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Sample records for raney nickel catalysts

  1. Polymer-Supported Raney Nickel Catalysts for Sustainable Reduction Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Green is the future of chemistry. Catalysts with high selectivity are the key to green chemistry. Polymer-supported Raney catalysts have been found to have outstanding performance in the clean preparation of some chemicals. For example, a polyamide 6-supported Raney nickel catalyst provided a 100.0% conversion of n-butyraldehyde without producing any detectable n-butyl ether, the main byproduct in industry, and eliminated the two main byproducts (isopropyl ether and methyl-iso-butylcarbinol in the hydrogenation of acetone to isopropanol. Meanwhile, a model for how the polymer support brought about the elimination of byproducts is proposed and confirmed. In this account the preparation and applications of polymer-supported Raney catalysts along with the corresponding models will be reviewed.

  2. A nanostructural study of Raney-type nickel catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devred, F.

    2004-01-01

    Raney-type nickel catalysts have been applied in commercial hydrogenation reactions for decades. They are relatively cheap and have proven to be very efficient in hydrogenation. The preparation process is relatively simple, but it appears that many parameters have an influence on the performance of

  3. TOTAL HYDROGENATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED FURFURAL OVER RANEY NICKEL-CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Inexpensive Raney Ni-clay composite (R-Ni/clay catalysts exhibited excellent activity and reusability in the total hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural into tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol under mild conditions. For the Raney Ni-bentonite (R-Ni/BNT catalysts, the complete reaction was achieved at 393 K, 180 min giving almost 99% yield of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol. The R-Ni/BNT catalyst was found to be reusable without any significant loss of activity and selectivity for at least six consecutive runs.

  4. Influence of RANEY Nickel on the Formation of Intermediates in the Degradation of Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Forchheim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignin forms an important part of lignocellulosic biomass and is an abundantly available residue. It is a potential renewable source of phenol. Liquefaction of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin as well as catalytical hydrodeoxygenation of the main intermediates in the degradation of lignin, that is, catechol and guaiacol, was studied. The cleavage of the ether bonds, which are abundant in the molecular structure of lignin, can be realised in near-critical water (573 to 673 K, 20 to 30 MPa. Hydrothermal treatment in this context provides high selectivity in respect to hydroxybenzenes, especially catechol. RANEY Nickel was found to be an adequate catalyst for hydrodeoxygenation. Although it does not influence the cleavage of ether bonds, RANEY Nickel favours the production of phenol from both lignin and catechol. The main product from hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol with RANEY Nickel was cyclohexanol. Reaction mechanism and kinetics of the degradation of guaiacol were explored.

  5. Raney copper catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction - II. Initial catalyst optimisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mellor, JR

    1997-12-23

    Full Text Available The initial Raney copper WGS activity based on catalyst volume has been shown to be comparable to industrial and co-precipitated alternatives under varying reaction conditions. The presence of zinc oxide in the Raney copper structure was shown...

  6. Reactivity of hydrogen contained in Raney nickel for ethylene hydrogenation studied by means of a tritium tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatani, Daisaku; Takeuchi, Toyosaburo.

    1979-01-01

    Reactivity of hydrogen contained in Raney nickel with ethylene was studied by using a tritium tracer. Hydrogen in Raney nickel was previously labeled with tritium and distinguished from hydrogen introduced during the hydrogenation reaction. The reactivity of the contained hydrogen was determined by measurement of the radioactivity of ethane produced in the hydrogenation. Ethylene reacted with hydrogen in Raney nickel for no supply of hydrogen during the hydrogenation. However, when ethylene was hydrogenated by both hydrogen in Raney nickel and introduced hydrogen, over 99% of the ethylene reacted with the introduced hydrogen and hardly reacted with the contained hydrogen. (author)

  7. Hydrodeoxygenation of bio-derived phenols to hydrocarbons using RANEY Ni and Nafion/SiO2 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Kou, Yuan; Lemonidou, Angeliki A; Li, Xuebing; Lercher, Johannes A

    2010-01-21

    A simple, green, cost- and energy-efficient route for converting phenolic components in bio-oil to hydrocarbons and methanol has been developed, with nearly 100% yields. In the heterogeneous catalysts, RANEY Ni acts as the hydrogenation catalyst and Nafion/SiO(2) acts as the Brønsted solid acid for hydrolysis and dehydration.

  8. Hydrogenolysis of 2-tosyloxy-1,3-propanediol into 1,3-propanediol over Raney Ni catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Zheng; Jianli, Wang; Zhen, Lu; Min, Luo; Miao, Zhang; Lixin, Xu; Jianbing [Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Biofuel, The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry-Synthesis Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China)

    2013-03-15

    2-Tosyloxy-1,3-propanediol (TPD), a potential precursor for 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) production, is produced by the tosylation of glycerol with the help of protecting group techniques. In this work, the hydrogenolysis of TPD into 1,3-PD over Raney Ni catalyst is discussed at different reaction parameters to optimize the reaction conditions for selective formation of 1,3-PD. The mechanisms of the hydrogenolysis of TPD and the side reactions were also confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique (author)

  9. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  10. One step hydrogenation–esterification of model compounds and bio-oil to alcohols and esters over Raney Ni catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ying; Zhang, Limin; Chang, Jiamin; Zhang, Xinghua; Ma, Longlong; Wang, Tiejun; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe–RN and Mo–RN showed excellent inhibition of alkylation and hydrogenation activity of phenol respectively. • The esterification activity of alcohols with acetic acid was followed as methanol > THFA > ethanediol. • After OHE of bio-oil, the total content of alcohols and esters reached to 87.27% in the product. - Abstract: Acids, aldehydes, ketones and phenols, which are the main components of bio-oil, have negative effects on the properties. In this paper, the mixture of acetic acid, furfural, hydroxyacetone, ethanediol, phenol and water were chosen as hybrid model compounds of bio-oil (MCB). To convert these compounds into stable and combustible oxygenated organics (alcohols and esters), one step hydrogenation–esterification (OHE) was carried out over Raney Ni catalyst (RN) and Mo, Sn, Fe, Cu modified Raney Ni catalysts (RNs) in the presence of methanol. 100% conversions of furfural and hydroxyacetone were achieved over RNs with high selectivity to desired products. The acetic acid conversion was only 35.1% with no methanol addition, while within 6 g/8 g methanol/MCB addition, the conversion of acetic acid increased to 81.1%. The esterification activity of alcohols was followed by methanol > tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA), the hydrogenation product of furfural > ethanediol. Among the RNs, the addition of Fe catalyst restrained the aqueous-phase reforming of methanol and promoted the esterification of methanol and acetic acid. The Mo–RN showed the most favorable performance in the hydrogenation of phenol among the RNs. But the RN modified by both Fe and Mo did not give a good performance. After the OHE of light fraction of raw bio-oil over Mo–RN, there was no ketone & aldehyde detected and the contents of acids and phenols decreased from 49.04% and 7.35% to 8.21% and 3.84%. The conversion of acids could reach to 85.01% which was nearly to the conversion of acetic acid in MCB. The contents of alcohols and esters increased from 5

  11. Coadsorption and reaction of H2 and CO on Raney nickel: Neutron vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, R.D.; Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron vibration spectroscopy is used to study the adsorption and reaction of H 2 and Co on a catalytic nickel surface. The sample was first exposed to H 2 and than to CO. At low temperatures there is no change of vibrational modes of H in the three-fold site; at a higher temperature changes occur. Some conclusions are drawn on the reaction product. (G.Q.)

  12. Sintering of nickel steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Niels Wessel; Falsig, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    . In this paper, particle migration and coalescence in nickel steam reforming catalysts is studied. Density functional theory calculations indicate that Ni-OH dominate nickel transport at nickel surfaces in the presence of steam and hydrogen as Ni-OH has the lowest combined energies of formation and diffusion...

  13. Raney copper catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction: I. Preparation, activity and stability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mellor, JR

    1997-12-23

    Full Text Available , T Haltchev, V Kafedjiiski, B. Kunev, M. Kalchev, I. Orizarski, D. Shopov, Proceedings ofthe Sixth International Symposium, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Part 1, Sofia, 1987, p. 235. \\[18\\] W.L. Marsden, M.S. Wainwright, J.B. Friedrich, Ind. Eng. Chem, Prod... and Testing of Catalysts, Academic Press, New York, 1985. \\[33\\] J.M. Thomas, J.W. Thomas, Introduction to the Principles of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Academic Press, New York, 1975, p. 16. \\[34\\] A.D. Tomsett, H.E. Curry-Hyde, M.S. Wainwright. D.J. Young...

  14. Hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of difurfurylidene acetone to liquid alkanes over Raney Ni and the supported Pt catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuping; Huang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Lungang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The C_8−C_1_4 alkane yield of 82.9% was obtained in the two-step hydrogenation/HDO process. • Protonation effect from methanol solvent increased F_2A conversion in the two-step process. • The rate-determining step was acyl C=O bond hydrogenation in the first step of F_2A hydrogenation. • The acidic centers from SiO_2−ZrO_2 activated the acyl and oxygen atoms of intermediates. • Acidity of SiO_2−ZrO_2 and Pt active centers of 1 wt%Pt/SiO_2−ZrO_2 resulted stable HDO performance. - Abstract: Direct HDO process for difurfurylidene acetone dimer (F_2A) conversion to liquid alkanes (C_8−C_1_4) at 260 °C in a batch reactor was investigated over different material supported 1 wt%Pt catalysts, including SAPO-11, HZSM-5, SiO_2−Al_2O_3, MCM-22, and home-made SiO_2−ZrO_2. C_8−C_1_4 alkanes of 55.8% was obtained over the optimized 1 wt%Pt/SiO_2−ZrO_2 due to its proper pore size of 9.0 nm and moderate acidic centers, together with more than 10% carbon yield of the oxygenated hydrocarbons, including C_1_1−C_1_3 chain alcohols & ketones and the hydrogenated F_2A dimers with furan ring (H-F_2A dimers). To improve the liquid alkane yield, a two-step process for F_2A conversion was also investigated, which included low-temperature hydrogenation at 50 °C over Raney Ni catalyst in a batch reactor and the subsequent high-temperature hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) at 280 °C over 1 wt%Pt/SiO_2−ZrO_2 in a fixed-bed reactor. The selectivity of 1,5-di(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-3-pentanol (II-c) was the highest of 83.0% among the hydrogenated intermediates of H-F_2A dimers due to the protonation effect of methanol as the solvent and the hydrogenation of C=C bonds by Ni active centers. In the same time, the high content of this saturated alcohol H-dimer of II-C increased the solubility and stability of the intermediates in methanol solvent. High carbon yield of C_8−C_1_4 alkanes of 82.9%(mol) was obtained after oxygen atom removal from H-F_2A dimers via

  15. Carbon formation on nickel and nickel-copper alloy catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstrup, I.; Soerensen, O.; Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R. [Haldor Topsoe Research Labs., Lyngby (Denmark); Tavares, M.T.; Bernardo, C.A.

    1998-05-01

    Equilibrium, kinetic and morphological studies of carbon formation in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, CO, and CO + H{sub 2} gases on silica supported nickel and nickel-copper catalysts are reviewed. The equilibrium deviates in all cases from graphite equilibrium and more so in CO + CO{sub 2} than in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. A kinetic model based on information from surface science results with chemisorption of CH{sub 4} and possibly also the first dehydrogenation step as rate controlling describes carbon formation on nickel catalyst in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} well. The kinetics of carbon formation in CO and CO + H{sub 2} gases are in agreement with CO disproportionation as rate determining step. The presence of hydrogen influences strongly the chemisorption of CO. Carbon filaments are formed when hydrogen is present in the gas while encapsulating carbon dominates in pure CO. Small amounts of Cu alloying promotes while larger amounts (Cu : Ni {>=} 0.1) inhibits carbon formation and changes the morphology of the filaments (``octopus`` carbon formation). Adsorption induced nickel segregation changes the kinetics of the alloy catalysts at high carbon activities. Modifications suggested in some very recent papers on the basis of new results are also briefly discussed. (orig.) 31 refs.

  16. Urine nickel concentrations in nickel-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacki, E J; Parsons, G E; Roy, B R; Mikac-Devic, M; Kennedy, C D; Sunderman, F W

    1978-01-01

    Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was employed for analyses of nickel concentrations in urine samples from nickel-exposed workers in 10 occupational groups and from non-exposed workers in two control groups. Mean concentrations of nickel in urine were greatest in workers who were exposed to inhalation of aerosols of soluble nickel salts (e.g., workers in nickel plating operations and in an electrolytic nickel refinery). Less marked increases in urine nickel concentrations were found in groups of metal sprayers, nickel battery workers, bench mechanics and are welders. No significant increases in mean concentrations of nickel were found in urine samples from workers who performed grinding, buffing and polishing of nickel-containing alloys or workers in a coal gasification plant who employed Raney nickel as a hydrogenation catalyst. Measurements of nickel concentrations in urine are more sensitive and practical than measurements of serum nickel concentrations for evaluation of nickel exposures in industrial workers.

  17. Plated nickel wire mesh makes superior catalyst bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sill, M.

    1965-01-01

    Porous nickel mesh screen catalyst bed produces gas evolution in hydrogen peroxide thrust chambers used for attitude control of space vehicles. The nickel wire mesh disks in the catalyst bed are plated in rugose form with a silver-gold coating.

  18. Coprecipitated nickel-alumina methanation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruissink, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    In the last few years there has been a renewed interest in the methanation reaction CO+3H 2 =CH 4 +H 2 O. The investigations described in this thesis were performed in relation to the application of this reaction, within the framework of the so-called 'NFE' project, also called 'ADAM' and 'EVA' project. This project, which has been under investigation in West Germany for some years, aims at the investigation of the feasibility of transporting heat from a nuclear high temperature reactor by means of a chemical cycle. A promising possibility to realize such a cycle exists in applying the combination of the endothermic steam reforming of methane and the exothermic methanation reaction. This thesis describes the investigations into a certain type of methanation catalyst, viz. a coprecipitated nickel-alumina catalyst, with the aim to give more insight into the interrelationship between the preparation conditions on the one hand and catalyst properties such as activity and stability on the other hand. (Auth.)

  19. Nickel catalysts for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R.J.; Berger, R.J.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas may be used instead of hydrogen as fuel for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by steam reforming the natural gas inside the MCFC, using a nickel catalyst (internal reforming). The severe conditions inside the MCFC, however, require that the catalyst has a very high stability. In

  20. Pulsed laser dewetting of nickel catalyst for carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y F; Pearce, R C; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D; Melechko, A V; Hensley, D K

    2008-01-01

    We present a pulsed laser dewetting technique that produces single nickel catalyst particles from lithographically patterned disks for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth through plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Unlike the case for standard heat treated Ni catalyst disks, for which multiple nickel particles and consequently multiple carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are observed, single vertically aligned CNFs could be obtained from the laser dewetted catalyst. Different laser dewetting parameters were tested in this study, such as the laser energy density and the laser processing time measured by the total number of laser pulses. Various nickel disk radii and thicknesses were attempted and the resultant number of carbon nanofibers was found to be a function of the initial disk dimension and the number of laser pulses

  1. METHANE STEAM REACTION OVER NICKEL CATALYSTS IN THE HYNOL PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the reaction of methane-steam over nickel catalysts in the Hynol process, a process that uses biomass and natural gas as feedstocks to maximize methanol yields and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. EPA's APPCD has established a laboratory in which to conduct...

  2. Sintering of nickel catalysts. Effects of time, atmosphere, temperature, nickel-carrier interactions, and dopants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehested, Jens; Gelten, Johannes A.P.; Helveg, Stig [Haldor Topsoee A/S, Nymoellevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2006-08-01

    Supported nickel catalysts are widely used in the steam-reforming process for industrial scale production of hydrogen and synthesis gas. This paper provides a study of sintering in nickel-based catalysts (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Specifically the influence of time, temperature, atmosphere, nickel-carrier interactions and dopants on the rate of sintering is considered. To probe the sintering kinetics, all catalysts were analyzed by sulfur chemisorption to determine the Ni surface area. Furthermore selected samples were further analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), mercury porosimetry, BET area measurements, and electron microscopy (EM). The observed sintering rates as a function of time, temperature, and P{sub H{sub 2}O}/P{sub H{sub 2}} ratio were consistent with recent model predictions [J. Sehested, J.A.P. Gelten, I.N. Remediakis, H. Bengaard, J.K. Norskov, J. Catal. 223 (2004) 432] over a broad range of environmental conditions. However, exposing the catalysts to severe sintering conditions the loss of nickel surface area is faster than model predictions and the deviation is attributed to a change in the sintering mechanism and nickel removal by nickel-carrier interactions. Surprisingly, alumina-supported Ni particles grow to sizes larger than the particle size of the carrier indicating that the pore diameter does not represent an upper limit for Ni particle growth. The effects of potassium promotion and sulfur poisoning on the rates of sintering were also investigated. No significant effects of the dopants were observed after ageing at ambient pressure. However, at high pressures of steam and hydrogen (31bar and H{sub 2}O:H{sub 2}=10:1) potassium promotion increased the sintering rate relative to that of the unpromoted catalyst. Sulfur also enhances the rate of sintering at high pressures, but the effect of sulfur is less than for potassium. (author)

  3. Wet chemical synthesis of nickel supported on alumina catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Ranny Rodrigues; Costa, Talita Kenya Oliveira; Morais, Ana Carla da Fonseca Ferreira; Costa, Ana Cristina Figueiredo de Melo; Freitas, Normanda Lino de

    2016-01-01

    Heterogenic catalysts are those found to be in a different phase on the reaction when compared to the reactants and products. Preferred when compared to homogeneous catalysts due to the easiness on which the separation is processed. The objective of this study is to obtain and characterize Alumina based catalysts impregnated with Nickel (Al_2O_3), by wet impregnation. The alumina was synthesized by combustion reaction. Before and after the impregnation the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), granulometric analysis, the textural analysis will be held by nitrogen adsorption (BET), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show a presence of a stable crystalline phase of Al2O3 in all the studied samples and after the impregnation the second phase formed was of NiO and NiAl_2O_4. The Al_2O_3 e Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts resulted in clusters with a medium diameter of 18.9 and 14.2 μm, respectively. The catalysts show a medium-pore characteristic (medium pore diameter between 2 and 50 nm), the superficial area to Al_2O_3 and Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts were 8.69 m"2/g and 5.56 m"2/g, respectively. (author)

  4. Equilibrium problems for Raney densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng; Zinn-Justin, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The Raney numbers are a class of combinatorial numbers generalising the Fuss-Catalan numbers. They are indexed by a pair of positive real numbers (p, r) with p > 1 and 0 0 and similarly use both methods to identify the equilibrium problem for (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, 1/q), θ > 0 and q \\in Z+ . The Wiener-Hopf method is used to extend the latter to parameters (p, r) = (θ/q + 1, m + 1/q) for m a non-negative integer, and also to identify the equilibrium problem for a family of densities with moments given by certain binomial coefficients.

  5. The Effect of Annealing Temperature on Nickel on Reduced Graphene Oxide Catalysts on Urea Electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, Dean E.; Galvan, Vicente; Prakash, G.K. Surya

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Nickel was reduced on graphene oxide and annealed under argon from 300 to 700 °C. •Nickel was oxidized from the removal of oxygen groups on the graphene oxide. •Higher annealed catalysts displayed decreased urea electrooxidation currents. •Micro direct urea/hydrogen peroxide fuel cells were employed for the first time. •Ni/rGO catalysts displayed enhanced fuel cell performance than the bare nickel. -- Abstract: The annealing temperature effects on nickel on reduced graphene oxide (Ni/rGO) catalysts for urea electrooxidation were investigated. Nickel chloride was directly reduced in an aqueous solution of graphene oxide (GO) followed by annealing under argon at 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C, respectively. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed an increase in the crystallite size of the nickel nanoparticles while the Raman spectra displayed an increase in the graphitic disorder of the reduced graphene oxide at higher annealing temperatures due to the removal of oxygen functional groups. The Ni/rGO catalysts annealed at higher temperatures displayed oxidized nickel surface characteristics from the Ni 2p X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) due to the oxidation of the nickel from the oxygen functional groups in the graphitic lattice. In the half-cell testing, the onset potential of urea electrooxidation decreased while the urea electrooxidation currents decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. The nickel catalyst annealed at 700 °C displayed a 31% decrease in peak power density while the catalyst annealed at 300 °C displayed a 13% increase compared with the unannealed Ni/rGO catalyst in the micro direct urea/hydrogen peroxide fuel cells tests.

  6. Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid over Nickel Catalysts Supported on Aluminum Oxide to Prepare γ-Valerolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Fu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Four types of nickel catalysts supported on aluminum oxide (Ni/Al2O3 with different nickel loadings were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and were used for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA to prepare γ-valerolactone (GVL. The synthesized Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited excellent catalytic activity in dioxane, and the activity of the catalysts was excellent even after being used four times in dioxane. The catalytic activity in dioxane as a solvent was found to be superior to the activity in water. Nitrogen physisorption, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the fresh and used catalysts. The effects of the nickel loading, temperature, hydrogen pressure, and substrate/catalyst ratio on the catalytic activity were investigated.

  7. The effect of Ni-Al ratio on the properties of coprecipitated nickel-alumina catalysts with high nickel contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Bosch, H.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A series of nickel-alumina catalysts with a Ni/Al ratio between 3 and 20 has been prepared by coprecipitation. The calcination and reduction of these samples have been studied by thermogravimetry and their structures after calcination and reduction at different temperatures has been examined by

  8. Hydrogen-water deuterium exchange over metal oxide promoted nickel catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagert, N H; Shaw-Wood, P E; Pouteau, R M.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1975-11-01

    Specific rates have been measured for hydrogen-water deuterium isotope exchange over unsupported nickel promoted with about 20% of various metal oxides. The oxides used were Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MoO/sub 2/, MnO, WO/sub 2/-WO/sub 3/, and UO/sub 2/. Nickel surface areas, which are required to measure the specific rates, were determined by hydrogen chemisorption. Specific rates were measured as a function of temperature in the range 353 to 573 K and as a function of the partial pressure of hydrogen and water over a 10-fold range of partial pressure. The molybdenum and tungsten oxides gave the highest specific rates, and manganese and uranium oxides the lowest. Chromium oxide was intermediate, although it gave the highest rate per gram of catalyst. The orders with respect to hydrogen and water over molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide promoted nickel were consistent with a mechanism in which nickel oxide is formed from the reaction of water with the catalyst, and then is reduced by hydrogen. Over manganese and uranium oxide promoted catalysts, these orders are consistent with a mechanism in which adsorbed water exchanges with chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on the nickel surface. Chromium oxide is intermediate. It was noted that those oxides which favored the nickel oxide route had electronic work functions closest to those of metallic nickel and nickel oxide.

  9. Leaching behavior of lanthanum, nickel and iron from spent catalyst using inorganic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, W.; Prilitasari, N. M.; Iskandar, Y.; Bratakusuma, D.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2018-01-01

    Highly technological applications of rare earth metals (REs) and scarcity of supply have become an incentive torecover the REs from various resources, which include high grade and low grade ores, as well as recycledwaste materials. Spent hydrocracking catalyst contain lanthanum and a variety of valuable metals such as nickel and iron. This study investigated the recovery of lanthanum, nickel and iron from spent hydrocracking catalyst by leaching using various inorganic acid (sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, and nitric acid). The effect of acid concentration, type of acid and leaching temperature was conducted to study the leaching behavior of each valuable metal from spent-catalyst. It has been shown that it is possible to recover more than 90% of lanthanum, however the leaching efficiency of nickel and iron in this process was very low. It can be concluded that the leaching process is selective for lanthanum recovery from hydrocracking spent-catalyst.

  10. Evaluation of nickel and copper catalysts in biogas reforming for hydrogen production in SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Leonardo Alves; Martins, Andre Rosa; Rangel, Maria do Carmo, E-mail: mcarmov@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Cinetica e Catalise; Ballarini, Adriana; Maina, Silvia [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis Y Petroquimica Ing. Jose Miguel Parera (INCAPE), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2017-01-15

    The solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) enable the efficient generation of clean energy, fitting the current requirements of the growing demand for electricity and for the environment preservation. When powered with biogas (from digesters of municipal wastes), the SOFCs also contribute to reduce the environmental impact of these wastes. The most suitable route to produce hydrogen inside SOFC from biogas is through dry reforming but the catalyst is easily deactivated by coke, because of the high amounts of carbon in the stream. A promising way to overcome this drawback is by adding a second metal to nickel-based catalysts. Aiming to obtain active, selective and stable catalysts for biogas dry reforming, solids based on nickel (15%) and copper (5%) supported on aluminum and magnesium oxide were studied in this work. Samples were prepared by impregnating the support with nickel and copper nitrate, followed by calcination at 500, 600 and 800 deg C. It was noted that all solids were made of nickel oxide, nickel aluminate and magnesium aluminate but no copper compound was found. The specific surface areas did not changed with calcination temperature but the nickel oxide average particles size increased. The solids reducibility decreased with increasing temperature. All catalysts were active in methane dry reforming, leading to similar conversions but different selectivities to hydrogen and different activities in water gas shift reaction (WGSR). This behavior was assigned to different interactions between nickel and copper, at different calcination temperatures. All catalysts were active in WGSR, decreasing the hydrogen to carbon monoxide molar ratio and producing water. The catalyst calcined at 500 deg C was the most promising one, leading to the highest hydrogen yield, besides the advantage of being produced at the lowest calcination temperature, requiring less energy in its preparation. (author)

  11. Evaluation of nickel and copper catalysts in biogas reforming for hydrogen production in SOFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Leonardo Alves; Martins, Andre Rosa; Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    2017-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) enable the efficient generation of clean energy, fitting the current requirements of the growing demand for electricity and for the environment preservation. When powered with biogas (from digesters of municipal wastes), the SOFCs also contribute to reduce the environmental impact of these wastes. The most suitable route to produce hydrogen inside SOFC from biogas is through dry reforming but the catalyst is easily deactivated by coke, because of the high amounts of carbon in the stream. A promising way to overcome this drawback is by adding a second metal to nickel-based catalysts. Aiming to obtain active, selective and stable catalysts for biogas dry reforming, solids based on nickel (15%) and copper (5%) supported on aluminum and magnesium oxide were studied in this work. Samples were prepared by impregnating the support with nickel and copper nitrate, followed by calcination at 500, 600 and 800 deg C. It was noted that all solids were made of nickel oxide, nickel aluminate and magnesium aluminate but no copper compound was found. The specific surface areas did not changed with calcination temperature but the nickel oxide average particles size increased. The solids reducibility decreased with increasing temperature. All catalysts were active in methane dry reforming, leading to similar conversions but different selectivities to hydrogen and different activities in water gas shift reaction (WGSR). This behavior was assigned to different interactions between nickel and copper, at different calcination temperatures. All catalysts were active in WGSR, decreasing the hydrogen to carbon monoxide molar ratio and producing water. The catalyst calcined at 500 deg C was the most promising one, leading to the highest hydrogen yield, besides the advantage of being produced at the lowest calcination temperature, requiring less energy in its preparation. (author)

  12. On the potential of nickel catalysts for steam reforming in membrane reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieterse, J.A.Z.; Boon, J.; Van Delft, Y.C.; Dijkstra, J.W.; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen membrane reactors have been identified as a promising option for hydrogen production for power generation from natural gas with pre-combustion decarbonisation. While Pd or Pd-alloy membranes already provide good hydrogen permeances the most suitable catalyst design for steam reforming in membrane reactors (SRMR) is yet to be identified. This contribution aims to provide insight in the suitability of nickel based catalysts in SRMR. The use of nickel (Ni) catalysts would benefit the cost-effectiveness of membrane reactors and therefore its feasibility. For this, the activity of nickel catalysts in SRMR was assessed with kinetics reported in literature. A 1D model was composed in order to compare the hydrogen production rates derived from the kinetics with the rate of hydrogen withdrawal by permeation. Catalyst stability was studied by exposing the catalysts to reformate gas with two different H/C ratios to mimic the hydrogen lean reformate gas in the membrane reactor. For both the activity (modeling) and stability study the Ni-based catalysts were compared to relevant catalyst compositions based on rhodium (Rh). Using the high pressure kinetics reported for Al2O3 supported Rh and MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 supported Ni catalyst it showed that Ni and Rh catalysts may very well provide similar hydrogen production rates. Interestingly, the stability of Ni-based catalysts proved to be superior to precious metal based catalysts under exposure to simulated reformate feed gas with low H/C molar ratio. A commercial (pre-)reforming Ni-based catalyst was selected for further testing in an experimental membrane reactor for steam reforming at high pressure. During the test period 98% conversion at 873 K could be achieved. The conversion was adjusted to approximately 90% and stable conversion was obtained during the test period of another 3 weeks. Nonetheless, carbon quantification tests of the Ni catalyst indicated that a small amount of carbon had deposited onto the catalyst

  13. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Encapsulated Nickel/Cobalt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Olefin Migration of Allylarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Buss, Kasper Spanggård

    2017-01-01

    Olefin migration of allylarenes is typically performed with precious metal-based homogeneous catalysts. In contrast, very limited progress has been made using cheap, earth-abundant base metals as heterogeneous catalysts for these transformations - in spite of the obvious economic and environmental...... advantages. Herein, we report on the use of an easily prepared heterogeneous catalyst material for the migration of olefins, in particular allylarenes. The catalyst material consists of nickel/cobalt alloy nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon shells. The encapsulated nanoparticles are stable...

  14. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  15. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  16. Potassium/calcium/nickel oxide catalysts for the oxidative coupling of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooley, K.; Dooley, Kerry M.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, Julian R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A series of potassium/calcium/nickel oxides were tested for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) at 843–943 K and water addition to the feed at 0–66 mol-%. The K/Ni ratios varied from 0.0–0.6 and Ca/Ni from 0.0–11; catalysts with no nickel were also tested. At least 10% water in the feed and

  17. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Natural Gas Over Vanadium-Nickel-Alumina Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jaekyeong; Park, Seungwon; Song, Ji Hwan; Song, In Kyu

    2018-09-01

    A series of vanadium-nickel-alumina (xVNA) catalysts were prepared by a single-step sol-gel method with a variation of vanadium content (x, wt%) for use in the hydrogen production by steam reforming of natural gas. The effect of vanadium content on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of xVNA catalysts in the steam reforming of natural gas was investigated. It was found that natural gas conversion and hydrogen yield showed volcano-shaped trends with respect to vanadium content. It was also revealed that natural gas conversion and hydrogen yield increased with decreasing nickel crystallite size.

  18. A submerged ceramic membrane reactor for the p-nitrophenol hydrogenation over nano-sized nickel catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R Z; Sun, H L; Xing, W H; Jin, W Q; Xu, N P

    2009-02-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol over nano-sized nickel catalysts was carried out in a submerged ceramic membrane reactor. It has been demonstrated that the submerged ceramic membrane reactor is more suitable for the p-nitrophenol hydrogenation over nano-sized nickel catalysts compared with the side-stream ceramic membrane reactor, and the membrane module configuration has a great influence on the reaction rate of p-nitrophenol hydrogenation and the membrane treating capacity. The deactivation of nano-sized nickel is mainly caused by the adsorption of impurity on the surface of nickel and the increase of oxidation degree of nickel.

  19. Electroless Nickel-Based Catalyst for Diffusion Limited Hydrogen Generation through Hydrolysis of Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P. Anderson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts based on electroless nickel and bi-metallic nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles were synthesized for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The catalysts were synthesized by polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticle-catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or Ni-Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts was tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects of electroless plating time lengths, temperature and NaBH4 concentration on hydrogen generation rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out for nano-metallized Al2O3 using Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDAX. The as-plated polymer-stabilized electroless nickel catalyst plated for 10 min and unstirred in the hydrolysis reaction exhibited appreciable catalytic activity for hydrolysis of NaBH4. For a zero-order reaction assumption, activation energy of hydrogen generation using the catalyst was estimated at 104.6 kJ/mol. Suggestions are provided for further work needed prior to using the catalyst for portable hydrogen generation from aqueous alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for fuel cells.

  20. Nickel nanoparticles: A highly efficient catalyst for one pot synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and KANIKA VIJ. Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India ... Keywords. PVP-stabilized Ni nanoparticles; ethylene glycol; tetraketones; biscoumarins; ... ing interest in using nickel nanoparticles in organic synthesis ...

  1. Processing of spent nickel catalyst for fat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nasir, Mohammad

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Spent nickel catalyst (SNC have the potential of insulting the quality of the environment in a number of ways. The disposal of SNC will have a pollution effect. Optimum recovery of fat from SNC , could save the environment and reduce the oil loss. Hexane has been the solvent of choice for oil extraction. Alternative solvents that are considered safer have been evaluated. Hexane, isopropanol, ethanol, and heptane were examined using soxhlet extraction. While hexane was more efficient in oil recovery from SNC, isopropanol proved to be very good, to clarifying separation of oil from waste material and also provide high solvent recovery compared to other solvents. Isopropanol extraction with chill provided separation of miscella into two phases: lower oil–rich and an upper solvent – rich. It saved much energy of vaporization for distilling. An aqueous extraction process with immiscible solvent assisted was tested. Solvent like hexane added to SNC, and water added later with continuous stirring. The mixture was stirred for about 30 minutes, prior to centrifugation. Aqueous process extracted less amount of oil compared to solvent extraction.El catalizador agotado de níquel (SNC tiene el potencial de dañar la calidad del medio ambiente de diversas formas. El depósito de SNC tendrá un efecto de polución. La recuperación óptima de la grasa a partir del SCN, podría conservar el medio ambiente y reducir la pérdida de aceite. El hexano ha sido el disolvente elegido para la extracción del aceite. También se han evaluado disolventes alternativos que son considerados seguros. Se han examinado hexano, isopropanol, etanol y heptano usando extracción con soxhlet. Mientras que el hexano fue el mas eficaz en la recuperación del aceite, el isopropanol demostró ser muy bueno para aclarar la separación del aceite a partir de la materia residual y también proporcionó una alta recuperación del disolvente en comparación con los otros

  2. Aqueous processing of nickel spent catalyst for a value added product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheik, Abdul Rauf; Ghosh, Malay Kumar; Sanjay, Kali; Subbaiah, Tondepu; Mishra, Barada Kanta; Baba, Abdullahi Aalafara

    2013-01-01

    Nickel was recovered from a fertilizer industry spent catalyst by leaching with nitric acid followed by nickel hydroxide precipitation. The optimization of temperature, initial acid concentration and particle size for leaching of the spent catalyst was done through 2 3 factorial design. A maximum extraction of 91.9% was achieved at 90 .deg. C, 1.5M HNO 3 and 62.5 µm particle size. Temperature and acid concentration showed positive effect, while particle size showed no effect. A regression equation was developed and employed to predict conditions for 100% extraction which were experimentally tested. Nickel hydroxide was electrochemically precipitated from the leach liquor and its maximum discharge capacity was found to be 155 mAh/g. A 3-stage counter current leaching circuit was designed to obtain a leach liquor of suitable pH. XRD characterization of the precipitated Ni(OH) 2 shows to consist of both α- and β-forms

  3. Pretreatments of porous silica for improving the activity of a nickel-loaded catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, M.; Ikushima, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.

    1986-02-01

    Nickel catalysts supported on porous silicas treated with water, ethanol, and 1-butanol were found to be more active than that supported on untreated silica for ethane hydrogenolysis and furan hydrogenation. To elucidate the reason for the activation, some surface properties of the treated silicas were examined. The treatments decreased the surface area and increased the volume of the macropores, the surface density of hydroxyl groups, and the heat of immersion in water per unit surface area. The state of nickel on the support was examined by temperature programed desorption (TPD) of hydrogen, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy/X-ray microanalysis. The dispersion measured by XRD was not appreciably altered by the treatments, but the TPD showed more hydrogen desorbed above 150/sup 0/C from nickel on the treated supports. The activation of nickel by pretreatment of the support was ascribed to the increase of those nickel atoms which dispersed finely over the support by the increased number of surface hydroxyl groups. This was based on the number of hydroxyl groups per unit surface area. The nickel catalyst supported on the pretreated silicas showed greater thermal stability. 16 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. Catalytic performance and characterization of cobalt-nickel nano catalysts for CO hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyzi, Mostafa; Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Babakhanian, Arash

    2014-01-01

    A series of Co-Ni nano catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method. We investigated the effect of Co/Ni molar ratios precipitate and calcination conditions on the catalytic performance of cobalt nickel catalysts for Fisher-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The catalyst containing 90%Co/10%Ni was found to be optimal for the conversion of synthesis gas to light olefins. The activity and selectivity of the optimal catalyst were studied in different operational conditions. The results show that the best operational conditions are the H 2 /CO=2/1 molar feed ratio at 310 .deg. C and GHSV=1,200 h - 1 under 5 bar of pressure. The prepared catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements such as BET and BJH methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)

  5. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over a nickel catalyst supported on mesoporous alumina xerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Cho, Kyung Min; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    Mesoporous alumina xerogel (A-SG) is prepared by a sol-gel method for use as a support for a nickel catalyst. The Ni/A-SG catalyst is then prepared by an impregnation method, and is applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of the mesoporous alumina xerogel support on the catalytic performance of Ni/A-SG catalyst is investigated. For the purpose of comparison, a nickel catalyst supported on commercial alumina (A-C) is also prepared by an impregnation method (Ni/A-C). Both the hydroxyl-rich surface and the electron-deficient sites of the A-SG support enhance the dispersion of the nickel species on the support during the calcination step. The formation of the surface nickel aluminate phase in the Ni/A-SG catalyst remarkably increases the reducibility and stability of the catalyst. Furthermore, the high-surface area and the well-developed mesoporosity of the Ni/A-SG catalyst enhance the gasification of surface hydrocarbons that are adsorbed in the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, the Ni/A-SG catalyst exhibits a better catalytic performance than the Ni/A-C catalyst in terms of LNG conversion and hydrogen production. Moreover, the Ni/A-SG catalyst shows strong resistance toward catalyst deactivation.

  6. CONVERSION OF (±-CITRONELLAL AND ITS DERIVATIVES TO (--MENTHOL USING BIFUNCTIONAL NICKEL ZEOLITE CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indri Badria Adilina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available (±-Citronellal and its derivatives were converted to (--menthol by a one-pot reaction system using zeolite based nickel catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by immobilization of nickel on natural zeolite (NZ or synthetic zeolite (ZSM-5 by a simple cation exchange method. Calcination and hydrogen treatment procedures were able to significantly increase the surface area and pore volume of NZ based catalysts whereas negligible changes in the properties were observed for that of ZSM-5. Catalytic reactions were carried out at 70ºC by stirring the mixture in the air for cyclization of (±-citronellal to (±-isopulegol followed by hydrogenation towards the desired (--menthol at 2 Mpa of H2 pressure. The Ni/NZ catalyst was able to convert a (±-citronellal derivative yielding 9% (--menthol (36% selectivity with conversion up to 24%, whereas Ni/ZSM5 catalyst directly converted 65% (±-citronellal to give 4% menthol (6% selectivity. These zeolite based catalysts are therefore potential materials for the conversion of biomass feed stock to value-added chemicals.

  7. Carbon-encapsulated nickel-iron nanoparticles supported on nickel foam as a catalyst electrode for urea electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Jao, Chi-Yu; Chuang, Farn-Yih; Chen, Fang-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical process can purify the urea-rich wastewater, producing hydrogen gas. • Carbon-encapsulated nickel iron nanoparticles (CE-NiFe) are prepared by pyrolysis. • An ultra-thin layer of CE-NiFe nanoparticles is attached to the 3D Ni foam. • CE-NiFe nanoparticles escalate both the urea electrolysis and hydrogen evolution. - Abstract: A cyanide-bridged bimetallic coordination polymer, nickel hexacyanoferrate, could be pyrolyzed to form carbon-encapsulated nickel-iron (CE-NiFe) nanoparticles. The formation of nitrogen-doped spherical carbon shell with ordered mesoporous structure prevented the structural damage of catalyst cores and allowed the migration and diffusion of electrolyte into the hollow carbon spheres. An ultra-thin layer of CE-NiFe nanoparticles could be tightly attached to the three-dimensional macroporous nickel foam (NF) by electrophoretic deposition. The CE-NiFe nanoparticles could lower the onset potential and increase the current density in anodic urea electrolysis and cathodic hydrogen production as compared with bare NF. Macroporous NF substrate was very useful for the urea electrolysis and hydrogen production, which allowed for fast transport of electron, electrolyte, and gas products. The superior electrocatalytic ability of CE-NiFe/NF electrode in urea oxidation and water reduction made it favorable for versatile applications such as water treatment, hydrogen generation, and fuel cells.

  8. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose by Integrating Dispersed Nickel Catalyst with HZSM-5 Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yadong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Hui; Hu, Jianli

    2018-01-01

    The effect of integrating dispersed nickel catalyst with HZSM-5 zeolite on upgrading of vapors produced from pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. The active component nickel nitrate was introduced onto the cellulose substrate by impregnation technique. Based on TGA experimental results, we discovered that nickel nitrate first released crystallization water, and then successively decomposed into nickel oxide which was reduced in-situ to metallic nickel through carbothermal reduction reaction. In-situ generated nickel nanoparticles were found highly dispersed over carbon substrate, which were responsible for catalyzing reforming and cracking of tars. In catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose, the addition of nickel nitrate caused more char formation at the expense of the yield of the condensable liquid products. In addition, the selectivity of linear oxygenates was increased whereas the yield of laevoglucose was reduced. Oxygen-containing compounds in pyrolysis vapors were deoxygenated into aromatics using HZSM-5. Moreover, the amount of condensable liquid products was decreased with the addition of HZSM-5.

  9. Raney Distributions and Random Matrix Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Recent works have shown that the family of probability distributions with moments given by the Fuss-Catalan numbers permit a simple parameterized form for their density. We extend this result to the Raney distribution which by definition has its moments given by a generalization of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. Such computations begin with an algebraic equation satisfied by the Stieltjes transform, which we show can be derived from the linear differential equation satisfied by the characteristic polynomial of random matrix realizations of the Raney distribution. For the Fuss-Catalan distribution, an equilibrium problem characterizing the density is identified. The Stieltjes transform for the limiting spectral density of the singular values squared of the matrix product formed from inverse standard Gaussian matrices, and standard Gaussian matrices, is shown to satisfy a variant of the algebraic equation relating to the Raney distribution. Supported on , we show that it too permits a simple functional form upon the introduction of an appropriate choice of parameterization. As an application, the leading asymptotic form of the density as the endpoints of the support are approached is computed, and is shown to have some universal features.

  10. Stability and resistance of nickel catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Gardini, Diego; de Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    The long term stability and resistance toward carbon deposition, sulfur, chlorine, and potassium of Ni/ZrO2 as a catalyst for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol in 1-octanol (as a model compound system for bio-oil) has been investigated at 250 degrees C and 100 bar in a trickle bed reactor...

  11. Stereoselective hydrogenation of H-alkynes on boron-nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, S.S.; Sijmer, Eh.Kh.; Amitan, I.I.

    1992-01-01

    It is ascertained that in the course of stereoselective hydrogenation of H-alkynes on boron-nickel catalysts the contact modified by 2-phenyl-1,5 dimethylpyrasol-2-anom in the ratio Ni(2+):BH 4 -=1:5 is the most active and selective one. Moreover, cis-alkane was prepared with the yield of 94.5% and selective of 79%

  12. Gas-phase hydrogenation of benzene on supported nickel catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, H.A.; Phillips, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    The reaction of 22.66-280 Pa benzene with 72.39-122.79 Pa hydrogen on kieselguhr-supported nickel at 392.2/sup 0/-468.2/sup 0/K yielded only cyclohexane and was independent of 5.33-40 Pa cyclohexane added to the feed of the differential flow reactor. Best fit for the kinetic data was obtained with a rate equation developed by van Meerten and Coenen which assumed that all hydrogen addition steps have the same rate constant and are slow. An observed rate maximum at 458/sup 0/K may be the result of an increasing rate constant and decreasing cyclohexyl surface coverage as the temperature increases. Temperature-programed hydrogen desorption showed a series of desorption peaks at 358/sup 0/-600/sup 0/K, including one at 453/sup 0/K, which may be due to the hydrogen involved in the surface reaction.

  13. Steam reforming of ethanol over nickel-tungsten catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, I.P.; Fernandez, A.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Gochi-Ponce, Y. [Instituto Tecnologico de Oaxaca, Division de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Ave. Ing. Victor Bravo Ahuja, esq. Ave. Tecnologico No. 120, Col. Centro. Oaxaca, Oax (Mexico); Contreras Larios, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Azcapotzalco, CBI., Energia, Av. Sn. Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa, C.P. 02200, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Ni-W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were synthesized, characterized and tested for the steam reforming of ethanol from 300 to 600 C. Addition of Ni and W on the alumina, decreased the surface area and increased the pore volume of the mesoporous materials synthesized. The reaction products obtained were: H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 3}CHO. A promoting effect of Ni-W was observed in the conversion of ethanol to H{sub 2} from 15 to 30 wt.% Ni and 1 wt.% W. The selectivity to H{sub 2} on the alumina with Ni-W, was between 66.53 and 68.53% at 550 C, appearing some undesirable products, with low ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. Reaction was studied on a fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure with an ethanol/water molar ratio of 1:4, from 300 to 600 C. The catalysts were characterized by the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)-Differential thermal analysis (DTA), N{sub 2} physisorption (BET and BJH methods), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), these techniques were used for characterization, before and after of the steam reforming. (author)

  14. Hydrogen production by dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide in one-dimensional nickel-based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez U, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is development of nickel catalysts supported over 1D matrix of cerium oxide, to be used in dry reforming methane reaction with carbon dioxide for hydrogen production. The catalysts were characterized by: Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (Sem), Surface Area (Bet method) an X Ray Diffraction (XRD). The TPR technique allowed to define reduction temperature of the active phase in the catalyst, Sem technique showed that the CeO_2 matrix had a nano rod morphology. XRD allowed to identify the crystalline phases of the catalysts. Finally, the catalysts were tested in the dry reforming methane reaction, high catalytic activity and hydrogen production were performed at 700 degrees Celsius and the catalyst with 30 wt.% of nickel. (Author)

  15. Secondary promoters in alumina-supported nickel-molybdenum hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Two secondary promoters, phosphorus and fluoride, have been investigated for their influences on the physicochemical properties of alumina-supported nickel-molybdenum hydroprocessing catalysts. Model compound reactions and infrared spectroscopy were used to probe the functionalities of the different catalysts, and the catalysts were tested in the hydroprocessing of a low-nitrogen and a high-nitrogen (quinoline-spiked) gas oil feed to assess the utility of the model compound reaction studies. Fluoride-promoted catalysts with high cumene hydrocracking activity and with comparable thiophene hydrodesulphurization (HDS) activity to Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] can be prepared by coimpregnation of the F, Ni and Mo additives. Fluoride promotes the hydrogenation (HYD) and HDS activity of Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] in the hydroprocessing (HYD) and HDS activity of Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] in the hydroprocessing of a low-nitrogen feed. Fluoride promotes the quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activity of Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts. Impregnation of phosphorus prior to the metal additives results in catalysts which are more active in HDS. Phosphorus increases indirectly the Broensted acidity of the catalyst by increasing the activity of the MoS[sub 2]-associated acid sites. Phosphorus promotes the HDSW and HYD activities of Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] in the hydroprocessing of the low-N feed. A promotional effect of phosphorus is seen in quinoline HDN. P- and F-promoted Ni-MO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts are very active in quinoline HDN and maintain good activity in HDS and HYD of the high-N feed. Thiophene HDS was a good reaction for probing the activity of catalysts in the HDS of sterically-unhindered molecules, but an inaccurate probe for the HDS of hindered compounds.

  16. Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Arai, Masahiko

    2014-12-25

    Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2.

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of Tetraselmis and Isochrysis microalgae by nickel ceria based catalysts for hydrocarbon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aysu, Tevfik; Abd Rahman, Nur Adilah; Sanna, Aimaro

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of Tetraselmis sp. and Isochrysis sp. was carried out over ceria based catalysts in a fixed bed reactor. There was a clear effect of the catalysts on the product yields and quality, with the catalysts able to recover a large fraction of the starting microalgae energy (67–77%) in the bio-oils. Bio-oil yield was found to be higher in presence of Ni–Ce/Al_2O_3 and Ni–Ce/ZrO_2 (26 wt.%). The produced bio-oils had HHVs (higher heating values) of 34–35 MJ/kg and suffered strong deoxygenation, with O level decreased from 40–41% in the starting microalgae to 9–15%. Also, 15–20% N removal was obtained using the ceria based catalysts. The oxygen contents in the bio-oils were remarkably lower than those previously obtained using ZSM-5 (25%) and other species without catalyst (17–24%). "1H NMR and GC–MS analysis showed that the bio-oils were enriched in aliphatics and depleted in N-compounds and water using the ceria based catalysts. - Highlights: • Nickel-ceria based catalysts were evaluated for the in-situ conversion of Tetraselmis and Isochrysis microalgae. • Catalysts recovered 72–77% of the starting microalgae energy in bio-oils. • Bio-oils suffered strong deoxygenation, with O level decreased from 40–41% in the starting microalgae to 9–15%. • Bio-oils were enriched in aliphatics and depleted in N-compounds.

  18. Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2010-01-01

    Although platinum is commonly used as catalyst on the cathode in microbial electrolysis cells (MEC), non-precious metal alternatives are needed to reduce costs. Cathodes were constructed using a nickel powder (0.5-1 μm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes containing Pt (0.002 μm) in MECs and electrochemical tests. The MEC performance in terms of coulombic efficiency, cathodic, hydrogen and energy recoveries were similar using Ni or Pt cathodes, although the maximum hydrogen production rate (Q) was slightly lower for Ni (Q = 1.2-1.3 m3 H2/m3/d; 0.6 V applied) than Pt (1.6 m3 H2/m3/d). Nickel dissolution was minimized by replacing medium in the reactor under anoxic conditions. The stability of the Ni particles was confirmed by examining the cathodes after 12 MEC cycles using scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry. Analysis of the anodic communities in these reactors revealed dominant populations of Geobacter sulfurreduces and Pelobacter propionicus. These results demonstrate that nickel powder can be used as a viable alternative to Pt in MECs, allowing large scale production of cathodes with similar performance to systems that use precious metal catalysts. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.

  19. Deactivation of nickel catalysts in the methanization of hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixtures under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeeb, H P

    1979-01-01

    The deactivation course of nickel methanization catalysts was investigated in the temperature range of 310/sup 0/C to 370/sup 0/C and in the pressure region of 20 to 80 bar. Raising the CO partial pressure accelerated the deactivation whereas raising the H/sub 2/ partial pressure slowed it down. An influence of the temperature could not be clearly recognized. The deactivation got slower with greater dwell time and larger degree of conversion. Two hypotheses to explain the deactivation are given.

  20. Pyrolysis-catalysis of waste plastic using a nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst for high-value carbon products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeshui; Nahil, Mohamad A; Wu, Chunfei; Williams, Paul T

    2017-11-01

    A stainless-steel mesh loaded with nickel catalyst was produced and used for the pyrolysis-catalysis of waste high-density polyethylene with the aim of producing high-value carbon products, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysis temperature and plastic-to-catalyst ratio were investigated to determine the influence on the formation of different types of carbon deposited on the nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst. Increasing temperature from 700 to 900°C resulted in an increase in the carbon deposited on the nickel-loaded stainless-steel mesh catalyst from 32.5 to 38.0 wt%. The increase in sample-to-catalyst ratio reduced the amount of carbon deposited on the mesh catalyst in terms of g carbon g -1 plastic. The carbons were found to be largely composed of filamentous carbons, with negligible disordered (amorphous) carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of the filamentous carbons revealed them to be composed of a large proportion (estimated at ∼40%) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum process conditions for CNT production, in terms of yield and graphitic nature, determined by Raman spectroscopy, was catalysis temperature of 800°C and plastic-to-catalyst ratio of 1:2, where a mass of 334 mg of filamentous/MWCNTs g -1 plastic was produced.

  1. Bioleaching of nickel from spent petroleum catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans DSM- 11478.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohita; Bisht, Varsha; Singh, Bina; Jain, Pratiksha; Mandal, Ajoy K; Lal, Banwari; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2015-06-01

    The present work deals with optimization of culture conditions and process parameters for bioleaching of spent petroleum catalyst collected from a petroleum refinery. The efficacy of Ni bioleaching from spent petroleum catalyst was determined using pure culture of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans DSM- 11478. The culture conditions of pH, temperature and headspace volume to media volume ratio were optimized. EDX analysis was done to confirm the presence of Ni in the spent catalyst after roasting it to decoke its surface. The optimum temperature for A. thiooxidans DSM-11478 growth was found to be 32 degrees C. The enhanced recovery of nickel at very low pH was attributed to the higher acidic strength of sulfuric acid produced in the culture medium by the bacterium. During the bioleaching process, 89% of the Ni present in the catalyst waste could be successfully recovered in optimized conditions. This environment friendly bioleaching process proved efficient than the chemical method. Taking leads from the lab scale results, bioleaching in larger volumes (1, 5 and 10 L) was also performed to provide guidelines for taking up this technology for in situ industrial waste management.

  2. Sulfur Tolerant Magnesium Nickel Silicate Catalyst for Reforming of Biomass Gasification Products to Syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Swartz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium nickel silicate (MNS has been investigated as a catalyst to convert tars and light hydrocarbons to syngas (CO and H2 by steam reforming and CO2 reforming in the presence of H2S for biomass gasification process at NexTech Materials. It was observed that complete CH4 conversion could be achieved on MNS catalyst granules at 800–900 °C and a space velocity of 24,000 mL/g/h in a simulated biomass gasification stream. Addition of 10–20 ppm H2S to the feed had no apparent impact on CH4 conversion. The MNS-washcoated monolith also showed high activities in converting methane, light hydrocarbons and tar to syngas. A 1200 h test without deactivation was achieved on the MNS washcoated monolith in the presence of H2S and/or NH3, two common impurities in gasified biomass. The results indicate that the MNS material is a promising catalyst for removal of tar and light hydrocarbons from biomass gasified gases, enabling efficient use of biomass to produce power, liquid fuels and valuable chemicals.

  3. Efficient photo-catalytic degradation of malachite green using nickel tungstate material as photo-catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaïli, N; Boudjamaa, A; Kebir, M; Bachari, K

    2017-03-01

    The present study focused on the evaluation of photo-catalytic and photo-electrochemical properties of the photo-catalyst based on nickel tungstate material prepared by a nitrate method through the degradation of malachite green (MG) dye's. The effect of catalyst loading and dye concentration was examined. Physico-chemical, optical, electrical, electrochemical, and photo-electrochemical properties of the prepared material were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET analysis, optical reflectance diffuse (DR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), electrical conductivity, cyclic voltammetry (CV), current intensity, mott-shottky, and nyquist. XRD revealed the formation of monoclinic structure with a small particle size. BET surface area of the sample was around 10 m 2 /g. The results show that the degradation of MG was more than 80%, achieved after 3 h of irradiation at pH 4.6 and with a catalyst loading of 75 mg. Also, it was found that the dye photo-degradation obeyed the pseudo-first order kinetic via Langmuir Hinshelwood model.

  4. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on nickel oxide - vanadium pentoxide catalysts and the effect of ionizing radiation on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucka, V.

    1984-01-01

    Some physico-chemical and catalytic properties of nickel oxide-vanadium pentoxide two-component catalysts were studied over the entire concentration range of the components, using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous solution as the test reaction. The two oxides were found to affect each other; this was shown by the dependences of the specific surface area, the V 4+ ion concentration, and the catalyst activity on the system composition. At low vanadium pentoxide concentrations (up to 15 mol%) the reaction took place on nickel oxide modified with vanadium pentoxide, whereas in the region of higher vanadium pentoxide concentrations the decomposition of the peroxide was catalyzed primarily in the homogeneous phase by vanadium(V) peroxide ions; in a sample with 30 mol% V 2 O 5 , trivalent vanadium also played a part. With catalysts obtained by mere mechanical mixing of the two oxides, a modified activity was observed in the region of high excess of nickel oxide. The activity of catalyst, particularly pure nickel oxide, was increased by its partial reduction and decreased by its exposure to gamma radiation if the dose was higher than 10 5 Gy. The effects observed are interpreted in terms of the concept of bivalent catalytic centres. (author)

  5. Magnetic nickel ferrite nanoparticles as highly durable catalysts for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of bio-based aldehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jian; Yang, Song; Riisager, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles were exploited as stable and easily separable heterogeneous catalysts for catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with 2-propanol as both the hydrogen source and the solvent providing 94% product yield at 180 degrees C...

  6. Structural analysis of nickel doped cerium oxide catalysts for fuel reforming in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavendish, Rio

    As world energy demands increase, research into more efficient energy production methods has become imperative. Heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience are used to promote chemical transformations important for energy production. These concepts are important in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which have attracted attention because of their potential to provide an efficient and environmentally favorable power generation system. The SOFC is also fuel-flexible with the ability to run directly on many fuels other than hydrogen. Internal fuel reforming directly in the anode of the SOFC would greatly reduce the cost and complexity of the device. Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon and a main component in natural gas, making it useful when testing catalysts on the laboratory scale. Nickel (Ni) and gadolinium (Gd) doped ceria (CeO 2) catalysts for potential use in the SOFC anode were synthesized with a spray drying method and tested for catalytic performance using partial oxidation of methane and steam reforming. The relationships between catalytic performance and structure were then investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and environmental transmission electron microscopy. The possibility of solid solutions, segregated phases, and surface layers of Ni were explored. Results for a 10 at.% Ni in CeO2 catalyst reveal a poor catalytic behavior while a 20 at.% Ni in CeO2 catalyst is shown to have superior activity. The inclusion of both 10 at.% Gd and 10 at.% Ni in CeO2 enhances the catalytic performance. Analysis of the presence of Ni in all 3 samples reveals Ni heterogeneity and little evidence for extensive solid solution doping. Ni is found in small domains throughout CeO2 particles. In the 20 at.% Ni sample a segregated, catalytically active NiO phase is observed. Overall, it is found that significant interaction between Ni and CeO2 occurs that could affect the synthesis and functionality of the SOFC anode.

  7. The Reduction of Nitriles to Aldehydes: Applications of Raney Nickel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    The selective reduction of a nitrile to an aldehyde, especially when the substrate ..... prelude to reductive amination chemistry was thwarted by a rapid aldol ... and allowed the direct incorporation of the α-methylbenzylamine chiral auxiliary.

  8. Gas-phase Hydrogenation of Crotonaldehyde Over Nickel-on-Kieselguhr Catalyst Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uraz, C.; Atalay, F.; Atalay, S.

    2001-01-01

    Gas phase catalytic hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to η-butanol was investigated. A nickel based commercial catalyst produced by Harshaw was used at constant temperatures ranging from 160 to 210deg; at pressures of 1.5, 2 , and 2.5 atm and at different crotonaldehyde to hydrogen feed ratios changing from 0.134 to 0.226. The conversion of crotonaldehyde at different operating conditions were determined and the reaction rates were calculated . The experimental results were fitted to ten langmuir-Hinshelwood/ Eley Rideal type models in addition to a homogeneous kinetics modal and the best modal was identified. The effects of external and internal mass transfer resistances were found to be negligible .(authors) refs 28., 2 figs , 4 tabs

  9. Nickel and cobalt bimetallic hydroxide catalysts for urea electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Wei; Wang Dan; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel–Cobalt bimetallic hydroxide electrocatalysts, synthesized through a one-step electrodeposition method, were evaluated for the oxidation of urea in alkaline conditions with the intention of reducing the oxidation overpotential for this reaction. The Nickel–Cobalt bimetallic hydroxide catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and polarization techniques. A significant reduction in the overpotential (150 mV) of the reaction was observed with the Nickel–Cobalt bimetallic hydroxide electrode (ca. 43% Co content) when compared to a nickel hydroxide electrode. The decrease of the urea oxidation potential on the Nickel–Cobalt bimetallic hydroxide electrodes reveals great potential for future applications of urea electro-oxidation, including wastewater remediation, hydrogen production, sensors, and fuel cells.

  10. Kinetic studies of isooctane partial oxidation over a nickel-based catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Hussameldin; Idem, Raphael; Aboudheir, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    The production of hydrogen (H 2 ) for fuel cell applications in mobile vehicles by reforming technologies such as partial oxidation of various fossil fuels has gained much attention recently. In this study, the production of H 2 by the catalytic partial oxidation of isooctane ((C 8 H 18 ) used here as a surrogate for gasoline) was investigated over alumina (AI 2 O 3 )supported nickel (Ni) catalyst. The work investigated the kinetics of the partial oxidation of isooctane over a stable Ni/□-AI 2 O 3 catalyst in the range of 863 to 913 K, at atmospheric pressure, W/F i c8 in the range of 1.97 to 8.58 g h mol - 1, and molar feed ratio in the range of 2.0 to 8.0 experiments to obtain kinetic data were performed in a 12.7 mm diameter Inconel micro-reactor housed in an electrically controlled furnace. The chemical reaction was then modeled using rate models developed from the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson (LHHW) and Eley-Rideal (ER) formulations. The model parameters were estimated using an adaptive Gauss-Newton and Marquardi-Levenberg minimization algorithm. Rival models were screened for their thermodynamic consistency and physicochemical significance of estimated parameters. Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson mechanism requiring the dissociative adsorption of isooctane and oxygen on two different sites appeared to be the most likely pathway for the partial oxidation reaction of isooctane. Reaction order with respect to isooctane indicates the strong coverage of nickel by isooctane. The activation energy of 73±3.1 kJ mol - 1 estimated from the LHHW model is consistent with the trend observed with lower hydrocarbons.(Author)

  11. OXIDATIVE-REFORMING OF METHANE AND PARTIAL OXIDATION OF METHANE REACTIONS OVER NiO/PrO2/ZrO2 CATALYSTS: EFFECT OF NICKEL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. O. Asencios

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work the behavior of NiO-PrO2-ZrO2 catalysts containing various nickel loadings was evaluated in the partial oxidation of methane and oxidative-reforming reactions of methane. The catalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction Analysis (in situ-XRD, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H2-TPR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDX and Adsorption-Desorption of nitrogen (BET area. The reactions were carried out at 750 °C and 1 atm for 5 hours. The catalysts were studied with different nickel content: 0, 5, 10 and 15% (related to total weight of catalyst, wt%. In both reactions, the catalyst containing the mixture of the three oxides (NiO/PrO2/ZrO2 with 15% nickel (15NiPrZr catalyst showed the best activity for the conversion of the reactants into Syngas and showed high selectivity for H2 and CO. The results suggest that the promoter PrO2 and the Niº centers are in a good proportion in the catalyst with 15% Ni. Our results showed that low nickel concentrations in the catalyst led to high metallic dispersion; however, very low nickel concentrations did not favor the methane transformation into Syngas. The catalyst containing only NiO/ZrO2 in the mixture was not sufficient for the catalysis. The presence of the promoter PrO2 was very important for the catalysis of the POM.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-supported nickel catalysts for the dry reforming of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidalgo, B.; Zubizarreta, L.; Bermudez, J.M.; Arenillas, A.; Menendez, J.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    A series of carbon-based nickel (Ni) catalysts was prepared in order to investigate the effect of the preparation method on the dispersion of Ni and its final catalytic activity in the dry reforming of methane, i.e. CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2} 2H{sub 2} + 2CO. Three parameters were studied: (i) the influence of the surface chemistry of the carbon used as support; (ii) the method of drying (conventional vs. microwave drying); and, (iii) the temperature of the reduction stage. In order to study the role of the surface chemistry of the commercial activated carbon used as support, the active carbon was tested as received and oxidized. Although a better Ni dispersion was achieved over the oxidized support, the conversions were much lower. It was also found that microwave drying offers various advantages over conventional drying, the main one being that less time is required to prepare the catalyst. Two reduction temperatures were used (300 and 500 C), being found that it is necessary to adjust this parameter to prevent the Ni particles from sintering. (author)

  13. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Adsorption of cadmium ions on nickel surface skeleton catalysts and its effect on reaction of cathodic hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, N.V.; Udris, E.Ya.; Savel'eva, O.N.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium adsorption from different concentration CdSO 4 solutions on nickel surface skeleton catalysts (Ni ssc ) is studied by recording of polarization and potentiodynamic curves using electron microscopy and X-ray spectrometry. Main regularities of cadmium adsorption on Ni ssc are shown to be similar to those on smooth and skeleton nickel. A conclusion is drawn that increase of catalytic activity in reaction of cathodic hydrogen evolution from alkali solutions of Ni ssc base electrodes after their treatment in solutions containing Cd 2+ ions is due to irreversible desorption of strongly and averagely bound hydrogen from electrode surface at cadmium adsorption on them

  15. Preparation and characterization of nickel catalysts supported on cerium for obtaining hydrogen from steam reforming of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbaninho, A.B.; Bergamaschi, V.S.; Ferreira, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The Ni/Ce catalysts for were prepared by co- precipitation method with a view to their use in steam reforming of ethanol to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; x-ray dispersive Spectroscopy and surface area BET method. This paper proposes to prepare, characterize and test nickel catalyst supported on cerium in order to obtain a material with higher activity and selectivity of the catalyst using the steam reforming reaction of ethanol, by varying the reaction temperature, molar ratio water/ethanol and uptime. The catalytic tests were monitored by chemical analysis of syngas from steam reforming of ethanol using an analysis online by gas Chromatograph in the reactor. (author)

  16. Catalytic reduction of NOx in gasoline engine exhaust over copper- and nickel-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Das, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Catalytic removal of NO x in engine exhaust gases can be accomplished by non-selective reduction, selective reduction and decomposition. Noble metals are extensively used for non-selective reduction of NO x and up to 90% of engine NO x emissions can be reduced in a stoichiometric exhaust. This requirement of having the stoichiometric fuel-air ratio acts against efficiency improvement of engines. Selective NO x reduction in the presence of different reductants such as, NH 3 , urea or hydrocarbons, requires close control of the amount of reductant being injected which otherwise may be emitted as a pollutant. Catalytic decomposition is the best option for NO x removal. Nevertheless, catalysts which are durable, economic and active for NO x reduction at normal engine exhaust temperature ranges are still being investigated. Three catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging the Na+ ion with copper, nickel and copper-nickel metal ions and applied to the exhaust of a stationary gasoline engine to explore their potential for catalytic reduction of NO x under a wide range of engine and exhaust conditions. Some encouraging results have been obtained. The catalyst Cu-X exhibits much better NO x reduction performance at any temperature in comparison to Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X; while Cu-Ni-X catalyst exhibits slightly better performance than Ni-X catalyst. Maximum NO x efficiency achieved with Cu-X catalyst is 59.2% at a space velocity (sv) of 31 000 h -1 ; while for Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X catalysts the equivalent numbers are 60.4% and 56% respectively at a sv of 22 000 h -1 . Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts exhibit significant NO x reduction capability for a wide range of air/fuel ratio and with a slower rate of decline as well with increase in air/fuel ratio. (author)

  17. Increase oil recovery of heavy oil in combustion tube using a new catalyst based nickel ionic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Garnica, M.A.; Hernandez-Perez, J.R.; Cabrera-Reves, M.C.; Schacht-Hernandez, P. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Mamora, D.D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    An ionic liquid-based nickel catalyst was used in conjunction with a combustion tube as an in situ process for heavy oil. The experimental system was comprised of a fluid injection system; a combustion tube; a fluid production system; a gas chromatograph; and a data recording system. Injected nitrogen and air was controlled by a mass flow controller. Nitrogen was used to pressurize the combustion tube and flush the system. Air was injected at a rate of 3 L per minute throughout the combustion run. Liquids leaving the combustion tube passed through a 2-stage separation process. Gases passing through the condenser were kept at low temperatures. Fractions of produced gas were analyzed by the chromatograph. Data loggers were used to obtain data at 30 second intervals. Two combustion experiments were conducted to obtain production times, temperature profiles, and the quality of the oil produced by the catalyst. Combustion tests were conducted with and without the catalyst. An analysis of the experimental data showed that use of the nickel catalyst resulted in increases in oil production as well as higher combustion efficiencies. Use of the catalyst also resulted in a faster combustion front and accelerated oil production. It was concluded that the produced oil contained fewer impurities than oil produced during the control experiment. 23 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  18. Wet chemical synthesis of nickel supported on alumina catalysts; Sintese de catalisadores de niquel suportado em alumina por via umida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Ranny Rodrigues; Costa, Talita Kenya Oliveira; Morais, Ana Carla da Fonseca Ferreira; Costa, Ana Cristina Figueiredo de Melo; Freitas, Normanda Lino de, E-mail: normanda@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Heterogenic catalysts are those found to be in a different phase on the reaction when compared to the reactants and products. Preferred when compared to homogeneous catalysts due to the easiness on which the separation is processed. The objective of this study is to obtain and characterize Alumina based catalysts impregnated with Nickel (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), by wet impregnation. The alumina was synthesized by combustion reaction. Before and after the impregnation the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), granulometric analysis, the textural analysis will be held by nitrogen adsorption (BET), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show a presence of a stable crystalline phase of Al2O3 in all the studied samples and after the impregnation the second phase formed was of NiO and NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} e Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts resulted in clusters with a medium diameter of 18.9 and 14.2 μm, respectively. The catalysts show a medium-pore characteristic (medium pore diameter between 2 and 50 nm), the superficial area to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were 8.69 m{sup 2}/g and 5.56 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. (author)

  19. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate a Ni/alumina catalyst. • The extent of hydrogen retention by the catalyst has been determined. • Filamentous carbon is identified as a by-product. - Abstract: An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO 2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH 4 and H 2 O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered

  20. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P. [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark [Department of Chemistry, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Staffs ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lennon, David, E-mail: David.Lennon@glasgow.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate a Ni/alumina catalyst. • The extent of hydrogen retention by the catalyst has been determined. • Filamentous carbon is identified as a by-product. - Abstract: An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO{sub 2} as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  1. Investigation of the supported nickel catalysts by XAS and XRD, using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.; Gluhoi, A.; Yaning, Xie; Dong, Bazohong

    2001-01-01

    In the first part of the paper we present a study based on EXAFS spectroscopy. This method can yield structural information about the local environment around a specific atomic constituent in the amorphous materials, the location and chemical state of any catalytic atom on any support or point defect structures in alloys and composites. EXAFS is a specific technique of the scattering of X-ray on materials. The present study is aimed toward elucidating the local structure of Ni atoms and their interaction with oxide support. In this case, we analyse the first three shells of coordination. The second aim of the paper consists in X-ray diffraction on the same samples. X-ray diffraction method which is capable to determine average particle size, microstrains, probability of faults as well as particle size distribution function of supported Ni catalysts is presented. The method is based on the Fourier analysis of X-Ray diffraction profiles such as (111) (200) and (220). We are going to work out a chemisorption model by the correlation of the local and global structure connected with the specific surface. On the other hand, we will try to estimate specific surface values determined by classical method with occupation factor evaluated by the geometrical Ni clusters. The results obtained on supported nickel catalysts which are used in H/D isotopic exchange reactions are reported. The global structure is obtained with a new fitting method based on the Generalised Fermi Function facilities for approximation and Fourier transform of the experimental X-Ray line profiles. Both types of measurements were performed on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facilities (BSRF). (authors)

  2. Low-cost removal of organic pollutants with nickel nanoparticle loaded ordered macroporous hydrogel as high performance catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Mingyi, E-mail: tmyi@tjcu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Huang, Guanbo, E-mail: gbhuang2007@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Sai [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Liu, Yue [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Xianxian [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Wang, Xingrui [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Pang, Xiaobo [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Qiu, Haixia, E-mail: qhx@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    A facile route for the in situ preparation of catalytically active Ni nanoparticles (NPs) in ordered macroporous hydrogel (OMH) has been developed. The hydrogel was fabricated based on polystyrene colloid template. The electronegativity of amide and carboxyl groups on the poly(acrylamide-co-acryl acid) chains of the hydrogel caused strong binding of Ni{sup 2+} ions which made them distribute uniformly inside the hydrogel. When immersed in NaBH{sub 4} aqueous solution, the Ni{sup 2+} ions on the hydrogel were reduced to Ni NPs. The resultant Ni NPs loaded OMH showed good catalytic activity for the reduction of a common organic pollutant, 4-nitrophenol, with NaBH{sub 4}. A kinetic study of the catalytic reaction was carried out. The rate constant per unit weight could reach 0.53 s{sup −1} g{sup −1}, which is much better than many common hydrogel loaded nickel catalysts. Moreover, the current catalyst can be easily separated and recovered with stable catalytic activity. - Highlights: • A new poly(acrylamide-co-acryl acid) hydrogel with ordered macropores. • A simple in situ fabrication of nickel nanoparticles under mild conditions. • High-performance heterogeneous catalyst for removal of nitrophenol from water. • Good recyclability of catalyst without any complicated regeneration process.

  3. Low-cost removal of organic pollutants with nickel nanoparticle loaded ordered macroporous hydrogel as high performance catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mingyi; Huang, Guanbo; Zhang, Sai; Liu, Yue; Li, Xianxian; Wang, Xingrui; Pang, Xiaobo; Qiu, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    A facile route for the in situ preparation of catalytically active Ni nanoparticles (NPs) in ordered macroporous hydrogel (OMH) has been developed. The hydrogel was fabricated based on polystyrene colloid template. The electronegativity of amide and carboxyl groups on the poly(acrylamide-co-acryl acid) chains of the hydrogel caused strong binding of Ni 2+ ions which made them distribute uniformly inside the hydrogel. When immersed in NaBH 4 aqueous solution, the Ni 2+ ions on the hydrogel were reduced to Ni NPs. The resultant Ni NPs loaded OMH showed good catalytic activity for the reduction of a common organic pollutant, 4-nitrophenol, with NaBH 4 . A kinetic study of the catalytic reaction was carried out. The rate constant per unit weight could reach 0.53 s −1  g −1 , which is much better than many common hydrogel loaded nickel catalysts. Moreover, the current catalyst can be easily separated and recovered with stable catalytic activity. - Highlights: • A new poly(acrylamide-co-acryl acid) hydrogel with ordered macropores. • A simple in situ fabrication of nickel nanoparticles under mild conditions. • High-performance heterogeneous catalyst for removal of nitrophenol from water. • Good recyclability of catalyst without any complicated regeneration process

  4. Study of Supported Nickel Catalysts Prepared by Aqueous Hydrazine Method. Hydrogenating Properties and Hydrogen Storage: Support Effect. Silver Additive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcieszak, R.

    2006-06-01

    We have studied Ni or NiAg nano-particles obtained by the reduction of nickel salts (acetate or nitrate) by hydrazine and deposited by simple or EDTA-double impregnation on various supports (γ-Al 2 O 3 , amorphous or crystallized SiO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , CeO 2 and carbon). Prepared catalysts were characterized by different methods (XRD, XPS, low temperature adsorption and desorption of N 2 , FTIR and FTIR-Pyridine, TEM, STEM, EDS, H 2 -TPR, H 2 -adsorption, H 2 -TPD, isopropanol decomposition) and tested in the gas phase hydrogenation of benzene or as carbon materials in the hydrogen storage at room temperature and high pressure. The catalysts prepared exhibited better dispersion and activity than classical catalysts. TOF's of NiAg/SiO 2 or Ni/carbon catalysts were similar to Pt catalysts in benzene hydrogenation. Differences in support acidity or preparation method and presence of Ag as metal additive play a crucial role in the chemical reduction of Ni by hydrazine and in the final properties of the materials. Ni/carbon catalysts could store significant amounts of hydrogen at room temperature and high pressure (0.53%/30 bars), probably through the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  5. TECHNOLOGIES OF DOPING OF CAST IRON THROUGH THE SLAG PHASE WITH USING OF THE SPENT NICKEL- AND COPPER-CONTAINING CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Provorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have defined the regularities of the doping of cast iron through the slag phase of nickel and copper due to the waste catalysts using a carbonaceous reducing agent. We have justified the need to use the cast iron chips as a seed in the composition of the slag mixture. We have defined the dependence of the degree of extraction of nickel or copper from spent catalyst on the amount of the catalyst, on the basicity of the slag mixture, on the temperature and time of melting.

  6. Nickel-silver composition shows promise as catalyst for hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerl, J. A.; Murray, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Carburized 3-1 nickel-silver preparation exhibits considerable catalytic activity, although not as high as platinum black. Cost and availability factors warrant further evaluation of nickel-silver materials.

  7. Adsorption of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by nickel oxide nano catalyst prepared by different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M. Mahmoud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution by heavy metal is arising as the most endangering tasks to both water sources and atmosphere quality today. The treatment of heavy metals is of special concern due to their recalcitrance and persistence in the environment. To limit the spread of the heavy metals within water sources, nickel oxide nanoparticles adsorbents were synthesized and characterized with the aim of removal of one of the aggressive heavy elements, namely; lead ions. Nano nickel oxide adsorbents were prepared using NaOH and oxalic acid dissolved in ethanol as precursors. The results indicated that adsorption capacity of Pb(II ion by NiO-org catalyst is favored than that prepared using NaOH as a precipitant. Nickel oxide nanoparticles prepared by the two methods were characterized structurally and chemically through XRD, DTA, TGA, BET and FT-IR. Affinity and efficiency sorption parameters of the solid nano NiO particles, such as; contact time, initial concentration of lead ions and the dosage of NiO nano catalyst and competitive adsorption behaviors were studied. The results showed that the first-order reaction law fit the reduction of lead ion, also showed good linear relationship with a correlation coefficient (R2 larger than 0.9.

  8. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst.

  9. Preparation and characterization of alumina supported nickel-oxalate catalyst for the hydrodeoxygenation of oleic acid into normal and iso-octadecane biofuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayodele, O.B.; Togunwa, Olayinka S.; Abbas, Hazzim F.; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of nickel oxalate complex as catalyst precursor. • Incorporation of nickel oxalate complex into alumina support. • Characterization of the alumina supported nickel oxalate catalyst. • Hydrodeoxygenation of oleic acid with nickel oxalate catalyst. • Nickel oxalate catalyst reusability studies. - Abstract: In this study, nickel II oxalate complex (NiOx) was prepared by functionalization of nickel with oxalic acid (OxA) and incorporated into Al 2 O 3 to synthesize alumina supported nickel oxalate (NiOx/Al 2 O 3 ) catalyst for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of oleic acid (OA) into biofuel. The synthesized NiOx/Al 2 O 3 was characterized and the X-ray fluorescence and elemental dispersive X-ray results showed that NiOx was successfully incorporated into the structure of Al 2 O 3 . The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy results confirmed that highly dispersed Ni species are present in the NiOx/Al 2 O 3 due to the functionalization with OxA. The catalytic activity of the NiOx/Al 2 O 3 on the HDO of OA produced a mixture of 21% iso-C18 and 72% n-C18 at a 360 °C, 20 bar, 30 mg NiOx/Al 2 O 3 loading pressure and gas flow rate of 100 mL/min. The presence of i-C 18 was ascribed to the OxA functionalization which increased the acidity of NiOx/Al 2 O 3 . The NiOx/Al 2 O 3 reusability study showed consistent HDO ability after 5 runs. These results are promising for further research into biofuel production for commercialization

  10. Conversion of Methane into Methanol and Ethanol over Nickel Oxide on Ceria-Zirconia Catalysts in a Single Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okolie, Chukwuemeka [School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Belhseine, Yasmeen F. [School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Lyu, Yimeng [School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Yung, Matthew M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kovarik, Libor [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Richland WA 99354 USA; Stavitski, Eli [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Sievers, Carsten [School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW Atlanta GA 30332 USA

    2017-09-26

    Direct conversion of methane into alcohols is a promising technology for converting stranded methane reserves into liquids that can be transported in pipelines and upgraded to value-added chemicals. We demonstrate that a catalyst consisting of small nickel oxide clusters supported on ceria-zirconia (NiO/CZ) can selectively oxidize methane to methanol and ethanol in a single, steady-state process at 723 K using O2 as an abundantly available oxidant. The presence of steam is required to obtain alcohols rather than CO2 as the product of catalytic combustion. The unusual activity of this catalyst is attributed to the synergy between the small Lewis acidic NiO clusters and the redox-active CZ support, which also stabilizes the small NiO clusters.

  11. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) over nickel catalysts supported on cationic surfactant-templated mesoporous aluminas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Pil; Chung, Jin Suk; Song, In Kyu

    Two types of mesoporous γ-aluminas (denoted as A-A and A-S) are prepared by a hydrothermal method under different basic conditions using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as a templating agent. A-A and A-S are synthesized in a medium of ammonia solution and sodium hydroxide solution, respectively. Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts (Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S) are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of a mesoporous γ-Al 2O 3 support on the catalytic performance of Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 is investigated. The identity of basic solution strongly affects the physical properties of the A-A and A-S supports. The high surface-area of the mesoporous γ-aluminas and the strong metal-support interaction of supported catalysts greatly enhance the dispersion of nickel species on the catalyst surface. The well-developed mesopores of the Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts prohibit the polymerization of carbon species on the catalyst surface during the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, both Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts give better catalytic performance than the nickel catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al 2O 3 (Ni/A-C). In addition, the Ni/A-A catalyst is superior to the Ni/A-S catalyst. The relatively strong metal-support interaction of Ni/A-A catalyst effectively suppresses the sintering of metallic nickel and the carbon deposition in the steam reforming of LNG. The large pores of the Ni/A-A catalyst also play an important role in enhancing internal mass transfer during the reaction.

  12. Effect study of the support in nickel and cobalt catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from ethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sirlane Gomes da

    2013-01-01

    A range of oxide-supported metal catalysts have been investigated for the steam reforming of ethanol for the production of hydrogen and subsequent application in fuel cells. The catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation and internal gelification methods using cobalt and nickel as active metals supported on aluminum, zirconium, lanthanum and cerium oxides. After prepared and calcined at 550 Cº the solids were fully characterized by different techniques such as X-rays diffraction(DRX), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption (B.E.T), temperature-programmed reduction in H2 (TPR-H2) and thermogravimetric analysis. The catalytic tests were performed in a monolithic quartz reactor and submitted to different thermodynamic conditions of steam reforming of ethanol at temperatures varying from 500º C to 800 ºC. The product gas streams from the reactor were analyzed by an on-line gas chromatograph. The cobalt/nickel catalyst supported on a ceria-lanthania mixture (Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 ) showed good catalytic performance in hydrogen selectivity reaching a concentration greater than 65%, when compared to other catalytic systems such as: Co 10% / Ni5% - CeO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 ZrO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - ZrO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - La 2 O 3 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 /K 2% ; Co 10 % / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 / Na 2% ; Ni 10% / Co 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 ; Co-Al 2 O 3 e Co-Al 2 O 3 CeO 2 . (author)

  13. Ultrasmall Dispersible Crystalline Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles as High-Performance Catalysts for Electrochemical Water Splitting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fominykh, K.; Feckl, J. M.; Sicklinger, J.; Döblinger, M.; Böcklein, S.; Ziegler, J.; Peter, L.; Rathouský, Jiří; Scheidt, E.-W.; Bein, T.; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 21 (2014), s. 3123-3129 ISSN 1616-301X Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrocatalysis * nickel oxide * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 11.805, year: 2014

  14. Palm H-FAME Production through Partially Hydrogenation using Nickel/Carbon Catalyst to Increase Oxidation Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramayeni Elsa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the methods to improve the oxidation stability of palm biodiesel is through partially hydrogenation. The production using Nickel/Carbon catalyst to speed up the reaction rate. Product is called Palm H-FAME (Hydrogenated FAME. Partial hydrogenation breaks the unsaturated bond on FAME (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester, which is a key component of the determination of oxidative properties. Changes in FAME composition by partial hydrogenation are predicted to change the oxidation stability so it does not cause deposits that can damage the injection system of diesel engine, pump system, and storage tank. Partial hydrogenation is carried out under operating conditions of 120 °C and 6 bar with 100:1, 100:3, 100:5, 100:10 % wt catalyst in the stirred batch autoclave reactor. H-FAME synthesis with 100:5 % wt Ni/C catalyst can decrease the iodine number which is the empirical measure of the number of unsaturated bonds from 91.78 to 82.38 (g-I2/100 g with an increase of oxidation stability from 585 to 602 minutes.

  15. Ni/SiO2 Catalyst Prepared with Nickel Nitrate Precursor for Combination of CO2 Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane: Characterization and Deactivation Mechanism Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Ni/SiO2 catalyst in the process of combination of CO2 reforming and partial oxidation of methane to produce syngas was studied. The Ni/SiO2 catalysts were prepared by using incipient wetness impregnation method with nickel nitrate as a precursor and characterized by FT-IR, TG-DTA, UV-Raman, XRD, TEM, and H2-TPR. The metal nickel particles with the average size of 37.5 nm were highly dispersed over the catalyst, while the interaction between nickel particles and SiO2 support is relatively weak. The weak NiO-SiO2 interaction disappeared after repeating oxidation-reduction-oxidation in the fluidized bed reactor at 700°C, which resulted in the sintering of metal nickel particles. As a result, a rapid deactivation of the Ni/SiO2 catalysts was observed in 2.5 h reaction on stream.

  16. Theoretical investigation of the mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction using nickel-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Jiamao; Deng, Bing; Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuo@cqut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: tanzhaoyi@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Four-step dehydrogenation of CT{sub 4} catalyzed by Ni to form Ni–C by releasing T{sub 2}. • The process of Ni + CT{sub 4} → NiCT{sub 2} + T{sub 2} is more achievable than that of NiCT{sub 2} → NiC + T{sub 2}. • TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC step is the RDS with the rate constant of k = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT). • The hydrogen isotope effect value of k{sub H}/k{sub T} is 2.94, and k{sub D}/k{sub T} is 1.39. • CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} dehydrogenations are likely to occur, accompanied by the CT{sub 4} cracking. - Abstract: The mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction catalyzed by nickel-based catalyst was investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/[6-311++G(d, p), SDD] level. The computational results indicated that the dehydrogenation of tritiated methane is endothermic. The decomposition of tritiated methane catalyzed by Ni to form Ni-based carbon (Ni–C) after a four-step dehydrogenation companied with releasing tritium. After the first and second dehydrogenation steps, Ni + CT{sub 4} formed NiCT{sub 2}. After the third and fourth dehydrogenation steps, NiCT{sub 2} formed NiC. The first and second steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and triplet states, and the lowest energy route is Ni + CT{sub 4} → {sup 1}COM → {sup 1}TS1 → {sup 3}IM1 → {sup 3}TS2 → {sup 3}IM2. The third and fourth steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and quintet states, and the minimum energy reaction pathway appeared to be IM3 → {sup 1}TS4 → {sup 5}IM4 → {sup 5}TS5 → {sup 5}IM5 → {sup 5}pro + T{sub 2}. The fourth step of dehydrogenation TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC was the rate-determining step of the entire reaction with the rate constant of k{sub 2} = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT) (in cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} s{sup −1}), and its activation energy barrier was calculated to be 51.8 kcal/mol. The Ni-catalyzed CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} cracking

  17. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Ethanol over Nickel Catalysts Supported on Sol Gel Made Alumina: Influence of Calcination Temperature on Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Zahira; Bshish, Ahmed; Ebshish, Ali; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Alhasan, Fatah H

    2013-05-30

    Selecting a proper support in the catalyst system plays an important role in hydrogen production via ethanol steam reforming. In this study, sol gel made alumina supports prepared for nickel (Ni) catalysts were calcined at different temperatures. A series of (Ni/Al S.G. ) catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation procedure. The influence of varying the calcination temperature of the sol gel made supports on catalyst activity was tested in ethanol reforming reaction. The characteristics of the sol gel alumina supports and Ni catalysts were affected by the calcination temperature of the supports. The structure of the sol gel made alumina supports was transformed in the order of γ → (γ + θ) → θ-alumina as the calcination temperature of the supports increased from 600 °C to 1000 °C. Both hydrogen yield and ethanol conversion presented a volcano-shaped behavior with maximum values of 4.3 mol/mol ethanol fed and 99.5%, respectively. The optimum values were exhibited over Ni/Al S.G800 (Ni catalyst supported on sol gel made alumina calcined at 800 °C). The high performance of the Ni/Al S.G800 catalyst may be attributed to the strong interaction of Ni species and sol gel made alumina which lead to high nickel dispersion and small particle size.

  18. Syntheses, Characterization and Kinetics of Nickel-Tungsten Nitride Catalysts for Hydrotreating of Gas Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchwey, Christian

    This thesis summarizes the methods and major findings of Ni-W(P)/gamma-Al 2O3 nitride catalyst synthesis, characterization, hydrotreating activity, kinetic analysis and correlation of the catalysts' activities to their synthesis parameters and properties. The range of parameters for catalyst synthesis were W (15-40 wt%), Ni (0-8 wt%), P (0-5 wt%) and nitriding temperature (TN) (500-900 °C). Characterization techniques used included: N2 sorption studies, chemisorption, elemental analysis, temperature programmed studies, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) were performed at: temperature (340-380 °C), pressure (6.2-9.0 MPa), liquid hourly space velocity (1-3 h-1) and hydrogen to oil ratio (600 ml/ml, STP). The predominant species on the catalyst surface were Ni3N, W2N and bimetallic Ni2W3N. The bimetallic Ni-W nitride species was more active than the individual activities of the Ni3N and W2N. P increased weak acid sites while nitriding temperature decreased amount of strong acid sites. Low nitriding temperature enhanced dispersion of metal particles. P interacted with Al 2O3 which increased the dispersion of metal nitrides on the catalyst surface. HDN activity increased with Ni and P loading but decreased with increase in nitriding temperature (optimum conversion; 60 wt%). HDS and HDA activities went through a maximum with increase in the synthesis parameters (optimum conversions; 88. wt% for HDS and 47 wt% for HDA). Increase in W loading led to increase in catalyst activity. The catalysts were stable to deactivation and had the nitride structure conserved during hydrotreating in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. The results showed good correlation between hydrotreating activities (HDS and HDN) and the catalyst nitrogen content, number of exposed

  19. Reduction of CO2 by nickel (II) macrocycle catalyst at HMDE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    CO is the major product in the gaseous phase and. HCOOH the sole product formed in the solution phase. Keywords. Nickel (II) azamacrocycle; electrocatalytic reduction of CO2; electrochemical reduction. 1. Introduction. Electrochemical processes for the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic substances have ...

  20. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  1. Carbon-Nanotube-Supported Bio-Inspired Nickel Catalyst and Its Integration in Hybrid Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil, Solène [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Métaux, Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS UMR5249, CEA, 38000 Grenoble France; Lalaoui, Noémie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Dutta, Arnab [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99532 USA; Current address: Chemistry Department, IIT Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382355 India; Nedellec, Yannig [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Cosnier, Serge [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99532 USA; Artero, Vincent [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Métaux, Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS UMR5249, CEA, 38000 Grenoble France; Le Goff, Alan [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France

    2017-01-12

    A biomimetic nickel bis-diphosphine complex incorporating the amino-acid arginine in the outer coordination sphere, was immobilized on modified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through electrostatic interactions. The sur-face-confined catalyst is characterized by a reversible 2-electron/2-proton redox process at potentials close to the equibrium potential of the H+/H2 couple. Consequently, the functionalized redox nanomaterial exhibits reversible electrocatalytic activity for the H2/2H+ interconversion over a broad range of pH. This system exhibits catalytic bias, analogous to hydrogenases, resulting in high turnover frequencies at low overpotentials for electrocatalytic H2 oxida-tion between pH 0 and 7. This allowed integrating such bio-inspired nanomaterial together with a multicopper oxi-dase at the cathode side in a hybrid bioinspired/enzymatic hydrogen fuel cell. This device delivers ~2 mW cm–2 with an open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V at room temperature and pH 5, which sets a new efficiency record for a bio-related hydrogen fuel cell with base metal catalysts.

  2. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-01-01

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al 2 O 3 , NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO + NiAl 2 O 4 ) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO+NiAl 2 O 4 ) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on NiAl 2 O 4 , and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied

  3. HDS, HDN and HDA activities of nickel-molybdenum catalysts supported on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Ramirez-Meneses, E. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Diaz-Garcia, L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Arce-Estrada, E.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Metalurgia y Materiales. A.P. 75-876, 07300 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    In this work, NiMo-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by using different alumina precursors. The supports were impregnated by means of the spray at incipient wetness technique in both basic and acid media. Both the supports and fresh catalysts were characterized by the adsorption-desorption isotherms, Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR), Thermal Pyridine Adsorption-Desorption (TPD) and X-Ray Diffraction analyses (XRD). After sulfidation, the NiMoS metallic particles were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The initial analyses were performed in a trickle-bed reactor by using a real feedstock (Mexican heavy gas oil) and performing hydrotreating reactions (HDS, HDN and HDA) at three different temperatures: 613, 633 and 653 K; and 54 kg cm{sup -} {sup 2}. The catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of the NiMo catalysts, alumina phase and pH of the impregnating solution. The catalytic results show an increase in the conversion profiles with temperature. The sulfur conversion was increased from 89 to 99.25%, 91-99%, 90.8-97%, 83-95% and 78-96% when the crystal size of the support varied from 3 to 20 nm, respectively. The nitrogen and aromatic conversions were also increased in the range of 23-45 wt.%. It was found that the {gamma} phase reached a higher catalytic performance than the {eta} phase. The NiMo catalysts synthesized in a basic medium showed a better catalytic performance than that obtained with those prepared in acid solutions. The significance of the kinetic data to compare the catalysts is discussed. The maximum value of the catalytic activity was reached with the catalysts with the smallest particle sizes. (author)

  4. Product of Ginibre matrices: Fuss-Catalan and Raney distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, Karol A.; Życzkowski, Karol

    2011-06-01

    Squared singular values of a product of s square random Ginibre matrices are asymptotically characterized by probability distributions Ps(x), such that their moments are equal to the Fuss-Catalan numbers of order s. We find a representation of the Fuss-Catalan distributions Ps(x) in terms of a combination of s hypergeometric functions of the type sFs-1. The explicit formula derived here is exact for an arbitrary positive integer s, and for s=1 it reduces to the Marchenko-Pastur distribution. Using similar techniques, involving the Mellin transform and the Meijer G function, we find exact expressions for the Raney probability distributions, the moments of which are given by a two-parameter generalization of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. These distributions can also be considered as a two-parameter generalization of the Wigner semicircle law.

  5. CH{sub 4} reforming with CO{sub 2} for syngas production over nickel catalysts supported on mesoporous nanostructured γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidian, Nasrollah; Habibi, Narges [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Mehran [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Nanostructured γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with high surface area and mesoporous structure was synthesized by sol-gel method and employed as catalyst support for nickel catalysts in methane reforming with carbon dioxide. The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, BET, TPR, TPH, SEM and TPO techniques. The BET analysis showed a high surface area of 204m{sup 2}g{sup -1} and a narrow pore-size distribution centered at a diameter of 5.5 nm for catalyst support. The results revealed that an increase in nickel loading from 5 to 15 wt% decreased the surface area of catalyst from 182 to 160 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}. In addition, the catalytic results showed an increase in methane conversion with increase in nickel content. TPO analysis revealed that the coke deposition increased with increasing in nickel loading, and the catalyst with 15 wt% of nickel showed the highest degree of carbon formation. SEM and TPH analyses confirmed the formation of whisker type carbon over the spent catalysts. Increasing CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio increased the methane conversion. The BET analysis of spent catalysts indicated that the mesoporous structure of catalysts still remained after reaction.

  6. Determination of the stability constants for cobalt, nickel and palladium homogeneous catalyst complexes containing triphenylphosphine ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djekic, T.; Zivkovic, Z.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; de Haan, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysts are complex compounds that are always in equilibrium with their free metal, free ligand and other forms of complexes. The ratios between different species are defined by the stability constants, which are influenced by different parameters such as the type of metal, ligand,

  7. Emprego de catalisadores à base de níquel para homo- e copolimerização de estireno The use of nickel-based catalysts for homo-and copolymerization of styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Ferreira Jr.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the homo- and copolymerization of styrene with nickel catalysts. The catalytic activity, polymer stereoregularity, polymer molecular weight and polydispersity are dependent upon nickel ligands and reaction parameters. Catalysts supported on silica, treated with methylaluminoxane (MAO, have shown higher stereospecificity and activity compared to homogeneous ones. The influence of these parameters is discussed focusing on the elucidation of some aspects of the polymerization mechanism.

  8. Nickel-based xerogel catalysts: Synthesis via fast sol-gel method and application in catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Dongliang; Ma, Lirong; Jiang, Deli; Xie, Jimin, E-mail: xiejm391@sohu.com; Zhu, Jianjun, E-mail: zhjj029@sina.com

    2016-09-30

    Graphical abstract: In order to investigate the roles of three-dimensional network structure and calcium on Ni catalysts, the Ni, Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} xerogel catalysts were successfully synthesized via the fast sol-gel process and chemical reduction method. - Highlights: • Epoxide-driven sol-gel and chemical reduction method subsequently were used to prepare Ni, Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni-Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. • Three-dimensional network structure of the gel was employed to adjust the size and distribution of Ni nanoparticles. • Calcium was employed to shorten the gelation time, improve the nickel dispersion, decrease thenickel particle size and strengthen the Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interaction. • The rate constants of Ni-Ca-Al2O3 catalysts (2.85 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}) is 2.8 times higher than the Ni catalysts (1.02 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}) and 2 times higher than the Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts(1.42 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}). • After 5 cycles, the conversion of PNP to PAP catalyzed by Ni, Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} remained 85%, 82%, 80%, respectively. - Abstract: In order to investigate the roles of three-dimensional network structure and calcium on Ni catalysts, the Ni, Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} xerogel catalysts were successfully synthesized via the fast sol-gel process and chemical reduction method. The crystal structure of three different catalysts was observed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption were employed to investigate the role of network structure of xerogel catalysts and the size distribution of Ni nanoparticles. The catalyst composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) measurement and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments were carried

  9. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential...... as high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...... transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Catalytic testing has been performed using guaiacol in 1-octanol acting as a model compound for bio-oil. Addition of sulphur (0.3 vol% octanethiol) in the feed...

  10. One-pot aqueous phase catalytic conversion of sorbitol to gasoline over nickel catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Yujing; Qiu, Songbai; Xu, Ying; Ding, Mingyue; Chen, Lungang; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Longlong; Wang, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Directly production gasoline (C5–C12 alkanes) from biomass-derived sugar alcohol sorbitol. • Temperature of STG (553–593 K) was lower than that of traditional methanol to gasoline (MTG) (623–773 K). • Gasoline yield of 46.9% and C7–C12 hydrocarbons reached up to 45.5% in the gasoline products. - Abstract: The carbon chain extension and hydrodeoxygenation steps play critical roles in the high-energy-density hydrocarbons production. In this paper, a systematic study had been carried out to investigate one-pot aqueous phase catalytic conversion of sorbitol to gasoline (STG) over bifunctional Ni-based catalysts. Characterization technologies of N 2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3 -TPD) were used to study the textural properties, phase compositions, acid behavior and morphologies of the catalysts. The catalytic performances were tested in a fixed bed reactor. It was found that the physically mixed Ni/HZSM-5 and Ni/silica-gel (mesoporous SG) catalyst realized the carbon chain extension and exhibited excellent performances on hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction (46.9% of gasoline (C5–C12) yield and 45.5% of C7–C12 hydrocarbons in the gasoline products). Especially, the temperature of STG (553–593 K) was lower obviously than that of the traditional methanol to gasoline (MTG) process (623–773 K). It provided a novel transformation of sorbitol to long-chain alkanes by one-pot process over the bifunctional catalyst (Ni@HZSM-5/SG), wherein hydrodeoxygenation, ketonization and aldol condensation steps were integrated

  11. Photodegradation of Methyl Green by Nickel-Dimethylglyoxime/ZSM-5 Zeolite as a Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ni-DMG/ZSM-5 zeolite was prepared by ion exchange and complexation procedures. FT-IR, XRD, SEM, TG, and DTG methods were used for characterization of the raw and modified samples. The prepared composite was used as a catalyst in the photodegradation process of an aqueous solution methyl green (MG dye under UV irradiation. The effect of key operating parameters such as catalyst dosage, temperature, the initial concentration of the dye, and pH of the samples was studied on the degradation extent of the dye. UV-Vis spectrophotometric measurements were performed for determination of the decolorization and mineralization extents. The optimal operation parameters were found as follows: , temperature of 60°C, 0.6 g L−1 of the catalyst, and 40 ppm of the dye concentration. The Ni-DMG particles out of zeolite framework did not show significant degradation efficiency. The degradation process obeys the first-order kinetic.

  12. Morphology-Tuned Synthesis of Nickel Cobalt Selenides as Highly Efficient Pt-Free Counter Electrode Catalysts for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xing; Li, Hongmei; Shao, Li; Jiang, Xiancai; Hou, Linxi

    2016-11-02

    In this work, morphology-tuned ternary nickel cobalt selenides based on different Ni/Co molar ratios have been synthesized via a simple precursor conversion method and used as counter electrode (CE) materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The experimental facts and mechanism analysis clarified the possible growth process of product. It can be found that the electrochemical performance and structures of ternary nickel cobalt selenides can be optimized by tuning the Ni/Co molar ratio. Benefiting from the unique morphology and tunable composition, among the as-prepared metal selenides, the electrochemical measurements showed that the ternary nickel cobalt selenides exhibited a more superior electrocatalytic activity in comparison with binary Ni and Co selenides. In particular, the three-dimensional dandelion-like Ni 0.33 Co 0.67 Se microspheres delivered much higher power conversion efficiency (9.01%) than that of Pt catalyst (8.30%) under AM 1.5G irradiation.

  13. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite catalysts by in situ formation of carbon template over nickel nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Kegnæs, Marina; Hytoft, Glen

    2016-01-01

    A novel synthesis procedure for the preparation of the hierarchical zeolite materials with MFI structure based on the carbon templating method with in situ generated carbon template is presented in this study. Through chemical vapour deposition of coke on nickel nanoparticles supported on silica...... oxide, a carbon-silica composite is obtained and exploited as a combined carbon template/silica source for zeolite synthesis. This approach has several advantages in comparison with conventional carbon templating methods, where relatively complicated preparative strategies involving multistep...... impregnation procedures and rather expensive chemicals are used. Removal of the carbon template by combustion results in zeolite single crystals with intracrystalline pore volumes between 0.28 and 0.48 cm3/g. The prepared zeolites are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and physisorption analysis. The isomerization...

  14. Adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a nickel/silica catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falconer, J.L.; Zagli, A.E.

    1980-04-01

    Temperature-programed desorption and reaction studies showed that increasing amounts of CO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica-supported 6.9% nickel with increasing temperature to a maximum adsorption at approx. 443/sup 0/K, i.e., that the adsorption was activated; that CO/sub 2/ desorbed partly as CO/sub 2/ with the peak at 543/sup 0/K, and partly as CO with several peaks; that in the presence of hydrogen, nearly all adsorbed CO/sub 2/ desorbed as methane, and a small amount as CO; and that the methane desorption peaks from adsorbed CO and CO/sub 2/ both occurred at 473/sup 0/K. These results suggested that carbon dioxide adsorbed dissociatively as a carbon monoxide and an oxygen species. An observed absence of higher hydrocarbons in the methanation products of carbon dioxide was attributed to a high hydrogen/carbon monoxide surface ratio caused by the activated carbon dioxide adsorption.

  15. Hydrogen production by dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide in one-dimensional nickel-based catalysts; Produccion de hidrogeno mediante el reformado seco de metano con dioxido de carbono en catalizadores unidimensionales a base de niquel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez U, A. C.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this thesis is development of nickel catalysts supported over 1D matrix of cerium oxide, to be used in dry reforming methane reaction with carbon dioxide for hydrogen production. The catalysts were characterized by: Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (Sem), Surface Area (Bet method) an X Ray Diffraction (XRD). The TPR technique allowed to define reduction temperature of the active phase in the catalyst, Sem technique showed that the CeO{sub 2} matrix had a nano rod morphology. XRD allowed to identify the crystalline phases of the catalysts. Finally, the catalysts were tested in the dry reforming methane reaction, high catalytic activity and hydrogen production were performed at 700 degrees Celsius and the catalyst with 30 wt.% of nickel. (Author)

  16. Nanostructured Co3O4 grown on nickel foam: An efficient and readily recyclable 3D catalyst for heterogeneous peroxymonosulfate activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruixia; Hu, Lin; Yu, Peng; Wang, Huaiyuan; Wang, Zhaohui; Fang, Jingyun

    2018-05-01

    Cobalt-based heterogeneous catalyst has been recognized as one of most efficient activators for peroxymonosulfate (PMS) decomposition, but usually suffers from the poor stability and difficulty to recover and reuse. Here easily recyclable cobalt oxide (Co 3 O 4 ) nanowires and nanoflowers grown on nickel foam (NF) are fabricated by a hydrothermal and calcination method. The prepared 3D Co 3 O 4 /NF catalyst is characterized and applied as a heterogeneous catalyst for PMS activation to generate sulfate radicals for decomposition of Acid Orange 7 (AO7). The results show that the AO7 degradation rate increases with cobalt loading and PMS dosage, but decreases with the increase of solution pH. The Co 3 O 4 /NF catalyst using 2 mM Co(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O as cobalt source exhibits highest activity, and almost complete decolorization could be achieved within 30 min. The diverse effects of coexisting anions (SO 4 2- , HCO 3 - , NO 3 - and Cl - ) on AO7 degradation are observed and explained. After 10 consecutive runs, excellent catalytic reactivity of the catalyst remains while the level of leached cobalt during the catalyst usage is much lower than the maximum allowable concentration in drinking and natural water. More importantly, the macroscopic Co 3 O 4 /NF catalyst shows advantage of easy recycling after application compared to traditional catalysts. It is believed that the as-prepared Co 3 O 4 /NF is promising to be an effective and green heterogeneous catalyst for PMS activation to degrade organic pollutants for environmental application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nickel nanoparticles-chitosan composite coated cellulose filter paper: An efficient and easily recoverable dip-catalyst for pollutants degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2016-11-01

    In this report, we used cellulose filter paper (FP) as high surface area catalyst supporting green substrate for the synthesis of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles in thin chitosan (CS) coating layer and their easy separation was demonstrated for next use. In this work, FP was coated with a 1 wt% CS solution onto cellulose FP to prepare CS-FP as an economical and environment friendly host material. CS-FP was put into 0.2 M NiCl 2 aqueous solution for the adsorption of Ni 2+ ions by CS coating layer. The Ni 2+ adsorbed CS-FP was treated with 0.1 M NaBH 4 aqueous solution to convert the ions into nanoparticles. Thus, we achieved Ni nanoparticles-CS composite through water based in-situ preparation process. Successful Ni nanoparticles formations was assessed by FESEM and EDX analyses. FTIR used to track the interactions between nanoparticles and host material. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the nanocomposite displays an excellent catalytic activity and reusability in three reduction reactions of toxic compounds i.e. conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, 2-nitrophenol to 2-aminophenol, and methyl orange dye reduction by NaBH 4 . Such a fabrication process of Ni/CS-FP may be applicable for the immobilization of other metal nanoparticles onto FP for various applications in catalysis, sensing, and environmental sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon-Nanotube-Supported Bio-Inspired Nickel Catalyst and Its Integration in Hybrid Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Solène; Lalaoui, Noémie; Dutta, Arnab; Nedellec, Yannig; Cosnier, Serge; Shaw, Wendy J; Artero, Vincent; Le Goff, Alan

    2017-02-06

    A biomimetic nickel bis-diphosphine complex incorporating the amino acid arginine in the outer coordination sphere was immobilized on modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through electrostatic interactions. The functionalized redox nanomaterial exhibits reversible electrocatalytic activity for the H 2 /2 H + interconversion from pH 0 to 9, with catalytic preference for H 2 oxidation at all pH values. The high activity of the complex over a wide pH range allows us to integrate this bio-inspired nanomaterial either in an enzymatic fuel cell together with a multicopper oxidase at the cathode, or in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using Pt/C at the cathode. The Ni-based PEMFC reaches 14 mW cm -2 , only six-times-less as compared to full-Pt conventional PEMFC. The Pt-free enzyme-based fuel cell delivers ≈2 mW cm -2 , a new efficiency record for a hydrogen biofuel cell with base metal catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Speciation of Raney Copper Oxide during High-Temperature Desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, H.-L.; Wang, H. Paul; Wei Yuling

    2007-01-01

    Speciation of copper in the Raney copper oxides (R-CuO) during high-temperature desulfurization has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The preedge XANES spectra (8975-8979 eV) of R-CuO exhibit a very weak 1s-to-3d transition forbidden by the selection rule in the case of the perfect octahedral symmetry. A shoulder at 8985-8988 eV and an intense band at 8994-9002 eV can be attributed to the 1s-to-4p transition that indicates the existence of the Cu(II) species. The preedge band at 8981-8984 eV can be attributed to the dipole-allowed 1s-to-4p transition of Cu(I), suggesting an existence of Cu2S during sulfurization. An enhanced absorbance at 9003 eV shows that Cu(0) species may be formed in the sulfurized R-CuO. The main copper species in regenerated R-CuO are CuO (96%) and Cu2S (4%)

  20. Nickel as a catalyst for the electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rahim, M. A.; Abdel Hameed, R. M.; Khalil, M. W.

    The use of Ni as a catalyst for the electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium was studied by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that only Ni dispersed on graphite shows a catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation but massive Ni does not. Ni was dispersed on graphite by the electro-deposition from acidic NiSO 4 solution using potentiostatic and galvanostatic techniques. The catalytic activity of the C/Ni electrodes towards methanol oxidation was found to vary with the amount of electro-deposited Ni. The dependence of the oxidation current on methanol concentration and scan rate was discussed. It was concluded from the electro-chemical measurements and SEM analysis that methanol oxidation starts as Ni-oxide is formed on the electrode surface.

  1. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  2. Moving protons with pendant amines: proton mobility in a nickel catalyst for oxidation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J; Raugei, Simone; Chen, Shentan; Yang, Jenny Y; Kilgore, Uriah J; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-14

    Proton transport is ubiquitous in chemical and biological processes, including the reduction of dioxygen to water, the reduction of CO(2) to formate, and the production/oxidation of hydrogen. In this work we describe intramolecular proton transfer between Ni and positioned pendant amines for the hydrogen oxidation electrocatalyst [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+) (P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2) = 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). Rate constants are determined by variable-temperature one-dimensional NMR techniques and two-dimensional EXSY experiments. Computational studies provide insight into the details of the proton movement and energetics of these complexes. Intramolecular proton exchange processes are observed for two of the three experimentally observable isomers of the doubly protonated Ni(0) complex, [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+), which have N-H bonds but no Ni-H bonds. For these two isomers, with pendant amines positioned endo to the Ni, the rate constants for proton exchange range from 10(4) to 10(5) s(-1) at 25 °C, depending on isomer and solvent. No exchange is observed for protons on pendant amines positioned exo to the Ni. Analysis of the exchange as a function of temperature provides a barrier for proton exchange of ΔG(‡) = 11-12 kcal/mol for both isomers, with little dependence on solvent. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental observations, suggesting metal-mediated intramolecular proton transfers between nitrogen atoms, with chair-to-boat isomerizations as the rate-limiting steps. Because of the fast rate of proton movement, this catalyst may be considered a metal center surrounded by a cloud of exchanging protons. The high intramolecular proton mobility provides information directly pertinent to the ability of pendant amines to accelerate proton transfers during catalysis of hydrogen oxidation. These results may also have broader implications for proton movement in

  3. Nickel-based electrodeposits as potential cathode catalysts for hydrogen production by microbial electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, M.; Chorbadzhiyska, E.; Nalbandian, L.; Hubenova, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The development of cost-effective cathodes, operating at neutral pH and ambient temperatures, is a crucial challenge for the practical application of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) technology. In this study, NiW and NiMo co-deposits produced by electroplating on Ni-foam are explored as cathodes in MEC. The fabricated electrodes exhibit higher corrosion stability and enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction in neutral electrolyte compared to the bare Ni-foam. NiW/Ni-foam electrodes possess six times higher intrinsic catalytic activity, estimated from data obtained by linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The newly developed electrodes are applied as cathodes in single-chamber membrane-free MEC reactors, inoculated with wastewater and activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Cathodic hydrogen recovery of 79% and 89% by using NiW and NiMo cathodes, respectively, is achieved at applied voltage of 0.6 V. The obtained results reveal potential for practical application of used catalysts in MEC.

  4. High hydrogen desorption properties of Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures: The effects of multiple catalysts in situ formed by adding nickel sulfides/graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiubo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Liu, Tong

    2017-12-01

    Nickel sulfides decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been produced by co-reducing Ni2+ and graphene oxide (GO), and is subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) produced by hydrogen plasma metal reaction (HPMR). The nickel sulfides of about 800 nm completely in situ change to MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni multiple catalysts after first hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process at 673 K. The Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite shows the highest hydrogen desorption kinetics and capacity properties, and the catalytic effect order of the additives is NiS/rGO, NiS and rGO. At 573 K, the Mg-NiS/rGO nanocomposite can quickly desorb 3.7 wt% H2 in 10 min and 4.5 wt% H2 in 60 min. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite are decreased to 44.47 and 63.02 kJ mol-1, smaller than those of the Mg-5wt%rGO and Mg-5wt%NiS samples. The best hydrogen desorption properties of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite can be explained by the synergistic catalytic effects of the highly dispersed MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni catalysts on the rGO sheets, and the more nucleation sites between the catalysts, rGO sheets and Mg matrix.

  5. Catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in gasoline engine exhaust over copper- and nickel-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Das, R.K. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Dept. of Engineering and Mining Machinery

    2001-10-11

    Catalytic removal of NO{sub x} in engine exhaust gases can be accomplished by non-selective reduction, selective reduction and decomposition. Noble metals are extensively used for non-selective reduction of NO{sub x} and up to 90% of engine NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced in a stoichiometric exhaust. This requirement of having the stoichiometric fuel-air ratio acts against efficiency improvement of engines. Selective NO{sub x} reduction in the presence of different reductants such as, NH{sub 3}, urea or hydrocarbons, requires close control of the amount of reductant being injected which otherwise may be emitted as a pollutant. Catalytic decomposition is the best option for NO{sub x} removal. Nevertheless, catalysts which are durable, economic and active for NO{sub x} reduction at normal engine exhaust temperature ranges are still being investigated. Three catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging the Na+ ion with copper, nickel and copper-nickel metal ions and applied to the exhaust of a stationary gasoline engine to explore their potential for catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} under a wide range of engine and exhaust conditions. Some encouraging results have been obtained. The catalyst Cu-X exhibits much better NO{sub x} reduction performance at any temperature in comparison to Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X; while Cu-Ni-X catalyst exhibits slightly better performance than Ni-X catalyst. Maximum NO{sub x} efficiency achieved with Cu-X catalyst is 59.2% at a space velocity (sv) of 31 000 h{sup -1}; while for Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X catalysts the equivalent numbers are 60.4% and 56% respectively at a sv of 22 000 h{sup -1}. Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts exhibit significant NO{sub x} reduction capability for a wide range of air/fuel ratio and with a slower rate of decline as well with increase in air/fuel ratio. (author)

  6. Study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst, by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.; Alonso, A.; Tumbarell, O.; Bustanmete, E.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), has the advantage of its simplicity, speed and low cost. All this, together with its high sensibility and selectivity, makes the AAS one the most widely used analytic techniques. The present work shows, the study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst of a refinery, by using this technique. The results are compared to those of two laboratories which use the ICP-AES and AAS techniques and shows the processing of the statistics with the use of the t of Student and the F of Snedecor. The results using different methods are also shown as well as the recommended application of this results in the chemical characterization of this type of catalysts

  7. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies on the structure of nickel phosphide catalyst supported on K-USY

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, T; Suzuki, S

    2003-01-01

    Local structure around Ni in a nickel phosphide catalyst supported on K-USY was investigated by an situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method during the reduction process of the catalyst and the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction of thiophene. In the passivated sample, Ni phosphide was partially oxidized but after the reduction, 1.1 nm diameter Ni sub 2 P particles were formed with Ni-P and Ni-Ni distances at 0.218 and 0.261 nm, respectively, corresponding to those of bulk Ni sub 2 P. In situ XAFS cleary revealed that the Ni sub 2 P structure was stable under reaction conditions and was an active structure for the HDS process.

  8. Computational Investigation of the Thermochemistry and Kinetics of Steam Methane Reforming Over a Multi-Faceted Nickel Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Blaylock, D. Wayne; Zhu, Yi-An; Green, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A microkinetic model of steam methane reforming over a multi-faceted nickel surface using planewave, periodic boundary condition density functional theory is presented. The multi-faceted model consists of a Ni(111) surface, a Ni(100) surface

  9. Liquid phase in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds to hydrocarbons over bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find an effective method for converting renewable biomass-derived phenolic compounds into hydrocarbons bio-fuel via in situ catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds was carried out in methanol-water solvent over bifunctional catalysts of Raney Ni and HZSM-5 or H-Beta. In the in...

  10. Hybrid Nanomaterials with Single-Site Catalysts by Spatially Controllable Immobilization of Nickel Complexes via Photoclick Chemistry for Alkene Epoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dwaipayan; Febriansyah, Benny; Gupta, Disha; Ng, Leonard Kia-Sheun; Xi, Shibo; Du, Yonghua; Baikie, Tom; Dong, ZhiLi; Soo, Han Sen

    2018-05-22

    Catalyst deactivation is a persistent problem not only for the scientific community but also in industry. Isolated single-site heterogeneous catalysts have shown great promise to overcome these problems. Here, a versatile anchoring strategy for molecular complex immobilization on a broad range of semiconducting or insulating metal oxide ( e. g., titanium dioxide, mesoporous silica, cerium oxide, and tungsten oxide) nanoparticles to synthesize isolated single-site catalysts has been studied systematically. An oxidatively stable anchoring group, maleimide, is shown to form covalent linkages with surface hydroxyl functionalities of metal oxide nanoparticles by photoclick chemistry. The nanocomposites have been thoroughly characterized by techniques including UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The IR spectroscopic studies confirm the covalent linkages between the maleimide group and surface hydroxyl functionalities of the oxide nanoparticles. The hybrid nanomaterials function as highly efficient catalysts for essentially quantitative oxidations of terminal and internal alkenes and show molecular catalyst product selectivities even in more eco-friendly solvents. XAS studies verify the robustness of the catalysts after several catalytic cycles. We have applied the photoclick anchoring methodology to precisely control the deposition of a luminescent variant of our catalyst on the metal oxide nanoparticles. Overall, we demonstrate a general approach to use irradiation to anchor molecular complexes on oxide nanoparticles to create recyclable, hybrid, single-site catalysts that function with high selectivity in a broad range of solvents. We have achieved a facile, spatially and temporally controllable photoclick method that can potentially be extended to other ligands, catalysts, functional molecules, and surfaces.

  11. Preparation of nickel ferrite/carbon nanotubes composite by microwave irradiation technique for use as catalyst in photo-fenton reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foletto, E.L.; Rigo, C.; Severo, E.C.; Mazutti, M.A.; Dotto, G.L.; Jahn, S.L.; Sales, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil); Chiavone-Filho, O. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), RS (Brazil); Gundel, A.; Lucchese, M. [Universidade Federal do Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Nickel ferrite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NiFe2O4/MWCNTs) composite has been rapidly synthesized via microwave irradiation technique. The structural properties of the formed product was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The catalytic behavior of composite material was evaluated by the degradation of Amaranth dye in the photo-Fenton reaction under visible light irradiation. The overall results showed that the prepared composite was successfully synthesized, demonstrating good performance in the dye degradation, with higher degradation rate compared to the NiFe2O4. The high efficiency in dye degradation can be attributed to synergism between NiFe2O4 and MWCNTs. Therefore, NiFe2O4/MWCNTs composite can be used as promising photo-Fenton catalyst to degrade Amaranth dye from aqueous solutions. (author)

  12. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong; Zhou, Lu; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Anjum, Dalaver; Kanoun, Mohammed; Scaranto, Jessica; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Khalid, Syed; Laveille, Paco; D'Souza, Lawrence; Clo, Alain M.; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  13. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-02-03

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  14. Toward stable nickel catalysts for aqueous phase reforming of biomass-derived feedstock under reducing and alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasterecht, van T.; Ludding, C.C.I.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers (CNF) can be stabilized in aqueous phase processes at elevated temperatures and pressures by tuning the reaction conditions to control Ni oxidation and leaching. As a showcase, Ni/CNF was used for the production of hydrogen via aqueous phase

  15. Hydrogen or synthesis gas production via the partial oxidation of methane over supported nickel-cobalt catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Alaric C.W. [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Chen, Luwei; Lin, Jianyi [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Kee Leong, Weng [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Johnson, Brian F.G.; Khimyak, Tetyana [University Chemical Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Activity, selectivity, and coking-resistance of a series of Ni{sub x}Co{sub y} (where x,y are the respective metal loadings of 0, 1, 2 or 3 wt.%; x+y=3) bimetallic catalysts supported on CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been studied for hydrogen/synthesis gas production via the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane. Catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray fluorescence multi-element analysis (XRF). Their activity for the partial oxidation of methane to hydrogen and carbon monoxide (at 1 bar, gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 144,000cm{sup 3}g{sup -1}h{sup -1} and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} molar ratio of 2) was investigated, and coke deposited on the spent catalysts was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The activity was found to decrease in the order of Ni{sub 2}Co>Ni{sub 3}>NiCo{sub 2}>>Co{sub 3}, while CO and H{sub 2} selectivities were found to be in the order ofNi{sub 2}Co>Ni{sub 3}{approx}NiCo{sub 2}>Co{sub 3}. Ni{sub 2}Co is also shown to be more resistant to coking as compared to Ni{sub 3}, which is a current catalyst of choice. Results show that not only does Ni{sub 2}Co have the highest activity and selectivity among all the catalysts tested, it is also relatively resistant to coking. This finding would be helpful for catalyst design to achieve high coking resistivity catalysts for hydrogen production from CPO of methane. (author)

  16. Zinc-nickel alloy electrodeposits for water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheela, G.; Pushpavanam, Malathy; Pushpavanam, S. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India)

    2002-06-01

    Electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloys of various compositions were prepared. A suitable electrolyte and conditions to produce alloys of various compositions were identified. Alloys produced on electroformed nickel foils were etched in caustic to leach out zinc and to produce the Raney type, porous electro catalytic surface for hydrogen evolution. The electrodes were examined by polarisation measurements, to evaluate their Tafel parameters, cyclic voltammetry, to test the change in surface properties on repeated cycling, scanning electron microscopy to identify their microstructure and X-ray diffraction. The catalytic activity as well as the life of the electrode produced from 50% zinc alloy was found to be better than others. (Author)

  17. Influence of supports on catalytic behavior of nickel catalysts in carbon dioxide reforming of toluene as a model compound of tar from biomass gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Meng; Fei, Jinhua; Wang, Shuai; Lu, Wen; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    A series of supported Ni catalysts including Ni/MgO, Ni/γ-Al2O3, Ni/α-Al2O3, Ni/SiO2 and Ni/ZrO2 was tested in CO2 reforming of toluene as a model compound of tar from biomass gasification in a fluidized bed reactor, and characterized by the means of temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR), XRD, TEM and temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). Combining the characterization results with the performance tests, the activity of catalyst greatly depended on Ni particles size, and the stability was affected by the coke composition. Both of them (Ni particle size and coke composition) were closely related to the interaction between nickel and support which would determine the chemical environment where Ni inhabited. The best catalytic performance was observed on Ni/MgO due to the strong interaction between NiO and MgO via the formation of Ni-Mg-O solid solution, and the highest dispersion of Ni particle in the basic environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Template-Assisted Wet-Combustion Synthesis of Fibrous Nickel-Based Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Methanation and Methane Steam Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayan, M; Potemkin, D I; Rubio-Marcos, F; Uskov, S I; Snytnikov, P V; Hussainova, I

    2017-12-20

    Efficient capture and recycling of CO 2 enable not only prevention of global warming but also the supply of useful low-carbon fuels. The catalytic conversion of CO 2 into an organic compound is a promising recycling approach which opens new concepts and opportunities for catalytic and industrial development. Here we report about template-assisted wet-combustion synthesis of a one-dimensional nickel-based catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation and methane steam reforming. Because of a high temperature achieved in a short time during reaction and a large amount of evolved gases, the wet-combustion synthesis yields homogeneously precipitated nanoparticles of NiO with average particle size of 4 nm on alumina nanofibers covered with a NiAl 2 O 4 nanolayer. The as-synthesized core-shell structured fibers exhibit outstanding activity in steam reforming of methane and sufficient activity in carbon dioxide methanation with 100% selectivity toward methane formation. The as-synthesized catalyst shows stable operation under the reaction conditions for at least 50 h.

  19. Preparation and characterization of nickel catalysts supported on cerium for obtaining hydrogen from steam reforming of ethanol; Preparacao e caracterizacao de catalisadores de niquel suportados em ceria para obtencao de hidrogenio a partir da reforma a vapor do etanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbaninho, A.B.; Bergamaschi, V.S.; Ferreira, J.C., E-mail: jcferrei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Células à Combustível e Hidrogênio

    2016-07-01

    The Ni/Ce catalysts for were prepared by co- precipitation method with a view to their use in steam reforming of ethanol to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; x-ray dispersive Spectroscopy and surface area BET method. This paper proposes to prepare, characterize and test nickel catalyst supported on cerium in order to obtain a material with higher activity and selectivity of the catalyst using the steam reforming reaction of ethanol, by varying the reaction temperature, molar ratio water/ethanol and uptime. The catalytic tests were monitored by chemical analysis of syngas from steam reforming of ethanol using an analysis online by gas Chromatograph in the reactor. (author)

  20. Hydrogenation of aromatic compounds during gas oil hydrodewaxing. Part 1. Effect of ruthenium content and method of nickel catalyst preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masalska, Aleksandra [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, 7/9 Gdanska Street, 50-344 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2008-09-30

    Ni-based (8 wt.% NiO) dewaxing catalysts for the hydroconversion of the hydroraffinate of oil fraction (d{sub 20} {sub C} = 0.845 g/cm{sup 3}; cloud point (CP) -2 C; aromatics = 25.8 wt.%; S = 25 ppm) were modified with Ru. The effect of Ru content (0.6, 0.75 and 0.9 wt.% of RuO{sub 2}) and the methods of Ni catalyst preparation were examined. The catalysts were characterised by N{sub 2} sorption, TPR, ICP, XRD, SEM, XPS, H{sub 2} chemisorption. Activity was tested in a continuous-flow system at 6 MPa (LHSV, 2.5 h{sup -1}; H{sub 2}:CH, 350 N m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}). NiO and RuO{sub 2} were found to exert a synergic effect on catalytic activity. The rise in RuO{sub 2} content from 0.6 to 0.9 wt.% increased the HDA of HON from 23 to 65% at 240 C and was parallelled by a drop in CP (by about 15 C). The effect of Ru was found to depend on the method of Ni catalyst preparation. (author)

  1. Computational Investigation of the Thermochemistry and Kinetics of Steam Methane Reforming Over a Multi-Faceted Nickel Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Blaylock, D. Wayne

    2011-08-20

    A microkinetic model of steam methane reforming over a multi-faceted nickel surface using planewave, periodic boundary condition density functional theory is presented. The multi-faceted model consists of a Ni(111) surface, a Ni(100) surface, and nickel step edge sites that are modeled as a Ni(211) surface. Flux and sensitivity analysis are combined to gain an increased understanding of the important reactions, intermediates, and surface facets in SMR. Statistical thermodynamics are applied to allow for the investigation of SMR under industrially-relevant conditions (e.g., temperatures in excess of 500 °C and pressures in excess of 1 bar). The most important surface reactions are found to occur at the under-coordinated step edge sites modeled using the Ni(211) surface as well as on the Ni(100) surface. The primary reforming pathway is predicted to be through C*+ O*→ CO*at high temperatures; however, hydrogen-mediated reactions such as C*+ OH*→ COH*and C.H.*+ O*→ CHO*are predicted to become more important at low temperatures. The rate-limiting reactions are predicted to be dissociative chemisorption of methane in addition to the aforementioned C-O addition reactions. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Activity of Ammonium Nickel Phosphate, [NH4]NiPO4·6H2O, and β-Nickel Pyrophosphate, β-Ni2P2O7: Catalysts for Electrocatalytic Decomposition of Urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguerdichian, Andrew G; Jafari, Tahereh; Shakil, Md R; Miao, Ran; Achola, Laura A; Macharia, John; Shirazi-Amin, Alireza; Suib, Steven L

    2018-02-19

    Electrocatalytic decomposition of urea for the production of hydrogen, H 2, for clean energy applications, such as in fuel cells, has several potential advantages such as reducing carbon emissions in the energy sector and environmental applications to remove urea from animal and human waste facilities. The study and development of new catalyst materials containing nickel metal, the active site for urea decomposition, is a critical aspect of research in inorganic and materials chemistry. We report the synthesis and application of [NH 4 ]NiPO 4 ·6H 2 O and β-Ni 2 P 2 O 7 using in situ prepared [NH 4 ] 2 HPO 4 . The [NH 4 ]NiPO 4 ·6H 2 O is calcined at varying temperatures and tested for electrocatalytic decomposition of urea. Our results indicate that [NH 4 ]NiPO 4 ·6H 2 O calcined at 300 °C with an amorphous crystal structure and, for the first time applied for urea electrocatalytic decomposition, had the greatest reported electroactive surface area (ESA) of 142 cm 2 /mg and an onset potential of 0.33 V (SCE) and was stable over a 24-h test period.

  3. Versatile Photocatalytic Systems for H2 Generation in Water Based on an Efficient DuBois-Type Nickel Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The generation of renewable H2 through an efficient photochemical route requires photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from a light harvester to an efficient electrocatalyst in water. Here, we report on a molecular H2 evolution catalyst (NiP) with a DuBois-type [Ni(P2R′N2R″)2]2+ core (P2R′N2R″ = bis(1,5-R′-diphospha-3,7-R″-diazacyclooctane), which contains an outer coordination sphere with phosphonic acid groups. The latter functionality allows for good solubility in water and immobilization on metal oxide semiconductors. Electrochemical studies confirm that NiP is a highly active electrocatalyst in aqueous electrolyte solution (overpotential of approximately 200 mV at pH 4.5 with a Faradaic yield of 85 ± 4%). Photocatalytic experiments and investigations on the ET kinetics were carried out in combination with a phosphonated Ru(II) tris(bipyridine) dye (RuP) in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Time-resolved luminescence and transient absorption spectroscopy studies confirmed that directed ET from RuP to NiP occurs efficiently in all systems on the nano- to microsecond time scale, through three distinct routes: reductive quenching of RuP in solution or on the surface of ZrO2 (“on particle” system) or oxidative quenching of RuP when the compounds were immobilized on TiO2 (“through particle” system). Our studies show that NiP can be used in a purely aqueous solution and on a semiconductor surface with a high degree of versatility. A high TOF of 460 ± 60 h–1 with a TON of 723 ± 171 for photocatalytic H2 generation with a molecular Ni catalyst in water and a photon-to-H2 quantum yield of approximately 10% were achieved for the homogeneous system. PMID:24320740

  4. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  5. Study of Supported Nickel Catalysts Prepared by Aqueous Hydrazine Method. Hydrogenating Properties and Hydrogen Storage: Support Effect. Silver Additive Effect; Catalyseurs de nickel supportes prepares par la methode de l'hydrazine aqueuse. Proprietes hydrogenantes et stockage d'hydrogene. Effet du support. Effet de l'ajout d'argent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcieszak, R

    2006-06-15

    We have studied Ni or NiAg nano-particles obtained by the reduction of nickel salts (acetate or nitrate) by hydrazine and deposited by simple or EDTA-double impregnation on various supports ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, amorphous or crystallized SiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, CeO{sub 2} and carbon). Prepared catalysts were characterized by different methods (XRD, XPS, low temperature adsorption and desorption of N{sub 2}, FTIR and FTIR-Pyridine, TEM, STEM, EDS, H{sub 2}-TPR, H{sub 2}-adsorption, H{sub 2}-TPD, isopropanol decomposition) and tested in the gas phase hydrogenation of benzene or as carbon materials in the hydrogen storage at room temperature and high pressure. The catalysts prepared exhibited better dispersion and activity than classical catalysts. TOF's of NiAg/SiO{sub 2} or Ni/carbon catalysts were similar to Pt catalysts in benzene hydrogenation. Differences in support acidity or preparation method and presence of Ag as metal additive play a crucial role in the chemical reduction of Ni by hydrazine and in the final properties of the materials. Ni/carbon catalysts could store significant amounts of hydrogen at room temperature and high pressure (0.53%/30 bars), probably through the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  6. Catalytic Converter Developed By Washcoat Of γ-Alumina On Nickel Oxide (Nio Catalyst In FeCrAl Substrate For Exhaust Emission Control : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automobile exhaust emission control is one of the trending issues in automobile research field. The existing catalytic converter using the noble metals of platinum (Pt, palladium (Pd and rhodium (Rd recently were in limited supply and higher in cost. There is a need for the automotive industry to produce ultra-low emitting vehicles at a reasonable cost. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of methods of fabrication of modified catalytic converter by approaching FeCrAl as a substrate which treated using ultrasonic bath technique to improve the exhaust emission control. The modified catalytic converter preparation will involve the ultrasonic bath process of FeCrAl foil which has fabricated as metallic monolith coated by γ-Al2O3 powder. Nickel as catalyst material will be prepared using electroplating process. The oxidation test will be conducted using a tube and automatic furnace in temperature of 1100°C for 100 hours. Mitsubishi 4G93 1800cc Petrol E.F.I with a multi -gas analyzer equipped with a hydraulic dynamometer will be used for emission measurements of HC, CO, and NOx in varying speed and load for both conditions with and without catalytic converter. The result will expect the γ-Al2O3 as the washcoat material that fully embedded to FeCrAl substrate with the combination of ultrasonic and electroplating technique will effectively convert the CO, NOx and HC to CO2, NO2 and H2O which means that catalytic converter is effective to improve exhaust emission control of diesel engine. The FeCrAl substrate as a metallic catalytic converter which coated by γ-Al2O3 using ultrasonic and nickelelectroplating technique may improve the exhaust emission control.

  7. Nickel Dermatitis - Nickel Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, T.; Thorboe, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel excretion in urine in four females -sensitive to nickel with an intermittent dyshidrotic eruption was measured with flameless atomic absorption. Excretion of nickel was found to be increased in association with outbreaks of vesicles. The results support the idea that the chronic condition ...

  8. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures; Contribution a l'etude de la reaction d'oxydation de l'oxyde de carbone au contact des catalyseurs issus de la decomposition a diverses temperatures des hydroaluminates de nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-09-26

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiO + NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} on the 2NiO+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiO+NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} on NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied.

  9. Research Update: Nickel filling in nanofeatures using supercritical fluid and its application to fabricating a novel catalyst structure for continuous growth of nanocarbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Watanabe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel catalyst structure for continuous growth of nanocarbon fibers is proposed. In this structure, catalyst nanofibers are embedded in a membrane that separates the growth ambient into carbon-supplying and carbon-precipitating environments. The catalyst nanofibers pierce through the membrane so that carbon source gas is supplied only to one end of the catalyst fibers and nanocarbon fibers grow continuously at the other end. To realize this structure, self-supporting anodized alumina was used as a membrane, and its nano-through-holes were filled with catalyst Ni in supercritical CO2 fluid. Direct carbon growth from the Ni nanofibers was confirmed using this catalyst structure.

  10. Nickel catalyst supported on magnesium and zinc aluminates (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinels for dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, L.C.B. de; Melo, D.M. de A.; Melo, M.A. de F.; Barros, J.M. de F.; Braga, R.M.; Costa, C. de C.; Rodrigues, G., E-mail: ieda.garcia@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (LACOM/UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2017-01-15

    Materials such as MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} assessed in the reaction of dry reforming of methane to produce syngas were synthesized by microwave-assisted combustion method using urea as fuel. Samples of synthesized oxides were calcined at 800 °C for 2 h and impregnated with 5% nickel. The impregnated samples were calcined at 850 °C for 4 h to obtain the desired phases. The results of the catalytic tests showed that the catalysts are active for the reaction of dry reforming of methane, and the catalyst that showed the best performance for methane conversion was 5% Ni/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} calcined at 850 °C/4 h. (author)

  11. Discovery of technical methanation catalysts based on computational screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Kasper Emil; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    Methanation is a classical reaction in heterogeneous catalysis and significant effort has been put into improving the industrially preferred nickel-based catalysts. Recently, a computational screening study showed that nickel-iron alloys should be more active than the pure nickel catalyst and at ...

  12. Development and characterization of nickel catalysts supported in CeO2-ZrO2-Al2O3, CeO2-La2O3-Al2O3 e ZrO2-La2O3-Al2O3 matrixes evaluated for methane reforming reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Amanda Jordão de

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the methane reforming is large interest industrial for the take advantage of these gas in production the hydrogen and synthesis gas (syngas). Among in the reactions of methane stand of the reactions steam reforming and carbon dioxide reforming of methane. The main catalysts uses in the methane reforming is Ni/Al 2 O 3 . However, the supported-nickel catalyst is susceptible to the deactivation or the destruction by coke deposition. The carbon dissolves in the nickel crystallite and its diffuses through the nickel, leading for formation of the carbon whiskers, which results in fragmentation of the catalyst. Modification of such catalysts, like incorporation of suitable promoters, is desirable to achieve reduction of the methane hydrogenolysis and/or promotion of the carbon gasification. Catalysts 5%Ni/Al 2 O 3 supported on solid solutions formed by ZrO 2 -CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and CeO 2 -ZrO 2 -La 2 O 3 were prepared, characterized and evaluated in reactions steam and carbon dioxide reforming and partial oxidation of methane with objective the value effect loading solution solid in support. The supports were prepared by co-precipitation method and catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and calcined at 500 deg C. The supports and catalysts were characterized by Nitrogen Adsorption, method -rays diffraction (XRD), X-rays dispersive spectroscopy (XDS), spectroscopy in the region of the ultraviolet and the visible (UV-vis NIR) to and temperature programmed reduction (TPR), Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. After all the catalytic reactions check which the addition of solid solution is beneficial for Ni/Al 2 O 3 catalysts and the best catalysts are Ni/CeO 2 -La 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 . (author)

  13. Nickel extraction from nickel matte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subagja, R.

    2018-01-01

    In present work, the results of research activities to make nickel metal from nickel matte are presented. The research activities were covering a) nickel matte characterization using Inductively Couple plasma (ICP), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), b) nickel matte dissolution process to dissolve nickel from nickel matte into the spent electrolyte solutions that contains hydrochloric acid, c) purification of nickel chloride leach solution by copper cementation process to remove copper using nickel matte, selective precipitation process to remove iron, solvent extraction using Tri normal octyl amine to separate cobalt from nickel chloride solutions and d) Nickel electro winning process to precipitate nickel into the cathode surface from purified nickel chloride solution by using direct current. The research activities created 99, 72 % pure nickel metal as the final product of the process.

  14. Catalytic production of sugar alcohols (polyols) and their application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R; Straetz, A; Vollheim, G

    1980-07-01

    The article surveys the numerous applications of the principal sugar alcohols sorbitol and xylitol and their world production in 1978. Nowadays, the industrial production of sugar alcohols is almost exclusively by catalytic hydrogenation of the corresponding sugars; thus sorbitol is manufactured by hydrogenation of D-glucose, xylitol by hydrogenation of xylose, and mannitol by hydrogenation of invert sugar or fructose. Some 80% of the world production of sugar alcohols are manufactured in batch suspension processes using Raney nickel catalysts. Apart from the Atlas Powder continuous suspension process employing nickel-carrier catalysts, continuous processes have recently been developed which use Raney nickel and prove more economical owing to the lower catalyst costs. Trickling processes with fixed catalyst continue to play a minor role. Available production capacity based on batch suspension processes can be expanded by process optimization and new catalyst developments. A newly developed special Raney nickel catalyst reduces the specific catalyst consumption by about 50%.

  15. Study on the influence of nickel and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support on MoS{sub 2} as hydrodenitrogenation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, J.; Hrabar, A.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2012-07-01

    Alumina-supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts as well as an unsupported NiMo catalyst were characterized and tested in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline in the presence of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The supported catalysts had a well dispersed MoS{sub 2} phase with an average stacking degree around two and slabs length below 10 nm. The unsupported NiMo sulfide catalyst exhibited long, multistacked MoS{sub 2} slabs and contained segregated Ni{sub x}S{sub y} phases. The formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase in both Ni containing catalysts was verified by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, whereas the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites was higher for the supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts than for the unsupported one. All catalysts were active in the HDN of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization of DBT. The catalytic activity increased in the order Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} < NiMo/unsupported < Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Thus, the influence on the catalytic activity of the promoter metal Ni is more important than the presence of a support due to the formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase (more active than MoS{sub 2}). (orig.)

  16. Parametric Investigation of the Isothermal Kinetics of Growth of Graphene on a Nickel Catalyst in the Process of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Shulitskii, B. G.; Labunov, V. A.; Ermolaeva, E. M.

    2016-11-01

    A kinetic model of isothermal synthesis of multilayer graphene on the surface of a nickel foil in the process of chemical vapor deposition, on it, of hydrocarbons supplied in the pulsed regime is considered. The dependences of the number of graphene layers formed and the time of their growth on the temperature of the process, the concentration of acetylene, and the thickness of the nickel foil were calculated. The regime parameters of the process of chemical vapor deposition, at which single-layer graphene and bi-layer graphene are formed, were determined. The dynamics of growth of graphene domains at chemical-vapor-deposition parameters changing in wide ranges was investigated. It is shown that the time dependences of the rates of growth of single-layer graphene and bi-layer graphene are nonlinear in character and that they are determined by the kinetics of nucleation and growth of graphene and the diffusion flow of carbon atoms in the nickel foil.

  17. Nickel oxide and carbon nanotube composite (NiO/CNT) as a novel cathode non-precious metal catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Taiping; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi

    2015-10-15

    Comparing with the precious metal catalysts, non-precious metal catalysts were preferred to use in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to the low cost and high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) efficiency. In this study, the transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction as well as Raman investigation revealed that the prepared nanoscale NiO was attached on the surface of CNT. Cyclic voltammogram and rotating ring-disk electrode tests showed that the NiO/CNT composite catalyst had an apparent oxygen reduction peak and 3.5 electron transfer pathway was acquired under oxygen atmosphere. The catalyst performance was highly dependent on the percentage of NiO in the CNT nanocomposites. When 77% NiO/CNT nano-sized composite was applied as cathode catalyst in membrane free single-chamber air cathode MFC, a maximum power density of 670 mW/m(2) and 0.772 V of OCV was obtained. Moreover, the MFC with pure NiO (control) could not achieve more than 0.1 V. All findings suggested that NiO/CNT could be a potential cathode catalyst for ORR in MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect study of the support in nickel and cobalt catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from ethanol steam reforming; Estudo do efeito do suporte em catalisadores de cobalto e niquel para obtencao de hidrogenio a partir da reforma a vapor do etanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sirlane Gomes da

    2013-09-01

    A range of oxide-supported metal catalysts have been investigated for the steam reforming of ethanol for the production of hydrogen and subsequent application in fuel cells. The catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation and internal gelification methods using cobalt and nickel as active metals supported on aluminum, zirconium, lanthanum and cerium oxides. After prepared and calcined at 550 C Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator the solids were fully characterized by different techniques such as X-rays diffraction(DRX), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption (B.E.T), temperature-programmed reduction in H2 (TPR-H2) and thermogravimetric analysis. The catalytic tests were performed in a monolithic quartz reactor and submitted to different thermodynamic conditions of steam reforming of ethanol at temperatures varying from 500 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator C to 800 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator C. The product gas streams from the reactor were analyzed by an on-line gas chromatograph. The cobalt/nickel catalyst supported on a ceria-lanthania mixture (Co{sub 10%} / Ni{sub 5%} - CeO{sub 2}La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed good catalytic performance in hydrogen selectivity reaching a concentration greater than 65%, when compared to other catalytic systems such as: Co{sub 10%} / Ni5% - CeO{sub 2}; Co{sub 10%} / Ni{sub 5%} - CeO{sub 2}ZrO{sub 2}; Co{sub 10%} / Ni{sub 5%} - ZrO{sub 2}; Co{sub 10%} / Ni{sub 5%} - La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Co{sub 10%} / Ni{sub 5%} - CeO{sub 2}La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/K{sub 2%}; Co{sub 10}% / Ni{sub 5%} - CeO{sub 2}La{sub 2}O{sub 3} / Na{sub 2%}; Ni{sub 10%} / Co{sub 5%} - CeO{sub 2}La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Co-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} e Co-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}CeO{sub 2}. (author)

  19. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  20. Effects of Gold Substrates on the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Activity of High-Loading Nickel-Based Oxyhydroxide Oxygen Evolution Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakthranont, Pongkarn; Kibsgaard, Jakob; Gallo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of Au substrates on the oxygen evolution activities of cathodically electrodeposited nickel oxyhydroxide (NiOOH), nickel–iron oxyhydroxide (NiFeOOH), and nickel–cerium oxyhydroxide (NiCeOOH) at varying loadings from 0 to 2000 nmol of metal/cm2. We determi...... high geometric current densities on flat substrates. By investigating the mass and site specific activities as a function of loading, we bridge the practical geometric activity to the fundamental intrinsic activity....

  1. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  2. Formation of hydrocarbon compounds during the hydrocracking of non-edible vegetable oils with cobalt-nickel supported on hierarchical HZSM-5 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlinda, L.; Al-Muttaqii, M.; Roesyadi, A.; Prajitno, D. H.

    2017-05-01

    The hierarchical Co-Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst with hierarchical pore structure was prepared by desilication and incipient wetness impregnation. Hydrocracking of non-edible vegetable oils at temperature of 400 °C, 20±5 bar for 2 h was performed in the presence of this type of catalyst under hydrogen initial pressure in pressured batch reactor. Non-edible vegetable oils, such as Reutealis trisperma (Blanco) airy shaw (sunan candlenut) and Hevea brasiliensis (rubber seed) were chosen to study the effect of the degree of saturation and lateral chain length on hydrocarbon compounds obtained through hydrocracking. Cerbera manghas oil was also tested for comparison because the composition of fatty acid was different with the other oils The hydrocracking test indicated that liquid product produced has a similar hydrocarbon compounds with petroleum diesel. The most abundant hydrocarbon is pentadecane (n-C15) and heptadecane (n-C17). The high aromatic compounds were found in liquid product produced in hydrocracking of Sunan candlenut oil.

  3. Marché des catalyseurs d'hydrogénation des corps gras Market of Hydrogenation Catalysts for Fats and Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barraque M.

    2006-11-01

    (production d'alcools gras. Les chiffres d'affaires pour ces 3 catalyseurs sont respectivement égaux à 50,1, 0,5 et 11 millions de dollars/an. Since Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP has a great deal of experience in the field of catalysts, particularly for hydrogenation, the Evaluation Department has made studies at various times to evaluate the potential markets. The analysis making up this article was made to determine the possible outlets for catalysts used for the hydrogenation of fats and oils. It covers the food industry, the hydrogenation of fatty acids of animal or vegetable origin, and the production of fatty alcohols and fatty amines. This market is over $60 million per year and corresponds to nearly 11,000 t/year of catalysts used. These figures include captive consumptions of catalysts produced by companies using them. This business turnover is about the same as the one for hydrogenation catalysts used for the synthesis of the major building-block petrochemicals. More than 64% of the applications have to do with the food industry, i. e. production of margarine and shortening, hydrogenation of salad oils and deep-frying oils in the United States. Whereas the consumption of catalysts used in lipochemistry is highly concentrated in the main industrialized regions (United States, Western Europe, Japan, that of the food industry is much more scattered. The three regions mentioned above account for less than 64% of world consumption. Estimated outlets represent annual business turnovers of $41 million for the food industry, $8. 3 million for the production of fatty acids, $11 million for the production of fatty alcohols, and $1. 3 million for the production of fatty amines. These hydrogenations are performed in the presence of supported nickel (food industry, production of fatty acids and secondary and tertiary amines or in the presence of Raney nickel (production of primary amines or, copper chromite (production of, fatty alcohols. The business turnovers for these

  4. In situ XAFS studies of the oxygen reduction reaction on carbon supported platinum and platinum nickel nano-scale alloys as cathode catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingying

    Platinum based bimetallic alloys have been investigated by conducting Pt L3 and Ni K edge in situ XAFS measurements on carbon supported Pt and PtNi(1:1) nanoscale catalysts under a wide range of operating potentials. We observed that (1) the Pt-Pt bond distance in PtNi alloys is shorter than that of Pt, and the bond distance between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is longer for PtNi. (2) Pt has a tendency to stay on the surface while Ni is mostly underneath the surface. (3) While a change in oxidation of pure Pt was clearly observed at different potentials, the Pt in the PtNi alloy remained nearly oxygen-free at all potentials, but an accompanying oxidation change of Ni was observed instead. (4) PtNi has higher open circuit voltage than Pt/C. These results indicate that the chemisorption energy between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is reduced in PtNi alloys, which prevents the poison of oxygen adsorbate and hence improves the reactivity. In addition, the strain and ligand effects in PtNi nanoparticle alloys were studied by FEW calculations using experimental data as a guide to understand the factors causing the reduction of chemisorptions energy of Pt. Our calculation indicates that Pt d-band is broader and lower in energy when the bond distance between Pt is shorter, resulting in weaker chemisorption energy between Pt and absorbed oxygen atom on top, and vice verse. Meanwhile, the investigation of ligand effect shows two trends in modifying Pt's properties within alloyed transition metals. The strain effect dominates in PtNi bimetallic system, corresponding to weaker chemisorptions energy and lower white intensity of Pt L3 edge, which is in consistent with our experimental results. The implications of these results afford a good guideline in understanding the reactivity enhancement mechanism and in the context of alloy catalysts design.

  5. Antipollution processing of a used refining catalyst and metal recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinh Dinh Chan; Llido, E.

    1992-04-30

    The used catalyst, containing metals such as vanadium, nickel and iron, is unloaded from the plant and is first processed by stripping; it is then calcined in critical conditions, and the catalyst metals are leached with a sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate aqueous solution. The antipollution process can be applied to oil fraction hydroconversion or hydroprocessing catalysts.

  6. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  7. New antipollution processing of a used refining catalyst and complete recovery of the catalyst metallic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinh Dinh Chan; Llido, E.

    1992-05-15

    The used refining catalyst, containing metals such as vanadium, nickel and iron, is first processed by stripping; it is then calcined in critical conditions and heat processed in the presence of a melted alkaline base; the resulting solid matter is then water processed. The antipollution process can be applied to oil fraction hydroconversion or hydroprocessing catalysts.

  8. A Study of Deactivating Carbon Species during Methanation on a Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sine Ellemann

     natural gas and as the infrastructure is already in place for natural gas, it is an attractive alternative to depleting oil resources. Catalysts based on nickel are the most common choice within industry due to the relatively low price of nickel and its acceptable performance. However, nickel catalysts...

  9. Hydroprocessing using regenerated spent heavy hydrocarbon catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, F.T.; Hensley, A.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: contacting the feedstock with hydrogen under hydroprocessing conditions with a hydroprocessing catalyst wherein the hydroprocessing catalyst contains a total contaminant metals build-up of greater than about 4 wt. % nickel plus vanadium, a hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of Group VIB metals and Group VIII metals and is regenerated spent hydroprocessing catalyst regenerated by a process comprising the steps: partially decoking the spent catalyst in an initial coke-burning step; impregnating the partially decoked catalyst with a Group IIA metal-containing impregnation solution; and decoking the impregnated catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein the impregnated catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature of about 600 degrees F to about 1400 degrees F

  10. Nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, L A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of nickel allergy varies between different population groups. Exposure regulation has proven effective in decreasing the frequency. Experimental studies with other allergens have shown a significant relation between patch test reactivity and repeated open application test...... in a patch test and a dilution series of three concentrations in a ROAT, with duration of up to 21 days. Eighteen persons with no nickel allergy were included as control group for the ROAT. RESULTS: The predicted dose which will elicit a reaction in 10% of allergic individuals was calculated to be 0......-response; indeed, there was no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: For elicitation of nickel allergy the elicitation threshold for the patch test is higher than the elicitation threshold (per application) for the ROAT, but is approximately the same as the accumulated elicitation threshold...

  11. Catalyst for reforming hydrocarbons with water vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicklin, T.; Farrington, F.; Whittaker, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The catalyst should reform hydrocarbons with water vapour. It consists of a carrier substance (preferably clay) on whose surface the catalytically active substances are formed. By impregnation one obtains this with a mixture of thermally destructable nickel and uranium compounds and calcination of the impregnated carrier. The catalyst is marked by a definite weight ratio of uranium to nickel (about 0.6 to 1), the addition of barium compounds and a maximum limit of these additives. All details of manufacture and the range of variations are described in detail. (UWI) [de

  12. Does airborne nickel exposure induce nickel sensitization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Eugen; Ranft, Ulrich; Eberwein, Georg; Gladtke, Dieter; Sugiri, Dorothee; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Schäfer, Torsten; Begerow, Jutta; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Krämer, Ursula; Wilhelm, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Nickel is one of the most prevalent causes of contact allergy in the general population. This study focuses on human exposure to airborne nickel and its potential to induce allergic sensitization. The study group consisted of 309 children at school-starter age living in the West of Germany in the vicinity of two industrial sources and in a rural town without nearby point sources of nickel. An exposure assessment of nickel in ambient air was available for children in the Ruhr district using routinely monitored ambient air quality data and dispersion modelling. Internal nickel exposure was assessed by nickel concentrations in morning urine samples of the children. The observed nickel sensitization prevalence rates varied between 12.6% and 30.7%. Statistically significant associations were showed between exposure to nickel in ambient air and urinary nickel concentration as well as between urinary nickel concentration and nickel sensitization. Furthermore, an elevated prevalence of nickel sensitization was associated with exposure to increased nickel concentrations in ambient air. The observed associations support the assumption that inhaled nickel in ambient air might be a risk factor for nickel sensitization; further studies in larger collectives are necessary.

  13. Organosulphur Compounds in Coals as Determined by Reaction with Raney Nickel and Microscale Pyrolysis Techniques. Quarterly report, January-March, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, L.; Philip, P.

    1997-01-01

    Since the last report, we have concentrated on completing all the chemical degradation experimental work. This has involved the completion of a series of chemical degradation experiments using deuterium labeled sodium borohydride and deuterated methanol . The products of these desulphurization experiments have, as usual, been fractionated into aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and NSO compounds. The aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions of each desulphurization experiment are currently being analysed by gas chromatography(GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GCMS). The object of the deuterium labelling experiments is to determine the relative abundance of thioether, triolane, and thiophene organic sulphur units cleaved in the different coal fractions( i.e. pre- extracted coal matrix, asphaltene and free polars from the maltenes)

  14. Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanostructures (CNS) are often grown using oxide nanoparticles as catalyst in chemical vapour deposition and these oxides are not expected to survive as such during growth. In the present study, the catalysts of cobalt- and nickel oxide-based nanoparticles of sizes varying over a range have been reduced at 575 ...

  15. TEORES DE DIMETIL SULFETO ESTIMADOS PELO MÉTODO NÍQUEL-RANEY E ACEITABILIDADE DE AMOSTRAS DE CACHAÇA Dimethyl sulfide contents estimated by Ni-Raney method and “cachaça” samples acceptability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. A. TOLEDO

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available

    O defeito sensorial das aguardentes de cana destiladas na ausência de cobre já foi relacionado com a presença do dimetil sulfeto (DMS, o que revela a importância de identificar os teores deste composto eventualmente presente nesta bebida. Considerando-se, porém, o custo relativamente elevado dos métodos de cromatografia de fase gasosa até agora utilizados na determinação do DMS, foi objetivo deste trabalho avaliar a possível utilização do método de Níquel-Raney como forma de controlar o referido defeito. Nesse sentido foi estudada a relação entre os teores de DMS estimados pelo método proposto, com sua influência sensorial avaliada através de testes de aceitação. Os resultados obtidos permitiram concluir que mesmo em concentrações abaixo de 5mg/L, os testes sensoriais revelam haver alta correlação entre os teores de DMS, determinados pelo método de Níquel-Raney com a diminuição da qualidade sensorial das amostras avaliadas. Os resultados obtidos permitem propor o método de Níquel-Raney como uma opção válida no controle da presença de DMS na cachaça e assim, prevenir efeitos negativos na qualidade sensorial do produto final.

    The sensory defect of “cachaça”, when distilled in absence of copper, had been already related to dimethyl sulphide levels, pointing out the importance to control its contents in this beverage. Considering the relatively higher costs of the gas-chromatography techniques, the aim of this work was to evaluate the possible use of the Níquel-Raney method, to control the dimethyl sulphide contents. In this way, the dimethyl sulphide contents (estimated by Níquel-Raney method and its sensory deffect evaluated by acceptability sensory tests, were compared. The results showed that

  16. Co-Production of Ethanol and 1,2-Propanediol via Glycerol Hydrogenolysis Using Ni/Ce–Mg Catalysts: Effects of Catalyst Preparation and Reaction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel N. Menchavez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Crude glycerol from biodiesel production is a biobased material capable of co-producing biofuels and chemicals. This study aimed to develop a line of Ni catalysts supported on cerium–magnesium (Ce–Mg to improve the process efficiency of glycerol hydrogenolysis for ethanol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO. Results showed that catalytic activity was greatly improved by changing the preparation method from impregnation to deposition precipitation (DP, and by adjusting calcination temperatures. Prepared via DP, the catalysts of 25 wt % Ni supported on Ce–Mg (9:1 mol/mol greatly improved the effectiveness in glycerol conversion while maintaining the selectivities to ethanol and 1,2-PDO. Calcination at 350 °C provided the catalysts better selectivities of 15.61% to ethanol and 67.93% to 1,2-PDO. Increases in reaction temperature and time improved the conversion of glycerol and the selectivity to ethanol, but reduced the selectivity to 1,2-PDO. A lower initial water content led to a higher conversion of glycerol, but lower selectivities to ethanol and 1,2-PDO. Higher hydrogen application affected the glycerol conversion rate positively, but the selectivities to ethanol and 1,2-PDO negatively. A comparison to the commercial Raney® Ni catalyst showed that the Ni/Ce–Mg catalyst developed in this study showed a better potential for the selective co-production of ethanol and 1,2-PDO from glycerol hydrogenolysis.

  17. Catalyst study for the plasma exhaust purification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Sannier, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several catalysts available from commercial sources have been screened to find out specific catalysts which allow complete methane oxidation and ammonia decomposition at temperature as low as possible in order to minimize tritium loss by permeation through processing equipment walls. Afterwards, an extended kinetic investigation has been performed on the best catalysts to achieve the data necessary to unit calculations. For methane oxidation, a palladium on alumina catalyst shows a very satisfactory low-temperature efficiency while a non-precious metal catalyst made of nickel oxide and alumina was found to be the more efficient for ammonia decomposition

  18. Influence of ni addition to a low-loaded palladium catalyst on the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Lederhos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-hydrogenation of alkynes has industrial and academic relevance on a large scale. To increase the activity, selectivity and lifetime of monometallic catalysts, the development of bimetallic catalysts has been investigated. 1-Heptyne hydrogenation over low-loaded Pd and Ni monometallic and PdNi bimetallic catalysts was studied in liquid phase at mild conditions. XPS results suggest that nickel addition to Pd modifies the electronic state of palladium as nickel loading is increased. Low-loaded Pd catalysts showed the highest selectivities (> 95%. The most active prepared catalyst, PdNi(1%, was more selective than the Lindlar catalyst.

  19. Rota hidrometalúrgica de recuperação de molibdênio, cobalto, níquel e alumínio de catalisadores gastos de hidrotratamento em meio ácido Hydrometallurgical route to recover molybdenum, nickel, cobalt and aluminum from spent hydrotreating catalysts in acid medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivam Macedo Valverde Júnior

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a hydrometallurgical route for processing spent commercial catalysts (CoMo and NiMo/Al2O3. Samples were preoxidized (500 ºC, 5 h in order to eliminate coke and other volatile species present. The calcined solid was dissolved in concentrated H2SO4 and water (1:1 vol/vol at 90 ºC; the insoluble matter was separated from the solution. Molybdenum was recovered by solvent extraction using tertiary amines at pH around 1.8. Cobalt (or nickel was separated by addition of aqueous ammonium oxalate at the above pH. Phosphorus was removed by passing the liquid through a strong anion exchange column. Aluminum was recovered by neutralizing the solution with NaOH. The route presented in this work generates less final aqueous wastes because it is not necessary to use alkaline medium during the metal recovery steps.

  20. Wafer scale integration of catalyst dots into nonplanar microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerde, Kjetil; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Gammelgaard, Lauge

    2007-01-01

    In order to successfully integrate bottom-up fabricated nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes or silicon, germanium, or III-V nanowires into microelectromechanical systems on a wafer scale, reliable ways of integrating catalyst dots are needed. Here, four methods for integrating sub-100-nm...... diameter nickel catalyst dots on a wafer scale are presented and compared. Three of the methods are based on a p-Si layer utilized as an in situ mask, an encapsulating layer, and a sacrificial window mask, respectively. All methods enable precise positioning of nickel catalyst dots at the end...

  1. Biological role of nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thauer, R K; Diekert, G; Schoenheit, P

    1980-01-01

    Several enzymes and one cofactor have recently been shown to contain nickel. For example, urease of jack beans has been found to be a nickel protein and factor F/sub 430/ from methanogenic bacteria to be a nickel tetrapyrrole. The biological role of nickel in several organisms is discussed.

  2. Catalytic Copolymerization of Ethene and Carbon Monoxide on Nickel Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domhöver, Bernd; Kläui, Wolfgang; Kremer-Aach, Andreas; Bell, Ralf; Mootz, Dietrich

    1998-11-16

    Can palladium be replaced by nickel? For the industrial copolymerization of carbon monoxide and ethene a palladium catalyst is used which cannot be recovered-a cheaper procedure would be desirable. The presented complex 1 is the first structurally characterized nickel compound which does not polymerize ethene but a mixture from carbon monoxide and ethene unter mild conditions to give a perfectly alternating polyketone. © 1998 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  3. Nickel-based anodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells and water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dayi

    Our world is facing an energy crisis, so people are trying to harvest and utilize energy more efficiently. One of the promising ways to harvest energy is via solar water splitting to convert solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen. Another of the options to utilize energy more efficiently is to use fuel cells as power sources instead of combustion engines. Catalysts are needed to reduce the energy barriers of the reactions happening at the electrode surfaces of the water-splitting cells and fuel cells. Nickel-based catalysts happen to be important nonprecious electrocatalysts for both of the anodic reactions in alkaline media. In alcohol fuel cells, nickel-based catalysts catalyze alcohol oxidation. In water splitting cells, they catalyze water oxidation, i.e., oxygen evolution. The two reactions occur in a similar potential range when catalyzed by nickel-based catalysts. Higher output current density, lower oxidation potential, and complete substrate oxidation are preferred for the anode in the applications. In this dissertation, the catalytic properties of nickel-based electrocatalysts in alkaline medium for fuel oxidation and oxygen evolution are explored. By changing the nickel precursor solubility, nickel complex nanoparticles with tunable sizes on electrode surfaces were synthesized. Higher methanol oxidation current density is achieved with smaller nickel complex nanoparticles. DNA aggregates were used as a polymer scaffold to load nickel ion centers and thus can oxidize methanol completely at a potential about 0.1 V lower than simple nickel electrodes, and the methanol oxidation pathway is changed. Nickel-based catalysts also have electrocatalytic activity towards a wide range of substrates. Experiments show that methanol, ethanol, glycerol and glucose can be deeply oxidized and carbon-carbon bonds can be broken during the oxidation. However, when comparing methanol oxidation reaction to oxygen evolution reaction catalyzed by current nickel

  4. Communicating catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  5. Human exposure to nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandjean, P

    1984-01-01

    In order of abundance in the earth's crust, nickel ranks as the 24th element and has been detected in different media in all parts of the biosphere. Thus, humans are constantly exposed to this ubiquitous element, though in variable amounts. Occupational exposures may lead to the retention of 100 micrograms of nickel per day. Environmental nickel levels depend particularly on natural sources, pollution from nickel-manufacturing industries and airborne particles from combustion of fossil fuels. Absorption from atmospheric nickel pollution is of minor concern. Vegetables usually contain more nickel than do other food items. Certain products, such as baking powder and cocoa powder, have been found to contain excessive amounts of nickel, perhaps related to nickel leaching during the manufacturing process. Soft drinking-water and acid beverages may dissolve nickel from pipes and containers. Scattered studies indicate a highly variable dietary intake of nickel, but most averages are about 200-300 micrograms/day. In addition, skin contact to a multitude of metal objects may be of significance to the large number of individuals suffering from contact dermatitis and nickel allergy. Finally, nickel alloys are often used in nails and prostheses for orthopaedic surgery, and various sources may contaminate intravenous fluids. Thus, human nickel exposure originates from a variety of sources and is highly variable. Occupational nickel exposure is of major significance, and leaching of nickel may add to dietary intakes and to cutaneous exposures. 79 references.

  6. Nickel metal with various morphologies: synthesis and performances for catalytic carbon dioxide reforming with methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teabpinyok, Nopporn; Samingprai, Sutheerawat; Chareonpanich, Metta

    2012-12-01

    In this research, nickel metal of three different morphologies including nanostar, icosahedra, and microsphere structures were synthesized. It was found nanostar nickel revealed the Ni(111) crystallographic plane with particle size in the range of 150-200 nm and BET surface area of 13 m2/g. The icosahedra nickel also showed the Ni(111) crystallographic plane with larger particle size (300-400 nm) and BET surface area of 20 m2/g, whereas microsphere nickel exhibited the relatively large cluster size (approximately 3 microm) and BET surface area (114 m2/g) as a result of an aggregation of Ni(101) nanoplates. The obtained nickel catalysts were tested for the activity in carbon dioxide reforming with methane. Based on the similar specific surface area of catalysts, nanostar nickel showed the highest carbon dioxide and methane conversions due to its crystallographic structure. At 700 degrees C, nanostar nickel catalyst exhibited the highest carbon dioxide and methane conversions of 17.6 and 10.5 times higher than those of microsphere nickel catalyst, respectively.

  7. Energetic Mapping of Ni Catalysts by Detailed Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørgum, Erlend; Chen, De; Bakken, Mari G.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO has been performed on supported and unsupported nickel catalysts. The unsupported Ni catalyst consists of a Ni(14 13 13) single crystal which has been studied under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The desorption energy for CO at low CO surface coverage...... was found to be 119 kJ/mol, and the binding energy of C to the Ni(111) surface of the crystal was 703 kJ/mol. The supported catalysts consist of nickel supported on hydrotalcite-like compounds with three different Mg2+/Al3+ ratios. The experimental results show that for the supported Ni catalysts TPD of CO...... precursor seems to result in more steplike sites, kinks, and defects for carbon monoxide dissociation. A detailed kinetic modeling of the TPO results based on elementary reaction steps has been conducted to give an energetic map of supported Ni catalysts. Experimental results from the ideal Ni surface fit...

  8. Effect of the nickel precursor on the impregnation and drying of γ-Al2O3 catalyst bodies: a UV-vis and IR micro-spectroscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinosa Alonso, L.; de Jong, K.P.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    The elemental preparation steps of impregnation and drying of Ni/g-Al2O3 catalyst bodies have been studied by combining UV-vis and IR microspectroscopy. The influence of the number of chelating ligands in [Ni(en)x(H2O)6-2x]2+ precursor complexes (with en ) ethylenediamine and x ) 0-3) has been

  9. Support acidity influence in NiMoS (Nickel and Molybdenum) catalyst for Marlim diesel; Influencia da acidez do suport de catalisadores NiMoS (Niquel e Molibidenio) no hidrotratamento de diesel Marlim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, Sheila Guimaraes de Almeida; Zotin, Jose Luiz; Jesus, Anderson Gomes de; Santos, Bruno Martins; Medeiros, Marcus Vinicius Costa [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The specification of diesel points to the reduction of the sulfur content, of the final boiling point, of the density range and increase of the cetane number. These two last properties are directly related with the ability of the hydrotreating catalytic system in promoting the hydrogenation of aromatic structures and ring opening of the naphthenic compounds, which are both associated to low cetane number. In such way, more acidic catalysts, able to promote the cracking of naphthenic structures, should be evaluated for the diesel HDT. Three bifunctional NiMo catalysts with the same metal content, different acidity and similar active phase dispersion were prepared using alumina, silica-alumina and alumina-Y zeolite as supports. These catalysts were evaluated in a micro-reactor unit for diesel HDT aiming to correlate their activity with the support acidity. The alumina and alumina-zeolite supported catalysts presented better performance than the one supported on silica-alumina. NiMo/alumina-zeolite showed higher cetane and density improvement, associated with a slight decrease in the initial boiling point. (author)

  10. SHS-produced intermetallides as catalysts for hydrocarbons synthesis from CO and H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Kazantsev, R.V.; Davydov, P.E.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry; Borshch, V.N.; Pugacheva, E.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation). Inst. of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science

    2012-07-01

    Raney-type polymetallic alloys were prepared by Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis followed by alkaline treating. Surface morphology and composition of were studied using XRD, BET, SEM and EMPA techniques. The samples were tested in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis demonstrated rather high activity and very high selectivity to heavy paraffins. High selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons is attributed to high thermal conductivity of alloys which prevents hot spots formation and therefore suppresses formation of methane and light hydrocarbons. Selectivity can be further improved by adding some d-metals in catalyst composition. Promotion with La seems to be particularly suitable for lowering methane formation while doping with Ni enhances methane yield greatly. (orig.)

  11. Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Alumina for Diesel Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Tribalis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel catalysts are the most popular for steam reforming, however, they have a number of drawbacks, such as high propensity toward coke formation and intolerance to sulfur. In an effort to improve their behavior, a series of Ni-catalysts supported on pure and La-, Ba-, (La+Ba- and Ce-doped γ-alumina has been prepared. The doped supports and the catalysts have been extensively characterized. The catalysts performance was evaluated for steam reforming of n-hexadecane pure or doped with dibenzothiophene as surrogate for sulphur-free or commercial diesel, respectively. The undoped catalyst lost its activity after 1.5 h on stream. Doping of the support with La improved the initial catalyst activity. However, this catalyst was completely deactivated after 2 h on stream. Doping with Ba or La+Ba improved the stability of the catalysts. This improvement is attributed to the increase of the dispersion of the nickel phase, the decrease of the support acidity and the increase of Ni-phase reducibility. The best catalyst of the series doped with La+Ba proved to be sulphur tolerant and stable for more than 160 h on stream. Doping of the support with Ce also improved the catalytic performance of the corresponding catalyst, but more work is needed to explain this behavior.

  12. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  13. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  14. Effects of preparation method and active metal content on of Ni/kieselguhr catalyst activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galuh Widiyarti; Wuryaningsih Sri Rahayu

    2010-01-01

    The preparation and the active metal content influence the activity of catalyst. Study has been conducted to see the activity of Ni/kieselguhr based on preparation method and Nickel (Ni) contents in the catalyst in the laboratory scale. The Ni/kieselguhr catalyst were prepared by impregnation and precipitation methods, with Ni active contents of 10, 20, and 30 % by weight. The catalysts characterization was analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Catalysts activities were analyzed based on decreasing of iodine number from hydrogenation of crude palm oil for 2 hours. The activity tests results show that precipitation catalysts are more active than impregnation catalysts. The decreasing in iodine number of fatty acid after 2 hours of hydrogenation process using precipitation catalysts and impregnation catalysts are 51.53 and 21.85 %, respectively. In addition, the catalysts are more active with increasing Ni contents. (author)

  15. Screening of Catalysts for Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenol as Model Compound for Bio-oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    Four groups of catalysts have been tested for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenol as a model compound of bio-oil, including: oxide catalysts, methanol synthesis catalysts, reduced noble metal catalysts, and reduced non-noble metal catalysts. In total 23 different catalysts were tested at 100 bar H2...... and 275 °C in a batch reactor. The experiments showed that none of the tested oxides and methanol synthesis catalysts had any significant activity for phenol HDO at the given conditions, which were linked to their inability to hydrogenate the phenol. HDO of phenol over reduced metal catalysts could...... on a carbon support, but more active than the carbon supported noble metal catalysts when supported on ZrO2. This observation indicates that the nickel based catalysts require a metal oxide as carrier on which the activation of the phenol for the hydrogenation can take place through heterolytic dissociation...

  16. Hydrogenation of citral into its derivatives using heterogeneous catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiyarmanto, Hidayati, Luthfiana Nurul; Kristiani, Anis; Aulia, Fauzan

    2017-11-01

    Citral as known as a monoterpene can be found in plants and citrus fruits. The hydrogenation of citral into its derivatives become interesting area for scientist. This compound and its derivatives can be used for many application in pharmaceuticals and food areas. The development of heterogeneous catalysts become an important aspect in catalytic hydrogenation citral process. Nickel supported catalysts are well known as hydrogenation catalyst. These heterogeneous catalysts were tested their catalytic activity in hydrogenation of citral. The effect of various operation conditions, in term of feed concentration, catalyst loading, temperature, and reaction time were also studied. The liquid products produced were analyzed by using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The result of catalytic activity tests showed nickel skeletal catalyst exhibits best catalytic activity in hydrogenation of citral. The optimum of operation condition was achieved in citral concentration 0.1 M with nickel skeletal catalyst loading of 10% (w/w) at 80 °C and 20 bar for 2 hours produced the highest conversion as of 64.20% and the dominant product resulted was citronellal as of 56.48%.

  17. Enhanced gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. L.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, Jr., L. J.; Robertus, R. J.; Mitchell, D. E.

    Experimental results obtained in laboratory investigations of steam gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts are presented. These studies are designed to test the technical feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from wood by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of combined catalysts. The desired products include substitute natural gas, hydrocarbon synthesis gas and ammonia synthesis gas. The gasification reactions are controlled through the use of specific catalyst combinations and operating parameters. A primary alkali carbonate gasification catalyst impregnated into the wood combined with specific commercially available secondary catalysts produced the desired products. A yield of 50 vol % methane was obtained with a randomly mixed combination of a commercial nickel methanation catalyst and silica-alumina cracking catalyst at a weight ratio of 3:1 respectively. Steam gasification of wood in the presence of a commercial Si-Al cracking catalyst produced the desired hydrocarbon synthesis gas. Hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide ratios needed for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons were obtained with this catalyst system. A hydrogen-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 for ammonia synthesis gas was achieved with steam-air gasification of wood in the presence of catalysts. The most effective secondary catalyst system employed to produce the ammonia synthesis gas included two commercially prepared catalysts formulated to promote the water-gas shift reaction.

  18. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  19. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  20. Design of a surface alloy catalyst for steam reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Chorkendorff, Ib; Clausen, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed studies of elementary chemical processes on well-characterized single crystal surfaces have contributed substantially to the understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. insight into the structure of surface alloys combined with an understanding of the relation between the surface compositi...... and reactivity is shown to lead directly to new ideas for catalyst design, The feasibility of such an approach is illustrated by the synthesis, characterization, and tests of a high-surface area gold-nickel catalyst for steam reforming....

  1. Catalysts and conditions for the highly efficient, selective and stable heterogeneous oligomerisation of ethylene

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heveling, J

    1998-10-11

    Full Text Available The oligomerisation of ethylene into products in the C-4-C-20 range over heterogeneous nickel catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor at low temperature and high pressure (LT-HP) is reported. The catalysts were obtained by Ni (II) exchange or impregnation...

  2. Non-Precious Bimetallic Catalysts for Selective Dehydrogenation of an Organic Chemical Hydride System

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2015-07-06

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-Toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as a hydrogen carrier system is successful with the selective dehydrogenation reaction of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  3. Heterogeneous hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds with catalyst P-2-Ni with turnover numbers up to 90,000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeier, W; Pfoehler, M; Steigerwald, H [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie

    1977-12-01

    Unsaturated compounds are very rapidly hydrogenated with nickel-boride catalyst P-2-Ni without solvent under mild conditions (70-85/sup 0/C and 10 bar). Turnover numbers UZ up to 90,000 and space-time-yields of 7.440 mmol product per l and 1 mgA Nickel in one hour with a mean catalyst activity a = 124 were observed. This hydrogenation catalyst has a power, which is in the same magnitude of very active noble metal catalysts.

  4. Development of industrial hydrogenating catalyst on rhenium base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, G.A.; Bat', I.I.; Rebrova, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    Processes for forming rhenium catalysts on carbon carrier and their catalytic properties in nitrobenzene (NB) reduction were studied. Application of an ammonia preparation to the carbon surface produced impregnated carbon saturated at room temperature with a water solution of the ammonia preparation, taken in a volume equal to the volumetric capacity of the carbon. With one impregnation, 2% rhenium was taken up. Catalysts containing more than 5% rhenium were obtained by impregnating the carbon with heating and use of more concentrated solutions. Catalysts made in this way and dried at 100 0 C had the composition Re 2 OH/carbon/. The most active catalysts were those reduced at 200-250 0 C; higher temperatures, up to 300-500 0 C, decreased the activity. Study of the catalytic properties of the rhenium catalysts in a liquid phase reduction of NB showed that the specific activity of rhenium depends only slightly on the content of the active component in the catalyst and is close to the specific activity of palladium and considerably exceeds that of nickel. Study of the effect of the NB concentration and hydrogen pressure on the activity and stability of the 5% rhenium catalyst indicated that with NB concentrations from 50 to 10% the process takes place at an essentially constant rate; the order of the reaction was close to zero with an apparent activation energy of about 7000 cal/mole. At pressures of 15-200 atm the yield with the 5% catalyst was proportional to the hydrogen pressure. A big advantage of the rhenium catalysts in the reduction of NB is their high selectivity. With a higher activity than palladium and nickel catalysts, 5% rhenium catalyst produces a high operating capacity in a wide range of contact charges, which has considerable significance for industrial use in contact apparatus of the column type. Comparison of the costs of rhenium catalysts and granular carbon carrier with those of nickel, platinum, and palladium showed that 5% rhenium catalyst can

  5. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  6. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yancai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyrocarbon at 1000 °C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel particles could be well distributed on carbon fibers and the pyrocarbon deposited catalytically had a smaller d002 value and a higher graphitization degree compared with that without catalyst. In addition, the deposition rate of pyrocarbon in each hour was measured. The deposition rate of pyrocarbon in the first hour was more than 10 times when carbon cloth substrates were doped with nickel catalysts as compared to the pure carbon cloths. The pyrocarbon gained by rapid deposition may include two parts, which are generation directly on the nickel catalyst and formation with the carbon nanofibers as crystal nucleus.

  7. Sputtered catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  8. Potential for preparation of hot gas cleanup sorbents from spent hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Biagini, M. [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Labs.

    1996-01-01

    Three spent-decoked hydroprocessing catalysts and two corresponding fresh catalysts were tested as hot gas clean-up sorbents and compared with the zinc ferrite using a simulated coal gasification gas mixture. The catalysts deposited only by coke exhibited relatively good cleaning efficiency. The catalyst deposited by coke and metals such as vanadium and nickel was less efficient. The useful life of the spent hydroprocessing catalysts may be extended if utilized as hot gas clean-up sorbents. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Activity of molybdenum-containing oxide catalysts in the reaction of ethane oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, V.I.; Ehpova, T.I.; Shchukin, V.P.; Averbukh, A.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    Investigation results concerning the catalytic activity of molybdenum-containing catalysts in ethane oxidation reaction are presented. It has been found that the greatest activity in the temperature range from 450 to 600 deg C is exhibited by cobalt-molybdenum catalyst; at 600 deg C bismuth-molybdenum catalyst is the most active. Nickel-molybdenum catalyst is selective and active with respect to ethylene. Iron- and manganese-molybdenum catalysts do not show high ethane oxidation rates and their selectivity is insignificant

  10. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include 234 Th, 234 Pa, 137 Cs, 239 Pu (trace), 60 Co, U, 99 Tc, and 237 Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs

  11. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  12. Recycling of spent hydroprocessing catalysts: EURECAT technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrebi, G.; Dufresne, P.; Jacquier, Y. (EURECAT-European Reprocessing Catalysts, La Voulte sur Rhone (France))

    1994-04-01

    Disposal of spent catalyst is a growing concern for all refiners. Environmental regulations are becoming stricter and stricter and there are State recommendations to develop disposal routes which would emphasize recycling as much as possible, and processing the wastes as near as possible to the production center. In this context, EURECAT has developed a recycling process for the hydroprocessing catalysts used in the oil refineries (NiMo, CoMo, NiW on alumina or mixed alumina silica). The process starts with a regeneration of the catalyst to eliminate hydrocarbons, carbon and sulfur. After a caustic roasting, the material is leached to obtain a solution containing mainly molybdenum (or tungsten) and vanadium, and a solid containing essentially alumina, cobalt and/or nickel. Molybdenum and vanadium are separated by an ion exchange resin technique. The solid is processed in an arc furnace to separate the alumina. Nickel and cobalt are separated by conventional solvent extraction to obtain pure metal. Alumina is disposed of as an inert slag. The strength of the process lies in the combination of proven technologies applied by companies whose reliability in their respective field is well known. The aspects concerning spent catalyst handling, packaging and transport are also discussed. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Ni(0-CMC-Na Nickel Colloids in Sodium Carboxymethyl-Cellulose: Catalytic Evaluation in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Karim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recyclable catalyst, Ni(0-CMC-Na, composed of nickel colloids dispersed in a water soluble bioorganic polymer, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Na, was synthesized by a simple procedure from readily available reagents. The catalyst thus obtained is stable and highly active in alkene hydrogenations.

  14. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  15. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  16. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  17. Oligomerization of ethylene catalysed by nickel complexes associated with nitrogen ligands in ionic liquids; Oligomerisation de l'ethylene catalysee par des complexes du nickel associes a des ligands azotes dans les liquides ioniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecocq, V.

    2003-09-01

    We report here the use of a new class of catalytic systems based on a nickel active center associated with nitrogen ligands, such as di-imines, or imino-pyridines, for the oligomerization of ethylene in a biphasic medium using ionic liquids as the catalyst solvent. The nickel catalyst is immobilized in the ionic liquid phase in which the olefinic reaction products are poorly miscible. This biphasic system makes possible an easy separation and recycle of the catalyst. Numerous di-imine and imino-pyridine ligands with different steric and electronic properties have been synthesized and their corresponding nickel complexes isolated and characterized. Different ionic liquids, based on chloro-aluminates or non-chloro-aluminates anions, have also been prepared and characterized. The effect of the nature of the ligand, the ionic liquid, the nickel precursor and its mode of activation have been studied and correlated with the selectivity and activity of the transformation of ethylene. (author)

  18. Characterization of composite metal-ceramic of nickel-oxide cerium doped gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.L.A. da; Varela, M.C.R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Composite nickel doped cerium oxide are used in SOFC anode materials. In this study we evaluated the effect of the presence of gadolinium on the properties of composite nickel and ceria and. The supports were synthesized by sol-gel method. The impregnation with nickel nitrate was taken sequentially, followed by calcination. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, measurement of specific surface area, temperature programmed reduction, Raman spectroscopy. The presence of gadolinium retained the fluorite structure of ceria by forming a solid solution, also not influencing significantly on the specific surface area of the support. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the area catalysts, which can be attributed to sintering of nickel. Furthermore, addition of gadolinium favored the formation of intrinsic and extrinsic vacancies in cerium oxide, which leads to an increase in the ionic conductivity of the solid, desirable property for an SOFC anode catalyst. (author)

  19. Electroless nickel plating on abs plastics from nickel chloride and nickel sulfate baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inam-ul-haque; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous acid nickel chloride and alkaline nickel sulphate bath were studied for electroless nickel planting on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) plastic. Before electroless nickel plating, specimens were etched, sensitized and activated. Effects of sodium hypophosphite and sodium citrate concentration on the electroless nickel plating thickness were discussed. Aqueous acid nickel chloride bath comprising, nickel chloride 10 g/L, sodium hypophosphite 40 g/L, sodium citrate 40g/L at pH 5.5, temperature 85 deg. C and density of 1 Be/ for thirty minutes gave best coating thickness in micrometer. It was found that acid nickel chloride bath had a greater stability, wide operating range and better coating thickness results than alkaline nickel sulphate bath. Acid nickel chloride bath gave better coating thickness than alkaline nickel sulfate bath

  20. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  1. NICKEL – ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is ubiquitus in our biosphere because of its emission from natural and anthropogenic sources. Its toxic and carcinogenic properties are well recognised only in workers exposed to high Ni concentrations. Nickel allergy is the most common form of cutaneus hypersensitivity in general population and also in occupationally exposed groups. As sensitizing agent Ni has a high prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis. The most important known risk factor associated with nickel allergy is ear piercing and use of other jewelry in females. In general population 17 % adults and 8 % children have Ni allergy symptoms. Permanently growing Ni allergy is regarded as serious risk for public health.

  2. Hydrogenation of the Exocyclic Olefinic Bond at C-16/C-17 Position of ent-Kaurane Diterpene Glycosides of Stevia rebaudiana Using Various Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Prakash, Indra

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of the exocyclic double bond present between C16 and C17 carbons of the four ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides namely rebaudioside A, rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D isolated from Stevia rebaudiana has been carried out using Pt/C, Pd(OH)2, Rh/C, Raney Ni, PtO2, and 5% Pd/BaCO3 to their corresponding dihydro derivatives with 17α and 17β methyl group isomers. Reactions were performed using the above-mentioned catalysts with the solvents methanol, water, and ethanol/water (8:2) under various conditions. Synthesis of reduced steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward chemistry and their structures were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectral data, including a comparison with reported spectral data. PMID:23896597

  3. Hydrogenation of the Exocyclic Olefinic Bond at C-16/C-17 Position of ent-Kaurane Diterpene Glycosides of Stevia rebaudiana Using Various Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of the exocyclic double bond present between C16 and C17 carbons of the four ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides namely rebaudioside A, rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D isolated from Stevia rebaudiana has been carried out using Pt/C, Pd(OH2, Rh/C, Raney Ni, PtO2, and 5% Pd/BaCO3 to their corresponding dihydro derivatives with 17α and 17β methyl group isomers. Reactions were performed using the above-mentioned catalysts with the solvents methanol, water, and ethanol/water (8:2 under various conditions. Synthesis of reduced steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward chemistry and their structures were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectral data, including a comparison with reported spectral data.

  4. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Transamidation of Secondary Amides with Nitroarenes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Ploeger, Marten Leendert; Hu, Xile

    2017-01-01

    Transmidation is an attractive method for amide synthesis. However, transamidation of secondary amides is challenging. Here, we describe a reductive transamidation method that employs readily available nitro(hetero)arenes as the nitrogen sources, zinc or manganese as reductant, and simple nickel salt and ligand as a catalyst system. The scope of amides includes both alkyl and aryl secondary amides, with high functional group compatibility.

  5. Dry Reforming of Methane Using a Nickel Membrane Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas M. Leimert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dry reforming is a very interesting process for synthesis gas generation from CH 4 and CO 2 but suffers from low hydrogen yields due to the reverse water–gas shift reaction (WGS. For this reason, membranes are often used for hydrogen separation, which in turn leads to coke formation at the process temperatures suitable for the membranes. To avoid these problems, this work shows the possibility of using nickel self-supported membranes for hydrogen separation at a temperature of 800 ∘ C. The higher temperature effectively suppresses coke formation. The paper features the analysis of the dry reforming reaction in a nickel membrane reactor without additional catalyst. The measurement campaign targeted coke formation and conversion of the methane feedstock. The nickel approximately 50% without hydrogen separation. The hydrogen removal led to an increase in methane conversion to 60–90%.

  6. Mono-, bi-, and tri-metallic Ni-based catalysts for the catalytic hydrotreatment of pyrolysis liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang; Venderbosch, Robbie H.; He, Songbo; Bykova, Maria V.; Khromova, Sofia A.; Yakovlev, Vadim A.; Heeres, Hero J.

    Catalytic hydrotreatment is a promising technology to convert pyrolysis liquids into intermediates with improved properties. Here, we report a catalyst screening study on the catalytic hydrotreatment of pyrolysis liquids using bi- and tri-metallic nickel-based catalysts in a batch autoclave (initial

  7. Full Scale Alternative Catalyst Testing for Bosch Reactor Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Katherine; Abney, Morgan B.

    2011-01-01

    Current air revitalization technology onboard the International Space Station (ISS) cannot provide complete closure of the oxygen and hydrogen loops. This makes re-supply necessary, which is possible for missions in low Earth orbit (LEO) like the ISS, but unviable for long term space missions outside LEO. In comparison, Bosch technology reduces carbon dioxide with hydrogen, traditionally over a steel wool catalyst, to create water and solid carbon. The Bosch product water can then be fed to the oxygen generation assembly to produce oxygen for crew members and hydrogen necessary to reduce more carbon dioxide. Bosch technology can achieve complete oxygen loop closure, but has many undesirable factors that result in a high energy, mass, and volume system. Finding a different catalyst with an equal reaction rate at lower temperatures with less catalyst mass and longer lifespan would make a Bosch flight system more feasible. Developmental testing of alternative catalysts for the Bosch has been performed using the Horizontal Bosch Test Stand. Nickel foam, nickel shavings, and cobalt shavings were tested at 500 C and compared to the original catalyst, steel wool. This paper presents data and analysis on the performance of each catalyst tested at comparable temperatures and recycle flow rates.

  8. Nickel in tap water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K E; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, M A; Fregert, S; Gruvberge, B

    1983-03-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found. Drinking of only the first portion in the morning might have an influence on nickel hand eczema.

  9. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices.

  10. Application of anodizing as a pre-treatment for nickel plating on aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, M.; Ahmad, J.; Aslam, M.; Iqbal, M.; Akhtar, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of anodizing on subsequent electroplating of nickel on aluminum was investigated. Electroplated nickel did not exhibit any adhesion with un-anodized aluminum. Formation of a very thin anodized alumina film prior to nickel plating led to an excellent adhesion between the nickel film and the substrate. If the thickness of the alumina film increased, adhesion of electroplated nickel was significantly deteriorated and became similar to that of un-anodized bare aluminum. The study revealed that deposition proceeded through pores and defects in the insulator alumina film. These pores and defects also acted as nucleation and anchor points for nickel deposit. There was larger number of nucleation/ anchor points on thin alumina films. This provided better adhesion of nickel with the substrate as well as excellent coverage in relatively shorter times. On the other hand, very rough and poorly adherent nickel deposits formed on thick anodized films. Therefore, it may be used as precursor for producing nickel powder with controlled particle size as well as a catalyst with high specific surface area for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions. (author)

  11. Highly Dispersed Nickel-Containing Mesoporous Silica with Superior Stability in Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane: The Effect of Anchoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Cai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of nickel-containing mesoporous silica samples (Ni-SiO2 with different nickel content (3.1%–13.2% were synthesized by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Their catalytic activity was tested in carbon dioxide reforming of methane. The characterization results revealed that the catalysts, e.g., 6.7%Ni-SiO2, with highly dispersed small nickel particles, exhibited excellent catalytic activity and long-term stability. The metallic nickel particle size was significantly affected by the metal anchoring effect between metallic nickel particles and unreduced nickel ions in the silica matrix. A strong anchoring effect was suggested to account for the remaining of small Ni particle size and the improved catalytic performance.

  12. Preparation and characterization of bi-metallic nanoparticle catalyst having better anti-coking properties using reverse micelle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Thomas

    Energy needs are rising on an exponential basis. The mammoth energy sources like coal, natural gas and petroleum are the cause of pollution. The large outcry for an alternate energy source which is environmentally friendly and energy efficient is heard during the past few years. This is where “Clean-Fuel” like hydrogen gained its ground. Hydrogen is mainly produced by steam methane reforming (SMR). An alternate sustainable process which can reduce the cost as well as eliminate the waste products is Tri-reforming. In both these reforming processes nickel is used as catalyst. However as the process goes on the catalyst gets deactivated due to coking on the catalytic surface. This goal of this thesis work was to develop a bi-metallic catalyst which has better anti-coking properties compared to the conventional nickel catalyst. Tin was used to dope nickel. It was found that Ni3Sn complex around a core of Ni is coking resistant compared to pure nickel catalyst. Reverse micelle synthesis of catalyst preparation was used to control the size and shape of catalytic particles. These studies will benefit researches on hydrogen production and catalyst manufactures who work on different bi-metallic combinations.

  13. Determination of nickel-63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletiko, C.

    1988-01-01

    The research of activation products in the environment is often centered on cobalt-60 or other gamma emitters, since pure beta emitters require time consuming separations to be counted. However, some beta emitters must be checked because they have a build up in the environment, leading to potential hazards. Among these nuclides, there is nickel-63 which is a pure, soft beta emitter (67 keV) with a long half-life (100 years). A chemical separation, providing good results, was developed. Such a separation is based upon nickel carrier addition in the sample than DMG complex formation and isolation; after elimination of solvent. DMG complex is destroyed. Chemical yield is determined by flame atomic absorption measurement and nickel-63 counted by liquid scintillation. The described procedure allows the determination of low-level activities in different samples (soils, effluents, etc.). Detection limits are close to 0.1 Bq per sample

  14. From fundamental studies of reactivity on single crystals to the design of catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Larsen, Jane; Chorkendorff, Ib

    One of the prominent arguments for performing surface science studies have for many years been to improve and design new and better catalysts. Although surface science has provided the fundamental framework and tools for understanding heterogeneous catalysis until now there have been extremely few examples of actually designing new catalysts based solely on surface science studies. In this review, we shall demonstrate how a close collaboration between different fundamental disciplines like structural-, theoretical-and reactivity-studies of surfaces as well as a strong interaction with industry can have strong synergetic effects and how this was used to develop a new catalyst. As so often before the studies reviewed here were not initiated with the objective to solve a specific problem, but realizing that a new class of very stable two-dimensional alloys could be synthesized from otherwise immiscible metals made it possible to present a new solution to a specific problem in the industrial catalysis relating to methane activation in the steam reforming process. Methane is the main constituent of natural gas and it is an extremely important raw material for many large scale chemical processes such as production of hydrogen, ammonia, and methanol. In the steam reforming process methane and water are converted into a mixture of mainly hydrogen and carbon monoxide, the so-called synthesis gas. Industrially the steam reforming process usually takes place over a catalyst containing small nickel crystallites highly dispersed on a porous support material like aluminum/magnesium oxides in order to achieve a high active metal area. There is a general consensus that the rate limiting step of this process is the dissociative sticking of methane on the nickel surface. Driven by the desire to understand this step and hopefully be able to manipulate the reactivity, a large number of investigations of the methane/nickel interaction have been performed using nickel single crystals as

  15. Stereospecific nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of alkyl ethers: enantioselective synthesis of diarylethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Buck L H; Swift, Elizabeth C; Waetzig, Joshua D; Jarvo, Elizabeth R

    2011-01-26

    Secondary benzylic ethers undergo stereospecific substitution reactions with Grignard reagents in the presence of nickel catalysts. Reactions proceed with inversion of configuration and high stereochemical fidelity. This reaction allows for facile enantioselective synthesis of biologically active diarylethanes from readily available optically enriched carbinols.

  16. Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicalho, U.O.; Santos, D.C.; Silvestrini, D.R.; Trama, B.; Carmo, D.R. do

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate (NHNi) were prepared in three medium (aqueous, formamide and aqueous/formamide). The materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electronica spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region and also by cyclic voltammetry (CV). By spectroscopic analysis of X-ray diffraction was possible to estimate the size of the particles obtained by the Scherrer equation. The graphite paste electrodes containing nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate means formamide was sensitive to different concentrations of Dipyrone. (author)

  17. Practical Stannylation of Allyl Acetates Catalyzed by Nickel with Bu3 SnOMe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeyama, Kimihiro; Itai, Yuuhei; Takaki, Ken

    2016-06-27

    A practical and scalable nickel-catalyzed allylic stannylation of allyl acetates with Bu3 SnOMe is described. A variety of acyclic and cyclic allyl acetates, even with base-sensitive moieties, undergoes the stannylation by using NiBr2 /4,4'-di-tert-butylbipyridine (dtbpy)/Mn catalyst system to afford highly functionalized allyl stannanes with excellent regioselectivity and yields. Furthermore, the scope of protocol is also extended by the reaction of propargyl acetates, giving rise to propargyl or allenyl stannanes. Additionally, a unique diastereoselectivity using the nickel catalyst different from the palladium was demonstrated for the stannylation of cyclic allyl acetates. In the reaction, inexpensive and stable nickel complexes, abundant reductant (Mn), and atom-economical stannyl source were used. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ammonia Generation via a Graphene-Coated Nickel Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel graphene-coated Ni electrode was developed in this investigation to improve corrosion resistance while unexpectedly enhancing the ammonia generation rate in the electrochemically induced urea to ammonia (eU2A process, which is an electrochemical onsite ammonia generation method. The development of the electrode is crucial for the eU2A reactions since in the ammonia generation process, the concentration of ammonia is inevitably high on the surface of the electrode, leading to severe corrosion of the electrode and the loss of generated ammonia as well. In this paper, the graphene was derived from raw coal by using the chemical vapor deposition method and self-lifted onto a Ni electrode to form a protective layer for corrosion prevention. Transmission electron microscopy showed the synthesized graphene had few-layers and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the coating of graphene was stable during the eU2A reaction. As a result, the ammonia corrosion of the Ni electrode was dramatically reduced by ~20 times with the graphene coating method. More importantly, a higher ammonia generation rate (~2 times was achieved using the graphene-coated Ni working electrode compared to a bare Ni electrode in the eU2A process.

  19. Nickel silicide formation in silicon implanted nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Z.; Williams, J. S.; Pogany, A. P.; Sood, D. K.; Collins, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    Nickel silicide formation during the annealing of very high dose (≥4.5×1017 ions/cm2) Si implanted Ni has been investigated, using ion beam analytical techniques, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. An initial amorphous Si-Ni alloy, formed as a result of high dose ion implantation, first crystallized to Ni2Si upon annealing in the temperature region of 200-300 °C. This was followed by the formation of Ni5Si2 in the temperature region of 300-400 °C and then by Ni3Si at 400-600 °C. The Ni3Si layer was found to have an epitaxial relationship with the substrate Ni, which was determined as Ni3Si∥Ni and Ni3Si∥Ni for Ni(100) samples. The minimum channeling yield in the 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectra of this epitaxial layer improved with higher annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, and reached a best value measured at about 8%. However, the epitaxial Ni3Si dissolved after long time annealing at 600 °C or annealing at higher temperatures to liberate soluble Si into the Ni substrate. The epitaxy is attributed to the excellent lattice match between the Ni3Si and the Ni. The annealing behavior follows the predictions of the Ni-Si phase diagram for this nickel-rich binary system.

  20. The cost of nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    %), followed by aluminium-bronze (62, 17%). In total, 239 denominations released nickel (28%). Coins from Bolivia, Brazil and Costa Rica did not release nickel. Fewer than one-third of the denominations or issues from China, India, the euro area and Indonesia released nickel. In the United States, the Russian...... Federation, Japan, and Mexico, one-third or more of the denominations released nickel. Conclusions. This worldwide selection of circulating coins covered countries with 75% of the world population, and shows that the majority of the world population lives in countries where coins release nickel. Pertinently...

  1. Development and characterization of nickel catalysts supported in CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} e ZrO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrixes evaluated for methane reforming reactions; Desenvolvimento e caracterização de catalisadores de níquel suportados em matrizes CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} e ZrO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} avaliados para as reações de reforma do metano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Amanda Jordão de

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the methane reforming is large interest industrial for the take advantage of these gas in production the hydrogen and synthesis gas (syngas). Among in the reactions of methane stand of the reactions steam reforming and carbon dioxide reforming of methane. The main catalysts uses in the methane reforming is Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, the supported-nickel catalyst is susceptible to the deactivation or the destruction by coke deposition. The carbon dissolves in the nickel crystallite and its diffuses through the nickel, leading for formation of the carbon whiskers, which results in fragmentation of the catalyst. Modification of such catalysts, like incorporation of suitable promoters, is desirable to achieve reduction of the methane hydrogenolysis and/or promotion of the carbon gasification. Catalysts 5%Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported on solid solutions formed by ZrO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared, characterized and evaluated in reactions steam and carbon dioxide reforming and partial oxidation of methane with objective the value effect loading solution solid in support. The supports were prepared by co-precipitation method and catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and calcined at 500 deg C. The supports and catalysts were characterized by Nitrogen Adsorption, method -rays diffraction (XRD), X-rays dispersive spectroscopy (XDS), spectroscopy in the region of the ultraviolet and the visible (UV-vis NIR) to and temperature programmed reduction (TPR), Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. After all the catalytic reactions check which the addition of solid solution is beneficial for Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the best catalysts are Ni/CeO{sub 2}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (author)

  2. Principal component analysis of NEXAFS spectra for molybdenum speciation in hydrotreating catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faro Junior, Arnaldo da C.; Rodrigues, Victor de O.; Eon, Jean-G.; Rocha, Angela S.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and supported molybdenum based catalysts, modified by nickel, phosphorous or tungsten were studied by NEXAFS spectroscopy at the Mo L III and L II edges. The techniques of principal component analysis (PCA) together with a linear combination analysis (LCA) allowed the detection and quantification of molybdenum atoms in two different coordination states in the oxide form of the catalysts, namely tetrahedral and octahedral coordination. (author)

  3. Nickel in tap water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Nielsen, G D; Flyvholm, Morten

    1983-01-01

    Nickel analyses of tap water from several sources in Copenhagen gave up to 490 X 10(-6) g X 1(-1) in the first 250 ml portions. Hot water gave higher values than cold water. After flushing for 5 min, low values were found. Considerable variation from time to time and from tap to tap was found...

  4. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NICKEL POISONING

    OpenAIRE

    Vladmila Bojanic; Vladimir Ilic; Biljana Jovic

    2007-01-01

    Nickel is widely distributed in the environment. High consumption of nickel containing products inevitably leads to environmental pollution by nickel and its derivatives at all stages of production, utilization, and disposal.Human exposure to nickel occurs primarily via inhalation and ingestion and is particularly high among nickel metallurgy workers. In addition, implantation of nickel-containing endoprostheses and iatrogenic administration of nickel-contaminated medica-tions leads to signif...

  6. Chemisorption of oxygen by coke deposited on catalyst surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Duguay, D.G.; Houle, J.

    1988-02-01

    Chemisorption of oxygen by nickel molybdate catalyst used for hydrotreating heavy oils was shown to increase with increasing temperature and reached a maximum at about 270 degrees C. Yields of CO/sub 2/, CO and SO/sub 2/ formed during isothermal chemisorption were estimated by using a fixed-bed reactor. Experimental observations were interpreted in terms of a hydrocarbon autoxidation mechanism. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Enhanced activity of Pt/CNTs anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells using Ni2P as co-catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Lanping; Peng, Feng; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao

    2018-03-01

    The direct methanol fuel cell is a promising energy conversion device because of the utilization of the state-of-the-art platinum (Pt) anode catalyst. In this work, novel Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalysts were prepared by the H2 reduction method. It was found that the activity and stability of Pt for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) could be significantly enhanced while using nickel phosphide (Ni2P) nanoparticles as co-catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the existence of Ni2P affected the particle size and electronic distribution of Pt obviously. Pt/CNTs catalyst, Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalysts with different Ni2P amount were synthesized, among which Pt/6%Ni2P/CNTs catalyst exhibited the best MOR activity of 1400 mAmg-1Pt, which was almost 2.5 times of the commercial Pt/C-JM catalyst. Moreover, compared to other Pt-based catalysts, this novel Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalyst also exhibited higher onset current density and better steady current density. The result of this work may provide positive guidance to the research on high efficiency and stability of Pt-based catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  8. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-10-07

    Ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material's structure. Core-shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core-shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  9. Half-sandwich nickel(II complexes bearing 1,3-di(cycloalkylimidazol-2-ylidene ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathon Yau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two new nickel catalysts have been prepared using a convenient procedure where nickelocene, the NHC·HBF4 salts, and [Et4N]Cl were heated in THF using microwave irradiation. The resulting [NiCl(Cp(NHC] complexes are air- and moisture stable in the solid state, and represent two new members of this valuable and practical class of nickel catalysts. The new species were fully characterised using methods including NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. When tested in model Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions, these complexes were found to be active for the cross-coupling of aryl bromides and aryl chlorides.

  10. Characterization of catalysts Rh and Ni/Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} for hydrogen production by ethanol steam reforming; Caracterisation de catalyseurs Rhodium et Nickel/ Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} pour la production d'hydrogene par vaporeformage de l'ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birot, A

    2005-07-01

    This work concerned a study on catalytic behaviour of metallic catalysts (Rh or Ni) supported on earth rare oxides Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} in ethanol steam reforming in order to produce hydrogen. Catalyst 1%Rh/Ce0,50Zr0,50O{sub 2} showed a good activity with a good hydrogen yield. We turned a study onto understanding inter-conversion reaction between H{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} which lead to CH{sub 4} formation. We also studied intrinsic properties of catalysts. We confirmed basic character of catalysts and a good hydrogenation activity. A good activity in CO hydrogenation allowed to evidence a necessity to use a catalyst which is less active in hydrogenation reaction and with a basic character in order to improve hydrogen yield. (author)

  11. Controlling thin film structure for the dewetting of catalyst nanoparticle arrays for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randolph, S J; Fowlkes, J D; Melechko, A V; Klein, K L; III, H M Meyer; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D

    2007-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) growth is a catalytic chemical vapor deposition process in which structure and functionality is controlled by the plasma conditions and the properties of the catalyst nanoparticles that template the fiber growth. We have found that the resultant catalyst nanoparticle network that forms by the dewetting of a continuous catalyst thin film is dependent on the initial properties of the thin film. Here we report the ability to tailor the crystallographic texture and composition of the nickel catalyst film and subsequently the nanoparticle template by varying the rf magnetron sputter deposition conditions. After sputtering the Ni catalyst thin films, the films are heated and exposed to an ammonia dc plasma, to chemically reduce the native oxide on the films and induce dewetting of the film to form nanoparticles. Subsequent nanoparticle treatment in an acetylene plasma at high substrate temperature results in CNF growth. Evidence is presented that the texture and composition of the nickel thin film has a significant impact on the structure and composition of the formed nanoparticle, as well as the resultant CNF morphology. Nickel films with a preferred (111) or (100) texture were produced and conditions favoring interfacial silicidation reactions were identified and investigated. Both compositional and structural analysis of the films and nanoparticles indicate that the properties of the as-deposited Ni catalyst film influences the subsequent nanoparticle formation and ultimately the catalytic growth of the carbon nanofibers

  12. Aromatic hydrocarbon production via eucalyptus urophylla pyrolysis over several metal modified ZSM-5 catalysts – an analysis by py-GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by ion exchange of NH4ZSM-5 (SIO2/Al2O3 = 23) using gallium, molybdenum, nickel and zinc, and their combinations thereof. The prepared catalysts were used to evaluate catalytic pyrolysis for the conversion of Eucalyptus urophylla to fuels and chemicals, ...

  13. Dispersion of nano-nickel into γ-Al2O3 studied by positron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun Zhu; Wang, S.J.; Luo, X.H.

    2003-01-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured as a function of the content of the nano-nickel, of temperature, as well as of the heating time for the supported nano-nickel catalyst that was prepared by mechanical mixture nano-metal nickel particles with gamma-alumina (γ-Al 2 O 3 ). The lifetime spectra were well resolved into four lifetime components. The longest lifetime τ 4 was assigned to ortho-positronium annihilating in the secondary pore of the γ-Al 2 O 3 . The results showed that part of the nano-nickel had entered into γ-Al 2 O 3 by thermal diffusion at heating above 200 deg. C and had interacted with the face of the γ-Al 2 O 3 , but the length of diffusion is not very large

  14. Dispersion of nano-nickel into γ-Al 2O 3 studied by positron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Zhu; Wang, S. J.; Luo, X. H.

    2003-10-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured as a function of the content of the nano-nickel, of temperature, as well as of the heating time for the supported nano-nickel catalyst that was prepared by mechanical mixture nano-metal nickel particles with gamma-alumina ( γ-Al 2O 3). The lifetime spectra were well resolved into four lifetime components. The longest lifetime τ4 was assigned to ortho-positronium annihilating in the secondary pore of the γ-Al 2O 3. The results showed that part of the nano-nickel had entered into γ-Al 2O 3 by thermal diffusion at heating above 200°C and had interacted with the face of the γ-Al 2O 3, but the length of diffusion is not very large.

  15. Strategies for improving the performance and stability of Ni-based catalysts for reforming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuirong; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-11-07

    Owing to the considerable publicity that has been given to petroleum related economic, environmental, and political problems, renewed attention has been focused on the development of highly efficient and stable catalytic materials for the production of chemical/fuel from renewable resources. Supported nickel nanoclusters are widely used for catalytic reforming reactions, which are key processes for generating synthetic gas and/or hydrogen. New challenges were brought out by the extension of feedstock from hydrocarbons to oxygenates derivable from biomass, which could minimize the environmental impact of carbonaceous fuels and allow a smooth transition from fossil fuels to a sustainable energy economy. This tutorial review describes the recent efforts made toward the development of nickel-based catalysts for the production of hydrogen from oxygenated hydrocarbons via steam reforming reactions. In general, three challenges facing the design of Ni catalysts should be addressed. Nickel nanoclusters are apt to sinter under catalytic reforming conditions of high temperatures and in the presence of steam. Severe carbon deposition could also be observed on the catalyst if the surface carbon species adsorbed on metal surface are not removed in time. Additionally, the production of hydrogen rich gas with a low concentration of CO is a challenge using nickel catalysts, which are not so active in the water gas shift reaction. Accordingly, three strategies were presented to address these challenges. First, the methodologies for the preparation of highly dispersed nickel catalysts with strong metal-support interaction were discussed. A second approach-the promotion in the mobility of the surface oxygen-is favored for the yield of desired products while promoting the removal of surface carbon deposition. Finally, the process intensification via the in situ absorption of CO2 could produce a hydrogen rich gas with low CO concentration. These approaches could also guide the design

  16. Carbon deposition on nickel ferrites and nickel-magnetite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Jutson, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    Carbon deposition on Commercial Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (CAGR) fuel cladding and heat exchanger surfaces lowers heat transfer efficiency and increases fuel pin temperatures. Several types of deposit have been identified including both thin dense layers and also low density columnar deposits with filamentary or convoluted laminar structure. The low-density types are often associated with particles containing iron, nickel or manganese. To identify the role of nickel in the deposition process surfaces composed of nickel-iron spinels or metallic nickel/magnetite mixtures have been exposed to γ radiation in a gas environment simulating that in the reactor. Examination of these surfaces by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown that while metallic nickel (Ni(O)) catalyses the formation of filamentary low density carbon deposits, the presence of divalent nickel (Ni(II)) sites in spinel type oxides is associated only with dense deposits. (author)

  17. Nickel hydrogen/nickel cadmium battery trade studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnick, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen cell and battery technology has matured to the point where a real choice exists between Nickel Hydrogen and Nickel Cadmium batteries for each new spacecraft application. During the past few years, a number of spacecraft programs have been evaluated at Hughes with respect to this choice, with the results being split about fifty-fifty. The following paragraphs contain criteria which were used in making the battery selection.

  18. Nickel ferrule applicators: a source of nickel exposure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Rizk, Christopher; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Eye makeup has been investigated for nickel content and found to have no direct association with nickel allergy and cosmetic dermatitis. However, the tools used (e.g., eyelash curlers, hairdressing scissors, hair curlers, and eye shadow and makeup applicators) may be sources. Nickel is ubiquitous and a wide range of sources have been reported, and makeup applicators (ferrules) now join the list. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Adsorption and bio-sorption of nickel ions and reuse for 2-chlorophenol catalytic ozonation oxidation degradation from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wei; Zong, Panpan; Cheng, Zihong; Wang, Baodong; Sun, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomass and fly ash which were widespread for adsorption of heavy metal ions. • Preparation of catalyst by saturated adsorbents for 2-chlorophenol ozone degradation. • This work demonstrated that the O 3 /catalyst process was an effective pathway. • The use of nickel ions, fly ash and sawdust to achieve the recycling utilization of resources. -- Abstract: This work explored the preparation of an effective and low-cost catalyst and investigated its catalytic capacity for 2-chlorophenol ozonation oxidation degradation in wastewater by using an ozone oxidation batch reactor. The catalyst was directly prepared by the reuse of fly ash and sawdust after saturated adsorption of nickel ions from wastewater, which was proposed as an efficient and economic approach. The obtained catalyst was characterized by TGA, BET, FTIR, XRD, and SEM, the results showed that fly ash as the basic framework has high specific surface area and the addition of sawdust as the porogen agent could improve the pore structure of the catalyst. The adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and sawdust from aqueous solution was also investigated in this study. The results obtained from the experiments indicated that adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and biomass sawdust could be well described by Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. The catalytic performance of catalyst was studied in terms of the effect of time, liquid–solid ratio and pH on 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation. It was found that the catalyst could effectively improve the ozonation reaction rate at pH = 7 with a 2:1 liquid–solid ratio. The kinetic study demonstrated that the reaction followed the first order model, and the rate constant increased 267% (0.03–0.1 min −1 ) of 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation with 5 mmol/L concentration at pH = 7.0 compared with ozonation alone

  20. Adsorption and bio-sorption of nickel ions and reuse for 2-chlorophenol catalytic ozonation oxidation degradation from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wei, E-mail: chmawv@yahoo.com [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zong, Panpan; Cheng, Zihong [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Baodong; Sun, Qi [National Institute of Clean-and-low Carbon Energy, Beijing 102209 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Biomass and fly ash which were widespread for adsorption of heavy metal ions. • Preparation of catalyst by saturated adsorbents for 2-chlorophenol ozone degradation. • This work demonstrated that the O{sub 3}/catalyst process was an effective pathway. • The use of nickel ions, fly ash and sawdust to achieve the recycling utilization of resources. -- Abstract: This work explored the preparation of an effective and low-cost catalyst and investigated its catalytic capacity for 2-chlorophenol ozonation oxidation degradation in wastewater by using an ozone oxidation batch reactor. The catalyst was directly prepared by the reuse of fly ash and sawdust after saturated adsorption of nickel ions from wastewater, which was proposed as an efficient and economic approach. The obtained catalyst was characterized by TGA, BET, FTIR, XRD, and SEM, the results showed that fly ash as the basic framework has high specific surface area and the addition of sawdust as the porogen agent could improve the pore structure of the catalyst. The adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and sawdust from aqueous solution was also investigated in this study. The results obtained from the experiments indicated that adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and biomass sawdust could be well described by Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. The catalytic performance of catalyst was studied in terms of the effect of time, liquid–solid ratio and pH on 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation. It was found that the catalyst could effectively improve the ozonation reaction rate at pH = 7 with a 2:1 liquid–solid ratio. The kinetic study demonstrated that the reaction followed the first order model, and the rate constant increased 267% (0.03–0.1 min{sup −1}) of 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation with 5 mmol/L concentration at pH = 7.0 compared with ozonation alone.

  1. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  2. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel based alloy, the characteristic of which is that it mainly includes in percentages by weight: 57-63 Ni, 7-18 Cr, 10-20 Fe, 4-6 Mo, 1-2 Nb, 0.2-0.8 Si, 0.01-0.05 Zr, 1.0-2.5 Ti, 1.0-2.5 Al, 0.02-0.06 C and 0.002-0.015 B. The aim is to create new nickel-chromium alloys, hardened in a solid solution and by precipitation, that are stable, exhibit reduced swelling and resistant to plastic deformation inside the reactor. These alloys of the gamma prime type have improved mechanical strengthm swelling resistance, structural stability and welding properties compared with Inconel 625 [fr

  3. Nickel accumulation by Hybanthus floribundus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severne, B C

    1974-04-26

    Several ecotypes of Hybanthus floribundus are found across the southern part of Australia. However, the three nickel accumulating ecotypes are restricted to a broad belt in Western Australia. Nickel concentrations in this shrub were observed to decrease southwards (from 8000 to 1000 p.p.m.) as the annual rainfall increased from 7 inches to more than 30 inches. Studies have shown that nickel concentrations increase from the roots through the rootstock, into the stems and reach maximum towards the leaf tips. High nickel concentrations are also seen in seed capsules (1500 p.p.m.), seeds (2000 p.p.m.) and flowers. The maximum nickel concentration recorded is 1.6% (26% nickel in ash) in mature leaf tissue. 16 references, 2 tables.

  4. Effects of adding lanthanum to Ni/ZrO2 catalysts on ethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profeti, Luciene Paula Roberto; Habitzheuter, Filipe; Assaf, Elisabete Moreira

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic performance of Ni/ZrO 2 catalysts loaded with different lanthanum content for steam reforming of ethanol was investigated. Catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction, and X-ray absorption fine structure techniques. Results showed that lanthanum addition led to an increase in the degree of reduction of both NiO and nickel surface species interacting with the support, due to the higher dispersion effect. The best catalytic performance at 450 deg C was found for the Ni/12LZ catalyst, which exhibited an effluent gaseous mixture with the highest H 2 yield. (author)

  5. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  6. Rapid accurate analysis of metal (oxide)-on-silica catalysts by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jütte, B.A.H.G.; Heikamp, A.; Agterdenbos, J.

    1979-01-01

    The catalysts, which contain 10–60% copper, chromium, nickel and silicon, are decomposed in sealed Teflon-lined vessels and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Matrix matching and bracketing standards are applied. The RSD of a single determination is about 1% for all components.

  7. Studies on the promotion of nickel—alumina coprecipitated catalysts: III. Cerium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Slaa, J.C.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Three series of cerium-promoted nickel—alumina catalysts with different nickel-to-aluminium ratios each containing different amounts of cerium have been prepared and characterized. The calcination and reduction behaviour were found not to be altered by the presence of cerium. Part of the promoter

  8. Studies on the promotion of nickel—alumina coprecipitated catalysts: II. Lanthanum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Paalman, R.P.A.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two series of lanthanum promoted nickel—alumina catalysts have been prepared by coprecipitation of the metal nitrates, using potassium carbonate. The molar ratio between nickel and the sum of aluminium and lanthanum was kept constant at 2.5 or 9.0 within each series. The calcination and reduction of

  9. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  10. Metal catalysts fight back

    OpenAIRE

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  11. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  12. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  13. More active and sulfur resistant bimetallic Pd-Ni catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betti, Carolina; Carrara, Nicolás; Badano, Juan; Lederhos, Cecilia; Vera, Carlos; Quiroga, Mónica, E-mail: mquiroga@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catálisis y Petroquímica, INCAPE (FIQ-UNL, CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2018-02-15

    The influence of the kind of metal precursor and the sequence of impregnation on the properties of Pd-Ni catalysts was evaluated during the test reaction of selective hydrogenation of styrene to ethylbenzene by means of physicochemical characterization. The focus was put on the final hydrogenating activity and the resistance to deactivation by sulfide compounds (thiophene). The used techniques of characterization were ICP, XPS, XDR, TPR, CO chemisorption and TEM. XPS results indicated the presence of different Pd species: Pd{sup δ-}, Pd{sup 0} and Pd{sup δ+}. In the case of the Ni containing catalysts, Ni{sup 0} and NiO species were also detected. These palladium and nickel species would be responsible of the variation of activity and sulfur resistance of the catalysts. NiClPd catalysts had a higher resistance to deactivation by sulfur poisoning. This was associated to a higher concentration of Pd{sup η+}Cl{sub x}O{sub y} species that would prevent the adsorption of thiophene by both steric and electronic effects. It could also be due to the lower concentration of Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} on these catalysts, as compared to those shown by the PdNiCl catalysts. Both the Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} species are more prone to poisoning because of their higher electronic availability. (author)

  14. Sodium borohydride hydrogen generator using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for 200 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Taek Hyun; Gang, Byeong Gyu; Kim, Hyuntak; Kwon, Sejin

    2015-01-01

    The response characteristics of electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for sodium borohydride hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of nickel foam geometry on the properties of the catalysts was evaluated. As the PPI (pores per inch) of the nickel foam increased, the hydrogen generation rate per gram of the deposited catalyst increased due to an increase in surface area. The response characteristics of various catalysts were compared under real operating conditions. When a thin nickel foam with high PPI was used, the response characteristics of the catalyst improved due to an increase in the amount of the deposited catalyst and surface area. Finally, a 200 W PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system using electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst was investigated. The response time to reach a hydrogen generation rate sufficient for a 200 W PEMFC was 71 s, and the energy density of a 200 W fuel cell system for producing 600 Wh was 252.1 Wh/kg. A fuel cell system using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts can be widely used as a power source for mobile applications due to fast response characteristics and high energy density. - Highlights: • Response characteristics of Co–P/Ni foam catalysts are investigated. • Catalytic activity is improved with increase in PPI (pores per inch) of Ni foam. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst has improved response characteristics. • The energy density of a 200 W PEMFC system for producing 600 Wh is 252.1 Wh/kg. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst is suitable for fuel cell system.

  15. Ultrasonic preparation of nano-nickel/activated carbon composite using spent electroless nickel plating bath and application in degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingyu; Jin, Guanping; Li, Changyong; Zhu, Xiaohui; Dou, Yan; Li, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Kunwei; Gu, Qianqian

    2014-11-01

    Ni was effectively recovered from spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by forming a nano-nickel coated activated carbon composite. With the aid of ultrasonication, melamine-formaldehyde-tetraoxalyl-ethylenediamine chelating resins were grafted on activated carbon (MFT/AC). PdCl2 sol was adsorbed on MFT/AC, which was then immersed in spent electroless nickel plating bath; then nano-nickel could be reduced by ascorbic acid to form a nano-nickel coating on the activated carbon composite (Ni/AC) in situ. The materials present were carefully examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemistry techniques. The resins were well distributed on the inside and outside surfaces of activated carbon with a size of 120 ± 30 nm in MFT/AC, and a great deal of nano-nickel particles were evenly deposited with a size of 3.8 ± 1.1 nm in Ni/MFT. Moreover, Ni/AC was successfully used as a catalyst for ultrasonic degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predic...

  17. Metal leaching from refinery waste hydroprocessing catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafi, Meena; Rana, Mohan S

    2018-05-18

    The present study aims to develop an eco-friendly methodology for the recovery of nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V) from the refinery waste spent hydroprocessing catalyst. The proposed process has two stages: the first stage is to separate alumina, while the second stage involves the separation of metal compounds. The effectiveness of leaching agents, such as NH 4 OH, (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 , and (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 , for the extraction of Mo, V, Ni, and Al from the refinery spent catalyst has been reported as a function of reagent concentration (0.5 to 2.0 molar), leaching time (1 to 6 h), and temperature (35 to 60°C). The optimal leaching conditions were achieved to obtain the maximum recovery of Mo, Ni, and V metals. The effect of the mixture of multi-ammonium salts on the metal extraction was also studied, which showed an adverse effect for Ni and V, while marginal improvement was observed for Mo leaching. The ammonium salts can form soluble metal complexes, in which stability or solubility depends on the nature of ammonium salt and the reaction conditions. The extracted metals and support can be reused to synthesize a fresh hydroprocessing catalyst. The process will reduce the refinery waste and recover the expensive metals. Therefore, the process is not only important from an environmental point of view but also vital from an economic perspective.

  18. Study on the production of alternative fuels by carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Kyu Sung; Han, Sang Do; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Youn Soon; Seo, Ji Mi [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The technologies of the fuel production from carbon dioxide by catalytic hydrogenation were surveyed. For the catalytic hydrogenation we made the lab-scale reaction apparatus and carried out some experiments with various catalysts like CuO/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Raney nickel and other commercial catalysts. In this year, the third year of the project, the experiments to find optimum catalysts and obtain the good conditions of carbon dioxide were performed followed by second year. And also the processes of the methanol synthesis was investigated simultaneously. (author). 58 refs., 58 figs., 28 tabs.

  19. Field emission of carbon nanotubes grown on nickel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yemin; Huo Kaifu; Chen Hong; Lu Yinong; Xu Li; Hu Zheng; Chen Yi

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized directly on the electrically conducting nickel substrate without additional catalyst. Field emission properties of the as-prepared sample were characterized using parallel plate diode configurations. It was observed that the field emission qualitatively follows the conventional Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory from the straight line of ln(I/V 2 ) versus 1/V plot at the high applied field region. The uniformity and stability of the electron emission have also been examined. The low electron turn-on field (E to ) and high emission current density indicates the potential applications of this new CNT-based emitter

  20. Electrolytic Recovery of Nickel from Spent Electroless Nickel Bath Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Idhayachander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plating industry is one of the largest polluting small scale industries and nickel plating is among the important surface finishing process in this industry. The waste generated during this operation contains toxic nickel. Nickel removal and recovery is of great interest from spent bath for environmental and economic reasons. Spent electroless nickel solution from a reed relay switch manufacturing industry situated in Chennai was taken for electrolytic recovery of nickel. Electrolytic experiment was carried out with mild steel and gold coated mild steel as cathode and the different parameters such as current density, time, mixing and pH of the solution were varied and recovery and current efficiency was studied. It was noticed that there was an increase in current efficiency up to 5 A/dm2 and after that it declines. There is no significant improvement with mixing but with modified cathode there was some improvement. Removal of nickel from the spent electroless nickel bath was 81.81% at 5 A/dm2 and pH 4.23. Under this condition, the content of nickel was reduced to 0.94 g/L from 5.16 g/L. with 62.97% current efficiency.

  1. Recovery of Ni Metal from Spent Catalyst with Emulsion Liquid Membrane Using Cyanex 272 as Extractant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Huda, M.; Ramadhan, I. T.; Farry, A. R.; Wulandari, P. T.; Alfia, R.

    2018-03-01

    In this study was conducted to recover nickel metal from spent nickel catalyst resulting from hydrotreating process in petroleum industry. The nickel extraction study with the emulsion liquid membrane using Cyanex 272 as an extractant to extract and separate nickel from the feed phase solution. Feed phase solution was preapred from spent catalyst using sulphuric acid. Liquid membrane consists of a kerosene as diluent, a Span 80 as surfactant, a Cyanex 272 as carrier and sulphuric acid solutions have been used as the stripping solution. The important parameters governing the permeation of nickel and their effect on the separation process have been studied. These parameters are surfactant concentration, extractant concentration feed phase pH. The optimum conditions of the emulsion membrane making process is using 0.06 M Cyanex 272, 8% w/v SPAN 80, 0.05 M H2SO4, internal phase extractant / phase volume ratio: 1/1, and stirring speed 1150 rpm for 60 Minute that can produce emulsion membrane with stability level above 90% after 4 hours. In the extraction process with optimum condition pH 6 for feed phase, ratio of phase emulsion/phase of feed: 1/2, and stirring speed 175 rpm for 15 minutes with result 81.51% nickel was extracted.

  2. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  3. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  4. Effect of mechanical activation on the interaction of nickel and molybdenum oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, E.D.; Chukin, G.D.; Irisova, K.N.; Mikhailov, V.I.; Nefedov, B.K.; Samgina, T.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the interaction in mixtures of ammonium paramolybdate and nickel nitrate, subjected to mechanochemical activation, by the methods of Raman scattering of light (RS) and derivatography. The ratios of the components NiO:MoO 3 , obtained by decomposition of the starting ammonium paramolybdate and nickel nitrate, encountered most often in catalysts of hydrogenation processes are presented. The RS spectra of the mechanochemically activated samples differ little from one another. With thermal treatment the amount of the MoO 3 phase relative to P-NiMoO 4 is higher than in samples not subjected to mechanochemical activation

  5. Influence of iron doping on tetravalent nickel content in catalytic oxygen evolving films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nancy; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Hadt, Ryan G.; Hayes, Dugan; Kempa, Thomas J.; von Cube, Felix; Bell, David C.; Chen, Lin X.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2017-01-30

    Iron doping of nickel oxide films results in enhanced activity for promoting the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Whereas this enhanced activity has been ascribed to a unique iron site within the nickel oxide matrix, we show here that Fe doping influences the Ni valency. The percent of Fe3+ doping promotes the formation of formal Ni4+, which in turn directly correlates with an enhanced activity of the catalyst in promoting OER. The role of Fe3+ is consistent with its behavior as a superior Lewis acid.

  6. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  7. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  8. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  9. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  10. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  11. Point defects in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.

    1969-01-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I B (31 deg. K), I C (42 deg. K), I D (from to 57 deg. K) and I E (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I B the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I D it is near the direction from the vacancy. In stage I E there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II B (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III A (370 deg. K) and III B (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [fr

  12. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki-Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a "green" alcohol solvent. The…

  14. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  15. Allergic contact dermatitis due to nickel in household detergent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Utami Putri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD is a cutaneous inflammatory reaction caused by contact with specific exogenous allergen to which a person has developed allergic sensitization. Nickel was reported as one of the most common causes of ACD worldwide, particularly affecting females. It is associated with a variety of nickel-containing products, from jewelry to detergent. A 32-year-old female was presented with pruritic eruption consist of erythematous papules and vesicles on both hands and extensor forearms since 2 weeks before admission. The patient is a housewife who did handwashing clothes and kitchenware with detergent and soap every day. At first, there were erythematous papules on the right extensor forearm, then the patient wore rubber gloves to protect hands when washing. However, the lesions spread to the left extensor forearm and there were also vesicles on both hands. There was history of localized reactions to metal items, the latter one was 3 weeks ago after wearing a metal necklace. The clinical presentation were multiple erythematous papules and vesicles, erythematous and hyperpigmented macules. The patch test using Chemotechnique Diagnostics AB and square chamber showed a 2+ reaction to nickel sulfate. The patient was educated to avoid the causative allergen and treated with oral antihistamine and topical corticosteroid. The patient showed significant clinical improvement after 2 weeks. Nickel as metal catalyst used in detergents is found in small concentration, but can lead to ACD in an already sensitized individual.The lesions persist despite the use of gloves because nickel is absorbed through rubber materia

  16. Characterization of composite metal-ceramic of nickel-oxide cerium doped gadolinium; Caracterizacao de compositos ceramica-metal de niquel e oxido de cerio dopado com gadolinio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.L.A. da, E-mail: maria.andrade@pro.unifacs.br [Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), BA (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia, Arquitetura e TI; Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil); Varela, M.C.R.S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Composite nickel doped cerium oxide are used in SOFC anode materials. In this study we evaluated the effect of the presence of gadolinium on the properties of composite nickel and ceria and. The supports were synthesized by sol-gel method. The impregnation with nickel nitrate was taken sequentially, followed by calcination. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, measurement of specific surface area, temperature programmed reduction, Raman spectroscopy. The presence of gadolinium retained the fluorite structure of ceria by forming a solid solution, also not influencing significantly on the specific surface area of the support. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the area catalysts, which can be attributed to sintering of nickel. Furthermore, addition of gadolinium favored the formation of intrinsic and extrinsic vacancies in cerium oxide, which leads to an increase in the ionic conductivity of the solid, desirable property for an SOFC anode catalyst. (author)

  17. Stability, carbon resistance, and reactivity toward autothermal reforming of nickel on ceria-based supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutthisripok, W.; Laosiripojana, N.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) normally requires a reformer unit, where the fuel such as natural gas, methane, methanol, or ethanol can be reformed to hydrogen before introducing to the main part of fuel cell. Nickel on commercial supports such as Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2 has been widely reported to be used as the reforming catalyst commercially. Carbon formation and catalyst deactivation are always the main problems of using this type of catalyst. It is well established that CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 have been applied as the catalysts in a wide variety of reactions involving oxidation or partial oxidation of hydrocarbons (e.g. automotive catalysis). In order to quantify the performance of nickel on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports for reformer application, the stabilities toward methane steam reforming and the carbon formation resistance were studied. After 18 hours, nickel on CeO2-ZrO2 with the Ce/Zr ratio of 3/1 presented the best performance in term of stability and activity. It also provided excellent resistance toward carbon formation compared to commercial Ni/Al2O3. The autothermal reforming of methane over Ni catalyst on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports were also investigated. Ni/Ce-ZrO2 with the Ce/ Zr ratio of 3/1 also showed the best performance. The kinetics of this reaction was also studied. In the temperature range of 750-900C, the reaction order in methane was always closed to 1. The catalyst showed a slight positive effect of hydrogen and a negative effect of steam on the steam reforming rate. The addition of oxygen increased the steam reforming rate. However, the productions of CO and H2 decreased with increasing oxygen partial pressure. (author)

  18. Application of sodium carbonate prevents sulphur poisoning of catalysts in automated total mercury analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Huang, Haiyong; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank; Mitchell, Carl P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Analysis of high sulphur-containing samples for total mercury content using automated thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectroscopy instruments (USEPA Method 7473) leads to rapid and costly SO2 poisoning of catalysts. In an effort to overcome this issue, we tested whether the addition of powdered sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the catalyst and/or directly on top of sample material increases throughput of sulphur-impregnated (8-15 wt%) activated carbon samples per catalyst tube. Adding 5 g of Na2CO3 to the catalyst alone only marginally increases the functional lifetime of the catalyst (31 ± 4 g of activated carbon analyzed per catalyst tube) in relation to unaltered catalyst of the AMA254 total mercury analyzer (17 ± 4 g of activated carbon). Adding ≈ 0.2 g of Na2CO3 to samples substantially increases (81 ± 17 g of activated carbon) catalyst life over the unaltered catalyst. The greatest improvement is achieved by adding Na2CO3 to both catalyst and samples (200 ± 70 g of activated carbon), which significantly increases catalyst performance over all other treatments and enables an order of magnitude greater sample throughput than the unaltered samples and catalyst. It is likely that Na2CO3 efficiently sequesters SO2, even at high furnace temperatures to produce Na2SO4 and CO2, largely negating the poisonous impact of SO2 on the catalyst material. Increased corrosion of nickel sampling boats resulting from this methodological variation is easily resolved by substituting quartz boats. Overall, this variation enables an efficient and significantly more affordable means of employing automated atomic absorption spectrometry instruments for total mercury analysis of high-sulphur matrices.

  19. Life Support Catalyst Regeneration Using Ionic Liquids and In Situ Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Karr, Laurel; Paley, Mark S.; Donovan, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen recovery from metabolic carbon dioxide is an enabling capability for long-duration manned space flight. Complete recovery of oxygen (100%) involves the production of solid carbon. Catalytic approaches for this purpose, such as Bosch technology, have been limited in trade analyses due in part to the mass penalty for high catalyst resupply caused by carbon fouling of the iron or nickel catalyst. In an effort to mitigate this challenge, several technology approaches have been proposed. These approaches have included methods to prolong the life of the catalysts by increasing the total carbon mass loading per mass catalyst, methods for simplified catalyst introduction and removal to limit the resupply container mass, methods of using in situ resources, and methods to regenerate catalyst material. Research and development into these methods is ongoing, but only use of in situ resources and/or complete regeneration of catalyst material has the potential to entirely eliminate the need for resupply. The use of ionic liquids provides an opportunity to combine these methods in a technology approach designed to eliminate the need for resupply of oxygen recovery catalyst. Here we describe the results of an initial feasibility study using ionic liquids and in situ resources for life support catalyst regeneration, we discuss the key challenges with the approach, and we propose future efforts to advance the technology.

  20. Electron beam application for regeneration of catalysts used in refinery cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Fernando Mantovani; Duarte, Celina Lopes; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Salvador, Vera Lucia Ribeiro; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo

    2013-01-01

    A catalyst is a substance that alters the rate of a reaction. The process of catalysis is essential to the modern day manufacturing industry, mainly in Fluid Catalytic Cracking Process (FCC) units. However, long-term exploitation of oil and gas processing catalysts leads to formation of carbon-and sulfur-containing structures of coke and dense products on the catalyst surface. They block reactive catalyst sites and reduce the catalytic activity. The main advantage of radiation processing by electron beam (EB) and gamma rays is chain cracking reaction in crude oil. Otherwise, under exposure to ionic radiation, considerable structure modification of equilibrium silica-alumina catalyst from FCC process may occur, in addition to the removal of impurities. The conditions applied in the irradiation range (20-150 kGy) of gamma rays and electron beam were not sufficient to alter the structure of the catalyst, whether for removal of the contaminant nickel, a major contaminant of the FCC catalyst, either to rupture of the crystalline structure either for the future reutilization of chemical elements. Attenuated Total Reflectance - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRFS) analysis were used to characterize and evaluate effects of radiation processing on equilibrium catalysts purification. To evaluate and comprehend the reactive catalyst sites, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and particle size distribution analyses were carried out. (author)

  1. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  2. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  3. Nickel Excretion in Urine after Oral Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Mikkelsen, H. I.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1978-01-01

    In recent years the importance of internal exposure to nickel in patients with recurrent hand eczema and nickel allergy has become evident. The present study was performed in order to investigate the value of urinary nickel determinations as an index of oral nickel intake. After oral administration...

  4. Engineering New Catalysts for In-Process Elimination of Tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Larry G. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The key objective of this project was to develop a new and more efficient methodology for engineering and economically producing optimized robust catalysts for the reduction or elimination of tars in biomass gasification. Whereas current catalyst technology typically disposes thin layers of catalytically-active material onto rigid supports via wet chemistry-based methods, this project investigated novel thermal methods for directly incorporating catalytically active materials onto robust supports as well as novel approaches for incorporating catalytically active materials on and/or within an otherwise inert refractory support material which is then subsequently formed and processed to create a catalytically-active material on all exposed surfaces. Specifically, the focus of this engineered catalyst development was on materials which were derived from, or otherwise related to, olivine-like minerals, due to the inherent attrition resistance and moderate catalytic properties exhibited by natural olivine when used in a fluidized bed biomass gasifier. Task 1 of this project successfully demonstrated the direct thermal impregnation of catalytically-active materials onto an olivine substrate, with the production of a Ni-olivine catalyst. Nickel and nickel oxide were thermally impregnated onto an olivine substrate and when reduced were shown to demonstrate improved catalytic activity over the baseline olivine material and equal the tar-decomposing performance of Ni-olivine catalysts prepared by conventional wet impregnation. Task 2 involved coordination with our subcontracted project partners to further develop and characterize catalyst formulations and to optimize activity and production methods. Within this task, several significant new materials were developed. NexTech Materials developed a sintered ceramic nickel-magnesium-silicate catalyst that demonstrated superb catalytic activity and high resistance to deactivation by H2S. Alfred University developed both supported

  5. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  6. Nickel aggregates produced by radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignier, J.L.; Belloni, J.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel aggregates with subcolloidal size and stable in water have been synthesized by inhibiting the corrosion by the medium. The protective effect of the surfactant is discussed in relation with the characteristics of various types of polyvinyl alcohol studied. The reactivity of aggregates towards oxidizing compounds, nitro blue tetrazolium, methylene blue, silver ions, oxygen, methylviologen, enables an estimation of the redox potential of nickel aggregates (E = - 04 ± 0.05 V). It has been applied to quantitative analysis of the particles in presence of nickel ions. 55 refs [fr

  7. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Macomber, Lee; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological co...

  8. Respiratory carcinogenicity assessment of soluble nickel compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Oller, Adriana R

    2002-01-01

    The many chemical forms of nickel differ in physicochemical properties and biological effects. Health assessments for each main category of nickel species are needed. The carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds has proven particularly difficult. Epidemiologic evidence indicates an association between inhalation exposures to nickel refinery dust containing soluble nickel compounds and increased risk of respiratory cancers. However, the nature of this association is unclear...

  9. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in nickel and in nickel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Lorber, A.; Harel, A.

    1981-11-01

    Various spectrochemical methods are described for the quantitative determination of 23 impurities in metallic nickel and in nickel oxide. The average limit of detection is from 1 to 5 ppm and the dynamic range lies over 2.5 orders of magnitude. The elements that were determined are: Al,B,Ba,Bi,Ca,Cd,Co,Cu,Fe,Ga,Ge,In,Mg,Mn,Mo,Nb,Si,Sn,Sr,Ti,Cr,V. (author)

  10. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  11. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  12. Removing nickel from nickel-coated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardianto, A.; Hertleer, C.; De Mey, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Conductive fibers/yarns are one of the most important materials for smart textiles because of their electrically conductive functionality combined with flexibility and light weight. They can be applied in many fields such as the medical sector, electronics, sensors and even as thermoelectric generators. Temperature sensors, for example, can be made using the thermocouple or thermopile principle which usually uses two different metal wires that can produce a temperature-dependent voltage. However, if metal wires are inserted into a textile structure, they will decrease the flexibility properties of the textile product. Nickel-coated Carbon Fiber (NiCF), a conductive textile yarn, has a potential use as a textile-based thermopile if we can create an alternating region of carbon and nickel along the fiber which in turn it can be used for substituting the metallic thermopile. The idea was to remove nickel from NiCF in order to obtain a yarn that contains alternating zones of carbon and nickel. Due to no literature reporting on how to remove nickel from NiCF, in this paper we investigated some chemicals to remove nickel from NiCF.

  13. Catalytic role of nickel in the decarbonylative addition of phthalimides to alkynes

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2013-11-11

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the catalytic role of nickel(0) in the decarbonylative addition of phthalimides to alkynes. According to Kurahashi et al. the plausible reaction mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack of nickel at an imide group, giving a six-membered metallacycle, followed by a decarbonylation and insertion of an alkyne leading to a seven-membered metallacycle. Finally a reductive elimination process produces the desired product and regenerates the nickel(0) catalyst. In this paper, we present a full description of the complete reaction pathway along with possible alternative pathways, which are predicted to display higher upper barriers. Our computational results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Catalytic role of nickel in the decarbonylative addition of phthalimides to alkynes

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Cavallo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the catalytic role of nickel(0) in the decarbonylative addition of phthalimides to alkynes. According to Kurahashi et al. the plausible reaction mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack of nickel at an imide group, giving a six-membered metallacycle, followed by a decarbonylation and insertion of an alkyne leading to a seven-membered metallacycle. Finally a reductive elimination process produces the desired product and regenerates the nickel(0) catalyst. In this paper, we present a full description of the complete reaction pathway along with possible alternative pathways, which are predicted to display higher upper barriers. Our computational results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...... phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones....

  16. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones.......Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...

  17. Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Yvette B.; Mccall, Kurt E.

    1992-01-01

    The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System-2, or 'NICBES-2', which was used by the NASA HST six-battery testbed, was subsequently converted into the Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System, or 'NICHES'. Accounts are presently given of this conversion process and future uses being contemplated for NICHES. NICHES will calculate orbital summary data at the end of each orbit, and store these files for trend analyses and rules-generation.

  18. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  19. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Tar Model Compound with Various Bio-Char Catalysts to Recycle Char from Biomass Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmiao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tar and char can be regarded as unwanted byproducts during the gasification process. In this study, three types of catalyst, i.e., biomass char (bio-char, nickel supported on biomass (Ni+bio-char, and nickel supported on bio-char (bio-char+Ni, were studied to compare the catalytic effects of different preparation methods on tar model compound removal. The structural characteristics of the three catalysts were also investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET methods. The results revealed that Ni+bio-char catalyst showed much higher activity for the reformation of toluene (C7H8 as a tar model compound than the other two catalysts. Toluene could be completely converted to small gas molecules at a conversion rate of 99.92% at 800 °C, and the maximum yield of gas was 432 mL/(mL C7H8. In particular, the H2 and CH4 yields were 339 and 85 mL/(mL C7H8 at 850 °C, respectively. An N2 absorption-desorption experiment demonstrated that the specific surface area of Ni+bio-char was 32.87 times that of bio-char and 8.39 times that of bio-char+Ni. Moreover, metallic nickel (Ni0 particles could be generated in the carbon matrix of Ni+bio-char catalyst. SEM analysis confirmed that the Ni+bio-char catalyst had a more porous structure. Nickel supported on biomass might be a promising catalyst for tar reformation because of its excellent catalytic activities.

  20. Biosorption of nickel with barley straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevannan, Ayyasamy; Mungroo, Rubeena; Niu, Catherine Hui

    2010-03-01

    Wastewater containing nickel sulphate generated from a nickel plating industry is of great concern. In the present work, biosorption of nickel by barley straw from nickel sulphate solution was investigated. Nickel uptake at room temperature (23+/-0.5 degrees C) was very sensitive to solution pH, showing a better uptake value at a pH of 4.85+/-0.10 among the tested values. The nickel biosorption isotherm fitted well the Langmuir equation. When the ionic strength (IS) of the solution was increased from less than 0.02-0.6M, nickel uptake was reduced to 12% of that obtained at IS of less than 0.02 M. Barley straw showed a higher nickel uptake (0.61 mmol/g) than acid washed crab shells (0.04 mmol/g), demonstrating its potential as an adsorbent for removal of nickel. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ni-SiO2 Catalysts for the Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane: Varying Support Properties by Flame Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C. Lovell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica particles were prepared by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP as a support for nickel catalysts. The impact of precursor feed rate (3, 5 and 7 mL/min during FSP on the silica characteristics and the ensuing effect on catalytic performance for the carbon dioxide, or dry, reforming of methane (DRM was probed. Increasing the precursor feed rate: (i progressively lowered the silica surface area from ≈340 m2/g to ≈240 m2/g; (ii altered the silanol groups on the silica surface; and (iii introduced residual carbon-based surface species to the sample at the highest feed rate. The variations in silica properties altered the (5 wt % nickel deposit characteristics which in turn impacted on the DRM reaction. As the silica surface area increased, the nickel dispersion increased which improved catalyst performance. The residual carbon-based species also appeared to improve nickel dispersion, and in turn catalyst activity, although not to the same extent as the change in silica surface area. The findings illustrate both the importance of silica support characteristics on the catalytic performance of nickel for the DRM reaction and the capacity for using FSP to control these characteristics.

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NICKEL POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladmila Bojanic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is widely distributed in the environment. High consumption of nickel containing products inevitably leads to environmental pollution by nickel and its derivatives at all stages of production, utilization, and disposal.Human exposure to nickel occurs primarily via inhalation and ingestion and is particularly high among nickel metallurgy workers. In addition, implantation of nickel-containing endoprostheses and iatrogenic administration of nickel-contaminated medica-tions leads to significant parenteral exposures. Exposure to nickel compounds can produce a variety of adverse effects on human health. Nickel allergy in the form of contact dermatitis is the most common reaction.A frontal headache, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, insomnia, and irritability are the most common signs of acute poisoning with nickel compounds. The respiratory tract, kidneys and liver suffer the most significant changes like nickel pneumoconiosis, chronic rhinitis and sinonasal tumors and transitory nephropathy. Although the accumulation of nickel in the body through chronic exposure can lead to lung fibrosis, cardiovascular and kidney diseases, the most serious concerns relate to nickel’s carcinogenic activity. Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and metallic nickel is possibly carcinogenic to humans.

  3. Relationship between nickel allergy and diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Ashimav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is a ubiquitous trace element and it occurs in soil, water, air and of the biosphere. It is mostly used to manufacture stainless steel. Nickel is the commonest cause of metal allergy. Nickel allergy is a chronic and recurring skin problem; females are affected more commonly than males. Nickel allergy may develop at any age. Once developed, it tends to persist life-long. Nickel is present in most of the dietary items and food is considered to be a major source of nickel exposure for the general population. Nickel content in food may vary considerably from place to place due to the difference in nickel content of the soil. However, certain foods are routinely high in nickel content. Nickel in the diet of a nickel-sensitive person can provoke dermatitis. Careful selection of food with relatively low nickel concentration can bring a reduction in the total dietary intake of nickel per day. This can influence the outcome of the disease and can benefit the nickel sensitive patient.

  4. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John

    2011-01-01

    In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive and the D......In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined...

  5. Relationship between nickel allergy and diet

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Ashimav

    2007-01-01

    Nickel is a ubiquitous trace element and it occurs in soil, water, air and of the biosphere. It is mostly used to manufacture stainless steel. Nickel is the commonest cause of metal allergy. Nickel allergy is a chronic and recurring skin problem; females are affected more commonly than males. Nickel allergy may develop at any age. Once developed, it tends to persist life-long. Nickel is present in most of the dietary items and food is considered to be a major source of nickel exposure for the...

  6. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  7. Synthesis of cerium and nickel doped titanium nanofibers for hydrolysis of sodium borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Ashif H; Gosavi, S W; Terashima, Chiaki; Fujishima, Akira; Pawar, Atul A; Kim, Hern

    2018-07-01

    A recyclable titanium nanofibers, doped with cerium and nickel doped was successfully synthesized by using sol-gel and electrospinning method for hydrogen generation from alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH 4 . The resultant nanocomposite was characterized to find out the structural and physical-chemical properties by a series of analytical techniques such as FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), XRD (X-ray diffraction), SEM (scanning electron microscope), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy),N 2 adsorption-desorption and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), etc. The results revealed that cerium and nickel nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed on the surface of the TiO 2 nanofibers due to having similar oxidation state and atomic radium of TiO 2 nanofibers with CeO 2 and NiO for the effective immobilization of metal ions. The NiO doped catalyst showed superior catalytic performance towards the hydrolysis reaction of NaBH 4 at room temperature. These catalysts have ability to produce 305 mL of H 2 within the time of 160 min at room temperature. Additionally, reusability test revealed that the catalyst is active even after five runs of hydrolytic reaction, implying the as-prepared NiO doped TiO 2 nanofibers could be considered as a potential candidate catalyst for portable hydrogen fuel system such as PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Iron-Induced Activation of Ordered Mesoporous Nickel Cobalt Oxide Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Öztürk, Secil; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Tüysüz, Harun

    2017-06-28

    Herein, ordered mesoporous nickel cobalt oxides prepared by the nanocasting route are reported as highly active oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts. By using the ordered mesoporous structure as a model system and afterward elevating the optimal catalysts composition, it is shown that, with a simple electrochemical activation step, the performance of nickel cobalt oxide can be significantly enhanced. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that charge transfer resistance increases for Co 3 O 4 spinel after an activation process, while this value drops for NiO and especially for CoNi mixed oxide significantly, which confirms the improvement of oxygen evolution kinetics. The catalyst with the optimal composition (Co/Ni 4/1) reaches a current density of 10 mA/cm 2 with an overpotential of a mere 336 mV and a Tafel slope of 36 mV/dec, outperforming benchmarked and other reported Ni/Co-based OER electrocatalysts. The catalyst also demonstrates outstanding durability for 14 h and maintained the ordered mesoporous structure. The cyclic voltammograms along with the electrochemical measurements in Fe-free KOH electrolyte suggest that the activity boost is attributed to the generation of surface Ni(OH) 2 species that incorporate Fe impurities from the electrolyte. The incorporation of Fe into the structure is also confirmed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  9. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macomber, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological concern. To date, the mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms and higher eukaryotes are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize nickel homeostasis processes used by microorganisms and highlight in vivo and in vitro effects of exposure to elevated concentrations of nickel. On the basis of this evidence we propose four mechanisms of nickel toxicity: 1) nickel replaces the essential metal of metalloproteins, 2) nickel binds to catalytic residues of non-metalloenzymes; 3) nickel binds outside the catalytic site of an enzyme to inhibit allosterically, and 4) nickel indirectly causes oxidative stress. PMID:21799955

  10. Platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon for 3-pentanone hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tuo; Yu, Changlin [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Tang, Zhenbiao [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst was successfully synthesized at room temperature. • PtNi alloy/C was obtained after PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C reduced in hydrogen at 300 °C. • Nanostructures of the PtNi catalysts were characterized by numerous techniques. • PtNi alloy/C exhibited high catalytic activity for 3-pentanone hydrogenation. - Abstract: In this work, we prepared the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C sample at room temperature by hydrazine hydrate reducing method. The galvanic replacement reaction method was applied to deposit platinum on the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, to prepare the PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst. The catalyst of platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon (signed as PtNi/C) was obtained by the thermal treatment of PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C in flowing hydrogen at 300 °C for 2 h. The size, nanostructure, surface properties, Pt and Ni chemical states of the PtNi/C catalyst were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) and elemental energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) line scanning, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (HS-LEIS) techniques. The as-synthesized PtNi/C catalyst showed enhanced catalytic performance relative to the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C, Ni/C, Pt/C and PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalysts for 3-pentanone hydrogenation due to electron synergistic effect between Pt and Ni species in the PtNi/C catalyst. The PtNi/C catalyst also had exceling stability, with industrial application value.

  11. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  12. Alumina- and titania-based monolithic catalysts for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, J.; Avila, P.; Suarez, S.; Martin, J.A.; Knapp, C.

    2000-01-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of NO+NO 2 (NO x ) at low temperature (180-230C) with ammonia has been investigated with copper-nickel and vanadium oxides supported on titania and alumina monoliths. The influence of the operating temperature, as well as NH 3 /NO x and NO/NO 2 inlet ratios has been studied. High NO x conversions were obtained at operating conditions similar to those used in industrial scale units with all the catalysts. Reaction temperature, ammonia and nitrogen dioxide inlet concentration increased the N 2 O formation with the copper-nickel catalysts, while no increase was observed with the vanadium catalysts. The vanadium-titania catalyst exhibited the highest DeNO x activity, with no detectable ammonia slip and a low N 2 O formation when NH 3 /NO x inlet ratio was kept below 0.8. TPR results of this catalyst with NO/NH 3 /O 2 , NO 2 /NH 3 /O 2 and NO/NO 2 /NH 3 /O 2 feed mixtures indicated that the presence of NO 2 as the only nitrogen oxide increases the quantity of adsorbed species, which seem to be responsible for N 2 O formation. When NO was also present, N 2 O formation was not observed

  13. Determination of nickel in hydrogenated fats and selected chocolate bars in Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnalova, Lucie; Bucek, Pavel; Vobornik, Petr; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2017-02-15

    Nickel is a metal that can be present in products containing hardened edible oils, possibly as leftover catalyst from the vegetable oil hardening process. Nickel may cause toxic effects including the promotion of cancer and contact allergy. In this work, nickel content was determined in hydrogenated vegetable fats and confectionery products, made with these fats, available on the Czech market using newly developed method combining microwave digestion and graphite furnace AAS. While concentrations of 0.086±0.014mg.kg(-1) or less were found in hydrogenated vegetable fats, the Ni content in confectionery products was significantly higher, varying between 0.742±0.066 and 3.141±0.217mg.kg(-1). Based on an average consumer basket, daily intake of nickel from vegetable fats is at least twice as low as intake from confectionery products. Based on results, the levels of nickel in neither vegetable fats nor confectionery products, do not represent a significant health risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  15. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  16. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  17. Nickel exposure and plasma levels of biomarkers for assessing oxidative stress in nickel electroplating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chung; Gu, Po-Wen; Liu, Su-Hsun; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Chen, Jau-Yuan; Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John

    2017-07-01

    The mechanism of nickel-induced pathogenesis remains elusive. To examine effects of nickel exposure on plasma oxidative and anti-oxidative biomarkers. Biomarker data were collected from 154 workers with various levels of nickel exposure and from 73 controls. Correlations between nickel exposure and oxidative and anti-oxidative biomarkers were determined using linear regression models. Workers with a exposure to high nickel levels had significantly lower levels of anti-oxidants (glutathione and catalase) than those with a lower exposure to nickel; however, only glutathione showed an independent association after multivariable adjustment. Exposure to high levels of nickel may reduce serum anti-oxidative capacity.

  18. An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalysts for multi-reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2014-05-01

    An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalyst was prepared by a two-step impregnation method. The trace amount 0.08 wt% of Pt doping efficiently suppressed the nickel particle sintering and improved the nickel oxides reducibility. The prepared Ni-Pt catalyst showed excellent performance during steam reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol under both 3000 h stationary and 500-time daily start-up and shut-down operation modes. Self-activation ability of this catalyst was evidenced, which was considered to be resulted from the hydrogen spillover effect over Ni-Pt alloy. In addition, an integrated combustion-reforming reactor was proposed in this study. However, the sintering of the alumina support is still a critical issue for the industrialization of Ni-Pt catalyst. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Co-catalytic effect of nickel in Pt-Ru/C and Pt-Sn/C electrocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribadeneira, R. E.; Hoyos, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of adding nickel to Pt-Ru and Pt-Sn catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation. The alcohol-reduction process with ethylene glycol was used to prepare ten electrocatalysts. These were microchemically and physically characterized by EDX and XRD analysis. The electrocatalysts were evaluated at mini-electrodes with cyclic voltammetry at 25 and 50 °C in sulfuric acid and ethanol solutions, and as anodes in fuel cell tests. Nickel addition to Pt-Ru mixtures...

  20. Nickel(0)-catalyzed enantioselective annulations of alkynes and arylenoates enabled by a chiral NHC ligand: efficient access to cyclopentenones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Joachim S E; Donets, Pavel A; Cramer, Nicolai

    2014-11-24

    Cyclopentenones are versatile structural motifs of natural products as well as reactive synthetic intermediates. The nickel-catalyzed reductive [3+2] cycloaddition of α,β-unsaturated aromatic esters and alkynes constitutes an efficient method for their synthesis. Here, nickel(0) catalysts comprising a chiral bulky C1-symmetric N-heterocyclic carbene ligand were shown to enable an efficient asymmetric synthesis of cyclopentenones from mesityl enoates and internal alkynes under mild conditions. The bulky NHC ligand provided the cyclopentenone products in very high enantioselectivity and led to a regioselective incorporation of unsymmetrically substituted alkynes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Oral nickel exposure may induce Type I hypersensitivity reaction in nickel-sensitized subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüköztürk, Suna; Gelincik, Aslı; Ünal, Derya; Demirtürk, Mustafa; Çelik, Dolay Damla; Erden, Sacide; Çolakoğlu, Bahattin; Erdem Kuruca, Serap

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the clinical and immunological changes in the nickel allergic patients with systemic symptoms. We aimed to evaluate T helper cell responses of patients with different clinical presentations due to nickel. Patients having various allergic symptoms and positive patch test results to nickel and 20 controls underwent skin prick tests with nickel. IL-10, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma were measured in the culture supernatants of PBMC stimulated by nickel during lymphocyte proliferation test (LTT). 69 patients (56 female, mean age: 49.2 ± 13.1), 97% having nickel containing dental devices and 20 controls (8 female, mean age 34.9 ± 12.06) were evaluated. Skin prick tests with nickel were positive in 70% of the patients (pnickel. Nickel containing dental alloys and oral nickel intake seem to trigger systemic symptoms in previously nickel sensitized patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John

    2011-01-01

    In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... by the EU Nickel Directive. Despite this, the EU Nickel Directive part 2 was expected to work as an operational limit that would sufficiently protect European consumers against nickel allergy and dermatitis. This review presents the accumulation of epidemiological studies that evaluated the possible effect...... and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined...

  3. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  4. Nickel may be released from laptop computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consumer nickel sensitization and dermatitis is caused by prolonged or repeated skin exposure to items that release nickel, for example jewellery, belts, buttons, watches, and mobile phones (1–3). We recently described a patient in whom primary nickel contact sensitization and dermatitis develope...

  5. Electrodeposition of zinc--nickel alloys coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J W; Johnson, H R

    1977-10-01

    One possible substitute for cadmium in some applications is a zinc--nickel alloy deposit. Previous work by others showed that electrodeposited zinc--nickel coatings containing about 85 percent zinc and 15 percent nickel provided noticeably better corrosion resistance than pure zinc. Present work which supports this finding also shows that the corrosion resistance of the alloy deposit compares favorably with cadmium.

  6. Phase transformation in nickel during tribotesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershberger, J. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: jhersh@anl.gov; Ajayi, O.O. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fenske, G.R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 212 Room D204, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    Commercially pure nickel was subjected to a polyalphaolefin-lubricated reciprocating tribotest with increasing load. A friction transition was observed and X-ray diffraction was performed on low-friction and high-friction areas. Hexagonal nickel or nickel carbide was formed at high friction. Broadening of the face-centered cubic peaks did not show dislocation structures characteristic of scuffing.

  7. Phase transformation in nickel during tribotesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, J.; Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Commercially pure nickel was subjected to a polyalphaolefin-lubricated reciprocating tribotest with increasing load. A friction transition was observed and X-ray diffraction was performed on low-friction and high-friction areas. Hexagonal nickel or nickel carbide was formed at high friction. Broadening of the face-centered cubic peaks did not show dislocation structures characteristic of scuffing

  8. Improved nickel plating of Inconel X-750

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M. E.; Feeney, J. E.; Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electroplating technique with acid pickling provides a method of applying nickel plating on Inconel X-750 tubing to serve as a wetting agent during brazing. Low-stress nickel-plating bath contains no organic wetting agents that cause the nickel to blister at high temperatures.

  9. Nickel-accumulating plant from Western Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severne, B C; Brooks, R R

    1972-01-01

    A small shrub Hybanthus floribundus (Lindl.) F. Muell. Violaceae growing in Western Australia accumulates nickel and cobalt to a very high degree. Values of up to 23% nickel in leaf ash may represent the highest relative accumulation of a metal on record. The high accumulation of nickel poses interesting problems in plant physiology and plant biochemistry. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H_2SO_4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H_2SO_4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  11. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinlong, Lv, E-mail: ljlbuaa@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  12. Void formation in irradiated binary nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Akhter, J.I.

    1994-01-01

    In this work a computer program has been used to compute void radius, void density and swelling parameter for nickel and binary nickel-carbon alloys irradiated with nickel ions of 100 keV. The aim is to compare the computed results with experimental results already reported

  13. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  14. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  15. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  16. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  17. Ecological Considerations on Nickel Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcussen, Poul V.

    1960-01-01

    The incidence of nickel dermatoses has shifted from the plating industry to other occupations and particularly to non-occupational causes. A Danish survey of 621 cases shows that 4% are due to nickel plating, 9·5% to other occupations, and 86·5% were not due to occupation. A primary eruption not due to occupation had occurred in 14% of the occupational cases. The importance of preventive measures for the community more than for the adequately controlled industry is underlined. PMID:14420983

  18. Mechanochemical synthesis of TiO2/NiFe2O4 magnetic catalysts for operation under RF field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlding, Thomas K.; Gao, Pengzhao; Degirmenci, Volkan; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Rebrov, Evgeny V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel NiFe 2 O 4 –TiO 2 composite magnetic catalysts have been prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. • The synthesis time of 30 min provides the highest specific absorption rate (SAR) in RF heating. • Formation of NiTiO 3 phase during calcination decreases the SAR of the catalysts. • High stability of the NiFe 2 O 4 –TiO 2 catalyst was observed in a continuous amide bond synthesis under RF heating. - Abstract: Composite NiFe 2 O 4 –TiO 2 magnetic catalysts were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis from a mixture of titania supported nickel ferrite nanoparticles and P25 titania (Evonic). The former provides fast and efficient heating under radiofrequency field, while the latter serves as an active catalyst or catalyst support. The highest heating rate was observed over a catalyst prepared for a milling time of 30 min. The catalytic activity was measured over the sulfated composite catalysts in the condensation of aniline and 3-phenylbutyric acid in a stirred tank reactor and in a continuous RF heated flow reactor in the 140–170 °C range. The product yield of 47% was obtained over the sulfated P25 titania catalyst in the flow reactor

  19. Porous bimetallic PdNi catalyst with high electrocatalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue; Bin, Duan; Yan, Bo; Du, Yukou; Majima, Tetsuro; Zhou, Weiqiang

    2017-05-01

    Porous bimetallic PdNi catalysts were fabricated by a novel method, namely, reduction of Pd and Ni oxides prepared via calcining the complex chelate of PdNi-dimethylglyoxime (PdNi-dmg). The morphology and composition of the as-prepared PdNi were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of PdNi catalysts towards ethanol electrooxidation were also studied by electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) measurement. In comparison with porous Pd and commercial Pd/C catalysts, porous structural PdNi catalysts showed higher electrocatalytic activity and durability for ethanol electrooxidation, which may be ascribed to Pd and Ni property, large electroactive surface area and high electron transfer property. The Ni exist in the catalyst in the form of the nickel hydroxides (Ni(OH) 2 and NiOOH) which have a high electron and proton conductivity enhances the catalytic activity of the catalysts. All results highlight the great potential application of the calcination-reduction method for synthesizing high active porous PdNi catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Catalytic performance of Ni/MgO catalyst in methane dry reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Swai, Basem M.; Osman, N. B.; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2017-10-01

    Methane dry reforming to synthesis gas over nickel catalysts supported on magnesium oxide has been studied. The support was prepared via co-precipitation method using ammonia solution (20 wt% in water) as the precipitating agent. 10 wt% of Ni metal was impregnated to form Ni/MgO catalyst. The prepared catalyst was characterized by different techniques, such as XRD, BET, SEM, and TGA analysis. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversions of CH4 and CO2, selectivity of H2 and CO, and carbon deposition were investigated in a tabular furnace reactor. The catalyst afforded as high as 93% CH4 conversion at 900 °C. The catalyst has also shown excellent stability during reaction at relatively higher space velocity (1.8×104 ml g-1 h-1) and 800 °C reaction temperature. TGA characterization of spent catalyst has shown lesser magnitude of carbon deposition on the surface of the catalyst at 900 °C.

  3. TiO2 nanotubes supported NiW hydrodesulphurization catalysts: Characterization and activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcheva, R.; Dimitrov, L.; Tyuliev, G.; Spojakina, A.; Jiratova, K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► NiW catalysts supported on TiO 2 nanotubes, titania and alumina. ► The best results are obtained with NiW/TiO 2 nanotubes in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of thiophene. ► Active phase is Ni-WO x S y . ► Electronic promotion of W by Ti. - Abstract: High surface area TiO 2 nanotubes (Ti-NT) synthesized by alkali hydrothermal method were used as a support for NiW hydrodesulphurization catalyst. Nickel salt of 12-tungstophosphoric acid – Ni 3/2 PW 12 O 40 was applied as oxide precursor of the active components. The catalyst was characterized by S BET , XRD, UV–vis DRS, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TPR and HRTEM. The results obtained were compared with those for the NiW catalysts prepared over high surface area titania and alumina supports. A polytungstate phase evidenced by Raman spectroscopy was observed indicating the destruction of the initial heteropolyanion. The catalytic experiments revealed two times higher thiophene conversion on NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT than those of catalysts supported on alumina and titania. Increased HDS activity of the NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT could be related to a higher amount of W oxysulfide entities interacting with Ni sulfide particles as consequence of the electronic effects of the Ti-NT observed with XPS analysis.

  4. New insides in the characterization of HDS industrial catalysts by HAADF-STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Angel, Paz; Ponce, Arturo; Arellano, Josefina; Yacaman, Miguel J.; Hernandez-Pichardo, Martha; Montoya, J. Ascencion; Escobar, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are of great importance in the petroleum industry. Transition metal sulphides catalysts of Ni(Co)Mo(W)/Al2O3 are widely used for hydrotreating reactions, like hydrodenitrogenation and HDS. One of the main issue in these catalysts is to understand the mechanism of the reaction, where MoS2 plays the most important role in the catalytic activity. We studied an industrial NiMo/Alumina sulfide catalyst highly active by using aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM techniques. The used catalysts was a state-of- the art commercial nickel-molybdenum alumina-supported formulation, including organic agent modifier. This type of material belongs to a novel family of catalysts specially designed for ultra-low sulfur production from straight-run gas oil (SRGO), cycle oil, coker gas oil, or their combinations at operating conditions of commercial interest in hydrotreating units at industrial scale. Aberration corrected HAADF-STEM allowed to observe the nanostructure and location of MoS2 and his interaction with the alumina. The results indicate that the MoS2 is highly dispersed on the alumina, however the location of Ni is one of the task of this kind of catalyst.

  5. Features of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions with phase transformations on catalyst surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, A D; Krylov, O V

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of 41 bibliographic references to experiments on the adsorption of various gases (e.g., carbon monoxide, formic acid, ammonia, and oxygen) on metals (e.g., nickel, molybdenum, and platinum) and oxides covers observations of two-dimensional phases during adsorption; the kinetics of adsorption and catalysis associated with two-dimensional phase transitions; and several approximate models for describing the kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis which account for two-dimensional phase transformations on catalyst surfaces.

  6. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  7. Sixtieth Anniversary of Ziegler-Natta Catalysts and Stereospecific Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janović Z.

    2015-07-01

    , a new family of transition metal complexes known as metallocene catalysts were discovered, based on biscyclopentadienyl and transition metal as Zr, Hf and Ti and appropriate cocatalysts. There major advantage is solubility, high catalytic activity, and the easy tailoring of the polymer microstructure. In 1986, the first synthesis of syndiotactic polystyrene was performed using monocyclopentadienyl/titanium chloride catalyst. The development of catalysts based on diimine complexes of nickel and palladium, and of phenoxy-imino complexes of zirconium and nickel, resulted in polyolefins of different structure and morphology, and many new copolymers of ethylene particularly with polar monomers, producing a variety of new functional polymers, reactive oligomers, and block copolymers. The described discoveries of organometallic catalysts and their applications are one of the most valid models and sources of inspiration for the progress in chemistry and chemical engineering.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ternary Pt-Ni-M/C (M=Cu, Fe, Ce, Mo, W) nano-catalysts for low temperature fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Riaz; Jamil, Rabia; Ansari, Muhammad Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Ternary metal catalysts were synthesized by impregnation method. The mixture of metal solutions was reduced slowly under inert atmosphere and the reduced metals were deposited on the Vulcan Carbon(VC). Tungsten, molybdenum, cerium, iron and copper were added to specified amounts of platinum and nickel. Addition of nickel generally improves catalytic activity of platinum. The XRD of the catalysts was done and the crystallite size and other parameters were calculated. Crystallite sizes were in the range of 5 to 16 nm. Electrochemical surface areas of the catalysts were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in acidic media and are compared. Electro oxidation of methanol on the catalysts was done and peak potential, peak current, mass activity of the catalysts were calculated and are compared. These parameters were determined in acidic and basic media. It was found that mass activity increased significantly in basic media. Rate constants for the electro oxidation of methanol were also calculated in acidic and basic media and are compared and discussed. Rate constants were generally higher in basic media. Ternary catalysts showed improved catalytic activity than the binary catalyst. Nano alloying improved the catalytic activity and stability of the ternary catalysts

  9. Hydrogenation of naphthalene on NiMo- Ni- and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro-Gezork, Ana Cristina Alves; Winterbottom, John Mike [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Natividad, Reyna [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon Esq. Tollocan, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico, Mexico CP 50120 (Mexico)

    2008-01-30

    The importance of the hydrodearomatisation (HDA) is increasing together with tightening legislation of fuel quality and exhaust emissions. The present study focuses on hydrogenation (HYD) kinetics of the model aromatic compound naphthalene, found in typical diesel fraction, in n-hexadecane over a NiMo (nickel molybdenum), Ni (nickel) and Ru (ruthenium) supported on trilobe alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) catalysts. Kinetic reaction expressions based on the mechanistic Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model were derived and tested by regressing the experimental data that translated the effect of both naphthalene and hydrogen concentration at a constant temperature (523.15 and 573.15 K over the NiMo catalyst and at 373.15 K over the Ni and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts) on the initial reaction rate. The L-H equation, giving an adequate fit to the experimental data with physically meaningful parameters, suggested a competitive adsorption between hydrogen and naphthalene over the presulphided NiMo catalyst and a non-competitive adsorption between these two reactants over the prereduced Ni and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. In addition, the adsorption constant values indicated that the prereduced Ru catalyst was a much more active catalyst towards naphthalene HYD than the prereduced Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or the presulphided NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. (author)

  10. Nickel exposure from keys: a Brazilian issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nathalie Mie; Duarte, Ida Alzira Gomes; Hafner, Mariana de Figueiredo Silva; Lazzarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    Keys are a significant source of exposure to metal allergens and can be a relevant problem for nickel-allergic individuals. This study aimed to perform nickel and cobalt spot testing among the 5 most common Brazilian brands of keys. Among the tested keys, 100% showed positive result to nickel spot test, 83,3% presented strong positive reaction. 50% exhibited cobalt release as well. Nickel release from keys is very common in our country and may cause a negative impact on sensitized individual's quality of life. Study's results highlight the importance of establishing directives to regulate nickel release in Brazil.

  11. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  12. Metal recovery from spent refinery catalysts by means of biotechnological strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beolchini, F.; Fonti, V.; Ferella, F.; Veglio, F.

    2010-01-01

    A bioleaching study aimed at recovering metals from hazardous spent hydroprocessing catalysts was carried out. The exhaust catalyst was rich in nickel (4.5 mg/g), vanadium (9.4 mg/g) and molybdenum (4.4 mg/g). Involved microorganisms were iron/sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Investigated factors were elemental sulphur addition, ferrous iron addition and actions contrasting a possible metal toxicity (either adding powdered activated charcoal or simulating a cross current process by means of periodical filtration). Ferrous iron resulted to be essential for metal extraction: nickel and vanadium extraction yields were 83% and 90%, respectively, while about 50% with no iron. The observed values for molybdenum extraction yields were not as high as Ni and V ones (the highest values were around 30-40%). The investigated actions aimed at contrasting a possible metal toxicity resulted not to be effective; in contrast, sequential filtration of the liquor leach had a significant negative effect on metals extraction. Nickel and vanadium dissolution kinetics resulted to be significantly faster than molybdenum dissolution ones. Furthermore, a simple first order kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental data. All the observed results supported the important role of the indirect mechanism in bioleaching of LC-Finer catalysts.

  13. Metal recovery from spent refinery catalysts by means of biotechnological strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beolchini, F., E-mail: f.beolchini@univpm.it [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Fonti, V. [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Ferella, F.; Veglio, F. [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L' Aquila, Monteluco di Roio, 67040 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    A bioleaching study aimed at recovering metals from hazardous spent hydroprocessing catalysts was carried out. The exhaust catalyst was rich in nickel (4.5 mg/g), vanadium (9.4 mg/g) and molybdenum (4.4 mg/g). Involved microorganisms were iron/sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Investigated factors were elemental sulphur addition, ferrous iron addition and actions contrasting a possible metal toxicity (either adding powdered activated charcoal or simulating a cross current process by means of periodical filtration). Ferrous iron resulted to be essential for metal extraction: nickel and vanadium extraction yields were 83% and 90%, respectively, while about 50% with no iron. The observed values for molybdenum extraction yields were not as high as Ni and V ones (the highest values were around 30-40%). The investigated actions aimed at contrasting a possible metal toxicity resulted not to be effective; in contrast, sequential filtration of the liquor leach had a significant negative effect on metals extraction. Nickel and vanadium dissolution kinetics resulted to be significantly faster than molybdenum dissolution ones. Furthermore, a simple first order kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental data. All the observed results supported the important role of the indirect mechanism in bioleaching of LC-Finer catalysts.

  14. Liquid and Gaseous Fuel from Waste Plastics by Sequential Pyrolysis and Catalytic Reforming Processes over Indonesian Natural Zeolite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Syamsiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of several differently treated natural zeolites in a sequential pyrolysis and catalytic reforming of plastic materials i.e. polypropylene (PP and polystyrene (PS were investigated. The experiments were carried out on two stage reactor using semi-batch system. The samples were degraded at 500°C in the pyrolysis reactor and then reformed at 450°C in the catalytic reformer. The results show that the mordenite-type natural zeolites could be used as efficient catalysts for the conversion of PP and PS into liquid and gaseous fuel. The treatment of natural zeolites in HCl solution showed an increase of the surface area and the Si/Al ratio while nickel impregnation increased the activity of catalyst. As a result, liquid product was reduced while gaseous product was increased. For PP, the fraction of gasoline (C5-C12 increased in the presence of catalysts. Natural zeolite catalysts could also be used to decrease the heavy oil fraction (>C20. The gaseous products were found that propene was dominated in all conditions. For PS, propane and propene were the main components of gases in the presence of nickel impregnated natural zeolite catalyst. Propene was dominated in pyrolysis over natural zeolite catalyst. The high quality of gaseous product can be used as a fuel either for driving gas engines or for dual-fuel diesel engine.

  15. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  16. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  17. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  18. Heat treatment of nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F. Jr.; Clatworthy, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    A heat treating process is described that can be used to produce desired combinations of strength, ductility, and fabricability characteristics in heat resistant age-hardenable alloys having precipitation-hardening amounts of niobium, titanium, and/or tantalum in a nickel-containing matrix. (U.S.)

  19. Electrolytic nickel deposits upon uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.; Chauvin, G.; Coriou, H.; Hure, J.

    1958-01-01

    The authors present a new possibility to protect uranium by very adherent nickel deposits got by aqueous medium electrolysis. Surface treatment of uranium is based upon the chemical etching method from Lietazke. After thermal treatments at 600, 700 and 800 deg. C, under vacuum, a good intermetallic U-Ni diffusion is observed for each case. (author) [fr

  20. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  1. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is described for preparing uranium objects prior to nickel electroplating. The process consiats in treating the surface of the uranium with molten ferric chloride hexahydrate, at a slightiy elevated temperature. This treatment etches the metal surface providing a structure suitable for the application of adherent electrodeposits and at the same time plates the surface with a thin protective film of iron.

  2. Nickel in nails, hair and plasma from nickel-hypersensitive women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Veien, Niels

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of nickel in finger-nails, toe-nails, hair and plasma from 71 nickel-hypersensitive women and 20 non-hypersensitive women were determined. Nickel concentrations in finger-nails were significantly higher than in toe-nails in both the nickel-hypersensitive group and the control...... group. Nickel-sensitive women had significantly higher levels of nickel in toe-nails, hair and plasma than had control subjects, whereas there was no significant difference in nickel concentration in finger-nails between the two groups. No correlation could be demonstrated between nickel levels in any...... combination of nails, hair and plasma in the nickel-hypersensitive or in the control group....

  3. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2011-12-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones. To investigate the proportion of mobile phones sold in Denmark that release nickel after regulation. Metallic parts from 50 randomly selected mobile phones currently for sale in Denmark were tested for nickel release by use of the dimethylglyoxime (DMG)-nickel spot test. Nine (18%) phones showed at least one positive DMG test reaction and two phones had more than one DMG test-positive spot. Apparently, the proportion of mobile phones with significant nickel release remains unchanged, despite the 2009 revision of the EU Nickel Directive. We encourage manufacturers to measure nickel release from metallic components used in the assembly of mobile phones to ensure safe products. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. A Catalyst for Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  5. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  6. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  7. Electroplated tin-nickel coatings as a replacement for nickel to eliminate nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Boyce, Jan M.; Nielsen, Lars Pleth

    2013-01-01

    . The main focus will be on the corrosion properties where the following corrosion investigations will be covered; corrosion potential measurements for the different coatings, estimation of corrosion rates for materials in galvanic coupling with tin/nickel coatings, salt spray test, medical tests...

  8. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene adsorbed on nickel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchak, V.N.; Tret'yakov, I.I.; Kislyuk, M.U.

    1976-01-01

    The reactivity of ethylene adsorbed on the pure films of nickel at various temperatures was studied with respect to hydrogen atoms generated in the gaseous phase. The experiments were conducted in a glass vacuum apparatus enabling one to obtain the highest vacuum up to 2x20 -10 torr. The catalyst, nickel films, was produced by their deposition onto the walls of the glass reactor at a pressure of the residual gas of 10 -9 torr and a temperature of the walls of 25 deg C. Gas purity was analyzed by the mass spectrometric method. The ethylene adsorbed at the temperatures below 173 deg K reacted readily with the hydrogen atoms to yield ethane. The process ran without practically any activation energy involved and was limited by the attachment of the first hydrogen atom to the ethylene molecule. The efficiency of this interaction was 0.02 of the number of the hydrogen atoms collisions against the surface occupied by the ethylene. The adsorption of the ethylene at room and higher temperatures was accompanied by its disproportioning with the release of the hydrogen into the gaseous phase and a serious destruction of the ethylene molecules adsorbed to produce hydrogen residues interacting with neither molecular nor atomic hydrogen [ru

  9. Hydrogenation of surface carbon on alumina-supported nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccarthy, J.G.; Wise, H.

    1979-05-01

    The methanation of carbon deposited by CO or ethylene decomposition on Girdler G-65 catalyst (25Vertical Bar3< nickel, 8Vertical Bar3< alkali, mostly CaO, 4Vertical Bar3< C as graphite, on alumina) was studied by temperature-programed desorption and temperature-programed surface reaction. Four types of carbon were identified: ..cap alpha..-carbon consisted of isolated carbon atoms bonded to nickel and reacting with hydrogen at 470/sup 0/ +/- 20/sup 0/K; ..gamma..-carbon was probably a bulk carbide, most likely Ni/sub 3/C, which had a reaction peak at 550/sup 0/K; ..beta..-carbon consisted of amorphous, polymerized carbon, which had a reaction peak at 680/sup 0/K; and an unreactive crystalline graphite-like species. The ..cap alpha..-form was thermally unstable and transformed into the ..beta..-form above 600/sup 0/K. Both ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-forms slowly converted to inert graphite above 600/sup 0/K. The evidence suggested that synthesis gas methanation proceeds by dissociative adsorption of CO as the rate-determining step which forms a very reactive carbon adatom state (..cap alpha..') which converts to the ..cap alpha..-state in the absence of hydrogen and to methane in the presence of hydrogen.

  10. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  11. Gold, nickel and copper mining and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Nancy E; Pacey, Michael A; Darling, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Ore mining occurs in all Canadian provinces and territories except Prince Edward Island. Ores include bauxite, copper, gold, iron, lead and zinc. Workers in metal mining and processing are exposed, not only to the metal of interest, but also to various other substances prevalent in the industry, such as diesel emissions, oil mists, blasting agents, silica, radon, and arsenic. This chapter examines cancer risk related to the mining of gold, nickel and copper. The human carcinogenicity of nickel depends upon the species of nickel, its concentration and the route of exposure. Exposure to nickel or nickel compounds via routes other than inhalation has not been shown to increase cancer risk in humans. As such, cancer sites of concern include the lung, and the nasal sinus. Evidence comes from studies of nickel refinery and leaching, calcining, and sintering workers in the early half of the 20th century. There appears to be little or no detectable risk in most sectors of the nickel industry at current exposure levels. The general population risk from the extremely small concentrations detectable in ambient air are negligible. Nevertheless, animal carcinogenesis studies, studies of nickel carcinogenesis mechanisms, and epidemiological studies with quantitative exposure assessment of various nickel species would enhance our understanding of human health risks associated with nickel. Definitive conclusions linking cancer to exposures in gold and copper mining and processing are not possible at this time. The available results appear to demand additional study of a variety of potential occupational and non-occupational risk factors.

  12. Vapor phase carbonylation of dimethyl ether and methyl acetate with supported transition metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikada, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Tominaga, H.O.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of acetic acid (AcOH) from methanol (MeOH) and carbon monoxide has been performed industrially in the liquid phase using a rhodium complex catalyst and an iodide promoter. The selectivity to AcOH is more than 99% under mild conditions (175 0 C, 28 atm). The homogeneous rhodium catalyst has been also effective for the synthesis of acetic anhydride (Ac 2 O) by carbonylation of dimethyl ether (DME) or methyl acetate (AcOMe). However, rhodium is one of the most expensive metals and its proved reserves are quite limited. It is highly desired, therefore, to develop a new catalyst as a substitute for rhodium. The authors have already reported that nickel supported on active carbon exhibits an excellent activity for the vapor phase carbonylation of MeOh in the presence of iodide promoter and under moderately pressurized conditions. In addition, corrosive attack on reactors by iodide compounds is expected to be negligible in the vapor phase system. In the present work, vapor phase carbonylation of DME and AcOMe on nickel-active carbon (Ni/A.C.) and molybdenum-active carbon (Mo/A.C.) catalysts was studied

  13. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  14. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  15. Use of deuterium n. m. r. spectroscopy in mechanistic studies of exchange reactions of ethers on supported metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Kemball, Charles; McDougall, G.S.

    1987-10-01

    Exchange reactions of diethyl ether (DEE) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) with deuterium have been studied over supported nickel, palladium, platinum, and rhodium catalysts. Products from most of the systems were analysed by deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy (55.28 MHz) which gave quantitative results about the distribution of deuterium in the exchanged ethers. The results confirm earlier conclusions about the mechanism of the exchange of DEE and provide new evidence about the reactions of THF. Some hydrogenolysis occurred simultaneously with exchange of THF over both nickel and platinum.

  16. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  17. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  18. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  19. Co, Fe and Ni catalysts supported on coke for direct coal liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Jose A; Villalba, Oscar A; Rodriguez, Luis I; Hernandez, Orlando; Agamez, Yasmin Y; Dias Jose de Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Transition metal catalysts supported on coke were prepared by impregnation with a solution of complex of metal-thiourea, that is produced from salt precursors of cobalt chloride, Nickel chloride or iron sulfate and ammonium. sulphide formation on the support surface was generated by decomposition of the metal complex. The catalysts obtained were used in direct coal liquefaction of a medium volatile bituminous coal (Yerbabuena N 1) from Cundinamarca using a 250 Ml, Parr reactor at 723 K and a hydrogen-donor solvent. The catalytic results show, for all samples, both a good coal conversion and an enhancement of the yield of oils, this indicates that the proposed preparation method of catalyst is effective and that eventually the H 2 S sulphidation conventional process could be replaced

  20. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

    1985-11-06

    A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  1. Ordered Mesoporous NiCeAl Containing Catalysts for Hydrogenolysis of Sorbitol to Glycols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jiaqi; Qin, Juan; Li, Dong; Wu, Wenliang

    2018-03-01

    Cellulose-derived sorbitol is emerging as a feasible and renewable feedstock for the production of value-added chemicals. Highly active and stable catalyst is essential for sorbitol hydrogenolysis. Ordered mesoporous M- xNi yCeAl catalysts with different loadings of nickel and cerium species were successfully synthesized via one-pot evaporation-induced self-assembly strategy (EISA) and their catalytic performance were tested in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol. The physical chemical properties for the catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 physisorption, H2-TPR, H2 impulse chemisorption, ICP and TEM techniques. The results showed that the ordered mesopores with uniform pore sizes can be obtained and the Ni nanoparticles around 6 nm in size were homogeneously dispersed in the mesopore channels. A little amount of cerium species introduced would be beneficial to their textural properties resulting in higher Ni dispersion, metal area and smaller size of Ni nanoparticles. The M-10Ni2CeAl catalyst with Ni and Ce loading of 10.9 and 6.3 wt % shows better catalytic performance than other catalysts, and the yield of 1,2-PG and EG can reach 56.9% at 493 K and 6 MPa pressure for 8 h after repeating reactions for 12 times without obvious deterioration of physical and chemical properties. Ordered mesoporous M-NiCeAl catalysts are active and stable in sorbitol hydrogenolysis.

  2. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  3. Synthesis of Nickel and Nickel Hydroxide Nano powders by Simplified Chemical Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tientong, J.; Garcia, S.; Thurber, C.R.; Golden, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano powders were synthesized by a chemical reduction of nickel ions with hydrazine hydrate at ph ∼ 12.5. Sonication of the solutions created a temperature of 54-65 °C to activate the reduction reaction of nickel nanoparticles. The solution ph affected the composition of the resulting nanoparticles. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles were formed from an alkaline solution (ph ∼10) of nickel-hydrazine complexed by dropwise titration. X-ray diffraction of the powder and the analysis of the resulting Williamson-Hall plots revealed that the particle size of the powders ranged from 12 to 14 nm. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone into the synthesis decreased the nickel nanoparticle size to approximately 7 nm. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were in the nanometer range. The structure of the synthesized nickel and nickel hydroxide nanoparticles was identified by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Nickel Nanowires Resulting from Reduction of Nickel Formate in Polyol Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Logutenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel linear nanostructures were synthesized by reduction of nickel formate with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol medium in the absence of any surfactants or capping agents for direction of the particles growth. The effect of the synthesis conditions such as temperature, reduction time, type of polyol, and nickel formate concentration on the reduction products was studied. The size and morphology of the nickel nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the nickel nanocrystallites were wire-shaped with a face-center-cubic phase. Ethylene glycol was found to play a crucial role in the formation of the nickel nanowires. The possible growth processes of the wire-shaped particles taking place at 110 and 130°C are discussed. It was shown that, under certain synthesis conditions, nickel nanowires grow on the surface of the crystals of the solid intermediate of nickel with hydrazine hydrate.

  5. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  6. Highly stable and active Ni-doped ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst on the steam reforming of ethanol application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Y.Z. Chiou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel one-step direct synthesis of nickel embedded in an ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst (NiOMC is done in a basic medium of nonaqueous solution by a solvent evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The NiOMC sample is characterized by a variety of analytical and spectroscopy techniques, e.g., N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and temperature-programed reduction (TPR. In this study, the NiOMC catalyst is found to exhibit superior catalytic activity for the steam reforming of ethanol (SRE, showing high hydrogen selectivity and durability. Ethanol can be completely converted at 350 °C over the NiOMC catalyst. Also, the durability of the NiOMC catalyst on the SRE reaction exceeds 100 h at 450 °C, with SH2 approaching 65% and SCO of less than 1%.

  7. Evaluation of Pt-Ru-Ni and Pt-Sn-Ni catalysts as anodes in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribadeneira, Esteban; Hoyos, Bibian A. [Escuela de Procesos y Energia, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2008-05-15

    In this study, the electrooxidation of ethanol on carbon supported Pt-Ru-Ni and Pt-Sn-Ni catalysts is electrochemically studied through cyclic voltammetry at 50 C in direct ethanol fuel cells. All electrocatalysts are prepared using the ethylene glycol-reduction process and are chemically characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). For fuel cell evaluation, electrodes are prepared by the transfer-decal method. Nickel addition to the anode improves DEFC performance. When Pt{sub 75}Ru{sub 15}Ni{sub 10}/C is used as an anode catalyst, the current density obtained in the fuel cell is greater than that of all other investigated catalysts. Tri-metallic catalytic mixtures have a higher performance relative to bi-metallic catalysts. These results are in agreement with CV results that display greater activity for PtRuNi at higher potentials. (author)

  8. High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Conversion of Furfural to Bio-Based Fuel Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pizzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The one-pot catalytic reductive etherification of furfural to 2-methoxymethylfuran (furfuryl methyl ether, FME, a valuable bio-based chemical or fuel, is reported. A large number of commercially available hydrogenation heterogeneous catalysts based on nickel, copper, cobalt, iridium, palladium and platinum catalysts on various support were evaluated by a high-throughput screening approach. The reaction was carried out in liquid phase with a 10% w/w furfural in methanol solution at 50 bar of hydrogen. Among all the samples tested, carbon-supported noble metal catalysts were found to be the most promising in terms of productivity and selectivity. In particular, palladium on charcoal catalysts show high selectivity (up to 77% to FME. Significant amounts of furfuryl alcohol (FA and 2-methylfuran (2-MF are observed as the major by-products.

  9. Controllable synthesis of hierarchical nickel cobalt sulfide with enhanced electrochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jinjin; Han, Jiaxi; Diao, Guiqiang; Liu, Jiwen; Xie, Zhuopeng; Cheng, Gao; Sun, Ming; Yu, Lin

    2018-03-01

    The composition of nickel cobalt sulfide has great influence on its electrochemical performance. Herein, the nickel cobalt sulfide with different composition and mixed phase were synthesized by one-step solvothermal method through changing the molar ratio of Ni to Co in the reaction system. The electrochemical measurements showed that the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co to be 1.5:1.5 (NCS-2) demonstrates the superior pseudocapacitive performance with a high specific capacitance (6.47 F cm-2 at 10 mA cm-2) and a favorable Coulombic efficiency (∼99%). Whereas, when applied as the catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co is 1:2 (NCS-1) displays better catalytic activity, and it requires a relatively lower overpotential of 282 mV to deliver the current density of 10 mA cm-2.

  10. Adhesion enhancement between electroless nickel and polyester fabric by a palladium-free process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yinxiang, E-mail: yxlu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xue Longlong; Li Feng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-01-15

    A new, efficient, palladium- and etchant-free process for the electroless nickel plating of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric has been developed. PET electroless plating can be prepared in three steps, namely: (i) the grafting of thiol group onto PET, (ii) the silver Ag{sup 0} seeding of the PET surface, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectrometer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG) were used to characterize the samples in the process, and the nickel loading was quantified by weighing. This process successfully compares with the traditional one based on KMnO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} etching and palladium-based seed layer. The nickel coating obtained in this palladium-free process can pass through ultrasonic washing challenge, and shows excellent adhesion with the PET substrate. However, the sample with Pd catalyst via traditional process was damaged during the testing experiment.

  11. Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Reconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Erik L.

    1997-01-01

    Reconditioning has traditionally been used as a means of maintaining the performance of normal cells and batteries. This paper describes methods and results in which reconditioning was used to improve the performance of nickel-hydrogen batteries. The following method are discussed: (1) SS/L reconditioning implementation; (2) Superbird reconditioning - pressure/capacity growth; (3) INTELSAT 7/7A reconditioning - cell voltage plateaus and life testing; and (4) N-Star reconditioning - cell voltage plateaus (capacity fading and recovery).

  12. Characterization and Growth Mechanism of Nickel Nanowires Resulting from Reduction of Nickel Formate in Polyol Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Logutenko, Olga A.; Titkov, Alexander I.; Vorob’yov, Alexander M.; Yukhin, Yriy M.; Lyakhov, Nikolay Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel linear nanostructures were synthesized by reduction of nickel formate with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol medium in the absence of any surfactants or capping agents for direction of the particles growth. The effect of the synthesis conditions such as temperature, reduction time, type of polyol, and nickel formate concentration on the reduction products was studied. The size and morphology of the nickel nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning, and transmission ...

  13. Effect on growth and nickel content of cabbage plants watered with nickel solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, O B

    1979-01-01

    Chinese cabbage plants were watered with different concentrations of NiCl/sub 2/ solutions and the effect on growth and uptake of nickel in the plants were studied. No toxic effect on plant growth was observed. A higher content of nickel was found in the plants exposed to more concentrated nickel solutions. Nickel contamination and its clinical consequences are discussed. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  14. Kinetics of Sulfur, Vanadium and Nickel Removal from Basra Crude Oil Hydro Treating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibrahim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available     Basra crude oil was hydro treated in trickle–bed reactor using cobalt - molybdenum alumina as a Catalyst. The reaction range temperatures was598 – 648 k, while LHSV was 0.7 – 2 hr-1. The pressure and H2/Oil for all experiments keep constant at 3Mpa and 300 L/L respectively.    Desulphurization and demutualization kinetics were studied and found that the kinetics of sculpture removal is of first – order, and the kinetic of vanadium and nickel removal is of second – order.    Activation energy were calculated and their value are 24.03, 745.86, 63.90 KJ / mole, respectively for sculpture, vanadium, and nickel.

  15. Vibrational Mode-Specific Reaction of Methane on a Nickel Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer D.; Maroni, Plinio; Papageorgopoulos, Dimitrios C.; Dang, Tung T.; Schmid, Mathieu P.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2003-10-01

    The dissociation of methane on a nickel catalyst is a key step in steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production. Despite substantial effort in both experiment and theory, there is still no atomic-scale description of this important gas-surface reaction. We report quantum state-resolved studies, using pulsed laser and molecular beam techniques, of vibrationally excited methane reacting on the nickel (100) surface. For doubly deuterated methane (CD2H2), we observed that the reaction probability with two quanta of excitation in one C-H bond was greater (by as much as a factor of 5) than with one quantum in each of two C-H bonds. These results clearly exclude the possibility of statistical models correctly describing the mechanism of this process and attest to the importance of full-dimensional calculations of the reaction dynamics.

  16. Respiratory carcinogenicity assessment of soluble nickel compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Adriana R

    2002-10-01

    The many chemical forms of nickel differ in physicochemical properties and biological effects. Health assessments for each main category of nickel species are needed. The carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds has proven particularly difficult. Epidemiologic evidence indicates an association between inhalation exposures to nickel refinery dust containing soluble nickel compounds and increased risk of respiratory cancers. However, the nature of this association is unclear because of limitations of the exposure data, inconsistent results across cohorts, and the presence of mixed exposures to water-insoluble nickel compounds and other confounders that are known or suspected carcinogens. Moreover, well-conducted animal inhalation studies, where exposures were solely to soluble nickel, failed to demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. Similar negative results were seen in animal oral studies. A model exists that relates respiratory carcinogenic potential to the bioavailability of nickel ion at nuclear sites within respiratory target cells. This model helps reconcile human, animal, and mechanistic data for soluble nickel compounds. For inhalation exposures, the predicted lack of bioavailability of nickel ion at target sites suggests that water-soluble nickel compounds, by themselves, will not be complete human carcinogens. However, if inhaled at concentrations high enough to induce chronic lung inflammation, these compounds may enhance carcinogenic risks associated with inhalation exposure to other substances. Overall, the weight of evidence indicates that inhalation exposure to soluble nickel alone will not cause cancer; moreover, if exposures are kept below levels that cause chronic respiratory toxicity, any possible tumor-enhancing effects (particularly in smokers) would be avoided.

  17. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  18. Catalysts for petroleum desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.; Diemann, E.; Baumann, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain marketable products from low-quality oils, efficient hydrogenation processes are required for removing sulfur (hydrodesulfurization, HDS), nitrogen (hydrodenitrification, HDN), and oxygen (hydrodeoxygenation, HDO), which would poison the noble metal catalysts of the downstream petrochemical processes. Hydrogenation will produce low-sulfur, low-nitrogen fuels and thus contribute to the reduction of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions which is long overdue from the ecological point of view (forest decline, acidification of surface bodies of water, etc.).

  19. Flare up of Nickel Contact Dermatits Following Oral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C R Srinivas

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient having contact dermatitis due to nickel on the wrist, sides of neck, thighs and legs, confirmed by patch tests with nickel sulphate, showed aggravation of the dermatitis following oral provocation with 25 mg nickel sulphate.

  20. Air Force standards for nickel hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Warren; Milden, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed are presented in viewgraph form and include Air Force nickel hydrogen standardization goals, philosophy, project outline, cell level standardization, battery level standardization, and schedule.

  1. Nickel-hydrogen bipolar battery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Rechargeable nickel-hydrogen systems are described that more closely resemble a fuel cell system than a traditional nickel-cadmium battery pack. This was stimulated by the currently emerging requirements related to large manned and unmanned low Earth orbit applications. The resultant nickel-hydrogen battery system should have a number of features that would lead to improved reliability, reduced costs as well as superior energy density and cycle lives as compared to battery systems constructed from the current state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen individual pressure vessel cells.

  2. On the reflectivity of nickel neutron mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Habib, N. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.); Kenawy, M.A.; Wahba, M.; Ashry, A.H. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-02-01

    Neutron reflectivities were determined for 300 nm thick films of natural nickel and nickel 58 coated on glass plates. The measurements were performed at glancing angles between 40' and 60'. The incident neutron beam from one of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels covered neutron wavelengths between 0.55 and 0.80 nm. It was found that nickel 58, because of the high value of its critical glancing angle, is more efficient as a neutron mirror than natural nickel. (orig.).

  3. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  4. [Nickel levels in female dermatological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegler, U; Twardella, D; Fedorov, M; Darsow, U; Schaller, K-H; Habernegg, R; Behrendt, H; Fromme, H

    2009-07-01

    Nickel levels in urine were determined among 163 female dermatological patients aged 18 to 46 years. Data on life-style factors were collected in parallel via a questionnaire. Urinary nickel excretion was in the normal range of the German female population (0.2-46.1 microg Ni/g creatinine). The 95th percentile (3.9 microg Ni/l urine) exceeded the German reference value (3.0 microg Ni/l urine). In the multivariate regression analyses we found a statistically significant increase of ln-transformed nickel levels with increase in age and in women using dietary supplements. The following variables were not associated with Nickel urine levels: suffering from nickel eczema, smoking, drinking stagnated water, eating foods with high nickel contents and using nickel-containing kitchen utensils as, for example, an electric kettle with an open heater coil. We conclude that personal urinary levels should be assessed with simultaneous consideration of habits and life-style factors. A German national survery would be useful. Those patients who experience the exacerbation of their eczema in cases of oral provocation, for example, by a high nickel diet should be aware of potential sources of nickel, such as supplements.

  5. Nickel-induced cytokine production from mononuclear cells in nickel-sensitive individuals and controls. Cytokine profiles in nickel-sensitive individuals with nickel allergy-related hand eczema before and after nickel challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, L; Christensen, J M; Kristiansen, J

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to nickel is a major cause of allergic contact dermatitis which is considered to be an inflammatory response induced by antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe the in vitro analysis of the nickel-specific T-cell-derived cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35...... was somewhat of a surprise, since previous studies have suggested a Th1 response in nickel-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. Subsequently, the nickel-allergic individuals were randomized to experimental exposure to nickel or vehicle in a double-blind design. A daily 10-min exposure of one finger to 10 ppm...... nickel solution for 1 week followed by 100 ppm for an additional week evoked a clinical response of hand eczema in the nickel-exposed group. Blood samples were drawn on days 7 and 14 after the start of this exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of nickel. No statistically significant...

  6. Nb effect in the nickel oxide-catalyzed low-temperature oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2012-01-01

    A method for the preparation of NiO and Nb-NiO nanocomposites is developed, based on the slow oxidation of a nickel-rich Nb-Ni gel obtained in citric acid. The resulting materials have higher surface areas than those obtained by the classical evaporation method from nickel nitrate and ammonium niobium oxalate. These consist in NiO nanocrystallites (7-13 nm) associated, at Nb contents >3 at.%., with an amorphous thin layer (1-2 nm) of a niobium-rich mixed oxide with a structure similar to that of NiNb 2O 6. Unlike bulk nickel oxides, the activity of these nanooxides for low-temperature ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) has been related to their redox properties. In addition to limiting the size of NiO crystallites, the presence of the Nb-rich phase also inhibits NiO reducibility. At Nb content >5 at.%, Nb-NiO composites are thus less active for ethane ODH but more selective, indicating that the Nb-rich phase probably covers part of the unselective, non-stoichiometric, active oxygen species of NiO. This geometric effect is supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations. The close interaction between NiO and the thin Nb-rich mixed oxide layer, combined with possible restructuration of the nanocomposite under ODH conditions, leads to significant catalyst deactivation at high Nb loadings. Hence, the most efficient ODH catalysts obtained by this method are those containing 3-4 at.% Nb, which combine high activity, selectivity, and stability. The impact of the preparation method on the structural and catalytic properties of Nb-NiO nanocomposites suggests that further improvement in NiO-catalyzed ethane ODH can be expected upon optimization of the catalyst. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  8. Risk assessment of nickel carcinogenicity and occupational lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, H M; Zhang, Q F

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in risk assessment of nickel carcinogenicity and its correlation with occupational lung cancer in nickel-exposed workers is reviewed. Epidemiological investigations provide reliable data indicating the close relation between nickel exposure and high lung cancer risk, especially in nickel refineries. The nickel species-specific effects and the dose-response relationship between nickel exposure and lung cancer are among the main questions that are explored extensively. It is als...

  9. Treatment of spent catalyst from the nitrogenous fertilizer industry-A review of the available methods of regeneration, recovery and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bina

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of spent catalyst is a problem as it falls under the category of hazardous industrial waste. The recovery of metals from these catalysts is an important economic aspect as most of these catalysts are supported, usually on alumina/silica with varying percent of metal; metal concentration could vary from 2.5 to 20%. Metals like Ni, Mo, Co, Rh, Pt, Pd, etc., are widely used as a catalyst in chemical and petrochemical industries and fertilizer industries. They are generally supported on porous materials like alumina and silica through precipitation or impregnation processes. Many workers have adapted pyrometallurgy and Hydrometallurgy process for recovery of precious metals. Many workers have studied the recovery of nickel from a spent catalyst in an ammonia plant by leaching it in sulphuric acid solution (Hydrometallurgy). Ninety-nine percent of the nickel was recovered as nickel sulphate when the catalyst, having a particle size of 0.09 mm was dissolved in an 80% sulphuric acid solution for 50 min in at 70 deg. C. Many researcher have studied the extraction of metals from spent catalyst by roasting-extraction method (Pyrometallurgy). Chelating agents are the most effective extractants, which can be introduced in the soil washing fluid to enhance heavy metal extraction from contaminated soils. The advantages of chelating agents in soil cleanup include high efficiency of metal extraction, high thermodynamic stabilities of the metal complexes formed, good solubilities of the metal complexes, and low adsorption of the chelating agents on soils, But very few workers have attempted chelating agent to extract metals from spent catalyst.

  10. Lanthanum and cerium co-modified Ni/SiO2 catalyst for CO methanation from syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Dandan; Li, Shuangshuang; Guo, Shaoxia; Tang, Honggui; Wang, Hong; Liu, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    Sintering of active metal nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon deposition is critical problems for many metal catalysts, such as nickel based catalysts for generating methane from syngas. To improve the resistance to the sintering and carbon deposition, a new scheme was proposed in this work. Lanthanum and cerium co-modified Ni/SiO2 catalysts were synthesized by using perovskite type oxide of La1-xCexNiO3 loaded on SiO2 as the precursor. In a nanocrystallite of La1-xCexNiO3, ions of nickel, lanthanum and cerium are evenly mixed at atomic level and confined in the nanocrystallite, therefore, Ni NPs and the two promoters of La2O3 and CeO2 should be in close contact and highly dispersed on SiO2 after reduction. The catalysts were characterized by using XRD, TEM, BET, H2-TPD, XPS, TG and Raman techniques. Compared with the mono-promoted catalysts, the bi-promoted La0.75Ce0.25NiO3/SiO2 showed much better resistance to carbon deposition, higher resistance to sintering and higher activity for CO methanation, which are attributed to co-eliminating effect of the two promoters for the deposited carbon, confinement of the interacted two promoters for Ni NPs and the higher dispersion of Ni NPs derived from the smaller size of La0.75Ce0.25NiO3.

  11. CO2 methanation on the catalyst of Ni/MCM-41 promoted with CeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliu; Zhu, Lingjun; Liu, Yincong; Wang, Shurong

    2018-06-01

    CO 2 as a raw feed combined with renewable hydrogen for the production of useful chemicals and alternative energy products is one of the solutions to environmental and energy problems. In this study, a series of Ni-xCeO 2 /MCM-41 catalysts with a nickel content of 20wt% were prepared through deposition precipitation method for CO 2 methanation. Different characterization methods, including BET, XRD, TEM, SEM, H 2 -TPR and H 2 -TPD were applied to help explore the influence mechanism of CeO 2 on Ni/MCM-41 in CO 2 methanation. It was found that all CeO 2 -promoted catalysts exhibited enhanced catalytic activity when compared to Ni/MCM-41. The catalyst modified with 20wt% CeO 2 showed the best catalytic performance, with CO 2 conversion and CH 4 selectivity of 85.6% and 99.8%, respectively, at the temperature of 380°C under atmospheric pressure. The synergetic effects among Ni 0 active sites, the promoter and the support, including nickel dispersion improvement and increased CO 2 adsorption sites due to the addition of CeO 2 , were considered as important factors for high reactivity of the promoted catalysts. The stability test showed that the promoted catalyst maintained its high reactivity after 30h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Activating catalysts with mechanical force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piermattei, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneously catalysed reactions can be ‘switched on’ by activating latent catalysts. Usually, activation is brought about by heat or an external chemical agent. However, activation of homogeneous catalysts with a mechanical trigger has not been demonstrated. Here, we introduce a general method to

  13. Behavioral interventions to reduce nickel exposure in a nickel processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumchev, Krassi; Brown, Helen; Wheeler, Amanda; Pereira, Gavin; Spickett, Jeff

    2017-10-01

    Nickel is a widely-used material in many industries. Although there is enough evidence that occupational exposure to nickel may cause respiratory illnesses, allergies, and even cancer, it is not possible to stop the use of nickel in occupational settings. Nickel exposure, however, can be controlled and reduced significantly in workplaces. The main objective of this study was to assess if educational intervention of hygiene behavior could reduce nickel exposure among Indonesian nickel smelter workers. Participants were randomly assigned to three intervention groups (n = 99). Group one (n = 35) received only an educational booklet about nickel, related potential health effects and preventive measures, group two (n = 35) attended a presentation in addition to the booklet, and group three (n = 29) received personal feedback on their biomarker results in addition to the booklet and presentations. Pre- and post-intervention air sampling was conducted to measure concentrations of dust and nickel in air along with worker's blood and urine nickel concentrations. The study did not measure significant differences in particles and nickel concentrations in the air between pre- and post-interventions. However, we achieved significant reductions in the post intervention urine and blood nickel concentrations which can be attributed to changes in personal hygiene behavior. The median urinary nickel concentration in the pre-intervention period for group one was 52.3 µg/L, for group two 57.4 µg/L, and group three 43.2 µg/L which were significantly higher (pnickel with significantly (p nickel levels of 0.1 µg/L for all groups. The study showed that educational interventions can significantly reduce personal exposure levels to nickel among Indonesian nickel smelter workers.

  14. Nickel-Catalyzed Phosphine Free Direct N-Alkylation of Amides with Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jagadish; Banerjee, Debasis

    2018-03-16

    Herein, we developed an operational simple, practical, and selective Ni-catalyzed synthesis of secondary amides. Application of renewable alcohols, earth-abundant and nonprecious nickel catalyst facilitates the transformations, releasing water as byproduct. The catalytic system is tolerant to a variety of functional groups including nitrile, allylic ether, and alkene and could be extended to the synthesis of bis-amide, antiemetic drug Tigan, and dopamine D2 receptor antagonist Itopride. Preliminary mechanistic studies revealed the participation of a benzylic C-H bond in the rate-determining step.

  15. Oxidative-reforming of model biogas over NiO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: The influence of the variation of support synthesis conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asencios, Yvan J.O., E-mail: yvan.jesus@unifesp.br [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Av. Alm. Saldanha da Gama, 89, Ponta da Praia, CEP: 11030-400, Santos-SP (Brazil); Elias, Kariny F.M. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sãocarlense, 400, 13560-970, São Carlos-SP (Brazil); Assaf, Elisabete M., E-mail: eassaf@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sãocarlense, 400, 13560-970, São Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Precipitation pH and ageing T °C of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} influenced the performance of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Ni catalysts supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained at pH 7 recorded high conversion values. • Catalysts supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained at pH 7 and 80 °C are promissory for reforming of biogas. • Catalysts supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained at pH 6 deactivated readily during reaction. - Abstract: In this study, nickel catalysts (20 wt%) supported on γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by the impregnation method. The γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was synthesized by precipitation of bayerite gel obtained from aluminum scrap. The synthetic conditions of the bayerite gel varied as follows: precipitation pH ranging from 6 to 7; ageing temperature ranging from 25 to 80 °C, the calcination temperature for all samples was 500 °C. The catalysts and the supports were analyzed by temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), physisorption of N{sub 2} (BET), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Isopropanol decomposition reactions over the catalysts were carried out to evaluate their acidity. SEM images of the spent catalysts showed that the morphology of the carbon formed during the reaction is of the filamentous type. The TPR analysis of the catalysts showed the presence of NiO species weakly interacted with the support as well as stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric nickel aluminate, the reduction of these species was also observed by XANES analysis. XRD analysis of the fresh catalyst showed peaks assigned to NiO, NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The best catalysts (samples NiAl7-25 and NiAl7-80) synthesized in this report showed high stability and high conversion values (CH{sub 4} (70%) and CO{sub 2} (78%)). These catalysts showed better performance than the catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which showed a

  16. Catalytic CO Oxidation over Au Nanoparticles Loaded Nanoporous Nickel Phosphate Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Leng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Au/nickel phosphate-5 (Au/VSB-5 composite with the noble metal loading amount of 1.43 wt.% is prepared by using microporous VSB-5 nanocrystals as the support. Carbon monoxide (CO oxidation reaction is carried out over the sample with several catalytic cycles. Complete conversion of CO is achieved at 238°C over the catalyst at the first catalytic cycle. The catalytic activity improved greatly at the second cycle with the complete conversion fulfilled at 198°C and preserved for the other cycles. A series of experiments such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS are carried out to characterize the catalysts before and after the reaction to study the factors influencing this promotion at the second cycle.

  17. Process for manufacture of a catalyst suitable for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons and for obtaining methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golebiowski, A.; Romotowski, T.; Hennel, W.; Wroblewska-Wroblewska, T.; Polanski, A.; Janecki, Z.; Paluch-Paluch, S.

    1982-07-29

    The invention concerns a process for the manufacture of a catalyst suitable for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons or for obtaining methane, by the deposition of the catalytic components on a metal carrier with a large surface area, particularly a process for the manufacture of a solid nickel catalyst, which is suitable for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons, particularly of methane. The following steps of the process are carried out: producing a highly porous layer of spongy metal from Ni powder on the side of a metal wall away from a heat medium, which separates the reaction mixture from the heat medium, then separate application of a non-reducing oxide (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and a reducing oxide (nickel oxide) on the spongy metal by soaking with metal salt solution and then roasting in the temperature range of 400 to 1200/sup 0/C.

  18. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Active Metals, Catalyst Supports, and Metal Loading Percentage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of active metals, catalyst supports, and metal loading percentage on the formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were studied. In particular, iron, cobalt, and nickel were investigated for SWNTs synthesis. Iron was found to grow better-quality SWNTs compared to cobalt and nickel. To study the effect of catalyst supports, magnesium oxide, silicon oxide, and aluminium oxide were chosen for iron. Among the studied supports, MgO was identified to be a suitable support for iron as it produced SWNTs with better graphitisation determined by Raman analysis. Increasing the iron loading decreased the quality of SWNTs due to extensive agglomeration of the iron particles. Thus, lower metal loading percentage is preferred to grow better-quality SWNTs with uniform diameters.

  19. Effects of P/Ni ratio and Ni content on performance of γ-Al_2O_3-supported nickel phosphides for deoxygenation of methyl laurate to hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhena; Tang, Mingxiao; Chen, Jixiang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The formation of AlPO_4 was unfavorable for that of nickel phosphides. • The phase compositions of nickel phosphide depended on the amount of reduced P. • Catalytic activity was determined by surface Ni site density and catalyst acidity. • HDO pathway was promoted by increasing P/Ni ratio and Ni content. • Nickel phosphide gave much higher carbon yield and lower H_2 consumption than Ni. - Abstract: γ-Al_2O_3-supported nickel phosphides (mNi-Pn) were prepared by the TPR method and tested for the deoxygenation of methyl laurate to hydrocarbons. The effects of the P/Ni ratio (n = 1.0–2.5) and Ni content (m = 5–15 wt.%) in the precursors on their structure and performance were investigated. Ni/γ-Al_2O_3 was also studied for comparison. It was found that the formation of AlPO_4 in the precursor inhibited the reduction of phosphate and so the formation of nickel phosphides. With increasing the P/Ni ratio and Ni content, the Ni, Ni_3P, Ni_1_2P_5 and Ni_2P phases orderly formed, accompanying with the increases of their particle size and the amount of weak acid sites (mainly due to P-OH group), while the CO uptake and the amount of medium strong acid sites (mainly related to Ni sites) reached maximum on 10%Ni-P1.5. In the deoxygenation reaction, compared with Ni/γ-Al_2O_3, the mNi-Pn catalysts showed much lower activities for decarbonylation, C−C hydrogenolysis and methanation due to the ligand and ensemble effects of P. The conversion and the selectivity to n-C11 and n-C12 hydrocarbons achieved maximum on 10%Ni-P 2.0 for the 10%Ni-Pn catalysts and on 8%Ni-P2.0 for the mNi-P2.0 catalysts, while the turnover frequency (TOF) of methyl laurate mainly increased with the P/Ni ratio and Ni content. We propose that TOF was influenced by the nickel phosphide phases, the catalyst acidity and the particle size as well as the synergetic effect between the Ni site and acid site. Again, the hydrodeoxygenation pathway of methyl

  20. Nickel allergy in a Danish population 25 years after the first nickel regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Malin G; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel in metallic items has been regulated in Denmark since 1990; however, 10% of young Danish women are still sensitized to nickel. There is a need for continuous surveillance of the effect of regulation. OBJECTIVES: To identify current self-reported metallic exposures leading...... reactions within 30 min of contact were reported by 30.7% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Nickel exposures that led to the implementation of a nickel regulation seem to persist. The durations of contact with metallic items to fall under the current REACH regulation of nickel correspond well with the results...... to dermatitis in nickel-allergic patients, and the minimum contact time needed for dermatitis to occur. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all patients who reacted positively to nickel sulfate 5% pet. within the last 5 years at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Gentofte Hospital. RESULTS...

  1. Nickel concentrations in fingernails as a measure of occupational exposure to nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, K; Gammelgaard, Bente; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    in nails (p less than 0.001). The difference between the 2 levels was also significant (p less than 0.001). No correlation between the nickel concentration in fingernails and the duration of exposure could be demonstrated. It was concluded that the higher the nickel level in the fingernails, the greater...... is the possibility that the person is occupationally exposed to nickel. Nail analysis is suggested as a measure of occupational exposure to nickel.......The nickel concentration in fingernails from 2 groups of people occupationally exposed to nickel was determined. In one group, comprising 83 persons moderately exposed to nickel, the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) was 29.2 micrograms/g +/- 56.7 micrograms/g and the median 13.8 micrograms/g (range...

  2. Prevalence of nickel allergy in Europe following the EU Nickel Directive - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Malin G; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil

    2017-01-01

    .4% versus 19.8%) (p = 0.02), in female dermatitis patients aged ≤17 years (14.3% versus 29.2%) (p women: 20.2% versus 36.6%) (p men: 4.9% versus 6.6%) (p ..., and generally remained high, affecting 8-18% of the general population. A consistent pattern of decreasing prevalence of nickel allergy in some EU countries was observed, although the prevalence among young women remains high. Steps should be taken for better prevention of nickel allergy in EU countries.......Nickel contact allergy remains a problem in EU countries, despite the EU Nickel Directive. To study the prevalence of nickel allergy in EU countries following the implementation of the EU Nickel Directive, we performed a systematic search in PubMed for studies that examined the prevalence of nickel...

  3. An XPS [x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy] study of the sulfidation-regeneration cycle of a hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, D.Y.; Adnot, A.; Kaliaguine, S. (Laval Univ., Ste-Foy, PQ (Canada)); Chmielowiec, J. (Petro Canada Products Co., Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    The formation of sulfates in an industrial Ni-W hydroprocessing (HP) catalyst was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A small fluidized bed test unit with on-line sampling device was constructed to simulate industrial sulfidation and oxyregeneration processes of HP catalysts. The results obtained show that the sulfates observed on the surface of sulfided catalysts are not formed during the sulfidation process. Two oxidation processes seem to be responsible for the formation of sulfates: one happens when the catalyst is exposed to air before it is properly cooled and the other is a slow conversion at ambient temperature. The two different processes might be associated to different sulfidic species formed during the sulfidation processes, with the sulfides in the bulk of catalyst particles being more easily oxidized than the ones on the external surface of the catalyst particles. The sulfate formed during the air oxidation of sulfided catalysts, as well as that after oxyregeneration, is not aluminum sulfate but nickel sulfate in both cases. XPS results also indicate that oxygenates in the feedstock are not directly involved in the sulfate formation. 18 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Coin exposure may cause allergic nickel dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Gawkrodger, David J; White, Ian R

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is used in coins because the metal has beneficial properties, including price, colour, weight, and corrosion resistance, and also because it is easy to stamp. It has often been claimed that the duration of skin contact with coins is too short to cause nickel release and dermatitis. However...

  5. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured.

  6. Technology development for producing nickel metallic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    A technology to produce metallic filters by Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN-Brazilian CNEN) providing the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-Brazilian CNEN) in obtaining nickel alloy filters used for filtration process of uranium hexafluoride, was developed. The experiences carried out for producing nickel conical trunk filters from powder metallurgy are related. (M.C.K.)

  7. Method of nickel-plating large components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbuer, K.

    1997-01-01

    The invention concerns a method of nickel-plating components, according to which even large components can be provided with an adequate layer of nickel which is pore- and stress-free and such that water is not lost. According to the invention, the component is heated and, after heating, is pickled, rinsed, scoured, plated in an electrolysis process, and rinsed again. (author)

  8. Evolution of the nickel/zirconia interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.L.; Olson, D.A.; De Jonghe, L.C.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The changes taking place at the nickel zirconia interface during oxidation in air at 900 0 C were studied using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The nickel oxide layer growing at the interface and the stabilizers used in zirconia interact, giving different interface morphologies

  9. Systemic contact dermatitis due to nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taruli Olivia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Systemic contact dermatitis (SCD is a systemic reactivation of a previous allergic contact dermatitis. The initial exposure may usually be topical, followed by oral, intravenous or inhalation exposure leading to a systemic hypersensitivity reaction. A case of a 27 year-old male with SCD due to nickel is reported Case Report: A 27 year-old male presented with recurrent pruritic eruption consist of deep seated vesicles on both palmar and left plantar since 6 months before admission. This complaint began after patient consumed excessive amounts of chocolate, canned food, and beans. The patient worked as a technician in a food factory. History of allergy due to nickel was acknowledged since childhood. The clinical presentation was diffuse deep seated vesicles, and multiple erythematous macules to plaques, with collarette scale. Patch test using the European standard showed a +3 result to nickel. The patient was diagnosed as systemic contact dermatitis due to nickel. The treatments were topical corticosteroid and patient education of avoidance of both contact and systemic exposure to nickel. The patient showed clinical improvement after 2 weeks. Discussion: SCD was diagnosed due to the history of massive consumption of food containing nickel in a patient who had initial sensitization to nickel, with clinical features and the patch test result. Advice to be aware of nickel and its avoidance is important in SCD management.

  10. Lead-nickel electrochemical batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Glaize, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The lead-acid accumulator was introduced in the middle of the 19th Century, the diverse variants of nickel accumulators between the beginning and the end of the 20th Century. Although old, these technologies are always very present on numerous markets. Unfortunately they are still not used in optimal conditions, often because of the misunderstanding of the internal electrochemical phenomena.This book will show that batteries are complex systems, made commercially available thanks to considerable amounts of scientific research, empiricism and practical knowledge. However, the design of

  11. Structure investigations of electrodeposited nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Brauer, G.; Leidheiser, H. Jr

    1981-01-01

    Electrodeposited nickel samples were investigated by positron annihilation (lifetime and Doppler-broadening), Moessbauer effect and X-ray diffraction measurements. Two-component positron lifetime spectra were obtained. The first component is thought to result from bulk annihilation and trapping at single trapping centres (TC), their concentrations are obtained from the trapping model. The second one possibly denotes annihilation at voids, the number of which is dependent on the stress in the deposit. The Moessbauer results show differences in the magnetic orientation in the three samples examined. (author)

  12. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of CO adsorption on Ni2P/mesoporous molecule sieve catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-qian; Ji, Sheng-fu; Wu, Ping-yi; Hu, Lin-hua; Huang, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Ji-qin; Li, Cheng-yue

    2009-05-01

    Abstract The supported nickel phosphate precursors were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using nickel nitrate as nickel source, diammonium hydrogen phosphate as phosphorus source, and MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15 and SBA-16 as supports, respectively. Then, the supported Ni2 P catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction in flowing Hz from their nickel phosphate precursors. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis with the probe molecule CO was carried out to characterize the surface properties. The results indicated that there were significant differences in the spectral features of the samples. The upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on mesoporous molecule sieve was attributed to weak physical adsorption. There are four different kinds of upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on Ni2 P/MCM-41 catalyst with the following assignments: (1) the formation of Ni(CO)4 at 2055 cm(-1). (2) CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0catalysts. The absorbance observed at 2051-2055 cm(-1) for CO adsorption on Ni2P/MCM-48, Ni2P/SBA-15 and Ni2P/SBA-16 catalysts is due to the formation of Ni(CO)4 species. The other upsilon absorbances observed at 2093-2096 cm(-1) was attributed to CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0

  13. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  14. Method of preparing a catalyst suitable for steam reformation of hydrocarbons and for methane production. [German patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golebiowski, A; Romotowski, T; Hennel, W; Wroblewska-Wroblewska, T; Polanski, A; Janecki, Z; Paluch-Paluch, S

    1977-05-26

    A method of producing a nickel catalyst suitable for steam reformation and methane production is described which forms a permanent bond with the inner surface of an externally heated metal tube, e.g. a heat exchanger tube. To begin with, a metal sponge with good adhesion to the metal tube is produced on the basis of a metallic powder of the metal group which is treated by a conventional calcination process. The metal sponge is then covered with a metal oxide which is not reduced under reformation conditions, e.g. aluminium oxide, by wetting the metal sponge with aluminium nitrate and repeated calcination. Wetting and calcination are repeated twice, and the calcination temperature is lower each time in the range between 400 and 1200/sup 0/C. The activated nickel is there deposited by wetting with a nickel salt solution and subsequent calcination.

  15. [Spectralsignatures of nickel and vanadium supported photocatalysts and their photocatalytic properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Feng; Zhang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Jian, Li

    2011-04-01

    Using SiO2, activated carbon (AC) and Al2O3 as supports, the supported photocatalysts Ni-V-O/SiO2, Ni-V-O/AC and Ni-V-O/Al2O3 were prepared by impregnation method, and their spectralsignatures were investigated. The carbonylation of methanol with CO2 under UV irradiation was used as a probe reaction to compare the photocatalytic performance of the prepared catalysts. Integrated with the testing results of carbonylation, the effects of different supports on selectivity for the carbonylation products of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) were discussed by pyridine-IR and UV-Vis techniques. XRD results showed that the particles of nickel and vanadium supported on SiO2 had the highest degree of dispersion. Results of pyridine-IR indicated that all catalysts retained Lewis acid sites. The acid strength was different from catalyst samples with different supports but with the same active components. The acid strengths could be arranged as follows: Ni-V-O/SiO2 > Ni-V-O/Al2 O3 > Ni-V-O/AC. Different acid strengths exhibited different influence on the selectivity of products MF and DMC of carbonylation. The surface acid strengths of catalysts were the major factor influencing the selectivity of carbonylation products.

  16. Effect of the application of ultrasonic waves on the leaching of nickel ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Padilla, Osniel; Castellanos Suarez, Jose; Hernandez Martinez, A. Naida; Cortes Miranda, Maritza; Abraham Islas, Osvel; Cardenas Merella, Rodnie; Trujillo, Maria Elena; Nicot, Yarisleydis; Calzada, Lidia; Sanabria de la Torre, Antonio; Echaide Hernandez, Marcos Julio

    2016-01-01

    The use of the ultrasonic waves (OU) he/she has been successful in some fields like: the medicine, in catalysts, treatments of foods and in the chemical procedures of laboratory. The applications of OU in the mining are not very well-known and it is not reported in detail in the literature. In the CIPIMM they have been carried out some test in the laboratory with positive results, for what the studies of this technique are continued. The objective of this work was to evaluate in a preliminary phase the application of ultrasonic waves in the process of lixiviation of nickel minerals. The prepared pulps with the mineral were treated in an ultrasonic bathroom at laboratory level. In the process of atmospheric lixiviation with H 2 SO 4 , the application of OU produced an increment in the nickel breakup between a 2 and 5%. The kinetics of breakup of Co was quicker than that of the nickel. The use of OU doesn't increase in a significant way the breakup of the iron, making that the process is selective. It was observed that the treatment with OU of 60 minutes during the lixiviation of the pulp of mineral lateritic (Serpentine of Nicaro) it was enough. The reported maximum recovery of Neither and Co was: 69% neither and 33% Co. The acid consumption (which represents 70% of the costs of industrial process) was between 11 to 20 t of acid per ton of nickel leached, being lower than the average reported consumption (26 ton acid / ton nickel) in the industrial plant acid pressure leaching in Moa. (Author)

  17. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  18. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithrick, J.J.; Odonnell, P.M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market.

  19. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  20. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  1. Nanosheet Supported Single-Metal Atom Bifunctional Catalyst for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-08-09

    Nanosheet supported single-atom catalysts (SACs) can make full use of metal atoms and yet entail high selectivity and activity, and bifunctional catalysts can enable higher performance while lowering the cost than two separate unifunctional catalysts. Supported single-atom bifunctional catalysts are therefore of great economic interest and scientific importance. Here, on the basis of first-principles computations, we report a design of the first single-atom bifunctional eletrocatalyst, namely, isolated nickel atom supported on β 12 boron monolayer (Ni 1 /β 12 -BM), to achieve overall water splitting. This nanosheet supported SAC exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic performance with the computed overpotential for oxygen/hydrogen evolution reaction being just 0.40/0.06 V. The ab initio molecular dynamics simulation shows that the SAC can survive up to 800 K elevated temperature, while enacting a high energy barrier of 1.68 eV to prevent isolated Ni atoms from clustering. A viable experimental route for the synthesis of Ni 1 /β 12 -BM SAC is demonstrated from computer simulation. The desired nanosheet supported single-atom bifunctional catalysts not only show great potential for achieving overall water splitting but also offer cost-effective opportunities for advancing clean energy technology.

  2. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Corynybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 4 tables.

  3. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  4. Selective nickel-catalyzed conversion of model and lignin-derived phenolic compounds to cyclohexanone-based polymer building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutyser, Wouter; Van den Bosch, Sander; Dijkmans, Jan; Turner, Stuart; Meledina, Maria; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Debecker, Damien P; Sels, Bert F

    2015-05-22

    Valorization of lignin is essential for the economics of future lignocellulosic biorefineries. Lignin is converted into novel polymer building blocks through four steps: catalytic hydroprocessing of softwood to form 4-alkylguaiacols, their conversion into 4-alkylcyclohexanols, followed by dehydrogenation to form cyclohexanones, and Baeyer-Villiger oxidation to give caprolactones. The formation of alkylated cyclohexanols is one of the most difficult steps in the series. A liquid-phase process in the presence of nickel on CeO2 or ZrO2 catalysts is demonstrated herein to give the highest cyclohexanol yields. The catalytic reaction with 4-alkylguaiacols follows two parallel pathways with comparable rates: 1) ring hydrogenation with the formation of the corresponding alkylated 2-methoxycyclohexanol, and 2) demethoxylation to form 4-alkylphenol. Although subsequent phenol to cyclohexanol conversion is fast, the rate is limited for the removal of the methoxy group from 2-methoxycyclohexanol. Overall, this last reaction is the rate-limiting step and requires a sufficient temperature (>250 °C) to overcome the energy barrier. Substrate reactivity (with respect to the type of alkyl chain) and details of the catalyst properties (nickel loading and nickel particle size) on the reaction rates are reported in detail for the Ni/CeO2 catalyst. The best Ni/CeO2 catalyst reaches 4-alkylcyclohexanol yields over 80 %, is even able to convert real softwood-derived guaiacol mixtures and can be reused in subsequent experiments. A proof of principle of the projected cascade conversion of lignocellulose feedstock entirely into caprolactone is demonstrated by using Cu/ZrO2 for the dehydrogenation step to produce the resultant cyclohexanones (≈80 %) and tin-containing beta zeolite to form 4-alkyl-ε-caprolactones in high yields, according to a Baeyer-Villiger-type oxidation with H2 O2 . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Performance of a palladium membrane reactor using a Ni catalyst for fusion fuel impurities processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Wilhelm, R.; Okuno, K.

    1994-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PNM) provides a means to recover hydrogen isotopes from impurities expected to be present in fusion reactor exhaust. This recovery is based on reactions such as water-gas shift and steam reforming for which conversion is equilibrium limited. By including a selectively permeable membrane such as Pd/Ag in the catalyst bed, hydrogen isotopes can be removed from the reacting environment, thus promoting the reaction to complete conversion. Such a device has been built and operated at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the reactions listed above, earlier study with this unit has shown that hydrogen single-pass recoveries approaching 100% can be achieved. It was also determined that a nickel catalyst is a feasible choice for use with a PMR appropriate for fusion fuel impurities processing. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the performance of the PMR using a nickel catalyst over a range of temperatures, feed compositions and flowrates. Reactions which were studied are the water-gas shift reaction and steam reforming

  6. Effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports prepared by a grafting method on hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over Ni/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Song, In Kyu

    SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports with various zirconium contents are prepared by grafting a zirconium precursor onto the surface of commercial Carbosil silica. Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports on the performance of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts is investigated. SiO 2-ZrO 2 prepared by a grafting method serves as an efficient support for the nickel catalyst in the steam reforming of LNG. Zirconia enhances the resistance of silica to steam significantly and increases the interaction between nickel and the support, and furthermore, prevents the growth of nickel oxide species during the calcination process through the formation of a ZrO 2-SiO 2 composite structure. The crystalline structures and catalytic activities of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are strongly influenced by the amount of zirconium grafted. The conversion of LNG and the yield of hydrogen show volcano-shaped curves with respect to zirconium content. Among the catalysts tested, the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) sample shows the best catalytic performance in terms of both LNG conversion and hydrogen yield. The well-developed and pure tetragonal phase of ZrO 2-SiO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) appears to play an important role in the adsorption of steam and subsequent spillover of steam from the support to the active nickel. The small particle size of the metallic nickel in the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) catalyst is also responsible for its high performance.

  7. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  8. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  9. Synthesis of Ni-Pt catalysts and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Everton R.F. dos; Sousa, Bianca Viana de; Barbosa, Antonielly dos Santos; Leite, Romulo C.N.; Rodrigues, Meiry G.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, bifunctionals catalysts using the MCM-22 zeolite as support and the nickel and platinum metal as hydrogenation/dehydrogenation sites were prepared. The method used for metal dispersion on the zeolite was the competitive ion exchange, using the amine complex [Pt(NH 3 ) 4 ]Cl 2 and [Ni(NH 3 ) 6 ]Cl 2 . After the exchange reactions, the samples were calcinated at 500 deg C for 2 hours and reduced at this same temperature under hydrogen flow. The MCM-22 zeolite and samples containing the metal were characterized by the techniques of: EDX, XRD, DTA/TGA. The diffractions of the precursor MCM-22 (P) presented typical peaks of the MWW topology composed by intercalated lamellar layers with organic molecules that are constituents of the template (HMI). According to the XRD pattern of the calcinated sample, no peaks related to the organic material which is responsible to produce the MCM-22 zeolite were detected. By thermogravimetry it was verified that the removal of the template took place between 500 and 650 deg C proving the effectiveness of the removal process. The chemical analysis by X-ray spectrometric was evidenced this the incorporation in the zeolites of platinum and nickel for all the texts in study. Results from XRD confirming the stability and crystal in study of zeolites. (author)

  10. Nickel accumulation and storage in bradyrhizobium japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, R.J.; Pihl, T.D.; Stults, L.; Sray, W.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenase-depressed (chemolithotrophic growth conditions) and heterotrophically grown cultures of Bradyrhizobium japonicum accumulated nickel about equally over a 3-h period. Both types of cultures accumulated nickel primarily in a form that was not exchangeable with NiCl 2 , and they accumulated much more Ni than would be needed for the Ni-containing hydrogenase. The nickel accumulated by heterotrophically incubated cultures could later be mobilized to allow active hydrogenase synthesis during derepression in the absence of nickel, while cells both grown with Ni and the derepressed without nickel had low hydrogenase activities. The level of activity in cells grown with Ni and then derepressed without nickel was about the same as that in cultures derepressed in the presence of nickel. The Ni accumulated by heterotrophically grown cultures was associated principally with soluble proteins rather than particulate material, and this Ni was not lost upon dialyzing an extract containing the soluble proteins against either Ni-containing or EDTA-containing buffer. However, this Ni was lost upon pronase or low pH treatments. The soluble Ni-binding proteins were partially purified by gel filtration and DEAE chromatography. They were not antigenically related to hydrogenase peptides. Much of the 63 Ni eluted as a single peak of 48 kilodaltons. Experiments involving immunuprecipitation of 63 Ni-containing hydrogenase suggested that the stored source of Ni in heterotrophic cultures that could later be mobilized into hydrogenase resided in the nonexchangeable Ni-containing fraction rather than in loosely bound or ionic forms

  11. Environmental and human toxicology of nickel - a review; Umwelt- und Humantoxikologie von Nickel - eine aktuelle Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, D. [Fachbereich Biologie und Chemie, Univ. Bremen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Nickel is a relatively rare element, and its concentrations in ambient air, soils and waters are very low. Higher burdens of nickel are found in nickel industries and their proximity. The human uptake of nickel from the ambient air is neglectably low, except in industrial exposures. The main fraction of human nickel uptake is from food, nearly 50% stems from vegetables. Only about 2% of the oral uptake of nickel are resorbed and distributed over all organs investigated. The uptake of nickel compounds through the skin generally is very low. However, chronic skin contact with nickel and nickel compounds causes a specific contact allergy. This disease was observed after occupational exposure but also frequently in the general population. The number of new cases has dropped considerably due to reinforced prevention. Epidemiological studies with workers of nickel smelting and refining plants have demonstrated increased risks of nose and lung cancer. Human data are supported by results from animal experiments which have shown that inhalation of various nickel compounds caused lung cancer. Furthermore, animal experiments have yielded evidence that oral and inhalative exposure to nickel compounds impair reproduction. National and international agencies have classified various nickel compounds as carcinogenic to humans. The unit cancer risk attributed to life-long inhalation of 1 {mu}g Ni/m{sup 3} air is estimated to be between 2 x 10{sup -4} and 7 x 10{sup -4}. Occupational exposure limits in Germany have been the Technical Guidance Values of 0.5 mg/m{sup 3} for nickel and weakly soluble nickel compounds and of 0.05 mg/m{sup 3} for inhalable droplets of soluble nickel salts. The German limit value for ambient immission is 0.015 mg Ni/m{sup 2}. d, and for emission 0,5 mg Ni/m{sup 3}. Limit values for nickel in air are to be taken not as safe thresholds but as guidance values for the delimitation of the cancer risk. (orig.)

  12. Development of a Micro-Fiber Nickel Electrode for Nickel-Hydrogen Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a high specific energy battery is one of the objectives of the lightweight nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) program at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen fuel cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active materials. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at different discharge levels followed by half-cell cycle testing at 80 percent depth-of-discharge in a low Earth orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flightweight designs are built and tested.

  13. Chiral Nickel(II) Complex Catalyzed Enantioselective Doyle-Kirmse Reaction of α-Diazo Pyrazoleamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaobin; Tang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Tan, Fei; Lin, Lili; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2018-03-07

    Although high enantioselectivity of [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of sulfonium ylides (Doyle-Kirmse reaction) has proven surprisingly elusive using classic chiral Rh(II) and Cu(I) catalysts, in principle it is due to the difficulty in fine discrimination of the heterotopic lone pairs of sulfur and chirality inversion at sulfur of sulfonium ylides. Here, we show that the synergistic merger of new α-diazo pyrazoleamides and a chiral N, N'-dioxide-nickel(II) complex catalyst enables a highly enantioselective Doyle-Kirmse reaction. The pyrazoleamide substituent serves as both an activating and a directing group for the ready formation of a metal-carbene- and Lewis-acid-bonded ylide intermediate in the assistance of a dual-tasking nickel(II) complex. An alternative chiral Lewis-acid-bonded ylide pathway greatly improves the product enantiopurity even for the reaction of a symmetric diallylsulfane. The majority of transformations over a series of aryl- or vinyl-substituted α-diazo pyrazoleamindes and sulfides proceed rapidly (within 5-20 min in most cases) with excellent results (up to 99% yield and 96% ee), providing a breakthrough in enantioselective Doyle-Kirmse reaction.

  14. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  15. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  16. Determination of electroless deposition by chemical nickeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Badida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of technical level and reliability of machine products in compliance with the economical and ecological terms belongs to the main trends of the industrial development. During the utilisation of these products there arise their each other contacts and the interaction with the environment. That is the reason for their surface degradation by wear effect, corrosion and other influences. The chemical nickel-plating allows autocatalytic deposition of nickel from water solutions in the form of coherent, technically very profitable coating without usage of external source of electric current. The research was aimed at evaluating the surface changes after chemical nickel-plating at various changes of technological parameters.

  17. Influence of Ce-precursor and fuel on structure and catalytic activity of combustion synthesized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts for biogas oxidative steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vita, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.vita@itae.cnr.it; Italiano, Cristina; Fabiano, Concetto; Laganà, Massimo; Pino, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanosized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis (SCS) varying the fuel (oxalyldihydrazide, urea, carbohydrazide and glycerol), the cerium precursor (cerium nitrate and cerium ammonium nitrate) and the nickel loading (ranging between 3.1 and 15.6 wt%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2}-physisorption, CO-chemisorption, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The catalytic activity towards the Oxy Steam Reforming (OSR) of biogas was assessed. The selected operating variables have a strong influence on the nature of combustion and, in turn, on the morphological and structural properties of the synthesized catalysts. Particularly, the use of urea allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area, particle size and reducibility of the catalysts, affecting positively the biogas OSR performances. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ni/CeO{sub 2} nanopowders by quick and easy solution combustion synthesis. • The fuel and precursor drive the structural and morphological properties of the catalysts. • The use of urea as fuel allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area and particle size. • Ni/CeO{sub 2} (7.8 wt% of Ni loading) powders synthesized by urea route exhibits high performances for the biogas OSR process.

  18. Influence of Ce-precursor and fuel on structure and catalytic activity of combustion synthesized Ni/CeO2 catalysts for biogas oxidative steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vita, Antonio; Italiano, Cristina; Fabiano, Concetto; Laganà, Massimo; Pino, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    A series of nanosized Ni/CeO 2 catalysts were prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis (SCS) varying the fuel (oxalyldihydrazide, urea, carbohydrazide and glycerol), the cerium precursor (cerium nitrate and cerium ammonium nitrate) and the nickel loading (ranging between 3.1 and 15.6 wt%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), N 2 -physisorption, CO-chemisorption, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H 2 -TPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The catalytic activity towards the Oxy Steam Reforming (OSR) of biogas was assessed. The selected operating variables have a strong influence on the nature of combustion and, in turn, on the morphological and structural properties of the synthesized catalysts. Particularly, the use of urea allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area, particle size and reducibility of the catalysts, affecting positively the biogas OSR performances. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ni/CeO 2 nanopowders by quick and easy solution combustion synthesis. • The fuel and precursor drive the structural and morphological properties of the catalysts. • The use of urea as fuel allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area and particle size. • Ni/CeO 2 (7.8 wt% of Ni loading) powders synthesized by urea route exhibits high performances for the biogas OSR process

  19. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  20. Synthesis of Ni2B nanoparticles by RF thermal plasma for fuel cell catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y; Tanaka, M; Watanabe, T; Choi, S Y; Shin, M S; Lee, K H

    2014-01-01

    The catalyst of Ni 2 B nanoparticles was successfully prepared using nickel and boron as precursors with the quenching gas in radio frequency thermal plasmas. The generating of Ni 2 B needs adequate reaction temperature and boron content in precursors. The quenching gas is beneficial for the synthesis of Ni 2 B in RF thermal plasma. The effect of quenching rate, powder feed rate and boron content in feeding powders on the synthesis of nickel boride nanoparticles was studied in this research. The high mass fraction of 28 % of Ni 2 B nanoparticles can be generated at the fixed initial composition of Ni:B = 2:3. Quenching gas is necessary in the synthesis of Ni 2 B nanoaprticles. In addition, the mass fraction of Ni 2 B increases with the increase of quenching gas flow rate and powder feed rate

  1. Coupling molecular catalysts with nanostructured surfaces for efficient solar fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tong

    Solar fuel generation via carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is a promising approach to meet the increasing global demand for energy and to minimize the impact of energy consumption on climate change. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable; its activation often requires the use of appropriate catalysts. In particular, molecular catalysts with well-defined structures and tunability have shown excellent activity in photochemical CO2 reduction. These homogenous catalysts, however, suffer from poor stability under photochemical conditions and difficulty in recycling from the reaction media. Heterogenized molecular catalysts, particularly those prepared by coupling molecular catalysts with solid-state surfaces, have attracted more attention in recent years as potential solutions to address the issues associated with molecular catalysts. In this work, solar CO2 reduction is investigated using systems coupling molecular catalysts with robust nanostructured surfaces. In Chapter 2, heterogenization of macrocyclic cobalt(III) and nickel (II) complexes on mesoporous silica surface was achieved by different methods. Direct ligand derivatization significantly lowered the catalytic activity of Co(III) complex, while grafting the Co(III) complex onto silica surface through Si-O-Co linkage resulted in hybrid catalysts with excellent activity in CO2 reduction in the presence of p-terphenyl as a molecular photosensitizer. An interesting loading effect was observed, in which the optimal activity was achieved at a medium Co(III) surface density. Heterogenization of the Ni(II) complex on silica surface has also been implemented, the poor photocatalytic activity of the hybrid catalyst can be attributed to the intrinsic nature of the homogeneous analogue. This study highlighted the importance of appropriate linking strategies in preparing functional heterogenized molecular catalysts. Coupling molecular complexes with light-harvesting surfaces could avoid the use of expensive molecular

  2. Absorption and retention of nickel from drinking water in relation to food intake and nickel sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, G D; Søderberg, U; Jørgensen, P J; Templeton, D M; Rasmussen, S N; Andersen, K E; Grandjean, P

    1999-01-01

    Two studies were performed to examine the influence of fasting and food intake on the absorption and retention of nickel added to drinking water and to determine if nickel sensitization played any role in this regard. First, eight nonallergic male volunteers fasted overnight before being given nickel in drinking water (12 micrograms Ni/kg) and, at different time intervals, standardized 1400-kJ portions of scrambled eggs. When nickel was ingested in water 30 min or 1 h prior to the meal, peak nickel concentrations in serum occurred 1 h after the water intake, and the peak was 13-fold higher than the one seen 1 h after simultaneous intake of nickel-containing water and scrambled eggs. In the latter case, a smaller, delayed peak occurred 3 h after the meal. Median urinary nickel excretion half-times varied between 19.9 and 26.7 h. Within 3 days, the amount of nickel excreted corresponded to 2.5% of the nickel ingested when it was mixed into the scrambled eggs. Increasing amounts were excreted as the interval between the water and the meal increased, with 25.8% of the administered dose being excreted when the eggs were served 4 h prior to the nickel-containing drinking water. In the second experiment, a stable nickel isotope, 61Ni, was given in drinking water to 20 nickel-sensitized women and 20 age-matched controls, both groups having vesicular hand eczema of the pompholyx type. Nine of 20 nickel allergic eczema patients experienced aggravation of hand eczema after nickel administration, and three also developed a maculopapular exanthema. No exacerbation was seen in the control group. The course of nickel absorption and excretion in the allergic groups did not differ and was similar to the pattern seen in the first study, although the absorption in the women was less. A sex-related difference in gastric emptying rates may play a role. Thus, food intake and gastric emptying are of substantial significance for the bioavailability of nickel from aqueous solutions

  3. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  4. Influence of thin film nickel pretreatment on catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiggelaar, R.M. [Mesoscale Chemical Systems, MESA" + Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Thakur, D.B.; Nair, H.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K. [Catalytic Processes and Materials, MESA" + Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Gardeniers, J.G.E., E-mail: j.g.e.gardeniers@utwente.nl [Mesoscale Chemical Systems, MESA" + Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2013-05-01

    Nickel and other metal nanoparticles are known to be active as catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. In this paper we investigate how dewetting and break-up of nickel thin films depends on film thickness, film–substrate interaction and pretreatment conditions. This is evaluated for films evaporated on oxidized silicon and fused silica substrates with or without tantalum coating, which were subsequently exposed to different pretreatment atmospheres (vacuum, nitrogen, air and hydrogen; 1 h, 650 °C). Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the films. Pretreated Ni films were subjected to a thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition procedure with brief ethylene exposures (0.5–3 min, 635 °C). It was found that only on the spherical nanoparticles originating from a hydrogen pretreatment of a Ni film with Ta adhesion layer, homogeneously distributed, randomly-oriented, well-attached, and semi-crystalline carbon nanofibers be synthesized. - Highlights: • On the formation of nanoparticles required for carbon nanofiber (CNF) synthesis • Various evaporated thin films on oxidized silicon and fused silica: Ni and Ni/Ta • Pretreatment of nickel-based thin films in vacuum, nitrogen, air and hydrogen • Only on reduced Ni/Ta fast – within 3 min – initiation of CNF nucleation and growth.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a layered double hydroxide containing an intercalated nickel(II) citrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lianying; Wu Guoqing; Evans, David G.

    2007-01-01

    The nickel(II) citrate complex anion ([Ni(C 6 H 4 O 7 )] 2- ) may be intercalated into the interlayer galleries of a layered double hydroxide (LDH) host by a process involving ion-exchange with an Mg 2 Al-NO 3 LDH precursor. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms that the layered structure is maintained. The thermal decomposition process of the complex anion-intercalated material has been characterized by in situ high temperature powder XRD, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The thermal stability of the nickel(II) citrate complex anion intercalated in LDHs in air is lower than that in the sodium salt. Calcination generates a high degree of nickel(II) oxide dispersion in a matrix of magnesium and aluminium oxide phases which should be an advantage if the materials are used as catalyst precursors. Based on the observed data, a structural model for the [Ni(C 6 H 4 O 7 )] 2- anion intercalated in the galleries of the LDH is proposed

  6. Magnetic properties of mosaic nanocomposites composed of nickel and cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Sepúlveda, S.; Corona, R.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Escrig, J., E-mail: juan.escrig@usach.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), 9170124 Santiago (Chile)

    2016-10-15

    Mosaic nanocomposites composed of nickel and cobalt nanowires arranged in different configurations were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple model that considers single-domain structures including length corrections due to the shape anisotropy. Our results showed that for an ordered array both the coercivity and the remanence decrease linearly as a function of the concentration of nickel nanowires. Besides, we obtained that the magnetic properties of an array of a certain hard magnetic material (cobalt) will not change, unless we have more than 50% of nanowires of other soft magnetic material (nickel) in the array. In principle the second material could be other soft magnetic material, but could also be a nonmagnetic material or could even be a situation in which some of the pore arrays were not filled by electrodeposition. Therefore, our results allow us to predict the behavior of magnetic mosaic nanocomposites that are promising candidates for functional electrodes, sensors, and model catalysts. - Highlights: • Mosaic nanocomposites composed of magnetic nanowires were investigated. • Magnetic properties can be adjusted by varying the concentration of nanowires. • Our results allow us to predict the behavior of magnetic mosaic nanocomposites.

  7. Selective Reductive Removal of Ester and Amide Groups from Arenes and Heteroarenes through Nickel-Catalyzed C−O and C−N Bond Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Huifeng

    2017-03-21

    An inexpensive nickel(II) catalyst and a hydrosilane were used for the efficient reductive defunctionalization of aryl and heteroaryl esters through a decarbonylative pathway. This versatile method could be used for the removal of ester and amide functional groups from various organic molecules. Moreover, a scale-up experiment and a synthetic application based on the use of a removable carboxylic acid directing group highlight the usefulness of this reaction.

  8. Selective Reductive Removal of Ester and Amide Groups from Arenes and Heteroarenes through Nickel-Catalyzed C−O and C−N Bond Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Huifeng; Guo, Lin; Lee, Shao-Chi; Liu, Xiangqian; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    An inexpensive nickel(II) catalyst and a hydrosilane were used for the efficient reductive defunctionalization of aryl and heteroaryl esters through a decarbonylative pathway. This versatile method could be used for the removal of ester and amide functional groups from various organic molecules. Moreover, a scale-up experiment and a synthetic application based on the use of a removable carboxylic acid directing group highlight the usefulness of this reaction.

  9. Hydrotreatment of bio-oil over Ni-based catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Zhang, Qi; Jiang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Inexpensive non-sulfided Ni-based catalysts were evaluated for hydrotreatments using phenol as model compound. HZSM-5, a zeolite with different ratio of Si/Al and γ-Al(2)O(3) were impregnated with Ni(NO(3))(2) · 6H(2)O and calcined at 450 °C. Conversion rates and product distribution for treatment of phenol at 160-240 °C in the presence of catalysts with nickel loads of 6, 10, 14 and 17 wt.% were determined. Phenol conversion was highest (91.8%) at 240 °C in the presence of HZSM-5(Si/Al = 38) loaded with 10% Ni. When hydrotreatment was carried out with bio-oil obtained from pyrolysis of pine sawdust under the optimal conditions determined for phenol, the pH of bio-oil increased from 2.27 to 4.07, and the hydrogen content increased from 6.28 to 7.01 wt.%. The decrease in acidity is desirable for the use of upgraded bio-oil. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Detection of airborne carbon nanotubes based on the reactivity of the embedded catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, N; Kasper, G

    2015-01-01

    A previously described method for detecting catalyst particles in workplace air((1,2)) was applied to airborne carbon nanotubes (CNT). It infers the CNT concentration indirectly from the catalytic activity of metallic nanoparticles embedded as part of the CNT production process. Essentially, one samples airborne CNT onto a filter enclosed in a tiny chemical reactor and then initiates a gas-phase catalytic reaction on the sample. The change in concentration of one of the reactants is then determined by an IR sensor as measure of activity. The method requires a one-point calibration with a CNT sample of known mass. The suitability of the method was tested with nickel containing (25 or 38% by weight), well-characterized multi-walled CNT aerosols generated freshly in the lab for each experiment. Two chemical reactions were investigated, of which the oxidation of CO to CO2 at 470°C was found to be more effective, because nearly 100% of the nickel was exposed at that temperature by burning off the carbon, giving a linear relationship between CO conversion and nickel mass. Based on the investigated aerosols, a lower detection limit of 1 μg of sampled nickel was estimated. This translates into sampling times ranging from minutes to about one working day, depending on airborne CNT concentration and catalyst content, as well as sampling flow rate. The time for the subsequent chemical analysis is on the order of minutes, regardless of the time required to accumulate the sample and can be done on site.

  11. Point defects in nickel; Les defauts ponctuels dans le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I{sub B} (31 deg. K), I{sub C} (42 deg. K), I{sub D} (from to 57 deg. K) and I{sub E} (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I{sub B} the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I{sub D} it is near the <110> direction from the vacancy. In stage I{sub E} there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II{sub B} (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III{sub A} (370 deg. K) and III{sub B} (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [French] Les defauts crees dans le nickel par irradiation avec des electrons a la temperature de 20 deg. K et par irradiation avec des neutrons a la temperature de 28 deg. K sont etudies par l'analyse simultanee du trainage magnetique, de la microscopie electronique et de la restauration de la resistivite electrique. Les echantillons sont en nickel, purifie par la methode de la zone fondue

  12. Point defects in nickel; Les defauts ponctuels dans le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I{sub B} (31 deg. K), I{sub C} (42 deg. K), I{sub D} (from to 57 deg. K) and I{sub E} (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I{sub B} the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I{sub D} it is near the <110> direction from the vacancy. In stage I{sub E} there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II{sub B} (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III{sub A} (370 deg. K) and III{sub B} (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [French] Les defauts crees dans le nickel par irradiation avec des electrons a la temperature de 20 deg. K et par irradiation avec des neutrons a la temperature de 28 deg. K sont etudies par l'analyse simultanee du trainage magnetique, de la microscopie electronique et de la restauration de la resistivite electrique. Les echantillons sont en nickel, purifie par la methode de la zone

  13. Hydroprocessing catalysts utilization and regeneration schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    The catalyst reactor inventory represents an important part of the cost of hydroprocessing operation. The selection of a suitable catalyst and reactor is influenced by feedstock properties. Processes ensuring an uninterrupted operation during catalyst addition and withdrawal are preferred for processing high asphaltene and metal content feedstocks. The spent catalyst can be regenerated and returned to the operation if the extent of its deactivation is not high. The regeneration may be performed either in-situ or off-site. The former is suitable for fixed bed reactors whereas the catalyst from ebullated bed reactors must be regenerated off-site. The regeneration of spent catalysts heavily loaded with metals such as V, Ni and Fe may not be economic. Such catalysts may be suitable for metal reclamation. An environmentally safe method for catalyst disposal must be found if neither regeneration nor metal reclamation from spent catalysts can be performed.

  14. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  15. The use of deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy in mechanistic studies of exchange reactions of ethers on supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Kemball, Charles; McDougall, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Exchange reactions of diethyl ether (DEE) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) with deuterium have been studied over supported nickel, palladium, platinum, and rhodium catalysts. Products from most of the systems were analysed by deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy (55.28 MHz) which gave quantitative results about the distribution of deuterium in the exchanged ethers. The results confirm earlier conclusions about the mechanism of the exchange of DEE and provide new evidence about the reactions of THF. Some hydrogenolysis occurred simultaneously with exchange of THF over both nickel and platinum. (author)

  16. Nickel nanostructured materials from liquid phase photodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, Salvatore; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Costanzo, Lucia L.; Ventimiglia, Giorgio; Nigro, Raffaella Lo; Favazza, Maria; Votrico, Enrico; Bongiorno, Corrado; Fragala, Ignazio L.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid Phase Photo-Deposition (LPPD) technique has been used to obtain both colloidal particles and thin films of metallic and chloride nickel from solutions of only precursor Ni(acac) 2 (acac=2,4-pentandionato). Metallic nickel was obtained from ethanol solutions by direct nickel(II) photoreduction at 254 nm and by acetone sensitised reaction at 300 nm. In this latter process the rate was higher than in the first one. NiCl 2 was formed from CCl 4 solution by a solvent-initiated reaction. TEM analysis, performed on colloidal particles of nickel, showed that their dimensions are in the range 2-4 nm. The films did not present carbon contamination and were characterized by AFM, XPS and GIXRD. Metallic films consisted of particles of 20-40 nm that are the result of the aggregation of smaller crystallites (4-5 nm). Larger agglomerations (around 200 nm) have been observed for NiCl 2 films

  17. Annealing texture of rolled nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshchaninov, I.V.; Khayutin, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    A texture of pure nickel and binary alloys after the 95% rolling and annealing has been studied. Insoluble additives (Mg, Zr) slacken the cubic texture in nickel and neral slackening of the texture (Zr). In the case of alloying with silicium (up to 2%) the texture practically coinsides with that of a technical-grade nickel. The remaining soluble additives either do not change the texture of pure nickel (C, Nb) or enhance the sharpness and intensity of the cubic compontnt (Al, Cu, Mn, Cr, Mo, W, Co -at their content 0.5 to 2.0%). A model is proposed by which variation of the annealing texture upon alloying is caused by dissimilar effect of the alloying elements on the mobility of high- and low-angle grain boundaries

  18. Fe/Ni-N-CNFs electrochemical catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction/oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuang [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Mian [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Fan, Liquan; Han, Jianan [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiong, Yueping, E-mail: ypxiong@hit.edu.cn [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Novel Fe/Ni-N-CNFs electrocatalysts are prepared by electrospinning technique. • The Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst exhibits the excellent ORR and OER catalytic activity. • Synergy of Fe/Ni alloy is responsible for the excellent catalytic performance. - Abstract: The novel of iron, nickel and nitrogen doped carbon nanofibers (Fe/Ni-N-CNFs) as bifunctional electrocatalysts are prepared by electrospinning technique. In alkaline media, the Fe/Ni-N-CNFs catalysts (especially for Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs) exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performances of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR)/oxygen evolution reaction (OER). For ORR catalytic activity, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst offers a higher onset potential of 0.903 V, a similar four-electron reaction pathway, and excellent stability. For OER catalytic activity, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst possesses a lower onset potential of 1.528 V and a smaller charge transfer resistance of 48.14 Ω. The unparalleled catalytic activity of ORR and OER for the Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs is attributed to the 3D porous cross-linked microstructures of carbon nanofibers with Fe/Ni alloy, N dopant, and abundant M-N{sub x} and NiOOH as catalytic active sites. Thus, Fe1Ni1-N-CNFs catalyst can be acted as one of the efficient and inexpensive catalysts of metal-air batteries.

  19. Effect of Ca, Ce or K oxide addition on the activity of Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the methane decomposition reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Beatriz; Torres-Garcia, Enelio [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Procesos y Reactores, Eje C. 152, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Valenzuela, Miguel A.; Palacios, Jorge [Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Lab. Catalisis y Materiales, Zacatenco, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 07738 (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    To increase the activity and stability of Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts, a series of Ni-Ca, Ni-K and Ni-Ce promoted catalysts were prepared by successive impregnations. The textural properties, reducibility and catalytic performance in the methane decomposition reaction were investigated. The catalyst containing 30 wt.% Ni and 30 wt.% cerium oxide greatly increased the conversion of methane (90% of equilibrium value) and improved the stability, whereas the Ni-K and Ni-Ca were less active and stable than the Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. The results suggest that Ce addition prevents the sintering of nickel particles during reduction process maintaining a random distribution between the silica and cerium oxide improving the distribution and migration of deposited carbon. (author)

  20. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)