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Sample records for range 3-20 gy

  1. Early changes of cortical blood flow, brain temperature and electrical activity after whole-body irradiation of the monkey (Macaca fascicularis) (dose range: 3-20 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, L.; Gourmelon, P.; Mestries, J.C.

    1987-02-01

    A polyparametric investigation was carried out on 31 monkeys chronically wearing bioinstrumentation allowing to get and process simultaneously local brain blood flow, cerebral temperature, and energies in various frequency bands of the brain electrical activity. This method, which supplied data during several consecutive days, made it possible to study both the biological rhythms at the level of the various parameters, and their fast variations. The effects of whole-body gamma or neutron-gamma irradiation were studied in the 3-20 Gy dose range. Immediate changes after exposure demonstrated different radiosensitivities at the level of the rhythms of the various parameters, and/or their recovery, as well as dose-effect relationships [fr

  2. ESR/Alanine {gamma}-dosimetry in the 10-30 Gy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fainstein, C. E-mail: cfainstein@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Winkler, E.; Saravi, M

    2000-05-15

    We report Alanine Dosimeter preparation, procedures for using the ESR/Dosimetry method, and the resulting calibration curve for {gamma}-irradiation in the range from 10-30 Gy. We use calibration curve to measure the irradiation dose in {gamma}-irradiation of human blood, as required in Blood Transfusion Therapy. The ESR/Alanine results are compared against those obtained using the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) method.

  3. Results of Zea mays seeds β- irradiation in 0 - 5 Gy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicea, Dan; Racuciu, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    In this study young plants, obtained from the control and beta irradiated seeds, were studied in laboratory experiments. Zea mays seeds with uniform genophond were irradiated with 90 Sr source in the 0 - 5 Gy range. Increased germination percentage was observed under the influence of different radiation doses. We found that small doses of β- radiation have a stimulating effect on the growth of the plantlets, the maximum simulation (among the doses we used) being induced by 0.615 Gy and is statistically significant. We investigated the chlorophyll a to b ratio and the average length variations with the irradiation dose and present the results. Key words: b- radiation, Zea mays, germination rate, plants growth, photoassimilatory pigments,

  4. A thermoluminescence study of mineral silicates extracted from herbs in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Monaca, Sara; Fattibene, Paola; Bortolin, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    The presence of silicates in many personal objects suggests their potential use at low dose as fortuitous dosimeter in an accidental radiological exposure, when conventional dosimetry is not available. The goal of the present work is the dosimetric characterization of mineral silicates extracted from the plant Hibiscus Sabdariffa L, known as Jamaica flower, in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy. By studying the radiation-induced signal in time, the temperature integration region between 210 °C and 250 °C was found to be the most stable and also reduced the effects of thermal fading in the dose reconstruction process; the dose response curve was linear between 0.5 Gy and 5 Gy. By checking the change in sensitivity after repeated exposures to ionizing radiations and to high temperature heating, no variation in the glow curve shape or peak intensities were detected. To eliminate a pre-existing background signal, all the characterization measurements were performed with aliquots “annealed” by a preliminary readout of the TL. - Highlights: • Glow curves change in shape and intensity just in the first 3 days after irradiation. • The dose response is linear in the dose range 0.5–5 Gy. • The curve shape or intensity don't change after repeated exposures and heatings. • Encouraging results were obtained in the dose recovery test

  5. Improvement of quality of radiation indicators used for food irradiation in dose range of 3-10 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Hoa Mai; Pham Duy Duong; Nguyen Dinh Duong

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive indicators based on the polyvinyl butyral dyed with leuco-malachite green and methyl orange were made for use as devices for discriminating and monitoring radiation treatment in food irradiation. The sensitivity and stability of the indicator have been improved by using several additives such as CCl 4 in combination with di(nonylphenyl) isophthalate [dinonyl phthalate -C 6 H 4 (COOC 9 H 19 ) 2 ]. The dosimeters change their color from orange to greenish when irradiated with gamma rays or electrons to dose just about 2 kGy. The greenish continue to develop to deep-green upon the increase of dose to 7 kGy. This makes the indicators useful for the dose range of food irradiation application, especially in treatment of frozen meat and sea products for elimination of micro-organism. The quality of indicators are also improved by adjusting of factors and procedures during preparation of film and dosimeters. The indicators were produced in a stick-on label type showing attractive characteristics in use. The orange color before irradiation keep well stable for as long as 20 months under normal conditions in laboratory. The green after irradiation was maintained up to 12 months in piratical conditions of products. The indicator can be produced in big amount to supply to the irradiation facilities in Vietnam instead of imported devices. (author)

  6. Dose-response relationship for life-shortening and carcinogenesis in mice irradiated at day 7 postnatal age with dose range below 1 Gy of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunsaku; Fukuda, Nobuo

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the dose-response relationships for life-shortening and tumorigenic effect in the dose range below 1 Gy of gamma rays delivered during the infant period. Female B6C3F 1 mice were irradiated with 0.10, 0.48 or 0.95 Gy at 7 days of age. All irradiated mice were allowed to live out their entire life span together with a simultaneously ongoing control group under a specific pathogen-free condition. Shortening of the mean life span was 1.58% in mice irradiated with 0.10 Gy, which was statistically significant. The coefficient of the linear dose-response relationship for life-shortening was 11.21% Gy -1 . The attributable death fraction for all causes of death in 0.10 Gy group reached 0.092. The excess relative risk for death rate from all causes was 0.102 in the group irradiated with 0.10 Gy. The coefficient of the linear dose-response relationship of the excess relative risk for death rate from all causes was 1.30 Gy -1 . The mean number of types of solid tumors at the time of death in mice irradiated with 0.10 Gy was distinctly larger than that in the control group. The excess relative risk for death rate from solid tumors was 0.45 in mice irradiated with 0.10 Gy. The coefficient of the linear dose-response relationship of excess relative risk for death rate from solid tumors was 4.52 Gy -1 . Increase in incidences of the pituitary, ovarian and adrenal tumors was observed in mice irradiated with 0.10 Gy. The results of the present study showed that infant mice are susceptible to solid tumor induction, especially of the endocrine organs. (author)

  7. Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

  8. Evaluation of the cell death mechanisms activated by the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1 to 5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin V, E.P.; Rojas C, E. L.; Martinez V, B. E.; Ramos B, J. C.; Jimenez M, N. P.; Ferro F, G.

    2016-10-01

    The radio immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the remission rate of patients with B-cell lymphomas over expressing the CD20. The radiolabeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. The anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The 177 Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum reach on soft tissue of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45 m Ci/m 2 ) for 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by synergistic effect of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work was evaluated; by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 in non-Hodgkin (Raji) lymphoma cells. The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20, are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation, activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio sensitivity) causes the acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell

  9. Seasonal Variations in Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Stress in Free-Ranging Pregnant Przewalski's Horses (E. ferus przewalskii within the Hortobágy National Park in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Pohlin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ecosystems with seasonal fluctuations in climate and food availability present physiological challenges to resident mammals and may cause “stress.” The two predominant physiological responses to stressors are (1 the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and (2 the modulation of the autonomic nervous system. To date, the primary indicator for “stress” in wildlife- and zoo animal research are glucocorticoid levels. By measuring the autonomic regulation of cardiac activity, particularly the vagal tone, heart rate variability (HRV is presently emerging as a suitable indicator of “stress” in farm- and domestic animal research.Objective: The aim of this study was to use HRV, a novel method in wildlife research, to assess seasonal patterns of “stress” in a group of free-ranging Przewalski's horses (Equus ferus przewalskii.Methods: Six pregnant Przewalski's horses from one harem within the Hortobágy National Park in Hungary were subjected to the study. We used a dedicated telemetry system consisting of a subcutaneously implanted transmitter and a receiver and storage unit in a collar to record HRV, heart rate (HR, subcutaneous body temperature, and activity throughout a one-year study period—climate data was also collected. We defined “stress” as a decrease in parasympathetic nervous system tone and calculated RMSSD (root mean square of successive differences as a measure of HRV. Linear mixed effects models with random intercept per individual were used for statistical analysis.Results: HRV and HR varied considerably throughout the year. Similar to temperate ruminants and hibernating mammals, Przewalski's horses experienced lower HR and HRV during winter, when resources are limited indicating decreased metabolic rates coupled with “stress.” In spring, we observed a drop of HRV along with a peak in HR indicating an increase of allostatic load that is most likely associated with increased energy

  10. Evaluation of cell death mechanisms activated by the administration of the theranostics radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1-5 Gy; Evaluacion de los mecanismos de muerte celular activados por la administracion del radiofarmaco teranostico {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 en un rango de dosis de 1-5 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez V, B. E.

    2016-07-01

    Radio-immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the rate of remission in patients with CD20 over expressing B-cell lymphomas. Radio-labeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. Anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The {sup 177}Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum soft tissue reach of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45m Ci/m{sup 2}) for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of synergistic activation of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work we evaluated by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 from non-Hod king lymphoma cells (Raji). The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio-sensitivity) causes acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell arrest

  11. Evaluation of the cell death mechanisms activated by the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1 to 5 Gy; Evaluacion de los mecanismos de muerte celular activados por el radiofarmaco {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 en un intervalo de dosis de 1 a 5 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin V, E.P.; Rojas C, E. L.; Martinez V, B. E.; Ramos B, J. C.; Jimenez M, N. P.; Ferro F, G., E-mail: erica.azorin@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The radio immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the remission rate of patients with B-cell lymphomas over expressing the CD20. The radiolabeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. The anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The {sup 177}Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum reach on soft tissue of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45 m Ci/m{sup 2}) for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by synergistic effect of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work was evaluated; by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 in non-Hodgkin (Raji) lymphoma cells. The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20, are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation, activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio sensitivity) causes the acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation

  12. Evaluation of cell death mechanisms activated by the administration of the theranostics radiopharmaceutical "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 in a dose range of 1-5 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez V, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Radio-immunotherapy with anti-CD20 antibodies significantly increases the rate of remission in patients with CD20 over expressing B-cell lymphomas. Radio-labeled antibodies directed to surface antigens allow delivering scaled doses of radiation to specific targets thus limiting the dose to healthy tissue. Anti-CD20 causes cell death by two major pathways; activating the immune system to destroy malignant cells and inducing the activation of cell death pathways. The "1"7"7Lu is a beta particle emitter (max. 0.497 MeV) with a maximum soft tissue reach of 0.7 mm and a half-life of 6.7 days. Several clinical studies have established a maximum tolerated dose (45m Ci/m"2) for "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-rituximab, which shows a favorable clinical response without hematological toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of synergistic activation of anti-CD20 and radionuclide have not been studied. In this work we evaluated by flow cytometry, the activation kinetics of the cell death mechanisms induced by the treatment with "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 from non-Hod king lymphoma cells (Raji). The absorbed radiation dose delivered to the cell nucleus was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the contribution of the beta emissions of the radiopharmaceutical present in the cell membrane and surrounding environment, as well as crossfire. This work shows that the application of radiation doses of 1 to 5 Gy of the radiopharmaceutical "1"7"7Lu-DOTA-anti-CD20 are sufficient to induce cell death by apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle. The combination of these factors (continuous delivery of radiation activation of repair mechanisms and increased radio-sensitivity) causes acute activation of the apoptotic program resulting in significant cell death after 96 h of treatment. The temporal analysis of cell death suggests the early activation of apoptosis that is counteracted by the activation of repair processes caused by sustained irradiation, which leads to cell arrest and increases

  13. Valine-spectrophotometric readout dosimeter (1 Gy-50 kGy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilekani, S.R.; Gupta, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this method 20 mg unirradiated/irradiated L-valine powder [(CH 3 ) 2 CH.NH 2 CH.COOH] is dissolved in 10 ml of a solution containing 4x10 -4 mol dm -3 Fe 2+ and 2.5x10 -4 mol dm -3 xylenol orange (XO) in aerated aqueous 0.060 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid (FX). The plot of absorbance at 550 nm against dose is non linear. A dose of 1-50 kGy can be measured. However, dosimeter can be sensitized in the dose range of 1 to 16 kGy by dissolving 50-mg valine powder in 10 ml of a solution which contains 5x10 -4 mol dm -3 Fe 2+ and 3x10 -4 mol dm -3 XO in aerated aqueous 0.065 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid. The plot of absorbance at 549 nm against dose is non-linear. However, dosimeter shows linear response when 500 mg unirradiated/irradiated L-valine powder is dissolved in 10 ml of a solution containing 7.5x10 -4 mol dm -3 Fe 2+ and 3x10 -4 mol dm -3 XO in aerated aqueous 0.25 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid. The plot of absorbance at 557 nm against dose is linear in the dose range of 20-400Gy and doses down to about 1 Gy can be measured using 10-cm path cells. Response of the dosimeter is independent of irradiation temperature in the temperature range 20-50 deg C. Irradiated valine powder is stable for about 1 month. The reproducibility of the method is better than ±2%. This dosimeter is very useful as transfer dosimeter for food irradiation and radiation sterilization

  14. Hortobágy National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Gyarmathy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available National parks and protected areas have an important role in protecting starry sky and the undisturbed nighttime environment. Hortobágy which is one of the darkest areas in Hungary, became an International Dark Sky Parks recently. Its significance is mostly related to the protection of the high biodiversity which is endangered by the effects of light pollution. A special monitoring program has been started to survey the nocturnal species and also to monitor the quality of the night sky using   digital cameras. Stargazing night walks are frequently organized. There is a high interest by the general public to attend these night adventures.

  15. Services of Economic Development Organisations in Győr

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    Adrienn Reisinger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic development of a municipality is highly depended on organizations and institutions, which services target local entrepreneurs and other economic actors. In the summer of 2015 we have collected and mapped the services of organizations with the function of economic development in the Hungarian city, Győr. Through our research we could identify the services and the characteristics of linkages and cooperation of the economic development organizations (EDOs. Most important findings of the study are the followings: activity of the organizations has a wide range. Some of them are presented in more organizations at the same time. Level of diversification is quite low. Directions of cooperation are mainly based on personal or ad hoc relations. We conducted that EDOs know about each other, despite of this fact the number of linkages is low. In this paper we provide findings about Győr, but the results can be used for other settlements’ economic development, too.

  16. Comparison of seed brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (70 Gy or 74 Gy) in 919 low-risk prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, G.; Poetter, R.; Schmid, M.P.; Kirisits, C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology; Battermann, J.J.; Sljivic, S.; Vulpen, M. van [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    The aim of this analysis was to compare the biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) rates in low-risk prostate cancer patients treated at two centers of excellence using different approaches: seed brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and methods: A total of 919 low-risk prostate cancer patients, treated from 1998-2008, were identified in the two databases. In Utrecht, 667 patients received I-125 BT applying a dose of 144 Gy. In Vienna, 252 patients were treated with EBRT, applying a local dose of 70 Gy in 82 patients and 74 Gy in 170 patients. bNED rates (Phoenix definition) were assessed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months (range 1-148 months). The 5-year actuarial bNED rates were 94% for BT patients and 88% for EBRT patients (p = 0.002) - 84% for patients receiving 70 Gy and 91% for patients receiving 74 Gy, respectively. In the univariate analysis, patients receiving 70 Gy showed significantly worse outcome compared to BT (p = 0.001) and a difference close to significance compared to 74 Gy (p = 0.06). In the multivariate analysis including tumor stage, Gleason score, initial PSA, hormonal therapy, and dose, patients receiving 70 Gy EBRT showed significantly worse bNED rates compared to BT patients. Conclusion: Low-risk prostate cancer patients receiving 74 Gy by EBRT show comparable biochemical control rates to patients receiving seed brachytherapy, whereas patients receiving 70 Gy show significantly worse outcome. (orig.)

  17. Cerebral necrosis after 25 Gy radiotherapy in childhood followed 28 years later by 54 Gy radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koot, Radboud W.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Aronica, Eleonora; Bosch, D. Andries

    2007-01-01

    The development of brain necrosis is life-long risk of repeat radiation therapy, even after a long time interval and a moderate radiation dose. We report on a 34-year-old patient who had prophylactic cranial irradiation with 25 Gy and adjuvant chemotherapy in childhood for leukaemia and in

  18. Repairs in 104 Gy/h?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In 1989 it was found that in each unit of the MAPS Candu nuclear power station in India the centre portion of the heavy water inlet manifold opposite the 300 mm inlet pipe had torn away. Equipment for remote inspection, repair and removal of debris in an area with constricted and difficult access and radiation fields of about 10 4 Gy/h was developed by Ricardo Hitec of the United Kingdom. This consists of a work performing manipulator, TV viewing systems and a posting tube manipulator for insertion of tools and debris containers into the calandria. A variety of special end effector and tools were also developed jointly with AEA Technology. A first repair campaign was carried out on Unit 1 in 1991. Following a detailed TV survey of the damage a reappraisal of the situation was undertaken and a programme of equipment enhancement carried out. In July 1992 a second repair campaign took place on Unit 2. The difficulties encountered and the degree of success achieved are described. Work proceeded at an intensive level for 14 days when the campaign was ended in view of the exhaustion both of personnel and the equipment. Although more work could have been done a major improvement had been achieved. (UK)

  19. Hypothyroidism in children with medulloblastoma: a comparison of 3600 and 2340 cGy craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Arnold C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if low-dose craniospinal irradiation (2340 cGy) with chemotherapy is associated with a lower incidence of hypothyroidism compared to standard dose (3600 cGy) with or without chemotherapy in children with medulloblastoma. Patients and Methods: Between 1980 and 1999, 32 patients ≤20 years old survived after craniospinal irradiation with or without chemotherapy. Twenty patients received 3600 cGy craniospinal irradiation (CSI), whereas 12 had 2340 cGy CSI; all patients received a posterior fossa boost to a total dose 5040-5580 cGy. The median ages at the time of CSI for those receiving 2340 cGy and 3600 cGy were 7.2 and 10.2 years, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was employed in 22 children. All children who received 2340 cGy had CT consisting of vincristine, CCNU, and either cisplatin or cyclophosphamide. Ten of 20 (50%) patients receiving 3600 cGy had CT; the most common regimen was vincristine, CCNU, and prednisone. Serum-free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations were measured in all children at variable times after radiotherapy. Thyroid-stimulating hormone responses to i.v. thyrotrophin-releasing hormone were assessed in those suspected of having central hypothyroidism. Median follow-up for children receiving 2340 cGy was 5 years (range: 2-11.2 years), whereas for those receiving 3600 cGy, follow-up was 12.5 years (range: 2.4-20 years). Results: Eighteen patients (56%) developed hypothyroidism at a median time after radiotherapy of 41 months (range: 10 months to 18 years). Primary hypothyroidism was more common than central hypothyroidism (38% and 19%). All 7 children 10 years had hypothyroidism (p<0.001). Hypothyroidism was documented in 10 of 12 (83%) who had 2340 cGy + CT, 6 of 10 (60%) who had 3600 cGy + CT, and 2 of 10 (20%) who had 3600 cGy without CT (p<0.025). Conclusions: Current treatment regimens consisting of chemotherapy and 2340 cGy craniospinal irradiation followed by a posterior fossa boost for

  20. Key technology studies of GY-20 and GY-40 High-capacity cobalt-60 transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huifang; Zhang Xin

    2012-01-01

    GY-20 and GY-40 high-capacity cobalt-60 transport casks are used to transport cobalt-60 industrial irradiators and cobalt-60 bundles. The radioactive contents have special features of high-activity and high residual heat, so only a few countries such as Canada, England and Russia have design capacity. The key technologies and corresponding solutions were studied for the design and manufacture of the cask taking into account the structural, thermal, mechanics and shield requests. A series of tests prove that the cask structure design, design criteria for lead coating structure and quality control measurements are reasonable and effective, and the cask shield integrity can be ensured for all conditions. The casks have ability to transport high-activity sealed sources safely, and the design of cask satisfies the requirement of design code and standard. It can provide reference for other B type package. (authors)

  1. Spine Radiosurgery: A Dosimetric Analysis in 124 Patients Who Received 18 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipani, Stefano; Wen, Winston; Jin, Jain-Yue; Kim, Jin Koo; Ryu, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the safely tolerated doses to organs at risk (OARs) adjacent to the target volume (TV) of spine radiosurgery (SRS) with 18-Gy in a single fraction. Methods and Materials: A total of 124 patient cases with 165 spine metastases were reviewed. An 18-Gy single-fraction regimen was prescribed to the 90% isodose line encompassing the TV. A constraint of 10 Gy to 10% of the spinal cord outlined 6 mm above and below the TV was used. Dosimetric data to OARs were analyzed. Results: A total of 124 patients (100%) were followed-up, and median follow-up time was 7 months (1-50 months). Symptoms and local control were achieved in 114 patients (92%). Acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 1 oral mucositis occurred in 11 of 11 (100%) patients at risk for oropharyngeal toxicity after cervical spine treatment. There were no RTOG grade 2-4 acute or late complications. Median TV was 43.2 cc (5.3-175.4 cc) and 90% of the TV received median dose of 19 Gy (17-19.8 Gy). Median (range) of spinal cord maximum dose (Dmax), dose to spinal cord 0.35 cc (Dsc0.35), and cord volume receiving 10 Gy (Vsc10) were 13.8 Gy (5.4-21 Gy), 8.9 Gy (2.6-11.4 Gy) and 0.33 cc (0-1.6 cc), respectively. Other OARs were evaluated when in proximity to the TV. Esophagus (n=58), trachea (n=28), oropharynx (n=11), and kidneys (n=34) received median (range) V10 and V15 of 3.1 cc (0-5.8 cc) and 1.2 cc (0-2.9 cc), 2.8 cc (0-4.9 cc), and 0.8 cc (0-2.1 cc), 3.4 cc (0-6.2 cc) and 1.6 cc (0-3.2 cc), 0.3 cc (0-0.8 cc) and 0.08 cc (0-0.1 cc), respectively. Conclusions: Cord Dmax of 14 Gy and D0.35 of 10 Gy are safe dose constraints for 18-Gy single-fraction SRS. Esophagus V10 of 3 cc and V15 of 1 cc, trachea V10 of 3 cc, and V15 of 1 cc, oropharynx V10 of 3.5 cc and V15 of 1.5 cc, kidney V10 of 0.3 cc, and V15 of 0.1 cc are planning guidelines when these OARs are in proximity to the TV.

  2. Preliminary results of a randomized trial comparing 400 cGy vs 700 cGy as an adjuvant to prevent heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Cam; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Silverton, Craig; Cummings, Marilyn; Galante, Jorge O.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: We report our preliminary results of a randomized trial comparing one single dose of 400 cGy versus 700 cGy given postoperatively in an attempt to prevent heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods: From 09/1993 and 05/1996, over 800 total hip replacements were performed at our hospital. From this group of patients, 120 hips in 114 high-risk patients (14%) were enrolled in a randomized trial to determine if 400 cGy (Group A) is as efficacious as 700 cGy (Group B) in preventing heterotopic ossification. In Group A, there were 42 males (46 hips) and 12 females (12 hips) with a mean age of 60 (range 41-79); with 18 primary cementless femoral components (33%), 30 primary cemented stems (55%) and 10 revisions. In Group B, there were 30 males (32 hips) and 30 females (31 hips) with a median age of 59 (range 41-85); with 12 primary cementless femoral components (20%), 44 primary cemented stems (73%) and 6 revisions. All acetabular components were of the cementless type. Patients were randomized to receive either 400 cGy or 700 cGy in one fraction. Radiotherapy is given within 48 hours post-operatively using paired anterior and posterior fields, with blocking of the cementless acetabular component and the femoral component. Results: All 114 patients were available for a minimum follow-up of 6 months (range 6-30 months). None of the arthroplasties has failed at the latest follow-up. There were no radiation therapy complications noted. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in the distribution of patients in either group according to age, sex, primary or revision arthroplasty, cemented or cementless femoral component fixation, preoperative heterotopic ossification risk, or surgical approach. Of the 58 hips in Group A, heterotopic ossification was graded as Grade 0 in 24 hips, Grade I in 10 hips, Grade II in 18 hips, Grade III in 6 hips, with no cases of Grade IV. Of the 63 hips in Group B, heterotopic ossification was

  3. The GETUG 70 Gy vs. 80 Gy randomized trial for localized prostate cancer: Feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean Marc; Lefloch, Olivier; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdin, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Lagrange, Jean-L.eon; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal M.D.; Hay, Men H.; Dubray, Bernard; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe treatments and acute tolerance in a randomized trial comparing 70 Gy and 80 Gy to the prostate in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1999 and February 2002, 306 patients were randomized to receive 70 Gy (153 patients) or 80 Gy (153 patients) in 17 institutions. Patients exhibited intermediate-prognosis tumors. If the risk of node involvement was greater than 10%, surgical staging was required. Previous prostatectomy was excluded, and androgen deprivation was not admitted. The treatment was delivered in two steps. PTV1-including seminal vesicles, prostate, and a 1-0.5-cm margin-received 46 Gy given with a 4-field conformal technique. PTV2, reduced to prostate with the same margins, irradiated with at least 5 fields. Dose was prescribed according to ICRU recommendations in the 70 Gy group, but adapted at the 80 Gy level. Results: All patients but one in the 80 Gy arm completed the treatment. In the 70 Gy arm, the mean dose to the PTV2 was 69.5 Gy. In the 80 Gy arm, the mean dose in the PTV2 was 78.5 Gy. Acute toxicity according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale during treatment was reported in 306 patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two arms: 12% had no toxicity, 80% complained of bladder toxicity, and 70% complained of rectal symptoms. Two months after the end of treatment, 43% of the 70 Gy level and 48% of the 80 Gy level complained of side effects, including 24% and 20% of sexual disorders. There was 6% and 2% of Grade 3 urinary and rectal toxicity. Five patients required a 10-29-day suspension of the treatment. Acute Grade 2 and 3 side effects were related to PTV and CTV1 size, which was the only independent predictive factor in multivariate analysis. Toxicity was not related to the center, age, arm of treatment, or selected data from dose-volume histogram of organ at risk. Conclusion: Treatments were completed in respect to constraints. Acute toxicity

  4. Multi-Institution Prospective Trial of Reduced-Dose Craniospinal Irradiation (23.4 Gy) Followed by Conformal Posterior Fossa (36 Gy) and Primary Site Irradiation (55.8 Gy) and Dose-Intensive Chemotherapy for Average-Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wallace, Dana; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Ashley, David M.; Sexton, Maree; Kellie, Stewart J.; Ahern, Verity M.B.B.S.; Gajjar, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Limiting the neurocognitive sequelae of radiotherapy (RT) has been an objective in the treatment of medulloblastoma. Conformal RT to less than the entire posterior fossa (PF) after craniospinal irradiation might reduce neurocognitive sequelae and requires evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between October 1996 and August 2003, 86 patients, 3-21 years of age, with newly diagnosed, average-risk medulloblastoma were treated in a prospective, institutional review board-approved, multi-institution trial of risk-adapted RT and dose-intensive chemotherapy. RT began within 28 days of definitive surgery and consisted of craniospinal irradiation (23.4 Gy), conformal PF RT (36.0 Gy), and primary site RT (55.8 Gy). The planning target volume for the primary site included the postoperative tumor bed surrounded by an anatomically confined margin of 2 cm that was then expanded with a geometric margin of 0.3-0.5 cm. Chemotherapy was initiated 6 weeks after RT and included four cycles of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine. Results: At a median follow-up of 61.2 months (range, 5.2-115.0 months), the estimated 5-year event-free survival and cumulative incidence of PF failure rate was 83.0% ± 5.3% and 4.9% ± 2.4% (± standard error), respectively. The targeting guidelines used in this study resulted in a mean reduction of 13% in the volume of the PF receiving doses >55 Gy compared with conventionally planned RT. The reductions in the dose to the temporal lobes, cochleae, and hypothalamus were statistically significant. Conclusion: This prospective trial has demonstrated that irradiation of less than the entire PF after 23.4 Gy craniospinal irradiation for average-risk medulloblastoma results in disease control comparable to that after treatment of the entire PF

  5. Comparison between external beam radiotherapy (70 Gy/74 Gy) and permanent interstitial brachytherapy in 890 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Pötter, Richard; Battermann, Jan J.; Kirisits, Christian; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Sljivic, Samir; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of this analysis was to compare biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) rates in intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients treated at two centres of excellence using different approaches: permanent interstitial brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and methods: A total of 890 intermediate-risk prostate-cancer patients, who were treated from 1998 to 2008, were identified in the two local databases. In Utrecht 601 patients received I-125 BT applying a dose of 144 Gy. In Vienna 289 patients were treated by EBRT, applying a local dose of 70 Gy in 105 patients and 74 Gy in 184 patients. bNED-rates (Phoenix-definition) were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months (1–150). 5-Year actuarial bNED-rates were 81% for BT-patients and 75% for EBRT-patients (67% for 70 Gy and 82% for 74 Gy), respectively. In univariate analysis no difference between BT and EBRT could be detected. In multivariate analysis including tumour-stage, GleasonScore, initial PSA, hormonal therapy and treatment-centre (BT vs. EBRT) only T-stage, GleasonScore and PSA were found to be significant. Additional analysis including radiation dose showed the same outcome. Conclusions: Intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy show biochemical tumour-control-rates which are comparable to EBRT of 74 Gy.

  6. 45 Gy - tolerance dose spinal cord - dogma or the facts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Hliniak, A.; Danczak-Ginalska, Z.; Meder, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.; Korzeniowski, S.; Peszynski, J.; Jassem, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dose of 45 Gy as a tolerance dose for spinal cord was questioned based on review of clinical data. Some data show that for conventional fractionation with the dose per fraction of less than 2.0 Gy spinal cord tolerance dose may arise up to 50-55 Gy. This was the base for round-table discussion and the importance of clinical and physical risk factors of postirradiation spinal cord injury was discussed and previous diseases of spinal cord, size of dose per fraction and length of irradiated spinal cord were pointed out as high risk factors. It was concluded that from clinical point of view there is no reason and on need to verify and to increase tolerance dose for spinal cord. (author)

  7. INDUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL MEIOTIC GY~OGENESIS WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    INDUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL MEIOTIC GY~OGENESIS WITH. ULTRAVIOLET RAYS IN THE AFRICA:" CATFISH, CI.ARIAS. ANGUILLARIS. ABSTRACT. P.O. ALUKO. National Institute for Freshwater Fisheries. Research, P.M.B. 6006, New Bussa. Artificial gynogenesis was induced in Clarias a11gw aris ) fenilizing the eggs ...

  8. Lowy, Schiller win 2018 Szent-Györgyi Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    A press release announcing that NCI scientists Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller will receive the 2018 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research from the National Foundation for Cancer Research for their work on HPV vaccines.

  9. Biodegradation polyurethane derived from vegetable oil irradiated with gamma rays 25 kGy and 100 kGy; Biodegradacao de poliuretano derivado de oleo vegetal irradiado com raios gama 25 kGy e 100 kGy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Antonia M. dos, E-mail: amsantos@rc.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista - Unesp, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Claro Neto, Salvador [Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Campus de Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Azevedo, Elaine C. de [Universidade Federal do Parana, Campus de Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The environment requires polymers that can be degraded by the action of microorganisms. In this work was studied the biodegradation of polyurethane samples derived from vegetable oil (castor oil), which were irradiated with gamma rays 25 kGy and 100 kGy compared with the same polyurethane without being irradiated. Biodegradation of polyurethane was carried out in culture medium containing the fungus Aspergillus niger by 146 days and the result was evaluated using the technique of thermogravimetric analysis, where there was a change of behavior of the curves TGA / DTG occurred indicating that chemical modifications of molecules present in the structure of the polymer chain, thus confirming that the material has undergone the action of microorganisms. (author)

  10. Biodegradation polyurethane derived from vegetable oil irradiated with gamma rays 25 kGy and 100 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Antonia M. dos; Claro Neto, Salvador; Azevedo, Elaine C. de

    2011-01-01

    The environment requires polymers that can be degraded by the action of microorganisms. In this work was studied the biodegradation of polyurethane samples derived from vegetable oil (castor oil), which were irradiated with gamma rays 25 kGy and 100 kGy compared with the same polyurethane without being irradiated. Biodegradation of polyurethane was carried out in culture medium containing the fungus Aspergillus niger by 146 days and the result was evaluated using the technique of thermogravimetric analysis, where there was a change of behavior of the curves TGA / DTG occurred indicating that chemical modifications of molecules present in the structure of the polymer chain, thus confirming that the material has undergone the action of microorganisms. (author)

  11. Higher than standard radiation doses (≥72 Gy) with or without androgen deprivation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Lyons, Janice; Klein, Eric A.; Reddy, Chandana A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect on biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and clinical disease-free survival of radiation doses delivered to the prostate and periprostatic tissues for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1041 consecutive localized prostate cancer cases treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) at our institution between 7/86 and 2/99 were reviewed. All cases had available pretreatment parameters including pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA), biopsy Gleason score (bGS), and clinical T stage. The median age was 69 years. Twenty-three percent of cases (n = 238) were African-American. The distribution by clinical T stage was as follows: T1 in 365 cases (35%), T2 in 562 cases (54%), and T3 in 114 cases (11%). The median iPSA level was 10.1 ng/ml (range: 0.4-692.9). The distribution by biopsy Gleason score (bGS) was as follows: ≤6 in 580 cases (56%) and ≥7 in 461 cases (44%). Androgen deprivation (AD) in the adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting was given in 303 cases (29%). The mean RT dose was 71.9 Gy (range: 57.6-78.0 Gy). The median RT dose was 70.2 Gy, with 458 cases (44%) receiving at least 72.0 Gy. The average dose in patients receiving <72 Gy was 68.3 Gy (median 68.4) versus 76.5 Gy (median 78.0) for patients receiving ≥72 Gy. The mean follow-up was 38 months (median 33 months). The number of follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels available was 5998. Results: The 5- and 8-year bRFS rates were 61% (95% CI 55-65%) and 58% (95% CI 51-65%), respectively. The 5-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 55% (95% CI 49-60%), respectively. The 8-year bRFS rates for patients receiving radiation doses ≥72 Gy versus <72 Gy were 87% (95% CI 82-92%) and 51% (95% CI 44-58%), respectively (p < 0.001). A multivariate analysis of factors affecting bRFS was performed using the following parameters: age (continuous variable), race, T-stage (T1-T2 vs. T3

  12. 125I Monotherapy Using D90 Implant Doses of 180 Gy or Greater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Johnny; Stone, Nelson N.; Lavaf, Amir; Dumane, Vishruta; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stock, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the oncologic results and toxicity profile of patients treated with 125 I implants using the dose delivered to 90% of the gland from the dose-volume histogram (D90) of greater than 144 Gy. Methods and Materials: From June 1995 to Feb 2005, a total of 643 patients were treated with 125 I monotherapy for T1-T2 prostate cancer with a D90 of 180 Gy or greater (median, 197 Gy; range, 180-267 Gy). Implantations were performed using a real-time ultrasound-guided seed-placement method and intraoperative dosimetry to optimize target coverage and homogeneity by using modified peripheral loading. We analyzed biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) of 435 patients who had a minimum 2-year prostate-specific antigen follow-up (median follow-up, 6.7 years; range, 2.0-11.1 years). Results: Five-year bDFS rates for the entire cohort using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions were 96.9% and 96.5%, respectively. Using the Phoenix definition, 5-year bDFS rates were 97.3% for low-risk patients and 92.8% for intermediate/high-risk patients. The positive biopsy rate was 4.1%. The freedom rate from Grade 2 or higher rectal bleeding at 5 years was 88.5%. Acute urinary retention occurred in 10.7%, more commonly in patients with high pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scores (p < 0.01). In patients who were potent before treatment, 73.4% remained potent at 5 years after implantation. Conclusions: Patients with a minimum D90 of 180 Gy had outstanding local control based on prostate-specific antigen control and biopsy data. Toxicity profiles, particularly for long-term urinary and sexual function, were excellent and showed that D90 doses of 180 Gy or greater performed using the technique described were feasible and tolerable

  13. Randomized Comparison of Whole Brain Radiotherapy, 20 Gy in Four Daily Fractions Versus 40 Gy in 20 Twice-Daily Fractions, for Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, P.H.; Bucci, J.; Browne, L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The present study compared the intracranial control rate and quality of life for two radiation fractionation schemes for cerebral metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 113 patients with a Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 months), absent, or concurrent presentation of extracranial disease were randomized to 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions (Arm A) or 20 Gy in four daily fractions (Arm B), stratified by resection status. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life 30-item questionnaire was administered monthly during Year 1, bimonthly during Year 2, and then every 6 months to Year 5. Results: The patient age range was 28-83 years (mean 62). Of the 113 patients, 41 had undergone surgical resection, and 74 patients had extracranial disease (31 concurrent and 43 stable). The median survival time was 6.1 months in Arm A and 6.6 months in Arm B, and the overall 5-year survival rate was 3.5%. Intracranial progression occurred in 44% of Arm A and 64% of Arm B patients (p = .03). Salvage surgery or radiotherapy was used in 4% of Arm A patients and 21% of Arm B patients (p = .004). Death was attributed to central nervous system progression in 32% of patients in Arm A and 52% of patients in Arm B (p = .03). The toxicity was minimal, with a minor increase in short-term cutaneous reactions in Arm A. The patients' quality of life was not impaired by the more intense treatment in Arm A. Conclusion: Intracranial disease control was improved and the quality of life was maintained with 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions. This schema should be considered for better prognosis subgroups of patients with cerebral metastases.

  14. Moving Beyond IGY: An Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Barton, C. E.; Rodger, A. S.; Thompson, B. J.; Fraser, B.; Papitashvili, V.

    2003-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new geophysical observatories pursuing the major IGY objectives - to collect geophysical data as widely as possible and to provide free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. Today, geophysics has attained a rather good understanding within traditional regions, i.e., the atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and other such geospheres. At the same time, it has become clear that much of the new and important science is coming from the studies of interfaces and coupling between geospheres. Thus, if geophysical data are made `'transparently'' available to a much wider range of scientists and students than to those who do the observations, then new and exciting discoveries can be expected. An International Association of Geomagnetic and Aeronomy (IAGA) task force, recognizing that a key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories, proposes that for the 50th anniversary of IGY, the worldwide scientific community should endorse and promote an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the IGY in 2007-2008 and provide a forward impetus to geophysics in 21st century, similar to that provided by the IGY fifty years ago. The IAGA task force strongly advocates: (1) Securing permission and release of existing data; (2) Creating access to information; and (3) Conversion of relevant analog data to digital form. The eGY concept embraces all available and upcoming geophysical data (e.g., atmospheric, ionospheric, geomagnetic, gravity, etc.) through the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being `'deployed'' in cyberspace. The eGY concept is modern, global, and timely; it is attractive, pragmatic, and affordable. The eGY is based on the existing and continually developing computing/networking technologies (e.g., XML, Semantic Web

  15. γ-Radiation (0-150 kGy) Effects on HDPE/LDPE Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, C.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, irradiation with 60 C o source was employed to study the effect of γ-rays on some physical properties of HDPE/LDPE blends (0/100, 10/90, 25/75, 50/50, 75/25, 100/0), using various doses: 0, 50, 150 kGy. The blends were prepared by extrusion and plates were compression molded employing fast and slow cooling methods from the melt. Density, degree of crystallinity and mechanical properties were dependant on the cooling rate used and blend composition. Better properties were found for HDPE-rich blends. Mechanical properties showed no significant variations in tensile modulus and yield stress. Instead, a decrease in elongation at break, due to molecular crosslinking or branching reaction effects, with the raise of radiation dose was obtained. Density measurements and differential scanning calorimetry results failed to exhibit significant changes with radiation dose. Some qualitative aspects included changes in endotherms shape. These were attributed to the variation of in crystallite sizes, probably due to structural changes originated by crosslinking and chain scission reactions occurring as a result of γ-rays exposure. On the other hand, there was an abrupt reduction of the melt flow index (MFI) from the range of 16-9 dg/min for 0 kGy to non-fluidity for an exposure of 150 kGy; this behavior is another sign of high crosslinking, impairing the viscous fluidity of the blends

  16. Photometry of the long period dwarf nova GY Hya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Albert; Monard, Berto

    2017-08-01

    Although comparatively bright, the cataclysmic variable GY Hya has not attracted much attention in the past. As part of a project to better characterize such systems photometrically, we observed light curves in white light, each spanning several hours, at Bronberg Observatory, South Africa, in 2004 and 2005, and at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, Brazil, in 2014 and 2016. These data permit to study orbital modulations and their variations from season to season. The orbital period, already known from spectroscopic observations of Peters and Thorstensen (2005), is confirmed through strong ellipsoidal variations of the mass donor star in the system and the presence of eclipses of both components. A refined period of 0.34723972 (6) days and revised ephemeries are derived. Seasonal changes in the average orbital light curve can qualitatively be explained by variations of the contribution of a hot spot to the system light together with changes of the disk radius. The amplitude of the ellipsoidal variations and the eclipse contact phases permit to put some constraints on the mass ratio, orbital inclination and the relative brightness of the primary and secondary components. There are some indications that the disk radius during quiescence, expressed in units of the component separation, is smaller than in other dwarf novae.

  17. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasola, Carolina E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Jones, Jennifer C. [Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Huang, Derek D. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles Olive View, Sylmar, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S., E-mail: sarah2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  18. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse

  19. Re-irradiation with 36 Gy (1.5 Gy Twice Daily) Plus Paclitaxel for Advanced Recurrent and Previously Irradiated SCCHN is Feasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Bartscht, Tobias; Idel, Christian; Hakim, Samer G

    2018-01-01

    Many patients developing a loco-regional recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) have a poor prognosis. Often, recurrences are unresectable, and patients require a second course of radiotherapy or chemoradiation. We present an approach of chemoradiation including mainly 30 Gy of radiotherapy (1.5 Gy twice daily) plus concurrent paclitaxel. To further improve the prognoses of these patients, we increased the radiation dose from 30 to 36 Gy. In four patients with recurrent and previously irradiated SCCHN (60-70 Gy) chemoradiation was carried out using 36 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) and concurrent paclitaxel (4-5 times 20-25 mg/m 2 ). One-year loco-regional control rates were 75% inside and 67% outside re-irradiated regions. One-year survival was 50%, and median survival time 11 months. Toxicities were mild (grade 0-2). Re-irradiation with 36 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) plus paclitaxel appears feasible and may lead to promising outcomes. This study is preceding a phase I trial. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Moreno, Marta; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Julian, Mikel; Alcalde, Juan; Jurado, Matias

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses ≥70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins ≥1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses ≤50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  1. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemsen, U.F.; Knesewitsch, P.; Kreisig, T.; Pickardt, C.R.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  2. Safety Evaluation of 30 kGy Irradiated Chocolate Ice Cream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Y.E.; Yin, X.F.; Chung, C.K.; Kang, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study was investigated the potential toxicity of gamma-irradiated chocolate ice cream for its future use in space. Chocolate ice cream was irradiated at a dose of 30 kGy at a temperature of -20°C. For the animal study, AIN-93G was used as a control diet and irradiated and non-irradiated chocolate ice cream diets were administered to male and female ICR mice (ten mice per group) for three months. During the experimental period, the group fed irradiated chocolate ice cream did not show any changes in appearance, behavior, mortality, body weight, organ weight, or food consumption compared to the control. Also, all biochemical parameters, including hematology profiles, erythrocyte counts, and serum biochemical values were in normal ranges. In histopathological examinations of liver and kidney tissues, there were no significant differences between the control group and the group fed irradiated chocolate ice cream. These results indicate that chocolate ice cream irradiated at 30 kGy did not cause any toxic effects and could be applied for the development of safe and hygienic space food

  3. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemsen, U.F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Knesewitsch, P. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Kreisig, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Pickardt, C.R. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, C.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  4. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response......PURPOSE: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments...... or a very good partial response rate (response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. CONCLUSIONS...

  5. Acute and late complications after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Results of a multicenter randomized trial comparing 68 Gy to 78 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Tabak, Hans; Mens, Jan Willem; Lebesque, Joos V.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects in prostate cancer patients randomized to receive 68 Gy or 78 Gy. Methods and materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, 669 prostate cancer patients were randomized between radiotherapy with a dose of 68 Gy and 78 Gy, in 2 Gy per fraction and using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. All T stages with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 120 days) was scored according to the slightly adapted RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Results: The median follow-up time was 31 months. For acute toxicity no significant differences were seen between the two randomization arms. GI toxicity Grade 2 and 3 was reported as the maximum acute toxicity in 44% and 5% of the patients, respectively. For acute GU toxicity, these figures were 41% and 13%. No significant differences between both randomization arms were seen for late GI and GU toxicity, except for rectal bleeding requiring laser treatment or transfusion (p = 0.007) and nocturia (p = 0.05). The 3-year cumulative risk of late RTOG/EORTC GI toxicity grade ≥2 was 23.2% for 68 Gy, and 26.5% for 78 Gy (p = 0.3). The 3-year risks of late RTOG/EORTC GU toxicity grade ≥2 were 28.5% and 30.2% for 68 Gy and 78 Gy, respectively (p = 0.3). Factors related to acute GI toxicity were HT (p < 0.001), a higher dose-volume group (p = 0.01), and pretreatment GI symptoms (p = 0.04). For acute GU toxicity, prognostic factors were: pretreatment GU symptoms (p < 0.001), HT (p = 0.003), and prior transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (p = 0.02). A history of abdominal surgery (p < 0.001) and pretreatment GI symptoms (p = 0.001) were associated with a higher incidence of late GI grade ≥2 toxicity, whereas HT (p < 0.001), pretreatment GU symptoms (p < 0.001), and prior TURP (p = 0.006) were prognostic factors for late GU grade ≥2. Conclusions: Raising the dose to the prostate from 68 Gy to

  6. Influence of neuraminidase and X-ray irradiation (2 Gy and 8 Gy) on microvilli and membrane invaginations of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in monolayer culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudenbach, G.; Baganz, O.; Pfab, R.; Hess, F.; Schachtschabel, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    A monolayer culture (Eagle basal medium plus 10% of fetal calf serum) of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells was exposed to X-radiation with 2 Gy and 8 Gy and treated with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase alone or combined with sublethal X-ray irradiation (2 Gy). Pictures of the Ehrlich ascites tumor cells taken with the electron microscope were investigated in order to find out any cell surface modifications due to membrane invaginations and microvilli. The results showed that the rate of microvilli as well as that of membrane invaginations became higher with the increasing X-ray dose (2 Gy; 8 Gy). Following to neuraminidase treatment there was a considerable augmentation of membran invaginations as compared to control cells, whereas the number of microvilli was slightly reduced. As it has been already described before, the influence of neuraminidase produced an increased endocytosis activity and a strengthening of the cytoskeleton. Combined treatment with neuraminidase and sublethal X-radiation (2 Gy) caused a higher rate of membrane invaginations than each method alone; the number of microvilli was slightly increased by combined treatment. The conclusion is drawn that these structure modifications are due to reparation processes induced by radiation on the one hand and to an enzymic action of neuraminidase on the cell surface on the other hand. (orig.) [de

  7. Effect of protracted whole-body gamma irradiation with 6.7 Gy and 4.8 Gy (700 and 500 R) on trypsin inhibition activity of blood, cervical mucus and on morphological structure of cervix in ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnarova, M.; Arendarcik, J.; Molnar, P.

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of changes in the trypsin inhibition activities (TIA) of blood plasma, cervical mucus and the morphological structure of the cervix was studied in ewes exposed to 60 Co radiation for seven and five days, the radiation doses being 6.7 Gy and 4.8 Gy, respectively. During exposure, the group of ewes irradaited with 4.8 Gy was given the Roboran vitamin addition and following irradiation ampicillin (5250 mg). TIA was determined from retardation of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate N-alpha-tosyl-p-nitroanilide by bovine trypsin; the TIA was expressed as the percentage of inhibited trypsin. Almost all the studied TIA values of blood plasma and cervical mucus were increased in the irradiated animals, the range being from 103.1 to 155.0% of the levels for non-irradiated ewes. A reduction was recorded only in the total TIA of blood plasma in the group irradiated with a dose of 6.7 Gy (83.1% of the values for non-irradiated animals). In the group of animals irradiated with 4.8 Gy and non Roboran administered, the TIA of cervical mucus was observed to decrease to 92.4%. It was found during the study of changes in the proportion of glands in the stroma and changes in epithelium thickness in the mucous membrane of the cervix uteri that the irradiated ewes had the epithelium thickness reduced to 95.3% to 65.5% and that their stromal gland number decreased to 75.4% to 79.7% of that recorded in non-irradiated animals. It was only in the group given the Roboran supplement that an increase to 123.7% of the gland number for untreated ewes was recorded on the tenth day after termination of the irradiation

  8. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

  9. A polymeric dosimeter film based on optically-stimulated luminescence for dose measurements below 1 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Baranyai, M.; Wojnarovits, L.; Slezsak, I.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, S.D.; Miller, A.; Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M.

    1999-01-01

    A new potential dosimetry system 'Sunna' containing a microcrystalline dispersion of an optically-stimulated fluor in a plastic matrix has been recently developed to measure and image high doses. Our previous investigations have revealed that the new dosimeter system is capable of measuring absorbed doses in the dose range of 1-100 kGy. The optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis is based on the blue light stimulation of the colour center states produced upon irradiation, and the intensity of the resulting red-light emission is used to measure absorbed dose. This analysis is carried out with a simple table-top fluorimeter developed for this purpose having also the ability to calculate the mathematical formula of the calibration function. The Sunna dosimeter was recently investigated for potential use in lower dose range below 1 kGy. These investigations have shown that the film is suitable for measuring doses in the range of 1-1000 Gy for both electron and gamma radiation. To test the applicability of the film, its reproducibility, stability, sensitivity to ambient and UV light and irradiation temperature were measured. The stability of the dosimeter was investigated by monitoring the change of the OSL signal with storage time after irradiation. Further experiments proved the homogeneity of the film with respect to thickness variation, and limited differences in its response were found between batches. (author)

  10. Gamma Radiation (5-10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Radiation (5-10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippocampus TERRY C. PELLMAR AND DENNIS L. LEPINSKI Ph.vsiology Department..Irmned Forces...L. Gamma Radiation ioral effects. Within hours of irradiation with 10 Gy and (5- 10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippo- less...acti v- Guinea pigs were exposed to 5 and 10 Gy ’y radiation. Hippo- ity (9) are evident. campal brain slices were isolated 30 min, I day, 3 days and 5

  11. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy (2100 cGY) for stage 4 neuroblastoma as part of intensive multimodality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollamudi, S.V.; Kushner, B.H.; Merchant, T.E.; LaQuaglia, M.; Lindsley, K.; Rosenfield, N.; Abramson, S.; Kramer, K.; Cheung, N.K.V.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To retrospectively evaluate the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy to the primary site following induction chemotherapy and aggressive surgical resection in patients (pts) with stage 4 neuroblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 48 previously untreated children (median age at diagnosis 3 yo, range 1-10 yo) with stage 4 neuroblastoma achieved a complete-, near-complete-, or partial-remission after multimodality therapy (protocol N4: 6 pts, N5: 7 pts, N6: 27 pts, or N7: 8 pts). All protocols included a regimen consisting of dose-intensive multiagent chemotherapy, maximal surgical debulking, followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Most pts then underwent consolidation with either autologous marrow transplantation (N4 and N5), or immunotherapy (N6 and N7) with radioimmunotherapy (N7). Of 48 pts, 46 had microscopic disease at the primary site prior to beginning radiotherapy (45 underwent gross total resection of the primary, and one had no residual primary disease after chemotherapy alone). One pt had a partial resection, and one remained unresectable after mutimodality therapy. The pre-chemotherapy volume of the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 2100cGy delivered twice-daily in 150 cGy fractions over 7 treatment days. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 32.5 months (range= 8-145 months), local-regional control was achieved in 44 of the 48 pts. Of the pts who are progression-free, median follow-up was 53.5 months. Overall, 24 of 48 pts progressed, three with local-regional recurrence as the first site of relapse, one with distant failure first and subsequent local-regional recurrence, and 21 with distant failure only. The probability of local-regional control at 32 months was 83%. One of the four pts with local-regional relapse never achieved a complete remission with either systemic therapy, surgical resection or radiotherapy. The progression-free survival at 32 months was 46%. Median time to overall progression was 16

  12. Comparison of 1 x 8 Gy and 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borgmann, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Section Radiobiology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Karstens, Johann H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alberti, Winfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Since life expectancy is markedly reduced in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), a short and effective radiation schedule is desired. This study investigates a reduction of the overall treatment time to only one day by comparing 1 x 8 Gy to the multi-fractionated 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome. Methods and materials: Data of 204 patients, treated for MSCC with either 1 x 8 Gy (n = 96) or 10 x 3 Gy (n = 108), were analyzed retrospectively. Motor function and ambulatory status were evaluated before and up to 24 weeks after RT. A multivariate analysis (nominal regression) was performed including radiation schedule, performance status, age, irradiated vertebra, and relevant prognostic factors (histology, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits). Improvement of motor deficits was selected as basic category and compared with no change and deterioration. Results: Univariate analysis showed no significant difference between the schedules for post-treatment motor function and ambulatory rates. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant effect on functional outcome for the prognostic factors, but not for the radiation schedule (p = 0.853 for no change, p = 0.237 for deterioration). Conclusions: Our data suggest the two fractionation schedules to be comparably effective for functional outcome. Thus, 1 x 8 Gy should be considered for patients with a poor survival prognosis.

  13. Comparison of 1 x 8 Gy and 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Karstens, Johann H.; Koning, Caro C.E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Since life expectancy is markedly reduced in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), a short and effective radiation schedule is desired. This study investigates a reduction of the overall treatment time to only one day by comparing 1 x 8 Gy to the multi-fractionated 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome. Methods and materials: Data of 204 patients, treated for MSCC with either 1 x 8 Gy (n = 96) or 10 x 3 Gy (n = 108), were analyzed retrospectively. Motor function and ambulatory status were evaluated before and up to 24 weeks after RT. A multivariate analysis (nominal regression) was performed including radiation schedule, performance status, age, irradiated vertebra, and relevant prognostic factors (histology, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits). Improvement of motor deficits was selected as basic category and compared with no change and deterioration. Results: Univariate analysis showed no significant difference between the schedules for post-treatment motor function and ambulatory rates. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant effect on functional outcome for the prognostic factors, but not for the radiation schedule (p = 0.853 for no change, p = 0.237 for deterioration). Conclusions: Our data suggest the two fractionation schedules to be comparably effective for functional outcome. Thus, 1 x 8 Gy should be considered for patients with a poor survival prognosis

  14. GY SAMPLING THEORY AND GEOSTATISTICS: ALTERNATE MODELS OF VARIABILITY IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the sampling theory developed by Pierre Gy, sample variability is modeled as the sum of a set of seven discrete error components. The variogram used in geostatisties provides an alternate model in which several of Gy's error components are combined in a continuous mode...

  15. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  16. Increased Risk of Biochemical and Clinical Failure for Prostate Patients with a Large Rectum at Radiotherapy Planning: Results from the Dutch Trial of 68 GY Versus 78 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Witte, Marnix G.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Incrocci, Luca; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether a large rectum filling visible on the planning CT scan was associated with a decrease in freedom from any failure (FFF) and freedom from clinical failure (FFCF) for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients from the Dutch trial (78 Gy vs. 68 Gy) with available acute toxicity data were analyzed (n = 549). A 10-mm margin was applied for the first 68 Gy and 0-5 mm for the 10-Gy boost. The dose in the seminal vesicles (SVs) was prescribed within four treatment groups according to the estimated risk of SV involvement. Two potential risk factors (RFs) for a geometric miss were defined: (1) an anorectal volume ≥ 90 cm 3 and ≥ 25% of treatment-time diarrhea (RF1); and (2) the mean cross-sectional area of the anorectum (RF2). We tested whether these were significant predictors for FFF and FFCF within each treatment group. Results: Significant results were observed only for patients with a risk of SV involvement > 25% (dose of 68-78 Gy to the SVs, n = 349). We found a decrease in FFF (p = 0.001) and FFCF (p = 0.01) for the 87 patients with RF1 (for RF2, p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). The estimated decrease in the FFCF rate at 5 years was 15%. Conclusion: Tumor control was significantly decreased in patients with a risk of SV involvement > 25% and at risk of geometric miss. Current image guidance techniques offer several solutions to geometrically optimize the treatment. Additional research is needed to evaluate whether geometric misses can be prevented using these techniques

  17. Studies of the effect of 0.4-Gy and 0.6-Gy prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal adult behavior in the Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensh, R P; Brent, R L; Vogel, W H

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-four pregnant Wistar rats were X-irradiated on the 9th or 17th day of gestation at a dosage level 0.4 Gy or 0.6 Gy or were sham-irradiated. All mothers were allowed to deliver their offspring, and litters were limited to a maximum of eight on day 2. On day 30, 224 offspring were weaned and raised until 60 days of age, at which time testing began. Each rat randomly received, in random order, three of the following six behavioral tests: Water T-maze, Conditioned Avoidance Response, Forelimb Hanging, Activity Wheel, Swimming, and Open Field. There were no statistically significant differences between the irradiated and control groups for maternal weight or weight gain or mean litter size, although the litter size of the 17th day 0.6-Gy group was slightly lower. Among offspring irradiated with 0.6 Gy on the 17th day, 3-day-old neonates' weights were significantly reduced. Offspring irradiated on the 17th day with 0.6 Gy exhibited higher Conditioned Avoidance Response 5th-day and retest avoidance scores than did the controls. There were also significant sex differences in responses within the irradiated and control groups for several tests, which were unrelated to radiation exposure. The results of this study indicate that low-level X-irradiation during the fetal period of rat gestation results in neonatal growth retardation and subtle behavioral alterations that may be manifested in adult life. Growth retardation may be the most sensitive indicator of subtle effects that result from low-level prenatal exposure to X-rays.

  18. Studies of the effect of 0.4-Gy and 0.6-Gy prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal adult behavior in the Wistar rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.; Vogel, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-four pregnant Wistar rats were X-irradiated on the 9th or 17th day of gestation at a dosage level 0.4 Gy or 0.6 Gy or were sham-irradiated. All mothers were allowed to deliver their offspring, and litters were limited to a maximum of eight on day 2. On day 30, 224 offspring were weaned and raised until 60 days of age, at which time testing began. Each rat randomly received, in random order, three of the following six behavioral tests: Water T-maze, Conditioned Avoidance Response, Forelimb Hanging, Activity Wheel, Swimming, and Open Field. There were no statistically significant differences between the irradiated and control groups for maternal weight or weight gain or mean litter size, although the litter size of the 17th day 0.6-Gy group was slightly lower. Among offspring irradiated with 0.6 Gy on the 17th day, 3-day-old neonates' weights were significantly reduced. Offspring irradiated on the 17th day with 0.6 Gy exhibited higher Conditioned Avoidance Response 5th-day and retest avoidance scores than did the controls. There were also significant sex differences in responses within the irradiated and control groups for several tests, which were unrelated to radiation exposure. The results of this study indicate that low-level X-irradiation during the fetal period of rat gestation results in neonatal growth retardation and subtle behavioral alterations that may be manifested in adult life. Growth retardation may be the most sensitive indicator of subtle effects that result from low-level prenatal exposure to X-rays

  19. 8 Gy single-dose radiotherapy is effective in metastatic spinal cord compression: Results of a phase III randomized multicentre Italian trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Casale, Michelina; Costantini, Sara; Lupattelli, Marco; Bellavita, Rita; Marafioti, Luigi; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Santacaterina, Anna; Mignogna, Marcello; Silvano, Giovanni; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a previous randomized trial we showed that the short-course radiotherapy (RT) regimen of 8 Gy x 2 was feasible in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) and short life expectancy. This phase III trial was planned to determine whether in the same category of patients 8 Gy single-dose is as effective as 8 Gy x 2. Materials and methods: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients with MSCC and short life expectancy were randomly assigned to a short-course of 8 Gy x 2 or to 8 Gy single-dose RT. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 4-58). Results: A total of 303 (93%) patients are assessable, 150 treated with the short-course and 153 with the single-dose RT. No difference in response was found between the two RT schedules adopted. Median duration of response was 5 and 4.5 months for short-course and single-dose RT (p = 0.4), respectively. The median overall survival was 4 months for all cases. Light acute toxicity was registered in a minority of cases. Late toxicity was never recorded. Conclusions: Both RT schedules adopted were effective. As already shown in several trials evaluating RT regimens in uncomplicated painful bone metastases, also MSCC patients may achieve palliation with minimal toxicity and inconvenience with a single-dose of 8 Gy.

  20. 20 Gy Versus 44 Gy of Supplemental External Beam Radiotherapy With Palladium-103 for Patients With Greater Risk Disease: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Wallner, Kent E.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Taira, Al V.; Orio, Peter; Adamovich, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The necessity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a supplement to prostate brachytherapy remains unknown. We report brachytherapy outcomes for patients with higher risk features randomized to substantially different supplemental EBRT regimens. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and June 2004, 247 patients were randomized to 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy EBRT followed by a palladium-103 boost (115 Gy vs. 90 Gy). The eligibility criteria included clinically organ-confined disease with Gleason score 7–10 and/or pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 10–20 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a PSA level of ≤0.40 ng/mL after nadir. The median day 0 prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume was 125.7%; 80 men received androgen deprivation therapy (median, 4 months). Multiple parameters were evaluated for their effect on bPFS. Results: For the entire cohort, the cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival rates were 97.7%, 93.2%, and 80.8% at 8 years and 96.9%, 93.2%, and 75.4% at 10 years, respectively. The bPFS rate was 93.1% and 93.4% for the 20-Gy and 44-Gy arms, respectively (p = .994). However, no statistically significant differences were found in cause-specific survival or overall survival were identified. When stratified by PSA level of ≤10 ng/mL vs. >10 ng/mL, Gleason score, or androgen deprivation therapy, no statistically significant differences in bPFS were discerned between the two EBRT regimens. On multivariate analysis, bPFS was most closely related to the preimplant PSA and clinical stage. For patients with biochemically controlled disease, the median PSA level was <0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: The results of the present trial strongly suggest that two markedly different supplemental EBRT regimens result in equivalent cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival. It is probable that the lack of benefit for a higher supplemental EBRT

  1. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparable effects of 1800- and 2400-rad (18- and 24-Gy) cranial irradiation on height and weight in children treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starceski, P.J.; Lee, P.A.; Blatt, J.; Finegold, D.; Brown, D.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effects of low-dose cranial irradiation on growth and to determine if one can predict patients in whom growth will be most affected, we studied 47 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia who had been treated with 2400 rad (24 Gy), 1800 rad (18 Gy), or no whole-brain irradiation. Serial measurements of height, weight, and weight for height were obtained by retrospective chart review. The effects of 1800 rad (18 Gy) and 2400 rad (24 Gy) treatment were indistinguishable. Height percentiles among irradiated patients decreased by a mean of 12% six months after diagnosis, and growth generally did not catch up. Moreover, although 33 irradiated patients maintained heights within the normal range, In 11 patients (33%) a dramatic falloff occurred such that by three years following diagnosis their height for age was more than 30 percentiles below the original value. These patients were all identifiable at six months since their height percentiles had already decreased by more than 15%. Although weight percentiles did not change following irradiation, the weight-for-height ratio increased and patients were relatively stockier three years after therapy than they had been at diagnosis. In patients who had received chemotherapy alone, the weight-for-height ratio also increased, but this appeared to be due to a disproportionate increase in weight. Longer follow-up and evaluation of larger cohorts of patients treated with 1800 rad (18 Gy) will be needed to confirm these results

  3. ESR dosimetry below 1 Gy, in X-ray irradiated tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainstein, Carlos; Winkler, Elin

    2000-01-01

    Tooth enamel, extracted from molars, was irradiated with 66 keV X-rays, with doses up to 1 Gy. The preparation of the powder samples is described, as well as the protocol for the acquisition and processing of the spectra. The radiation induced paramagnetism is measured, at room temperature, by ESR Spectroscopy. The ESR spectra is well described considering two paramagnetic species, with magnetic moments (in units of Bohr magneton) g=2,0041, and g 1 =2,0018, g 2 =1,9972. The ESR data (peak-to-peak amplitude per mg, hpp/mg, vs dose D), for doses 0 Gy 2 =0,996) with the linear expression: [hpp/mg] = -0,2(0,4)+14,9(0,5). D [Gy]. The result supports the growing confidence in the use of this material, and method, in Retrospective Dosimetry. (author)

  4. ESR Dosimetry Below 1 Gy, in X-Ray Irradiated Tooth Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainstein, Carlos; Winkler, E; Dubner, D; Gisone, P; Perez, M.R; Saravi, M; Alvarez, P; Davila, F

    2000-01-01

    Tooth enamel, extracted from molars, was irradiated with 66keV X-rays, with doses up to 1Gy.The preparation of the powder samples is described, as well as the protocol for the acquisition and processing of the spectra.The radiation induced paramagnetism is measured, at room temperature, by ESR Spectroscopy.The ESR spectra is well described considering two paramagnetic species, with magnetic moments (in units of Bohr magnetons) g=2,0041, and g1=2,0018, g2=1,9972.The ESR data (peak-to-peak amplitude per mg, hpp/mg, vs dose D), for doses 0Gy 2 =0,996) with the linear expression: [hpp/mg] = -0,2( 0,4)+14,9(0,5). D [Gy].The result supports the growing confidence in the use of this material, and method, in Retrospective Dosimetry

  5. Textural gain and subsequent loss in irradiated apples, carrots and potatoes with increase in dose from 0.03 to 1.0 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathalin, J.; McNulty, P.

    1996-01-01

    Cored samples (16mm X 15mm diameter) of apples, carrots and potatoes were irradiated in an Isomedix Gammacell 1000 irradiator at a dose rate of approximately 9Gy/min. Texture was measured using unrestrained uniaxial compression to microrupture on the JJ Universal Testing Machine. The loading rate was 6mm/min. Texture or firmness was assessed as the force to microrupture; the force required for various microrupture sample deformations (25%, 50% and 75%); the apparent Young's Modulus (ratio of the average stress to the average strain to microrupture); and the microrupture energy (area under the force-deformation curve). As the dose increased from 0.03 up to about 0.1 kGy, a gain in texture generally occurred in all products ranging from 3% to 16%. A transition area from gain to loss occurred within the 0.1 to 0.3 kGy range. Loss of texture occurred in all products as the dose increased from 0.3 to 1.0kGy, the loss ranging from 4% to 30%. The greatest loss of texture occurred in apples and the least loss in carrots. There textural trends may have commercial significance in low dose irradiation processes such as sprout inhibition, senescence delay and disinfestation

  6. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  7. 哈氏弧菌EcGY020401优化培养%Optimization Culture of Vibrio harveyi EcGY020401

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶家发; 赖迎迢; 潘厚军; 石存斌; 吴淑勤

    2010-01-01

    目的:为规模化制备弧菌疫苗提供相关数据.方法:利用摇瓶和小型发酵罐培养,通过平板计数测定培养菌液的活菌数.结果:哈氏弧菌(Vibrio harveyi)EcGY020401株最适盐度为20~25g/L,合适的pH为7.5~7.7,葡萄糖浓度最适浓度为2~5g/L,用TSB优化培养基:胰蛋白胨5g/L、蛋白胨15g/L、大豆蛋白胨3g/L、酵母膏1g/L、葡萄糖4g/L、磷酸氢二钾5g/L、氯化钠15g/L、pH 7.5,培养EcGY020401菌株,可达2.95×1010 cfu/mL;小型发酵罐培养,10h可达到生长最大值,菌液浓度为3.46×1010cfu/mL 结论:用优化TSB培养基,采用发酵罐培养弧菌,可降低成本,提搞培养效率.

  8. A prospective study of the early clinical symptoms following a 2 Gy therapeutic whole-body irradiation; Etude prospective de la symptomatologie clinique precoce apres irradiation corporelle totale therapeutique de 2 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fizazi, K.; Chaillet, M.P.; Fourquet, A.; Jammet, P.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-10-01

    Early human tolerance following total body irradiation (TBI) according to the dose received is still poorly known. Thirteen selected patients were prospectively evaluated for clinical side effects during the first 10 hours following a 2 Gy TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. All of them but one were treated for haematological malignancies and were in clinical remission at the date of TBI. There were 10 males and 3 females, with a median age of 43 y (range 16*61) and a good performance status (WHO 0-1). They received granisetron (3 mg) injected intravenously 1 h before the time of TBI in order to prevent nausea and vomiting. The main symptoms consisted in drowsiness (69%), headache (62%), xerostomia (62%), nausea and vomiting (46%), anorexia (38%), parotid gland pain (23%) and abdominal pain (8%). Their intensity was always moderate, except for 2 patients who experimented severe vomiting. The incidence rate and the time-course of the symptoms of the prodromal phase may proved to be helpful for early clinical evaluation and triage of victims of an accidental irradiation. In particular, absence of fever at the 6{sup th} h after TBI supports the assumption of an estimated exposure dose below 2 Gy. (authors). 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Effect of 30-Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter on platelet and transfusion efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojima, Hiromi; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Itoh, Takeyoshi

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 30-Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter on platelet and transfusion efficiency, we studied platelet recovery, leukocyte reduction rate, content of platelet factor 4 and β-thromboglobulin in platelet products, platelet functions, and positive rates of platelet surface membranes CD42 and CD62, prior to and after treatment. We also evaluated the efficiency of platelet transfusion by estimating post- transfusion (1 and 24 hour) corrected count increment (CCI), and transfusion side effects. Recovery of platelets was 91.8±6.5% and depletion rate of leukocytes was 1.7±1.1 log. There was no significant difference in platelet activation markers or function tests prior to and after the procedure. The mean post-transfusion CCI and 1 and 24 hours were 16,550 (n=114) and 13,310 (n=93), respectively, with 30-Gy irradiation and leukocyte reduction filter. Those treated solely with leukocyte reduction filter were 14,970 (n=114) and 10,880 (n=118), respectively. There was no increase in transfusion side effects after the treatment of platelet concentrate with 30-Gy irradiation combined with leukocyte reduction filter compared with treatment by leukocyte reduction filter alone. These results indicate that treatment with 30 Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter is safe and effective in platelet transfusion. (author)

  10. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguardia, L., E-mail: laguardia@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Caniello, R.; Cremona, A. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Dell’Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In this work results of the first D{sub 2}/N{sub 2} experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (n{sub e} 5 ⋅ 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3–5 ⋅ 10{sup 20} m{sup −2}s{sup −1}) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ⋅ 10{sup 23} m{sup −2}. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of W{sub x}N{sub y} layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1–10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  11. A prospective study of the early clinical symptoms following a 2 Gy therapeutic whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fizazi, K.; Chaillet, M.P.; Fourquet, A.; Jammet, P.; Cosset, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Early human tolerance following total body irradiation (TBI) according to the dose received is still poorly known. Thirteen selected patients were prospectively evaluated for clinical side effects during the first 10 hours following a 2 Gy TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. All of them but one were treated for haematological malignancies and were in clinical remission at the date of TBI. There were 10 males and 3 females, with a median age of 43 y (range 16*61) and a good performance status (WHO 0-1). They received granisetron (3 mg) injected intravenously 1 h before the time of TBI in order to prevent nausea and vomiting. The main symptoms consisted in drowsiness (69%), headache (62%), xerostomia (62%), nausea and vomiting (46%), anorexia (38%), parotid gland pain (23%) and abdominal pain (8%). Their intensity was always moderate, except for 2 patients who experimented severe vomiting. The incidence rate and the time-course of the symptoms of the prodromal phase may proved to be helpful for early clinical evaluation and triage of victims of an accidental irradiation. In particular, absence of fever at the 6 th h after TBI supports the assumption of an estimated exposure dose below 2 Gy. (authors). 23 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Subacute Toxicity Study of 40 kGy Irradiated Ready-to-Eat Bulgogi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.G.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, J.W.; Byun, M.W.; Jeon, Y.E.; Kang, I.J.; Hwang, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    The wholesomeness of 40 kGy irradiated ready-to-eat (RTE) bulgogi was evaluated by subacute toxicity studies (body weight, food consumption, organ weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, and histopathological examination) with groups of 40 male and female ICR mice fed the agent at dietary levels of 5% for 90 days. There were no treatment-related adverse effects with regard to body weight, food consumption, organ weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, and histopathology. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was also determined to be greater than dietary level of at least 5% (3900 mg/kg body weight/day for males, 3500 mg/kg body weight/day for females) for samples under the present experimental conditions. These results suggest that, under these experimental conditions, RTE bulgogi irradiated at 40 kGy did not show any toxic effects

  13. Histochemical study of reaction of the nucleus supraopticus of rat brain to irradiation with 500 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosoudilova, M.; Kamarad, V.

    1987-01-01

    The activities were described of some enzymes in nucleus supraopticus of the rat brain at an early interval (5 min) after gamma irradiation with 500 Gy, at a dose rate of 6.9 Gy per minute. The study was performed using cryostat sections. The activities of the following enzymes were shown: alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, ATP-splitting enzyme, thiaminepyrophosphatase, butyrylcholinesterase, acetylcholinesterase, glycero-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, acid nonspecific esterase, and beta glucuronidase. After irradiation, increased activities of acid phosphatase, thiaminepyrophosphatase, and acetylcholinesterase was observed in perikarya of magnocelullar neurons of the nucleus, whereas the activities of other enzymes were weak when compared to controls. A significant decrease in the activity of acidic nonspecific esterase was found. In contrast to the controls, blood capillaries showed increased activities of ATP-splitting enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, thiaminepyrophosphatase. The activities of alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase were not changed. No activity of other enzymes was observed in that site. (author). 13 refs

  14. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after γ-irradiation with 6 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dewen; Guan Mingchen; Liu Xuetong

    1986-01-01

    Forty dogs γ-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied

  15. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after. gamma. -irradiation with 6 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewen, Wang; Mingchen, Guan; Xuetong, Liu

    1986-10-01

    Forty dogs ..gamma..-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied.

  16. Transformation of soybean Gy3 gene into Artemisaarenaria mediated by corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Lu-meng; Na, Ri; Xue, Dan; Xu, Yongze; Liu, Teng

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the protein content of desert plant, a method of genetic transformation mediated by corona discharge was established. Artemisia seeds were processed in corona electric field for 120 min at 12 kV, and then soaked in 0.1 SSC media that contained Soybean Gy3 gene DNA to incubate for 12 h at 26 °C. Finally the seeds were inoculated on the differentiation medium. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) detection showed that the Soybean Gy3 gene had been successfully introduced into genomic DNA of the regenerated plants of Artemisaarenaria. The study provided a new way for corona discharge in plant genetic modification.

  17. Minerals sampling: sensibility analysis and correction factors for Pierre Gy's equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallebuona, G.; Niedbalski, F.

    2005-01-01

    Pierre Gy's equation is widely used in ore sampling. This equation is based in four parameters: shape factor, size distribution factor, mineralogical factor and liberation factor. The usual practice is to consider fixed values for the shape and size distribution factors. This practice does not represent well several important ores. The mineralogical factor considers only one specie of interest and the gangue, leaving out other cases such as polymetallic ores where there are more than one species of interest. A sensibility analysis to the Gy's equation factors was done and a procedure to determine specific values for them was developed and presented in this work. mean ore characteristics, associated with an insecure use of the actual procedure, were determined. finally, for a case study, the effects of using each alternative were evaluated. (Author) 4 refs

  18. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Dana L.; Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Modak, Shakeel; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods and Materials: After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Results: Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). Conclusion: After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR.

  19. Comparing morbidity and cancer control after 3D-conformal (70/74 Gy) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (78/82 Gy) for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zouhar, Milan; Jansa, Jan; Paluska, Petr; Vaculikova, Miloslava; Sefrova, Jana; Kohlova, Tereza; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare toxicity and cancer control between patients with prostate cancer treated using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and those treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 553 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT 70-74 Gy (3D-CRT 70, 3D-CRT 74) or IMRT 78-82 Gy (IMRT 78, IMRT/SIB 82). Late toxicity was scored according to FC-RTOG/LENT criteria. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix and ASTRO definitions. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 genitourinary toxicity was 26.3 % (3D-CRT 70), 27.2 % (3D-CRT 74), 17.3 % (IMRT 78), and 25.1 % (IMRT/SIB 82) without statistical differences. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was 19.4 % (3D-CRT 70), 42.1 % (3D-CRT 74), 20.5 % (IMRT 78), and 26.6 % (IMRT/SIB 82). The differences between 3D-CRT 74 and 3D-CRT 70 and between 3D-CRT 74 and IMRT 78 were statistically significant (log rank p = 0.03). The 5-year Phoenix PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients treated using 3D-CRT were 89.4, 65.5, and 57.8 %, respectively. Patients treated with IMRT achieved the following results: 90.9, 89.4, and 83.9 %. Clinical relapse-free survival (C-RFS) in patients treated using 3D-CRT vs. IMRT for the aforementioned groups were 94.7 vs. 100 %, 86.8 vs. 98.6 %, and 84.4 vs. 94.5 %. Disease-free survival (DFS) for patients treated using 3D-CRT were 83.1, 70.9, and 71.5 %. The IMRT group reached 95.8, 89.1, and 87.6 %. The PSA-RFS for intermediate- and high-risk patients were statistically significant, while C-RFS and DFS were marginally better. Dose escalation with IMRT was associated with improved cancer control in intermediate- and high-risk patients in comparison with 3D-CRT, without compromising toxicity. (orig.) [de

  20. The Ringhoffer family firm´s stratégy between continuity and change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlavačka, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2 (2015), s. 201-206 ISSN 0231-7540 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19640S Institutional support: RVO:67985963 Keywords : the Ringhoffer family * firm stratégy * economic history * transformation into joint-venture company Subject RIV: AB - History OBOR OECD: History (history of science and technology to be 6.3, history of specific sciences to be under the respective headings)

  1. Local Control With 21-Gy Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dana L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Modak, Shakeel [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after 21-Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the primary site in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Methods and Materials: After receiving dose-intensive chemotherapy and gross total resection (GTR), 246 patients (aged 1.2-17.9 years, median 4.0 years) with high-risk neuroblastoma underwent RT to the primary site at Memorial Sloan Kettering from 2000 to 2014. Radiation therapy consisted of 21 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each. Local failure (LF) was correlated with biologic prognostic factors and clinical findings at the time of diagnosis and start of RT. Results: Median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.4 years. Cumulative incidence of LF was 7.1% at 2 years after RT and 9.8% at 5 years after RT. The isolated LF rate was 3.0%. Eighty-six percent of all local failures were within the RT field. Local control was worse in patients who required more than 1 surgical resection to achieve GTR (22.4% vs 8.3%, P=.01). There was also a trend toward inferior local control with MYCN-amplified tumors or serum lactate dehydrogenase ≥1500 U/L (P=.09 and P=.06, respectively). Conclusion: After intensive chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking, hyperfractionated RT with 21 Gy in high-risk neuroblastoma results in excellent local control. Given the young patient age, concern for late effects, and local control >90%, dose reduction may be appropriate for patients without MYCN amplification who achieve GTR.

  2. Increased expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in lung following 12 Gy local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Kunyu; Liu Li; Zhang Tao; Wu Gang; Hu Yu; Ruebe, C.; Ruebe, C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure expressions of metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in the lung following thoracic irradiation of 12 Gy, and explore its possible role in the development of radiation-induced lung damage. Methods: C57BL/6J mice at age of 8 weeks were thoracically irradiated with 12 Gy X-rays (10 MV, 2.4 Gy/min, single exposure), and the control mice were sham-irradiated. The mice were sacrificed at 4 or 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation by decapitation. Lung tissues samples were collected. Expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-3, MMP-13, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 in lung samples were measured. Results: There was no significant difference in expressions of MMP-3, MMP-13, TIMP-1 TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 in the lung between the two groups at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation (or sham-irradiation). However, the expressions of MMP-2 were enhanced by 1.7 and 1.9 folds, and MMP-9 by 2.7 and 2.6 folds at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: Enhanced expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the lung were involved in the development of acute lung injury after thoracic irradiation, leading to a disruption of the structure and fibrosis. (authors)

  3. Sterilization of allograft bone: is 25 kGy the gold standard for gamma irradiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huynh; Morgan, David A F; Forwood, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    For several decades, a dose of 25 kGy of gamma irradiation has been recommended for terminal sterilization of medical products, including bone allografts. Practically, the application of a given gamma dose varies from tissue bank to tissue bank. While many banks use 25 kGy, some have adopted a higher dose, while some choose lower doses, and others do not use irradiation for terminal sterilization. A revolution in quality control in the tissue banking industry has occurred in line with development of quality assurance standards. These have resulted in significant reductions in the risk of contamination by microorganisms of final graft products. In light of these developments, there is sufficient rationale to re-establish a new standard dose, sufficient enough to sterilize allograft bone, while minimizing the adverse effects of gamma radiation on tissue properties. Using valid modifications, several authors have applied ISO standards to establish a radiation dose for bone allografts that is specific to systems employed in bone banking. These standards, and their verification, suggest that the actual dose could be significantly reduced from 25 kGy, while maintaining a valid sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10(-6). The current paper reviews the methods that have been used to develop radiation doses for terminal sterilization of medical products, and the current trend for selection of a specific dose for tissue banks.

  4. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  5. Radiation dose ≥54 Gy and CA 19–9 response are associated with improved survival for unresectable, non-metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden Daniel W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unresectable pancreatic cancer (UPC has low survival. With improving staging techniques and systemic therapy, local control in patients without metastatic disease may have increasing importance. We investigated whether the radiation dose used in chemoradiation (CRT as definitive treatment for UPC and the CA 19–9 response to therapy have an impact on overall survival (OS. Methods From 1997–2009 46 patients were treated with CRT for non-metastatic UPC. Median prescribed RT dose was 54 Gy (range 50.4-59.4 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy (41: 5-fluorouracil, 5: other and 24 received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results 41 patients were inoperable due to T4 disease and 5 patients with T3 disease were medically inoperable. Five patients did not complete CRT due to progressive disease or treatment-related toxicity (median RT dose 43.2 Gy. Overall, 42 patients were dead of disease at the time of last follow-up. The median and 12 month OS were 8.8 months and 35%, respectively. By univariate analysis, minimum CA 19–9 post-CRT Conclusions CRT as definitive treatment for UPC had low survival. However, our retrospective data suggest that patients treated to ≥54 Gy or observed to have a minimum post-CRT CA 19–9

  6. Conformal radiotherapy to 76 Gy in localized prostate cancer. Therapeutic modalities and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontvert, D.; Mammar, H.; Flam, T.; Debre, B.; Thiounn, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Jourdan-Da Silvae, N.; Beuzeboc, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to describe therapeutic modalities for localized prostate cancer treated by conformal radiation to 76 Gy with or without androgen ablation. To evaluate the preliminary results in terms of survival, biological control and toxicity. Patients and method: between January 1998 and June 2001, 321 patients with localized prostate cancer were irradiated at Institut Curie. Tumors were stratified into the three Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prognostic groups (1998) for analysis: favorable risk group (F.G.) 23%, intermediate risk group (I.G.) 36.5%, unfavorable risk group (U.G.) 40.5%. Androgen deprivation, mainly neo-adjuvant, less or equal to one year was prescribed to 93.8% of patients (72.6% less or equal to six months). Planning target volume prescription doses were: prostate: 76 Gy, seminal vesicles: 56 to 76 Gy, and pelvic lymph nodes: 44 Gy to 16.8% of patients. Results: the five-year actuarial overall survival was 94% (95% I.C.: 90-97%). The median post-therapeutic follow-up was 36 months (nine to 60 months). The 48-month actuarial rates of biochemical control for the three prognostic groups were statistically different according to both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus (A.S.T.R.O. 1997) and the Fox Chase Cancer Center definitions of biochemical failure (F.C.C.C. 2000) with respectively 87 and 94% for F.G., 78 and 84% for I.G., 54 and 58% for U.G. (P < 10-6 and P < 10-8). At time of our analysis, late post-treatment rectal and bladder bleedings were 17,4 and 13,6%, respectively. According to a 1-4 scale adapted from M.D. Anderson Cancer Center criteria: rectal bleedings were grade 1 (9.6%), grade 2 (6.2%) and grade 3 (1.6%). Bladder bleedings were grade 2 (13%) and grade 3 (0.6%). Analysis of rectal bleeding risk factors showed significant correlations with pelvic lymph nodes irradiation for grade 2 and 3, (P = 0.02), and for all grades, a correlation with smaller rectal wall volumes (P = 0.03), and greater

  7. Therapeutic effects of combined cytokines on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianzhi; Li Ming; Xing Shuang; Hu Zhiqing; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Ou Hongling; Huang Haixiao; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Zhang Xueguang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Ri; Luo Qingliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effects of combined cytokines on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidences for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: 16 beagles were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays total body irradiation, and then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group and cytokines group. In addition to supportive care, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) were administered subcutaneouly to dogs in cytokines group. Peripheral blood hemogram was examined once every two days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood were collected to proceed colony cultivation 4 d pre-irradiation and 1 and 45 d post-irradiation. Conventional histopathological sections sternum were prepared to observe the histomorphology changes. Results: After irradiation, the population of all kinds of cells in peripheral blood declined sharply. WBC nadir was elevated (1.04 x 10 9 /L, but 0.28 x 10 9 /L and 0.68 x 10 9 /L for the irradiation control group and the supportive care group separately), the duration of thrombocytopenia was shortened (24 days, but 33 days for the supportive care group) and red blood cell counts were maintained in the range of normal values after cytokines treatment in combination. The colony forming efficiency of haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow and peripheral blood decreased obviously 1 d post irradiation, but recovered to the level of that before irradiation 45 d post irradiation after supportive care and cytokines treatment. Hematopoietic cells disappeared in bone marrow of animals in irradiation control group, but hematopoietic functions were recovered after cytokines were administrated. Conclusions: RhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 used in combination could elevate WBC nadir, accelerate the

  8. Muusikamaailm : "Represseeritud muusika" Moskvas. György Kurtagi festival Londonis. Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevad. Herbert Wernicke lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Moskvas toimuvast festivalist "Represseeritud muusika". Londonis toimuvast György Kurtagi festivalist. Saksa orkestri Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevadesinemistest. Suri saksa ooperilavastaja Herbert Wernicke

  9. Identification of several gy4 nulls from the USDA soybean germplasm collection provides new genetic resources for the development of high-quality tofu cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Seok; Ho, Heo Jae; Nelson, Randall L; Krishnan, Hari B

    2008-12-10

    Tofu, a cheese-like food made by curdling soy milk, is a major dietary staple of Asian countries. Consumption of tofu and other soy products is steadily increasing in North America due to its well-known health benefits. Soybean A(5), A(4), and B(3) peptide null lines 'Enrei' and 'Raiden' are commonly utilized in breeding programs to develop high-quality tofu cultivars. To expand the genetic diversity it is desirable to identify and utilize other A(5), A(4), and B(3) null genotypes in the development of improved tofu cultivars that are adapted to North American conditions. In this study were screened diverse soybean accessions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection to identify Gy4 mutants, the locus that controls A(5), A(4), and B(3) peptide production. Analysis of total seed proteins from 485 soybean lines by SDS-PAGE enabled the identification of 38 accessions that lacked the A(5), A(4), and B(3) peptides. These accessions showed marked differences in seed size and seed coat color and represented different maturity groups ranging from 0 to IX. To ascertain the molecular basis for the lack of A(5), A(4), and B(3) peptides in the newly identified Gy4 mutants, the nucleotide sequence of a portion of the Gy4 gene was determined from eight soybean accessions representing different maturity groups. These eight Gy4 mutants revealed a single point mutation that changed the translation initiation codon ATG to ATA, resulting in the A(5), A(4), and B(3) null phenotype. The newly identified Gy4 mutants from this study will enable plant breeders to expand the genetic diversity of North American food-quality soybeans and also aid in the development of hypoallergenic soybeans.

  10. Individual variations in dose response for spatial memory learning among outbred wistar rats exposed from 5 to 20 cGy of (56) Fe particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrobek, Andrew J; Britten, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Exposures of brain tissue to ionizing radiation can lead to persistent deficits in cognitive functions and behaviors. However, little is known about the quantitative relationships between exposure dose and neurological risks, especially for lower doses and among genetically diverse individuals. We investigated the dose relationship for spatial memory learning among genetically outbred male Wistar rats exposed to graded doses of (56) Fe particles (sham, 5, 10, 15, and 20 cGy; 1 GeV/n). Spatial memory learning was assessed on a Barnes maze using REL3 ratios measured at three months after exposure. Irradiated animals showed dose-dependent declines in spatial memory learning that were fit by a linear regression (P for slope learning at 10 cGy exposures, no detectable learning between 10 and 15 cGy, and worsened performances between 15 and 20 cGy. The proportions of poor learners and the magnitude of their impairment were fit by linear regressions with doubling doses of ∼10 cGy. In contrast, there were no detectable deficits in learning among the good learners in this dose range. Our findings suggest that genetically diverse individuals can vary substantially in their spatial memory learning, and that exposures at low doses appear to preferentially impact poor learners. This hypothesis invites future investigations of the genetic and physiological mechanisms of inter-individual variations in brain function related to spatial memory learning after low-dose HZE radiation exposures and to determine whether it also applies to physical trauma to brain tissue and exposures to chemical neurotoxicants. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:331-340, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Significant correlation between rectal DVH and late bleeding in patients treated after radical prostatectomy with conformal or conventional radiotherapy (66.6-70.2 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Bolognesi, Angelo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Villa, Eugenio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Investigating the correlation between dosimetric/clinical parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Data of 154 consecutive patients, including three-dimensional treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum (including filling), were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six of 154 patients presenting a (full) rectal volume >100 cc were excluded from the analysis. All patients considered for the analysis (n=128) were treated at a nominal dose equal to 66.6-70.2 Gy (ICRU dose 68-72.5 Gy; median 70 Gy) with conformal (n=76) or conventional (n=52) four-field technique (1.8 Gy/fr). Clinical parameters such as diabetes mellitus, acute rectal bleeding, hypertension, age, and hormonal therapy were considered. Late rectal bleeding was scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and patients experiencing ≥Grade 2 were considered bleeders. Median follow-up was 36 months (range 12-72). Mean and median rectal dose were considered, together with rectal volume and the % fraction of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, and 65 Gy (V50, V55, V60, V65, respectively). Median and quartile values of all parameters were taken as cutoff for statistical analysis. Univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox hazard model) analyses were performed. Results: Fourteen of 128 patients experienced ≥Grade 2 late bleeding (3-year actuarial incidence 10.5%). A significant correlation between a number of cutoff values and late rectal bleeding was found. In particular, a mean dose ≥54 Gy, V50 ≥63%, V55 ≥57%, and V60 ≥50% was highly predictive of late bleeding (p≤0.01). A rectal volume <60 cc and type of treatment (conventional vs. conformal) were also significantly predictive of late bleeding (p=0.05). Concerning clinical variables, acute bleeding (p < 0.001) was significantly related to late bleeding, and a trend was found for

  12. Effects of 5-Gy irradiation on fertility and mating behaviour of Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunic, A.; Cokl, A.; Sersa, G.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The polyphagous and cosmopolitan species Nezara viridula is one of the most important insect pests. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a pest control strategy that involves sterilising males by exposing them to ionising radiation. Sterile males, released into wild population, mate with females, but eggs are not fertilised and the population gradually declines. Exposing insects to radiation during their growth stage might require lower sterilising dose. The aim of our study was to test whether 5-Gy irradiation of 5 th instar nymphs significantly affects: (1) moulting and further development of the irradiated nymphs, (2) the male's and female's reproductive system and (3) the mating competitiveness of treated males, with special focus on vibrational communication. Methods: The 5 th instar nymphs were irradiated with 5 Gy using X-ray generator and monitored daily. Results: The observed effects of irradiation were: prolonged moulting, increased mortality during development and during the first day of adult life, decreased males to females ratio, decreased fecundity, egg production, proportion of fertile eggs and progeny survival. The reaction of a male to stimulation with the model female calling song was tested. The irradiated and non-irradiated males responded to stimulation with emission of the courtship song (MCrS). Temporal parameters of MCrS emitted by non-irradiated males differed when compared with those of irradiated ones. Conclusions: The 5-Gy irradiation of 5 th instar nymphs did not affect mating behaviour. However since the irradiation during growth stage decreased the fertility and fecundity of emerged adults, this technique, in combination with certain other suppression techniques, could be a successful control strategy for management of Nezara viridula. On the other hand observed effects on moulting and further development of the irradiated nymphs could decrease the efficiency and application of this strategy. (author)

  13. Clinical results of definitive-dose (50 Gy/25 fractions) preoperative chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Osamu; Yasuda, Takushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical results of definitive-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks for unresectable esophageal cancer were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were unresectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with T4b or mediastinal lymph nodes invading to the trachea or aorta. Radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks was combined concurrently with two courses of FP therapy (CDDP 70 mg/m 2 + 5-FU 700 mg/m 2 /d x 5 days: day 1-5, day 29-33). Tumor response was evaluated 4 weeks after completion of RT. Subtotal esophagectomy was planned 6-8 weeks after RT. Thirty patients (26 male and 4 female) aged from 50-78 years (median 66) were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. The clinical stages according to the 7th edition of UICC were stages II/III/IV, 1/23/6; T1/2/3/4, 1/1/4/24; and N0/1/2/3, 3/25/1/1. All 30 patients completed RT of 50 Gy/ 25 fractions. Initial tumor responses were 21 patients with resectable disease, 7 with unresectable disease, and 2 with progressive disease. Subtotal esophagectomy was performed in 18 (60%) of the 30 patients. Pathological complete response was obtained in five (28%) patients. There were two patients with hospitalization death after surgery (11%). Six of the 7 patients who still had unresectable disease were treated with 1-3 courses of docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU. Three patients treated without surgery showed long-term survival. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate for the 30 patients were 70 and 49%, respectively. Definitive-dose preoperative CRT was feasible, and is a promising treatment strategy for unresectable esophageal cancer. (author)

  14. Economic Development and Economic Governance Through the Example of the City of Győr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávid Fekete

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s the metropolitan region and its governance has got into the focus of regional science again. Nowadays a newer wave of metropolitan governance is authoritative, which has exceeded the former administrative-territorial planning aspects, and has appeared on the scene as the mechanism of economic development policy. Examining the development stages of regional policy it is well-known that the classical (modern approach was superseded by the postmodern one. While the national methods applied in the classical period were characterized by strictness, central regulation, indirect regulation of the market (Fordist approach, in the postmodern period flexibility, decentralization and direct regulation have come to the fore (Post-Fordism. In the postmodern period the state level also takes its role in the financing of innovation and research&development, and the notions of networking and competitiveness are coming more and more to the fore. In this article I analyze these processes through the case study of Győr. After the theoretical introduction I examine the tools of economic development and economic governance in the Győr metropolitan region. Activities observed in Győr can strengthen the view-point that the processes of economic development and economic governance have nowadays been going on in parallel with each other. Moreover, the coordinating activities of local authorities can be observed in the work of organizations that support economic governance. In the course of the research it was also confirmed that built infrastructure can serve as a fundamental condition for the cooperation of network-systems that operate the governance system of a municipality.

  15. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemoradiation with two doses of radiotherapy, 60Gy and 66Gy, concomitant with a fixed dose of oral vinorelbine in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Knap, Marianne M; Khalil, Azza

    2017-01-01

    was local progression free interval. A scheduled FDG-PET-CT-scan was performed 9months after randomization. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT 00887783). RESULTS: Both arms were well tolerated. The local progression free interval at 9months was 54% in the 60Gy arm and 59% in the 66Gy arm...

  16. Effects of 2.0 Gy of 60Co gamma rays irradiation on rat embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juing-Yi; Satow, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    Pregnant rats of Donryu strain were exposed to a whole-body 60 Co γ ray irradiation of a single dose of 2.0 Gy (Dose rate: 0.5 Gy/min) on day 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 of gestation (sperm day = day 0). The rats were sacrificed on day 18 and the offspring were examined for external and visceral malformations. Malformed embryos occurred between days 7 and 11 with the highest incidence occurring on day 9. Dose with 2.0 Gy increased the rate of resorption or death (52.1 %), in the survivors, caused congenital malformation in a majority of embryos (86.5 %) on day 8 of gestation. There is an increase in malformation (93.3 %) and growth retardation, but no increase in mortality (42.9 %) on day 9 of gestation. Relatively few anomalies resulted from irradiation on day 7 of gestation. The peak day for cardiovascular anomalies occurred on day 9 (88.3 % of all survival embryos) with high levels also occurring on day 8 (86.5 %). Cardiovascular anomalies consisted of VSD, hypoplasia of the pulmonary trunk, coarctation of the aorta, double aortic arch, right aortic arch, riding aorta, complete transposition of the aorta, persistent atrioventricular canal, vascular ring, aberrant right subclavian artery and others. Similar anomalies, but at a lower incidence, were produced by 60 Co γ ray at dose levels of 2.0 Gy on day 10 or 11 of gestation. Cases of cleft lip and cleft palate or facial cleft were observed seventeen fetuses on day 9 of gestation (31 %). Exencephaly occurred in nine embryos treated on day 9 (16.1 %) and in one embryos treated on day 10. Tail defects appeared with treatment on day 9 with the latter predominating on day 11. The present study show that maximum resorption (52.1 %) was seen with treatment on day 8 whereas the highest rate of malformation (93.3 %) was observed with treatment on day 9. (J.P.N.)

  17. Effects of 2. 0 Gy of /sup 60/Co gamma rays irradiation on rat embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juing-Yi; Satow, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    Pregnant rats of Donryu strain were exposed to a whole-body /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. ray irradiation of a single dose of 2.0 Gy (Dose rate: 0.5 Gy/min) on day 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 of gestation (sperm day = day 0). The rats were sacrificed on day 18 and the offspring were examined for external and visceral malformations. Malformed embryos occurred between days 7 and 11 with the highest incidence occurring on day 9. Dose with 2.0 Gy increased the rate of resorption or death (52.1 %), in the survivors, caused congenital malformation in a majority of embryos (86.5 %) on day 8 of gestation. There is an increase in malformation (93.3 %) and growth retardation, but no increase in mortality (42.9 %) on day 9 of gestation. Relatively few anomalies resulted from irradiation on day 7 of gestation. The peak day for cardiovascular anomalies occurred on day 9 (88.3 % of all survival embryos) with high levels also occurring on day 8 (86.5 %). Cardiovascular anomalies consisted of VSD, hypoplasia of the pulmonary trunk, coarctation of the aorta, double aortic arch, right aortic arch, riding aorta, complete transposition of the aorta, persistent atrioventricular canal, vascular ring, aberrant right subclavian artery and others. Similar anomalies, but at a lower incidence, were produced by /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. ray at dose levels of 2.0 Gy on day 10 or 11 of gestation. Cases of cleft lip and cleft palate or facial cleft were observed seventeen fetuses on day 9 of gestation (31 %). Exencephaly occurred in nine embryos treated on day 9 (16.1 %) and in one embryos treated on day 10. Tail defects appeared with treatment on day 9 with the latter predominating on day 11. The present study show that maximum resorption (52.1 %) was seen with treatment on day 8 whereas the highest rate of malformation (93.3 %) was observed with treatment on day 9. (J.P.N.).

  18. Local Sensorium, Local Cinema: György Pálfi’s Sensuous Body Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmár György

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available György Pálfi’s Hukkle (2002 and Taxidermia (2006 establish markedly unique cinematic styles and richly sensorial life-worlds, which function in both films as counter-discourses opposing official history, hegemonic ideologies, and conventional patterns of (cinematic understanding. In the present study I analyse the ways Pálfi’s films communicate through non-symbolic meaning, bodily discourses, and a heavy reliance on the multisensory evocation of the local sensorium (Marks and the local habitus (Bourdieu so as to create significance on the margins of established, hegemonic systems of meaning, cinema, ideology and identity.

  19. General patterns in the photochemistry of pregna-1,4-dien-3,20-diones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Andrea; Fasani, Elisa; Mella, Mariella; Albini, Angelo

    2003-05-30

    The photochemistry of six pregna-1,4-dien-3,20-diones has been compared and found to involve both the cyclohexadienone moiety in ring A and the isolated ketone at C-20. The two reactions take place proportionally to the fraction of light absorbed by each chromophore. The cross-conjugated ketone absorbs predominantly or exclusively at both 254 and 366 nm and undergoes the "lumi" rearrangement to bicyclo[3.1.0]hex-3-en-2-one. The quantum yield of the reaction diminished somewhat with increasing lambda(exc), e.g., for prednisolone Phi(254) (nm) = 0.42, Phi(366) (nm) = 0.3. A much stronger lowering is caused by halogen substitution in position 9 (by a factor of 3 for F, >50 for Cl), apparently due to a shortened triplet lifetime caused by heavy atom effect. At 310 nm, both chromophores absorb to a comparable degree and both may react. The reaction at C(20) ketone involves either quite efficient alpha-cleavage (C(17)-C(20)) for compounds bearing an acetal or hydroxyl function at C(17) or less effective (by a factor of ca. 10) hydrogen abstraction from the 18-methyl group in the other cases (finally resulting in Norrish II fragmentation or Yang cyclization). The results allow generalizing how the substitution pattern surrounding each chromophore affects the photoreactivity at that site and the competition between the two modes, allowing predicting the photochemistry of this family of antiinflammatory drugs.

  20. Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaferstein, F [Director, Programme of Food Safety and Food Aid, WHO, CH-1211, Geneva 27, (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    Strictly from the scientific point of view, no ceiling should be set for food irradiated with doses greater than the currently recommended upper level of 10 kGy by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The food irradiation technology itself is safe to such a degree that as long as sensory qualities of food are retained and harmful microorganisms are destroyed, the actual amount of ionizing radiation applied is of secondary consideration. That was the main conclusion of a week-long meeting on high dose irradiation organized jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The knowledge of what can and does occur chemically in high dose irradiated foods which derives from over 50 years of research tells us that one can go as high as 75 kGy, as has already been done in some countries, and the result is the same food is safe and wholesome and nutritionally adequate. (Author)

  1. SyZyGy: A straight interferometric spacecraft system for gravity wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, F.B.; Armstrong, J.W.; Tinto, Massimo; Folkner, William

    2003-01-01

    We consider a spaceborne gravitational wave (GW) detector formed by three spacecraft in a linear array, coherently exchanging laser beams and using the data combinations of time-delay interferometry (TDI). We previously showed how the measured time series of Doppler shifts in the six one-way laser links between spacecraft pairs in a general unequal-arm triangular configuration can be combined, using TDI, to exactly cancel the otherwise overwhelming phase noise of the lasers while retaining sensitivity to GWs. Here we apply TDI, unfolding the general triangular configuration, to the special case of a linear array of three spacecraft. We show that such an array ('SyZyGy') has, compared with an equilateral triangle GW detector of the same scale, a degraded (but non-zero) sensitivity at low frequencies [f -4 -10 -1 Hz). SyZyGy with ∼1 light-second scale could, for the same instrumental assumptions as LISA, make observations in this intermediate frequency GW band with 5σ sensitivity to sinusoidal waves ≅2.5x10 -23 in a year's integration

  2. Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaferstein, F.

    1997-01-01

    Strictly from the scientific point of view, no ceiling should be set for food irradiated with doses greater than the currently recommended upper level of 10 kGy by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The food irradiation technology itself is safe to such a degree that as long as sensory qualities of food are retained and harmful microorganisms are destroyed, the actual amount of ionizing radiation applied is of secondary consideration. That was the main conclusion of a week-long meeting on high dose irradiation organized jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The knowledge of what can and does occur chemically in high dose irradiated foods which derives from over 50 years of research tells us that one can go as high as 75 kGy, as has already been done in some countries, and the result is the same food is safe and wholesome and nutritionally adequate. (Author)

  3. Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaferstein, F. [Director, Programme of Food Safety and Food Aid, WHO, CH-1211, Geneva 27, (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    Strictly from the scientific point of view, no ceiling should be set for food irradiated with doses greater than the currently recommended upper level of 10 kGy by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The food irradiation technology itself is safe to such a degree that as long as sensory qualities of food are retained and harmful microorganisms are destroyed, the actual amount of ionizing radiation applied is of secondary consideration. That was the main conclusion of a week-long meeting on high dose irradiation organized jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The knowledge of what can and does occur chemically in high dose irradiated foods which derives from over 50 years of research tells us that one can go as high as 75 kGy, as has already been done in some countries, and the result is the same food is safe and wholesome and nutritionally adequate. (Author)

  4. Effects of 15 Gy 137Cs γ-rays radiation of rat kidneys on bone metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Linfeng; Wang Hongfu; Xu Peikang; Xu Aihong; Zhu Feipeng

    2003-01-01

    The work was to observe the effects of γ-rays radiation of rat kidneys on rat bone metabolism. Ten male SD rats aged 6 months were irradiated at their kidneys with 15 Gy 137 Cs γ-rays (0.91 Gy/min) and were raised for 3 months after the radiation. On collecting 24h urine of rats they were sacrificed for serum, kidney, spine, femur and tibia exams. Results show that the γ-ray irradiation could induce the pathological injuries of renal glomeruli, tubules and mesenchyme. Comparing to the control group, significant changes were found in the irradiated group in terms of their blood urea, nitrogen creatinine, urinal β-2 microglobulin, serum Ca and P, urine Ca and P, activity of serum alkaline phosphatase, 1,25 (OH) 2 D 3 , serum PTH, urine PYD/creatinine, bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebras, mineral mass of No.4 lumbar vertebra, BMD, dehydrated weight and ash weight of right femur. Marked changes were also found in bone trabecula volume, average bone trabecula thick and the ratio of nodes/points, and rate of mineralization deposition. It was concluded that renal dysfunction and metabolic bone disease might occur with the character of accelerated bone turnover and decreased bone mass

  5. Comparison of 36 Gy, 20 Gy, or No Radiation Therapy After 6 Cycles of EBVP Chemotherapy and Complete Remission in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Risk Factors: Results of the EORT-GELA H9-F Intergroup Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, José; Fermé, Christophe; Noordijk, Evert M; Morschhauser, Franck; Girinsky, Théodore; Gaillard, Isabelle; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; André, Marc; Lybeert, Marnix L M; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Beijert, Max; Hélias, Philippe; Eghbali, Houchingue; Gabarre, Jean; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Jaubert, Jérôme; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Boulat, Olivier; Roesink, Judith M; Christian, Bernard; Ong, Francisca; Bordessoule, Dominique; Tertian, Gérard; Gonzalez, Hugo; Vranovsky, Andrej; Quittet, Philippe; Tirelli, Umberto; de Jong, Daphne; Audouin, Josée; Aleman, Berthe M P; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2018-04-01

    While patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have an excellent outcome with combined treatment, the radiation therapy (RT) dose and treatment with chemotherapy alone remain questionable. This noninferiority trial evaluates the feasibility of reducing the dose or omitting RT after chemotherapy. Patients with untreated supradiaphragmatic HL without risk factors (age ≥ 50 years, 4 to 5 nodal areas involved, mediastinum-thoracic ratio ≥ 0.35, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥ 50 mm in first hour without B symptoms or erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥ 30 mm in first hour with B symptoms) were eligible for the trial. Patients in complete remission after chemotherapy were randomized to no RT, low-dose RT (20 Gy in 10 fractions), or standard-dose involved-field RT (36 Gy in 18 fractions). The limit of noninferiority was 10% for the difference between 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) estimates. From September 1998 to May 2004, 783 patients received 6 cycles of epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and prednisone; 592 achieved complete remission or unconfirmed complete remission, of whom 578 were randomized to receive 36 Gy (n=239), 20 Gy of involved-field RT (n=209), or no RT (n=130). Randomization to the no-RT arm was prematurely stopped (≥20% rate of inacceptable events: toxicity, treatment modification, early relapse, or death). Results in the 20-Gy arm (5-year RFS, 84.2%) were not inferior to those in the 36-Gy arm (5-year RFS, 88.6%) (difference, 4.4%; 90% confidence interval [CI] -1.2% to 9.9%). A difference of 16.5% (90% CI 8.0%-25.0%) in 5-year RFS estimates was observed between the no-RT arm (69.8%) and the 36-Gy arm (86.3%); the hazard ratio was 2.55 (95% CI 1.44-4.53; P<.001). The 5-year overall survival estimates ranged from 97% to 99%. In adult patients with early-stage HL without risk factors in complete remission after epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and prednisone chemotherapy, the RT dose may be limited to 20 Gy

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene; Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of ≥10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL

  7. Identification of microbial isolates from vacuum-packaged ground pork irradiated at 1 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehioba, R.M.; Kraft, A.A.; Molins, R.A.; Walker, H.W.; Olson, D.G.; Subbaraman, G.; Skowronski, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial cultures from irradiated (1 kGy) and nonirradiated, vacuum-packaged ground pork held at 5 0 C were isolated and characterized over a 12-day storage period. The initial flora of the meat was composed mostly of Pseudomonas sp., and Enterobacter sp. Although the microflora of nonirradiated samples gradually shifted from Gram-negative to Gram-positive microorganisms, 76% of the isolates were characterized as Gram-negative at the onset of spoilage (9 days at 5 0 C). In contrast, the irradiated ground pork microflora was mainly Gram-positive (66%) shortly after irradiation and increased to 97% after 9 days at 5 0 C. A total of 720 isolates were identified to genus

  8. The affect of bone marrow cell biomechanical characteristics to 6 Gy γ irradiation-injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Xiaoyun; Chen Xiaoli; Pan Jing; Li Zhaoquan; Deng Jun; Huang Hui; Ye Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the change of bone marrow cell biomechanical characteristics in radiation-injured mice and the influencing factors. Methods: Male Kunming mice were exposed to total body irradiation of 6 Gy γ-rays from a 60 Co source. Electrophoresis, DPH probe-micropore filter, and adhesion rate methods were used to detect cell surface charge, membrane microviscosity, cell deformability, and cell adhesion, respectively. Results: The deformability, adhesiveness and cell surface charges of bone marrow cells (including hematopoietic cells and stromal cells) were dramatically decreased, but membrane microviscosity was obviously increased after irradiation on 1 d, 3 d and 7 d. Conclusion: The biomechanical characteristics of bone marrow cells are obviously changed after radiation injury. It might be one of the reasons of hematopoietic failure after irradiation. (authors)

  9. Pierre Gy's sampling theory and sampling practice heterogeneity, sampling correctness, and statistical process control

    CERN Document Server

    Pitard, Francis F

    1993-01-01

    Pierre Gy's Sampling Theory and Sampling Practice, Second Edition is a concise, step-by-step guide for process variability management and methods. Updated and expanded, this new edition provides a comprehensive study of heterogeneity, covering the basic principles of sampling theory and its various applications. It presents many practical examples to allow readers to select appropriate sampling protocols and assess the validity of sampling protocols from others. The variability of dynamic process streams using variography is discussed to help bridge sampling theory with statistical process control. Many descriptions of good sampling devices, as well as descriptions of poor ones, are featured to educate readers on what to look for when purchasing sampling systems. The book uses its accessible, tutorial style to focus on professional selection and use of methods. The book will be a valuable guide for mineral processing engineers; metallurgists; geologists; miners; chemists; environmental scientists; and practit...

  10. Cardiac ultrastructural changes in rats following 250 Gy whole body. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guo; Mingyue, Zhu; Zhiqin, Zhao

    1985-10-01

    Sixteen rats were whole body irradiated with 250 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, killed at different intervals after exposure, and then observed by electron microscope. We found lysis of part of myofilaments in specimen obtained at 10 minutes after exposure, and resolution of Z-band at 30 minutes after exposure. These changes were more significant in sections at 12 hours postirradiation, but there also appeared cell regeneration at the same time. The vascular changes were more obvious with the endothelial cytoplasma projected in capillary lumen, nearly obstructing it. All of above described changes may be found in hematologic or intestinal forms of radiation sickness, but they must take place more late after exposure. In cardiovascular form, however, these changes were found as early as 10-30 minutes after exposure; this is a special feature helpful to diagnosis.

  11. Study of differential gene expression in human hepatocyte exposed to 50 cGy γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianhua; Li Jianguo; Tian Huancheng; Li Yanling; Wang Xiaoli; Zuo Yanhui

    2008-01-01

    The study analyzed the differential transcriptional profile of the normal human hepatic cell and the human hepatic cell radiated with 50 cGy γ ray by gene chip technique. The results showed that there were 614 differentially expressed genes among 14 112 human genes analyzed, in which 521 genes were up-regulated and 93 genes down-regulated. These genes are associated with mitochondrial regulation, homo sapiens hepatitis A virus cellular receptor, tumor necrosis factor, cell cycle regulation, kinase and zinc finger protein etc. RT-PCR results indicated that up-regulated expression of gene HAVcr-1, HAVcr-2, MFTC, MOAP1 and down-regulated expression of gene TRIP12, DCN were consistent with gene chip data. (authors)

  12. Substantiation of 25 kGy (by use of VDmax25 method) as the sterilization dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The International standards for radiation sterilization require evidence of the effectiveness of a minimum sterilization dose of 25 kGy but do not provide detailed guidance on how this evidence can be generated. Although many of the procedural elements in method VD m ax are similar to those of Method 1 of ANSI/AAMI/ISO 11137-2, there are differences that require elaboration. In this project, test procedure of VD m ax 2 5 method was established and then validated in Radiation Microbiology Laboratory (RML) test conditions. Beside, this method has been applied successfully for two years in order to reply the demand of the manufacturer firms as routine test service. In the near future, RML will be the only accredited laboratory in Turkey on 'validation of radiation sterilization' standard (ANSI/AAMI/ISO 11137-2: 2006) that consists of VD m ax 2 5 method

  13. Morphometric changes of pulmonary tissues after 20 Gy external irradiation of rat chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Ye Changqing; Yuan Lizhen

    1996-01-01

    The changes in the main parameters of the lungs at different periods of early stage after local 20 Gy external irradiation of the lungs were measured with morphometric method. The results indicated that the walls of pulmonary arterioles and venules thickened and the vascular permeability index (area of vascular lumen/total area of blood vessel) decreased 7 days after irradiation (P 2 , r = -0.919), indicating that narrowing of the vascular lumen was the result of thickening of the vascular wall. Fifteen days after irradiation, the pulmonary alveolar wall thickened, the area of alveolar cavity decreased and the area of pulmonary interstitial space increased (P<0.01). Electron microscopic examination demonstrated profuse exudation surrounding the microvessels, obvious evacuation of pulmonary type-II cells and increase in cellular types and quantity of pulmonary tissues

  14. Randomized trial of 8 Gy in 1 versus 20 Gy in 5 fractions of radiotherapy for neuropathic pain due to bone metastases (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, TROG 96.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Turner, Sandra L.; O'Brien, Peter C.; Smith, Jennifer G.; Spry, Nigel A.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Ball, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Despite numerous randomized trials investigating radiotherapy (RT) fractionation schedules for painful bone metastases, there are very few data on RT for bone metastases causing pain with a neuropathic component. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group undertook a randomized trial comparing the efficacy of a single 8 Gy (8/1) with 20 Gy in 5 fractions (20/5) for this type of pain. Materials and methods: Eligible patients had radiological evidence of bone metastases from a known malignancy with no change in systemic therapy within 6 weeks before or anticipated within 4 weeks after RT, no other metastases along the distribution of the neuropathic pain and no clinical or radiological evidence of cord/cauda equina compression. All patients gave written informed consent. Primary endpoints were pain response within 2 months of commencement of RT and time to treatment failure (TTF). The hypothesis was that 8/1 is at least as effective as 20/5 and the planned sample size was 270 patients. Results: Between February 1996 and December 2002, 272 patients were randomized (8/1:20/5=137:135) from 15 centres (Australia 11, New Zealand 3, UK 1). The commonest primary cancers were lung (31%), prostate (29%) and breast (8%); index sites were spine (89%), rib (9%), other (2%); 72% of patients were males and the median age was 67 (range 29-89). The median overall survival (95% CI) for all randomized patients was 4.8 mo (4.2-5.7 mo). The intention-to-treat overall response rates (95% CI) for 8/1 vs 20/5 were 53% (45-62%) vs 61% (53-70%), P=0.18. Corresponding figures for complete response were 26% (18-34%) vs 27% (19-35%), P=0.89. The estimated median TTFs (95% CI) were 2.4 mo (2.0-3.3 mo) vs 3.7 mo (3.1-5.9 mo) respectively. The hazard ratio (95% CI) for the comparison of TTF curves was 1.35 (0.99-1.85), log-rank P=0.056. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of re-treatment, cord compression or pathological fracture by arm

  15. Quality of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xuetong; Guan Wenqiang; Sokorai, Kimberly J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the samples were stored for 14 days at 4 °C. O 2 levels in the packages of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce decreased and CO 2 levels increased with increasing radiation dose, suggesting that irradiation increased respiration rates of lettuce. Tissue browning of irradiated cut lettuce was less severe than that of non-irradiated, probably due to the lower O 2 levels in the packages. However, samples irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy had lower maximum force and more severe sogginess than the non-irradiated control. In addition, ascorbic acid content of irradiated lettuce was 22–40% lower than the non-irradiated samples after 14 days of storage. The visual appearance of spinach was not affected by irradiation even at a dose of 4 kGy. Consumer acceptance suggested that more people would dislike and would not buy spinach that was treated at 3 and 4 kGy as compared to the non-irradiated sample. Overall, irradiation at doses of 1 and 2 kGy may be employed to enhance microbial safety of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach while maintaining quality. - Highlights: ▶ Headspace composition in the modified atmosphere packages of cut lettuce was affected by irradiation. ▶ Fresh-cut lettuce in adapted atmosphere could tolerate 1 or 2 kGy rays without quality deterioration in look and texture. ▶ Lettuce irradiated at doses higher than 2 kGy developed sogginess. ▶ Irradiated spinach maintained a good appearance at doses of 3 and 4 kGy. ▶ Higher doses (3 and 4 kGy) of radiation decreased consumers' likingness and purchase intent of irradiated spinach.

  16. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  17. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system. The subjects were 19 patients who had localized lung tumor (11 primaries, 8 metastases) between May 2003 and October 2005. Treatment was conducted on 19 lung tumors by fixed multiple noncoplanar conformal beams with a standard linear accelerator. The isocentric dose was 54 Gy in nine fractions. The median overall treatment time was 15 days (range 11-22 days). All patients were immobilized by a thermo-shell and a custom-made headrest during the treatment. The crude local tumor control rate was 95% during the follow-up of 9.4-39.5 (median 17.7) months. In-field recurrence was noted in only one patient at the last follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 2 years was 89.5%. Grade 1 radiation pneumonia and grade 1 radiation fibrosis were observed in 12 of the 19 patients. Treatment-related severe early and late complications were not observed in this series. The stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without any severe complications. The results suggest that SBRT can be one of the alternatives for patients with localized lung tumors. (author)

  18. High-dose irradiation: Wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a joint FAO/IAEA/WHO study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of an international group of experts convened by the World Health Organization, in association with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency, to consider the implications of food irradiated to doses higher than those recommended in 1980 by the Joint Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food. Irradiation ensures the hygienic quality of food and extends shelf-life. The public perception of the safety of food irradiation has generally precluded its widespread use. However, current applications of food irradiation to doses over 10 kGy have been in the development of high-quality shelf-stable convenience foods for specific target groups such as immunosuppressed individuals and those under medical care, astronauts and outdoor enthusiasts. The Study Group reviewed data relating to the toxicological, nutritional, radiation chemical and physical aspects of food irradiated to doses above 10kGy from a wide range and number of studies carried out over the last forty years. This report presents a comprehensive summary, along with references, of the effectiveness and safety of the irradiation process. It concludes that foods treated with doses greater than 10kGy can be considered safe and nutritionally adequate when produced under established Good Manufacturing Practice

  19. Field evaluations of the VDmax approach for substantiation of a 25 kGy sterilization dose and its application to other preselected doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, John B.; Herring, Craig; Baryschpolec, Lisa; Reger, John; Patel, Jay; Feeney, Mary; Tallentire, Alan

    2002-01-01

    The International and European standards for radiation sterilization require evidence of the effectiveness of a minimum sterilization dose of 25 kGy but do not provide detailed guidance on how this evidence can be generated. An approach, designated VD max , has recently been described and computer evaluated to provide safe and unambiguous substantiation of a 25 kGy sterilization dose. The approach has been further developed into a practical method, which has been subjected to field evaluations at three manufacturing facilities which produce different types of medical devices. The three facilities each used a different overall evaluation strategy: Facility A used VD max for quarterly dose audits; Facility B compared VD max and Method 1 in side-by-side parallel experiments; and Facility C, a new facility at start-up, used VD max for initial substantiation of 25 kGy and subsequent quarterly dose audits. A common element at all three facilities was the use of 10 product units for irradiation in the verification dose experiment. The field evaluations of the VD max method were successful at all three facilities; they included many different types of medical devices/product families with a wide range of average bioburden and sample item portion values used in the verification dose experiments. Overall, around 500 verification dose experiments were performed and no failures were observed. In the side-by-side parallel experiments, the outcomes of the VD max experiments were consistent with the outcomes observed with Method 1. The VD max approach has been extended to sterilization doses >25 and max method for doses other than 25 kGy must await controlled field evaluations and the development of appropriate specifications/standards

  20. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Berit L.; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions (α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible

  1. Early FDG PET at 10 or 20 Gy under chemoradiotherapy is prognostic for locoregional control and overall survival in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Maria; Appold, Steffen; Baumann, Michael; Schreiber, Andreas; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Abramyuk, Andrij; Doerr, Wolfgang; Kotzerke, Joerg; Zoephel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the optimal timing as well as the most appropriate prognostic parameter of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for an early prediction of outcome for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Serial PET data (before and three times during CRT) of 37 patients with advanced stage HNSCC, receiving combined CRT between 2005 and 2009, were evaluated. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), the average SUV (SUV mean ) and the gross tumour volume determined by FDG PET (GTV PET), based on a source to background algorithm, were analysed. Stratified actuarial analysis was performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional control (LRC). The median follow-up time was 26 months (range 8-50). For all patients, OS was 51%, DFS 44% and LRC 55% after 2 years. The 2-year OS (88%) and 2-year LRC (88%) were higher for patients whose SUV max of the primary tumour decreased 50% or more from the beginning (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT (ΔSUV max10/20 ≥ 50%) than for patients with ΔSUV max20 max from before (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT is a potential prognostic marker for patients with HNSCC. Because GTV PET depends on the applied method of analysis, we suggest the use of SUV max , especially ΔSUV max10/20 , for an early estimation of therapy outcome. Confirmatory studies are warranted. (orig.)

  2. Role of NO in adrenergic regulation of the heart after chronic gamma irradiation in 1 Gy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, T.A.; Lobanok, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic irradiation in 1 Gy dose significantly decreased adrenoreactivity of the heart. Modification of NO-mediated mechanisms plays an important role in radiation-induced changes of adrenergic control of heart functional activity and coronary flow. (authors)

  3. eGY-Africa: addressing the digital divide for science in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Paul; Nguno, Anna; Barton, Charles; Amaeshi, Larry; Tenthani, Chifundo; Petitdidier, Monique; Cottrell, Les

    2013-04-01

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in the development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is still a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this digital divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the digital divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the digital divide - either as a direct policy objective, or indirectly

  4. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, C.E.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; /Lab.Phys.Plasmas, Saint Maur des Fosses; Barry, B.; /Assoc.African Univ., Accra; Chukwuma; /Olabisi Onabanjo U.; Cottrell, R.L.; /SLAC; Kalim, U.; /Pakistan Natl. U.; Mebrahtu, A.; /Mekelle U.; Petitdidier, M.; /Lab. d' Atmos., Velizy; Rabiu, B.; /Federal Tech. U., Akure; Reeves, C.; /Earthworks bv, Delft

    2010-06-16

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide - either as a direct policy

  5. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the achieved dose above 200 Gy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Weber, I.; Marx, K.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to determine the results of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) when the achieved dose in the thyroid was above 200 Gy and to characterize predictive factors for treatment outcome. Patients, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis Groves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of antithyroid drugs two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose was 250 Gy and the therapeutically achieved dose was calculated from serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months after RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The relation between success rate and the achieved dose, thyroid volume, age and sex of patients, TSH- and TRAb-values and presence of ophthalmopathy was analysed. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients who received more than 200 Gy, even for thyroid volumes >40 ml. The success of ablative RIT was not influenced by age or sex of patients, or by TSH- or TRAb values or concomitant ophthalmopathy. The mean achieved dose in the thyroid was 298 Gy with a standard deviation of 74.6 Gy. Conclusion: to achieve a dose of over 200 Gy with the above standard deviation, we recommend calculating on intended dose of 250 Gy and using a dosimetric approach with early and late uptake values in the radioiodine test, to allow early therapeutic intervention should the posttherapeutic thyroid dose fall unexpectedly below 200 Gy. (orig.)

  6. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Neurosurgery Unit, Umberto I Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Raco, Antonino [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Bozzao, Alessandro [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  7. Lack of evidence for increased tolerance of rat spinal cord with decreasing fraction doses below 2 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; van der Kogel, A.J.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the spinal cord, both in man and in rats, has been shown to depend strongly on the size of the dose per fraction. With fraction doses down to about 2 Gy, the spinal cord tolerance can be predicted by a modified Ellis formula. More recently alternative isoeffect formulas were based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival where the effect of dose fractionation is characterized by the ratio α/β which varies from tissue to tissue. For the spinal cord, as well as for other late responding tissues, the ratio α/β is small, in contrast to most acutely responding tissues. Both the Ellis-type formula, and to a lesser extent the LQ-model, predict a continuously increasing tolerance dose with decreasing fraction size. From previous experiments on the rat cervical spinal cord with doses per fraction down to about 2 Gy, the ratio α/β was determined to be 1.7 Gy, and the LQ-model would predict a rise in tolerance with a reduction in fraction size to far below 2 Gy. Based on these predictions clinical studies have been initiated assuming a significantly increased tolerance by reduction of fraction size to about 1 Gy. However, in the present experiments no evidence was found for such an increase in tolerance with fraction sizes below 2 Gy

  8. Clotting mechanism in beagles irradiated by 4.5 Gy γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Li Ming; Xing Shuang; Huang Haixiao; Ou Hongling; Xiong Guolin; Zhao Yanfang; Xie Ling; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Zhang Xueguang; Luo Qingliang; Cong Yuwen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clotting mechanism in beagles irradiated by 4.5 Gy γ-rays after treatment with supportive care, or supportive care and combined cytokines. Methods: Sixteen beagles were divided into irradiation control group, Supportive care group and combined cytokines treatment group. Platelet aggregation test, thrombelastography (TEG) and the time measurement were analyzed in vitro. Results: In irradiation group and supportive care group, the platelet aggregation rates in beagles were decreased markedly and the k value of TEG was increased 7 d post-irradiation, while those indexes in combined cytokines treatment group changed little. At 14 d post-irradiation, each parameter of TEG in irradiated group changed obviously. The values of r, k, r + k and M were elevated significantly, clotting time and the maximum coagulation time of thrombus delayed, the Ma value was decreased markedly, and the maximum elasticity amplitude of thrombus was diminished. All parameters in combined cytokines treatment group were better than those in supportive care group. The thrombin time was prolonged obviously in irradiated group 14 d post-irradiation, while the thrombin time was the longest at 2-3 weeks post irradiation in supportive care group and combined cytokines treatment group (P>0.05). Conclusions: Cytokines could improve the platelet aggregation and the blood clotting functions of beagles suffering from acute radiation sickness. (authors)

  9. Alpha-methyl-homocysteine thiolactone protects lung of BALB/c mice irradiated with 6 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubec, G.; Tichatschek, E.; Foltinova, J.; Leplawy, T.; Mallinger, R.; Getoff, N.

    1996-01-01

    The radiation protective activity of intaperitoneally administered alpha-methyl-homocysteine thiolactone (α-MHCTL); 100 mg/kg body weight) in female BALB/c mice and such treated with cysteine treated (100 mg/kg body weight), using unirradiated and placebo treated irradiated mice were tested as controls. 6Gy whole body irradiated was applied and after a period of three weeks the animals were sacrificed and lungs were taken for morphometry and the determination of o-tyrosine. Septal areas were highest in the irradiated, placebo treated mice (68.67 + 9.82% septal area to total area) and lowest in the α-MHCTL treated irradiated mice (55.67 + 11.29%), significant at the p < 0.05 level. Morphometric data were accompanied by highest levels of o-tyrosine, a reliable parameter for OH-attack, in the irradiated, placebo treated group with 1.87 + 0.40 μM/g lung tissue and 0.32 + 0.13 μM/g lung tissue in the αMHCTL treated group; the statistical difference was significant. Significant radiation protection in the mammalian system at the morphological and biochemical level were found. The potent effect could be explained by the influence of alpha-alkylation in homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL) which renders amino acids unmetabolizeable, nontoxic, increases lipophilicity and therefore improving permeability through membranes. The present report confirms morphological data on the radiation protective activity of this interesting thiol compound. (Author)

  10. Behavioural consequences of an 8 Gy total body irradiation in mice: Regulation by interleukin-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of an 8 Gy γ total body irradiation (TBI) on exploration and locomotion activities as well as temperature were studied in C57BL6/J mice. Survival, body weight, and blood cell counts were also assessed in irradiated mice treated with placebo or interleukin (IL)-4. The efficacy of IL-4 treatment on improvement in exploration activity was evaluated. The study was carried out from 3 h to 30 days following exposure. Our results showed a biphasic response to irradiation concerning the exploration activity of mice. Irradiated mice had reduced activity as early as 3 h after exposure, with recovery of activity within 24 h. The exploration activity again decreased 4 days after irradiation and the recovery occurred slowly after day 17. IL-4 ameliorated the exploration status in mice in both phases. The locomotion activity was studied using a telemetry apparatus. A similar pattern to that of the exploration data was observed, with a minimal activity observed between days 13 and 17. A radiation-induced hypothermia was also noticed over the same time period. (author)

  11. Histopathological findings in a surgically resected thalamic cavernous hemangioma 1 year after 40-Gy irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyáry, István; Major, Otto; Hanzély, Zoltán; Szeifert, György T

    2005-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a controversial treatment modality in the management of cerebral cavernous hemangiomas (CHs), and results vary from center to center. Even the interpretation of treatment failure is controversial. It is suggested that the systematic pathological investigation of irradiated specimens could help to resolve the controversy. A hemorrhagic lesion in the posterior part of the thalamus had been diagnosed as a tumor and was treated with 40-Gy fractionated radiotherapy. One year after this treatment the case was reconsidered based on new imaging evidence, and the lesion was removed by conventional craniotomy. Histopathological examination revealed a CH with postirradiation changes. Compared with nonirradiated control CH tissue samples, there was endothelial cell destruction and marked fibrosis with scar tissue formation in the stroma of the treated lesion. The histopathological findings in this specimen were similar to those described in arteriovenous malformations after gamma knife surgery. The results of light microscopic investigations suggest that the ionizing effect of radiation energy evokes vascular and connective tissue stroma changes in CHs as well.

  12. Behavioural consequences of an 8 Gy total body irradiation in mice: Regulation by interleukin-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection de la sante de l' Homme et de Dosimetrie, Section Autonome de Radiobiologie Appliquee a la Medecine, IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2001-02-01

    The effects of an 8 Gy {gamma} total body irradiation (TBI) on exploration and locomotion activities as well as temperature were studied in C57BL6/J mice. Survival, body weight, and blood cell counts were also assessed in irradiated mice treated with placebo or interleukin (IL)-4. The efficacy of IL-4 treatment on improvement in exploration activity was evaluated. The study was carried out from 3 h to 30 days following exposure. Our results showed a biphasic response to irradiation concerning the exploration activity of mice. Irradiated mice had reduced activity as early as 3 h after exposure, with recovery of activity within 24 h. The exploration activity again decreased 4 days after irradiation and the recovery occurred slowly after day 17. IL-4 ameliorated the exploration status in mice in both phases. The locomotion activity was studied using a telemetry apparatus. A similar pattern to that of the exploration data was observed, with a minimal activity observed between days 13 and 17. A radiation-induced hypothermia was also noticed over the same time period. (author)

  13. 100 Gy 60Co γ-Ray Induced Novel Mutations in Tetraploid Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuntao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 10 accessions of tetraploid wheat were radiated with 100 Gy 60Co γ-ray. The germination energy, germination rate, special characters (secondary tillering, stalk with wax powder, and dwarf, meiotic process, and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs were observed. Different species has different radiation sensibility. With 1 seed germinated (5%, T. dicoccum (PI434999 is the most sensitive to this dose of radiation. With a seed germination rate of 35% and 40%, this dose also affected T. polonicum (As304 and T. carthlicum (As293. Two mutant dwarf plants, T. turgidum (As2255 253-10 and T. polonicum (As302 224-14, were detected. Abnormal chromosome pairings were observed in pollen mother cells of both T. dicoccoides (As835 237-9 and T. dicoccoides (As838 239-8 with HMW-GS 1Ax silent in seeds from them. Compared with the unirradiated seed of T. polonicum (As304 CK, a novel HMW-GS was detected in seed of T. polonicum (As304 230-7 and its electrophoretic mobility was between 1By8 and 1Dy12 which were the HMW-GSs of Chinese Spring. These mutant materials would be resources for wheat breeding.

  14. Histopathological findings in a surgically resected thalamic cavernous hemangioma 1 year after 40-Gy irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyáry, István; Major, Otto; Hanzély, Zoltán; Szeifert, György T

    2005-01-01

    ✓ Stereotactic radiosurgery is a controversial treatment modality in the management of cerebral cavernous hemangiomas (CHs), and results vary from center to center. Even the interpretation of treatment failure is controversial. It is suggested that the systematic pathological investigation of irradiated specimens could help to resolve the controversy. A hemorrhagic lesion in the posterior part of the thalamus had been diagnosed as a tumor and was treated with 40-Gy fractionated radiotherapy. One year after this treatment the case was reconsidered based on new imaging evidence, and the lesion was removed by conventional craniotomy. Histopathological examination revealed a CH with postirradiation changes. Compared with nonirradiated control CH tissue samples, there was endothelial cell destruction and marked fibrosis with scar tissue formation in the stroma of the treated lesion. The histopathological findings in this specimen were similar to those described in arteriovenous malformations after gamma knife surgery. The results of light microscopic investigations suggest that the ionizing effect of radiation energy evokes vascular and connective tissue stroma changes in CHs as well.

  15. Onset of behavioral effects in mice exposed to 10 Gy Co-60 radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, D.M.; Landauer, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of 10 Gray (Gy) Co-60 radiation on social behavior, locomotor activity, and body weight were assessed in individually housed male Swiss-Webster mice. In experiment 1, aggressive behavior was evaluated prior to irradiation and for 7 d postirradiation by placing an untreated intruder in the irradiated or sham-irradiated resident's home cage for 5 min. Offensive aggressive behavior was not affected significantly by radiation until day 7 postirradiation, when attack latency increased, the frequency and duration of fighting decreased, and the frequency of bites, lunges, and chases decreased. Untreated intruder mice paired with irradiated resident mice showed a decrease in the duration of defensive upright postures and a decrease in the frequency of defensive upright postures, squeaks, and escapes on day 7 postirradiation. In experiment 2, locomotor activity and body weight were monitored for 7 d postirradiation. Body weight was decreased in irradiated mice beginning 4 d postirradiation. Locomotor activity was suppressed in irradiated animals 90 min after irradiation and remained depressed throughout the 7-d testing period. 25 refs

  16. Definitive radiotherapy alone over 60 Gy for patients unfit for combined treatment to stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Su Ssan; Jeong, Yuri; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Wonsik; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are frequently treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone, due to poor performance status or underlying disease. We investigated the effectiveness of RT over 60 Gy administered alone to NSCLC patients who were unfit or rejecting for combination treatment. From April 2002 to July 2010, 83 patients with stage II-III NSCLC, aged over 60 years, treated by RT alone with a curative aim were analyzed. Radiation was targeted to the primary tumor and clinically involved lymph nodes. A total dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions (2.2 Gy/fraction) was delivered once daily (5 fractions weekly). One month after completing RT, initial tumor responses were evaluated. Median age of patients was 73 years (range, 60 – 82 years). The median survival time was 18.6 months (range, 2–135). The actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 3 years were 39 % and 23 %, and cause-specific survival rate at 2 and 3 years were 57 % and 47 %, respectively. When primary tumor was controlled, the 2- and 3-year CSS were 56 % and 45 %, but 32 % and 23 % in those patients with local failure, respectively (P = 0.017). Additionally, the local control rate was associated with the initial tumor response (P = 0.01). No patient experienced grade 4+ toxicity. For stage II-III NSCLC patients aged over 60 years and unfit or rejecting for combination treatment, RT alone showed promising result. Long-term disease control can be expected if an early tumor response to radiation is achieved, which could result in improved overall survival rates

  17. Histological studies in developing brain after 0.5 Gy neutron irradiation in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, S.; Fueloep, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Pregnant mice were irradiated with 0.5 Gy neutrons on day 13, 15 or 18 of gestation. There was no significant difference in number of living young born per litter between in neutron irradiated mice and controls. Mortality of irradiated offspings increased in the first 3 days after birth. The brain weight of 21-day old animals after neutron irradiation averaged only 55, 56 and 69% of controls, resp. At six hours after irradiation morphological analysis showed nuclear pyknosis in the central nervous system. On day 13 the telencephalon was severely affected. The 30% cells were pyknotic in the wall of the cerebral hemisphere and 20% of cells in corpus striatum. In the metencephalon marked pyknosis was established in the tectal lamina of mesencephalon (16%) and in the cerebellar anlage (21%). The olfactory plate (24%), the ventricular zone of cerebral hemisphere (30%) and colliculus ganglionaris were damaged mostly (40%) after radiation on day 15 of gestation. The tectum of the mesencephali and in metencephalon the external granular layer of cerebellum and area of the rhombic lip were affected by irradiation (17-20%). The telencephalon found pyknotic but to a less extent in group irradiated on day 18 than it was on day 15. In the olfactory bulb 10% of pyknotic cells were seen and 16% of primary cortex of cerebral hemisphere more over 30% of nucleus caudatus/putamen were affected. In metencephalon 19% of external granular layer of cerebellum and 13% of trigonum cerebelli were pyknotic. In general, lesions of irradiation were rather mild in diencephalon and myelencephalon at all examined ages. Histological examinations support that defined parts of brain are damaged after neutron irradiation in utero and it may lead to the described physiological 18-20 and biochemical consequences 20,23 . (orig.)

  18. Development of the Exam of GeoloGy Standards, EGGS, to Measure Students' Conceptual Understanding of Geology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffey, S. K.; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Discipline-based geoscience education researchers have considerable need for criterion-referenced, easy-to-administer and easy-to-score, conceptual diagnostic surveys for undergraduates taking introductory science survey courses in order for faculty to better be able to monitor the learning impacts of various interactive teaching approaches. To support ongoing discipline-based science education research to improve teaching and learning across the geosciences, this study establishes the reliability and validity of a 28-item, multiple-choice, pre- and post- Exam of GeoloGy Standards, hereafter simply called EGGS. The content knowledge EGGS addresses is based on 11 consensus concepts derived from a systematic, thematic analysis of the overlapping ideas presented in national science education reform documents including the Next Generation Science Standards, the AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy, the Earth Science Literacy Principles, and the NRC National Science Education Standards. Using community agreed upon best-practices for creating, field-testing, and iteratively revising modern multiple-choice test items using classical item analysis techniques, EGGS emphasizes natural student language over technical scientific vocabulary, leverages illustrations over students' reading ability, specifically targets students' misconceptions identified in the scholarly literature, and covers the range of topics most geology educators expect general education students to know at the end of their formal science learning experiences. The current version of EGGS is judged to be valid and reliable with college-level, introductory science survey students based on both standard quantitative and qualitative measures, including extensive clinical interviews with targeted students and systematic expert review.

  19. Prevention of heterotopic bone formation with early post operative irradiation in high risk patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty: comparison of 10.00 Gy vs 20.00 Gy schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, P.; Keys, H.; Evarts, C.M.; Rubin, P.; Lush, C.

    1987-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to the hip area following total hip replacement (THR) surgery in preventing the development of heterotopic bone formation in patients considered to be at high risk for development of this complication. Previously, patients received 20.00 Gy in 10 fractions (fx) over 2 weeks, beginning as soon postop as medically feasible (usually post-op day 2). In an effort to reduce hospital stay and risk of secondary malignancy, a prospective treatment program was initiated April 1982 using a reduced dose of 10.00 Gy in 5 fx over 5-7 days. As of February 1984, 46 consecutive hips determined to be at high risk were treated with this reduced dose. Prior studies have demonstrated that heterotopic bone is always radiographically evident by 8 weeks. Of the 46 hips, 41 had been evaluated with the minimum required 8 week follow-up X ray. Twenty-five of these hips, 61%, had a mean long term follow-up of 12 months. It historical control group, consisting of 54 consecutive high risk post-THR's, was shown to have a 68.5% incidence of heterotopic bone. The 20.00 Gy group, when RT was started by post-op day 5, demonstrated a 3.2% incidence, compared to 4.9% in the 10.00 Gy group. Complication rates were also comparable in the two RT groups, 19.4% and 7.3% respectively; 10.00 Gy is apparently as effective as 20.00 Gy in preventing heterotopic bone formation in high risk post-THR patients

  20. Underwater Ranging

    OpenAIRE

    S. P. Gaba

    1984-01-01

    The paper deals with underwater laser ranging system, its principle of operation and maximum depth capability. The sources of external noise and methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio are also discussed.

  1. SAFETY AND TOXICITY OF AN ACCELERATED COARSELY FRACTIONATED RADIATION PROTOCOL FOR TREATMENT OF APPENDICULAR OSTEOSARCOMA IN 14 DOGS: 10 GY × 2 FRACTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Candace; Boudreaux, Bonnie; Shiomitsu, Keijiro

    2016-09-01

    Coarsely fractionated radiation is commonly used as a method for pain control in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma, however there is little published information on optimal protocols. The aim of this retrospective, descriptive study was to report safety and toxicity findings in a sample of dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma that had been treated with a radiation scheme of 10 Gy delivered over two consecutive days for a total of 20 Gy. Dogs were included in the study if they had osteosarcoma that was treated with the aforementioned protocol. Dogs were excluded if treated with the same protocol for any other bone tumor besides osteosarcoma or inadequate follow-up. Thirteen of the 14 patients received adjuvant therapy with pamidronate and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory. Nine dogs received adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin after radiation was complete. Within a median of 14 days, 92.8% of dogs subjectively had improved pain control. Median duration of response (DOR) was 80 days (range 20-365). The majority of patients developed VRTOG grade one toxicity, primarily alopecia. Five dogs (35.7%) developed pathologic fracture postradiation treatment. Timing of fracture was variable ranging from 24 to 250 days. This radiation protocol was well tolerated, with minimal toxicity, subjectively improved survival time, and had the benefit of being completed in two consecutive days. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Prospective Study Delivering Simultaneous Integrated High-dose Tumor Boost (≤70 Gy) With Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Radical Treatment of Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: Shaista.Hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Warren-Oseni, Karole [The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen A.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Jones, Kelly; Tan, Melissa; Khan, Attia [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; Mohammed, Kabir; Thomas, Karen; Thompson, Alan; Kumar, Pardeep [The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy offers individualized solutions to improve target coverage and reduce normal tissue irradiation, allowing the opportunity to increase the radiation tumor dose and spare normal bladder tissue. Methods and Materials: A library of 3 intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created (small, medium, and large) from planning computed tomography (CT) scans performed at 30 and 60 minutes; treating the whole bladder to 52 Gy and the tumor to 70 Gy in 32 fractions. A “plan of the day” approach was used for treatment delivery. A post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired weekly to assess intrafraction filling and coverage. Results: A total of 18 patients completed treatment to 70 Gy. The plan and treatment for 1 patient was to 68 Gy. Also, 1 patient's plan was to 70 Gy but the patient was treated to a total dose of 65.6 Gy because dose-limiting toxicity occurred before dose escalation. A total of 734 CBCT scans were evaluated. Small, medium, and large plans were used in 36%, 48%, and 16% of cases, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation rate of intrafraction filling at the start of treatment (ie, week 1) was 4.0 ± 4.8 mL/min (range 0.1-19.4) and at end of radiation therapy (ie, week 5 or 6) was 1.1 ± 1.6 mL/min (range 0.01-7.5; P=.002). The mean D{sub 98} (dose received by 98% volume) of the tumor boost and bladder as assessed on the post-treatment CBCT scan was 97.07% ± 2.10% (range 89.0%-104%) and 99.97% ± 2.62% (range 96.4%-112.0%). At a median follow-up period of 19 months (range 4-33), no muscle-invasive recurrences had developed. Two patients experienced late toxicity (both grade 3 cystitis) at 5.3 months (now resolved) and 18 months after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy to deliver a simultaneous integrated tumor boost to 70 Gy is feasible, with acceptable toxicity, and will be

  3. GEA CRDA Range Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-28

    E1, July-August 1998 18 3.3. Example 3: SatMex, Solidaridad 2, May-June 1998 27 3.4. Example 4: PanAmSat, Galaxy IV, May-June 1998 33 3.5...17 Millstone measurements residuals for Telstar 401 on Days 181-263. 26 3-18 Millstone measurement residuals for Solidaridad 1 on Days 141-153...with 29 SatMex range data. 3-19 Hermosillo B-- Solidaridad 1 range residuals through Days 135-144 with bias 30 removed. 3-20 Iztapalapa D

  4. Response of mesenchymal stem cells in mice to 3.5 Gy X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Wenxia; Liu Huimin; Chen Yonghong; Zeng Wen; Liu Wenli; Sun Hanying

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the response of mesenchymal stem cells in mice to medium-dose X-ray irradiation in vitro. Methods: The mouse mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 was submitted to 3.5 Gy X-ray irradiation. Hoechst33258 staining of adherent cells and Annexin V-FITC staining and flow cytometry analysis of suspension cells were performed respectively to assess cellular apoptosis at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week after irradiation. SA-β-gal staining was performed to analyze the cellular senescence at 24, 48, 72 h and 1 week after irradiation. The mRNA level of both Fas with its ligand FasL and p53 with its downstream target p21 WAF1 were measured by Real-Time PCR analysis. The expression of Fas protein was determined by immunofluorescence staining. Results: An increased apoptosis was observed at 3 h after irradiation with apoptosis rate 11.72% ± 1.61% (t=9.01, P<0.01), the apoptosis rate reached the peak level at 12 h 20.52% ± 1.96% (t=16.27, P<0.01), and then declined progressively to normal level at 48 h 4.93% ±0.46% (t=2.26, P>0.05). The SA-β-gal positive rate of post-radiation cells at 72 h was 53.33% ± 5.62%, significantly higher than that of normal control 3.24% ± 0.39% (t=17.77, P<0.01). The level of Fas, FasL mRNA was found to be elevated 3 h after irradiation with a peak at 12 h, and no differences were found l week later. The level of Fas protein was observed to reach the peak at 12 h after irradiation. The occurrence of peak level of Fas/FasL mRNA and protein was consistent with that of apoptosis of C3H10T1/2 cell. A transient up-regulation of p53, p21 WAF1 mRNA expression was found at 12 h after irradiation followed by a significant increase later at 72 h after irradiation. The occurrence of the two peaks of p53, p21 WAF1 mRNA expression were coincident with that of cellular apoptosis and senescence, respectively. The levels of p53, p21 WAF1 mRNA in senescence group were significantly higher than those of apoptosis group (t=17.85, 13

  5. Geometric, stability, and electronic properties of gold-doped Pd clusters (Pd{sub n}Au, n = 3~20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huan, Hao; Chen, Yan; Wang, Tao; Ye, Xiang, E-mail: yexiang@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics (China); Gu, Xiao, E-mail: gx@cqu.edu.cn [Chongqing University, Department of Applied Physics (China)

    2016-11-15

    The structure, stability, and electronic properties of Pd{sub n}Au (n = 3~20) clusters are studied by density functional theory. The results show that the clusters studied here prefer three-dimensional structures even with very small atom number. It is found that the binding energies of Pd{sub n}Au clusters are higher than the corresponding pure Pd{sub n} clusters with the same atom number. Most Pd{sub n}Au clusters studied here are magnetic with magnetic moments ranging from 1.0 to 7.0 μ{sub B.} The dissociation energies of Pd atoms are lower than the doped gold atom, that is the doped Au atom will increase the mother clusters stability and activity.

  6. Early FDG PET at 10 or 20 Gy under chemoradiotherapy is prognostic for locoregional control and overall survival in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, Maria [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Appold, Steffen; Baumann, Michael [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Schreiber, Andreas [Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Department of Radiotherapy, Dresden (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Institute and Polyclinic of Diagnostic Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Abramyuk, Andrij [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg; Zoephel, Klaus [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Polyclinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Our study aimed to explore the optimal timing as well as the most appropriate prognostic parameter of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for an early prediction of outcome for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Serial PET data (before and three times during CRT) of 37 patients with advanced stage HNSCC, receiving combined CRT between 2005 and 2009, were evaluated. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), the average SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and the gross tumour volume determined by FDG PET (GTV PET), based on a source to background algorithm, were analysed. Stratified actuarial analysis was performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional control (LRC). The median follow-up time was 26 months (range 8-50). For all patients, OS was 51%, DFS 44% and LRC 55% after 2 years. The 2-year OS (88%) and 2-year LRC (88%) were higher for patients whose SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour decreased 50% or more from the beginning (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT ({delta}SUV{sub max10/20} {>=} 50%) than for patients with {delta}SUV{sub max20} < 50% (2-year OS = 38%; p = 0.02; 2-year LRC 40%; p = 0.06). A pretreatment GTV PET below the median of 10.2 ml predicted a better 2-year OS (34% for GTV PET {>=} 10.2 ml vs 83% for GTV PET < 10.2 ml; p = 0.02). The decrease of SUV{sub max} from before (0 Gy) to week 1 or 2 (10 or 20 Gy) of CRT is a potential prognostic marker for patients with HNSCC. Because GTV PET depends on the applied method of analysis, we suggest the use of SUV{sub max}, especially {delta}SUV{sub max10/20}, for an early estimation of therapy outcome. Confirmatory studies are warranted. (orig.)

  7. Biological dosimetry of low doses (0.05 - 0.4 Gy) with micronucleus dicentrics and chromosome fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Sanchez, E.; Linares, C.; Navlet, J.

    1997-01-01

    This study was carried out within the framework of the agreement between the National Nuclear Safety Council and the University of Alcala of Hernares and in co-operation with the Radiological Service and the Radiation Protection Unit of the Gregorio Maranon General Hospital of Madrid, where irradiations were performed. Blood samples were taken of 4 individuals irradiated with 6 doses of gamma rays between 0.05 Gy and 0.40 Gy, leaving an aliquot dose of 0 Gy. Cultures of lymphocytes for the study of dicentric chromosomes (DC) and chromosomal fragments (fr), stopping the first mitosis after postirradiation with Colcemid. A study of micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells was also performed, interrupting the first cytokinesis after postirradiation with citocalasina B. After the corresponding studies with optical microscope, statistical analysis was made on the observed data on DC, fr and MN. We made a multiple linear regression analysis of the data of the 4 individuals. We obtained the average of the 4 individuals for each variable and dose and performed the variance analysis. According to our study, neither the DC nor the MN are valid dosemeters for lower doses up to 0.4 Gy. Nevertheless there are indications that the fragments are correlated with the dose to these levels. By increasing both the points of dose and the number of metaphases studied, we believe that a dose curve can be done that would allow to estimate with a reasonable degree of confidence the dose received by a sample irradiated

  8. Development of a 10 kGy(Si) rad hard controller for a mobile robot using COTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, J.M.; Marceau, M.

    1999-01-01

    The CEA has developed a 10 kGy(Si) hardened controller using only COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf devices), to equip the mobile robot Andros. An electronic architecture adapted to the constraint of hardening have been carried out, leading to the construction of a complete set of electronics modules (power electronic, control computer). (authors)

  9. Creativity Beyond Originality: György Pálfi's FINAL CUT as Narrative Supercut : [an audiovisual essay / videographic adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    György Pálfi’s FINAL CUT – LADIES & GENTLEMEN (2012) is a movie made out of other movies, literally. It is Vimeo’s and YouTube’s beloved film mashups and supercuts on steroids. Nevertheless, Final Cut does not only offer a genre-, style-, year- or author- and actor-bound fan-made compilation; it is

  10. Palliative radiation therapy for AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma by using a single fraction of 800 cGy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R.; Smit, W. G.; Veenhof, K. H.; Bakker, P. J.; Oldenburger, F.; González, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A single radiation fraction of 800 cGy was used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). A total of 74 radiation treatments was given to a total of 31 patients. Of all 74 evaluable treatments, there were 25 objective major responses (6 complete,

  11. Thermoluminescence of Ge- and Al-doped SiO2 optical fibers subjected to 0.2-4.0 Gy external photon radiotherapeutic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, I.; Wagiran, H.; Yaakob, N.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we studied the thermoluminescence response of Ge- and Al-doped optical fibers, its linearity, energy dependence, and sensitivity. The Ge-doped optical fibers demonstrate useful TL properties and represent an excellent candidate for use in TL dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The TL response increases monotonically over a wide photon dose range, from 0.2 Gy to 4.0 Gy. The TL results for these fibers have been compared with similar TL data for phosphor TLD-100. Commercially available Al- and Ge-doped optical fibers have both been found to yield a linear dose-TL signal relationship, although the Al-doped fiber provides only 5 % of the sensitivity of the Ge-doped fibers. The TL characteristics of Ge-doped optical fiber, plus its small size (125 μm diameter), high flexibility, ease of handling, and low cost compared with other TL materials, make this commercial optical fiber a very promising TL material for use in medicine, industry, reactor operation, and a variety of other areas. (author)

  12. Study of L-aspartic acid for its possible use as a dosimeter in the interval of 3.4-20 kGy at different irradiation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-López, Adriana; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M.; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    Certain commercial applications of radiation processing increase the efficiency of chemical reactions at low temperatures to decrease the free radicals in the bulk material and avoid the synergistic effects of heat. Such applications have motivated the search for a reliable, low-temperature dosimeter for use under the conditions of the irradiation process. For this purpose, polycrystalline samples of L-aspartic acid (2-aminobutanedioic acid) were irradiated with gamma rays at low temperatures and doses in the kiloGray range (3.4-64 kGy). The potential use of the aspartic acid system as a chemical dosimeter is based on the formation of stable free radicals when the amino acid is exposed to ionizing radiation. These radicals can be studied and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR). The response curves at different temperatures show that the intensity of the ESR spectra (the five characteristic lines) depends on the dose received. The response of the dosimeter increases with increasing temperature, and this relationship is linear up to 20 kGy at 298 K. The decay characteristics show that the change in the ESR signal over time is low and reproducible. In addition, the L-aspartic acid dosimeter is easy to handle and has low cost.

  13. STAYGREEN (CsSGR) is a candidate for the anthracnose (Colletotrichum orbiculare) resistance locus cla in Gy14 cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Junsong; Tan, Junyi; Wang, Yuhui; Zheng, Xiangyang; Owens, Ken; Li, Dawei; Li, Yuhong; Weng, Yiqun

    2018-04-21

    Map-based cloning identified a candidate gene for resistance to the anthracnose fungal pathogen Colletotrichum orbiculare in cucumber, which reveals a novel function for the highly conserved STAYGREEN family genes for host disease resistance in plants. Colletotrichum orbiculare is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in cucumber and other cucurbit crops. No host resistance genes against the anthracnose pathogens have been cloned in crop plants. Here, we reported fine mapping and cloning of a resistance gene to the race 1 anthracnose pathogen in cucumber inbred lines Gy14 and WI 2757. Phenotypic and QTL analysis in multiple populations revealed that a single recessive gene, cla, was underlying anthracnose resistance in both lines, but WI2757 carried an additional minor-effect QTL. Fine mapping using 150 Gy14 × 9930 recombinant inbred lines and 1043 F 2 individuals delimited the cla locus into a 32 kb region in cucumber Chromosome 5 with three predicted genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggested that the cucumber STAYGREEN (CsSGR) gene is a candidate for the anthracnose resistance locus. A single nucleotide mutation in the third exon of CsSGR resulted in the substitution of Glutamine in 9930 to Arginine in Gy14 in CsSGR protein which seems responsible for the differential anthracnose inoculation responses between Gy14 and 9930. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that CsSGR was significantly upregulated upon anthracnose pathogen inoculation in the susceptible 9930, while its expression was much lower in the resistant Gy14. Investigation of allelic diversities in natural cucumber populations revealed that the resistance allele in almost all improved cultivars or breeding lines of the U.S. origin was derived from PI 197087. This work reveals an unknown function for the highly conserved STAYGREEN (SGR) family genes for host disease resistance in plants.

  14. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  15. Examination of 2 times 8.5 Gy method as palliative therapy of the case that convalescence is expected for a short term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Akira; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Araya, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report on the clinical course of cases in which the 8.5 Gy x 2 method was used as a palliative irradiation method at our hospital. There were 21 cases in which irradiation with 8.5 Gy x 2 was used at our hospital from June 2004 to March 2006. These included 15 male cases and 6 female cases. The ages of the subjects ranged from 49 to 89 years (median value: 65 years of age). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ranged from 50 to 90% (median value: 70%). The disorders (symptoms) included 7 cases of mediastinal lymph node metastasis (respiratory discomfort, coughing, and hemosputum), 4 cases of esophageal cancer (dysphagia), 5 cases of lung tumors (hemosputum and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome), 1 case each of bone infiltration by soft tissue tumors in the abdomen and in the extremities (pain), 2 cases of abdominal lymph node metastasis (jaundice and pain), and 1 case of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biliary infiltration (jaundice). Ten MVX was used in all cases. The treatment plan was carried out using CT simulation. Irradiation with 8.5 Gy was used twice. The site attributable to the symptoms was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the region sufficiently containing GTV was defined as planning target volume (PTV). In 2 cases, the general condition of the patients worsened prior to the second irradiation, and therefore irradiation was discontinued. A total of 19 cases were treated with irradiation. A temporary improvement of the symptoms was observed in 12 cases. Early-stage adverse events (NCI-CTC ver. 2, grade 2 or higher) included 2 cases of grade 2 esophagitis, and 1 case of grade 2 nausea. Late-stage adverse events could not be evaluated. A temporary improvement of the symptoms was observed in about half of the cases. There were no grade 3 or higher early-stage adverse events. It is believed that this palliative irradiation method is acceptable if long-term irradiation is impossible. (author)

  16. Tribological Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3-20 wt.%TiO2 Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shiyu; Miao, Qiang; Liang, Wenping; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Yi; Ren, Beilei

    2017-05-01

    Al2O3-20 wt.% TiO2 ceramic coatings were deposited on the surface of Grade D steel by plasma spraying of commercially available powders. The phases and the microstructures of the coatings were investigated by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The Al2O3-20 wt.% TiO2 composite coating exhibited a typical inter-lamellar structure consisting of the γ-Al2O3 and the Al2TiO5 phases. The dry sliding wear behavior of the coating was examined at 20 °C using a ball-on-disk wear tester. The plasma-sprayed coating showed a low wear rate ( 4.5 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1), which was matrix ( 283.3 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1), under a load of 15 N. In addition, the tribological behavior of the plasma-sprayed coating was analyzed by examining the microstructure after the wear tests. It was found that delamination of the Al2TiO5 phase was the main cause of the wear during the sliding wear tests. A suitable model was used to simulate the wear mechanism of the coating.

  17. The use of potassium dichromate for ultra high dose up to 120 kGy measurements in industrial irradiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, Cirilo C.S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the study of radiation-induced reduction of the Potassium Dichromate dosimeter in perchloric acid using modification in the composition of Dichromate dosimeter proposed by Sharpe (NPL, October 1982) to extend dose limit up to 120 kGy. This modification can allow measuring dose in process of irradiation of gem and cork directly, in these processes that the absorbed doses are very high. The dosimeter study reached linear response between 10 to 120 kGy. This dosimeter was traceable to the international metrology system, using Gammacell calibrated by Fricke reference dosimeter. The evaluation of the doses was done by spectrophotometric method. Compared to the costs using PMMA (perpex dosimeters), the use of dichromate dosimeters can reduce up to 70% of the dosimetry costs in Brazil. (author)

  18. Initial experience of single fraction radiotherapy (8 Gy x 1) in the treatment of painful bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Kosuke; Ikeda, Hiroko; Chigusa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Katayama, Hirofumi; Takeda, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen patients with painful bone metastases received single fraction radiotherapy of 8 Gy. Single fraction radiotherapy was effective in providing pain relief with response rate of 88.8%. There were no severe acute side effects. The therapeutic regimen was also safe and effective in patients with poor performance status and poor prognosis. Therefore single fraction radiotherapy should be considered to treat pain arising from bone metastases. (author)

  19. Effectiveness and toxicity of single-fraction radiotherapy with 1x8 Gy for metastatic spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Zschenker, Oliver; Alberti, Winfried; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicity and functional outcome were evaluated in 199 MSCC-patients irradiated with 1x8 Gy. Motor function improved in 54/199 patients (27%). Patients who regained walking ability were 20/78 (26%). Long-term-survivors (≥12 months) who needed re-irradiation for in-field-recurrence were 19/65 (29%). Acute toxicity was mild, late toxicity not observed. A randomised trial comparing single-fraction RT to multi-fraction RT is mandatory

  20. Effectiveness and toxicity of single-fraction radiotherapy with 1x8 Gy for metastatic spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany) and Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zschenker, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Section Radiobiology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Alberti, Winfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-04-01

    Toxicity and functional outcome were evaluated in 199 MSCC-patients irradiated with 1x8 Gy. Motor function improved in 54/199 patients (27%). Patients who regained walking ability were 20/78 (26%). Long-term-survivors ({>=}12 months) who needed re-irradiation for in-field-recurrence were 19/65 (29%). Acute toxicity was mild, late toxicity not observed. A randomised trial comparing single-fraction RT to multi-fraction RT is mandatory.

  1. Long-Term Follow-up of Acoustic Schwannoma Radiosurgery With Marginal Tumor Doses of 12 to 13 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Rahul; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To define long-term tumor control and clinical outcomes of radiosurgery with marginal tumor doses of 12 to 13 Gy for unilateral acoustic schwannoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with previously untreated unilateral acoustic schwannoma underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery between 1992 and 2000 with marginal tumor doses of 12 to 13 Gy (median, 13 Gy). Median follow-up was 5.7 years (maximum, 12 years; 41 patients with >8 years). Treatment volumes were 0.08-37.5 cm 3 (median, 1.3 cm 3 ). Results: The 10-year actuarial resection-free control rate was 98.3% ± 1.0%. Three patients required tumor resection: 2 for tumor growth and 1 partial resection for an enlarging adjacent subarachnoid cyst. Among 121 hearing patients with >3 years of follow-up, crude hearing preservation rates were 71% for keeping the same Gardner-Robertson hearing level, 74% for serviceable hearing, and 95% for any testable hearing. For 25 of these patients with intracanalicular tumors, the respective rates for preserving the same Gardner-Robertson level, serviceable hearing, and testable hearing were 80%, 88%, and 96%. Ten-year actuarial rates for preserving the same Gardner-Robertson hearing levels, serviceable hearing, any testable hearing, and unchanged facial and trigeminal nerve function were 44.0% ± 11.7%, 44.5% ± 10.5%, 85.3% ± 6.2%, 100%, and 94.9% ± 1.8%, respectively. Conclusions: Acoustic schwannoma radiosurgery with 12 to 13 Gy provides high rates of long-term tumor control and cranial nerve preservation after long-term follow-up

  2. Repeated irradiations with γ-rays at a dose of 0.5 Gy may exacerbate asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Su-ping; Tago, Fumitoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Simura, Noriko; Kojima, Shuji; Muto, Yasuko; Goto, Resuke

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that 0.5 Gy whole-body γ-ray irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures inhibits tumor growth in mice, via elevation of the IFNγ/IL-4 ratio concomitantly with a decrease in the percentage of B cells. Here we examined whether repeated 0.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation can improve asthma in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthmatic mouse model. We found that repeated irradiation (10 times) with 0.5 Gy of γ-rays significantly increased total IgE in comparison with the disease-control group. The levels of IL-4 and IL-5 were also significantly higher in the γ-ray-irradiated group, while that of IFN-γ was significantly lower, resulting in a further decrease of the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio from the normal value. These results indicate that the repeated irradiation with γ-rays may exacerbate asthma, and may have opposite effects on different immune reactions unlike the irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures. (author)

  3. Effect of prolonged gamma irradiation (6.7 Gy) on monoamine oxidase activity in ewe hypothalamus in anestral period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorova, B.; Arendarcik, J.

    1988-01-01

    Changes were studied of monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the hypothalamus and hypophysis of ewes in the anestral period following whole-body 60 Co irradiation for 7 days with a dose of 6.7 Gy. The gamma radiation exposure rate was 0.039 Gy/h. The activity of MAO was determined using the radiochemical method. 14 C-tryptamine was used as the substrate. The highest activity was determined in the rostral hypothalamus (1100 pmol.mg -1 .min -1 ). MAO activity was at its lowest in the caudal region of the hypothalamus (550 pmol). The results show that whole-body exposure to gamma radiation with a total dose of 6.7 Gy makes a statistically significant increase (P<0.001) in MAO activity in the caudal hypothalamus of ewes while remaining at the level of the control group or increasing insignificantly in the rostral and medial hypothalamus. A significant decrease (P<0.05) was recorded in the hypophysis. It may be assumed that the increased degradation of catecholamines caused by MAO is one of the mechanisms responsible for the decreased concentration of catecholamines in the hypothalamus of ewes after irradiation. (author). 1 fig., 22 refs

  4. An elective radiation dose of 46 Gy is feasible in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to compare the treatment outcome of different radiation doses of elective neck irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In total, 504 patients with nondisseminated NPC who underwent magnetic resonance imaging before radical IMRT between 2000 and 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into 2 groups based on the ENI dose: low ENI when the ENI dose was 46 Gy (n = 446) and high ENI when the ENI doses were 50 to 60 Gy (n = 58). All the patients in both the groups received a median dose of 72 Gy to the gross tumor and involved nodes. The fraction size was 2 Gy per fraction. Matching was performed between low ENI and high ENI in a 2:1 ratio, and the matching criteria were N-stage, T-stage, treatment modality, pathology classification, sex, and age. The median follow-up for all patients was 63.5 months. In all patients, the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC), regional control (RC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for low ENI and high ENI patients were 69.0% and 63.2% (P = 0.331), 89.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.235), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.246), 86.8% and 76.6% (P = 0.056), 77.5% and 80.8% (P = 0.926), and 84.4% and 82.5% (P = 0.237), respectively. In the matched-pair analysis, the 5-year PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS for matched low ENI and high ENI patients were 74.1% and 63.2% (P = 0.134), 92.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.152), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.356), 86.2% and 76.6% (P = 0.125), 87.0% and 80.8% (P = 0.102), and 88.6% and 82.5% (P = 0.080), respectively. In the multivariable analysis for all patients, the ENI group was not a significant factor for PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS. A low ENI dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions is feasible in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and this concept should be validated in

  5. Infrared spectroscopy (2.3-20 microns) for the geological interpretation of remotely-sensed multispectral thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Kahle, Anne B.; Hoover, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    The spectral radiance and spectral reflectance of natural weathered surfaces of common sedimentary and igneous rocks is determined from in situ and in the laboratory measurements. In situ spectral radiance measurements (5-14 microns) were made with a portable spectral radiometer and were used to derive the spectral emissivity of the rocks. The spectral reflectance measurements (2.3-20 microns) were made in a laboratory with a Fourier transform IR spectrometer with a diffuse reflectance accessory. Good agreement is found between the two techniques. The field portable spectrometer has a larger field of view and the in situ data provide more accurate measurements of the intensity of spectral features related to temperature and atmospheric effects.

  6. Assessment of low-dose radiotherapy (two 2 Gy sessions) for the cure of MALT lymphoma of the lung; evaluation de la radiotherapie faible (deux seances de 2 Gy) a visee curative dans le lymphome du Malt pulmonaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, A.; Ghalibafian, M.; Gilmore, J.; Girinsky, T. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hanna, C.; Raphael, J.; Ferme, C.; Ribrag, V. [Departement d' hematologie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of low-dose radiotherapy (two sessions of 2 Gy in two days) for the curative treatment of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the lung. The treatment of this lymphoma is discussed in terms of surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or even simple monitoring. The authors analyse the results obtained on nine patients who have been treated this way since 2002, straight away for some of them, after surgery or chemotherapy for others. Survival rate, recurrence, evolutions and responses are discussed. Short communication

  7. Low-Dose (10-Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An Open Clinical Study and Pooled Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamstrup, Maria R., E-mail: mkam0004@bbh.regionh.dk [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gniadecki, Robert [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Iversen, Lars [Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Skov, Lone [Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter Meidahl [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. Methods and Materials: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over <2.5 weeks, receiving a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. Results: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (<1% skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. Conclusions: Low-dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT.

  8. Favorable Preliminary Outcomes for Men With Low- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Treated With 19-Gy Single-fraction High-dose-rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Ye, Hong [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A. [21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Mitchell, Beth; Sebastian, Evelyn; Limbacher, Amy; Gustafson, Gary S. [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and preliminary clinical outcomes of a prospective trial evaluating 19-Gy, single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 63 patients were treated according to an institutional review board-approved prospective study of single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Eligible patients had tumor stage ≤T2a, prostate-specific antigen level ≤15 ng/mL, and Gleason score ≤7. Patients with a prostate gland volume >50 cm{sup 3} and baseline American Urologic Association symptom score >12 were ineligible. Patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal implantation of the prostate, followed by single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Treatment was delivered using {sup 192}Ir to a dose of 19 Gy prescribed to the prostate, with no additional margin applied. Results: Of the 63 patients, 58 had data available for analysis. Five patients had withdrawn consent during the follow-up period. The median follow-up period was 2.9 years (range 0.3-5.2). The median age was 61.4 years. The median gland volume at treatment was 34.8 cm{sup 3}. Of the 58 patients, 91% had T1 disease, 71% had Gleason score ≤6 (29% with Gleason score 7), and the median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level was 5.1 ng/mL. The acute and chronic grade 2 genitourinary toxicity incidence was 12.1% and 10.3%, respectively. No grade 3 urinary toxicity occurred. No patients experienced acute rectal toxicity grade ≥2, and 2 experienced grade ≥2 chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. Three patients experienced biochemical failure, yielding a 3-year cumulative incidence estimate of 6.8%. Conclusions: Single-fraction HDR brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with favorable preliminary biochemical and clinical disease control rates.

  9. Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome following breast-conserving surgery and radiation up to a total dose of 56 Gy without boost in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayerl, A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival, local tumor control and cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy without boost irradiation. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study 270 breast cancer patients were treated with breast conserving surgery combined with a homogenous radiation of the tumor bearing breast up to a total dose of 56 Gy without local boost irradiation. Mean follow-up was 48 months. Local tumor control, side effects, cosmetic results and contentment with treatment were assessed using physical examinations and interviews based on a standardized questionnaire. Results: Cause-specific survival at 5 years after treatment was 88.3%, actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years was 76.1%. Within 23 to 78 months after treatment 12 patients suffered from ipsilateral breast recurrence. The actuarial freedom from local recurrence (single tumor manifestation) was 96.8% at 5 years after treatment, 89% at 10 years. The occurrence of local failures was not significantly correlated to tumor size, margins, grading, nodal status, age or lymphangiosis. 15.6% of the patients developed distant metastases. In all patients treatment was performed without interruption. Side effects were predominantly of mild degree, no severe side effects were detected. 73% of physicians and 81% of patients scored their cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. 93% of patients would again decide in favor of this procedure. Whereas, use of adjuvant chemotherapy as well as subcutaneous reconstruction of breast tissue did not significantly affect breast cosmesis, analysis demonstrated impaired cosmetic results related to a larger breast size. Conclusion: The data of this study show that tumor control achieved by breast conserving surgery in combination with a radiation technique up to a total dose of 56 Gy which omits boost irradiation is within the range of literature data. Side effects of the therapy were tolerable. The treatment displayed a good

  10. Exposure to low doses (20 cGy) of Hze results in spatial memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Richard; Johnson, Angela; Davis, Leslie; Green-Mitchell, Shamina; Chabriol, Olivia; Sanford, Larry; Drake, Richard

    INTRODUCTION. Current models predict that the astronauts on a mission to a deep space destination, such as Mars, will be exposed to 25 cGy of Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). The long-term consequence of exposure to such doses is largely unknown, but given that 1.3 Gy of X-rays has been reported to lead to long-term cognitive deficits (Shore et al, 1976) and that CGR have an RBE of 2-5, it is likely that the predicted 25 cGy of GCR will lead to defects in the cognitive ability of the astronauts during and after the mission. Our studies are designed to help define the GCR dose that will lead to defects in complex working memory, and also to elucidate the mechanisms whereby hadronic radiation diminishes neurocognitive function. The identification of such processes would provide an opportunity for post-mission surveillance, and hopefully will lead to intervention strategies that will ameliorate or attenuate GCR-induced neurocognitive deficits. MATERIALS METHODS. Four-week old male Wistar rats were exposed to either X-rays or 1 GeV 56Fe. At three or six months post exposure the performance of the rats in the Barnes' Maze (Spatial memory) was established. The duration and frequency of REM sleep was also monitored to determine if the neurocognitive deficits arose due to reduced memory consolidation as a result of diminished REM sleep. We used a novel, but maturing technique, called MALDI-MS imaging (or MALDI-MSI), to identify specific regions of the brain where the neuroproteome differs in rats that have developed spatial memory impairments. RESULTS. 11.5 Gy of X-rays led to reduced performance in the Barnes's maze. In contrast, exposure to 20 cGy of Hze (1 GeV 56Fe) resulted in a significant impairment of spatial memory performance as measured in the Barnes' Maze, which was manifested by an increase in relative escape latency REL over a 5 day testing period. Such an increase in REL could arise from the rats becoming less able, or perhaps less willing, to locate the

  11. Longitudinal changes over 2 years in parotid glands of patients treated with preoperative 30-Gy irradiation for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomitaka, Etsushi; Murakami, Ryuji; Teshima, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate longitudinal changes in parotid volumes and saliva production over 2 years after 30 Gy irradiation. We retrospectively evaluated 15 assessable patients treated for advanced oral cancer. Eligibility criteria were a pathologic diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma, preoperative radiation therapy with a total dose of 30 Gy delivered in 15 fractions, and the availability of longitudinal data of morphological assessments by computed tomography and functional assessments with the Saxon test spanning 2 years after radiation therapy. In the Saxon test, saliva production was measured by weighing a folded sterile gauze pad before and after chewing; the low-normal value is 2 g/2 min. Repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was used to determine the longitudinal changes. The normalized ipsilateral parotid volumes 2 weeks and 6-, 12- and 24 months after radiation therapy were found to be 72.5, 63.7, 66.9 and 78.1%, respectively; the normalized contralateral volumes were 69.8, 64.6, 72.2 and 82.0%, respectively. The bilateral parotid volumes were significantly decreased after radiation therapy (P<0.01). The nadir appeared at 6 months post-radiation therapy and the volumes substantially recuperated 24 months after radiation therapy (P<0.01). Mean saliva production before radiation therapy was 3.7 g; the longitudinal changes after radiation therapy were 31.3, 38.0, 43.3 and 69.6%, respectively. Substantial recuperation of saliva production was observed 24 months after radiation therapy (P=0.01). Although parotid volumes and saliva production were decreased after 30 Gy irradiation, we observed the recuperation of morphological and functional changes in the parotid glands 2 years after radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate neoadjuvant intensity-modulated short term radiation therapy (5 × 5 gy) and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 gy) in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer - NEOPANC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E; Werner, Jens; Timke, Carmen; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Schneider, Lutz; Hackert, Thilo; Hartwig, Werner; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Hensley, Frank W; Buechler, Markus W

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment, at least in Europe, for patients with primarily resectable tumors, consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. But even in this prognostic favourable group, long term survival is disappointing because of high local and distant failure rates. Postoperative chemoradiation has shown improved local control and overalls survival compared to surgery alone but the value of additional radiation has been questioned in case of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, there remains a strong rationale for the addition of radiation therapy considering the high rates of microscopically incomplete resections after surgery. As postoperative administration of radiation therapy has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant and intraoperative approaches theoretically offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, reduction of toxicity and patients comfort especially if hypofractionated regimens with highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy are considered. The NEOPANC trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant short course intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5 × 5 Gy) in combination with surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 Gy), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy according to the german treatment guidelines, in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer. The aim of accrual is 46 patients. The primary objectives of the NEOPANC trial are to evaluate the general feasibility of this approach and the local recurrence rate after one year. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late toxicity, postoperative morbidity and mortality and quality of life. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01372735

  13. Dwarf Rice Mutant Derived from 0.2 kGy Gamma Rays Irradiated Seeds of Atomita 4 Variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrizal; Sutisna Sanjaya; Carkum; Mohamad Ismachin

    2004-01-01

    Dwarf rice mutant was obtained when Atomita 4 seeds were irradiated by 0.2 kGy gamma rays. The results of segregation analyses in F2 populations and F3 lines derived from reciprocal crosses of mutant and Atomita 4 suggested that the dwarf was controlled by a single recessive gene. This gene was not located on rice cytoplasmic genome but on nuclear genome. The gene for dwarf obtained in this study tentatively could be assumed as a new finding until the allelic relationships with other dwarf genes are verified. (author)

  14. Hormone regulation system and cyclic nucleotids in the Chernobyl accident liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    During 6 years after the accident (1987-1992) a functional state of endocrine system that regulate the adaptation, reproduction, metabolism, vessels tonicity and water-electrolyte balance were investigated in 249 liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy. The changes of these systems activity in state of basal secretion and peculiarities of their reactions under influence of perturbation (adrenaline, insulin) were revealed. Post-irradiation endocrinopathy was characterized and its role in decrease of the organism's adaptation and in mechanism of sanogenesis and pathogenesis was found. (author)

  15. Immuno-enhancement in tumor-bearing mice induced by whole body X-irradiation with 75 mGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Li Xiuyi; Gong Shouliang; Liu Shuzheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: In present study the authors observed the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays on the immune function of tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Lewis lung carcinoma cells were implanted into the right thigh muscle of C57BL/6J mice. Ten days after tumor implantation, the tumor-bearing mice were administrated with 75 mGy X-rays WBI, then the mice were sacrificed 18 h after irradiation to detect the immune parameters including the spontaneous proliferation of thymocytes, the proliferative response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS, the cytotoxic activities of specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer cells (NK), as well as lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK) in spleen. The methods the authors used were 3 H-TdR incorporation or release assay. Results: the immune parameters of exposed tumor-bearing mice were much higher than those of sham-irradiated tumor-bearing mice (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results suggested that low dose radiation (LDR) could enhance the immune function of tumor-bearing mice, which might be of practical significance in the prevention and therapy of cancer

  16. The decreasing effect of exogenous SOD on damage of mice irradiated with 5 Gy 60Co-γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fenju; Jiang Jiagui; Yi Jian

    1999-01-01

    The author presents a report on the activity of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and the content of LPO measured in tissue of Liver, heart and brain of mice irradiated by 60 Co-γ rays 5 Gy 1, 3, 5 and 8 days after irradiation respectively. After radiation exogenous SOD was immediately i.p. injected into mice. The variation of LPO content in the above mentioned three kinds of tissue has been observed. The result of the measurement shows that after radiation at a dose of 5 Gy 60 Co-γ rays, the LPO content and SOD activity of mice organs varied with radiation time. The LPO content varied earliest in liver, while the variation of LPO content in heart and cerebrum took place 8 days after radiation, meanwhile the activity of SOD in the tissues significantly decreased in comparison with that the control group (P<0.01). After injection with SOD, the LPO content and SOD activity of the organs irradiated for different time significantly decreased and increased in comparison with that in the control group. This shows that the enzyme of SOD is of significant anti-radiation effect

  17. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Peter; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2016-02-03

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)--a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientific research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, significant research to the fight against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pioneering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt's work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene amplification and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine.

  18. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  19. Standard (60 Gy) or Short-Course (40 Gy) Irradiation Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma: A Propensity-Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Terrenato, Irene [Biostatistic Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo; Arcella, Antonella [Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Pace, Andrea [Neurology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Giangaspero, Felice [Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Bozzao, Alessandro [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 specific radiation schedules, each combined with temozolomide (TMZ), assessing their efficacy and safety in patients aged ≥65 years with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients aged ≥65 years with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥60 who received either standard (60 Gy) or short-course (40 Gy) radiation therapy (RT) with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ between June 2004 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. A propensity score analysis was executed for a balanced comparison of treatment outcomes. Results: A total of 127 patients received standard RT-TMZ, whereas 116 patients underwent short-course RT-TMZ. Median overall survival and progression-free survival times were similar: 12 months and 5.6 months for the standard RT-TMZ group and 12.5 months and 6.7 months for the short-course RT-TMZ group, respectively. Radiation schedule was associated with similar survival outcomes in either unadjusted or adjusted analysis. O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation was the most favorable prognostic factor (P=.0001). Standard RT-TMZ therapy was associated with a significant rise in grade 2 and 3 neurologic toxicity (P=.01), lowering of KPS scores during the study (P=.01), and higher posttreatment dosing of corticosteroid (P=.02). Conclusions: In older adults with GBM, survival outcomes of standard and short-course RT-TMZ were similar. An abbreviated course of RT plus TMZ may represent a reasonable therapeutic approach for these patients, without loss of survival benefit and acceptable toxicity.

  20. From nGy to MGy - new TL dosimetry of complex radiation at high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obryk, B.; Bilski, P.; Budzanowski, M.; Olko, P.

    2011-01-01

    One of the well known advantages of thermoluminescence (TL) detectors made of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium, copper and phosphorus (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) is their very high sensitivity to ionizing radiation. LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors enable measurements of radiation doses from tens of nano grays up to a few kilo grays, when the total saturation of the signal of the so-called main dosimetric peak (at about 220 C. degrees) occurs. In 2006 for the first time we observed unprecedented high-temperature emission of LiF detectors heated to temperatures up to 600 C. degrees, after exposures to radiation doses ranging from 1 kGy to 1 MGy. For quantification of the glow curve shape changes of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in this range of doses and determination of the absorbed dose, the high temperature coefficient (UHTR) was defined. This newly established dosimetric method was tested in a range of radiation qualities, such as gamma radiation, electron and proton beams, thermal neutron fields and in high-energy mixed fields around the SPS and PS accelerators at CERN. A number of dosimetric sets with LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors are currently installed around the LHC at CERN. The new method for ultra-high dose range monitoring with a single LiF:Mg,Cu,P detector, which is capable of covering at least twelve orders of magnitude of doses, can be used for dosimetry at high energy accelerators and has great potential for accident dosimetry in particular. (authors)

  1. Regulation of a putative corticosteroid, 17, 21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene, 3, 20-one, in sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W.; Didier, Wes; Satbir, Rai; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Libants, Scot V.; Sang-Seon, Yun; Close, David

    2013-01-01

    In higher vertebrates, in response to stress, the hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates cells in the anterior pituitary to produce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which in turn stimulates production of either cortisol (F) or corticosterone (B) by the adrenal tissues. In lampreys, however, neither of these steroids is present. Instead, it has been proposed that the stress steroid is actually 17,21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione (11-deoxycortisol; S). However, there have been no studies yet to determine its mechanism of regulation or site of production. Here we demonstrate that (1) intraperitoneal injections of lamprey-CRH increase plasma S in a dose dependent manner, (2) intraperitoneal injections of four lamprey-specific ACTH peptides at 100 lg/kg, did not induce changes in plasma S concentrations in either males or females; (3) two lamprey-specific gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH I and III) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT), all at single doses, stimulated S production as well as, or to an even greater extent than CRH; (4) sea lamprey mesonephric kidneys, in vitro, converted tritiated 17a-hydroxyprogesterone (17a-P) into a steroid that had the same chromatographic properties (on HPLC and TLC) as S; (5) kidney tissues released significantly more immunoassayable S into the incubation medium than gill, liver or gonad tissues. One interpretation of these results is that the corticosteroid production of the sea lamprey, one of the oldest extant vertebrates, is regulated through multiple pathways rather than the classical HPI-axis. However, the responsiveness of this steroid to the GnRH peptides means that a reproductive rather than a stress role for this steroid cannot yet be ruled out.

  2. Value of low-dose 2 X 2 Gy palliative radiotherapy in advanced low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, M.; Wirth, A.; Ryan, G.; MacManus, M.

    2006-01-01

    Low-dose radiotherapy over the last decade has been reported to provide effective palliation for patients with low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this retrospective case series of 10 patients, we report our early experience using low-dose radiotherapy (usually 2 x2 Gy) for patients with advanced-stage follicular, mucosal associated lymphoid tissue, mantle cell and small lymphocytic lymphomas. Median follow up was 27 weeks. Response rates were high (complete response, 70%; partial response, 20%), the response durable and the toxicity was minimal (no toxicity greater than grade 1). Low-dose irradiation is an effective treatment option for patients with low-grade lymphomas with local symptoms Copyright (2006) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  3. Changes in microflora and other characteristics of vacuum-packaged pork loins irradiated at 3.0 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebepe, S.; Molins, R.A.; Charoen, S.P.; Farrar, H. IV; Skowronski, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of 3.0-kGy irradiation on microflora and other attributes of fresh, vacuum-packaged pork loins were examined during storage (2-4 degrees C, 98 days) and mishandling (24-25 degrees C, 24 and 48 hr). Shelf life of pork chops from irradiated loins was determined at 5 degrees C. Irradiated loins kept at 2-4 degrees C tested negative for Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus. Yersinia spp., was detected in pork chops held at 5 degrees C; this organism, C. perfringens and Aeromonas spp. were present in abused samples. In two irradiated samples Listeria monocytogenes was found. Irradiation reduced aerobic, anaerobic and Aeromonas spp. counts; lactobacilli were least affected. Chemical spoilage began after 91 days at 2-4 degrees C. With irradiation, TBA values were unaffected but Hunter a color values increased

  4. The use of biological isodoses ''IsobioGy 2'' for evaluation of tumour and normal tissues response for fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skolyszewski, J.; Majewski, S.; Lobodziec, W.; Jedynak, T.; Slosarek, K.

    1988-01-01

    Divergences between physical and biological dose distributions were analysed using linear quadratic model. It was found that small variations in physical dose distribution and differences in normal tissue sensitivity for change in dose per fraction, expressed by a α/β value, can cause a high difference between physical and biological doses. This difference significantly increases when one field instead of two fields is daily treated. If there is no enough separation between treated fields, the biological dose may dramatically increase. The use of biological ''isobioGy 2'' isodoses, instead of physical isodoses, can provide an important information on biological effect in tumour or normal tissue and may diminish the risk of giving too high dose to normal tissue and too low dose to the tumour. 6 figs., 13 refs. (author)

  5. Haematological effects of rhG-CSF on dogs exposed to 6.5 Gy uneven γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Qingliang; Xia Zhenbiao; Dong Bo

    1996-01-01

    The stimulative effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on hematopoietic regeneration were studied in dogs receiving an uneven γ-irradiation with the pelvis shielded at a dose of 6.5 Gy. In the treated dogs, intravenous administration of rhG-CSF at 5 or 10 μg/kg per day for 16 to 20 days caused significant increases of peripheral blood leucocytes, neutrophils, reticulocytes, and platelets. The nucleated cell and CFU-GM counts of bone marrow also showed an obvious rise, while the hemoglobin level did not significantly change during the course of treatment. In the irradiated dogs treated with rhG-CSF, the severity of neutropenia decreased, and its duration shortened

  6. Residual haematopoietic damage in adult and 8 day-old mice exposed to 7 Gy of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, T.; Bueren, J.A.; Gaitan, S.; Tejero, C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors' experiments have focused on the analysis of residual haematopoietic damage in 8-day-old and 12-week-old mice X-irradiated with a single dose of 7 Gy. In the case of adult mice, analysis of femoral and splenic CFU-S, CFU-GM and BFU-E showed a persistent depletion of these haematopoietic progenitor cells after irradiation. In contrast, in 1-week-old irradiated mice, a progressive recovery of the femoral haematopoietic progenitors was observed, achieving essentially normal values 1 year after irradiation. The spleens of these mice, however, contained significantly less haematopoietic progenitors than the control group, mainly as a consequence of the size reduction of this organ. In the peripheral blood, normal cellularity values were observed in most cases, although in the adult group a decline in numbers or circulating cells was noted after the first year following irradiation. (author)

  7. Phase-changes in cell cycle of wound tissue irradiated with 5.21 Gy soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianzhong; Zhou Yuanguo; Cheng Tianmin; Zhou Ping; Liu Xia; Li Ping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the phase-changes in cell cycle of wound tissue which was locally irradiated with 5.21 Gy soft X-rays. Methods: Flow cytometry and PI staining were used to analyze cell cycle. Cell proliferation was determined with BrdU labeling. Results: During 3-9 days after irradiation, the percentage of the G 0 /G 1 phase cells in wound of the control side decreased while the percentage of S phase cells increased and reached the highest value on day 9. The percentage of G 2 /M phase cells also increased, and reached its peak on day 15. The percentage of G 0 /G 1 phase cell increased in wound of the irradiation side and was higher than that of the control wound, meanwhile the percentages of S and G 2 /M cells were significantly lower than those of the control wound. In the period of 12-22 days after wounding, the percentage of S phase cells increased and reached its peak value on the 22 th day. When most of cells were in S phase and arrested dramatically. Through the whole healing process, the percentage of G 2 /M in wound of the irradiation side was lower than that of the non-irradiated wound. The BrdU-positive cells were fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that G 1 block, S phase arrest, and switch of G 2 /M with suppression of mitotic activity of these cells are induced by local 5.21 Gy soft X-ray irradiation. Therefore, wound healing delay is induced partly by cell cycle arrest

  8. A phase II study of localized prostate cancer treated to 75.6 Gy with 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan; Chung, Peter; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Divanbiegi, Lorella; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Rob; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate toxicity, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and biopsy-proven local control for prostate cancer patients treated with 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions using 6-field conformal radiotherapy to prostate alone. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 1999, 140 patients with T1-2NxM0, Gleason score ≤8, and PSA ≤20 ng/ml prostate cancer were assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late toxicity scores. bFFS was determined for 120 patients treated without hormones. Post-treatment prostate biopsies were performed at a median of 3 years and a late toxicity questionnaire was administered at a median of 5 years. Results: Clinically important acute toxicities were gastrointestinal (GI) grade 2: 22% and 3: 0%, and genitourinary (GU) grade 2: 24% and 3: 2%. Late physician-assessed toxicities were GI ≥grade 2: 2%, and GU ≥grade 2: 1%. The 3-year bFFS of patients failure-free before biopsy was 93% (95% CI: 83-100) from a negative biopsy and 22% (95% CI: 0-56) from a positive biopsy (P=0.001). Patients reported significantly more late toxicity than physicians (GI: P=0.003, GU: P<0.001). At 5.0 years median follow-up, cause-specific survival was 98% (95% CI: 96-100), overall survival was 91% (95% CI: 86-97), and bFFS was 55% (95% CI: 45-64). Conclusions: 75.6 Gy caused modest levels of acute and late toxicity. Three-year biopsies predicted subsequent biochemical outcome

  9. Bone marrow sparing in intensity modulated proton therapy for cervical cancer: Efficacy and robustness under range and setup uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and methods: IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18 F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3 mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results: In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V 5Gy , 47% for V 10Gy , 54% for V 20Gy , and 57% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V 5Gy , 37% for V 10Gy , 41% for V 20Gy , and 39% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01. Conclusions: The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors

  10. Bone Marrow Sparing in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Cervical Cancer: Efficacy and Robustness under Range and Setup Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and Methods IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V5GY, 47% for V10Gy, 54% for V20Gy, and 57% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V5Gy, 37% for V10Gy, 41% for V20Gy, and 39% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01. Conclusions The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors. PMID:25981130

  11. Hyperfractionated radiaton therapy and bis-chlorethyl nitrosourea in the treatment of malignant glioma - possible advantage observed at 72.0 Gy in 1.2 Gy B.I.D. fractions: Report of the radiation therapy oncology group protocol 8302

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.F.; Curran, W.J.; Powlis, W.D.; Scott, C.; Nelson, J.S.; Weinstein, A.S.; Ahmad, K.; Constine, L.S.; Murray, K.; Mohiuddin, M.; Fischbach, J.

    1993-01-01

    Between January 1983 and November 1987, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a prospective, randomized, multi-institutional, dose searching Phase I/II trial to evaluate hyperfractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of supratentorial malignant glioma. Patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, or glioblastoma multiforme, age 18-70 years with a Karnofsky performance status of 40-100 were stratified according to age, Karnofsky performance status, and histology, and were randomized. Initially randomization was to one of three arms: 64.8 Gy, 72.0 Gy, and 76.8 Gy. Fractions of 1.2 Gy were given twice daily, 5 days per week, with intervals of 4 to 8 hr. All patients received bis-chlorethyl nitrosourea (BCNU) 80 mg/m2 on days 3, 4, 5 of radiation therapy and then every 8 weeks for 1 year. After acceptable rates of acute and late effects were found, the randomization was changed to 81.6 Gy and 72.0 Gy with a weighting of 2:1. Out of 466 patients randomized, 435 were analyzed. The distribution of prognostic factors was comparable among the 76.8 Gy arm, 81.6 Gy arm, and the final randomization of the 72 Gy arm. The 64.8 Gy arm and the initial randomization of the 72 Gy arm had somewhat worse prognostic variables. Late radiation toxicity occurred in 1.3-6.8% of the patients, with a modest increase with increasing radiation dose. The best survival occurred in those patients treated with 72 Gy. The Cox proportional hazards model confirmed the prognostic variables of age, histology and Karnofsky performance status. In addition, the longer interval of 4.5-8 hr was associated with a worse prognosis than the 4-4.4 hr interval. The difference in survival between the 81.6 Gy arm and the lower three arms approached significance with inferior survival observed in the 81.6 Gy arm. 72 Gy delivered by 1.2 Gy twice daily is no more toxic than 60 Gy delivered conventionally. 26 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  12. SU-F-T-351: Establishing a Workflow for IMRT Pre-Treatment Reviews for NRG-GY006 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaddui, T [Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, N; Moore, K; Mell, L [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States); Curry, K [MIM Software, Inc., Clevealand, OH (United States); Leath, C [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Kunos, C [Northeastern Ohio University College, Clevealand, OH (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a workflow for NRG-GY006 IMRT pre-treatment reviews, incorporating advanced radiotherapy technologies being evaluated as part of the clinical trial. Methods: Pre-Treatment reviews are required for every IMRT case as part of NRG-GY006 (a randomized phase II trial of radiation therapy and cisplatin alone or in combination with intravenous triapine in women with newly diagnosed bulky stage I B2, stage II, IIIB, or IVA cancer of the uterine cervix or stage II-IVA vaginal cancer. The pretreatment review process includes structures review and generating an active bone marrow(ABM)- to be used as an avoidance structure during IMRT optimization- and evaluating initial IMRT plan quality using knowledgeengineering based planning (KBP). Institutions will initially submit their simulation CT scan, structures file and PET/CT to IROC QA center for generating ABM. The ABM will be returned to the institution for use in planning. Institutions will then submit an initial IMRT plan for review and will receive information back following implementation of a KBP algorithm, for use in re-optimization, before submitting the final IMRT used for treatment. Results: ABM structure is generated using MIM vista software (Version 6.5, MIM corporation, Inc.). Here, the planning CT and the diagnostic PET/CT are fused and a sub threshold structure is auto segmented above the mean value of the SUV of the bone marrow. The generated ABM were compared with those generated with other software system (e.g. Velocity, Varian) and Dice coefficient (reflects the overlap of structures) ranged between 80 – 90% was achieved. A KBP model was built in Varian Eclipse TPS using the RapidPlan KBP software to perform plan quality assurance. Conclusion: The workflow for IMRT pretreatment reviews has been established. It represents a major improvement of NRG Oncology clinical trial quality assurance and incorporates the latest radiotherapy technologies as part of NCI clinical trials. This project

  13. SU-F-T-351: Establishing a Workflow for IMRT Pre-Treatment Reviews for NRG-GY006 Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, T; Li, N; Moore, K; Mell, L; Curry, K; Leath, C; Kunos, C; Xiao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a workflow for NRG-GY006 IMRT pre-treatment reviews, incorporating advanced radiotherapy technologies being evaluated as part of the clinical trial. Methods: Pre-Treatment reviews are required for every IMRT case as part of NRG-GY006 (a randomized phase II trial of radiation therapy and cisplatin alone or in combination with intravenous triapine in women with newly diagnosed bulky stage I B2, stage II, IIIB, or IVA cancer of the uterine cervix or stage II-IVA vaginal cancer. The pretreatment review process includes structures review and generating an active bone marrow(ABM)- to be used as an avoidance structure during IMRT optimization- and evaluating initial IMRT plan quality using knowledgeengineering based planning (KBP). Institutions will initially submit their simulation CT scan, structures file and PET/CT to IROC QA center for generating ABM. The ABM will be returned to the institution for use in planning. Institutions will then submit an initial IMRT plan for review and will receive information back following implementation of a KBP algorithm, for use in re-optimization, before submitting the final IMRT used for treatment. Results: ABM structure is generated using MIM vista software (Version 6.5, MIM corporation, Inc.). Here, the planning CT and the diagnostic PET/CT are fused and a sub threshold structure is auto segmented above the mean value of the SUV of the bone marrow. The generated ABM were compared with those generated with other software system (e.g. Velocity, Varian) and Dice coefficient (reflects the overlap of structures) ranged between 80 – 90% was achieved. A KBP model was built in Varian Eclipse TPS using the RapidPlan KBP software to perform plan quality assurance. Conclusion: The workflow for IMRT pretreatment reviews has been established. It represents a major improvement of NRG Oncology clinical trial quality assurance and incorporates the latest radiotherapy technologies as part of NCI clinical trials. This project

  14. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  15. External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-Daily Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashtan, Itai M.; Recht, Abram; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Brachtel, Elena; Abi-Raad, Rita F.; D'Alessandro, Helen A.; Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Goldberg, Saveli; Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L.; Powell, Simon N.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-daily fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.

  16. External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-Daily Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashtan, Itai M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brachtel, Elena [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi-Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D' Alessandro, Helen A. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-daily fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.

  17. Electrokinetic-Enhanced Remediation of Phenanthrene-Contaminated Soil Combined with Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and Biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weijia; Guo, Chuling; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xujun; Wei, Yanfu; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Electrokinetic-microbial remediation (EMR) has emerged as a promising option for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to enhance degradation of phenanthrene (Phe)-contaminated soils using EMR combined with biosurfactants. The electrokinetic (EK) remediation, combined with Phe-degrading Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, and biosurfactant obtained by fermentation of Pseudomonas sp. MZ01, degraded Phe in the soil with an efficiency of up to 65.1 % at the anode, 49.9 % at the cathode after 5 days of the treatment. The presence of biosurfactants, electricity, and a neutral electrolyte stimulated the growth of the degrading bacteria as shown by a rapid increase in microbial biomass with time. The electrical conductivity and pH changed little during the course of the treatment, which benefitted the growth of microorganisms and the remediation of Phe-contaminated soil. The EMR system with the addition of biosurfactant had the highest Phe removal, demonstrating the biosurfactant may enhance the bioavailability of Phe and the interaction with the microorganism. This study suggests that the EMR combined with biosurfactants can be used to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils.

  18. Changes in hemopoiesis of mice during chronic irradiation with a dose rate of 957 mGy/day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackova, N.; Marko, L.; Horak, J.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative changes in the blood producing organs and in the peripheral blood of mice were evaluated. The animals have been continually irradiated for 42 days with a daily dosage of 957 mGy. Until the 7th day of irradiation a significant diminution of the cellularity of the bone marrow and of the cellularity as well as the mass of the spleen could be observed. After the 14th day of irradiation a temporary stabilization of the cell number in the bone marrow could be found until the 28th day, after that time there was a moderately strong decrease. The cellularity and the mass of the spleen increased temporarily until the 28th day of irradiation owing to the increase of erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis from 20% to 50%. The most significant changes in the peripheral blood could be observed in agranulocytes as a kind of sudden and permanent decrease. The diminution of the granulocyte and reticulocyte numbers proceeded somewhat more slowly, with a temporarily increasing tendency on the 28th day of irradiation. The erythrocyte numbers as well as the hematocrit and hemoglobin values decreased continually beginning from the 7th day of irradiation until the death of the animals. (author)

  19. Language and Family Dispersion: North Korean Linguist Kim Su-gyŏng and the Korean War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Itagaki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the unpublished memoir of Kim Su-gyŏng (1918–2000, a linguist who was active in North Korea from the mid-1940s until the late 1960s, and situates his account of his experience of the Korean War within the context of his linguistic essays and correspondence. In doing so, the article considers the role that the personal and the social play in language, utilizing Saussure’s theoretical framework, with which Kim himself was well versed. Kim wrote his memoirs in the 1990s to his family, from whom he had become separated during the Korean War and who now lived in Toronto. In this text, he writes in “personal” language that reveals his uncertainty and his feelings for his family, but then immediately negates these feelings through the use of “social” language, which resonates with his interpretation of the linguistic thesis that Josef Stalin developed during the Korean War on language and national identity. For Kim, the relationship between language and nation was not at all self-evident, but something that he idealized in response to the dispersal of his family. By offering a reflexive reading of a memoir written by a North Korean linguist, this article makes a breakthrough in the investigation of North Korean wartime academic history, which has not risen above the level of analyzing articles in the field of linguistics that were published at the time.

  20. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to investigate the relation between these observed incidences and parameters derived from the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) of rectum and bladder wall. Patients and Methods: Hundred and thirty patients with T 2-4 G 1-3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer were treated with conformal radiotherapy with the simultaneous boost technique in a dose-escalating protocol; 78 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, 11 patients 74 - 76 Gy and 41 patients 78 Gy, each with a dose of 2 Gy per fraction. DVHs of the rectal wall were used to calculate NTCPs according to the model of Kutcher et al. with the estimated parameter values (n = 0.12, m = 0.15, TD 50 = 80 Gy) according to Burman et al. The median follow-up was 17 months (range 6 - 72 months). The crude and actuarial incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications were determined using the RTOG/EORTC morbidity scoring system (Grade I to IV). Results: Neither for late GI nor for GU complaints, a grade IV complication was observed. GU complaints occurred in 90 patients (69%): 54 patients (42%) only experienced grade I toxicity, 26 patients (20%) had grade II toxicity, and 10 patients (8%) had grade III complications, of which 8 patients (6%) developed a urethral (7 pts) or ureteric stenosis (1 pt). The actuarial incidence of grade III GU complications was 10% at 2 years. Since bladder wall DVHs are unreliable and most grade III complications were not related to the bladder, the grade II and/or III complications were analyzed in terms of the total prescribed dose only, but no correlation could be demonstrated. GI complications occurred in 71 patients (55%): 59 patients (45%) developed a grade I complication, 11 a grade II complication and only 1 patient required laser treatment twice and blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding (grade III). The actuarial incidence of GI

  1. p38 MAPK Inhibitor Insufficiently Attenuates HSC Senescence Administered Long-Term after 6 Gy Total Body Irradiation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Senescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs accumulate with age and exposure to stress, such as total-body irradiation (TBI, which may cause long-term myelosuppression in the clinic. However, the methods available for long-term myelosuppression remain limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that sustained p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK activation in HSCs following exposure to TBI in mice and the administration of its inhibitor twenty-four hours after TBI may partially prevent long-term myelosuppression. However, long-term myelosuppression is latent and identified long after the administration of radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of SB203580 (a small molecule inhibitor of p38 MAPK on long-term myelosuppression induced by TBI. Mice with hematopoietic injury were injected intraperitoneally with SB203580 every other day five times beginning 70 days after 6 Gy of 137Cs γ ray TBI. Our results at 80 days demonstrated that SB203580 did not significantly improve the TBI-induced long-term reduction of peripheral blood cell and bone marrow nucleated cell (BMNC counts, or defects in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs and HSC clonogenic function. SB203580 reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production and p-p38 expression; however, SB203580 had no effect on p16 expression in the HSCs of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that treatment with SB203580 70 days after TBI in mice inhibits the ROS-p38 oxidative stress pathway; however, it has no therapeutic effect on long-term myelosuppression induced by TBI.

  2. Degradation of slime extracellular polymeric substances and inhibited sludge flocs destruction contribute to sludge dewaterability enhancement during fungal treatment of sludge using filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhanced by filamentous fungi during fungal treatment of sludge were investigated in the present study. The filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1, isolated from waste activated sludge, enhanced sludge dewaterability by 82.1% to achieve the lowest value of normalized sludge specific resistance to filtration (SRF), 8.18 × 10(10) m · L/kg · g-TSS. During the fungal treatment of sludge, 57.8% of slime extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and 51.1% of polysaccharide in slime EPS were degraded, respectively, by Mucor sp. GY-1, contributing to the improvement of sludge dewaterability. Slime EPS is much more available for Mucor sp. GY-1 than either LB-EPS or TB-EPS that bound with microbial cells. In addition, filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1 entrapped small sludge particles and inhibited the destruction of sludge flocs larger than 100 μm, thus enhancing sludge dewaterability, during fungal treatment of sludge using Mucor sp. GY-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonmonotonous changes of thymus nuclei lipid metabolism upon chronic gamma-radiation of rats at a dose-rate of 3 c Gy/Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagina, T.P.; Kolomijtseva, I.K.; Moiseeva, S.A.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the thymus nuclei lipid metabolism under chronic gamma-radiation in low doses with the dose rate of 3 cGy/day is studied. It is shown, that at the 25 cGy dose rate there takes place activation of exchange in the fatly-acid part of the phospholipid molecule with simultaneous activation of the cholesterol and fatty acids synthesis. The synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids at 50 cGy remains activated, whereas metabolism of the fatty-acid part of the phospholipids molecule is sharply depressed. The identified changes reveal the similarity with the processes, proceeding by the apoptose induction. At the same time the dynamics of the thymocyte nuclei lipid exchange in the process of adaptation to the long radiation effect as nonmonotonous metabolic response to low dose impact is characterized for the first time [ru

  4. Effect of radioiodine irradiation of thyroid gland in vitro with a dose of 4-5 Gy on iodide transport in thyrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paster, Yi.P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the influence of ouabain on the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptake in thyroid gland preliminarily irradiated by radioiodine (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy) in vitro. Newborn pig thyroid tissue was incubated in a medium, containing 37 kBq/ml of 131-iodine (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy), washed and achieved by collagenase dissociation. Thyrocytes were incubated with thyrotropin (100.0 mE/ml), ouabain (0.1 mol/l), and 125-iodide (0.4 kBq/ml). Then cells were washed, stored at 4 degree C for 60 days, and the 125-iodide uptake was assessed. Ouabain depressed both the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptakes by thyrocytes in vitro. After preliminary radioiodine irradiation of the thyroid tissue (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy), ouabain stimulated both the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptakes by thyrocytes

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation at doses of 5-15 kGy on the quality properties of durum wheat semolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Semolina purified from four durum wheat varieties were gamma-irradiated with doses of 0, 5, 10 and 15 kGy, i.e., dose levels expected to improve the colour of pasta products, suitable for reduction of microbial contamination, and high doses required for insect disinfestation. The irradiation resulted in significant losses in carotenoid content and oxidative enzyme activities. Gamma irradiation slightly affected the mixing properties, greatly reduced the gluten strength and adversely affected firmness of cooked pasta. Consequently, preservative gamma irradiation of durum wheat semolina should be limited to a maximum dose of 5 kGy. (author) 39 refs.; 3 tabs

  6. Implant R100 Predicts Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with IG-IMRT to 45 Gy and Pd-103 Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Packard; Vladimir Valakh; Russell Fuhrer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To define factors associated with rectal bleeding in patients treated with IG-IMRT followed by Pd-103 seed implant. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively reviewed 61 prostate adenocarcinoma patients from 2002 to 2008. The majority (85.2%) were of NCCN intermediate risk category. All received IG-IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles followed by Pd-103 implant delivering a mean D90 of 100.7 Gy. Six patients received 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes and 10 received androgen deprivation...

  7. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [de

  8. A wide range survey meter for estimating γ- and β-dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1980-09-01

    A survey meter has been developed to measure β-dose rates in the range 0.1 - 100 rad/h (1 mGy/h - 1 Gy/h) and γ-dose rates in the range 1 mrad/h - 100 rad/h (10 μGy/h-1 Gy/h). It also provides an audible warning of high γ-dose rates and an audible and visible warning when a predetermined γ-dose is exceeded. The report describes the design of the survey meter and presents data measured on the performance of an engineering prototype. Factors which affect performance and have been investigated are temperature, battery voltage (and type of battery), GM counter counting loss, direction of incident radiation, and energy of γ-rays. Finally, the application and calibration of the survey meter are discussed. (auth)

  9. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  10. Muusikamaailm. Magnus Lindbergi festivali jätk. Jonas Forsell taas ooperijuhiks. Marcello Panni uus ooper. György Kurtagile Sonningi preemia. Peter Gradenwitz lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Soome helilooja Magnus Lindbergi mitmeid teoseid esitatakse Inglismaal. Rootsi heliloojast Jonas Forsellist sai jaanuaris Kopenhaageni trupi Den Anden Opera kunstiline juht. Firenzes tuli esiettekandele Marcello Panni uus ooper "The Banquet ئ Talking about Love". Helilooja György Kurtag pälvis Taani 2003.a. Leonie Sonningi muusikapreemia. 91aastasena suri muusikateadlane Peter Gradenwitz

  11. Preoperative irradiation with 5x5 Gy in a murine isolated colon loop model does not cause anastomotic weakening after colon resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karliczek, A.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Benaron, D. A.; Coppes, R. P.; Wiggers, T.; van Dam, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction There are conflicting studies on the influence of fractionated preoperative 5 days of 5 Gy irradiation on tissue oxygenation and subsequent colonic anastomotic strength. To elucidate the effect of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic strength, an isolated colon loop model was

  12. 2, 4 and 6 kGy effect on the microbiological characteristics of chicken hamburgers stored at 2±2 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Z.; Basurto, H.; Silva, M.

    2001-01-01

    Decimal reduction dose (D 10 ) of S. typhimurium irradiated in Casoy broth (TSB) and inoculated in chicken burger was found to be 0,425 and 0,547 kGy respectively being the second value 22,3 % higher than the first one. Then, chicken burger previously radiosterilized at 15 kGy was inoculated with S. typhimurium, irradiated at 2, 4 and 6 kGy and kept under storage for 57 days at 2± 2 o C and HR 90 5%. Another batch of chicken burger without radiosterilization was irradiated at 2, 4 and 6 kGy and stored under the same conditions than the previous one in order to study the natural bacterial flora. It was observed that there is a synergic effect between irradiation dose and time of storage (α=5%) in the counting of S. typhimurium. In unirradiated chicken burger, the number of total coliforms increased from 29 NMP/g at the beginning to 4250 NMP/g at day 22 and fecal coliforms from 4 to 240 NMP/g; subsequently the number of these bacteria dropped again at the end of the storage time, while in irradiated samples no coliforms were found. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria diminished its ability of growing up and making colonies, proportionally to the applied irradiation doses. However, as the storage time advanced these bacteria recovered its ability to grow up and of cause spoilage. (authors)

  13. Phase I study of intraoperative radiotherapy with photon radiosurgery system in children with recurrent brain tumors: Preliminary report of first dose level (10 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Goldman, Stewart; Stellpflug, Wendy; Curran, John; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Marymont, Maryanne H.; Tomita, Tadanori

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the preliminary results after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with the photon radiosurgery system in children with recurrent brain tumors treated at the first dose level (10 Gy) of a Phase I protocol. Methods and Materials: A Phase I IORT dose escalation protocol was initiated at Children's Memorial Hospital to determine the maximal tolerated IORT dose in children with recurrent brain tumors. Results: Fourteen children have received IORT thus far. Eight had been previously irradiated. Thirteen children had ependymoma. The median follow-up was 16 months. Three patients (21%) developed radiation necrosis on follow-up MRI scans 6 to 12 months after IORT. They had not been previously irradiated and had received 10 Gy to a depth of 5 mm. One required surgery and the other two had resolution of their lesions without treatment. All 3 patients were asymptomatic at the last follow-up. No other late toxicity was observed at the last follow-up visit. Eight patients (57%) had tumor control within the surgical bed after IORT. Conclusion: Our findings have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of IORT to a dose of 10 Gy to 2 mm in children with previously irradiated brain tumors. IORT to a dose of 10 Gy at 5 mm was associated with a greater complication rate

  14. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 μg/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 μg/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles

  15. Whole-brain radiotherapy with 20 Gy in 5 fractions for brain metastases in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Bohlen, G.; Dunst, J.; Lohynska, R.; Veninga, T.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Schild, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most common treatment for brain metastases. Survival of patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) presenting with brain metastases is extremely poor. A radiation program with a short overall treatment time (short-course RT) would be preferable to longer programs if it provides similar outcomes. This study compares short-course RT with 20 Gy in 5 fractions (5 x 4 Gy) given over 5 days to longer programs in CUP patients. Patients and Methods: Data regarding 101 CUP patients who received either short course WBRT (n = 34) with 5 x 4 Gy or long-course WBRT (n = 67) with 10 x 3 Gy given over 2 weeks or 20 x 2 Gy given over 4 weeks for brain metastases were analyzed retrospectively. Six additional potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of brain metastases, extracranial metastases, RPA-(Recursive Partitioning Analysis-)class. Results: On univariate analysis, the radiation program was not associated with survival (p = 0.88) nor intracerebral control (p = 0.36). Improved survival was associated with KPS ≥ 70 (p < 0.001), absence of extracranial metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA-class 1 (p < 0.001). On multivariate analyses, KPS (risk ratio [RR]: 4.55; p < 0.001), extracranial metastases (RR: 1.70; p = 0.018), and RPA-class (RR: 2.86; p < 0.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, KPS (p < 0.001) and RPA-class (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with intracerebral control. On multivariate analyses, KPS (RR: 2.72; p < 0.001) and RPA-class (RR: 2.09; p < 0.001) remained significant. Conclusion: Short-course WBRT with 5 x 4 Gy provided similar intracerebral control and survival as longer programs for the treatment of brain metastases in CUP patients. 5 x 4 Gy appears preferable because it is more convenient for patients. (orig.)

  16. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving ≥20, ≥30, ≥40, ≥50, and ≥60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R 2 = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm 3 was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to 3 , if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  17. Dose-rate effects between 0.3 and 30 Gy/h in a normal and a malignant human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdur, R.J.; Bedford, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study used continuous open-quotes intermediateclose quotes dose rate irradiation (0.3-30 Gy/h) to compare the capacity for and repair of sublethal radiation damage in different cell lines growing in tissue culture. Two human cell lines were studied; one was derived from normal human fibroblasts (AG1522) and the other from a squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (HTB-35). Dose-response curves for clonogenic survival were determined following irradiation of plateau-phase cultures at five different dose rates: 22.6, 6.12, 3.65, 1.04, and 0.38 Gy/h. Subculture following irradiation was delayed for 8-24 h to allow for the full repair of open-quotes potentially lethal damage.close quotes A significant dose-rate effect was seen in both cell lines. For irradiation at the highest dose rate, survival at 2 Gy (SF2) and the α/β ratio were similar for the two cell lines (approximately 0.7 and 8.0 Gy, respectively) but the half-time of repair of sublethal damage was estimated to be approximately five times longer in the normal human fibroblast line (154 min) than in the carcinoma (31 min) cell line. These results indicate that measuring the dose-rate effect between 0.3 and 30 Gy/h is a useful way to identify and quantify differences in sublethal damage repair between cell lines. To the extent that in vitro and in vivo repair parameters are similar, and that representative tumor biopsy specimens can be examined in this way, this approach may provide a prospective way of determining the dose rate (brachytherapy) or fractionation schedule that will optimize the therapeutic ratio. 32 refs., 1 fig

  18. Parameter changes in silicon IMPATT diodes for mm wavelength range exposed to gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbina, L.V.; Torchinskaya, T.V.; Shcherbina, E.S.; Polupan, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the p + -n-n + -silicon mesa-diodes fabricated using batch technique whose breakdown voltage was 19±1 V. The exposition of IMPATT diodes to 60 Co gamma-radiation was made in the 10 3 to 10 7 Gy dose range. When the gamma-irradiation dose was increased up to (5-8)*10 5 Gy, then the thermal-generation component of the reverse current was monotonously decreasing. The breakdown voltage remained the same during gamma-irradiation. It was shown experimentally that exposition of diodes to (5-8)*10 5 Gy doses of gamma-irradiation led to some drop of both the number of microplasmas in the avalanche breakdown region and the micro plasma noise level. 60 Co gamma-irradiation in the 10 3 -8*10 5 Gy dose range led also to the growth of the microwave output power P out . The decrease of the micro plasma number in the avalanche breakdown region and Pout growth may be explained if one assumes that gamma-irradiation in the 10 3 - 8*10 5 Gy dose range leads to 'healing' of structural defects in the semiconductor due to their interaction with the radiation-induced point defects. The gamma-irradiation dose increase over 8*10 5 Gy results in a storage of some radiation-induced defects in the IMPATT diode base and electrical parameters of diodes are degrading

  19. Effect of a magnetic field on the permittivity of 80%La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/20%GeO2 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirov, Yu. V.; Gavrilyachenko, V. G.; Bogatin, A. S.; Sitalo, E. I.; Yatsenko, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    The dielectric properties of a magnetoresistive conducting two-phase 80%La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/20%GeO2 (wt %) composite have been studied near the percolation threshold in magnetic fields from 0 to 15 kOe at frequencies of the measurement field from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The samples have inductive impedances; i.e., their permittivities can be considered negative due to a high conductivity in this frequency range. The permittivity increases in magnitude in magnetic field, and the values of the magnetodielectric coefficient reach 23% at room temperature. The reasons for the effect of magnetic field on the dielectric permittivity of samples are discussed.

  20. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  1. Cardiac Toxicity After Radiotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Dose-Escalation Trials Delivering 70 to 90 Gy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Deal, Allison M.; Lipner, Matthew; Zagar, Timothy M.; Wang, Yue; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lee, Carrie B.; Jensen, Brian C.; Rosenman, Julian G.; Socinski, Mark A.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The significance of radiotherapy (RT) –associated cardiac injury for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear, but higher heart doses were associated with worse overall survival in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 study. We assessed the impact of heart dose in patients treated at our institution on several prospective dose-escalation trials. Patients and Methods From 1996 to 2009, 127 patients with stage III NSCLC (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, 0 to 1) received dose-escalated RT to 70 to 90 Gy (median, 74 Gy) in six trials. RT plans and cardiac doses were reviewed. Records were reviewed for the primary end point: symptomatic cardiac events (symptomatic pericardial effusion, acute coronary syndrome, pericarditis, significant arrhythmia, and heart failure). Cardiac risk was assessed by noting baseline coronary artery disease and calculating the WHO/International Society of Hypertension score. Competing risks analysis was used. Results In all, 112 patients were analyzed. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.8 years. Twenty-six patients (23%) had one or more events at a median of 26 months to first event (effusion [n = 7], myocardial infarction [n = 5], unstable angina [n = 3], pericarditis [n = 2], arrhythmia [n = 12], and heart failure [n = 1]). Heart doses (eg, heart mean dose; hazard ratio, 1.03/Gy; P = .002,), coronary artery disease (P < .001), and WHO/International Society of Hypertension score (P = .04) were associated with events on univariable analysis. Heart doses remained significant on multivariable analysis that accounted for baseline risk. Two-year competing risk–adjusted event rates for patients with heart mean dose < 10 Gy, 10 to 20 Gy, or ≥ 20 Gy were 4%, 7%, and 21%, respectively. Heart doses were not associated with overall survival. Conclusion Cardiac events were relatively common after high-dose thoracic RT and were independently associated with both heart dose and

  2. Tonopah Test Range - Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capabilities Test Operations Center Test Director Range Control Track Control Communications Tracking Radars Photos Header Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Tonopah Test Range Top TTR_TOC Tonopah is the testing range of choice for all national security missions. Tonopah Test Range (TTR) provides research and

  3. Hematological toxicity in radioimmunotherapy is predicted both by the computed absorbed whole body dose (cGy) and by the administered dose (mCi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Sheri D.; Knox, Susan J.; Trisler, Kirk D.; Goris, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has yielded encouraging response rates in patients with recurrent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but myelotoxicity remains the dose limiting factor. Dose optimization is theoretically possible, since a pretreatment biodistribution study with tracer doses allows for a fairly accurate estimate of the whole body (and by implication the bone marrow) dose in patients. It has been shown that the radiation dose as a function of the administered dose varies widely from patient to patient. The pretreatment study could therefore be used to determine the maximum tolerable dose for each individual patient. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the administered dose or the estimated whole body absorbed radiation dose were indeed predictors of bone marrow toxicity. Materials and Methods: We studied two cohorts of patients to determine if the computed integral whole body or marrow dose is predictive of myelotoxicity. The first cohort consisted of 13 patients treated with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 (2B8) monoclonal antibody. Those patients were treated in a dose escalation protocol, based on the administered dose, without correction for weight or body surface. The computed whole body dose varied from 41 to 129 cGy. The second cohort (6 patients) were treated with Iodine-131 labeled anti-CD20 (B1) antibody. In this group the administered dose was tailored to deliver an estimated 75 cGy whole body dose. The administered dose varied from 54 to 84 mCi of Iodine-131. For each patient, white blood cell count with differential, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet levels were measured before and at regular intervals after RIT was administered. Using linear regression analysis, a relationship between administered dose, absorbed dose and myelotoxicity was determined for each patient cohort. Results: Marrow toxicity was measured by the absolute decrease in white blood cell (DWBC), platelet (DPLAT), and neutrophil (DN) values. In the Yttrium

  4. Use of the gamma radiation, in a dose of 0,4 kGy, on the storage temperature reduction of the banana nanica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoel, Luciana; Vieites, Rogerio Lopes

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the use of gamma radiation, in a dose of 0,4 kGy, on the storage temperature reduction of the banana 'Nanica'. The bananas 'Nanica' were harvested in the Arm Taperao, Brotas (SP) town, and sent to CBE (Companhia Brasileira de Esterilizacao-Cotia-SP) for irradiation and constitution of the following treatments: T1 (fruits irradiated at 0,4 kGy and stored at 16 ±1 deg C); T2 (fruits irradiated at 0,4 kGy and stored at 14 ±1 deg C); T3 (fruit irradiated ata 0,4 kGy and stored at 12±1 deg C); T4 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 16±1 deg C); T5 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 14±1 deg C) and T6 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 12±1 deg C). The fruits were stored in B.O.Ds. of the Agroindustrial Management and Technology Department, with a relative humidity of 80±5%. The experiment was divided in two groups: control group (post harvest conservation and disease incidence) and parcel group (soluble solids and pulp/peel). The analyses were performed in intervals of five days during a period of 25 days. The experimental design employed was completely randomized (DIC) by applying a factor of 2 x 3 x 6 (irradiation x temperature x time). The Tukey test with 5% of probability was used for comparison between means. The storage temperature of the bananas 'Nanica' was not reduce by irradiation. (author)

  5. Clinical outcomes of a phase I/II study of 48 Gy of stereotactic body radiotherapy in 4 fractions for primary lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mitsumori, Michihide; Shibuya, Keiko; Araki, Norio; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of 48 Gy of three-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy in four fractions for treating Stage I lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients who were treated between September 1998 and February 2004 were included in this study. Thirty-two patients had Stage IA lung cancer, and the other 13 had Stage IB lung cancer where tumor size was less than 4 cm in diameter. Three-dimensional treatment planning using 6-10 noncoplanar beams was performed to maintain the target dose homogeneity and to decrease the irradiated lung volume >20 Gy. All patients were irradiated using a stereotactic body frame and received four single 12 Gy high doses of radiation at the isocenter over 5-13 (median = 12) days. Results: Seven tumors (16%) completely disappeared after treatment (CR) and 38 tumors (84%) decreased in size by 30% or more (PR). Therefore, all tumors showed local response. During the follow-up of 6-71 (median = 30) months, no pulmonary complications greater than an National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria of Grade 3 were noted. No other vascular, cardiac, esophageal, or neurologic toxicities were encountered. Forty-four (98%) of 45 tumors were locally controlled during the follow-up period. However, regional recurrences and distant metastases occurred in 3 and 5 of T1 patients and zero and 4 of T2 patients, respectively. For Stage IA lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates after 1 and 3 years were 80% and 72%, and 92% and 83%, respectively, whereas for Stage IB lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 92% and 71%, and 82% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: Forty-eight Gy of 3D stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 fractions using a stereotactic body frame is useful for the treatment of Stage I lung tumors

  6. Late morbidity profiles in prostate cancer patients treated to 79-84 Gy by a simple four-field coplanar beam arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Derek B.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne H.; Mitra, Raj K.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the frequency and magnitude of late GI and GU morbidity in prostate cancer patients treated to high dose levels with a simple three-dimensional conformal technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 156 intermediate- and high-risk patients were treated between January 1, 1992 and February 28, 1999 with a simple four-field three-dimensional conformal technique to 79-84 Gy. All patients were treated with a four-field conformal technique; the prostate received 82 Gy and the seminal vesicles and periprostatic tissue 46 Gy. GI and GU toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Morbidity Grading Scale and compared using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: The late Grade 2 GI complication rate was 9% and 38% at 3 years for patients treated with and without rectal blocking, respectively (p=0.0004). No Grade 3 late GI complications developed. The rate of Grade 2 late GU complications was 5%, 8%, and 12% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. The Grade 3 late GU complication rate was 2% at 36 months. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The treatment method described is a simple four-field conformal technique that can be easily implemented in the general radiation community. A dose of 79-84 Gy can be safely delivered to the prostate, with a 9% rate of late Grade 2 GI, 12% rate of late Grade 2 GU, and 2% rate of late Grade 3 GU complications

  7. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  8. Effects of 200 Gy 60Co-γ Radiation on the Regulation of Antioxidant Enzymes, Hsp70 Genes, and Serum Molecules of Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxue; Luo, Lingyan; Karthi, Sengodan; Zhang, Ke; Luo, Jianjun; Hu, Qiongbo; Weng, Qunfang

    2018-04-26

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), is one of the notorious pests causing substantial loses to many cruciferous vegetables across the nations. The effects of 60 Co-γ radiation on physiology of P. xylostella were investigated and the results displayed that 200 Gy irradiation significantly alters the antioxidant enzyme regulation in six-day-old male pupae of P. xylostella . First, in our research, we detected Oxidase system and stress response mechanism of irradiated pupae, the results displayed that 200 Gy irradiation significantly alters the antioxidant enzyme regulation in six-day-old male pupae of P. xylostella . The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were increased significantly in contrast the level of peroxidase (POD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were decreased in 12⁻24 h post-treatment. The heat shock proteins (Hsps) gene expression level was significant increasing, maximum > 2-folds upregulation of genes were observed in peak. However, they also had a trend of gradual recovery with development. Second, we detected the testis lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activity found that in male adults testis they increased significantly than control during its development. Thus the present research investigation highlights that the 60 Co-γ radiation treatments alters the physiological development of diamondback moth. The results showed that 200 Gy dosage resulted in stress damage to the body and reproductive system of the diamondback moth.

  9. Effects of 200 Gy 60Co-γ Radiation on the Regulation of Antioxidant Enzymes, Hsp70 Genes, and Serum Molecules of Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxue Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus, is one of the notorious pests causing substantial loses to many cruciferous vegetables across the nations. The effects of 60Co-γ radiation on physiology of P. xylostella were investigated and the results displayed that 200 Gy irradiation significantly alters the antioxidant enzyme regulation in six-day-old male pupae of P. xylostella. First, in our research, we detected Oxidase system and stress response mechanism of irradiated pupae, the results displayed that 200 Gy irradiation significantly alters the antioxidant enzyme regulation in six-day-old male pupae of P. xylostella. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT were increased significantly in contrast the level of peroxidase (POD and glutathione S-transferase (GST were decreased in 12–24 h post-treatment. The heat shock proteins (Hsps gene expression level was significant increasing, maximum > 2-folds upregulation of genes were observed in peak. However, they also had a trend of gradual recovery with development. Second, we detected the testis lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and acid phosphatase (ACP activity found that in male adults testis they increased significantly than control during its development. Thus the present research investigation highlights that the 60Co-γ radiation treatments alters the physiological development of diamondback moth. The results showed that 200 Gy dosage resulted in stress damage to the body and reproductive system of the diamondback moth.

  10. Differential effects of 18- and 24-Gy cranial irradiation on growth rate and growth hormone release in children with prolonged survival after acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicognani, A.; Cacciari, E.; Vecchi, V.; Cau, M.; Balsamo, A.; Pirazzoli, P.; Tosi, M.T.; Rosito, P.; Paolucci, G.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of two different doses of cranial irradiation on growth and growth hormone (GH) release, we studied 61 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia who had survived at least five years in continuous complete remission. Forty-three children received 24 Gy (group 1) and 18 children received 18 Gy (group 2). Height was evaluated at diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 months later. Growth hormone release was evaluated by arginine and levodopa tests after the end of treatment. After diagnosis, the height SD score decreased significantly in both groups; two years after the end of treatment, only group 1 showed an SD score for height that was still significantly lower than at diagnosis. Group 1 showed impaired GH responses to the tests and, compared with controls, group 1 in fact included a percentage of subjects with a normal response to levodopa (ie, greater than 8 micrograms/L) that was significantly lower (56.4% vs 83.3%) and a percentage of nonresponders to both tests that was significantly higher (21.6% vs 0%). These data indicate that only patients treated with lower cranial irradiation dosage (18 Gy) had complete growth recovery and normal GH responses to pharmacologic tests

  11. An elective radiation dose of 46 Gy is feasible in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy: A long-term follow-up result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the treatment outcome of different radiation doses of elective neck irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).In total, 504 patients with nondisseminated NPC who underwent magnetic resonance imaging before radical IMRT between 2000 and 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into 2 groups based on the ENI dose: low ENI when the ENI dose was 46 Gy (n = 446) and high ENI when the ENI doses were 50 to 60 Gy (n = 58). All the patients in both the groups received a median dose of 72 Gy to the gross tumor and involved nodes. The fraction size was 2 Gy per fraction. Matching was performed between low ENI and high ENI in a 2:1 ratio, and the matching criteria were N-stage, T-stage, treatment modality, pathology classification, sex, and age.The median follow-up for all patients was 63.5 months. In all patients, the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC), regional control (RC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for low ENI and high ENI patients were 69.0% and 63.2% (P = 0.331), 89.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.235), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.246), 86.8% and 76.6% (P = 0.056), 77.5% and 80.8% (P = 0.926), and 84.4% and 82.5% (P = 0.237), respectively. In the matched-pair analysis, the 5-year PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS for matched low ENI and high ENI patients were 74.1% and 63.2% (P = 0.134), 92.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.152), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.356), 86.2% and 76.6% (P = 0.125), 87.0% and 80.8% (P = 0.102), and 88.6% and 82.5% (P = 0.080), respectively. In the multivariable analysis for all patients, the ENI group was not a significant factor for PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS.A low ENI dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions is feasible in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and this concept should be validated in the

  12. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  13. Very low-dose (0.15 mGy) chest CT protocols using the COPDGene 2 test object and a third-generation dual-source CT scanner with corresponding third-generation iterative reconstruction software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, John D; Fuld, Matthew K; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sieren, Jered P; Chan, Kung-Sik; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomographic (CT) acquisitions with Sn prefiltration and third-generation iterative reconstruction on density-based quantitative measures of growing interest in phenotyping pulmonary disease. The effects of both decreasing dose and different body habitus on the accuracy of the mean CT attenuation measurements and the level of image noise (SD) were evaluated using the COPDGene 2 test object, containing 8 different materials of interest ranging from air to acrylic and including various density foams. A third-generation dual-source multidetector CT scanner (Siemens SOMATOM FORCE; Siemens Healthcare AG, Erlangen, Germany) running advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) software (Siemens Healthcare AG) was used.We used normal and very large body habitus rings at dose levels varying from 1.5 to 0.15 mGy using a spectral-shaped (0.6-mm Sn) tube output of 100 kV(p). Three CT scans were obtained at each dose level using both rings. Regions of interest for each material in the test object scans were automatically extracted. The Hounsfield unit values of each material using weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) at 1.5 mGy was used as the reference value to evaluate shifts in CT attenuation at lower dose levels using either WFBP or ADMIRE. Statistical analysis included basic statistics, Welch t tests, multivariable covariant model using the F test to assess the significance of the explanatory (independent) variables on the response (dependent) variable, and CT mean attenuation, in the multivariable covariant model including reconstruction method. Multivariable regression analysis of the mean CT attenuation values showed a significant difference with decreasing dose between ADMIRE and WFBP. The ADMIRE has reduced noise and more stable CT attenuation compared with WFBP. There was a strong effect on the mean CT attenuation values of the scanned materials for ring

  14. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin, irinotecan, and paclitaxel followed by high dose three-dimension conformal thoracic radiotherapy (74 Gy) with concurrent carboplatin, paclitaxel, and gefitinib in unresectable stage IIIA and stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Morris, David E; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Hayes, D Neil; Halle, Jan S; Rivera, M Patricia; Rosenman, Julian G; Socinski, Mark A

    2008-03-01

    Combined modality therapy is a standard therapy for patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gefitinib is active in advanced NSCLC, and in preclinical models, it potentiates the activity of radiation therapy. We investigate the tolerability of gefitinib in combined modality therapy in combination with three-dimensional thoracic conformal radiation therapy (3-dimensional TCRT). Stage III patients with a good performance status were treated with induction chemotherapy (carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] of 5, irinotecan 100 mg/m(2), and paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) days 1 and 22) with pegfilgrastim support followed by concurrent chemotherapy (carboplatin AUC 2, and paclitaxel 45 mg/m(2) weekly) and gefitinib 250 mg daily beginning on day 43 with 3-dimensional TCRT to 74 Gy. Between March 2004 and January 2006, 23 patients received treatment on the trial: median age 62 years (range 44-82), 52% female, 61% stage IIIA, 61% performance status 0, 17% > or =5% weight loss, and 91% underwent positron emission tomography staging. Induction chemotherapy with pegfilgrastim support was well tolerated and active (partial response rate, 24%; stable disease, 76%; and early progression, 0%). Twenty-one patients initiated the concurrent chemoradiation, and 20 patients completed therapy to 74 Gy. The primary toxicities of concurrent chemoradiation were grade 3 esophagitis (19.5%) and cardiac arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation) (9.5%). The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 9 months (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 7-13 months) and 16 months (95% CI: 10-20 months), respectively. Treatment with induction chemotherapy and gefitinib concurrent with 3-dimensional TCRT has an acceptable toxicity and tolerability, but the survival results were disappointing.

  15. Compressive laser ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  16. Implant R100 Predicts Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with IG-IMRT to 45 Gy and Pd-103 Implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, M.; Fuhrer, R.; Valakh, V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To define factors associated with rectal bleeding in patients treated with IG-IMRT followed by Pd-103 seed implant. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively reviewed 61 prostate adenocarcinoma patients from 2002 to 2008. The majority (85.2%) were of NCCN intermediate risk category. All received IG-IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles followed by Pd-103 implant delivering a mean D90 of 100.7 Gy. Six patients received 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes and 10 received androgen deprivation. Results. Ten patients (16.4%) developed rectal bleeding: 4 were CTCAE v.3 grade 1, 5 were grade 2, and 1 was grade 3. By univariate analysis, age, stage, Gleason sum, PSA, hormonal therapy, pelvic radiation, postoperative prostate volume, D9, V100, individual source activity, total implanted activity per cm 3 , and duration of interval before implant did not impact rectal bleeding. Implant R100 was higher in patients with rectal bleeding: on average, 0.885 versus 0.396 cm 3 ,(Ρ =0.02) , odds ratio of 2.26 per .5 cm 3 (95% CI, 1.16–4.82). A trend for significance was seen for prostate V200 and total implanted activity. Conclusion. Higher implant R100 was associated with development of rectal bleeding in patients receiving IG-IMRT to 45 Gy followed by Pd-103 implant. Minimizing implant R100 may reduce the rate of rectal bleeding in similar patients.

  17. 2, 4 and 6 kGy effect on the microbiological characteristics of chicken hamburgers stored at 2{+-}2 {sup o}C; Efecto de 2, 4 y 6 kGy sobre las caracteristicas microbiologicas de hamburguesa de pollo almacenadas a 2{+-}2{sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Z [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru); Basurto, H; Silva, M [Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Lima (Peru)

    2001-01-01

    Decimal reduction dose (D{sub 10}) of S. typhimurium irradiated in Casoy broth (TSB) and inoculated in chicken burger was found to be 0,425 and 0,547 kGy respectively being the second value 22,3 % higher than the first one. Then, chicken burger previously radiosterilized at 15 kGy was inoculated with S. typhimurium, irradiated at 2, 4 and 6 kGy and kept under storage for 57 days at 2{+-} 2 {sup o}C and HR 90 5%. Another batch of chicken burger without radiosterilization was irradiated at 2, 4 and 6 kGy and stored under the same conditions than the previous one in order to study the natural bacterial flora. It was observed that there is a synergic effect between irradiation dose and time of storage ({alpha}=5%) in the counting of S. typhimurium. In unirradiated chicken burger, the number of total coliforms increased from 29 NMP/g at the beginning to 4250 NMP/g at day 22 and fecal coliforms from 4 to 240 NMP/g; subsequently the number of these bacteria dropped again at the end of the storage time, while in irradiated samples no coliforms were found. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria diminished its ability of growing up and making colonies, proportionally to the applied irradiation doses. However, as the storage time advanced these bacteria recovered its ability to grow up and of cause spoilage. (authors)

  18. Weekly bi-fractionated 40 Gy three-dimensional conformational accelerated partial irradiation of breast: results of a phase II French pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgier, C.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Heymann, S.; Biron, B.; Delaloge, S.; Garbay, J.R.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourhis, J.; Taghian, A.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the first French experience of three-dimensional conformational and accelerated partial irradiation of breast. Twenty five patients have been concerned by this phase II trial. The prescribed total dose was 40 Gy, was delivered over 5 days in two daily fractions. Irradiation was performed with two 6 MV tangential mini-beams and a 6-22 MeV front electron beams. The planning target volume coverage was very good. Toxicity has been assessed. Healthy tissues (heart, lungs) are considerably protected. The acute and late toxicity is correct. Short communication

  19. Screening of radiation-induced genes in human lymphoblastoid cells irradiated with 20 cGy of γ-ray by gene chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huiping; Long Xianhui; Xu Qinzhi; Bai Bei; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2006-01-01

    cDNA gene chip was used to detect the transcriptional profile of human lymphoblasts cells irradiated with 20 cGy of 60 Co γ-ray. The microarray contains 14112 cDNA probing corresponding to 14112 human genes. The results showed that the transcription level of 83 genes changed; among which 21 genes were up-regulated. Most of them were associated with signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cellular immunity, cytoskeleton and movement, etc. It indicated that low-dose irradiation can modulate the expression of a series of functional genes, which is the primary molecular basis of cellular responses to radiation. (authors)

  20. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  1. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  2. Life stage, not climate change, explains observed tree range shifts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máliš, F.; Kopecký, Martin; Petřík, Petr; Vladovič, J.; Merganič, J.; Vida, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2016), s. 1904-1914 ISSN 1354-1013 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0267; GA ČR GPP505/10/P173 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278065 - LONGWOOD Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : elevational range shift * vegetation resurvey * temperate forests Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 8.502, year: 2016

  3. Wide-range neutron dose determination with CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneja, A.R.; Waker, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical density measurements of CR-30 irradiated with 252 Cf neutrons and chemically etched with 6.5 N KOH solution have been used to determine neutron absorbed doses between 0.1 and 10 Gy. Optimum etching conditions will depend upon the absorbed dose. Since it is not always possible to know the range of absorbed dose on a CR-39 dosemeter collected from personnel and area monitor stations in a criticality accident situation, a three-step two-hour chemical etch at 60 o C has been found to be appropriate. If after a total of six hours of chemical etching the optical density is found to be below 0.04 for 500 nm light (transmission > 90%) then further treatment in the form of electrochemical etching can be carried out to determine the lower absorbed dose. In this manner, absorbed doses below 0.1 Gy can be determined by counting tracks over a unit area. (author)

  4. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  5. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  6. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  7. Autonomous Target Ranging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz

    2003-01-01

    of this telescope, a fast determination of the range to and the motion of the detected targets are important. This is needed in order to prepare the future observation strategy for each target, i.e. when is the closest approach where imaging will be optimal. In order to quickly obtain such a determination two...... ranging strategies are presented. One is an improved laser ranger with an effective range with non-cooperative targets of at least 10,000 km, demonstrated in ground tests. The accuracy of the laser ranging will be approximately 1 m. The laser ranger may furthermore be used for trajectory determination...... of nano-gravity probes, which will perform direct mass measurements of selected targets. The other is triangulation from two spacecraft. For this method it is important to distinguish between detection and tracking range, which will be different for Bering since different instruments are used...

  8. Soliton microcomb range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-based range measurement systems are important in many application areas, including autonomous vehicles, robotics, manufacturing, formation flying of satellites, and basic science. Coherent laser ranging systems using dual-frequency combs provide an unprecedented combination of long range, high precision, and fast update rate. We report dual-comb distance measurement using chip-based soliton microcombs. A single pump laser was used to generate dual-frequency combs within a single microresonator as counterpropagating solitons. We demonstrated time-of-flight measurement with 200-nanometer precision at an averaging time of 500 milliseconds within a range ambiguity of 16 millimeters. Measurements at distances up to 25 meters with much lower precision were also performed. Our chip-based source is an important step toward miniature dual-comb laser ranging systems that are suitable for photonic integration.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation in a wide range of doses on the morphological characteristics of Lemna minor L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasskazova, M.M.; Berestina, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the morphological parameters of Lemna minor L. were studied. As the sensitive parameters were invited to use chlorosis and necrosis. Significant differences between samples begin to show after 14 days of observation. The presence of effect, irrespective of the dose in the range 0,1-30 Gy, shows the efficiency of a sufficiently small dose (0,1 Gy) was revealed.

  10. Assessment of the lower ESR dating range in Greek speleothems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiakos, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Pilot ESR dating studies on geologically young calcitic sinters were carried out, aiming at assessment of the lower ESR dating range in characteristic Greek speleoenvironments. Five stalactites were dated, coming from an ancient mining gallery, idle for the last 2,500 years, found on Siphnos island (Aegean). The calculated ages range between 1,7-2,0 ka. Medium to low measured external dose rates (aprox. 900 μGy/a) and very low measured radioelement concentration in samples are very usual in the Mediterranean environments. The study concludes that ESR dating of speleothems younger than two millenia is practically unattainable. Some geoarchaeological implications of the obtained ages are discussed. (author)

  11. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an open clinical study and pooled data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars; Skov, Lone; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thyroxine clearance in rats within the first month after the single whole-body {gamma} - irradiation at a dose of 10Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryadko, Kirill A. [Institute of Radiobiology, National Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of acute whole-body {gamma} -irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy on thyroxine (T{sub 4}) plasma clearance rate (PCR) and thyroidal and blood T4 concentration ([T{sub 4}]) were examined within one month after exposure. The PCR values were measured using the bolus injection, single-compartmental approach. To eliminate the influence of radiation-induced anorexia animals were fasting for two days before the pharmacokinetic experiments. Hormone concentrations in blood and in thyroid tissue were measured by RIA. Throughout the observation period, PCR was elevated in irradiated rats with maximum at day 4 after exposure (0.56{+-}0.04 vs. 0.36{+-}0.03 ml/h100 gbw, P<0.001). [T{sub 4}] in blood was not significantly different from that in control animals. Thyroidal [T{sub 4}] was significantly decreased in irradiated animals 4 days after exposure (151.8{+-}21.7 vs. 258.8{+-}29.9 pmol/mg protein, P<0.01) and gradually increased after day 9. 10 Gy {gamma} -irradiation causes the intensification of T{sub 4} metabolism without the pronounced changes in concentration. Presumably, at early terms the rising local demand in O{sub 4} can not be compensated with the existing level of production. Alterations in the intensity of T{sub 4} metabolism are evident at least one month after exposure but they may not be detected without taking into account kinetic data.

  13. Tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii irradiated with 255 Gy induces decrease of cysts and cerebral lesions in mice challenged with cysts of ME-49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Galisteo Juniorm Andres Jimenez; Nascimento, Nanci do; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2002-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis can cause ocular lesions in normal individuals and several diseases in foetus, HIV infection and transplants. Toxoplasma gondii has a complex life cycle, involving cats, as the definitive host, and warm blood species, as intermediated hosts. The infection occurs by ingestion of food and water contaminated with infected cat faeces, contaminated milk and cheese or raw and undercook meat of the intermediated hosts. To date, there is no commercial vaccine of use in humans. In this work, tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain were irradiated with 255 Gy and inoculated in C57Bl/6j mice (3 doses, biweekly), after mice were challenged with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 25 cysts of ME-49 by oral gavage. The lesions and cysts in the brain were analyzed in all mice, after 4-week post infection. The mortality was 20% in control mice (ME-49 cysts only) and not one in immunized mice. The number of cysts was high in the control group, but low in immunized 255 Gy mice (n<100). Immunized mice showed less cerebral pathology and necrosis foci. Ionizing radiation is an important tool in the study toxoplasmosis and vaccine development. (author)

  14. Effect of low-dose (1 kGy) gamma radiation and selected phosphates on the microflora of vacuum-packaged ground pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehioba, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of low-dose (1 kGy) gamma radiation and selected phosphates on the microbiology of refrigerated, vacuum-packaged ground pork were studied. Low-dose gamma radiation reduced the numbers of naturally occurring mesophiles, psychrotrophs, and anaerobes. The effect of low-dose radiation on the populations of lactic acid bacteria was minimal. On storage of the irradiated vacuum-packaged ground pork at 5 0 C, there was a partial bacterial recovery, suggesting sublethal bacterial injury due to irradiation. When 10 7 CFU/g of meat is taken to be the level beyond which the meat would be considered spoiled, uninoculated, vacuum-packaged ground pork treated with 1 kGy (100 krad) of gamma radiation had 3.5 more days of shelf-life in terms of psychrotrophic total counts. In relation to anaerobic bacterial numbers, meat shelf-life was extended 2.5 days, while the shelf-life of meat was extended 1 day in terms of aerobic mesophilic bacteria. Irradiation prolonged shelf-life in inoculated (10 5 CFU/g) meat for 1.0-1.5 days. Addition of 0.4% sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP) contributed 2 additional days to inoculated, irradiated vacuum-packaged ground pork shelf-life. However, SAPP had no added effect on naturally occurring microflora. Irradiation greatly decreased the numbers of gram-negative microorganisms, resulting in predominance of the gram-positive, nonsporeforming Lactobacillus and coryneform bacteria

  15. Prediction ranges. Annual review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.C.; Tharp, W.H.; Spiro, P.S.; Keng, K.; Angastiniotis, M.; Hachey, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    Prediction ranges equip the planner with one more tool for improved assessment of the outcome of a course of action. One of their major uses is in financial evaluations, where corporate policy requires the performance of uncertainty analysis for large projects. This report gives an overview of the uses of prediction ranges, with examples; and risks and uncertainties in growth, inflation, and interest and exchange rates. Prediction ranges and standard deviations of 80% and 50% probability are given for various economic indicators in Ontario, Canada, and the USA, as well as for foreign exchange rates and Ontario Hydro interest rates. An explanatory note on probability is also included. 23 tabs.

  16. Antenna Pattern Range (APR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheAntenna Pattern Range (APR)features a non-metallic arch with a trolley to move the transmit antenna from the horizon to zenith. At the center of the ground plane,...

  17. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  18. EV range sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostafew, C. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation included a sensitivity analysis of electric vehicle components on overall efficiency. The presentation provided an overview of drive cycles and discussed the major contributors to range in terms of rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; motor efficiency; and vehicle mass. Drive cycles that were presented included: New York City Cycle (NYCC); urban dynamometer drive cycle; and US06. A summary of the findings were presented for each of the major contributors. Rolling resistance was found to have a balanced effect on each drive cycle and proportional to range. In terms of aerodynamic drive, there was a large effect on US06 range. A large effect was also found on NYCC range in terms of motor efficiency and vehicle mass. figs.

  19. Unique in vitro and in vivo thrombopoietic activities of ingenol 3,20 dibenzoate, a Ca(++-independent protein kinase C isoform agonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick K Racke

    Full Text Available Thrombopoiesis following severe bone marrow injury frequently is delayed, thereby resulting in life-threatening thrombocytopenia for which there are limited treatment options. The reasons for these delays in recovery are not well understood. Protein kinase C (PKC agonists promote megakaryocyte differentiation in leukemia cell lines and primary cells. However, little is known about the megakaryopoietic effects of PKC agonists on primary CD34+ cells grown in culture or in vivo. Here we present evidence that the novel PKC isoform-selective agonist 3,20 ingenol dibenzoate (IDB potently stimulates early megakaryopoiesis of human CD34+ cells. In contrast, broad spectrum PKC agonists failed to do so. In vivo, a single intraperitoneal injection of IDB selectively increased platelets in mice without affecting hemoglobin or white counts. Finally, IDB strongly mitigated radiation-induced thrombocytopenia, even when administered 24 hours after irradiation. Our data demonstrate that novel PKC isoform agonists such as IDB may represent a unique therapeutic strategy for accelerating the recovery of platelet counts following severe marrow injury.

  20. Hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy of posteriorly located choroidal melanoma with five fractions at ten Gy – Clinical results after six years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Zehetmayer, Martin; Gleiss, Andreas; Geitzenauer, Wolfgang; Kircher, Karl; Georg, Dietmar; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Poetter, Richard; Dieckmann, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy with 5 five fractions at 10 Gy each in patients with centrally located choroidal melanoma. Materials and Methods: Ninety-one patients with centrally located choroidal melanoma were treated stereotactically at a linear accelerator with 6 MV photon beams with 5 fractions at 10 Gy each. Examinations were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and yearly thereafter. Median follow-up was 37.8 months (IQR 19.2–49.9). They included visual acuity assessment, routine ophthalmological examinations with fundoscopy, echography for measurement of tumor dimensions, medical examinations and, if necessary, fluorescein angiography. Results: Initial tumor base diameters, height and volume were 11.20 mm (IQR 9.10–13.70), 9.80 mm (IQR 7.80–11.70), 4.53 mm (IQR 3.33–6.43) and 253.8 mm 3 (IQR 127.5–477.0). Local tumor control and eye retention rates were 97.7% and 86.4% after 5 years, respectively. Eight patients developed metastatic disease and 3 of them died due to metastatic disease during the follow-up period. Median visual acuity decreased from 0.67 initially to 0.05 at the last individual follow-up (p < 0.001). The most common toxicities (any grade) were radiation retinopathy (n = 39), optic neuropathy (n = 32), radiogenic cataract (n = 21), neovascular glaucoma (n = 15) and dry eye syndrome (n = 10). The 5 year probabilities to remain free of these side effects (any grade) were 26.0%, 45.4%, 55.4%, 72.6% and 80.5%, respectively. The most important prognostic factors for toxicities were the largest tumor base diameter, tumor height and tumor distance to the optic disk. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy delivered in 5 fractions is a highly effective treatment option in patients with centrally located choroidal melanoma and has a moderate toxicity profile

  1. Repeated 0.5 Gy gamma-ray irradiation attenuates autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice with up-regulation of regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutoshi Tsukimoto; Fumitoshi Tago; Hiroko Nakatsukasa; Shuji Kojima

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. MRL-lpr/lpr mice present a single gene mutation on the Fas (CD95) gene that leads to reduced signaling for apoptosis. With aging, these mice spontaneously develop autoimmune disease and are used as a model of systemic lupus erythematosus. We previously reported attenuation of autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice by repeated γ-ray irradiation (0.5 Gy each time). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of this attenuation focusing the highly activated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, which are characteristically involved in autoimmune pathology in these mice. We measured the weight of the spleen and the population of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells. Splenomegaly and increase in percentage of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, which occur with aging in non-irradiated mice, were suppressed in irradiated mice. To investigate the function of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, we isolated these cells from splenocytes by magnetic cell sorting. Isolated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells were more resistant to irradiation-induced cell death than isolated CD4 + T cells. Although high proliferation rate and IL-6 production were observed in isolated CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells, the proliferation rate and IL-6 production were lower in the cells isolated from the irradiated mice. Moreover, the production of autoantibodies (anti-collagen antibody and anti-single strand DNA antibody) was also lowered by irradiation. These results indicate that activation of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - B220 + T cells and progression of pathology would be suppressed by repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation. To uncover the mechanism of the immune suppression, we analyzed population of regulatory T cells (CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + ), which suppress activated T cells and excessive autoimmune responses. Intriguingly, significant increase of the percentage of regulatory T cells was observed in irradiated mice. In conclusion, we found that repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation

  2. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    and several natural special cases thereof. The rst special case is known as range median, which arises when k is xed to b(j 􀀀 i + 1)=2c. The second case, denoted prex selection, arises when i is xed to 0. Finally, we also consider the bounded rank prex selection problem and the xed rank range......Range selection is the problem of preprocessing an input array A of n unique integers, such that given a query (i; j; k), one can report the k'th smallest integer in the subarray A[i];A[i+1]; : : : ;A[j]. In this paper we consider static data structures in the word-RAM for range selection...... selection problem. In the former, data structures must support prex selection queries under the assumption that k for some value n given at construction time, while in the latter, data structures must support range selection queries where k is xed beforehand for all queries. We prove cell probe lower bounds...

  3. Use of the gamma radiation, in a dose of 0,4 kGy, on the storage temperature reduction of the banana nanica;Utilizacao da radiacao gama, na dose de 0,4kGy, na reducao da temperatura de armazenamento da banana nanica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoel, Luciana, E-mail: luciana_manoel@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual Paulisa (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Energia na Agricultura; Vieites, Rogerio Lopes, E-mail: vieites@fca.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulisa (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Gestao e Tecnologia Agroindustrial

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the use of gamma radiation, in a dose of 0,4 kGy, on the storage temperature reduction of the banana 'Nanica'. The bananas 'Nanica' were harvested in the Arm Taperao, Brotas (SP) town, and sent to CBE (Companhia Brasileira de Esterilizacao-Cotia-SP) for irradiation and constitution of the following treatments: T1 (fruits irradiated at 0,4 kGy and stored at 16 +-1 deg C); T2 (fruits irradiated at 0,4 kGy and stored at 14 +-1 deg C); T3 (fruit irradiated ata 0,4 kGy and stored at 12+-1 deg C); T4 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 16+-1 deg C); T5 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 14+-1 deg C) and T6 (fruits non-irradiated and stored at 12+-1 deg C). The fruits were stored in B.O.Ds. of the Agroindustrial Management and Technology Department, with a relative humidity of 80+-5%. The experiment was divided in two groups: control group (post harvest conservation and disease incidence) and parcel group (soluble solids and pulp/peel). The analyses were performed in intervals of five days during a period of 25 days. The experimental design employed was completely randomized (DIC) by applying a factor of 2 x 3 x 6 (irradiation x temperature x time). The Tukey test with 5% of probability was used for comparison between means. The storage temperature of the bananas 'Nanica' was not reduce by irradiation. (author)

  4. The freezing and thawing of water in poultry meat and vegetables irradiated by electrons at doses of 0.1-4 kGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubini, B.; Montecchia, F.; Ponzi-Bossi, M.G.; Messina, G.

    1993-01-01

    Poultry meat and some vegetables, irradiated by 5 MeV electrons (0.1-4 kGy), were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry, from 24 h after irradiation. The temperature and enthalpy transitions of the water contained in the irradiated samples were measured and compared with those of unirradiated samples. The authors analysed 18 meat and 10 vegetable samples for each irradiation dose together with a similar number of unirradiated controls. The mean supercooling temperatures of water in the irradiated poultry meat samples and in some vegetables are significantly lower than those of controls. Moreover, the freezing enthalpies of the irradiated poultry breast are significantly lower than those of controls, while they are unchanged in the other cases. The mean ice melting temperatures and enthalpies are similar for all samples. The amount of the lowering of the water-ice transition depends on the nature of the sample and is highest in poultry breast and lowest in vegetables. (author)

  5. Inactivation of contaminated fungi and antioxidant effects of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch cv Dangeumdo) by 0.5-2 kGy gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Mi-Seon [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong-Gi [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yook, Hong-Sun, E-mail: yhsuny@naver.co [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of gamma irradiation (0.5-2 kGy) on the physicochemical properties of peaches was investigated during a 6-day storage at 20+-3 deg. C. Gamma irradiation is able to inactivate the four pathogens, namely Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, Rhizopus stolonifer var. stolonifer and Monilinia fructicola in peaches. Hardness significantly decreased with the increment of irradiation dose level whereas soluble solid and total polyphenol contents increased with increment of irradiation dose level. 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity of the irradiated peach was higher than that of control, and its activity increased with increment of irradiation dose level. These results suggest that gamma irradiation of peaches improved antioxidant activity, but dramatically affects the hardness throughout the entire storage time.

  6. Effects of 0.5 - 2 Gy gamma-rays on physical activities and intellectual behavior in dogs and influence of physical exertion on clinical manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingxi; Li Chunhai; Jin Cuizhen

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of 88 pre-radiation and 433 post-radiation determinations demonstrated that 0.5∼2.0 Gy gamma irradiated police dogs could keep a good condition in physical performances such as 100-metre dash with or without load and 1.5∼5 km long-distance running with a load of 1/5 body weight. No detectable change could be found in intellectual behavior including performances in response to vocal or gestural command, discrimination of metronomic frequencies, differentiation between handkerchiefs from different persons, trailing, guarding and memory in any one of these dogs. As compared with 6 police dogs and 3 mongrel dogs kept at rest after irradiation, 7 police dogs and 3 mongrel dogs and 3 mongrel dogs undergoing above mentioned physical exertion showed fewer and milder symptoms and higher white

  7. Marguerite Duras/Claude Régy: L’Amante Anglaise, the genesis of a text, the gestation of a theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almuth Grésillon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the genesis of the first staging of Margerite Duras’s L’Amante Anglaise, by Claude Régy, a well succeeded genesis, carried out based on the interplay between dramaturgy and the stage. Without any satisfying answer, we are facing an important theoretical issue of genetic criticism applied to theatre: is the work a dramatic text or a spectacle? Depending on the stress on the first or on the second answer, the organizing axis of the genetic dossier can be the author’s writing and all stagings of L’Amante Anglaise,forming a theoretically unified set; or the director’s notes and all of his creations. This study explores a third possibility, stipulating the indispensable intersection between both hypotheses.

  8. Inactivation of contaminated fungi and antioxidant effects of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch cv Dangeumdo) by 0.5-2 kGy gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Mi-Seon; Kim, Hong-Gi; Yook, Hong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation (0.5-2 kGy) on the physicochemical properties of peaches was investigated during a 6-day storage at 20±3 deg. C. Gamma irradiation is able to inactivate the four pathogens, namely Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, Rhizopus stolonifer var. stolonifer and Monilinia fructicola in peaches. Hardness significantly decreased with the increment of irradiation dose level whereas soluble solid and total polyphenol contents increased with increment of irradiation dose level. 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity of the irradiated peach was higher than that of control, and its activity increased with increment of irradiation dose level. These results suggest that gamma irradiation of peaches improved antioxidant activity, but dramatically affects the hardness throughout the entire storage time.

  9. Total body 100-mGy X-irradiation does not induce Alzheimer's disease-like pathogenesis or memory impairment in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ji, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The cause and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are poorly understood. Possible cognitive and behavioral consequences induced by low-dose radiation are important because humans are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Early transcriptional response in murine brain to low-dose X-rays (100 mGy) has been reported, suggesting alterations of molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and AD. To investigate acute and late transcriptional, pathological and cognitive consequences of low-dose radiation, we applied an acute dose of 100-mGy total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays to C57BL/6J Jms mice. We collected hippocampi and analyzed expression of 84 AD-related genes. Mouse learning ability and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze test. We performed in vivo PET scans with 11 C-PIB, a radiolabeled ligand for amyloid imaging, to detect fibrillary amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) accumulation, and examined characteristic AD pathologies with immunohistochemical staining of amyloid precursor protein (APP), Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). mRNA studies showed significant downregulation of only two of 84 AD-related genes, Apbb1 and Lrp1, at 4 h after irradiation, and of only one gene, Il1α, at 1 year after irradiation. Spatial learning ability and memory were not significantly affected at 1 or 2 years after irradiation. No induction of amyloid fibrillogenesis or changes in APP, Aβ, tau, or p-tau expression was detected at 4 months or 2 years after irradiation. TBI induced early or late transcriptional alteration in only a few AD-related genes but did not significantly affect spatial learning, memory or AD-like pathological change in mice. (author)

  10. The use of discriminant analysis for evaluation of early-response multiple biomarkers of radiation exposure using non-human primate 6-Gy whole-body radiation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossetrova, N.I. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil; Farese, A.M.; MacVittie, T.J. [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Bressler Research Building, Room 7-039, University of Maryland-Baltimore, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Manglapus, G.L.; Blakely, W.F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The present need to rapidly identify severely irradiated individuals in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios prompted an evaluation of potential protein biomarkers to provide early diagnostic information after exposure. The level of specific proteins measured using immunodiagnostic technologies may be useful as protein biomarkers to provide early diagnostic information for acute radiation exposures. Herein we present results from on-going studies using a non-human primate (NHP) 6-Gy X-rays ( 0.13Gymin{sup -1}) whole-body radiation model. Protein targets were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in blood plasma before, 1, and 2 days after exposure. Exposure of 10 NHPs to 6 Gy resulted in the up-regulation of plasma levels of (a) p21 WAF1/CIP1, (b) interleukin 6 (IL-6), (c) tissue enzyme salivary {alpha}-amylase, and (d) C-reactive protein. Data presented show the potential utility of protein biomarkers selected from distinctly different pathways to detect radiation exposure. A correlation analysis demonstrated strong correlations among different combinations of four candidate radiation-responsive blood protein biomarkers. Data analyzed with use of multivariate discriminant analysis established very successful separation of NHP groups: 100% discrimination power for animals with correct classification for separation between groups before and 1 day after irradiation, and 95% discrimination power for separation between groups before and 2 days after irradiation. These results also demonstrate proof-in-concept that multiple protein biomarkers provide early diagnostic information to the medical community, along with classical biodosimetric methodologies, to effectively manage radiation casualty incidents.

  11. Role of 10-Gy boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery for stage I-II breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, Masafumi; Uchida, Nobue; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    According to the Guidelines for breast-conserving therapy of the Japanese Breast Cancer Society, the surgical margin is ''negative'' when the minimum distance between the tumor edge and the margin of the resected specimen is more than 5 mm. The value of boost radiation for early breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin remains unclear. A total of 137 patients with stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery between July 1987 and August 2002. All of the patients had negative margins according to the Japanese guidelines. Their median age was 50 years and the median follow-up period was 62 months. The entire ipsilateral breast was irradiated to a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions). Then an additional 10 Gy (5 fractions) was given to 79 patients, using 6- to 12-MeV electrons (boost group), while 58 patients (no-boost group) received no further radiation. Factors influencing local recurrence were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. For the entire population, the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence rates were 96.0%, 96.8%, 94.2%, and 1.67%, respectively. Boost radiation reduced local recurrence, but the improvement was not significant (P=0.070). Univariate and multivariate analyses failed to detect any factors that were significantly associated with local control. There were no severe complications in either group and there were no differences between the groups in the cosmetic outcome. Boost radiation can be performed for stage I-II breast cancer with negative margins (Japanese guidelines), and showed a tendency to decrease local recurrence. A large randomized controlled study is necessary to establish final conclusions. (author)

  12. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L; Migrino, Raymond Q; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E; Baker, John E

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20-120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  13. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  14. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...

  15. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...

  16. Range-clustering queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamsen, M.; de Berg, M.T.; Buchin, K.A.; Mehr, M.; Mehrabi, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    In a geometric k -clustering problem the goal is to partition a set of points in R d into k subsets such that a certain cost function of the clustering is minimized. We present data structures for orthogonal range-clustering queries on a point set S : given a query box Q and an integer k>2 , compute

  17. Determination of dose ranges of gamma rays to induce specific changes in three ornamental species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez J, J.

    2011-11-01

    In order to confirming the possibility of to settle a dose range that takes place directly and not at random, a specific effect independently of the species that is were produced several similar organisms to three ornamental species took place via meristems cultivation: Petunia hybrid, Impatiens walleriana and Sprekelia formosissima, same that were irradiated in an irradiator Gamma cell 220, to different dose: 0, 3.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5 and 20 Gy. Later on, of the plants treated via in vitro the subsequent generations were obtained until the M 4 . To determine the DL 50 and the possible good doses, the survival parameters, development, morphogenesis and height were evaluated during 8 weeks, interpreting based on them, the possible physiologic and genetic alterations induced by the radiation. The established DL 50 were: 7.5 Gy (Petunia), 19.0 Gy (Impatiens) and 12.0 Gy (Sprekelia). Based on the DL 50 of each species, a range of coincident dose settled down that produces a similar effect in the three species: a range of DL 23 to the DL 50 induces and alteration in the cytokinins production affecting directly in the leaves number, buds and plants taken place by meristem, also a range of DL 32 - DL 50 impacts in the auxins production altering to the radicule system. However, when being superimposed the dose is considered that the investigation should continue. (Author)

  18. Extended Range Intercept Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    1988). Desert bighorn ewes with lambs show a stronger response than do groups of only rams, only ewes, or mixed groups of adults (Miller and Smith...1985). While all startle events may affect desert bighorns, those occurring during the lambing period (February-April) would represent the highest...35807 U.S. Army Pueblo Depot Activity SDSTE-PU-EE Pueblo, CO 81001-5000 U.S. Army White Sands Missile Range STEWS -EL-N White Sands, NM 88002-5076

  19. ORANGE: RANGE OF BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Parle Milind; Chaturvedi Dev

    2012-01-01

    No wonder that oranges are one of the most popular fruits in the world. Orange (citrus sinensis) is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties throughout the world. From times immemorial, whole Orange plant including ripe and unripe fruits, juice, orange peels, leaves and flowers are used as a traditional medicine. Citrus sinensis belongs to the family Rutaceae. The fruit is a fleshy, indehiscent, berry that ranges widely in size from 4 cm to 12 cm. The major medicinal proper...

  20. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  1. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  2. Long-range antigravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession. (orig.)

  3. Dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy leads to an increase in pain relief for spinal metastases: a comparison study with a regimen of 30 Gy in 10 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlan; Xiao, Jianghong; Peng, Xingchen; Duan, Baofeng; Li, Yan; Ai, Ping; Yao, Min; Chen, Nianyong

    2017-12-22

    Under the existing condition that the optimum radiotherapy regimen for spinal metastases is controversial, this study investigates the benefits of dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) with 60-66 Gy in 20-30 fractions for spinal metastases. In the dose-escalation group, each D50 of planning gross tumor volume (PGTV) was above 60 Gy and each Dmax of spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) was below 48 Gy. The median biological effective dose (BED) of Dmax of spinal cord was lower in the dose-escalation group compared with that in the 30-Gy group (69.70 Gy vs. 83.16 Gy, p pain responses were better in the dose-escalation group than those in the 30-Gy group ( p = 0.005 and p = 0.024), and the complete pain relief rates were respectively 73.69% and 34.29% ( p = 0.006), 73.69% and 41.38% ( p = 0.028) in two compared groups. In the dose-escalation group, there is a trend of a longer duration of pain relief, a longer overall survival and a lower incidence of acute radiation toxicities. No late radiation toxicities were observed in both groups. Dosimetric parameters and clinical outcomes, including pain response, duration of pain relief, radiation toxicities and overall survival, were compared among twenty-five metastatic spinal lesions irradiated with the dose-escalation regimen and among forty-four lesions treated with the 30-Gy regimen. Conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT for spinal metastases could escalate dose to the vertebral lesions while sparing the spinal cord, achieving a better pain relief without increasing radiation complications.

  4. Range Process Simulation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  5. Calculation of projected ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, J.P.

    1980-09-01

    The concept of multiple scattering is reconsidered for obtaining the directional spreading of ion motion as a function of energy loss. From this the mean projection of each pathlength element of the ion trajectory is derived which - upon summation or integration - leads to the desired mean projected range. In special cases, the calculation can be carried out analytically, otherwise a simple general algorithm is derived which is suitable even for the smallest programmable calculators. Necessary input for the present treatment consists only of generally accessable stopping power and straggling formulas. The procedure does not rely on scattering cross sections, e.g. power potential or f(t 1 sup(/) 2 ) approximations. The present approach lends itself easily to include electronic straggling or to treat composed target materials, or even to account for the so-called time integral. (orig.)

  6. Hematopoietic effects of early and long terms of rhG-CSF in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yuwen; Mao Bingzhi; Luo Qingliang; Dong Bo; Chen Huipeng

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate the long-term protective effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on hematopoiesis after a second irradiation, different doses of rhG-CSF were given to 6.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiated C 57 BL/6 mice. When the peripheral blood cells recovered to normal level, the survived mice were exposed to a second dose of radiation exactly the same as the first one. It was showed that peripheral WBC, RBC and platelet counts recovered much quicker in the mice treated with the factor after irradiation and the effect was dependent on the dose of rhG-CSF. In the survived mice exposed to a second dose of γ-rays 45 days after the first irradiation, as compared with the control, the recovery of peripheral blood cell counts was evidently accelerated and the survival rate was markedly elevated. These results not only demonstrate that the recovery of hematopoiesis in the irradiated mice could be accelerated after the administration of rhG-CSF but also suggest that early administration of the factor could produce a long-term protective effect on the hematopoietic function against a second irradiation given 45 days later

  7. Evaluation of apoptosis and apoptosis proteins as possible markers of radiation at doses 0.1-2 Gy, in comparison to the micronucleus assay in three cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.; Angelis, P. de

    1997-01-01

    In recent years the interest in apoptosis as possible indicator of radiation damage has increased. Studies have been done to examine the induction of apoptosis after ionizing radiation using morphological criteria, characteristic DNA damage pattern(ladders), early DNA damage using flow cytometry and/or expression of the proteins involved in apoptosis. But the picture which emerges from these investigations is unclear. Some researchers suggest that apoptosis studies can be used as potential assays of biological dosimetry, others doubt if apoptosis can be used as a marker of irradiation at all. Most studies have been done using relatively high doses of radiation. In this study we focus on apoptosis induction after relatively small doses (0,1-2 Gy). We detected apoptosis with the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay by flow cytometry, and measured the expression of proteins that regulate apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, P53) with Western blotting. As comparison we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay as a reference. The studies were carried out in three lymphoid cell lines: the mouse lymphoma L5178Y resistant and sensitive cell lines widely used in radiobiological studies, and the human pre-B cell leukemia Reh cells. Our results indicate that we can not consider the examined parameters of apoptosis as markers of radiation in these cell lines. (author)

  8. Influence of SNP Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes on the Level of Persistent Damage in Human Lymphocytes After Exposure to 2 Gy of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, M.; Rozgaj, R.; Kasuba, V.; Kubelka, D.; Angelini, S.; Hrelia, P.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in cell response to ionising radiation could be result of changes in gene expression and/or polymorphisms of DNA repair genes. The aim of the study was to estimate the DNA damage level in human lymphocytes after exposure to 2 Gy of ionising radiation. Medical workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionising radiation (N = 20) and matched controls (N 20) were genotyped for polymorphic hOGG1, XRCC1, APE1, XPD10, XPD23, XRCC3, PARP1 and MGMT genes. Micronucleus (MN) test was used for the estimation of DNA damage before and after radiation. Incidence of MN in irradiated samples positively correlated with age and negatively with polymorphic variants of XPD23. Significant difference was observed between irradiated homozygotes (HO) and heterozygotes (HE). HO and HE APE1 differed in MN before exposure. HO and polymorphic variants of XPD10 differed in MN after exposure. Gender showed different MN in the exposed group after exposure. Age correlated positively with MN after exposure, working probation and received dose. Multiple regression analysis revealed connection between polymorphic variants of APE1 and XRCC3 with MN before exposure. These results confirm the value of micronucleus assay in DNA damage estimation and suggest possible use of polymorphic genes in monitoring of individuals professionaly exposed to ionising radiation. (author)

  9. Sensitivity difference between anterior and posterior lobes of rat cerebellum to prenatal exposure to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation. A histological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.M.; Inouye, Minoru

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the histological differences in abnormality between anterior lobes (vermian lobules II, III and culmen IV, V) and posterior lobes (lobules IX, X) of the rat cerebellum following prenatal exposure to X-irradiation. Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation at gestation day-21 (GD-21), and pups were sacrificed from birth through 15 days of age. Their cerebella were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for glial fibrillary acidic protein in Bergmann fibers. Extensive cell death was found in the external granular layer (EGL) of the cerebellum on the day of birth. In the anterior lobes, the number of cell deaths was higher than in the posterior lobes. During 5 days after birth, the recovery of EGL was earlier in the posterior lobes than in the anterior lobes. Seven days after birth, Bergmann fibers were more irregular in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The number of Purkinje cells in ectopic locations was higher in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The EGL and migrating Purkinje cells showed different responses to X-irradiation in the anterior than in the posterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  10. Magnetoresistance properties of Fe0,2C0,8 composite materials pre and post gamma irradiated at 250 kGy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunasfi; Setyo Purwanto; Wisnu A A

    2009-01-01

    Research about change of, magnetoresistance properties of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite materials pre and post gamma irradiation at a dose of 250 kGy was carried out. Fe 0,2 C 0,8 was prepared by mixing of Fe and C powder with the ratio of Fe : C set on 20:80 in weight %. In this research, the phase structure and magnetic properties of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite materials after 250 KGy dose of gamma irradiation have been measured and analyzed. The phase structure of Fe 0,2 C 0,8 was analyzed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), whole the magnetoresistance properties was characterized using Four Point Probe method. The analyzing results showed the decreasing of X-ray diffraction peak intensity, but also in the same time showed the increasing of magnetoresistance properties after gamma irradiation. The enhancement of magnetoresistance value reached 5 times at 7,5 kOe magnetic field. This enhancement was caused due to structure defect within Fe 0,2 C 0,8 composite initiated by interaction between radiation of gamma ray and composite materials that further causes a change of magnetic interaction intensity in this materials. (author)

  11. Tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii irradiated with 255 Gy induces decrease of cysts and cerebral lesions in mice challenged with cysts of ME-49; Taquizoitos de Toxoplasma gondii irradiados com 255 Gy induzem diminuicao de cistos e lesoes cerebrais em camundongos desafiados com cistos da cepa ME-49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Galisteo Juniorm Andres Jimenez; Nascimento, Nanci do; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mail: rmhiramoto@bol.com.br; hfandrad@usp.br

    2002-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis can cause ocular lesions in normal individuals and several diseases in foetus, HIV infection and transplants. Toxoplasma gondii has a complex life cycle, involving cats, as the definitive host, and warm blood species, as intermediated hosts. The infection occurs by ingestion of food and water contaminated with infected cat faeces, contaminated milk and cheese or raw and undercook meat of the intermediated hosts. To date, there is no commercial vaccine of use in humans. In this work, tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain were irradiated with 255 Gy and inoculated in C57Bl/6j mice (3 doses, biweekly), after mice were challenged with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 25 cysts of ME-49 by oral gavage. The lesions and cysts in the brain were analyzed in all mice, after 4-week post infection. The mortality was 20% in control mice (ME-49 cysts only) and not one in immunized mice. The number of cysts was high in the control group, but low in immunized 255 Gy mice (n<100). Immunized mice showed less cerebral pathology and necrosis foci. Ionizing radiation is an important tool in the study toxoplasmosis and vaccine development. (author)

  12. A case of cardiac cancer diagnosed after 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma without helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Akamatsu, Taiji; Shinji, Akihiro

    2005-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was referred to Shinshu University Hospital in April 2001 for treatment of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. He had received anti-biotic therapy in spite of no evidence of H. pylori infection in the former hospital 3 years ago, but no remarkable improvement was recognized and endoscopic findings were progressive. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed mucosal redness on the greater curvature and the anterior wall of the body. Biopsy specimens taken from the lesions showed remarkable infiltration of atypical small lymphocytes, and this lesions were diagnosed MALT lymphoma by an immunophenotypic studies. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed that MALT lymphoma was limited within the mucosa and submucosa. Staging work up revealed stage I. After written informed consent, he was treated by 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric MALT lymphoma. Response assessment was performed by EGD, EUS, and biopsy specimens, and a complete remission was confirmed. After that, he was followed up with regular intervals, and EGD was performed every 6 months. He was diagnosed to have O I type cardiac cancer at 21 months after radiation therapy. He underwent proximal partial gastrectomy, and histopathological findings showed as follows: O I type, 17 x 12 mm, tub 2, SM, ly 1, v 1, n 0, PM (-), DM (-), INFγ, stage I A. No residual lesion of gastric MALT lymphoma and no dysplasia of gastric mucosa was recognized. Causal relationship between radiation therapy and carcinogenesis in this case is unclear. However, it might be suggested by the facts that cancer occurred in the radiation field where MALT lymphoma had been presented and gastric cancer was rare in the stomach without H. pylori infection. (author)

  13. 255Gy irradiated tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii induce intestinal immune response in C57BL/6J immunized by oral route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Alves, Janaina Baptista [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mail: galisteo@usp.br; Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Parasitoses Sistemicas]. E-mail: hiramoto@usp.br; Carmo, Claudia Villano do; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de [Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Protozoologia]. E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a prevalent widespread infection in man and animals, occurs mainly through ingestion of water and food contaminated with oocyst from cat feces, causing usually benign disease in humans, except in intrauterine fetal infection or in immunodeficient patients. We study the oral route for the development of a vaccine for toxoplasmosis, using parasites irradiated with 60 Cobalt, as an alternative for vaccine development to this worldwide parasitic infection. We evaluated the development of immunity at serum or mucosal levels, and their efficiency in protect the mice against challenge with oral cysts of the ME-49 strain. C57Bl/6j isogenic mice were immunized by oral route with 10{sup 7} 255 Gy irradiated tachyzoites from RH strain, at several protocols using milk as anti-peptic adjuvant and alum hydroxide as antacid. The preparations of irradiated tachyzoites induced production of serum IgG and IgA in immunized mice, as determined by ELISA, with IgG2a as the dominant subclass, similar to chronic infection. Their use with adjuvant allowed the excretion of significant amounts of IgA in stools also IgG, despite a lesser extent. All oral preparations induced some quantitative protection against challenge, which was similar to the parenteral route only isolated alum hydroxide was used as adjuvant. All these data support the possibility of the development of an oral vaccine against toxoplasmosis, using irradiated tachyzoites, which would be possible tool in near future for use in field baits, for immunizing either domestic or wild felids. (author)

  14. 255Gy irradiated tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii induce intestinal immune response in C57BL/6J immunized by oral route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Alves, Janaina Baptista; Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Carmo, Claudia Villano do; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2005-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a prevalent widespread infection in man and animals, occurs mainly through ingestion of water and food contaminated with oocyst from cat feces, causing usually benign disease in humans, except in intrauterine fetal infection or in immunodeficient patients. We study the oral route for the development of a vaccine for toxoplasmosis, using parasites irradiated with 60 Cobalt, as an alternative for vaccine development to this worldwide parasitic infection. We evaluated the development of immunity at serum or mucosal levels, and their efficiency in protect the mice against challenge with oral cysts of the ME-49 strain. C57Bl/6j isogenic mice were immunized by oral route with 10 7 255 Gy irradiated tachyzoites from RH strain, at several protocols using milk as anti-peptic adjuvant and alum hydroxide as antacid. The preparations of irradiated tachyzoites induced production of serum IgG and IgA in immunized mice, as determined by ELISA, with IgG2a as the dominant subclass, similar to chronic infection. Their use with adjuvant allowed the excretion of significant amounts of IgA in stools also IgG, despite a lesser extent. All oral preparations induced some quantitative protection against challenge, which was similar to the parenteral route only isolated alum hydroxide was used as adjuvant. All these data support the possibility of the development of an oral vaccine against toxoplasmosis, using irradiated tachyzoites, which would be possible tool in near future for use in field baits, for immunizing either domestic or wild felids. (author)

  15. Long range trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P. W.; Jessup, E. A.; White, R. E. [Air Resources Field Research Office, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    1967-07-01

    A single air molecule can have a trajectory that can be described with a line, but most meteorologists use single lines to represent the trajectories of air parcels. A single line trajectory has the disadvantage that it is a categorical description of position. Like categorized forecasts it provides no qualification, and no provision for dispersion in case the parcel contains two or more molecules which may take vastly different paths. Diffusion technology has amply demonstrated that an initial aerosol cloud or volume of gas in the atmosphere not only grows larger, but sometimes divides into puffs, each having a different path or swath. Yet, the average meteorologist, faced with the problem of predicting the future motion of a cloud, usually falls back on the line trajectory approach with the explanation that he had no better tool for long range application. In his more rational moments, he may use some arbitrary device to spread his cloud with distance. One such technique has been to separate the trajectory into two or more trajectories, spaced about the endpoint of the original trajectory after a short period of travel, repeating this every so often like a chain reaction. This has the obvious disadvantage of involving a large amount of labor without much assurance of improved accuracy. Another approach is to draw a circle about the trajectory endpoint, to represent either diffusion or error. The problem then is to know what radius to give the circle and also whether to call it diffusion or error. Meteorologists at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are asked frequently to provide advice which involves trajectory technology, such as prediction of an aerosol cloud path, reconstruction of the motion of a volume of air, indication of the dilution, and the possible trajectory prediction error over great distances. Therefore, we set out, nearly three years ago, to provide some statistical knowledge about the status of our trajectory technology. This report contains some of the

  16. Cultural Identity Crisis inside Self-Same Culture as Reflected in György Lőrincz’s Novel Sounds of the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Erzsébet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available After the decisive historical moment of December 1989, the “border” is open for Transylvanian Hungarians and, in the subsequent euphoria, an exodus to the mother country commences. But with the political freedom of crossing national borders, due to globalization (too, new kinds of border problems present themselves for the youth leaving their native land: border issues of small versus large community, of interpersonal relations; the gap between generations; borders between majority versus minority identity and national versus cultural identity as well. This paper is a literary analysis with special focus on contemporary social phenomena, which will examine - through discussing a relevant contemporary Székely-Hungarian novel - how cultural identity can be deformed, damaged, or at least temporarily distorted when a Hungarian from beyond the border, who arrives in mother-country Hungary, will have to redefine herself/himself within a culture which, in this case, is basically one and the same.1 Can the identity-code, which was formed by, and grew strong in, the minority existence of the native land, function when s/he enters a cultural vacuum which turns out or can turn out to be another cultural maze for her or him? Can we talk about assimilation in such cases? What happens when a “rebellious” young individual’s “I” identity, unsteady in the first place, is left without the conserving and protective “We” identity in the confrontation of mother-nation versus beyond-the-border cultures so that, eventually, the young woman’s “I” identity will be damaged by big-city underworld (subculture. Or, will cultural mimicry emerge in this situation too as a strategy to help the individual retain his/her identity? We will seek answers to these questions through discussing a novel - A szív hangjai [Sounds of the Heart] - by a fine representative of contemporary Székely-Hungarian literature, György Lőrincz.

  17. The Hadean upper mantle conundrum: evidence for source depletion and enrichment from Sm-Nd, Re-Os, and Pb isotopic compositions in 3.71 Gy boninite-like metabasalts from the Isua Supracrustal Belt, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Polat, Ali; Meibom, Anders

    2004-04-01

    Here we present Sm-Nd, Re-Os, and Pb isotopic data of carefully screened, least altered samples of boninite-like metabasalts from the Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB, W Greenland)that characterize their mantle source at the time of their formation. The principal observations of this study are that by 3.7-3.8 Ga melt source regions existed in the upper mantle with complicated enrichment/depletion histories. Sm-Nd isotopic data define a correlation line with a slope corresponding to an age of 3.69 ± 0.18 Gy and an initial εNd value of +2.0 ± 4.7. This Sm-Nd age is consistent with indirect (but more precise) U-Pb geochronological estimates for their formation between 3.69-3.71 Ga. Relying on the maximum formation age of 3.71 Gy defined by the external age constraints, we calculate an average εNd [T = 3.71 Ga] value of +2.2 ± 0.9 (n = 18, 1σ) for these samples, which is indicative of a strongly depleted mantle source. This is consistent with the high Os concentrations, falling in the range between 1.9-3.4 ppb, which is similar to the estimated Os concentration for the primitive upper mantle. Re-Os isotopic data (excluding three outliers) yield an isochron defining an age of 3.76 ± 0.09 Gy (with an initial γOs value of 3.9 ± 1.2), within error consistent with the Sm-Nd age and the indirect U-Pb age estimates. An average initial γOs [T = 3.71 Ga] value of + 4.4 ± 1.2 (n = 8; 2σ) is indicative of enrichment of their source region during, or prior to, its melting. Thus, this study provides the first observation of an early Archean upper mantle domain with a distinctly radiogenic Os isotopic signature. This requires a mixing component characterized by time-integrated suprachondritic Re/Os evolution and a Os concentration high enough to strongly affect the Os budget of the mantle source; modern sediments, recycled basaltic crust, or the outer core do not constitute suitable candidates. At this point, the nature of the mantle or crustal component responsible for the

  18. Super-ranging. A new ranging strategy in European badgers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoibheann Gaughran

    Full Text Available We monitored the ranging of a wild European badger (Meles meles population over 7 years using GPS tracking collars. Badger range sizes varied seasonally and reached their maximum in June, July and August. We analysed the summer ranging behaviour, using 83 home range estimates from 48 individuals over 6974 collar-nights. We found that while most adult badgers (males and females remained within their own traditional social group boundaries, several male badgers (on average 22% regularly ranged beyond these traditional boundaries. These adult males frequently ranged throughout two (or more social group's traditional territories and had extremely large home ranges. We therefore refer to them as super-rangers. While ranging across traditional boundaries has been recorded over short periods of time for extraterritorial mating and foraging forays, or for pre-dispersal exploration, the animals in this study maintained their super-ranges from 2 to 36 months. This study represents the first time such long-term extra-territorial ranging has been described for European badgers. Holding a super-range may confer an advantage in access to breeding females, but could also affect local interaction networks. In Ireland & the UK, badgers act as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (TB. Super-ranging may facilitate the spread of disease by increasing both direct interactions between conspecifics, particularly across social groups, and indirect interactions with cattle in their shared environment. Understanding super-ranging behaviour may both improve our understanding of tuberculosis epidemiology and inform future control strategies.

  19. Properties of Wide-dose-range GafChromic Films for Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2007-01-01

    GafChromic films have been used at SPring-8 to detect the intensively irradiated parts and protect them from damage by being covered with shield or moved. To extend the usable dose range more widely, a new type of sensitive film EBT was investigated for the introduction. Calibration curves were obtained irradiated with 60Co γ rays and compared with those of other GafChromic films. For the application, these films were set in the white x-ray hutch and the dose distribution was measured. Ratio of doses given by EBT and XT-R indicated the degree of the photon spectrum hardness, which depended on the positions. As a result, dose range from 50 mGy to 300 kGy became available for dose distribution measurements, and a set of films having different energy responses was found to give information of photon spectra

  20. Study of microbiological, physico-chemical and biochemical a fourth range salad irradiated for people immunosuppressed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayadi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in this work to immunocompromised patients in the National Transplant Center Bone Marrow of Tunis, that's why a raw salad IV range was irradiated and chosen as auxiliary dish. Following a series of microbiological analysis carried out on samples treated with different doses : 0 (control) , 1, 2 , 3, 3.5 and 4 kGy. 4 kGy dose was the most suitable for this type of dish ensuring good bacterial quality below the limits prescribed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for 9 days of refrigerated storage. The physico-chemical and biochemical parameters showed no significant effect on the gamma radiation on nutrients such as proteins , trace elements and vitamin E. The raw salads IV range perfectly packaged and irradiated can be a good way to stimulate the immune system in immunocompromised patients and improve their health.

  1. Rock glaciers, Zailiysiky Range, Kungei Ranges, Tienshan, Kazakhstan, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Zailiyskiy Alatau is the northernmost parallel latitudinal ranges of the Northern Tien Shan. The highest point of this range is the Talgar peak (4973 m a.s.l.)....

  2. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  3. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Meungwong, Pooriwat; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale ≥ grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with ≥ grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  4. PeoplePersonality: Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream Teaching Anecdotes: Annie Jump Cannon Obituary: György Marx 1927-2002 Starting Out: What Katie did next: part 3 Opinions: What is really important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education PERSONALITY (156) Chris Clarke - a physicist who studies ice cream TEACHING ANECDOTES (157) Annie Jump Cannon OBITUARY (158) György Marx 1927-2002 Steven Chapman STARTING OUT (159) What Katie did next: part 3 Katie Pennicott OPINIONS (160) What is really important? Kerry Parker

  5. The relationship between dose rate and transformation induction in C3H/10T1/2 cells by TRIGA reactor fission neutrons at 0.3 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E.K.; Harrison, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their own and other data showing dose-effect relations for cell survival and the induction of transformations in C3H/IOT 1/2 cells in exponential or stationary cultures after a range of high dose-rate irradiations with X-rays or AFRRI neutrons. (UK)

  6. Optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes: exposure to 12.5 mGy X-rays for 8 weeks efficiently protects the kidney from diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Fengsheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Guo, Weiying; Li, Cai; Li, Wei; Wang, Guixia; Xing, Xiao; Gao, Ying; Ge, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guanjun; Cai, Lu

    2014-05-08

    We reported the attenuation of diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by exposure to multiple low-dose radiation (LDR) at 25 mGy every other day by suppressing renal oxidative damage. We here explored the optimal conditions of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice with type 1 diabetes were induced with multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin. Diabetic mice received whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 12.5, 25 or 50 mGy every other day for either 4 or 8 weeks. Age-matched normal mice were similarly irradiated at the dose of 25 mGy for 4 or 8 weeks. The renal function and histopathological changes were examined at the 4th and 8th weeks of the study. Diabetes induced renal dysfunction is shown by the decreased creatinine and increased microalbumin in the urine. Renal oxidative damage, detected by protein nitration and lipid oxidation, and remodeling, reflected by increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, collagen IV and fibronectin, were significantly increased in diabetic mice. All these renal pathological and function changes in diabetic mice were significantly attenuated by exposure to LDR at all regimens, among which, however, exposure to LDR at 12.5 mGy for 8 weeks provided the best protective effect on the kidney of diabetic mice. Our results suggest that whole-body LDR at 12.5 mGy every other day for 8 weeks is the optimal condition of LDR to protect the kidney from diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Deeply trapped electrons in imaging plates and their utilization for extending the dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, Hiroko; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The absorption spectra of deep centers in an imaging plate (IP) made of BaFBr 0:85 I 0:15 :Eu 2+ have been studied in the ultraviolet region. Electrons trapped in deep centers are considered to be the cause of unerasable and reappearing latent images in IPs over-irradiated with X-rays. Deep centers showed a dominant peak at around 320 nm, followed by two small peaks at around 345 and 380 nm. By utilizing deeply trapped electrons, we have attempted to extend the dynamic range of an IP. The IP was irradiated by 150-kV X-rays with doses from 8.07 mGy to 80.7 Gy. Reading out the latent image by the stimulation of Eu 2+ luminescence with a 633-nm He-Ne laser light from a conventional Fuji reader showed a linear relationship with irradiated dose up to 0.8 Gy, but then becoming non-linear. After fully erasing with visible light, unerasable latent images were read out using 635-nm semi-conductor laser light combined with a photon-counting detection system. The dose-response curve so obtained gave a further two orders of magnitude extending the dynamic range up to 80.7 Gy. Comprehensive results indicate that electrons supplied from deep centers to the F centers provided the extended dynamic range after the F centers became saturated. Based on these facts, a model of the excitation of deeply trapped electrons and PSL processes is proposed.

  8. Need for High Radiation Dose (≥70 Gy) in Early Postoperative Irradiation After Radical Prostatectomy: A Single-Institution Analysis of 334 High-Risk, Node-Negative Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Montorsi, Francesco; Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Bolognesi, Angelo; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Freschi, Massimo; Roscigno, Marco; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical benefit of high-dose early adjuvant radiotherapy (EART) in high-risk prostate cancer (hrCaP) patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients and Methods: The clinical outcome of 334 hrCaP (pT3-4 and/or positive resection margins) node-negative patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy before 2004 was analyzed according to the EART dose delivered to the prostatic bed, <70.2 Gy (lower dose, median 66.6 Gy, n = 153) or ≥70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy, n = 181). Results: The two groups were comparable except for a significant difference in terms of median follow-up (10 vs. 7 years, respectively) owing to the gradual increase of EART doses over time. Nevertheless, median time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure was almost identical, 38 and 36 months, respectively. At univariate analysis, both 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly higher (83% vs. 71% [p = 0.001] and 94% vs. 88% [p = 0.005], respectively) in the HD group. Multivariate analysis confirmed EART dose ≥70 Gy to be independently related to both bRFS (hazard ratio 2.5, p = 0.04) and DFS (hazard ratio 3.6, p = 0.004). Similar results were obtained after the exclusion of patients receiving any androgen deprivation. After grouping the hormone-naive patients by postoperative PSA level the statistically significant impact of high-dose EART on both 5-year bRFS and DFS was maintained only for those with undetectable values, possibly owing to micrometastatic disease outside the irradiated area in case of detectable postoperative PSA values. Conclusion: This series provides strong support for the use of EART doses ≥70 Gy after radical retropubic prostatectomy in hrCaP patients with undetectable postoperative PSA levels.

  9. 31 CFR 3.20 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... owned property caused by the negligence of any officer or employee of the Government acting within the scope of his employment. The Federal Tort Claims Act superseded the Small Claims Act with respect to... Federal Tort Claims Act, for example, claims arising abroad, may be allowable under the Small Claims Act. ...

  10. 42 CFR 3.20 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical laboratory, or health center; or (ii) A physician, physician assistant, registered nurse, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified registered nurse anesthetist, certified nurse midwife... the Secretary, which issues decisions in panels of three. Bona fide contract means: (1) A written...

  11. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  12. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  13. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...... and Rosenberg's theorem), are also hard for dynamic range searching in the group model. This theorem allows us to reuse decades of research on range reporting lower bounds to immediately obtain a range of new group model lower bounds. Amongst others, this includes an improved lower bound for the fundamental...

  14. Short-range fundamental forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Baessler, S.; Buchner, M.; Fedorov, V.V.; Hoedl, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Pignol, G.; Protasov, K.V.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces; 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments

  15. Moderate risk-adapted dose escalation with 3D-conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer from 70 to 74 Gy : long-term morbidity and survival from a prospective phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombosch, V. B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract English Background and Purpose: Evaluation of late side-effects and survival more than 60 months after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with moderate, risk adapted dose escalation from 70 to 74 Gy in patients with localized prostate cancer within a prospective Austrian-German phase II multicenter trial. Material and Methods: Between 03/1999 and 07/2002 486 patients were registered in the prospective Austrian-German multicenter phase II trial. 441 (90.7%) patients were evaluated. Patients in the low and intermediate risk group were treated with 70Gy, patients in the high risk group received 74Gy. Additional hormonal-therapy was recommended for intermediate- and high-risk group patients. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) late toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG criteria, initial appearance, prevalence and duration of grade >=2 side-effects were investigated. Furthermore bNED (Phoenix/Nadir + 2), overall and disease specific survival were prospectively assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 90 (2-158) months in all 441 patients and 99 (18-158) months in living patients. 154 patients (35%) had a follow-up of longer or equal 120 months. Distribution among risk groups was 26% (low), 51% (intermediate) and 23% (high). HT was administered in 86% of patients prior to RT. Late gastrointestinal side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 29%/32% (70/74Gy) and 30%/35% (70/74Gy) as actuarial rates; p=0.67. Late genitourinary side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 17%/26% (70/74Gy) and 27%/34% (70/74Gy); p=0.12. No more than 15% (GI) and 15% (GU) of patients suffered from side-effects >=2 at any time after the end of therapy (prevalence). The proportion of patients suffering from severe toxicity was low (Grade 3 GI: 2%, GU: 10%). 10 year actuarial bNED rate was 65%, 70% and 58% in the low-, intermediate- and high risk group according to Phoenix (Nadir +2) criteria. Overall and disease specific survival were 67% and 91% in all patients. Conclusion: Dose escalation

  16. Does initial 45Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduce late complications in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer? A cohort control study using definitive chemoradiotherapy with high-dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Liang, Ji-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Chang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Wu-Chou; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Comparing initial 45 Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and non-IMRT in terms of the late toxicities associated with advanced cervical cancer that has also been treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy and high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB). This retrospective study included 320 stage IB2-IIIB cervical cancer patients treated with CCRT (83 IMRT and 237 non-IMRT). The two groups had similar stage and HDRICB ratings. Following 45 Gy to the pelvis, HDRICB of 24 Gy in four courses was prescribed. Late toxicities, including rectal complications (RC), bladder complications (BC) and non-rectal intestinal injury (NRRII), were scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of the complications. With a median follow-up duration of 33 and 77 months for IMRT and non-IMRT, 33 patients had Grade 2 or higher late RC (7.2% IMRT, 11.4% non-IMRT), whereas that for BC was 40 (9.6% IMRT, 13.5% non-IMRT) and for NRRII was 48 (12.0% IMRT, 16.0% non-IMRT). The cumulative rate for total grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities was 8.4% and 11.8% (p = 0.33). IMRT did not reduce the OR for all endpoints; however, the ORs for rectum and bladder reference doses to Point A were associated with RC and BC. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with initial 45Gy of pelvic IMRT and HDRICB have similar treatment-related late toxicities as those treated with non-IMRT. Optimization of the brachytherapy scheme is essential to minimize late toxicities

  17. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  18. International Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research: basic and translational research recognition : Mary-Claire King received the 2016 Prize for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hali; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2017-11-21

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award sponsored by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that supports innovative cancer research globally with the ultimate goal to cure cancer. The coveted Szent-Györgyi Prize annually honors a scientist whose seminal discovery or body of work has resulted in, or led toward, notable contributions to cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment; and the discovery has had a high direct impact of saving people's lives. In addition, the prize promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. In 2016, NFCR's Szent-Györgyi Prize Selection Committee was unanimous in its decision to recognize an icon in human disease genetics, Dr. Mary-Claire King, for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Her proof of existence of BRCA1 gene and its location has made genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers possible, saving lives of many people who are at high risk with inherited BRCA1 mutations.

  19. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ammonium bicarbonate over a large dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Vujosevic, S.I.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Albarran-Sanchez, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.05 mol dm -3 ammonium and sodium bicarbonate were studied after receiving various doses of 60 Co gammas (0.01-400 kGy) or 0.5-20 Gy pulses of 10 Mev electrons. Formate and oxalate were found to be the main radiolytic products, in addition to trace amounts of formaldehyde and an unidentified polymer. A large initial yield of formate in the γ-radiolysis, G(HCOO - ) = 2.2, is due to the reaction COO - + HCO 3 - ↔ HCOO - +CO 3 - . The efficiency of organic synthesis within the large dose range studied is low and is explained by efficient pathways leading to the reformation of bicarbonate, where the reaction COO - + CO 3 - is particularly significant. (author)

  20. Dosimetric properties of the 'Pille' portable, wide dose range TLD reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, P.P.; Feher, I.; Deme, S.; Szabo, B.; Vagvoelgyi, J.

    1986-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of a portable TLD reader are described. The TLD system named 'Pille' or 'moth' consists of a lightweight battery-operated portable TLD reader and its CaSO 4 :Dy bulb dosemeters. The reproducibility of the TLD system at constant temperature was found to be better than + -2%, and the mean time between failures exceeded 5 years. The dose range of the system is wide, covering more than 6 orders of magnitude, from 5 μGy to 10 Gy. The energy dependence of the CaSO 4 :Dy bulb dosemeters is less than + - 20% above 100 keV in the energy compensation capsules. Without additional annealing, the bulb dosemeters can be re-used at least 100 times, which is an important aspect during in situ measurements. (author)

  1. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Given a set P of n coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range α-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on P. More specifically, for a query range Q, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an α-fraction of the points contained in Q. We present a ne...

  2. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    entropy saturation behavior of the estimator is analytically described. Simultaneous range-compression and aperture synthesis is experimentally...4 2.1 Circular and Inverse -Circular HAL...2.3 Single Aperture, Multi-λ Imaging ...................................................................................... 14 2.4 Simultaneous Range

  3. Precise Range Determination Using Laser Ranging Data of LAGEOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ryul Kim

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite laser ranging observation of LAGEOS ¥± has been performed using the SLR System at Sheshan Laser Ranging Station, Shanghai Observatory. And we obtained 1,838 observational points The observed range data is corrected by means of system delay correction using ground target observation, atmospheric refraction delay correction, offset correction, general relativistic correction and tide correction including solid tide, polar tide and ocean tide. As a result, the determined range delay mean value is 19.12m and the mean internal accuracy by means of polynomial fitting and least square method is ¡¾7cm. Corrected observational points are 1,340 and noise ratio to total observational points is 27.1%

  4. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  5. Recent mortality statistics for distally exposed A-bomb survivors: The lifetime cancer risk for exposure under 50 cGy (rad)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Belsey, R.E.; Koehnlein, W.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of mortality statistics from the most recent Life Span Study reports of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors (covering both the 1950-1982 and the 1950-1985 follow-up periods) indicates a significant difference (p < 0.001) in cancer mortality rates between two distally exposed groups of survivors with organ-absorbed radiation doses under 40 cSv. This implies a mean incremental lifetime cancer risk (exclusive of leukemias) of about 25 excess fatal cancers per 10,000 persons exposed to one additional cSv (rem) of ionizing radiation for persons who had been exposed to doses in the range 1-40 cSv above background levels. This risk value is independent of whether the original (T65DR) dosimetry assignments (choosing a value of 10 for the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons) or the new dosimetry estimates (DS86) are used. The present estimate of A-bomb survivor radiogenic cancer risk associated with low dose exposure was obtained directly from the observed cancer deaths in the low-dose exposure groups without reliance on model-dependent extrapolation from high-dose data. This low-dose risk estimate is about ten times larger than the risk estimates adopted previously by national and international radiation commissions as a basis for current radiation safety guidelines for workers and the general public. (author)

  6. On inertial range scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    Inertial-range scaling laws for two- and three-dimensional turbulence are re-examined within a unified framework. A new correction to Kolmogorov's k -5/3 scaling is derived for the energy inertial range. A related modification is found to Kraichnan's logarithmically corrected two-dimensional enstrophy cascade law that removes its unexpected divergence at the injection wavenumber. The significance of these corrections is illustrated with steady-state energy spectra from recent high-resolution closure computations. The results also underscore the asymptotic nature of inertial-range scaling laws. Implications for conventional numerical simulations are discussed

  7. GPS test range mission planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  8. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-04-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges.

  9. Intentionally Short Range Communications (ISRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    molecular oxygen in the atmosphere at 60 GHz (figure 9 LIppolito, 1981]). The MMW range is similar to that of the UV links. 3.3.1 Variable Range Similar to...option also requires that the signal be strong enough to overcome the noise from the solar and background sources, although the molecular oxygen and... emisions . Lasing will occur only within the cavity when the alignment is correct and not lasing othem ise. Such a cavity is dcteclable only when an observer

  10. Ionizing radiations dosimetry: new results in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.

    1989-01-01

    Industrial irradiation for food preservation, medical sterilization and plastic processing is in great expansion and an accurate dosimetry in the megagray range is required. It is also required for safety purposes around nuclear reactors or waste storage sites. The study of photon-matter interaction leads us to consider high-dose dosimeters among the solids in which radiolysis occurs. Organic conductors are indeed good candidates for high-dose dosimetry. These materials show original properties due to the great anisotropy of their electronic system. Radiation effects, especially on the resistivity and on the (E.S.R.) Electron Spin Resonance linewidth, are very important. We show that a simple resistance measurement allows an accurate monitoring of the absorbed dose, in the range 0.01 - 50 MGy, for X-rays, gamma-rays and electron irradiations. The E.S.R. linewidth measurements permits the use of small dosimeters between 1 and 100 MGy. Finally, some organic conductors are proposed as high-temperature dosimeters for irradiation performed up to 120 0 C. The irradiated pure silica contains a large variety of defects. Only the E' center seems helpful for dosimetry purposes, and its electron spin resonance (E.S.R.) signal is simply related to the absorbed dose in the range 0.1 - 3 MGy or even, 0.5 kGy - 5 MGy [fr

  11. The influence of non-radiation induced ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes for dosimetry in the radiotherapy dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Lettau, C.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The yield of radicals induced by ionizing radiation in the amino acid alanine and its quantification by ESR spectroscopy has proven excellent reproducibility. Those radicals trapped in the crystal lattice are prevented from recombination providing a thermally very stable system. This allows alanine to be applied as a transfer dosemeter. With paraffin-alanine probes ESR dosimetry can be performed with a standard deviation of ± 0.5% in the dose range from 20 Gy up to 100 kGy. At 1 Gy dose level the error increases to ± 6%. This dose level is three orders of magnitude higher than the calculated detection threshold for alanine with modern X-band ESR spectrometers. It was found that the poor standard deviation at the 1 Gy dose level, is not mainly produced by a bad signal-to-noise ratio but by a variable non-radiation induced ESR background signal from the alanine probes within a batch. In the present study the main sources of error for ESR dosimetry in the dose range below 20 Gy were analyzed. The influences of the production process, UV light and humidity upon the ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes were investigated. Measurements are shown indicating a second stable structure of the alanine radical at room temperature. (author)

  12. Eye safe laser range finders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snir, M.; Margaliot, M.; Amitzi, A.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1970's, Ruby (Q switched) laser based range finders with a wavelength of 694nm were first used. These lasers operated in a pulse mode within the visible light range and produced a risk for the eye retina. The laser beam striking the macula could damage the eye and might cause blindness. Over the years, Nd:YAG (Q switched) lasers were developed (operating at 1064nm) for range finding and designation uses. The wavelength of these lasers, operating in the near Infra-Red range (invisible), is also focused tightly on the retina. The human eye does not respond to the invisible light so there is no natural protection (eye blink reflex) as in the visible light. The operation of these lasers worldwide, especially when the laser beam is exposed, causes occasional eye accidents. Another risk is stemming from the use of observation systems with a high optical gain, in the laser operation areas, which enlarge the range of risk quite significantly. Therefore, research and development efforts were invested in order to introduce eye safe lasers. One of the solutions for this problem is presented in following document

  13. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  14. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54–56 Gy given in 9–7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003–2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54–56 Gy in 9–7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16–48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10–55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures

  15. Predictors of pulmonary toxicity in limited stage small cell lung cancer patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and 70 Gy daily radiotherapy: CALGB 30904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Joseph K; Pang, Herbert; Bogart, Jeffrey A; Blackstock, A William; Urbanic, James J; Hogson, Lydia; Crawford, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett E

    2013-12-01

    Standard therapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) is concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by prophylactic cranial radiotherapy. Predictors of post chemoradiotherapy pulmonary toxicity in limited stage (LS) small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients are not well defined. Current guidelines are derived from non-small cell lung cancer regimens, and do not account for the unique biology of this disease. Therefore, we analyzed patients on three consecutive CALGB LS-SCLC trials treated with concurrent chemotherapy and daily high dose radiotherapy (70 Gy) to determine patient and treatment related factors predicting for post-treatment pulmonary toxicity. Patients treated on CALGB protocols 39808, 30002, 30206 investigating two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and 70 Gy daily thoracic radiation therapy were pooled. Patient, tumor, and treatment related factors were evaluated to determine predictors of grade 3–5 pulmonary toxicities after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. 100 patients were included. No patient experienced grade 4–5 post-treatment pulmonary toxicity. Patients who experienced post-treatment pulmonary toxicity were more likely to be older (median age 69 vs 60, p = 0.09) and have smaller total lung volumes (2565 cc vs 3530 cc, p = 0.05).). Furthermore,exposure of larger volumes of lung to lower (median V5 = 70%, p = 0.09, median V10 = 63%, p = 0.07), inter-mediate (median V20 = 50, p = 0.04) and high (median V60 = 25%, p = 0.01) doses of radiation were all associated with post-treatment grade 3 pulmonary toxicity, as was a larger mean lung radiation dose(median 31 Gy) p = 0.019. Post-treatment pulmonary toxicity following the completion of 2 cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and high dose daily radiation therapy was uncommon. Care should be taken to minimize mean lung radiation exposure, as well as volumes of low, intermediate and high doses of radiation.

  16. Studies on mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human interleukin-11 and recombinant human interleukin-2 on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Ou Hongling; Xing Shuang; Huang Haixiao; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Zhao Yanfang; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Luo Qingliang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Xueguang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidence for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: Sixteen beagle dogs were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI), then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group or cytokines + supportive care (abbreviated as cytokines) group. In addition to supportive care, rhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 were administered subcutaneously to treat dogs in cytokines group. The percentage of CD34 + cells, cell cycle and apoptosis of nucleated cells in peripheral blood were examined by Flow cytometry. Results: After 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, the CD34 + cells in peripheral blood declined obviously (61.3% and 52.1% of baseline for irradiation control and supportive care group separately). The cell proportion of nucleated cells in G 0 /G 1 phase was increased notably notably (99.27% and 99.49% respectively). The rate of apoptosis (26.93% and 21.29% separately) and necrosis (3.27% and 4.14%, respectively) of nucleated cells were elevated significantly when compared with values before irradiation (P 0 /G 1 phase blockage of nucleated cells became more serious (99.71%). The rate of apoptosis (5.66%) and necrosis (1.60%) of nucleated cells were significantly lower than that of irradiation control and supportive care groups 1 d after exposure. Conclusions: Cytokines maybe mobilize CD34 + cells in bone marrow to peripheral blood, indce cell block at G 0 /G 1 phase and reduce apoptosis, and eventually cure hematopoietic injuries induced by irradiation. (authors)

  17. Radioprotective effects of melanin-glucan complex from Fomes Fomentarius and indralin at irradiation of mice BALB/C by dose of 5,95 Gy/8,5 min

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Seniuk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protective effect of melanin-glucan complex from F. fomentarius (MGC and Russian armed forces radiopro-tector indralin in the model of acute exposure by dose of 5.95 Gy/8.5min care is compared. Obtained results indi-cate availabi¬lity at MGC and indralin both direct and indirect "bystander effect” of DNA-protective properties, as well as severe anxiolytic activity. Thus for indralin protection factor was 0.33 when in MGC it was 2.3 times higher (0.75.

  18. Phase II-trial of radiation therapy with 45 Gy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC) in patients with anal cancer - a rationale to add regional hyperthermia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, R.; Wust, P.; Gellermann, J.; Mohr, B.; Goegler, H.; Riess, H.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of standard regimen of chemoradiation for anal cancer with a radiation dose of 45 Gy on survival, local control and toxicity with respect to the discussion about intensification of therapy. Assessment of prognostic factors and designing improved treatment strategies for certain risk groups. Materials and Methods: From 1987 to 1995 46 patients with localized anal cancer were eligible. Thirty-five women and 11 men with a median age of 54 years were treated according to the protocoll. Thirty-two (70%) patients had histologically a squamous cell carcinoma, 12 (26%) a cloacogenic carcinoma. Thirty-one patients (68%) had T1, T2 tumors, 15 patients (33%) had locally advanced primary tumors (T3, T4), 9 patients (20%) had N1-3 disease. Radiotherapy consisted of 30 Gy to the primary tumor and pelvic lymph nodes, followed by one week treatment break and boost to the primary tumor to a total dose of 45 Gy with a single dose of 2 Gy, mean duration of radiotherapy 44 days. 5-FU was given on days 1-5 and 29-33 as continuous infusion (800 mg/m 2 /day), MMC (10 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously as bolus on day 1 and 29. Patients were followed for survival and local control. Toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria and the LENT score (late effects normal tissues). The mean follow-up time was 34,4 months. Results: The cancer specific actuarial 5-year survival rate was 69%: 79% in T1, T2 and 41% in T3, T4 tumors (p = 0,03). The 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74%: 89% in T1, T2 tumors, 42% ind T3, T4 tumors (p 5 cm): p 4 cm): p = 0,04, depth of infiltration: p < 0,00, response: p < 0,00. No local control was achievable for tumors greater than 6 cm, whereas all local failures occurred when there was extrasphincteric infiltration. Conclusions: Colostomy-free survival was unsatisfactory. Depth of infiltration (extrasphincteric involvement) as well as tumor size (≥ 5 cm) has been shown as negative prognostic factor for local control

  19. Wide range neutron monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Fumiyasu; Arita, Setsuo; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Matsumiya, Shoichi; Furusato, Ken-ichiro; Nishida, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention has a function of reliably switching measuring values between a pulse method and a Cambel method even if noise level and saturated level are fluctuated. That is, a proportional range judging means always monitors neutron flux measuring values in a start-up region and neutron flux measuring values in an intermediate power region, so that the proportional range is detected depending on whether the difference or a variation coefficient of both of the measured values is constant or not. A switching value determining means determines a switching value by the result of judgement of the proportional range judging means. A selection/output means selects and outputs measuring signals at a neutron flux level in the start-up region or the intermediate power region by the output of the switching value determining means. With such procedures, since the measuring value is switched after confirming that arrival at the proportional range where the difference or a variation coefficient of the measured value between the pulse processing method and the measured value by the Cambel method is constant, an accurate neutron flux level containing neither noise level nor saturated level can be outputted. (I.S.)

  20. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare...

  1. Heteronuclear Long-Range Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole W.

    The lecture will cover heteronuclear long-range correlation techniques like HMBC, H2BC, and HAT HMBC with the emphasis on determining the number of covalent bonds between two spins being correlated. H2BC and HMBC spectra are quite complementary as a peak can be strong in one of the two spectra...

  2. Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis of human lens epithelial cells exposed to a low-dose-range of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christian Harry; Kumar, Achint; Qutob, Sami; Nyiri, Balazs; Chauhan, Vinita; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings in populations exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) indicate dose-related lens opacification occurs at much lower doses (micro-spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of varying doses of radiation, ranging from 0.01 Gy to 5 Gy, on human lens epithelial (HLE) cells which were chemically fixed 24 h post-irradiation. Raman spectra were acquired from the nucleus and cytoplasm of the HLE cells. Spectra were collected from points in a 3  ×  3 grid pattern and then averaged. The raw spectra were preprocessed and principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis was used to discriminate between dose and control for 0.25, 0.5, 2, and 5 Gy. Using leave-one-out cross-validation accuracies of greater than 74% were attained for each dose/control combination. The ultra-low doses 0.01 and 0.05 Gy were included in an analysis of band intensities for Raman bands found to be significant in the linear discrimination, and an induced repair model survival curve was fit to a band-difference-ratio plot of this data, suggesting HLE cells undergo a nonlinear response to low-doses of IR. A survival curve was also fit to clonogenic assay data done on the irradiated HLE cells, showing a similar nonlinear response.

  3. Wide range neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yorimasa; Fukushima, Toshiki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a wide range neutron-flux monitor adapted such that the flux monitoring function and alarming function can automatically by shifted from pulse counting system to cambel method system. Constitution: A wide range neutron-flux monitor comprises (la) pulse counting system and (lb) cambel-method system for inputting detection signals from neutron detectors and separating them into signals for the pulse measuring system and the cambel measuring system, (2) overlap detection and calculation circuit for detecting the existence of the overlap of two output signals from the (la) and (lb) systems, and (3) trip circuit for judging the abnormal state of neutron detectors upon input of the detection signals. (Seki, T.)

  4. Tri-LORE-gy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mun, Terry

    . This thesis presents the work behind the establishment of Lotus Base, which has seen wide use across the legume research community since its launch. The modular construction and scalable design of this online resource will also hopefully inspire and maybe benefit ongoing efforts to establish specialised...... secretion system (T4SS), but dependent on pathogen-encoded T3SS. Furthermore, LjEin2b was found in a symbiotic phenotyping screen to be required for negative regulation of symbiosis, but also confers susceptibility towards microbial wilt agents. In addition, a whole transcriptome sequencing experiment......, comprehensive online portal providing a user-friendly interface to access all Lotus data. The creation of Lotus Base (https://lotus.au.dk) is a response to a fragmented data landscape, helping to unify and integrated various datasets, and to provide simple yet powerful data visualisation and analysis tools...

  5. Short-range communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  6. Wide range neutron detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H. Sr.

    1978-01-01

    A neutron detection system for reactor control is described which is operable over a wide range of neutron flux levels. The system includes a fission type ionization chamber neutron detector, means for gamma and alpha signal compensation, and means for operating the neutron detector in the pulse counting mode for low neutron flux levels, and in the direct current mode for high neutron flux levels

  7. Long Range Aircraft Trajectory Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Magister, Tone

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the improvement of the aircraft future trajectory prediction accuracy for long-range airborne separation assurance. The strategic planning of safe aircraft flights and effective conflict avoidance tactics demand timely and accurate conflict detection based upon future four–dimensional airborne traffic situation prediction which is as accurate as each aircraft flight trajectory prediction. The improved kinematics model of aircraft relative flight considering flight ...

  8. Long range supergravity coupling strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    A limit of 2x10 -13 has recently been deduced for the fractional difference between the gravitational masses of the K 0 and anti K 0 mesons. This limit is applied here to put stringent limits on the strengths of the long range vector-scalar gravitational couplings envisaged in supergravity theories. A weaker limit is inferred from the general relativistic fit to the precession of the orbit of the pulsar PSR1913+16. (orig.)

  9. Range expansion of heterogeneous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations.

  10. High frequencies of chromatid aberrations produced during G/sub 2/ in human lymphocytes by very low doses (0. 025-0. 4 Gy) of X-rays in combination with inhibitors of DNA synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, H.C.; Kihlman, B.A. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Genetics)

    1984-09-01

    Whole-blood cultures of human lymphocytes were exposed in the G/sub 2/-phase (3.5 h before harvesting) to various doses of X-rays and post-treated for 3 h with inhibitors of DNA synthesis. The inhibitors used were 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), hydroxyurea (HU) and 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). To prevent deamination of dAdo by adenosine deaminase (ADA), the dAdo treatments were carried out in the presence of the ADA inhibitor coformycin. HU and ara-C were used either alone or in combination. After the 3-h inhibitor treatments, the cultures were harvested and slides prepared and analyzed for chromatid aberrations in metaphase. When the inhibitors were used at concentrations high enough to cause marked chromosome damage by themselves, very low doses of X-rays (0.025-0.2 Gy) were sufficient to produce a dramatic increase in the frequency of chromatid aberrations. High frequencies of chromatid aberrations were also obtained when cultures that had received moderate doses of X-rays (0.4-0.8 Gy) were post-treated with low inhibitor concentrations that produce no or only a few aberrations by themselves.

  11. Medium Range Forecasts Representation (and Long Range Forecasts?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, J.-C.

    2009-09-01

    The progress of the numerical forecasts urges us to interest us in more and more distant ranges. We thus supply more and more forecasts with term of some days. Nevertheless, precautions of use are necessary to give the most reliable and the most relevant possible information. Available in a TV bulletin or on quite other support (Internet, mobile phone), the interpretation and the representation of a medium range forecast (5 - 15 days) must be different from those of a short range forecast. Indeed, the "foresee-ability” of a meteorological phenomenon decreases gradually in the course of the ranges, it decreases all the more quickly that the phenomenon is of small scale. So, at the end of some days, the probability character of a forecast becomes very widely dominating. That is why in Meteo-France the forecasts of D+4 to D+7 are accompanied with a confidence index since around ten years. It is a figure between 1 and 5: the more we approach 5, the more the confidence in the supplied forecast is good. In the practice, an indication is supplied for period D+4 / D+5, the other one for period D+6 / D+7, every day being able to benefit from a different forecast, that is be represented in a independent way. We thus supply a global tendency over 24 hours with less and less precise symbols as the range goes away. Concrete examples will be presented. From now on two years, we also publish forecasts to D+8 / J+9, accompanied with a sign of confidence (" good reliability " or " to confirm "). These two days are grouped together on a single map because for us, the described tendency to this term is relevant on a duration about 48 hours with a spatial scale slightly superior to the synoptic scale. So, we avoid producing more than two zones of types of weather over France and we content with giving an evolution for the temperatures (still, in increase or in decline). Newspapers began to publish this information, it should soon be the case of televisions. It is particularly

  12. SU-C-207A-04: Accuracy of Acoustic-Based Proton Range Verification in Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, KC; Sehgal, CM; Avery, S; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and dose required for acoustic-based proton range verification (protoacoustics) in water. Methods: Proton pulses with 17 µs FWHM and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10 7 protons/pulse, 8.9 cGy/pulse) were generated by a clinical, hospital-based cyclotron at the University of Pennsylvania. The protoacoustic signal generated in a water phantom by the 190 MeV proton pulses was measured with a hydrophone placed at multiple known positions surrounding the dose deposition. The background random noise was measured. The protoacoustic signal was simulated to compare to the experiments. Results: The maximum protoacoustic signal amplitude at 5 cm distance was 5.2 mPa per 1 × 10 7 protons (1.6 cGy at the Bragg peak). The background random noise of the measurement was 27 mPa. Comparison between simulation and experiment indicates that the hydrophone introduced a delay of 2.4 µs. For acoustic data collected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 21, deconvolution of the protoacoustic signal with the proton pulse provided the most precise time-of-flight range measurement (standard deviation of 2.0 mm), but a systematic error (−4.5 mm) was observed. Conclusion: Based on water phantom measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron, protoacoustics is a potential technique for measuring the proton Bragg peak range with 2.0 mm standard deviation. Simultaneous use of multiple detectors is expected to reduce the standard deviation, but calibration is required to remove systematic error. Based on the measured background noise and protoacoustic amplitude, a SNR of 5.3 is projected for a deposited dose of 2 Gy.

  13. Wide range radiation monitoring apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, N.P.

    1983-01-01

    There is described a simple and rugged detector capable of measuring radiation fields over the range of 0.02 R/hr up to 10/8 R/hr or higher. The device consists of an emitter element of high atomic number material which is connected to the center conductor of a signal cable. This emitter element is positioned in a spaced-apart relationship between collector element of a low atomic number material with a gap region between the emitter element and the adjacent collector elements

  14. BENTON RANGE ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Edwin H.; Rains, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, two parts of the Benton Range Roadless Area, California are considered to have mineral-resource potential. The central and southern part of the roadless area, near several nonoperating mines, has a probable potential for tungsten and gold-silver mineralization in tactite zones. The central part of the area has a substantiated resource potential for gold and silver in quartz veins. Detailed mapping and geochemical sampling for tungsten, gold, and silver in the central and southern part of the roadless area might indicate targets for shallow drilling exploration.

  15. Applichation of the sulphate ceric dosimetric in the high doses range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, F.

    1991-01-01

    The ceric-cerous dosimetric system is one of the system more employed in the high dose dosimetry. The spectrophotometric procedure to measure the ceric-concentration is an usual analityc method to determine the absorbed dose. On the other hand, due at increase employ of the irradiation process control. In this paper is realized the ceric-cerous dosimetric calibration in the dose range of 0,6 - 5 kGy and the application in the irradiation process control to differents absorbed dose values

  16. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  17. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  18. Dynamic Planar Range Maxima Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dynamic two-dimensional maxima query problem. Let P be a set of n points in the plane. A point is maximal if it is not dominated by any other point in P. We describe two data structures that support the reporting of the t maximal points that dominate a given query point, and allow...... for insertions and deletions of points in P. In the pointer machine model we present a linear space data structure with O(logn + t) worst case query time and O(logn) worst case update time. This is the first dynamic data structure for the planar maxima dominance query problem that achieves these bounds...... are integers in the range U = {0, …,2 w  − 1 }. We present a linear space data structure that supports 3-sided range maxima queries in O(logn/loglogn+t) worst case time and updates in O(logn/loglogn) worst case time. These are the first sublogarithmic worst case bounds for all operations in the RAM model....

  19. Range-Measuring Video Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard T.; Briscoe, Jeri M.; Corder, Eric L.; Broderick, David

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors of a proposed type would perform the functions of both electronic cameras and triangulation- type laser range finders. That is to say, these sensors would both (1) generate ordinary video or snapshot digital images and (2) measure the distances to selected spots in the images. These sensors would be well suited to use on robots that are required to measure distances to targets in their work spaces. In addition, these sensors could be used for all the purposes for which electronic cameras have been used heretofore. The simplest sensor of this type, illustrated schematically in the upper part of the figure, would include a laser, an electronic camera (either video or snapshot), a frame-grabber/image-capturing circuit, an image-data-storage memory circuit, and an image-data processor. There would be no moving parts. The laser would be positioned at a lateral distance d to one side of the camera and would be aimed parallel to the optical axis of the camera. When the range of a target in the field of view of the camera was required, the laser would be turned on and an image of the target would be stored and preprocessed to locate the angle (a) between the optical axis and the line of sight to the centroid of the laser spot.

  20. Long-range correlated percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinrib, A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a study of the percolation problem with long-range correlations in the site or bond occupations. An extension of the Harris criterion for the relevance of the correlations is derived for the case that the correlations decay as x/sup -a/ for large distances x. For a d the correlations are relevant if dν-2<0. Applying this criterion to the behavior that results when the correlations are relevant, we argue that the new behavior will have ν/sub long/ = 2/a. It is shown that the correlated bond percolation problem is equivalent to a q-state Potts model with quenched disorder in the limit q→1. With the use of this result, a renormalization-group study of the problem is presented, expanding in epsilon = 6-d and in delta = 4-a. In addition to the normal percolation fixed point, we find a new long-range fixed point. The crossover to this new fixed point follows the extended Harris criterion, and the fixed point has exponents ν/sub long/ = 2/a (as predicted) and eta/sub long/ = (1/11)(delta-epsilon). Finally, several results on the percolation properties of the Ising model at its critical point are shown to be in agreement with the predictions of this paper

  1. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  2. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  3. TU-FG-BRB-05: A 3 Dimensional Prompt Gamma Imaging System for Range Verification in Proton Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, E; Chen, H; Polf, J [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mackin, D; Beddar, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Avery, S [University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Peterson, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the initial developments of a clinical 3-dimensional (3D) prompt gamma (PG) imaging system for proton radiotherapy range verification. Methods: The new imaging system under development consists of a prototype Compton camera to measure PG emission during proton beam irradiation and software to reconstruct, display, and analyze 3D images of the PG emission. For initial test of the system, PGs were measured with a prototype CC during a 200 cGy dose delivery with clinical proton pencil beams (ranging from 100 MeV – 200 MeV) to a water phantom. Measurements were also carried out with the CC placed 15 cm from the phantom for a full range 150 MeV pencil beam and with its range shifted by 2 mm. Reconstructed images of the PG emission were displayed by the clinical PG imaging software and compared to the dose distributions of the proton beams calculated by a commercial treatment planning system. Results: Measurements made with the new PG imaging system showed that a 3D image could be reconstructed from PGs measured during the delivery of 200 cGy of dose, and that shifts in the Bragg peak range of as little as 2 mm could be detected. Conclusion: Initial tests of a new PG imaging system show its potential to provide 3D imaging and range verification for proton radiotherapy. Based on these results, we have begun work to improve the system with the goal that images can be produced from delivery of as little as 20 cGy so that the system could be used for in-vivo proton beam range verification on a daily basis.

  4. Investigation on magnetoelectric behavior of (80Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-20Bi0.5K0.5TiO3)-CoFe2O4 particulate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Yan, Shuoqing; Yao, Lingling; He, Jun; He, Longhui; Hu, Zhaowen; Huang, Shengxiang; Deng, Lianwen

    2017-12-01

    Particulate magnetoelectric (ME) ceramics constituted by (1-x)(80Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-20Bi0.5K0.5TiO3)-xCoFe2O4 [(1-x)BNKT-xCFO] (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 1.0) were synthesized by an powder-in-sol precursor hybrid processing method and their structure, magnetic, ferroelectric, magnetodielectric (MD) and ME properties have been investigated. Results showed that the ceramics consisted of only two chemically separated phases and had homogeneous microstructure. The introduction of CFO into BNKT matrix led to the weakening of ferroelectric and dielectric properties whereas the strengthening magnetic and MD properties. The observation of the MD effect revealed the evidence of the strain-induced ME coupling and the MD value is well scaled with M2. A maximum value of ME output of 25.07 mV/cm·Oe was achieved for the 0.7BNKT-0.3CFO composite. The improved ME response together with the linear MD effect makes the ceramics promise for use in magnetic field controllable devices or magneto-electric transducers.

  5. Wide-range voltage modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider's Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-μs wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 μs, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented

  6. Long-Range Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Stromswold, D.C.; Hansen, R.R.; Reeder, P.L.; Barnett, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m 2 ) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the 3 He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10 5 n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10 5 n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph

  7. O tema da morte trágica de Liev Tolstói e seu impacto em Max Weber e György Lukács: sobre a autonomia nas ciências e na arte * Leo Tolstoy´s tragic death and his impacts on Max Weber and György Lukács: on autonomy of arts and science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS FELIPE DE SALLES ROSELINO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O tema da morte trágica, presente nos escritos de Liev Tolstói, auxiliou tanto a Max Weber como a György Lukács a caracterizarem o pathos moderno de pressentimento da morte como uma contemplação do vazio. Weber e Lukács encontraram, através das leituras de Tolstói, uma interessante maneira de questionar a autonomia da arte e da ciência moderna, considerando pela esfera estética, como se mostra sem sentido a recente realidade imanente. Ambos assumiram o tema central das obras de Tolstói segundo uma mesma imagem, derivada do contraste entre o mundo antigo e o moderno. Max Weber adequou esse tema a sua teoria do desencantamento do mundo e Lukács, de modo muito semelhante, seguindo seu conceito do paradoxo da necessidade religiosa.Palavras-chave: Tolstói – Weber – Lukács – Desencantamento – Necessidade Religiosa – L’Art Pour l’Art. Abstract: The tragic death in Tolstoy's writings has helped both Max Weber and György Lukács in characterizing the modern pathos as a tragic contemplation of the emptiness of life. Through Tolstoy's readings, Weber and Lukács found an interesting source of denying arts and modern sciences autonomy, considering, from the aesthetics sphere, the meaningless of this new immanent reality. Both has assumed Tolstoy main theme from the same perspective, contrasting ancient and modern worldviews. Max Weber presented this theme in his disenchantment of world theory and Lukács, in a very similar way, following the paradox of religious needing as a mainline.Keywords: Tolstoy – Weber – Lukács – Disenchantment – Religious Needing – L’Art Pour l’Art.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a 60 Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  9. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanea, Fahed [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim [Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Drive, RT 041, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States); Stantz, Keith M., E-mail: kstantz@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 and Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 West Walnut Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  10. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  11. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deuk Hee; Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm 3 which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way

  12. Ranging behavior relates to welfare indicators pre- and post-range access in commercial free-range broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2018-06-01

    Little is known about the effect of accessing an outdoor range on chicken welfare. We tracked individual ranging behavior of 538 mixed-sex Ross 308 chickens on a commercial farm across 4 flocks in winter and summer. Before range access, at 17 to 19 d of age, and post-range access, at 30 to 33 and 42 to 46 d of age in winter and summer flocks respectively, welfare indicators were measured on chickens (pre-range: winter N = 292; summer N = 280; post-range: winter N = 131; summer N = 140), including weight, gait score, dermatitis and plumage condition. Post-ranging autopsies were performed (winter: N = 170; summer: N = 60) to assess breast burn, leg health, and ascites. Fewer chickens accessed the range in winter flocks (32.5%) than summer flocks (82.1%). Few relationships between welfare and ranging were identified in winter, likely due to minimal ranging and the earlier age of post-ranging data collection compared to summer flocks. In summer flocks prior to range access, chickens that accessed the range weighed 4.9% less (P = 0.03) than chickens that did not access the range. Pre-ranging weight, gait score, and overall plumage cover predicted the amount of range use by ranging chickens in summer flocks (P ranging behavior. In summer flocks post-range access, ranging chickens weighed 12.8% less than non-ranging chickens (P range visits were associated with lower weight (P range was associated with lower weight (P range in summer is partly related to changes in broiler chicken welfare. Further investigations are required to determine causation.

  13. Survival Fraction at 2 Gy and γH2AX Expression Kinetics in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes From Cancer Patients: Relationship With Acute Radiation-Induced Toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouliliou, Stamatia E. [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Radiobiology and Radiopathology Unit, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Lialiaris, Theodoros S. [Department of Medical Genetics, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Dimitriou, Thespis [Department of Anatomy, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Papazoglou, Dimitrios [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Pappa, Aglaia [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Pistevou, Kyriaki [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Aristotle University of Thessalonica, Thessalonica (Greece); Kalamida, Dimitra [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Radiobiology and Radiopathology Unit, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Radiobiology and Radiopathology Unit, School of Health Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Predictive assays for acute radiation toxicities would be clinically relevant in radiation oncology. We prospectively examined the predictive role of the survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and of γH2AX (double-strand break [DSB] DNA marker) expression kinetics in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cancer patients before radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: SF2 was measured with Trypan Blue assay in the PBMCs from 89 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy at 4 hours (SF2{sub [4h]}) and 24 hours (SF2{sub [24h]}) after ex vivo irradiation. Using Western blot analysis and band densitometry, we further assessed the expression of γH2AX in PBMC DNA at 0 hours, 30 minutes, and 4 hours (33 patients) and 0 hour, 4 hours, and 24 hours (56 patients), following ex vivo irradiation with 2 Gy. Appropriate ratios were used to characterize each patient, and these were retrospectively correlated with early radiation therapy toxicity grade. Results: The SF2{sub (4h)} was inversely correlated with the toxicity grade (P=.006). The γH2AX-ratio{sub (30min)} (band density of irradiated/non-irradiated cells at 30 minutes) revealed, similarly, a significant inverse association (P=.0001). The DSB DNA repair rate from 30 minutes to 4 hours, calculated as the relative RγH2AX-ratio (γH2AX-ratio{sub (4h)}/γH2AX-ratio{sub (30min)}) showed a significant direct association with high toxicity grade (P=.01). Conclusions: Our results suggest that SF2 is a significant radiation sensitivity index for patients undergoing radiation therapy. γH2AX Western blot densitometry analysis provided 2 important markers of normal tissue radiation sensitivity. Low γH2AX expression at 30 minutes was linked with high toxicity grade, suggesting that poor γH2AX repair activity within a time frame of 30 minutes after irradiation predicts for poor radiation tolerance. On the other hand, rapid γH2AX content restoration at 4 hours after irradiation, compatible with

  14. Survival Fraction at 2 Gy and γH2AX Expression Kinetics in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes From Cancer Patients: Relationship With Acute Radiation-Induced Toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouliliou, Stamatia E.; Lialiaris, Theodoros S.; Dimitriou, Thespis; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Papazoglou, Dimitrios; Pappa, Aglaia; Pistevou, Kyriaki; Kalamida, Dimitra; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Predictive assays for acute radiation toxicities would be clinically relevant in radiation oncology. We prospectively examined the predictive role of the survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and of γH2AX (double-strand break [DSB] DNA marker) expression kinetics in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cancer patients before radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: SF2 was measured with Trypan Blue assay in the PBMCs from 89 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy at 4 hours (SF2 [4h] ) and 24 hours (SF2 [24h] ) after ex vivo irradiation. Using Western blot analysis and band densitometry, we further assessed the expression of γH2AX in PBMC DNA at 0 hours, 30 minutes, and 4 hours (33 patients) and 0 hour, 4 hours, and 24 hours (56 patients), following ex vivo irradiation with 2 Gy. Appropriate ratios were used to characterize each patient, and these were retrospectively correlated with early radiation therapy toxicity grade. Results: The SF2 (4h) was inversely correlated with the toxicity grade (P=.006). The γH2AX-ratio (30min) (band density of irradiated/non-irradiated cells at 30 minutes) revealed, similarly, a significant inverse association (P=.0001). The DSB DNA repair rate from 30 minutes to 4 hours, calculated as the relative RγH2AX-ratio (γH2AX-ratio (4h) /γH2AX-ratio (30min) ) showed a significant direct association with high toxicity grade (P=.01). Conclusions: Our results suggest that SF2 is a significant radiation sensitivity index for patients undergoing radiation therapy. γH2AX Western blot densitometry analysis provided 2 important markers of normal tissue radiation sensitivity. Low γH2AX expression at 30 minutes was linked with high toxicity grade, suggesting that poor γH2AX repair activity within a time frame of 30 minutes after irradiation predicts for poor radiation tolerance. On the other hand, rapid γH2AX content restoration at 4 hours after irradiation, compatible with efficient DSB repair ability

  15. Performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent cognitive domains are not concomitantly impaired in rats exposed to 20 cGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Richard A.; Miller, Vania D.; Hadley, Melissa M.; Jewell, Jessica S.; Macadat, Evangeline

    2016-08-01

    NASA is currently conducting ground based experiments to determine whether the radiation environment that astronauts will encounter on deep space missions will have an impact on their long-term health and their ability to complete the various tasks during the mission. Emerging data suggest that exposure of rodents to mission-relevant HZE radiation doses does result in the impairment of various neurocognitive processes. An essential part of mission planning is a probabilistic risk assessment process that takes into account the likely incidence and severity of a problem. To date few studies have reported the impact of space radiation in a format that is amenable to PRA, and those that have only reported data for a single cognitive process. This study has established the ability of individual male Wistar rats to conduct a hippocampus-dependent (spatial memory) task and a cortex-dependent (attentional set shifting task) 90 days after exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles. Radiation-induced impairment of performance in one cognitive domain was not consistently associated with impaired performance in the other domain. Thus sole reliance upon a single measure of cognitive performance may substantially under-estimate the risk of cognitive impairment, and ultimately it may be necessary to establish the likelihood that mission-relevant HZE doses will impair performance in the three or four cognitive domains that NASA considers to be most critical for mission success, and build a PRA using the composite data from such studies.

  16. Influence of age on radioinduced cognitive disorders: Experimental studies with cerebral irradiation of 30 Gy in 10 sessions and 12 days in the Wistar rat at 1.5, 4 and 18 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamproglou, I.; Baillet, F.; Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Delattre, J.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of age on the learning and memory dysfunction induced by cranial radiation in the male Wistar rat. Ninety-six 45-day-old, 70 4-month-old, and 78 18-month-old male rats were divided in two equal groups: (i) irradiated and (ii) control. A course of whole-brain radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days) was administered to the irradiated group, while the control group received sham irradiation. Sequential behavioral studies including one and two-way avoidance tests were undertaken before and after the 7 months following radiation. The results suggest that radiation induced progressive and irreversible memory dysfunction in elderly (18-month-old) rats, but this effect was partial or almost reversible in the 4-month-old and 45-day-old rats, respectively. In return, the learning dysfunction was age non-dependent despite the fact that is occurs more rapidly in the young (45 days, 4 months) rats. (author)

  17. Rózsa Ignácz’s Torockói gyász [‘Torockó Mourning’]: Identity Beyond the Borders of Time and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Abádi-Nagy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rózsa Ignácz’s historical novel Torockói gyász [‘Torockó Mourning’] (1958 deals with the staggering tragedy of Transylvanian Torockó in 1702. But the referential pattern that emerges from the dramatic plot clearly points beyond eighteenth-century time and space in partly overt and mostly covert ways: to the early twentieth-century post-Trianon fate of the Hungarians in Transylvania, and beyond, to the destructive post-1945 totalitarian communist regime in Hungary, as well as to the backlash of the 1956 anticommunist and anti-Soviet revolution and war of independence. The narrative techniques of expanding early eighteenth-century time and space will be examined through the ways in which thematic threads of collective identity are woven in the novel in general, and the customs, habits, and the religious affiliation of the community are handled in particular. Theories of Jan Assmann, Michael Bamberg, David Herman, Erving Goffman, Fritz Heider and Anselm L. Strauss as well as observations of Ignácz researchers such as Lajos Kántor, Gabriella F. Komáromi, and Erzsébet Dani will be used.

  18. Acoustic time-of-flight for proton range verification in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Measurement of the arrival times of thermoacoustic waves induced by pulsed proton dose depositions (protoacoustics) may provide a proton range verification method. The goal of this study is to characterize the required dose and protoacoustic proton range (distance) verification accuracy in a homogeneous water medium at a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: Gaussian-like proton pulses with 17 μs widths and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10{sup 7} protons/pulse, 3.4 cGy/pulse at the Bragg peak) were generated by modulating the cyclotron proton source with a function generator. After energy degradation, the 190 MeV proton pulses irradiated a water phantom, and the generated protoacoustic emissions were measured by a hydrophone. The detector position and proton pulse characteristics were varied. The experimental results were compared to simulations. Different arrival time metrics derived from acoustic waveforms were compared, and the accuracy of protoacoustic time-of-flight distance calculations was assessed. Results: A 27 mPa noise level was observed in the treatment room during irradiation. At 5 cm from the proton beam, an average maximum pressure of 5.2 mPa/1 × 10{sup 7} protons (6.1 mGy at the Bragg peak) was measured after irradiation with a proton pulse with 10%–90% rise time of 11 μs. Simulation and experiment arrival times agreed well, and the observed 2.4 μs delay between simulation and experiment is attributed to the difference between the hydrophone’s acoustic and geometric centers. Based on protoacoustic arrival times, the beam axis position was measured to within (x, y) = (−2.0,  0.5) ± 1 mm. After deconvolution of the exciting proton pulse, the protoacoustic compression peak provided the most consistent measure of the distance to the Bragg peak, with an error distribution with mean = − 4.5 mm and standard deviation = 2.0 mm. Conclusions: Based on water tank measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron

  19. Influence of age on radioinduced cognitive disorders: Experimental studies with cerebral irradiation of 30 Gy in 10 sessions and 12 days in the Wistar rat at 1.5, 4 and 18 months; Influence de l'age sur les troubles cognitifs radioinduits : etudes experimentales avec irradiation cerebrale de 30 Gy en 10 seances et 12 jours chez le rat Wistar de 1 1/2, 4 et 18 mois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I. [Lab. de Chimie et Biophysique des Traceurs, Faculte de Medecine Xavier Bichat, Paris (France); Baillet, F.; Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Delattre, J.Y. [Dept. of Neurology and Inst. National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of age on the learning and memory dysfunction induced by cranial radiation in the male Wistar rat. Ninety-six 45-day-old, 70 4-month-old, and 78 18-month-old male rats were divided in two equal groups: (i) irradiated and (ii) control. A course of whole-brain radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days) was administered to the irradiated group, while the control group received sham irradiation. Sequential behavioral studies including one and two-way avoidance tests were undertaken before and after the 7 months following radiation. The results suggest that radiation induced progressive and irreversible memory dysfunction in elderly (18-month-old) rats, but this effect was partial or almost reversible in the 4-month-old and 45-day-old rats, respectively. In return, the learning dysfunction was age non-dependent despite the fact that is occurs more rapidly in the young (45 days, 4 months) rats. (author)

  20. Development of new chemical dosimeter for low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Adhikari, S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of low dose radiation in complex systems is of utmost importance in radiation biology and related areas. Ferrous Benzoic acid Xylenol orange (FBX) system is being widely used for measurement of low dose gamma radiation because of its reproducibility and precision. However, an additional step, i.e., dissolution of benzoic acid in water at higher temperature followed by cooling at room temperature is involved for the preparation of this dosimeter. This makes it inconvenient as a ready to use dosimeter. In the present work, the organic molecule, sorbitol has been used for measurement of low doses of radiation. The advantages of using sorbitol are its ready availability and instantaneous water solubility. Owing to its dissolution at room temperature, possible errors those are involved in calculation of dose due to thermal oxidation of ferrous ions during preparation of the FBX dosimetric solution could be made insignificant in the proposed dosimeter. In the present system, sorbitol acts as radiolytic sensitizer for the oxidation of ferrous ion, and xylenol orange forms a 1:1 complex specifically with ferric ions. Thus, the analytical detection limit of ferric ions is enhanced compared to other systems. Final composition of the dosimetric solution is; 0.5 mol/m 3 xylenol orange, 10 mol/m 3 sorbitol and 0.2 mol/m 3 ferrous ion in 50 mol/m 3 sulfuric acid. Radiolytic sensitization in combination with analytical enhancement of the ferrous based system, allows us to measure radiation dose in the range of 0.05 Gy–12 Gy with ease and high reproducibility.

  1. 90Y microsphere (TheraSphere) treatment for unresectable colorectal cancer metastases of the liver: response to treatment at targeted doses of 135-150 Gy as measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Robert J; Thurston, Kenneth G; Goin, James E; Wong, Ching-Yee O; Gates, Vanessa L; Van Buskirk, Mark; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Salem, Riad

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this phase II study was to determine the safety and efficacy of TheraSphere treatment (90Y microspheres) in patients with liver-dominant colorectal metastases in whom standard therapies had failed or were judged to be inappropriate. Twenty-seven patients with unresectable hepatic colorectal metastases were treated at a targeted absorbed dose of 135-150 Gy. Safety and toxicity were assessed according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Response was assessed with use of computed tomography (CT) and was correlated with response on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Survival from first treatment was estimated with use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Tumor response measured by FDG PET imaging exceeded that measured by CT imaging for the first (88% vs 35%) and second (73% vs 36%) treated lobes. Tumor replacement of 25% or less (vs >25%) was associated with a statistically significant increase in median survival (339 days vs 162 days; P = .002). Treatment-related toxicities included mild fatigue (n = 13; 48%), nausea (n = 4; 15%), and vague abdominal pain (n = 5; 19%). There was one case of radiation-induced gastritis from inadvertent deposition of microspheres to the gastrointestinal tract (n = 1; 4%). Three patients (11%) experienced ascites/pleural effusion after treatment with TheraSphere as a consequence of liver failure in advanced-stage metastatic disease. With the exception of these three patients whose sequelae were not considered to be related to treatment, all observed toxicities were transient and resolved without medical intervention. TheraSphere administration appears to provide stabilization of liver disease with minimal toxicity in patients in whom standard systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed.

  2. Colored Range Searching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Roberto; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2014-01-01

    In colored range searching, we are given a set of n colored points in d ≥ 2 dimensions to store, and want to support orthogonal range queries taking colors into account. In the colored range counting problem, a query must report the number of distinct colors found in the query range, while...... an answer to the colored range reporting problem must report the distinct colors in the query range. We give the first linear space data structure for both problems in two dimensions (d = 2) with o(n) worst case query time. We also give the first data structure obtaining almost-linear space usage and o...

  3. Directional Wide-Angle Range Finder (DWARF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation, the Directional Wide-Angle Range Finder (DWARF) is the creation of a laser range-finder with a wide field-of-view (FOV) and a directional...

  4. Lead Pollution of Shooting Range Soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    range. Most of the shooting range soils contained high levels of Pb in the range above 2000 mg kg–1 far exceeding the United States ... N. Sehube, R. Kelebemang, O. Totolo, M. Laetsang, O. Kamwi and P. Dinake,. 21 ..... Eng. Sci., 1999, 16,.

  5. Magnetic short range order in Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate magnetic short range order in Gd for 80 0 K 0 K. Short range order exists throughout this range from well below T/sub C/ = 291 0 K to well above it and can be reasonably well described by an anisotropic Orstein-Zernike form for chi

  6. Food sources of total omega 3 fatty acids (18:3 + 20:5 + 22:6), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food sources of total omega 3 fatty acids (18:3 + 20:5 + 22:6), listed in descending order by percentages of their contribution to intake, based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

  7. Ultra-wideband ranging precision and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGougan, Glenn; O'Keefe, Kyle; Klukas, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ultra-wideband (UWB) in the context of ranging applications and assesses the precision and accuracy of UWB ranging from both a theoretical perspective and a practical perspective using real data. The paper begins with a brief history of UWB technology and the most current definition of what constitutes an UWB signal. The potential precision of UWB ranging is assessed using Cramer–Rao lower bound analysis. UWB ranging methods are described and potential error sources are discussed. Two types of commercially available UWB ranging radios are introduced which are used in testing. Actual ranging accuracy is assessed from line-of-sight testing under benign signal conditions by comparison to high-accuracy electronic distance measurements and to ranges derived from GPS real-time kinematic positioning. Range measurements obtained in outdoor testing with line-of-sight obstructions and strong reflection sources are compared to ranges derived from classically surveyed positions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the potential applications for UWB ranging

  8. HEVC for high dynamic range services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hwan; Zhao, Jie; Misra, Kiran; Segall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Displays capable of showing a greater range of luminance values can render content containing high dynamic range information in a way such that the viewers have a more immersive experience. This paper introduces the design aspects of a high dynamic range (HDR) system, and examines the performance of the HDR processing chain in terms of compression efficiency. Specifically it examines the relation between recently introduced Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) ST 2084 transfer function and the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. SMPTE ST 2084 is designed to cover the full range of an HDR signal from 0 to 10,000 nits, however in many situations the valid signal range of actual video might be smaller than SMPTE ST 2084 supported range. The above restricted signal range results in restricted range of code values for input video data and adversely impacts compression efficiency. In this paper, we propose a code value remapping method that extends the restricted range code values into the full range code values so that the existing standards such as HEVC may better compress the video content. The paper also identifies related non-normative encoder-only changes that are required for remapping method for a fair comparison with anchor. Results are presented comparing the efficiency of the current approach versus the proposed remapping method for HM-16.2.

  9. Second research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project 'Development of strategies for the effective monitoring of veterinary drug residues in livestock and livestock products in developing countries' (D3.20.22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The second RCM under this CRP was held in Pretoria, South Africa, 3 - 7 November 2003. Eleven of the twelve research contract holders, three research agreement holders and one technical contract holder attended the RCM. The three research agreement holders gave presentations on relevant aspects of veterinary drug residues analysis. The increasingly important role of bioassay techniques such as reporter gene assays for the direct screening of the effects of hormonal and other residues in animal cells and the future role of such assays to complement existing instrumental techniques was highlighted. The technical contract holder and research contract holders reviewed the results of the research and method development performed under the first phase of the CRP. Considerable progress has been made in many aspects of the overall work plan. Several commercial immunoassay methods have been critically evaluated. The main problems identified with these kits were the instability of reagents, notably the enzyme conjugates, resulting in poor performance, and the need for better sample preparation protocols applicable to a wider range of matrices. Work plans have been agreed with several laboratories to attempt to address these problems. Good progress has been made in several laboratories working on the development of in-house ELISA methods for chloramphenicol residues. The laboratories involved have produced and characterized antisera in various species and these will be used with reagents produced by technical contract holders to elaborate assay protocols. Further investigation into aspects such as reagent stability, antibody maturation and assay development using various assay formats is planned. A full set of reagents and protocols for their optimisation in a 125 I radioimmunoassay (RIA) for chloramphenicol have been developed by the technical contract holders and transferred to a research contract holder for further method development. However, this researcher was unable to

  10. Willow Flycatcher Range - CWHR [ds594

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  11. Great Blue Heron Range - CWHR [ds609

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  12. Western Pond Turtle Range - CWHR [ds598

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  13. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  14. Caspian Tern Range - CWHR [ds604

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  15. Bank Swallow Range - CWHR [ds606

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  16. Close range photogrammetry and machine vision

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, KB

    1996-01-01

    This book presents the methodology, algorithms, techniques and equipment necessary to achieve real time digital photogrammetric solutions, together with contemporary examples of close range photogrammetry.

  17. Common Loon Range - CWHR [ds603

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  18. Yellow Warbler Range - CWHR [ds607

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  19. Black Swift Range - CWHR [ds605

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  20. Autonomous system for launch vehicle range safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Bob; Haley, Sam

    2001-02-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is a launch vehicle subsystem whose ultimate goal is an autonomous capability to assure range safety (people and valuable resources), flight personnel safety, flight assets safety (recovery of valuable vehicles and cargo), and global coverage with a dramatic simplification of range infrastructure. The AFSS is capable of determining current vehicle position and predicting the impact point with respect to flight restriction zones. Additionally, it is able to discern whether or not the launch vehicle is an immediate threat to public safety, and initiate the appropriate range safety response. These features provide for a dramatic cost reduction in range operations and improved reliability of mission success. .

  1. Black Rail Range - CWHR [ds595

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  2. Bald Eagle Range - CWHR [ds600

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  3. California Tiger Salamander Range - CWHR [ds588

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  4. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  5. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Michael; Huber, Wolfgang; Pagès, Hervé; Aboyoun, Patrick; Carlson, Marc; Gentleman, Robert; Morgan, Martin T; Carey, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  6. Snowy Egret Range - CWHR [ds611

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  7. Giant Garter Snake Range - CWHR [ds599

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  8. Least Bittern Range - CWHR [ds608

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  9. Arroyo Toad Range - CWHR [ds612

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  10. Dosimetry in the multi kilo-Gray range using optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermally-transferred OSL from quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbidge, C.I.; Cabo Verde, S.I.; Fernandes, A.C.; Prudencio, M.I.; Botelho, M.L.; Dias, M.I.; Cardoso, G.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the potential for using photon-stimulated luminescence of quartz grains to retrospectively evaluate multi-kGy gamma radiation doses. Subsamples from two ceramic tiles were given 60 Co gamma doses of 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30 kGy (nominal), accompanied by PMMA dosimeters and quartz grains from a geological sample known to exhibit thermally-transferred optically-stimulated luminescence (TTOSL). Following gamma irradiation, quartz grains were prepared from each subsample. OSL and TTOSL signals were measured for different preheat temperatures, and following re-irradiation with beta doses designed to equal the nominal gamma doses. OSL responses to 10 Gy beta test doses were measured following each cycle of high dose irradiation. Gamma doses were predicted from the beta responses, to evaluate the effectiveness of retrospective dose evaluation for different signal integrals, preheat combinations, and dose intervals. The use of linear modulation limited maximum OSL signal levels to 1.5 x 10 6 cps without reducing detector sensitivity, for the measurement of smaller TTOSL signals. The dosimetric behaviour of the three samples differed significantly: the best results were obtained from the pre-prepared geological quartz. OSL signals evident at short stimulation times, which are conventionally used for dosimetry and dating, did not in general appear appropriate for dosimetry in the range of doses examined. They exhibited dose response characteristics that were highly preheat dependant and variable in form between samples, which contained rapidly saturating and/or non-monotonic components. Higher preheats, up to 300 o C, preferentially removed OSL and TTOSL signals evident at longer stimulation times: those that remained yielded growth in signal with dose to approximately 10 kGy, but the accuracy of retrospective dose determinations was variable. TTOSL signals evident at short stimulation times increased proportionally with dose when 300 o C preheats were used, up

  11. 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the 2011 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. As is typical with odd year editions, this is an abbreviated Range Safety Annual Report providing updates and links to full articles from the previous year's report. It also provides more complete articles covering new subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed and updated in the 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2011 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again the web-based format was used to present the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition and hope you enjoy this year's product as well. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. In conclusion, it has been a busy and productive year. I'd like to extend a personal Thank You to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the upcoming year.

  12. Radio Ranging Techniques to test Relativistic Gravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Cowsik, R.

    1999-01-01

    It is suggested that modern techniques of radio ranging when applied to study the motion of the Moon, can improve the accuracy of tests of relativistic gravitation obtained with currently operating laser ranging techniques. Other auxillary information relevant to the Solar system would also emerge from such a study.

  13. 5 CFR 534.502 - Pay range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay range. 534.502 Section 534.502 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.502 Pay range. A pay rate fixed under this...

  14. Tests of Gravity Using Lunar Laser Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Merkowitz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lunar laser ranging (LLR has been a workhorse for testing general relativity over the past four decades. The three retroreflector arrays put on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts and the French built arrays on the Soviet Lunokhod rovers continue to be useful targets, and have provided the most stringent tests of the Strong Equivalence Principle and the time variation of Newton’s gravitational constant. The relatively new ranging system at the Apache Point 3.5 meter telescope now routinely makes millimeter level range measurements. Incredibly, it has taken 40 years for ground station technology to advance to the point where characteristics of the lunar retroreflectors are limiting the precision of the range measurements. In this article, we review the gravitational science and technology of lunar laser ranging and discuss prospects for the future.

  15. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Broiler Chickens 2: Individual Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-07-20

    Little is known about broiler chicken ranging behaviour. Previous studies have monitored ranging behaviour at flock level but whether individual ranging behaviour varies within a flock is unknown. Using Radio Frequency Identification technology, we tracked 1200 individual ROSS 308 broiler chickens across four mixed sex flocks in two seasons on one commercial farm. Ranging behaviour was tracked from first day of range access (21 days of age) until 35 days of age in winter flocks and 44 days of age in summer flocks. We identified groups of chickens that differed in frequency of range visits: chickens that never accessed the range (13 to 67% of tagged chickens), low ranging chickens (15 to 44% of tagged chickens) that accounted for range visits and included chickens that used the range only once (6 to 12% of tagged chickens), and high ranging chickens (3 to 9% of tagged chickens) that accounted for 33 to 50% of all range visits. Males spent longer on the range than females in winter ( p ranging behaviour may help optimise ranging opportunities in free-range systems and is important to elucidate the potential welfare implications of ranging.

  16. A general approach for cache-oblivious range reporting and approximate range counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Hamilton, Chris; Zeh, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    We present cache-oblivious solutions to two important variants of range searching: range reporting and approximate range counting. Our main contribution is a general approach for constructing cache-oblivious data structures that provide relative (1+ε)-approximations for a general class of range c...

  17. Volume higher; spot price ranges widen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is the October 1994 uranium market summary. During this reporting period, volume on the spot concentrates market doubled. Twelve deals took place: three in the spot concentrates market, one in the medium and long-term market, four in the conversion market, and four in the enrichment market. The restricted price range widened due to higher prices at the top end of the range, while the unrestricted price range widened because of lower prices at the bottom end. Spot conversion prices were higher, and enrichment prices were unchanged

  18. Compressed Data Structures for Range Searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2015-01-01

    matrices and web graphs. Our contribution is twofold. First, we show how to compress geometric repetitions that may appear in standard range searching data structures (such as K-D trees, Quad trees, Range trees, R-trees, Priority R-trees, and K-D-B trees), and how to implement subsequent range queries...... on the compressed representation with only a constant factor overhead. Secondly, we present a compression scheme that efficiently identifies geometric repetitions in point sets, and produces a hierarchical clustering of the point sets, which combined with the first result leads to a compressed representation...

  19. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  20. Problems in implementing improved range management on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Africa; Australia; Livestock development; Pastoral communities; Rangeland development; Rangeland systems; Sustainability; development; ecology; holism; pastoralism; range management; strategies; environment; water; health; crop production; rangelands; resource management; north africa; holistic approach ...

  1. Magnetic short-range order in Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic short-range order in a ferromagnetic, isotopically enriched 160 Gd metal single crystal has been investigated by quasielastic scattering of 81-meV neutrons. Since Gd behaves as an S-state ion in the metal, little anisotropy is expected in its magnetic behavior. However, the data show that there is anisotropic short-range order present over a large temperature interval both above and below T/sub C/. The data have been analyzed in terms of an Ornstein-Zernike Lorentzian form with anisotropic correlation ranges. These correlation ranges as deduced from the observed data behave normally above T/sub C/ but seem to remain constant over a fairly large interval below T/sub C/ before becoming unobservable at lower temperatures. These observations suggest that the magnetic ordering in Gd may be a more complicated phenomenon than first believed

  2. Long range diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, I.S.; Scherrer, P.; Ross, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    The diffusion of H in single crystals of YH 0.2 is investigated by means of Quasielastic neutron scattering between 593 K and 695 K. Individual jump rates giving rise to long range and local diffusion are determined. (orig.)

  3. African Journal of Range and Forage Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Range & Forage Science is the leading rangeland and pastoral journal in Africa. The Journal is dedicated to publishing quality original material that advances rangeland ecology and pasture management in Africa. Read more abou the journal here.

  4. Normal range of human dietary sodium intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarron, David A; Kazaks, Alexandra G; Geerling, Joel C

    2013-01-01

    The recommendation to restrict dietary sodium for management of hypertensive cardiovascular disease assumes that sodium intake exceeds physiologic need, that it can be significantly reduced, and that the reduction can be maintained over time. In contrast, neuroscientists have identified neural...... circuits in vertebrate animals that regulate sodium appetite within a narrow physiologic range. This study further validates our previous report that sodium intake, consistent with the neuroscience, tracks within a narrow range, consistent over time and across cultures....

  5. Poisson filtering of laser ranging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Shelus, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The filtering of data in a high noise, low signal strength environment is a situation encountered routinely in lunar laser ranging (LLR) and, to a lesser extent, in artificial satellite laser ranging (SLR). The use of Poisson statistics as one of the tools for filtering LLR data is described first in a historical context. The more recent application of this statistical technique to noisy SLR data is also described.

  6. Makran Mountain Range, Iran and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The long folded mountain ridges and valleys of the coastal Makran Ranges of Iran and Pakistan (26.0N, 63.0E) illustrate the classical Trellis type of drainage pattern, common in this region. The Dasht River and its tributaries is the principal drainage network for this area. To the left, the continental drift of the northward bound Indian sub-continent has caused the east/west parallel ranges to bend in a great northward arc.

  7. Long-range spin deformations around quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, M.; Gunn, M.

    1989-01-01

    The quasi-particle formed by a hole in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet has an associated long-range spin distortion whose amplitude increases with the velocity of the hole. The authors show that the existence and properties of this distortion follow from simple classical arguments based on the long-wavelength equations of motion for the spin system. A similar long-range distortion is found in the quantum-mechanical problem of an electron exchange coupled to a Heisenberg antiferromagnet

  8. Hamiguitan Range: A sanctuary for native flora

    OpenAIRE

    Amoroso, Victor B.; Aspiras, Reyno A.

    2010-01-01

    Hamiguitan Range is one of the wildlife sanctuaries in the Philippines having unique biodiversity resources that are at risk due to forest degradation and conversion of forested land to agriculture, shifting cultivation, and over-collection. Thus, it is the main concern of this research to identify and assess the endemic and endangered flora of Hamiguitan Range. Field reconnaissance and transect walk showed five vegetation types namely: agro-ecosystem, dipterocarp, montane, typical mossy and ...

  9. Organic and free-range egg production

    OpenAIRE

    Hammershøj, M.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter includes information on the development of the free range and the organic egg production and their market shares in different countries. Consumer behaviour is investigated particularly in relation to the price and availability of non-cage eggs. Regulations on the production of free range and organic eggs and their present and future impact are examined. Nutrient supply, animal welfare, productivity, safety and environmental impact of the types of egg production are covered with a...

  10. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  11. A methodology for direct quantification of over-ranging length in helical computed tomography with real-time dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Christopher J; Winslow, James F; Hintenlang, David E

    2011-01-31

    In helical computed tomography (CT), reconstruction information from volumes adjacent to the clinical volume of interest (VOI) is required for proper reconstruction. Previous studies have relied upon either operator console readings or indirect extrapolation of measurements in order to determine the over-ranging length of a scan. This paper presents a methodology for the direct quantification of over-ranging dose contributions using real-time dosimetry. A Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multislice helical CT scanner is used with a novel real-time "point" fiber-optic dosimeter system with 10 ms temporal resolution to measure over-ranging length, which is also expressed in dose-length-product (DLP). Film was used to benchmark the exact length of over-ranging. Over-ranging length varied from 4.38 cm at pitch of 0.5 to 6.72 cm at a pitch of 1.5, which corresponds to DLP of 131 to 202 mGy-cm. The dose-extrapolation method of Van der Molen et al. yielded results within 3%, while the console reading method of Tzedakis et al. yielded consistently larger over-ranging lengths. From film measurements, it was determined that Tzedakis et al. overestimated over-ranging lengths by one-half of beam collimation width. Over-ranging length measured as a function of reconstruction slice thicknesses produced two linear regions similar to previous publications. Over-ranging is quantified with both absolute length and DLP, which contributes about 60 mGy-cm or about 10% of DLP for a routine abdominal scan. This paper presents a direct physical measurement of over-ranging length within 10% of previous methodologies. Current uncertainties are less than 1%, in comparison with 5% in other methodologies. Clinical implantation can be increased by using only one dosimeter if codependence with console readings is acceptable, with an uncertainty of 1.1% This methodology will be applied to different vendors, models, and postprocessing methods--which have been shown to produce over-ranging lengths

  12. Range Reference Atmosphere 0-70 Km Altitude. Kwajalein Missile Range, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    DOCUMENT 360-82 KWAJALEIN MISSILE RANGE KWAJALEIN, MARSHALL ISLANDS RANGE REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE 0-70 KM ALTITUDE, C00 L’’I METEOROLOGY GROUP .RANGE...34Reference Atmosphere (Part 1), Kwajale 4n Missile Range, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands ," ADA002664. * 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revorsae d. If necoeewy...CLASSIFICATION OF TIlS PAGE (Whe~n Data EnterecD -v DOCUMENT 360-82 Vo- KWAJALEIN MISSILE RANGE KWAJALEIN, MARSHALL ISLANDS RANGE REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE 0-70 km

  13. Implications of stress range for inelastic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabin, M.E.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    The elastic stress range over a complete load cycle is routinely used to formulate simplified rules regarding the inelastic behavior of structures operating at elevated temperature. For example, a 300 series stainless steel structure operating at elevated temperature, in all probability, would satisfy the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria if the linearized elastic stress range is less than three times the material yield strength. However, at higher elastic stress ranges it is difficult to judge, a priori, that a structural component would comply with inelastic Code criteria after a detailed inelastic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that it is not the elastic stress range but the stress intensities at specific times during a thermal transient which provide a better insight into the inelastic response of the structure. The specific example of the CRBRP flued head design demonstrates that the temperature differential between various parts of the structure can be changed by modifying the insulation pattern and heat flow path in the structure, without significantly altering the elastic stress range over a complete load cycle. However, the modified design did reduce the stress intensity during steady state elevated temperature operation. This modified design satisfied the inelastic Code criteria whereas the initial design failed to comply with the strain accumulation criterion

  14. Examining fluvial fish range loss with SDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew T.; Papeş, Monica; Long, James M.

    2018-01-01

    Fluvial fishes face increased imperilment from anthropogenic activities, but the specific factors contributing most to range declines are often poorly understood. For example, the range of the fluvial‐specialist shoal bass (Micropterus cataractae) continues to decrease, yet how perceived threats have contributed to range loss is largely unknown. We used species distribution models to determine which factors contributed most to shoal bass range loss. We estimated a potential distribution based on natural abiotic factors and a series of currently occupied distributions that incorporated variables characterizing land cover, non‐native species, and river fragmentation intensity (no fragmentation, dams only, and dams and large impoundments). We allowed interspecific relationships between non‐native congeners and shoal bass to vary across fragmentation intensities. Results from the potential distribution model estimated shoal bass presence throughout much of their native basin, whereas models of currently occupied distribution showed that range loss increased as fragmentation intensified. Response curves from models of currently occupied distribution indicated a potential interaction between fragmentation intensity and the relationship between shoal bass and non‐native congeners, wherein non‐natives may be favored at the highest fragmentation intensity. Response curves also suggested that >100 km of interconnected, free‐flowing stream fragments were necessary to support shoal bass presence. Model evaluation, including an independent validation, suggested that models had favorable predictive and discriminative abilities. Similar approaches that use readily available, diverse, geospatial data sets may deliver insights into the biology and conservation needs of other fluvial species facing similar threats.

  15. Variability of Diurnal Temperature Range During Winter Over Western Himalaya: Range- and Altitude-Wise Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, M. S.; Devi, Usha; Dash, S. K.; Singh, G. P.; Singh, Amreek

    2018-04-01

    The current trends in diurnal temperature range, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, mean temperature, and sun shine hours over different ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya during winter have been studied. Analysis of 25 years of data shows an increasing trend in diurnal temperature range over all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya during winter, thereby confirming regional warming of the region due to present climate change and global warming. Statistical studies show significant increasing trend in maximum temperature over all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya. Minimum temperature shows significant decreasing trend over Pir Panjal and Shamshawari range and significant increasing trend over higher altitude of Western Himalaya. Similarly, sunshine hours show significant decreasing trend over Karakoram range. There exists strong positive correlation between diurnal temperature range and maximum temperature for all the ranges and altitudes of Western Himalaya. Strong negative correlation exists between diurnal temperature range and minimum temperature over Shamshawari and Great Himalaya range and lower altitude of Western Himalaya. Sunshine hours show strong positive correlation with diurnal temperature range over Pir Panjal and Great Himalaya range and lower and higher altitudes.

  16. Meteorological perspective on intermediate range atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Hoven, I.

    1981-01-01

    The intermediate range of atmospheric transport and diffusion is defined as those dispersion processes which take place at downwind distances of 10 to 100 kilometers from pollutant sources. Meteorologists often define this range as the mesoscale. It is the range of distances where certain environmental assessments are of concern such as the determination of significant deterioration of visibility, the effect of effluent releases from tall stacks, and the effect of pollutant sources in rural settings upon the more distant urban centers. Atmospheric diffusion theory is based on steady state conditions and spatial homogeniety. Techniques must be developed to measure the inhomogenieties, models must be devised to account for the complexities, and a data base consisting of appropriate measured meteorological parameters concurrent with tracer gas concentrations should be collected

  17. Range distributions in multiply implanted targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, S.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Armour, D.G.; Carter, G.; Salford Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Range distributions in inhomogeneous binary targets have been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Silicon single crystal targets [(111) orientation] were implanted with 40 keV Pb + ions to fluences in the range from 5x10 14 to 7.5x10 16 cm -2 prior to bombardment with 80 keV Kr + ions to a fluence of 5x10 15 cm -2 . The samples were analysed using high resolution Rutherford backscattering before and after the krypton implantation in order to determine the dependence of the krypton distribution on the amount of lead previously implanted. The theoretical analysis was undertaken using the formalism developed in [1] and the computer simulation was based on the MARLOWE code. The agreement between the experimental, theoretical and computational krypton profiles is very good and the results indicate that accurate prediction of ranges profiles in inhomogeneous binary targets is possible using available theoretical and computational treatments. (orig.)

  18. Hip strength and range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosler, Andrea B.; Crossley, Kay M.; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the normal profiles for hip strength and range of motion (ROM) in a professional football league in Qatar, and examine the effect of leg dominance, age, past history of injury, and ethnicity on these profiles. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Participants...... values are documented for hip strength and range of motion that can be used as reference profiles in the clinical assessment, screening, and management of professional football players. Leg dominance, recent past injury history and ethnicity do not need to be accounted for when using these profiles...... included 394 asymptomatic, male professional football players, aged 18–40 years. Strength was measured using a hand held dynamometer with an eccentric test in side-lying for hip adduction and abduction, and the squeeze test in supine with 45° hip flexion. Range of motion measures included: hip internal...

  19. High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Multiple Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xinglin; Luo, Haibo; Zhou, Peipei; Zhou, Wei

    2017-06-01

    It is challenging to capture a high-dynamic range (HDR) scene using a low-dynamic range (LDR) camera. This paper presents an approach for improving the dynamic range of cameras by using multiple exposure images of same scene taken under different exposure times. First, the camera response function (CRF) is recovered by solving a high-order polynomial in which only the ratios of the exposures are used. Then, the HDR radiance image is reconstructed by weighted summation of the each radiance maps. After that, a novel local tone mapping (TM) operator is proposed for the display of the HDR radiance image. By solving the high-order polynomial, the CRF can be recovered quickly and easily. Taken the local image feature and characteristic of histogram statics into consideration, the proposed TM operator could preserve the local details efficiently. Experimental result demonstrates the effectiveness of our method. By comparison, the method outperforms other methods in terms of imaging quality.

  20. Inertial-range spectrum of whistler turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical model of an inertial-range energy spectrum for homogeneous whistler turbulence. The theory is a generalization of the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan concept of the inertial-range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. In the model the dispersion relation is used to derive scaling laws for whistler waves at highly oblique propagation with respect to the mean magnetic field. The model predicts an energy spectrum for such whistler waves with a spectral index −2.5 in the perpendicular component of the wave vector and thus provides an interpretation about recent discoveries of the second inertial-range of magnetic energy spectra at high frequencies in the solar wind.

  1. Range calculations using multigroup transport methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, T.J.; Robinson, M.T.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Several aspects of radiation damage effects in fusion reactor neutron and ion irradiation environments are amenable to treatment by transport theory methods. In this paper, multigroup transport techniques are developed for the calculation of particle range distributions. These techniques are illustrated by analysis of Au-196 atoms recoiling from (n,2n) reactions with gold. The results of these calculations agree very well with range calculations performed with the atomistic code MARLOWE. Although some detail of the atomistic model is lost in the multigroup transport calculations, the improved computational speed should prove useful in the solution of fusion material design problems

  2. Long range correlations in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochicchio, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Off diagonal long range order (ODLRO) correlations are strongly related with the generalized Bose-Einstein condensation. Under certain boundary conditions, one implies the other. These phenomena are of great importance in the description of quantum situations with a macroscopic manifestation (superfluidity, superconductivity, etc.). Since ion pairs are not bosons, the definition of ODLRO is modified. The information contained with the 2-particle propagator (electron pairs) and the consequences that lead to pairs statistics are shown in this presentation. The analogy between long range correlations and fluids is also analyzed. (Author). 17 refs

  3. Distance Ranging Based on Quantum Entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jun-Jun; Han Xiao-Chun; Zeng Gui-Hua; Fang Chen; Zhao Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    In the quantum metrology, applications of quantum techniques based on entanglement bring in some better performances than conventional approaches. We experimentally investigate an application of entanglement in accurate ranging based on the second-order coherence in the time domain. By a fitting algorithm in the data processing, the optimization results show a precision of ±200 μm at a distance of 1043.3m. In addition, the influence of jamming noise on the ranging scheme is studied. With some different fitting parameters, the result shows that the proposed scheme has a powerful anti-jamming capability for white noise

  4. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  5. Range conditions for a spherical mean transform

    KAUST Repository

    Agranovsky, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The paper is devoted to the range description of the Radon type transform that averages a function over all spheres centered on a given sphere. Such transforms arise naturally in thermoacoustic tomography, a novel method of medical imaging. Range descriptions have recently been obtained for such transforms, and consisted of smoothness and support conditions, moment conditions, and some additional orthogonality conditions of spectral nature. It has been noticed that in odd dimensions, surprisingly, the moment conditions are superfluous and can be eliminated. It is shown in this text that in fact the same happens in any dimension.

  6. Short-range correlations with pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1976-01-01

    Short-range correlations in nuclei are considered on an unitary-model operator approach. Short-range pseudopotentials have been added to achieve healing in the correlated wave functions. With the introduction of the pseudopotentials, correlated basis wave functions are constructed. The matrix element for effective interaction in nuclei is developed. The required pseudopotentials have been calculated for the Hamda-Johnston, Yale and Reid potentials and for the nuclear nucleon-nucleon potential A calculated by us according to meson exchange between nucleons. (Osman, A.)

  7. High dynamic range coding imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renfan; Huang, Yifan; Hou, Guangqi

    2014-10-01

    We present a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system design scheme based on coded aperture technique. This scheme can help us obtain HDR images which have extended depth of field. We adopt Sparse coding algorithm to design coded patterns. Then we utilize the sensor unit to acquire coded images under different exposure settings. With the guide of the multiple exposure parameters, a series of low dynamic range (LDR) coded images are reconstructed. We use some existing algorithms to fuse and display a HDR image by those LDR images. We build an optical simulation model and get some simulation images to verify the novel system.

  8. Range conditions for a spherical mean transform

    KAUST Repository

    Agranovsky, Mark; Finch, David; Kuchment, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the range description of the Radon type transform that averages a function over all spheres centered on a given sphere. Such transforms arise naturally in thermoacoustic tomography, a novel method of medical imaging. Range descriptions have recently been obtained for such transforms, and consisted of smoothness and support conditions, moment conditions, and some additional orthogonality conditions of spectral nature. It has been noticed that in odd dimensions, surprisingly, the moment conditions are superfluous and can be eliminated. It is shown in this text that in fact the same happens in any dimension.

  9. Dynamic range meter for radiofrequency amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozd S. S.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The new measurement setup having increased on 20…30 dB the own dynamic range in comparison with the standard circuit of the dynamic range meter is offered and the rated value of an error bringing by setup in the worst case does not exceed ± 2,8 dB. The measurement setup can be applied also to determinate levels of intermodulation components average power amplifiers and powerful amplifiers of a low-frequency at replacement of the quartz filter on meeting low-frequency the LC-filter and the spectrum analyzer.

  10. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  11. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  12. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Broiler Chickens 1: Factors Related to Flock Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-07-20

    Little is known about the ranging behaviour of chickens. Understanding ranging behaviour is required to improve management and shed and range design to ensure optimal ranging opportunities. Using Radio Frequency Identification technology, we tracked 300 individual broiler chickens in each of four mixed sex ROSS 308 flocks on one commercial farm across two seasons. Ranging behaviour was tracked from the first day of range access (21 days of age) until 35 days of age in winter and 44 days of age in summer. Range use was higher than previously reported from scan sampling studies. More chickens accessed the range in summer (81%) than winter (32%; p range use was greater in summer flocks (4.4 ± 0.1 visits for a total of 26.3 ± 0.8 min/day) than winter flocks (3.2 ± 0.2 visits for a total of 7.9 ± 1.0 min/day). Seasonal differences were only marginally explained by weather conditions and may reflect the reduction in range exposure between seasons (number of days, hours per day, and time of day). Specific times of the day ( p ranging and external factors that may explain ranging preferences.

  13. Radar meteors range distribution model. I. Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecinová, Drahomíra; Pecina, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2007), s. 83-106 ISSN 1335-1842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/1405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : physics of meteors * radar meteors * range distribution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  14. Long-range terms in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.H.; Weaver, O.L.

    1986-01-01

    Various separations, or ''gauge choices,'' are possible for the decomposition of the total Hamiltonian into electronic and internuclear terms. We show that, for one particular choice, all long-range Coulomb terms are associated with the internuclear motion. The potential then associated with electronic transitions is non-Coulombic. Some practical consequences of this gauge choice are discussed

  15. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  16. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    high capacity transmission lines, solar arrays, and geothermal 4 | 2014 Sustainable Ranges Report February 2014 Chapter 1: Military Service... geothermal power and associated transmission infrastructure both on- and off-shore will require close attention to ensure the Marine Corps’ access...Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman; offshore wind development proposed south of Pearl Harbor, HI, NAWC China Lake, CA/Nevada Test

  17. Maximizing the Range of a Projectile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses solutions to the problem of maximizing the range of a projectile. Presents three references that solve the problem with and without the use of calculus. Offers a fourth solution suitable for introductory physics courses that relies more on trigonometry and the geometry of the problem. (MDH)

  18. A range of equipment for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, G.P.M.; Clement, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of the history of dental radiography is followed by a description of the latest Philips equipment, ranging from compact units for intra-oral radiography to advanced systems for panoramic techniques and skull radiography. The advantages of automatic exposure control and automatic film processing are also discussed. In conclusion, some probable future trends are forecast. (Auth.)

  19. Resources and Long-Range Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Waldo E.

    1973-01-01

    The author argues that forecasts of quick depletion of resources in the environment as a result of overpopulation and increased usage may not be free from error. Ignorance still exists in understanding the recovery mechanisms of nature. Long-range forecasts are likely to be wrong in such situations. (PS)

  20. Look Ahead: Long-Range Learning Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Faced with an unsteady economy and fluctuating learning needs, planning a learning strategy designed to last longer than the next six months can be a tall order. But a long-range learning plan can provide a road map for success. In this article, four companies (KPMG LLP, CarMax, DPR Construction, and EMC Corp.) describe their learning plans, and…

  1. Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Bryce A. Richardson; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original...

  2. Short range order of selenite glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neov, S.; Gerasimova, I.; Yordanov, S.; Lakov, L.; Mikula, Pavol; Lukáš, Petr

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (1999), s. 111-112 ISSN 0031-9090 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1010104 Keywords : short range * selenite glasses Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.822, year: 1999

  3. The frequency range of TMJ sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmalm, S E; Williams, W J; Djurdjanovic, D; McKay, D C

    2003-04-01

    There are conflicting opinions about the frequency range of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds. Some authors claim that the upper limit is about 650 Hz. The aim was to test the hypothesis that TMJ sounds may contain frequencies well above 650 Hz but that significant amounts of their energy are lost if the vibrations are recorded using contact sensors and/or travel far through the head tissues. Time-frequency distributions of 172 TMJ clickings (three subjects) were compared between recordings with one microphone in the ear canal and a skin contact transducer above the clicking joint and between recordings from two microphones, one in each ear canal. The energy peaks of the clickings recorded with a microphone in the ear canal on the clicking side were often well above 650 Hz and always in a significantly higher area (range 117-1922 Hz, P 375 Hz) or in microphone recordings from the opposite ear canal (range 141-703 Hz). Future studies are required to establish normative frequency range values of TMJ sounds but need methods also capable of recording the high frequency vibrations.

  4. Lunar ranging instrument for Chandrayaan-1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Committee on Scientific Values · Project Lifescape · Scientific Data of Public Interest ... Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI)proposed for the first Indian lunar ... field by precisely measuring the altitude from a polar orbit around the Moon. ... Laboratory for Electro-Optics Systems, Indian Space Research Organization ...

  5. On the validity range of piston theory

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meijer, M-C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The basis of linear piston theory in unsteady potential flow is used in this work to develop a quantitative treatment of the validity range of piston theory. In the limit of steady flow, velocity perturbations from Donov’s series expansion...

  6. Long range diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I S; Scherrer, P [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Ross, D K [Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics; Bonnet, J E [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE), Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1989-01-01

    The diffusion of H in single crystals of YH{sub 0.2} is investigated by means of Quasielastic neutron scattering between 593 K and 695 K. Individual jump rates giving rise to long range and local diffusion are determined. (orig.).

  7. Long range echo classification for minehunting sonars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theije, P.A.M. de; Groen, J.; Sabel, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focesus on single-ping classification of sea mines, at a range of about 400 m, and combining a hull mounted sonar (HMS) and a propelled variable-depth sonar (PDVS). The deleoped classifier is trained and tested on a set of simulated realistic echoes of mines and non-mines. As the mines

  8. Investigation of Kodak extended dose range (EDR) film for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Charland, Paule M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the measured optical density on the incident beam energy, field size and depth for a new type of film, Kodak extended dose range (Kodak EDR). Film measurements have been conducted over a range of field sizes (3x3 cm 2 to 25x25 cm 2 ) and depths (d max to 15 cm), for 6 MV and 15 MV photons within a solid water phantom, and the variation in sensitometric response (net optical density versus dose) has been reported. Kodak EDR film is found to have a linear response with dose, from 0 to 350 cGy, which is much higher than that typically seen for Kodak XV film (0-50 cGy). The variation in sensitometric response for Kodak EDR film as a function of field size and depth is observed to be similar to that of Kodak XV film; the optical density varied in the order of 2-3% for field sizes of 3x3 cm 2 and 10x10 cm 2 at depths of d max , 5 cm and 15 cm in the phantom. Measurements for a 25x25 cm 2 field size showed consistently higher optical densities at depths of d max , 5 cm and 15 cm, relative to a 10x10 cm 2 field size at 5 cm depth, with 4-5% differences noted at a depth of 15 cm. Fractional depth dose and profiles conducted with Kodak EDR film showed good agreement (2%/2 mm) with ion chamber measurements for all field sizes except for the 25x25 cm 2 at depths greater than 15 cm, where differences in the order of 3-5% were observed. In addition, Kodak EDR film measurements were found to be consistent with those of Kodak XV film for all fractional depth doses and profiles. The results of this study indicate that Kodak EDR film may be a useful tool for relative dosimetry at higher dose ranges. (author)

  9. Investigation of Kodak extended dose range (EDR) film for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Indrin J; Charland, Paule M

    2002-10-21

    We have investigated the dependence of the measured optical density on the incident beam energy, field size and depth for a new type of film, Kodak extended dose range (Kodak EDR). Film measurements have been conducted over a range of field sizes (3 x 3 cm2 to 25 x 25 cm2) and depths (d(max) to 15 cm), for 6 MV and 15 MV photons within a solid water phantom, and the variation in sensitometric response (net optical density versus dose) has been reported. Kodak EDR film is found to have a linear response with dose, from 0 to 350 cGy, which is much higher than that typically seen for Kodak XV film (0-50 cGy). The variation in sensitometric response for Kodak EDR film as a function of field size and depth is observed to be similar to that of Kodak XV film; the optical density varied in the order of 2-3% for field sizes of 3 x 3 cm2 and 10 x 10 cm2 at depths of d(max), 5 cm and 15 cm in the phantom. Measurements for a 25 x 25 cm2 field size showed consistently higher optical densities at depths of d(max), 5 cm and 15 cm, relative to a 10 x 10 cm2 field size at 5 cm depth, with 4-5% differences noted at a depth of 15 cm. Fractional depth dose and profiles conducted with Kodak EDR film showed good agreement (2%/2 mm) with ion chamber measurements for all field sizes except for the 25 x 25 cm2 at depths greater than 15 cm, where differences in the order of 3-5% were observed. In addition, Kodak EDR film measurements were found to be consistent with those of Kodak XV film for all fractional depth doses and profiles. The results of this study indicate that Kodak EDR film may be a useful tool for relative dosimetry at higher dose ranges.

  10. Metrological large range scanning probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Gaoliang; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Xu Min; Hasche, Klaus; Wilkening, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    We describe a metrological large range scanning probe microscope (LR-SPM) with an Abbe error free design and direct interferometric position measurement capability, aimed at versatile traceable topographic measurements that require nanometer accuracy. A dual-stage positioning system was designed to achieve both a large measurement range and a high measurement speed. This dual-stage system consists of a commercially available stage, referred to as nanomeasuring machine (NMM), with a motion range of 25 mmx25 mmx5 mm along x, y, and z axes, and a compact z-axis piezoelectric positioning stage (compact z stage) with an extension range of 2 μm. The metrological LR-SPM described here senses the surface using a stationary fixed scanning force microscope (SFM) head working in contact mode. During operation, lateral scanning of the sample is performed solely by the NMM. Whereas the z motion, controlled by the SFM signal, is carried out by a combination of the NMM and the compact z stage. In this case the compact z stage, with its high mechanical resonance frequency (greater than 20 kHz), is responsible for the rapid motion while the NMM simultaneously makes slower movements over a larger motion range. To reduce the Abbe offset to a minimum the SFM tip is located at the intersection of three interferometer measurement beams orientated in x, y, and z directions. To improve real time performance two high-end digital signal processing (DSP) systems are used for NMM positioning and SFM servocontrol. Comprehensive DSP firmware and Windows XP-based software are implemented, providing a flexible and user-friendly interface. The instrument is able to perform large area imaging or profile scanning directly without stitching small scanned images. Several measurements on different samples such as flatness standards, nanostep height standards, roughness standards as well as sharp nanoedge samples and 1D gratings demonstrate the outstanding metrological capabilities of the instrument

  11. Normal range of gastric emptying in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Collins, C.; Francis, L.; Henry, R.; O'Loughlin, E.; John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, NSW

    1999-01-01

    Full text: As part of a larger study looking at gastric emptying times in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the normal range of gastric emptying in a control group of children. Thirteen children (8 girls, 5 boys) aged 4-15 years (mean 10) were studied. Excluded were children with a history of relevant gastrointestinal medical or surgical disease, egg allergy or medication affecting gastric emptying. Imaging was performed at 08.00 h after an overnight fast. The test meal was consumed in under 15 min and comprised one 50 g egg, 80 g commercial pancake mix, 10 ml of polyunsaturated oil, 40 ml of water and 30 g of jam. The meal was labelled with 99 Tc m -macroaggregates of albumin. Water (150 ml) was also consumed with the test meal. One minute images of 128 x 128 were acquired over the anterior and posterior projections every 5 min for 30 min, then every 15 min until 90 min with a final image at 120 min. Subjects remained supine for the first 60 min, after which they were allowed to walk around. A time-activity curve was generated using the geometric mean of anterior and posterior activity. The half emptying time ranged from 55 to 107 min (mean 79, ± 2 standard deviations 43-115). Lag time (time for 5% to leave stomach) ranged from 2 to 26 min (mean 10). The percent emptied at 60 min ranged from 47 to 73% (mean 63%). There was no correlation of half emptying time with age. The normal reference range for a test meal of pancakes has been established for 13 normal children

  12. Flow Range of Centrifugal Compressor Being Extended

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    General Aviation will benefit from turbine engines that are both fuel-efficient and reliable. Current engines fall short of their potential to achieve these attributes. The reason is compressor surge, which is a flow stability problem that develops when the compressor is subjected to conditions that are outside of its operating range. Compressor surge can occur when fuel flow to the engine is increased, temporarily back pressuring the compressor and pushing it past its stability limit, or when the compressor is subjected to inlet flow-field distortions that may occur during takeoff and landing. Compressor surge can result in the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. Unfortunately, the most efficient operating line for the compressor is usually closer to its stability limit line than it is to the line that provides an adequate margin of safety. A wider stable flow range will permit operation along the most efficient operating line of the compressor, improving the specific fuel consumption of the engine and reducing emissions. The NASA Glenn Research Center is working to extend the stable flow range of the compressor. Significant extension has been achieved in axial compressors by injecting air upstream of the compressor blade rows. Recently, the technique was successfully applied to a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor by injecting streams of air into the diffuser. Both steady and controlled unsteady injection were used to inject air through the diffuser shroud surface and extend the range. Future work will evaluate the effect of air injection through the diffuser hub surface and diffuser vanes with the goal of maximizing the range extension while minimizing the amount of injected air that is required.

  13. Phase II, two-arm RTOG trial (94-11) of bischloroethyl-nitrosourea plus accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (64.0 or 70.4 Gy) based on tumor volume (> 20 or ≤ 20 cm2, respectively) in the treatment of newly-diagnosed radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.; Scott, C.; Langer, C.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Rubin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survivorship, and acute and delayed toxicities following radiation therapy (RT) of radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with tumor volume-influenced, high-dose accelerated, hyperfractionated RT plus bischloroethyl-nitrosourea (BCNU), using prior RTOG malignant glioblastoma patients as historical controls. Methods and Materials: One hundred four of 108 patients accrued from June 1994 through May 1995 from 26 institutions were analyzable. Patients were histologically confirmed with GBM, and previously untreated. Treatment assignment (52 patients/arm) was based on tumor mass (TM), defined as the product of the maximum diameter and greatest perpendicular dimension of the titanium-gadolinium-enhanced postoperative MRI: Arm A, 64 Gy, TM > 20 cm 2 ; or Arm B, 70.4 Gy, TM ≤ 20 cm 2 . Both Arms A and B received BCNU (80 mg/m 2 , under hyperhydration) days 1-3, 56-58, then 4 cycles, each 8 weeks, for a total of 6 treatment series. Results: During the 24 months immediately post-treatment, the overall median survival was 9.1 months in Arm A (64 Gy) and 11.0 months in Arm B (70.4 Gy). Median survival in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class III/IV was 10.4 months in Arm A and 12.2 months in Arm B, while RPA Class V/VI was 7.6 months in Arm A and 6.1 months in Arm B. There were no grade 4 neurological toxicities in Arm A; 2 grade 4 neurological toxicities were observed in Arm B (1 motor deficit, 1 necrosis at 157 days post-treatment). Conclusion: This strategy of high-dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy shortens overall RT treatment times while allowing dose escalation, and it provides the potential for combination with currently available, as well as newer, chemotherapy agents. Survival is comparable with previously published RTOG data, and toxicities are within acceptable limits.

  14. Individual Ranging Behaviour Patterns in Commercial Free-Range Layers as Observed through RFID Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Hannah; Cronin, Greg M; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Smith, Carolynn L; Hemsworth, Paul H; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-03-09

    In this exploratory study, we tracked free-range laying hens on two commercial flocks with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology with the aim to examine individual hen variation in range use. Three distinct outdoor zones were identified at increasing distances from the shed; the veranda [0-2.4 m], close range [2.4-11.4 m], and far range [>11.4 m]. Hens' movements between these areas were tracked using radio frequency identification technology. Most of the hens in both flocks (68.6% in Flock A, and 82.2% in Flock B) accessed the range every day during the study. Of the hens that accessed the range, most hens accessed all three zones (73.7% in Flock A, and 84.5% in Flock B). Hens spent half of their time outdoors in the veranda area. Within-individual consistency of range use (daily duration and frequency) varied considerably, and hens which were more consistent in their daily range use spent more time on the range overall ( p ranging behaviour may help elucidate the implications of ranging for laying hens.

  15. Relationship between welfare and individual ranging behaviour in commercial free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, H; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Gebhardt-Henrich, S G; Smith, C L; Rault, J-L

    2018-01-24

    Laying hens housed in free-range systems have access to an outdoor range, and individual hens within a flock differ in their ranging behaviour. Whether there is a link between ranging and laying hen welfare remains unclear. We analysed the relationships between ranging by individual hens on a commercial free-range layer farm and behavioural, physiological and health measures of animal welfare. We hypothesised that hens that access the range more will be (1) less fearful in general and in response to novelty and humans, (2) have better health in terms of physical body condition and (3) have a reduced physiological stress response to behavioural tests of fear and health assessments than hens that use the range less. Using radio frequency identification tracking across two flocks, we recorded individual hens' frequency, duration and consistency of ranging. We also assessed how far hens ventured into the range based on three zones: 0 to 2.4, 2.4 to 11.4 or >11.4 m from the shed. We assessed hen welfare using a variety of measures including: tonic immobility, open field, novel object, human approach, and human avoidance (HAV) behavioural tests; stress-induced plasma corticosterone response and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites; live weight, comb colour, and beak, plumage, footpad, and keel bone condition. Range use was positively correlated with plasma corticosterone response, faecal glucocorticoid metabolites, and greater flight distance during HAV. Hens that used the range more, moved towards rather than away from the novel object more often than hens that ranged less. Distance ranged from the shed was significantly associated with comb colour and beak condition, in that hens with darker combs and more intact beaks ranged further. Overall the findings suggest that there is no strong link between outdoor range usage and laying hen welfare. Alternatively, it may be that hens that differed in their ranging behaviour showed few differences in measures of welfare because

  16. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  17. Long-range alpha detector (LRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity, even if the particles are intercepted. Of necessity, these detectors are operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. In our new long-range alpha detector (LRAD), alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of about 30,000 ion pairs per MeV of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The LRAD-based monitor is more sensitive and more thorough than conventional monitors. We present current LRAD sensitivity limits and results, practical monitor designs, and proposed uses for LRAD monitors. 4 refs., 7 figs

  18. Visual Control of Robots Using Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Torres

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, 3D-vision systems based on the time-of-flight (ToF principle have gained more importance in order to obtain 3D information from the workspace. In this paper, an analysis of the use of 3D ToF cameras to guide a robot arm is performed. To do so, an adaptive method to simultaneous visual servo control and camera calibration is presented. Using this method a robot arm is guided by using range information obtained from a ToF camera. Furthermore, the self-calibration method obtains the adequate integration time to be used by the range camera in order to precisely determine the depth information.

  19. OPTIMAL AIRCRAFT TRAJECTORIES FOR SPECIFIED RANGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.

    1994-01-01

    For an aircraft operating over a fixed range, the operating costs are basically a sum of fuel cost and time cost. While minimum fuel and minimum time trajectories are relatively easy to calculate, the determination of a minimum cost trajectory can be a complex undertaking. This computer program was developed to optimize trajectories with respect to a cost function based on a weighted sum of fuel cost and time cost. As a research tool, the program could be used to study various characteristics of optimum trajectories and their comparison to standard trajectories. It might also be used to generate a model for the development of an airborne trajectory optimization system. The program could be incorporated into an airline flight planning system, with optimum flight plans determined at takeoff time for the prevailing flight conditions. The use of trajectory optimization could significantly reduce the cost for a given aircraft mission. The algorithm incorporated in the program assumes that a trajectory consists of climb, cruise, and descent segments. The optimization of each segment is not done independently, as in classical procedures, but is performed in a manner which accounts for interaction between the segments. This is accomplished by the application of optimal control theory. The climb and descent profiles are generated by integrating a set of kinematic and dynamic equations, where the total energy of the aircraft is the independent variable. At each energy level of the climb and descent profiles, the air speed and power setting necessary for an optimal trajectory are determined. The variational Hamiltonian of the problem consists of the rate of change of cost with respect to total energy and a term dependent on the adjoint variable, which is identical to the optimum cruise cost at a specified altitude. This variable uniquely specifies the optimal cruise energy, cruise altitude, cruise Mach number, and, indirectly, the climb and descent profiles. If the optimum

  20. KYPO Cyber Range: Design and Use Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Vykopal Jan; Ošlejšek Radek; Čeleda Pavel; Vizváry Martin; Tovarňák Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The physical and cyber worlds are increasingly intertwined and exposed to cyber attacks. The KYPO cyber range provides complex cyber systems and networks in a virtualized, fully controlled and monitored environment. Time-efficient and cost-effective deployment is feasible using cloud resources instead of a dedicated hardware infrastructure. This paper describes the design decisions made during it’s development. We prepared a set of use cases to evaluate the proposed design decisions and to de...

  1. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    interactive distance-learning as well as resident learning. Marine Corps Marine Corps has taken steps to include standardizing manning and training towards...time-sensitive land-based targets using air-to- ground (A-G) weapons. The STW range also supports tactics and operations associated with manned and...procedures. New larger exclusion zone for Somerton Airport (uncontrolled). If traffic increase impacts to MCAS flight ops and cuts into MCAS airspace

  2. Long-range correlations from colour confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, J.; Zenczykowski, P.

    1979-01-01

    A class of independent parton emission models is generalized by the introduction of the colour degrees of freedom. In the proposed models colour confinement extorts strong long-range forward-backward correlations, the rise of one-particle inclusive distribution and the KNO scaling. It leads to the analytically calculable definite asymptotic predictions for the D/ ratio which depends only on the choice of the colour group. Multiplicity distribution develops a remarkably long tail. (author)

  3. Gauge hierarchy and long range forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, P.B.; Keung, Wai-Yee; Chang, D.

    1990-01-01

    With the aid of simple examples, we show how a long range attractive force can arise in a gauge theory with a hierarchy. The force is due to the exchange of a Higgs boson whose mass and matter couplings are both naturally suppressed by the hierarchical mass ratio. Such bosons appear if there is an accidental global symmetry in the low-energy renormalizable Lagrangian after the high energy symmetry breaking. 6 refs

  4. Transfinite ranges and the local spectrum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cho, M.; Harte, R.; Müller, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 1 (2013), s. 403-408 ISSN 0022-247X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0473; GA AV ČR IAA100190903 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : transfinite ranges * Coeur algébrique * local spectrum Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.119, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X12007081

  5. Long-range interaction between spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.C.; Pradhan, T.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that invariance of Lagrangian field theory under a class of the coordinate-dependent Lorentz group of transformations requires the introduction of a massless axial vector gauge field which gives rise to a super-weak long-range spin-spin force between particles in vacuum. Recent experiments demonstrating repulsion and attraction between circularly polarised laser beams are interpreted to be due to such a force enhanced by spin polarisation of sodium vapour, through which these beams pass. (author)

  6. A Multi-Element Ultrasonic Ranging Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    of local tehiperature, in degrees Rankine (degrees Farenheit + 460 degrees). At 70 degrees F: c = 49.018 V ^60 + 70 = 1128 ft/sec At 30 degrees F...the RS-232. When acknowledged, the ranges sre sequentially dumped out the serial interface and placed by the Scheduler in Page Zero indexed storage...served, such as collision avoidance or object tracking, where absolute accuracies are not as important as is relative information

  7. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    SPECTRUM The growing prevalence of wireless technology and its demand for additional frequency conflicts with the DoD’s requirement to train for...HE R Beaver Training Area US UT ARNG 657 0 0 0 N N Y N N N N N N N N Beckley City Police Range US WV ARNG 2 0 0 0 N N N N Y N N N N N N Beech Fork

  8. Rapidly solidified long-range-ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Koch, C.C.; Liu, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of rapid solidification processing on the microstructure of long-range-ordered alloys in the (Fe, Co, Ni) 3 V system has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. The main microstructural feature of the as-quenched alloys was a fine cell structure (approx. 300 nm diameter) decorated with carbide particles. This structure was maintained aftr annealing treatments which develop the ordered crystal structure. Other features of the microstructures both before and after annealing are presented and discussed. 6 figures

  9. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Tortugas and Fort Jefferson. 3. The ASUW Mission Area for the range complex was deleted for the 2011 assessment; the assessment dropped from 9.09 to...Comments Noise Restrictions Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) Sonic booms generated by VFA aircraft in the vicinity of the Dry Tortugas reportedly startles...Environmental Assessment recommended stipulating the expansion of an existing buffer zone around the Dry Tortugas by 2,000 feet, from 18,000 to 20,000

  10. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  11. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    OpenAIRE

    F. F. van Ogtrop; R. W. Vervoort; G. Z. Heller; D. M. Stasinopoulos; R. A. Rigby

    2011-01-01

    Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a statistical model to forecast streamflow up to 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to determine th...

  12. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    OpenAIRE

    F. F. van Ogtrop; R. W. Vervoort; G. Z. Heller; D. M. Stasinopoulos; R. A. Rigby

    2011-01-01

    Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a probabilistic statistical model to forecast streamflow 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to determine the probabil...

  13. Brownian motion in short range random potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, A.H.; Romero, A.H.; Sancho, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study of Brownian motion of noninteracting particles in random potentials is presented. The dynamics are modeled by Langevin equations in the high friction limit. The random potentials are Gaussian distributed and short ranged. The simulations are performed in one and two dimensions. Different dynamical regimes are found and explained. Effective subdiffusive exponents are obtained and commented on. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutteridge, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the author, except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. These maps directly yield an absolute value for the water content of the sample that is unaffected by relaxation and any RF inhomogeneity or calibration errors in the radio frequency pulses applied. It has also been suggested that the signal generated by dipolar field effects may provide novel contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the third application, the effects of microscopic susceptibility variation on the signal are studied and the relaxation rate of the signal is compared to that of a conventional spin echo. (author)

  15. Scientific analysis of satellite ranging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.

    1994-01-01

    A network of satellite laser ranging (SLR) tracking systems with continuously improving accuracies is challenging the modelling capabilities of analysts worldwide. Various data analysis techniques have yielded many advances in the development of orbit, instrument and Earth models. The direct measurement of the distance to the satellite provided by the laser ranges has given us a simple metric which links the results obtained by diverse approaches. Different groups have used SLR data, often in combination with observations from other space geodetic techniques, to improve models of the static geopotential, the solid Earth, ocean tides, and atmospheric drag models for low Earth satellites. Radiation pressure models and other non-conservative forces for satellite orbits above the atmosphere have been developed to exploit the full accuracy of the latest SLR instruments. SLR is the baseline tracking system for the altimeter missions TOPEX/Poseidon, and ERS-1 and will play an important role in providing the reference frame for locating the geocentric position of the ocean surface, in providing an unchanging range standard for altimeter calibration, and for improving the geoid models to separate gravitational from ocean circulation signals seen in the sea surface. However, even with the many improvements in the models used to support the orbital analysis of laser observations, there remain systematic effects which limit the full exploitation of SLR accuracy today.

  16. Calibration device for wide range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodoku, Masaya; Sato, Toshifumi.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration device for a wide range monitor according to the present invention can continuously calibrate the entire counting regions of a wide range monitor. The wide range monitor detect the reactor power in the neutron source region by means of a pulse counting method and detects the reactor power in the intermediate region by means of a cambell method. A calibration signal outputting means is disposed for continuously outputting, as such calibration signals, pulse number varying signals in which the number of pulses per unit time varies depending on the reactor power in the neutron source region to be simulated and amplitude square means varying signal in which the mean square value of amplitude varies depending on the reactor power in the intermediate region to be simulated. By using both of the calibration signals, calibration can be conducted for the nuclear reactor power in the neutron source region and the intermediate region even if the calibration is made over two regions, further, calibration for the period present over the two region can be conducted easily as well. (I.S.)

  17. Lead Poisoning at an Indoor Firing Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Ju

    2017-10-01

    In March 2014, a 39-year-old Korean male presented with a 6-month history of various nonspecific symptoms including dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, irritability, elevated blood pressure, palpitation, eyestrain, and tinnitus. His occupational history revealed that he had been working as an indoor firing range manager for 13 months; therefore, he was subjected to a blood lead level (BLL) test. The test results showed a BLL of 64 μg/dL; hence, he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and immediately withdrawn from work. As evident from the workplace environmental monitoring, the level of lead exposure in the air exceeded its limit (0.015-0.387 mg/m³). He received chelation treatment with calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 g/day) for 5 days without any adverse effects. In the follow-up results after 2 months, the BLL had decreased to 9.7 μg/dL and the symptoms resolved. This report represents the first occupational case of lead poisoning in firing ranges in Korea, and this necessitates institutional management to prevent the recurrence of poisoning through this route. Workplace environmental monitoring should be implemented for indoor firing ranges, and the workers should undergo regularly scheduled special health examinations. In clinical practice, it is essential to question the patient about his occupational history. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  18. Long-range order in canary song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jeffrey E; Ivie, Elizabeth; Kligler, Laura; Gardner, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Bird songs range in form from the simple notes of a Chipping Sparrow to the rich performance of the nightingale. Non-adjacent correlations can be found in the syntax of some birdsongs, indicating that the choice of what to sing next is determined not only by the current syllable, but also by previous syllables sung. Here we examine the song of the domesticated canary, a complex singer whose song consists of syllables, grouped into phrases that are arranged in flexible sequences. Phrases are defined by a fundamental time-scale that is independent of the underlying syllable duration. We show that the ordering of phrases is governed by long-range rules: the choice of what phrase to sing next in a given context depends on the history of the song, and for some syllables, highly specific rules produce correlations in song over timescales of up to ten seconds. The neural basis of these long-range correlations may provide insight into how complex behaviors are assembled from more elementary, stereotyped modules.

  19. Hamiguitan Range: A sanctuary for native flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Victor B; Aspiras, Reyno A

    2011-01-01

    Hamiguitan Range is one of the wildlife sanctuaries in the Philippines having unique biodiversity resources that are at risk due to forest degradation and conversion of forested land to agriculture, shifting cultivation, and over-collection. Thus, it is the main concern of this research to identify and assess the endemic and endangered flora of Hamiguitan Range. Field reconnaissance and transect walk showed five vegetation types namely: agro-ecosystem, dipterocarp, montane, typical mossy and mossy-pygmy forests. Inventory of plant species revealed 163 endemic species, 35 threatened species, and 33 rare species. Assessment of plants also showed seven species as new record in Mindanao and one species as new record in the Philippines. Noteworthy is the discovery of Nepenthes micramphora, a new species of pitcher plant found in the high altitudes of Hamiguitan Range. This species is also considered site endemic, rare, and threatened. The result of the study also showed that the five vegetation types of Mt. Hamiguitan harbor a number of endangered, endemic, and rare species of plants. Thus, the result of this study would serve as basis for the formulation of policies for the protection and conservation of these species and their habitats before these plants become extinct.

  20. Free range hens use the range more when the outdoor environment is enriched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, T A D; Glatz, P C

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the role of using forage, shade and shelterbelts in attracting birds into the range, three trials were undertaken with free range layers both on a research facility and on commercial farms. Each of the trials on the free range research facility in South Australia used a total of 120 laying hens (Hyline Brown). Birds were housed in an eco-shelter which had 6 internal pens of equal size with a free range area adjoining the shelter. The on-farm trials were undertaken on commercial free range layer farms in the Darling Downs in Southeast Queensland with bird numbers on farms ranging from 2,000-6,800 hens. The first research trial examined the role of shaded areas in the range; the second trial examined the role of forage and the third trial examined the influence of shelterbelts in the range. These treatments were compared to a free range area with no enrichment. Aggressive feather pecking was only observed on a few occasions in all of the trials due to the low bird numbers housed. Enriching the free range environment attracted more birds into the range. Shaded areas were used by 18% of the hens with a tendency (p = 0.07) for more hens to be in the paddock. When forage was provided in paddocks more control birds (55%) were observed in the range in morning than in the afternoon (30%) while for the forage treatments 45% of the birds were in the range both during the morning and afternoon. When shelterbelts were provided there was a significantly (prange (43% vs. 24%) and greater numbers of birds were observed in areas further away from the poultry house. The results from the on-farm trials mirrored the research trials. Overall 3 times more hens used the shaded areas than the non shaded areas, with slightly more using the shade in the morning than in the afternoon. As the environmental temperature increased the number of birds using the outdoor shade also increased. Overall 17 times more hens used the shelterbelt areas than the control areas, with slightly