small step of laser line tuning and the presence of absorption lines of other atmospheric gases, including atmospheric pollutants, in the spectral range under study make this laser a unique instrument for atmospheric sounding.

  9. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  10. Investigating the backscattering characteristics of individual normal and cancerous cells based on experimentally determined three-dimensional refractive index distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chen; Su, Jing-Wei; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2012-12-01

    The progression of epithelial dysplasia is accompanied by changes of sub-cellular structures which alter light scattering, particularly backscattering, properties of epithelial cells. In this study, we quantified the refractive index (RI) distributions of normal and cancerous epithelial cells of skin and oral cavity using digital holographic microtomography and investigated the backscattering characteristics of the cells using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results show that cancerous cells present higher average values of nuclear and nucleolar RI and a higher standard deviation of cytoplasmic RI than normal cells. Both the total scattering and backscattering cross-sections of the cancerous cells are significantly higher than those of the normal cells.

  11. A comparative analysis of UV nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dragani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative assessment of ultraviolet nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone profile assimilation. The Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp-A Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2 nadir and the ENVISAT Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS limb profiles, generated by the ozone consortium of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA O3-CCI, were individually added to a reference set of ozone observations and assimilated in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF data assimilation system (DAS. The two sets of resulting analyses were compared with that from a control experiment, only constrained by the reference dataset, and independent, unassimilated observations. Comparisons with independent observations show that both datasets improve the stratospheric ozone distribution. The changes inferred by the limb-based observations are more localized and, in places, more important than those implied by the nadir profiles, albeit they have a much lower number of observations. A small degradation (up to 0.25 mg kg−1 for GOME-2 and 0.5 mg kg−1 for MIPAS in the mass mixing ratio is found in the tropics between 20 and 30 hPa. In the lowermost troposphere below its vertical coverage, the limb data are found to be able to modify the ozone distribution with changes as large as 60 %. Comparisons of the ozone analyses with sonde data show that at those levels the assimilation of GOME-2 leads to about 1 Dobson Unit (DU smaller root mean square error (RMSE than that of MIPAS. However, the assimilation of MIPAS can still improve the quality of the ozone analyses and – with a reduction in the RMSE of up to about 2 DU – outperform the control experiment thanks to its synergistic assimilation with total-column ozone data within the DAS. High vertical resolution ozone profile observations are essential to accurately monitor and

  12. Phase Identification of Dual-Phase (DP980) Steels by Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Nanoindentation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Ruimi, Annie; Field, David P

    2016-02-01

    Phase identification of multi-phase materials provides essential information relating the material to its mechanical properties. In this study we selected DP980, a type of dual-phase steel, to investigate the content of martensite and ferrite grains. A combination of advanced techniques was used to provide detailed and precise information of the microstructure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to provide observations of the sample surface at different scales. Martensite and ferrite phases of DP980 were further identified and characterized using electron backscatter diffraction and scanning probe microscopy. Results obtained with nanoindentation tests confirmed that the differences in nanohardness values in single-phase grains are martensite and ferrite with different surface heights shown by scanning probe microscopy. The similarity shown in the image quality map and scanning probe microscopy proves that a large fraction of martensite can be distinguished in this undeformed material using image quality parameters obtained during electron backscatter diffraction imaging.

  13. Coherent backscattering and forward-scattering peaks in the quantum kicked rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarié, G.; Müller, Cord A.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Miniatura, C.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and analyze an experimental scheme using the quantum kicked rotor to observe the newly predicted coherent forward-scattering peak together with its long-known twin brother, the coherent backscattering peak. Contrary to coherent backscattering, which arises already under weak-localization conditions, coherent forward scattering is only triggered by Anderson or strong localization. So far, coherent forward scattering has not been observed in conservative systems with elastic scattering by spatial disorder. We propose to turn to the quantum kicked rotor, which has a long and successful history as an accurate experimental platform to observe dynamical localization, i.e., Anderson localization in momentum space. We analyze the coherent forward-scattering effect for the quantum kicked rotor by extensive numerical simulations, both in the orthogonal and unitary class of disordered quantum systems, and show that an experimental realization involving phase-space rotation techniques is within reach of state-of-the-art cold-atom experiments.

  14. Method and apparatus for shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system and protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Jacobs, Sharon Auerback (Inventor); Dugan, Edward (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system includes at least one penetrating radiation source for providing a penetrating radiation field, and at least one partially transmissive radiation detector, wherein the partially transmissive radiation detector is interposed between an object region to be interrogated and the radiation source. The partially transmissive radiation detector transmits a portion of the illumination radiation field. A shadow aperture having a plurality of radiation attenuating regions having apertures therebetween is disposed between the radiation source and the detector. The apertures provide illumination regions for the illumination radiation field to reach the object region, wherein backscattered radiation from the object is detected and generates an image by the detector in regions of the detector that are shadowed by the radiation attenuation regions.

  15. Bulk elastic waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states in a time-dependent superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinteck, N., E-mail: swinteck@email.arizona.edu; Matsuo, S.; Runge, K.; Lucas, P.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Vasseur, J. O. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-08-14

    Recent progress in electronic and electromagnetic topological insulators has led to the demonstration of one way propagation of electron and photon edge states and the possibility of immunity to backscattering by edge defects. Unfortunately, such topologically protected propagation of waves in the bulk of a material has not been observed. We show, in the case of sound/elastic waves, that bulk waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states can be observed in a time-dependent elastic superlattice. The superlattice is realized via spatial and temporal modulation of the stiffness of an elastic material. Bulk elastic waves in this superlattice are supported by a manifold in momentum space with the topology of a single twist Möbius strip. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one way transport and immunity to scattering of bulk elastic waves.

  16. Comparison of aerosol lidar retrieval methods for boundary layer height detection using ceilometer aerosol backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Vanessa; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Lefer, Barry; Morris, Gary; Toledo, Daniel; Delgado, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    Three algorithms for estimating the boundary layer heights are assessed: an aerosol gradient method, a cluster analysis method, and a Haar wavelet method. Over 40 daytime clear-sky radiosonde profiles are used to compare aerosol backscatter boundary layer heights retrieved by a Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Overall good agreement between radiosonde- and aerosol-derived boundary layer heights was found for all methods. The cluster method was found to be particularly sensitive to noise in ceilometer signals and lofted aerosol layers (48.8 % of comparisons), while the gradient method showed limitations in low-aerosol-backscatter conditions. The Haar wavelet method was demonstrated to be the most robust, only showing limitations in 22.5 % of all observations. Occasional differences between thermodynamically and aerosol-derived boundary layer heights were observed.

  17. Backscatter Transponder Based on Frequency Selective Surface for FMCW Radar Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Lazaro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an actively-controlled frequency selective surface (FSS to implement a backscatter transponder. The FSS is composed by dipoles loaded with switching PIN diodes. The transponder exploits the change in the radar cross section (RCS of the FSS with the bias of the diodes to modulate the backscattered response of the tag to the FMCW radar. The basic operation theory of the system is explained here. An experimental setup based on a commercial X-band FMCW radar working as a reader is proposed to measure the transponders. The transponder response can be distinguished from the interference of non-modulated clutter, modulating the transponder’s RCS. Some FSS with different number of dipoles are studied, as a proof of concept. Experimental results at several distances are provided.

  18. Simultaneous detection of rotational and translational motion in optical tweezers by measurement of backscattered intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Banerjee, Ayan

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple yet powerful technique of simultaneously measuring both translational and rotational motion of mesoscopic particles in optical tweezers by measuring the backscattered intensity on a quadrant photodiode (QPD). While the measurement of translational motion by taking the difference of the backscattered intensity incident on adjacent quadrants of a QPD is well-known, we demonstrate that rotational motion can be measured very precisely by taking the difference between the diagonal quadrants. The latter measurement eliminates the translational component entirely, and leads to a detection sensitivity of around 50 mdeg at S/N of 2 for angular motion of a driven micro-rod. The technique is also able to resolve the translational and rotational Brownian motion components of the micro-rod in an unperturbed trap, and can be very useful in measuring translation-rotation coupling of micro-objects induced by hydrodynamic interactions.

  19. A three-part geometric model to predict the radar backscatter from wheat, corn, and sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Eger, G. W., III; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    A model to predict the radar backscattering coefficient from crops must include the geometry of the canopy. Radar and ground-truth data taken on wheat in 1979 indicate that the model must include contributions from the leaves, from the wheat head, and from the soil moisture. For sorghum and corn, radar and ground-truth data obtained in 1979 and 1980 support the necessity of a soil moisture term and a leaf water term. The Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an appropriate input for the leaf contribution to the radar response for wheat and sorghum, however the LAI generates less accurate values for the backscattering coefficient for corn. Also, the data for corn and sorghum illustrate the importance of the water contained in the stalks in estimating the radar response.

  20. A didactic proposal about Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with theoretic, experimental, simulation and application activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corni, Federico; Michelini, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is a nuclear analysis technique widely used for materials science investigation. Despite the strict technical requirements to perform the data acquisition, the interpretation of a spectrum is within the reach of general physics students. The main phenomena occurring during a collision between helium ions—with energy of a few MeV—and matter are: elastic nuclear collision, elastic scattering, and, in the case of non-surface collision, ion stopping. To interpret these phenomena, we use classical physics models: material point elastic collision, unscreened Coulomb scattering, and inelastic energy loss of ions with electrons, respectively. We present the educational proposal for Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, within the framework of the model of educational reconstruction, following a rationale that links basic physics concepts with quantities for spectra analysis. This contribution offers the opportunity to design didactic specific interventions suitable for undergraduate and secondary school students.

  1. Mapping Wetlands in Zambia Using Seasonal Backscatter Signatures Derived from ENVISAT ASAR Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Schlaffer; Marco Chini; Denise Dettmering; Wolfgang Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands are considered a challenging environment for mapping approaches based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data due to their often complex internal structures and the diverse backscattering mechanisms caused by vegetation, soil moisture and flood dynamics contributing to the resulting imagery. In this study, a time series of >100 SAR images acquired by ENVISAT during a time period of ca. two years over the Kafue River basin in Zambia was compared to water heights derived from radar a...

  2. Backscattering of Ground Terrain and Building Materials at Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    for the 0.1 – 0.3 THz region continues to grow. Much work has been done on studying the dielectric and scattering properties of various types of...A preliminary investigation was made of the 100 GHz and 240 GHz radar backscattering coefficient of sand, gravel, topsoil with various moisture...of generic topsoil that consisted of course organic soil as well as some small twigs and stones. The soil was first baked in a vacuum oven at 120

  3. Simulation of radar backscattering from snowpack at X-band and Ku-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Michel; Phan, Xuan-Vu; Ferro-Famil, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a multilayer snowpack electromagnetic backscattering model, based on Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT). This model is capable of simulating the interaction of electromagnetic wave (EMW) at X-band and Ku-band frequencies with multilayer snowpack. The air-snow interface and snow-ground backscattering components are calculated using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) by [1], whereas the volume backscattering component is calculated based on the solution of Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equation at order 1. Case study has been carried out using measurement data from NoSREx project [2], which include SnowScat data in X-band and Ku-band, TerraSAR-X acquisitions and snowpack stratigraphic in-situ measurements. The results of model simulations show good agreement with the radar observations, and therefore allow the DMRT model to be used in various applications, such as data assimilation [3]. [1] A.K. Fung and K.S. Chen, "An update on the iem surface backscattering model," Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 75 - 77, april 2004. [2] J. Lemmetyinen, A. Kontu, J. Pulliainen, A. Wiesmann, C. Werner, T. Nagler, H. Rott, and M. Heidinger, "Technical assistance for the deployment of an x- to ku-band scatterometer during the nosrex ii experiment," Final Report, ESA ESTEC Contract No. 22671/09/NL/JA., 2011. [3] X. V. Phan, L. Ferro-Famil, M. Gay, Y. Durand, M. Dumont, S. Morin, S. Allain, G. D'Urso, and A. Girard, "3d-var multilayer assimilation of x-band sar data into a detailed snowpack model," The Cryosphere Discussions, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 4881-4912, 2013.

  4. Effect of articular cartilage proteoglycan depletion on high frequency ultrasound backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellaumail, B; Watrin, A; Loeuille, D; Netter, P; Berger, G; Laugier, P; Saïed, A

    2002-07-01

    To study the effect of variations of articular cartilage proteoglycans (PG) on high-frequency ultrasound backscatter. The study was performed on patellar cartilages of immature and mature rats (N=36). The variation of PG content was induced by enzyme digestion. Control and treated cartilages were explored in vitro using a 55MHz scanning acoustic microscopy, then assessed by histology for the fibrillar collagen organization analysis. The variations of proteoglycan and collagen content were evaluated. Thickness measurements performed on both B-scan images and histologic sections were compared. Ultrasonic radio-frequency signals reflected by the cartilage surface and backscattered from its internal matrix were processed to estimate the integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and apparent integrated backscatter (AIB). Although hyaluronidase treatment of immature and mature cartilages removed approximately 50% of the proteoglycans, the echogenicity level of ultrasound images of degraded cartilages was similar to that of controls. IRC and AIB parameters did not significantly vary. Histologic sections of degraded cartilage displayed no change in collagen fiber organization. The thickness mean values measured by ultrasound in PG-depleted groups were significantly higher than in controls, whereas no significant difference in thickness was detected by histological measurement. The increase in cartilage thickness may potentially be explained by a decrease of speed of sound in PG-depleted cartilages that is more likely subsequent to an increase of water content. Current results indicate that PG depletion has no significant effect on high frequency ultrasound backscattered from rat patellar cartilage. Ultrasound may provide information about variations of PG content via speed of sound measurement. Copyright 2002 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infrared reflectometry of skin: Analysis of backscattered light from different skin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleitez, Miguel A.; Hertzberg, Otto; Bauer, Alexander; Lieblein, Tobias; Glasmacher, Mathias; Tholl, Hans; Mäntele, Werner

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported infrared spectroscopy of human skin in vivo using quantum cascade laser excitation and photoacoustic or photothermal detection for non-invasive glucose measurement . Here, we analyze the IR light diffusely reflected from skin layers for spectral contributions of glucose. Excitation of human skin by an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser in the spectral region from 1000 to 1245 cm- 1, where glucose exhibits a fingerprint absorption, yields reflectance spectra with some contributions from glucose molecules. A simple three-layer model of skin was used to calculate the scattering intensities from the surface and from shallow and deeper layers using the Boltzmann radiation transfer equation. Backscattering of light at wavelengths around 10 μm from the living skin occurs mostly from the Stratum corneum top layers and the shallow layers of the living epidermis. The analysis of the polarization of the backscattered light confirms this calculation. Polarization is essentially unchanged; only a very small fraction (< 3%) is depolarized at 90° with respect to the laser polarization set at 0°. Based on these findings, we propose that the predominant part of the backscattered light is due to specular reflectance and to scattering from layers close to the surface. Diffusely reflected light from deeper layers undergoing one or more scattering processes would appear with significantly altered polarization. We thus conclude that a non-invasive glucose measurement based on backscattering of IR light from skin would have the drawback that only shallow layers containing some glucose at concentrations only weakly related to blood glucose are monitored.

  6. Study of {sup 60}Co as gamma source in backscatter gamma densitometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour Peyvandi, R.; Taheri, A.; Rahmanzadeh Tootkaleh, S.; Askari Lehdarboni, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Islami Rad, S.Z. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Univ. of Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physic

    2015-07-15

    In this work the performance of backscatter gamma densitometer is studied using {sup 60}Co as gamma source. The ability of the densitometer to determine the liquid's interfaces in multi-phase flows was assessed. The aim mainly was to investigate the possibility of using {sup 60}Co in this system. Furthermore, a comparison between {sup 60}Co and was done. The obtained results indicate that {sup 60}Co can be advantageous in this regard.

  7. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  8. Backscattering of linearly polarized light from turbid tissue-like scattering medium with rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Markhvida, Igor; Lee, Tim K.; Meglinski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of further development of a unified computational tool for the needs of biomedical optics, we introduce an electric field Monte Carlo (MC) model for simulation of backscattering of coherent linearly polarized light from a turbid tissue-like scattering medium with a rough surface. We consider the laser speckle patterns formation and the role of surface roughness in the depolarization of linearly polarized light backscattered from the medium. The mutual phase shifts due to the photons' pathlength difference within the medium and due to reflection/refraction on the rough surface of the medium are taken into account. The validation of the model includes the creation of the phantoms of various roughness and optical properties, measurements of co- and cross-polarized components of the backscattered/reflected light, its analysis and extensive computer modeling accelerated by parallel computing on the NVIDIA graphics processing units using compute unified device architecture (CUDA). The analysis of the spatial intensity distribution is based on second-order statistics that shows a strong correlation with the surface roughness, both with the results of modeling and experiment. The results of modeling show a good agreement with the results of experimental measurements on phantoms mimicking human skin. The developed MC approach can be used for the direct simulation of light scattered by the turbid scattering medium with various roughness of the surface.

  9. Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties from Satellites Using Temperature and Salinity-dependent Backscattering by Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, Paul J.; Franz, Bryan Alden; Lefler, Jason Travis; Robinson, Wayne D.; Boss, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Time-series of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs) from ocean color satellite instruments provide valuable data records for studying long-term time changes in ocean ecosystems. Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide a common method for estimating IOPs from radiometric measurements of the marine light field. Most SAAs assign constant spectral values for seawater absorption and backscattering, assume spectral shape functions of the remaining constituent absorption and scattering components (e.g., phytoplankton, non-algal particles, and colored dissolved organic matter), and retrieve the magnitudes of each remaining constituent required to match the spectral distribution of measured radiances. Here, we explore the use of temperature- and salinity-dependent values for seawater backscattering in lieu of the constant spectrum currently employed by most SAAs. Our results suggest that use of temperature- and salinity-dependent seawater spectra elevate the SAA-derived particle backscattering, reduce the non-algal particles plus colored dissolved organic matter absorption, and leave the derived absorption by phytoplankton unchanged.

  10. A radar backscattering mechanism of ocean surface in response to rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinan; Zheng, Quanan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of ocean surface in response to rainfall and its radar back-scatter are simultaneously measured in laboratory. The experiment is carried out in a water pool that is 1.22 m by 1.22 m with a water depth of 0.3 m. Artificial rainfall is generated from an array of hypodermic needles. The surface characteristics including crowns, stalks, secondary droplets and ring waves are measured with a cinematic Laser-Induced-Florescence (LIF) technique. Our experimental results show that impinging raindrops on the water surface generate various water surface structures with different relative sizes. Among them stalks and crowns comprise the dominant radar backscattering. On the basis of these laboratory experiments and theories of radar scattering from a rough surface, a near-resonance radar backscattering model for quantifying the dependence of the radar return intensity on rain rate on the ocean surface is developed. The model explains the radar response to rain rate simultaneously observed by C-band ASAR and ground-based weather radar. The physical model provides reasonable mechanisms to explain the frequency dependence and polarization behavior of radar signatures from rain cells on the ocean surface. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences under grant OCE962107.

  11. A system-based approach to modeling the ultrasound signal backscattered by red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, I; Bertrand, M; Cloutier, G

    1999-11-01

    A system-based model is proposed to describe and simulate the ultrasound signal backscattered by red blood cells (RBCs). The model is that of a space-invariant linear system that takes into consideration important biological tissue stochastic scattering properties as well as the characteristics of the ultrasound system. The formation of the ultrasound signal is described by a convolution integral involving a transducer transfer function, a scatterer prototype function, and a function representing the spatial arrangement of the scatterers. The RBCs are modeled as nonaggregating spherical scatterers, and the spatial distribution of the RBCs is determined using the Percus-Yevick packing factor. Computer simulations of the model are used to study the power backscattered by RBCs as a function of the hematocrit, the volume of the scatterers, and the frequency of the incident wave (2-500 MHz). Good agreement is obtained between the simulations and theoretical and experimental data for both Rayleigh and non-Rayleigh scattering conditions. In addition to these results, the renewal process theory is proposed to model the spatial arrangement of the scatterers. The study demonstrates that the system-based model is capable of accurately predicting important characteristics of the ultrasound signal backscattered by blood. The model is simple and flexible, and it appears to be superior to previous one- and two-dimensional simulation studies.

  12. Analysis of dose and risk associated with the use of backscatter vans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Samanda C.A.; Aquino, Josilto O., E-mail: scorrea@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: josilto@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIAPI/CGMI/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Instalacoes Medicas e Industriais. Div. de Aplicacoes Industriais; Souza, Edmilson M., E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CAPI/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, imaging technology using radiation has been gaining in importance for the screening of persons for security reasons and in order to detect contraband. And currently, new X-ray detection technologies have been introduced such as the Backscatter Van. The Backscatter Van is used in port and border security, force protection, urban surveillance, and other critical security applications in order to seize drugs, explosives, and more. The system is mobile, affordable and the faster, more effective, and less expensive than any mobile screening solution in the marketplace. However, although the application of this equipment in the national security area is indeed relevant, its use has caused a great deal of controversy, especially with regard to the doses absorbed and to the cancer induction risk associated with these exposures. The aim of this study is to use the Monte Carlo MCNPX code and the male adult voxel (MAX) and female adult voxel (FAX) phantoms, to evaluate the absorbed dose, effective dose and cancer induction risk values associated with the exposures of individuals submitted to Backscatter Van. The effective dose values were calculated as recommended by the new ICRP 103 and the cancer induction risk values were estimated through the BEIR VII document. (author)

  13. An adaptive ultrasonic backscattered signal processing technique for instantaneous characteristic frequency detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Vai, Mang I

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic diagnosis that is convenient and nondestructive to the human body is widely used in medicine. In clinical, ultrasonic backscattered signals characteristics are utilized to acquire information of the human body tissues to perform diagnosis. In this paper, an adaptive ultrasonic backscattered signal processing technique for instantaneous characteristic frequency detection based on the marginal spectrum is presented. In the beginning, the ultrasonic backscattered signal is decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) algorithm. Then the Hilbert spectrum is gained by the Hilbert transform on the IMFs decomposed and screened. Finally, the time-frequency information in the Hilbert spectrum is utilized to extract the instantaneous characteristic frequency based on the marginal spectrum features to detect the objective. With this technique, the spacing between tissues can be estimated for tissue characterization by processing multiple echoes even in the complicated environment. In the simulation study, comparing with the FFT, the technique presented shows its strong noise immunity and indicates its validity in instantaneous characteristic frequency detection.

  14. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya st., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  15. NOAA TIFF Graphic - 0.5 meter Backscatter Mosaic of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the southern shore of St. John, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  16. NOAA TIFF Graphic- 0.5m Backscatter Mosaic of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geotiff represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of Buck Island, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  17. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 3m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico (Isla de Vieques) - UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 3 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCFHR, in...

  18. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  19. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  20. Simulation of L-band and HH microwave backscattering from coniferous forest stands - A comparison with SIR-B data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    SIR-B images of the Mt. Shasta region of northern California are used to evaluate a composite L-band HH backscattering model of coniferous forest stands. It is found that both SIR-B and simulated backscattering coefficients for eight stands studied have similar trends and relations to average tree height and average number of trees per pixel. Also, the dispersion and distribution of simulated backscattering coefficients from each stand broadly match SIR-B data from the same stand. Although the limited quality and quantity of experimental data makes it difficult to draw any strong conclusions, the comparisons indicate that a stand-based L-band HH composite model seems promising for explaining backscattering features.

  1. NOAA TIFF Graphic- 0.5m Backscatter Mosaic of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of Buck Island, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  3. L-Band SAR Backscatter Related to Forest Cover, Height and Aboveground Biomass at Multiple Spatial Scales across Denmark

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neha P Joshi; Edward T A Mitchard; Johannes Schumacher; Vivian K Johannsen; Sassan Saatchi; Rasmus Fensholt

    2015-01-01

    .... Here, we attempt to quantify the effect of these factors by relating L-band ALOS PALSAR HV backscatter and unique country-wide LiDAR-derived maps of vegetation penetrability, height and AGB over...

  4. Wintertime water dynamics and moonlight disruption of the acoustic backscatter diurnal signal in an ice‐covered Northeast Greenland fjord

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrusevich, Vladislav; Dmitrenko, Igor A; Kirillov, Sergey A; Rysgaard, Søren; Falk‐Petersen, Stig; Barber, David G; Boone, Wieter; Ehn, Jens K

    2016-01-01

    Six and a half month records from three ice‐tethered Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers deployed in October 2013 in Young Sound fjord in Northeast Greenland are used to analyze the acoustic backscatter signal...

  5. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  6. Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from portions of the banktop and bank edge environments at Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA. These data provide coverage between 0 and 200...

  7. Acoustic Backscatter of the Sacramento River, from the Feather River to Knights Landing, California in February 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents acoustic backscatter data collected on February 1, 2011, in the Sacramento River from the confluence of the Feather River to...

  8. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 3m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico (Isla de Vieques) - UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131852)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 3 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCFHR, in...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Backscatter Mosaic, Florida Deep Coral Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the Atlantic Coast...

  10. Backscatter Mosaic used to identify, delineate and classify moderate-depth benthic habitats around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2x2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the moderate-depth portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St....

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Nancy Foster - (2006), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  12. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  13. Simrad EM300 multibeam backscatter data from portions of the banktop and bank edge environments at Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA. These data provide coverage between 0 and 2000...

  14. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data from the islands and banks in the Mariana archipelago, 2007.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Uracas Island in the Commonwealth...

  15. Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from portions of the banktop and bank edge environments at Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA. These data provide coverage between 0 and 300...

  16. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  17. CRED Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in netCDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf, and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific....

  18. Two-wavelength lidar inversion algorithm for a two-component atmosphere with variable extinction-to-backscatter ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, J

    1998-05-20

    This numerical study addresses the boundary value determination of the aerosol extinction coefficient from backscatter lidar measurements by use of the simultaneous evaluation of signals at 532 and 1064 nm. The basic equations are formulated for the most common case of a two-component atmosphere with variable aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratios along the lidar line. The method proved to be quite stable for optically thick atmospheres even if the true profiles of the lidar ratios are not known exactly.

  19. Strong correlation of borehole optical backscattering and volcanic sulfate signatures at Siple Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talghader, J.; Chan, W. S.; Mah, M.; Bay, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    A borehole logging instrument measuring optical backscattering was deployed at Siple Dome (SDMA) in January 2014. The logger body was a completely passive instrument consisting of a lightweight aluminum structure supporting two optical fiber cables and associated collimating connectors. One cable guided light from an 808 nm laser on the ice surface while the second collected backscattered light and guided it to a silicon detector, also on the surface. Both laser and detector were positioned within a few cm of one another for high resolution. An image of the device is shown in Figure 1. The laser wavelength was chosen so that the scattering length for light within the ice would be comparable to the absorption length. In this way it was possible to guarantee that most of the light received had been directly backscattered from sites within the ice rather than traveling for many meters through many scattering events, which would reduce the resolution of the layer measurement. The resolution of the measurement was estimated to be on the order of a centimeter to a few centimeters, the lower limit given by the size of the collimated laser beam and the other by the geometry of the laser-detector unit and the nature of the optical backscattering at 808 nm. The ice could not be sampled directly to determine the physical source of the scattering but, based on prior work at Siple Dome and other boreholes, the background signal was assumed to be produced by bubbles with the observed layer structure primarily due to volcanic ash. Useful data was measured to a depth of approximately 175 m, with the resulting signal given in Figure 2, minus the background scattering due to bubbles. 20 of the 27 statistically significant deviations from the background average matched closely with the volcanic sulfate record published by Kurbatov, et. al. in 2006 using the chronology of Taylor, et. al. in 2004. The correlation between optical backscattering, presumably from ash, and the presence of

  20. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noh Young M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica. During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section and the number density of quartz molecules, the mass concentration of quartz in the atmosphere can be estimated from the quartz backscatter coefficient. The weight percentage from 40 to 70 % for quartz in the Asian dust was estimated from references. The vertical resolved mass concentration of dust was estimated by quartz mass concentration and weight percentage. We also present a retrieval method to obtain dust backscatter coefficient from the mixed Asian dust and pollutant layer. OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds simulations were conducted to calculate dust backscatter coefficient. The retrieved dust mass concentration was used as an input parameter for the OPAC calculations. These approaches in the study will be useful for characterizing the quartz dominated in the atmospheric aerosols and estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust. It will be especially applicable for optically distinguishing the dust and non-dust aerosols in studies on the mixing state of Asian dust plume. Additionally, the presented method combined with satellite observations is enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring for Asian dust.