WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomly shuffled sequences

  1. uShuffle: A useful tool for shuffling biological sequences while preserving the k-let counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillespie Joel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomly shuffled sequences are routinely used in sequence analysis to evaluate the statistical significance of a biological sequence. In many cases, biologists need sophisticated shuffling tools that preserve not only the counts of distinct letters but also higher-order statistics such as doublet counts, triplet counts, and, in general, k-let counts. Results We present a sequence analysis tool (named uShuffle for generating uniform random permutations of biological sequences (such as DNAs, RNAs, and proteins that preserve the exact k-let counts. The uShuffle tool implements the latest variant of the Euler algorithm and uses Wilson's algorithm in the crucial step of arborescence generation. It is carefully engineered and extremely efficient. The uShuffle tool achieves maximum flexibility by allowing arbitrary alphabet size and let size. It can be used as a command-line program, a web application, or a utility library. Source code in C, Java, and C#, and integration instructions for Perl and Python are provided. Conclusion The uShuffle tool surpasses existing implementation of the Euler algorithm in both performance and flexibility. It is a useful tool for the bioinformatics community.

  2. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Máté De Gérando, H.; Fayolle-Guichard, F.; Rudant, L.; Millah, S.K.; Monot, F.; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of

  3. An Improved Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm for Assembly Sequence Planning of Remote Handling Maintenance in Radioactive Environment

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    Jianwen Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assembly sequence planning (ASP of remote handling maintenance in radioactive environment is a combinatorial optimization problem. This study proposes an improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA for the combinatorial optimization problem of ASP. An ASP experiment is conducted to verify the feasibility and stability of the improved SFLA. Simultaneously, the improved SFLA is compared with SFLA, genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization, and adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization in terms of efficiency and capability of locating the best global assembly sequence. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm exhibits outstanding performance in solving the ASP problem. The application of the proposed algorithm should increase the level of ASP in a radioactive environment.

  4. absolutely regular random sequences

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    Michel Harel

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the central limit theorems for the density estimator and for the integrated square error are proved for the case when the underlying sequence of random variables is nonstationary. Applications to Markov processes and ARMA processes are provided.

  5. Enhancing heterologous protection in pigs vaccinated with chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing the full-length sequences of shuffled structural genes of multiple heterologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Debin; Cao, Dianjun; Lynn Heffron, C; Yugo, Danielle M; Rogers, Adam J; Overend, Christopher; Matzinger, Shannon R; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Opriessnig, Tanja; LeRoith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-25

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of arguably the most economically important global swine disease. The extensive genetic variation of PRRSV strains is a major obstacle for heterologous protection of current vaccines. Previously, we constructed a panel of chimeric viruses containing only the ectodomain sequences of DNA-shuffled structural genes of different PRRSV strains in the backbone of a commercial vaccine, and found that one chimeric virus had an improved cross-protection efficacy. In this present study, to further enhance the cross-protective efficacy against heterologous strains, we constructed a novel chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 containing the full-length sequences of shuffled structural genes (ORFs 3-6) from 6 heterologous PRRSV strains in the backbone of PRRSV strain VR2385. We showed that the chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies in pigs against two heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination and challenge study in 48 pigs revealed that the chimeric virus VR2385-S3456 conferred an enhanced cross-protection when challenged with heterologous virus strain NADC20 or a contemporary heterologous strain RFLP 1-7-4. The results suggest that the chimera VR2385-S3456 may be a good PRRSV vaccine candidate for further development to confer heterologous protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Doing the Meiosis Shuffle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauskopf, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Presents a game called the Meiosis Shuffle that helps students simulate the process of meiosis in which homologous cards representing chromosomes pair up, line up, and split apart. Students respond well to the simulation and are better able to conceptualize what chromosomes do and how independent assortment causes genetic variation. (CCM)

  7. Permutation Entropy for Random Binary Sequences

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    Lingfeng Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we generalize the permutation entropy (PE measure to binary sequences, which is based on Shannon’s entropy, and theoretically analyze this measure for random binary sequences. We deduce the theoretical value of PE for random binary sequences, which can be used to measure the randomness of binary sequences. We also reveal the relationship between this PE measure with other randomness measures, such as Shannon’s entropy and Lempel–Ziv complexity. The results show that PE is consistent with these two measures. Furthermore, we use PE as one of the randomness measures to evaluate the randomness of chaotic binary sequences.

  8. Evolutionary engineering by genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biot-Pelletier, Damien; Martin, Vincent J J

    2014-05-01

    An upsurge in the bioeconomy drives the need for engineering microorganisms with increasingly complex phenotypes. Gains in productivity of industrial microbes depend on the development of improved strains. Classical strain improvement programmes for the generation, screening and isolation of such mutant strains have existed for several decades. An alternative to traditional strain improvement methods, genome shuffling, allows the directed evolution of whole organisms via recursive recombination at the genome level. This review deals chiefly with the technical aspects of genome shuffling. It first presents the diversity of organisms and phenotypes typically evolved using this technology and then reviews available sources of genetic diversity and recombination methodologies. Analysis of the literature reveals that genome shuffling has so far been restricted to microorganisms, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with an overepresentation of antibiotics- and biofuel-producing microbes. Mutagenesis is the main source of genetic diversity, with few studies adopting alternative strategies. Recombination is usually done by protoplast fusion or sexual recombination, again with few exceptions. For both diversity and recombination, prospective methods that have not yet been used are also presented. Finally, the potential of genome shuffling for gaining insight into the genetic basis of complex phenotypes is also discussed.

  9. Design of a highly effective therapeutic HPV16 E6/E7-specific DNA vaccine: optimization by different ways of sequence rearrangements (shuffling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad N Almajhdi

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with the high-risk Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16 is the causative event for the development of cervical cancer and other malignant tumors of the anogenital tract and of the head and neck. Despite many attempts to develop therapeutic vaccines no candidate has entered late clinical trials. An interesting approach is a DNA based vaccine encompassing the nucleotide sequence of the E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins. Because both proteins are consistently expressed in HPV infected cells they represent excellent targets for immune therapy. Here we report the development of 8 DNA vaccine candidates consisting of differently rearranged HPV-16 E6 and E7 sequences within one molecule providing all naturally occurring epitopes but supposedly lacking transforming activity. The HPV sequences were fused to the J-domain and the SV40 enhancer in order to increase immune responses. We demonstrate that one out of the 8 vaccine candidates induces very strong cellular E6- and E7- specific cellular immune responses in mice and, as shown in regression experiments, efficiently controls growth of HPV 16 positive syngeneic tumors. This data demonstrates the potential of this vaccine candidate to control persistent HPV 16 infection that may lead to malignant disease. It also suggests that different sequence rearrangements influence the immunogenecity by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  10. Uncovering cis regulatory codes using synthetic promoter shuffling.

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    Ali Kinkhabwala

    Full Text Available Revealing the spectrum of combinatorial regulation of transcription at individual promoters is essential for understanding the complex structure of biological networks. However, the computations represented by the integration of various molecular signals at complex promoters are difficult to decipher in the absence of simple cis regulatory codes. Here we synthetically shuffle the regulatory architecture--operator sequences binding activators and repressors--of a canonical bacterial promoter. The resulting library of complex promoters allows for rapid exploration of promoter encoded logic regulation. Among all possible logic functions, NOR and ANDN promoter encoded logics predominate. A simple transcriptional cis regulatory code determines both logics, establishing a straightforward map between promoter structure and logic phenotype. The regulatory code is determined solely by the type of transcriptional regulation combinations: two repressors generate a NOR: NOT (a OR b whereas a repressor and an activator generate an ANDN: a AND NOT b. Three-input versions of both logics, having an additional repressor as an input, are also present in the library. The resulting complex promoters cover a wide dynamic range of transcriptional strengths. Synthetic promoter shuffling represents a fast and efficient method for exploring the spectrum of complex regulatory functions that can be encoded by complex promoters. From an engineering point of view, synthetic promoter shuffling enables the experimental testing of the functional properties of complex promoters that cannot necessarily be inferred ab initio from the known properties of the individual genetic components. Synthetic promoter shuffling may provide a useful experimental tool for studying naturally occurring promoter shuffling.

  11. Nonlinear deterministic structures and the randomness of protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Yan Zhao

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the randomness of protein sequences, we make a detailed analysis of a set of typical protein sequences representing each structural classes by using nonlinear prediction method. No deterministic structures are found in these protein sequences and this implies that they behave as random sequences. We also give an explanation to the controversial results obtained in previous investigations.

  12. On the Shuffle Automaton Size for Words

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    Franziska Biegler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the state size of DFAs accepting the shuffle of two words. We provide words u and v, such that the minimal DFA for u shuffled with v requires an exponential number of states. We also show some conditions for the words u and v which ensure a quadratic upper bound on the state size of u shuffled with v. Moreover, switching only two letters within one of u or v is enough to trigger the change from quadratic to exponential.

  13. Tool path planning of hole-making operations in ejector plate of injection mould using modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm

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    Amol M. Dalavi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of hole-making operations in manufacturing industry plays a vital role. Tool travel and tool switch planning are the two major issues in hole-making operations. Many industrial applications such as moulds, dies, engine block, automotive parts etc. requires machining of large number of holes. Large number of machining operations like drilling, enlargement or tapping/reaming are required to achieve the final size of individual hole, which gives rise to number of possible sequences to complete hole-making operations on the part depending upon the location of hole and tool sequence to be followed. It is necessary to find the optimal sequence of operations which minimizes the total processing cost of hole-making operations. In this work, therefore an attempt is made to reduce the total processing cost of hole-making operations by applying relatively new optimization algorithms known as shuffled frog leaping algorithm and proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm for the determination of optimal sequence of hole-making operations. An industrial application example of ejector plate of injection mould is considered in this work to demonstrate the proposed approach. The obtained results by the shuffled frog leaping algorithm and proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm are compared with each other. It is seen from the obtained results that the results of proposed modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm are superior to those obtained using shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

  14. Simulations Using Random-Generated DNA and RNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, C. F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Using a very simple computer program written in BASIC, a very large number of random-generated DNA or RNA sequences are obtained. Students use these sequences to predict complementary sequences and translational products, evaluate base compositions, determine frequencies of particular triplet codons, and suggest possible secondary structures.…

  15. Combining genome shuffling and interspecific hybridization among Streptomyces improved ε-poly-L-lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xusheng; Dong, Chuanliang; Zhao, Fulin; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2013-01-01

    Here we first improved the ε-PL productivity in five species of wild-type strains in Streptomyces (Streptomyces padanus, Streptomyces griseofuscus, Streptomyces graminearus, Streptomyces hygroscopicus, and Streptomyces albulus) by genome shuffling. Then all the shuffled strains were suffered from an interspecific hybridization through stochastic protoplast fusion. One hybrid designated FEEL-1 was selected by morphology and spore color with ε-PL production of 1.12 g/L in shake flask, about 2.75-fold higher than that in wild types. The ε-PL production of FEEL-1 was then obtained as 24.5 g/L in fed-batch fermentation, which was 63-81 % higher than those in shuffled strains. Random amplified polymorphic DNA revealed that FEEL-1 was probably hybridized from S. padanus, S. griseofuscus, and S. albulus. Activities of several enzymes in FEEL-1 (hexokinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, aspartokinase, and citrate synthase) were more active than those in shuffled strains, which was a possible reason for the enhancement of ε-PL production. This research highlights the importance of genome shuffling along with interspecific hybridization as a new breeding strategy for improving phenotype of industrial strains.

  16. Exon Shuffling and Origin of Scorpion Venom Biodiversity

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    Xueli Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion venom is a complex combinatorial library of peptides and proteins with multiple biological functions. A combination of transcriptomic and proteomic techniques has revealed its enormous molecular diversity, as identified by the presence of a large number of ion channel-targeted neurotoxins with different folds, membrane-active antimicrobial peptides, proteases, and protease inhibitors. Although the biodiversity of scorpion venom has long been known, how it arises remains unsolved. In this work, we analyzed the exon-intron structures of an array of scorpion venom protein-encoding genes and unexpectedly found that nearly all of these genes possess a phase-1 intron (one intron located between the first and second nucleotides of a codon near the cleavage site of a signal sequence despite their mature peptides remarkably differ. This observation matches a theory of exon shuffling in the origin of new genes and suggests that recruitment of different folds into scorpion venom might be achieved via shuffling between body protein-coding genes and ancestral venom gland-specific genes that presumably contributed tissue-specific regulatory elements and secretory signal sequences.

  17. Evolutionary Novelty in a Butterfly Wing Pattern through Enhancer Shuffling.

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    Richard W R Wallbank

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An important goal in evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic changes underlying novel morphological structures. We investigated the origins of a complex wing pattern found among Amazonian Heliconius butterflies. Genome sequence data from 142 individuals across 17 species identified narrow regions associated with two distinct red colour pattern elements, dennis and ray. We hypothesise that these modules in non-coding sequence represent distinct cis-regulatory loci that control expression of the transcription factor optix, which in turn controls red pattern variation across Heliconius. Phylogenetic analysis of the two elements demonstrated that they have distinct evolutionary histories and that novel adaptive morphological variation was created by shuffling these cis-regulatory modules through recombination between divergent lineages. In addition, recombination of modules into different combinations within species further contributes to diversity. Analysis of the timing of diversification in these two regions supports the hypothesis of introgression moving regulatory modules between species, rather than shared ancestral variation. The dennis phenotype introgressed into Heliconius melpomene at about the same time that ray originated in this group, while ray introgressed back into H. elevatus much more recently. We show that shuffling of existing enhancer elements both within and between species provides a mechanism for rapid diversification and generation of novel morphological combinations during adaptive radiation.

  18. Directed DNA shuffling of retrovirus and retrotransposon integrase protein domains.

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    Xiaojie Qi

    Full Text Available Chimeric proteins are used to study protein domain functions and to recombine protein domains for novel or optimal functions. We used a library of chimeric integrase proteins to study DNA integration specificity. The library was constructed using a directed shuffling method that we adapted from fusion PCR. This method easily and accurately shuffles multiple DNA gene sequences simultaneously at specific base-pair positions, such as protein domain boundaries. It produced all 27 properly-ordered combinations of the amino-terminal, catalytic core, and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase gene from human immunodeficiency virus, prototype foamy virus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae retrotransposon Ty3. Retrotransposons can display dramatic position-specific integration specificity compared to retroviruses. The yeast retrotransposon Ty3 integrase interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors to target integration at the transcription initiation site. In vitro assays of the native and chimeric proteins showed that human immunodeficiency virus integrase was active with heterologous substrates, whereas prototype foamy virus and Ty3 integrases were not. This observation was consistent with a lower substrate specificity for human immunodeficiency virus integrase than for other retrovirus integrases. All eight chimeras containing the Ty3 integrase carboxyl-terminal domain, a candidate targeting domain, failed to target strand transfer in the presence of the targeting protein, suggesting that multiple domains of the Ty3 integrase cooperate in this function.

  19. Entropy and long-range correlations in random symbolic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Melnik, S S

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop an estimate for the entropy of random long-range correlated symbolic sequences with elements belonging to a finite alphabet. As a plausible model, we use the high-order additive stationary ergodic Markov chain. Supposing that the correlations between random elements of the chain are weak we express the differential entropy of the sequence by means of the symbolic pair correlation function. We also examine an algorithm for estimating the differential entropy of finite symbolic sequences. We show that the entropy contains two contributions, the correlation and fluctuation ones. The obtained analytical results are used for numerical evaluation of the entropy of written English texts and DNA nucleotide sequences. The developed theory opens the way for constructing a more consistent and sophisticated approach to describe the systems with strong short- and weak long-range correlations.

  20. Humans cannot consciously generate random numbers sequences: Polemic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurska, Małgorzata; Stańczyk, Maciej; Kulesza, Kamil

    2008-01-01

    It is widely believed, that randomness exists in Nature. In fact such an assumption underlies many scientific theories and is embedded in the foundations of quantum mechanics. Assuming that this hypothesis is valid one can use natural phenomena, like radioactive decay, to generate random numbers. Today, computers are capable of generating the so-called pseudorandom numbers. Such series of numbers are only seemingly random (bias in the randomness quality can be observed). Question whether people can produce random numbers, has been investigated by many scientists in the recent years. The paper "Humans can consciously generate random numbers sequences..." published recently in Medical Hypotheses made claims that were in many ways contrary to state of art; it also stated far-reaching hypotheses. So, we decided to repeat the experiments reported, with special care being taken of proper laboratory procedures. Here, we present the results and discuss possible implications in computer and other sciences.

  1. Classification of periodic, chaotic and random sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ities of different datasets. Entropy cannot differentiate between chaotic and random sequences while ApEn and LZ cannot distinguish between weak and strong chaos. Figure 1. 95% confidence interval for mean LZ complexity of 50 samples of length. 20 using four bins. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 84, No. 3, March 2015. 367 ...

  2. Golden gate shuffling: a one-pot DNA shuffling method based on type IIs restriction enzymes.

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    Carola Engler

    Full Text Available We have developed a protocol to assemble in one step and one tube at least nine separate DNA fragments together into an acceptor vector, with 90% of recombinant clones obtained containing the desired construct. This protocol is based on the use of type IIs restriction enzymes and is performed by simply subjecting a mix of 10 undigested input plasmids (nine insert plasmids and the acceptor vector to a restriction-ligation and transforming the resulting mix in competent cells. The efficiency of this protocol allows generating libraries of recombinant genes by combining in one reaction several fragment sets prepared from different parental templates. As an example, we have applied this strategy for shuffling of trypsinogen from three parental templates (bovine cationic trypsinogen, bovine anionic trypsinogen and human cationic trypsinogen each divided in 9 separate modules. We show that one round of shuffling using the 27 trypsinogen entry plasmids can easily produce the 19,683 different possible combinations in one single restriction-ligation and that expression screening of a subset of the library allows identification of variants that can lead to higher expression levels of trypsin activity. This protocol, that we call 'Golden Gate shuffling', is robust, simple and efficient, can be performed with templates that have no homology, and can be combined with other shuffling protocols in order to introduce any variation in any part of a given gene.

  3. Engineering and selection of shuffled AAV genomes: a new strategy for producing targeted biological nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuping; Asokan, Aravind; Wu, Zhijian; Van Dyke, Terry; DiPrimio, Nina; Johnson, Jarrod S; Govindaswamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Leichtle, Stefan; Redmond, D Eugene; McCown, Thomas J; Petermann, Kimberly B; Sharpless, Norman E; Samulski, Richard J

    2008-07-01

    We report a DNA shuffling-based approach for developing cell type-specific vectors through directed evolution. Capsid genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1-9 were randomly fragmented and reassembled using PCR to generate a chimeric capsid library. A single infectious clone (chimeric-1829) containing genome fragments from AAV1, 2, 8, and 9 was isolated from an integrin minus hamster melanoma cell line previously shown to have low permissiveness to AAV. Molecular modeling studies suggest that AAV2 contributes to surface loops at the icosahedral threefold axis of symmetry, while AAV1 and 9 contribute to two- and fivefold symmetry interactions, respectively. The C-terminal domain (AAV9) was identified as a critical structural determinant of melanoma tropism through rational mutagenesis. Chimeric-1829 utilizes heparan sulfate as a primary receptor and transduces melanoma cells more efficiently than all serotypes. Further, chimeric-1829 demonstrates altered tropism in rodent skeletal muscle, liver, and brain including nonhuman primates. We determined a unique immunological profile based on neutralizing antibody (NAb) titer and crossreactivity studies strongly supporting isolation of a synthetic laboratory-derived capsid variant. Application of this technology to alternative cell/tissue types using AAV or other viral capsid sequences is likely to yield a new class of biological nanoparticles as vectors for human gene transfer.

  4. Engineering and Selection of Shuffled AAV Genomes: A New Strategy for Producing Targeted Biological Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuping; Asokan, Aravind; Wu, Zhijian; Van Dyke, Terry; DiPrimio, Nina; Johnson, Jarrod S; Govindaswamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Leichtle, Stefan; Eugene Redmond, D; McCown, Thomas J; Petermann, Kimberly B; Sharpless, Norman E; Samulski, Richard J

    2008-07-01

    We report a DNA shuffling-based approach for developing cell type-specific vectors through directed evolution. Capsid genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1-9 were randomly fragmented and reassembled using PCR to generate a chimeric capsid library. A single infectious clone (chimeric-1829) containing genome fragments from AAV1, 2, 8, and 9 was isolated from an integrin minus hamster melanoma cell line previously shown to have low permissiveness to AAV. Molecular modeling studies suggest that AAV2 contributes to surface loops at the icosahedral threefold axis of symmetry, while AAV1 and 9 contribute to two- and fivefold symmetry interactions, respectively. The C-terminal domain (AAV9) was identified as a critical structural determinant of melanoma tropism through rational mutagenesis. Chimeric-1829 utilizes heparan sulfate as a primary receptor and transduces melanoma cells more efficiently than all serotypes. Further, chimeric-1829 demonstrates altered tropism in rodent skeletal muscle, liver, and brain including nonhuman primates. We determined a unique immunological profile based on neutralizing antibody (NAb) titer and crossreactivity studies strongly supporting isolation of a synthetic laboratory-derived capsid variant. Application of this technology to alternative cell/tissue types using AAV or other viral capsid sequences is likely to yield a new class of biological nanoparticles as vectors for human gene transfer. Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Gene Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-transcriptional exon shuffling events in humans can be evolutionarily conserved and abundant

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Balool, Haya H.; Weber, David; Liu, Yilei; Wade, Mark; Guleria, Kamlesh; Nam, Pitsien Lang Ping; Clayton, Jake; Rowe, William; Coxhead, Jonathan; Irving, Julie; Elliott, David J.; Hall, Andrew G.; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Jackson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    In silico analyses have established that transcripts from some genes can be processed into RNAs with rearranged exon order relative to genomic structure (post-transcriptional exon shuffling, or PTES). Although known to contribute to transcriptome diversity in some species, to date the structure, distribution, abundance, and functional significance of human PTES transcripts remains largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we identify 205 putative human PTES produc...

  6. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  8. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  9. PRIMITIVE MATRICES AND GENERATORS OF PSEUDO RANDOM SEQUENCES OF GALOIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beletsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In theory and practice of information cryptographic protection one of the key problems is the forming a binary pseudo-random sequences (PRS with a maximum length with acceptable statistical characteristics. PRS generators are usually implemented by linear shift register (LSR of maximum period with linear feedback [1]. In this paper we extend the concept of LSR, assuming that each of its rank (memory cell can be in one of the following condition. Let’s call such registers “generalized linear shift register.” The research goal is to develop algorithms for constructing Galois and Fibonacci generalized matrix of n-order over the field , which uniquely determined both the structure of corresponding generalized of n-order LSR maximal period, and formed on their basis Galois PRS generators of maximum length. Thus the article presents the questions of formation the primitive generalized Fibonacci and Galois arbitrary order matrix over the prime field . The synthesis of matrices is based on the use of irreducible polynomials of degree and primitive elements of the extended field generated by polynomial. The constructing methods of Galois and Fibonacci conjugated primitive matrices are suggested. The using possibilities of such matrices in solving the problem of constructing generalized generators of Galois pseudo-random sequences are discussed.

  10. Intersection of two TASEP traffic lanes with frozen shuffle update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Cividini, J.; Hilhorst, H. J.

    2011-10-01

    Motivated by interest in pedestrian traffic we study two lanes (one-dimensional lattices) of length L that intersect at a single site. Each lane is modeled by a deterministic TASEP (totally asymmetric exclusion process). The particles enter and leave lane σ (where σ = 1, 2) with probabilities ασ and βσ, respectively. We employ the 'frozen shuffle' update introduced in earlier work (Appert-Rolland et al 2011 J. Stat. Mech. P07009), in which the particle positions are updated in a fixed random order. We find analytically that each lane may be in a 'free flow' or in a 'jammed' state. Hence the phase diagram in the domain 0 <= α1, α2 <= 1 consists of four regions with boundaries depending on β1 and β2. The regions meet in a single point on the diagonal of the domain. Our analytical predictions for the phase boundaries as well as for the currents and densities in each phase are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Shuffled magnetization-prepared multicontrast rapid gradient-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peng; Zhu, Xucheng; Tang, Shuyu; Leynes, Andrew; Jakary, Angela; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-01-01

    To develop a novel acquisition and reconstruction method for magnetization-prepared 3-dimensional multicontrast rapid gradient-echo imaging, using Hankel matrix completion in combination with compressed sensing and parallel imaging. A random k-space shuffling strategy was implemented in simulation and in vivo human experiments at 7 T for 3-dimensional inversion recovery, T2 /diffusion preparation, and magnetization transfer imaging. We combined compressed sensing, based on total variation and spatial-temporal low-rank regularizations, and parallel imaging with pixel-wise Hankel matrix completion, allowing the reconstruction of tens of multicontrast 3-dimensional images from 3- or 6-min scans. The simulation result showed that the proposed method can reconstruct signal-recovery curves in each voxel and was robust for typical in vivo signal-to-noise ratio with 16-times acceleration. In vivo studies achieved 4 to 24 times accelerations for inversion recovery, T2 /diffusion preparation, and magnetization transfer imaging. Furthermore, the contrast was improved by resolving pixel-wise signal-recovery curves after magnetization preparation. The proposed method can improve acquisition efficiencies for magnetization-prepared MRI and tens of multicontrast 3-dimensional images could be recovered from a single scan. Furthermore, it was robust against noise, applicable for recovering multi-exponential signals, and did not require any previous knowledge of model parameters. Magn Reson Med 79:62-70, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Climate Action Tracker Update. Climate Shuffle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, N.; Fekete, H.; Vieweg, M.; Hare, B.; Schaeffer, M.; Rocha, M.; Larkin, J.; Guetschow, J.; Jeffery, L.

    2011-11-15

    The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) compares and assesses national and global action against a range of different climate targets across all relevant time frames, starting with an ongoing analysis of countries' current emission reduction pledges. National action on climate change mitigation appears to be joining the international climate negotiations in the new and ever popular 'climate shuffle' dance. It involves maximum effort and motion while staying in the same spot, or even, in some cases, going backwards. Recent emissions trends and estimates of the effects of those policies in place and proposed lead to a new estimate that warming is likely to approach 4C by 2100, significantly above the warming that would result from full implementation of the pledges (3.3C). The continuous global fossil-fuel intensive development of the past decade suggests that high warming levels of 4C are more plausible than assuming full implementation of current pledges. Evidence is ever increasing that existing and planned policies are not sufficient for countries to meet these pledges.

  13. Cumulants, free cumulants and half-shuffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Fard, Kurusch; Patras, Frédéric

    2015-04-08

    Free cumulants were introduced as the proper analogue of classical cumulants in the theory of free probability. There is a mix of similarities and differences, when one considers the two families of cumulants. Whereas the combinatorics of classical cumulants is well expressed in terms of set partitions, that of free cumulants is described and often introduced in terms of non-crossing set partitions. The formal series approach to classical and free cumulants also largely differs. The purpose of this study is to put forward a different approach to these phenomena. Namely, we show that cumulants, whether classical or free, can be understood in terms of the algebra and combinatorics underlying commutative as well as non-commutative (half-)shuffles and (half-) unshuffles. As a corollary, cumulants and free cumulants can be characterized through linear fixed point equations. We study the exponential solutions of these linear fixed point equations, which display well the commutative, respectively non-commutative, character of classical and free cumulants.

  14. Lithiation-induced shuffling of atomic stacks

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2014-09-10

    In rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, understanding the atomic-scale mechanism of Li-induced structural evolution occurring at the host electrode materials provides essential knowledge for design of new high performance electrodes. Here, we report a new crystalline-crystalline phase transition mechanism in single-crystal Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires upon lithiation. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observed that stacks of atomic planes in an intermediate hexagonal (h-)LiZnSb phase are "shuffled" to accommodate the geometrical confinement stress arising from lamellar nanodomains intercalated by lithium ions. Such atomic rearrangement arises from the anisotropic lithium diffusion and is accompanied by appearance of partial dislocations. This transient structure mediates further phase transition from h-LiZnSb to cubic (c-)Li2ZnSb, which is associated with a nearly "zero-strain" coherent interface viewed along the [001]h/[111]c directions. This study provides new mechanistic insights into complex electrochemically driven crystalline-crystalline phase transitions in lithium-ion battery electrodes and represents a noble example of atomic-level structural and interfacial rearrangements.

  15. Asymptotic Solutions of Serial Radial Fuel Shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Nong Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanism of traveling wave reactors (TWRs is investigated from the mathematical physics point of view, in which a stationary fission wave is formed by radial fuel drifting. A two dimensional cylindrically symmetric core is considered and the fuel is assumed to drift radially according to a continuous fuel shuffling scheme. A one-group diffusion equation with burn-up dependent macroscopic coefficients is set up. The burn-up dependent macroscopic coefficients were assumed to be known as functions of neutron fluence. By introducing the effective multiplication factor keff, a nonlinear eigenvalue problem is formulated. The 1-D stationary cylindrical coordinate problem can be solved successively by analytical and numerical integrations for associated eigenvalues keff. Two representative 1-D examples are shown for inward and outward fuel drifting motions, respectively. The inward fuel drifting has a higher keff than the outward one. The 2-D eigenvalue problem has to be solved by a more complicated method, namely a pseudo time stepping iteration scheme. Its 2-D asymptotic solutions are obtained together with certain eigenvalues keff for several fuel inward drifting speeds. Distributions of the neutron flux, the neutron fluence, the infinity multiplication factor kinf and the normalized power are presented for two different drifting speeds.

  16. Random Whole Metagenomic Sequencing for Forensic Discrimination of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Smith, Renee J.; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations. PMID:25111003

  17. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia S Khodakova

    Full Text Available Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER; similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF; non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS; and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  18. Development of novel vaccines using DNA shuffling and screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Christopher P; Soong, Nay Wei; Whalen, Robert G; Punnonen, Juha

    2004-02-01

    DNA shuffling and screening technologies recombine and evolve genes in vitro to rapidly obtain molecules with improved biological activity and fitness. In this way, genes from related strains are bred like plants or livestock and their successive progeny are selected. These technologies have also been called molecular breeding-directed molecular evolution. Recent developments in bioinformatics-assisted computer programs have facilitated the design, synthesis and analysis of DNA shuffled libraries of chimeric molecules. New applications in vaccine development are among the key features of DNA shuffling and screening technologies because genes from several strains or antigenic variants of pathogens can be recombined to create novel molecules capable of inducing immune responses that protect against infections by multiple strains of pathogens. In addition, molecules such as co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines have been evolved to have improved T-cell proliferation and cytokine production compared with the wild-type human molecules. These molecules can be used to immunomodulate vaccine responsiveness and have multiple applications in infectious diseases, cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. Moreover, DNA shuffling and screening technologies can facilitate process development of vaccine manufacturing through increased expression of recombinant polypeptides and viruses. Therefore, DNA shuffling and screening technologies can overcome some of the challenges that vaccine development currently faces.

  19. Rank-Size Distribution of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal

    We trace the rank size distribution of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta distribution than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of distributions dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of distributions. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked distribution of sizes of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of distributions that are mixed and ranked.

  20. An Improved Shuffled Frog-Leaping Algorithm for Flexible Job Shop Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Lu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The flexible job shop scheduling problem is a well-known combinatorial optimization problem. This paper proposes an improved shuffled frog-leaping algorithm to solve the flexible job shop scheduling problem. The algorithm possesses an adjustment sequence to design the strategy of local searching and an extremal optimization in information exchange. The computational result shows that the proposed algorithm has a powerful search capability in solving the flexible job shop scheduling problem compared with other heuristic algorithms, such as the genetic algorithm, tabu search and ant colony optimization. Moreover, the results also show that the improved strategies could improve the performance of the algorithm effectively.

  1. Enhanced production of fructosyltransferase in Aspergillus oryzae by genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghai; Duan, Mengjie; Liu, Yalan; Fan, Sen; Lin, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    To breed Aspergillus oryzae strains with high fructosyltransferase (FTase) activity using intraspecific protoplast fusion via genome-shuffling. A candidate library was developed using UV/LiCl of the conidia of A. oryzae SBB201. By screening for enzyme activity and cell biomass, two mutants (UV-11 and UV-76) were chosen for protoplast fusion and subsequent genome shuffling. After three rounds of genome recombination, a fusion mutant RIII-7 was obtained. Its FTase activity was 180 U g-1, approximately double that of the original strain, and RIII-7 was genetically stable. In fermentation culture, FTase activity of the genome-shuffled strain reached a maximum of 353 U g-1 using substrate-feeding method, and this value was approximately 3.4-times higher than that of the original strain A. oryzae SBB201. Intraspecific protoplast fusion of A. oryzae significantly enhanced FTase activity and generated a potentially useful strain for industrial production.

  2. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Equivalent Conditions of Complete Convergence for Weighted Sums of Sequences of Negatively Dependent Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingle Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete convergence for weighted sums of sequences of negatively dependent random variables is investigated. By applying moment inequality and truncation methods, the equivalent conditions of complete convergence for weighted sums of sequences of negatively dependent random variables are established. These results not only extend the corresponding results obtained by Li et al. (1995, Gut (1993, and Liang (2000 to sequences of negatively dependent random variables, but also improve them.

  4. Drawing a random number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard; Sørensen, Majken Vildrik

    2006-01-01

    highly uniform multidimensional draws, which are highly relevant for todays traffic models. This paper shows among others combined shuffling and scrambling seems needless, that scrambling gives the lowest correlation and that there are detectable differences between random numbers, dependent...

  5. Design of Long Period Pseudo-Random Sequences from the Addition of m -Sequences over 𝔽 p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Jian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-random sequence with good correlation property and large linear span is widely used in code division multiple access (CDMA communication systems and cryptology for reliable and secure information transmission. In this paper, sequences with long period, large complexity, balance statistics, and low cross-correlation property are constructed from the addition of m -sequences with pairwise-prime linear spans (AMPLS. Using m -sequences as building blocks, the proposed method proved to be an efficient and flexible approach to construct long period pseudo-random sequences with desirable properties from short period sequences. Applying the proposed method to 𝔽 2 , a signal set ( ( 2 n − 1 ( 2 m − 1 , ( 2 n + 1 ( 2 m + 1 , ( 2 ( n + 1 / 2 + 1 ( 2 ( m + 1 / 2 + 1 is constructed.

  6. Distributions on unbounded moment spaces and random moment sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Dette, Holger; Nagel, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we define distributions on moment spaces corresponding to measures on the real line with an unbounded support. We identify these distributions as limiting distributions of random moment vectors defined on compact moment spaces and as distributions corresponding to random spectral measures associated with the Jacobi, Laguerre and Hermite ensemble from random matrix theory. For random vectors on the unbounded moment spaces we prove a central limit theorem where the centering vecto...

  7. Modeling, design and testing of the electrostatic shuffle motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Wissink, Jeroen; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Sander, Louis; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Sander, A.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The shuffle motor is a linear electrostatic stepper motor employing a mechanical transformation to obtain large forces and small steps. A model has been made to calculate the step size and the driving voltage as a function of the load force and the motor geometry. The motor consists of three

  8. A Novel Method for Increasing the Entropy of a Sequence of Independent, Discrete Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczyslaw Jessa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel method for increasing the entropy of a sequence of independent, discrete random variables with arbitrary distributions. The method uses an auxiliary table and a novel theorem that concerns the entropy of a sequence in which the elements are a bitwise exclusive-or sum of independent discrete random variables.

  9. Cryptographic pseudo-random sequences from the chaotic Hénon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pseudo-random number sequences are useful in many applications including Monte-Carlo simulation, spread spectrum ... a pseudo-random binary sequence from the two-dimensional chaotic Hénon map is explored. ... is the Hénon map, a two-dimensional discrete-time nonlinear dynamical system represented by the state ...

  10. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Large-scale robot-assisted genome shuffling yields industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts with increased ethanol tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Tim; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Mertens, Stijn; Saels, Veerle; Verplaetse, Alex; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    During the final phases of bioethanol fermentation, yeast cells face high ethanol concentrations. This stress results in slower or arrested fermentations and limits ethanol production. Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with superior ethanol tolerance may therefore allow increased yield and efficiency. Genome shuffling has emerged as a powerful approach to rapidly enhance complex traits including ethanol tolerance, yet previous efforts have mostly relied on a mutagenized pool of a single strain, which can potentially limit the effectiveness. Here, we explore novel robot-assisted strategies that allow to shuffle the genomes of multiple parental yeasts on an unprecedented scale. Screening of 318 different yeasts for ethanol accumulation, sporulation efficiency, and genetic relatedness yielded eight heterothallic strains that served as parents for genome shuffling. In a first approach, the parental strains were subjected to multiple consecutive rounds of random genome shuffling with different selection methods, yielding several hybrids that showed increased ethanol tolerance. Interestingly, on average, hybrids from the first generation (F1) showed higher ethanol production than hybrids from the third generation (F3). In a second approach, we applied several successive rounds of robot-assisted targeted genome shuffling, yielding more than 3,000 targeted crosses. Hybrids selected for ethanol tolerance showed increased ethanol tolerance and production as compared to unselected hybrids, and F1 hybrids were on average superior to F3 hybrids. In total, 135 individual F1 and F3 hybrids were tested in small-scale very high gravity fermentations. Eight hybrids demonstrated superior fermentation performance over the commercial biofuel strain Ethanol Red, showing a 2 to 7% increase in maximal ethanol accumulation. In an 8-l pilot-scale test, the best-performing hybrid fermented medium containing 32% (w/v) glucose to dryness, yielding 18.7% (v/v) ethanol with a productivity

  12. Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm for Preemptive Project Scheduling Problems with Resource Vacations Based on Patterson Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA for the single-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problem where activities can be divided into equant units and interrupted during processing. Each activity consumes 0–3 types of resources which are renewable and temporarily not available due to resource vacations in each period. The presence of scarce resources and precedence relations between activities makes project scheduling a difficult and important task in project management. A recent popular metaheuristic shuffled frog leaping algorithm, which is enlightened by the predatory habit of frog group in a small pond, is adopted to investigate the project makespan improvement on Patterson benchmark sets which is composed of different small and medium size projects. Computational results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SFLA in reducing project makespan and minimizing activity splitting number within an average CPU runtime, 0.521 second. This paper exposes all the scheduling sequences for each project and shows that of the 23 best known solutions have been improved.

  13. A copyright protection scheme for digital images based on shuffled singular value decomposition and visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, B Pushpa; Singh, Kh Manglem; Roy, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new watermarking algorithm based on the shuffled singular value decomposition and the visual cryptography for copyright protection of digital images. It generates the ownership and identification shares of the image based on visual cryptography. It decomposes the image into low and high frequency sub-bands. The low frequency sub-band is further divided into blocks of same size after shuffling it and then the singular value decomposition is applied to each randomly selected block. Shares are generated by comparing one of the elements in the first column of the left orthogonal matrix with its corresponding element in the right orthogonal matrix of the singular value decomposition of the block of the low frequency sub-band. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme clearly verifies the copyright of the digital images, and is robust to withstand several image processing attacks. Comparison with the other related visual cryptography-based algorithms reveals that the proposed method gives better performance. The proposed method is especially resilient against the rotation attack.

  14. Mapping sequences by parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guziolowski Carito

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: We present the N-map method, a pairwise and asymmetrical approach which allows us to compare sequences by taking into account evolutionary events that produce shuffled, reversed or repeated elements. Basically, the optimal N-map of a sequence s over a sequence t is the best way of partitioning the first sequence into N parts and placing them, possibly complementary reversed, over the second sequence in order to maximize the sum of their gapless alignment scores. Results: We introduce an algorithm computing an optimal N-map with time complexity O (|s| × |t| × N using O (|s| × |t| × N memory space. Among all the numbers of parts taken in a reasonable range, we select the value N for which the optimal N-map has the most significant score. To evaluate this significance, we study the empirical distributions of the scores of optimal N-maps and show that they can be approximated by normal distributions with a reasonable accuracy. We test the functionality of the approach over random sequences on which we apply artificial evolutionary events. Practical Application: The method is illustrated with four case studies of pairs of sequences involving non-standard evolutionary events.

  15. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Aaron TL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. Results The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. Conclusions The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk.

  16. Quantifying biodiversity and asymptotics for a sequence of random strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Hitoshi; Kishino, Hirohisa

    2010-06-01

    We present a methodology for quantifying biodiversity at the sequence level by developing the probability theory on a set of strings. Further, we apply our methodology to the problem of quantifying the population diversity of microorganisms in several extreme environments and digestive organs and reveal the relation between microbial diversity and various environmental parameters.

  17. Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and random amplified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    21 of 30 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers produced 220 reproducible bands with average of 10.47 bands per primer and 80.12% of polymorphism. OPR02 primer showed the highest number of effective allele (Ne), Shannon index (I) and genetic diversity (H). Some of the cultivars had specific bands, ...

  18. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC...COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES...sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences. 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16

  19. Hybridisations of Variable Neighbourhood Search and Modified Simplex Elements to Harmony Search and Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithms for Process Optimisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aungkulanon, P.; Luangpaiboon, P.

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays, the engineering problem systems are large and complicated. An effective finite sequence of instructions for solving these problems can be categorised into optimisation and meta-heuristic algorithms. Though the best decision variable levels from some sets of available alternatives cannot be done, meta-heuristics is an alternative for experience-based techniques that rapidly help in problem solving, learning and discovery in the hope of obtaining a more efficient or more robust procedure. All meta-heuristics provide auxiliary procedures in terms of their own tooled box functions. It has been shown that the effectiveness of all meta-heuristics depends almost exclusively on these auxiliary functions. In fact, the auxiliary procedure from one can be implemented into other meta-heuristics. Well-known meta-heuristics of harmony search (HSA) and shuffled frog-leaping algorithms (SFLA) are compared with their hybridisations. HSA is used to produce a near optimal solution under a consideration of the perfect state of harmony of the improvisation process of musicians. A meta-heuristic of the SFLA, based on a population, is a cooperative search metaphor inspired by natural memetics. It includes elements of local search and global information exchange. This study presents solution procedures via constrained and unconstrained problems with different natures of single and multi peak surfaces including a curved ridge surface. Both meta-heuristics are modified via variable neighbourhood search method (VNSM) philosophy including a modified simplex method (MSM). The basic idea is the change of neighbourhoods during searching for a better solution. The hybridisations proceed by a descent method to a local minimum exploring then, systematically or at random, increasingly distant neighbourhoods of this local solution. The results show that the variant of HSA with VNSM and MSM seems to be better in terms of the mean and variance of design points and yields.

  20. Prediction of Protein Hotspots from Whole Protein Sequences by a Random Projection Ensemble System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjian Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot residues are important in the determination of protein-protein interactions, and they always perform specific functions in biological processes. The determination of hotspot residues is by the commonly-used method of alanine scanning mutagenesis experiments, which is always costly and time consuming. To address this issue, computational methods have been developed. Most of them are structure based, i.e., using the information of solved protein structures. However, the number of solved protein structures is extremely less than that of sequences. Moreover, almost all of the predictors identified hotspots from the interfaces of protein complexes, seldom from the whole protein sequences. Therefore, determining hotspots from whole protein sequences by sequence information alone is urgent. To address the issue of hotspot predictions from the whole sequences of proteins, we proposed an ensemble system with random projections using statistical physicochemical properties of amino acids. First, an encoding scheme involving sequence profiles of residues and physicochemical properties from the AAindex1 dataset is developed. Then, the random projection technique was adopted to project the encoding instances into a reduced space. Then, several better random projections were obtained by training an IBk classifier based on the training dataset, which were thus applied to the test dataset. The ensemble of random projection classifiers is therefore obtained. Experimental results showed that although the performance of our method is not good enough for real applications of hotspots, it is very promising in the determination of hotspot residues from whole sequences.

  1. Prediction of Protein Hotspots from Whole Protein Sequences by a Random Projection Ensemble System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinjian; Wang, Nian; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Chunhou; Wang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Hotspot residues are important in the determination of protein-protein interactions, and they always perform specific functions in biological processes. The determination of hotspot residues is by the commonly-used method of alanine scanning mutagenesis experiments, which is always costly and time consuming. To address this issue, computational methods have been developed. Most of them are structure based, i.e., using the information of solved protein structures. However, the number of solved protein structures is extremely less than that of sequences. Moreover, almost all of the predictors identified hotspots from the interfaces of protein complexes, seldom from the whole protein sequences. Therefore, determining hotspots from whole protein sequences by sequence information alone is urgent. To address the issue of hotspot predictions from the whole sequences of proteins, we proposed an ensemble system with random projections using statistical physicochemical properties of amino acids. First, an encoding scheme involving sequence profiles of residues and physicochemical properties from the AAindex1 dataset is developed. Then, the random projection technique was adopted to project the encoding instances into a reduced space. Then, several better random projections were obtained by training an IBk classifier based on the training dataset, which were thus applied to the test dataset. The ensemble of random projection classifiers is therefore obtained. Experimental results showed that although the performance of our method is not good enough for real applications of hotspots, it is very promising in the determination of hotspot residues from whole sequences. PMID:28718782

  2. An empirical study of the complexity and randomness of prediction error sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsaby, Joel

    2011-07-01

    We investigate a population of binary mistake sequences that result from learning with parametric models of different order. We obtain estimates of their error, algorithmic complexity and divergence from a purely random Bernoulli sequence. We study the relationship of these variables to the learner's information density parameter which is defined as the ratio between the lengths of the compressed to uncompressed files that contain the learner's decision rule. The results indicate that good learners have a low information density ρ while bad learners have a high ρ. Bad learners generate mistake sequences that are atypically complex or diverge stochastically from a purely random Bernoulli sequence. Good learners generate typically complex sequences with low divergence from Bernoulli sequences and they include mistake sequences generated by the Bayes optimal predictor. Based on the static algorithmic interference model of [18] the learner here acts as a static structure which "scatters" the bits of an input sequence (to be predicted) in proportion to its information density ρ thereby deforming its randomness characteristics.

  3. Do natural proteins differ from random sequences polypeptides? Natural vs. random proteins classification using an evolutionary neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide De Lucrezia

    Full Text Available Are extant proteins the exquisite result of natural selection or are they random sequences slightly edited by evolution? This question has puzzled biochemists for long time and several groups have addressed this issue comparing natural protein sequences to completely random ones coming to contradicting conclusions. Previous works in literature focused on the analysis of primary structure in an attempt to identify possible signature of evolutionary editing. Conversely, in this work we compare a set of 762 natural proteins with an average length of 70 amino acids and an equal number of completely random ones of comparable length on the basis of their structural features. We use an ad hoc Evolutionary Neural Network Algorithm (ENNA in order to assess whether and to what extent natural proteins are edited from random polypeptides employing 11 different structure-related variables (i.e. net charge, volume, surface area, coil, alpha helix, beta sheet, percentage of coil, percentage of alpha helix, percentage of beta sheet, percentage of secondary structure and surface hydrophobicity. The ENNA algorithm is capable to correctly distinguish natural proteins from random ones with an accuracy of 94.36%. Furthermore, we study the structural features of 32 random polypeptides misclassified as natural ones to unveil any structural similarity to natural proteins. Results show that random proteins misclassified by the ENNA algorithm exhibit a significant fold similarity to portions or subdomains of extant proteins at atomic resolution. Altogether, our results suggest that natural proteins are significantly edited from random polypeptides and evolutionary editing can be readily detected analyzing structural features. Furthermore, we also show that the ENNA, employing simple structural descriptors, can predict whether a protein chain is natural or random.

  4. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  5. Assessing randomness and complexity in human motion trajectories through analysis of symbolic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen ePeng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complexity is a hallmark of intelligent behavior consisting both of regular patterns and random variation. To quantitatively assess the complexity and randomness of human motion, we designed a motor task in which we translated subjects' motion trajectories into strings of symbol sequences. In the first part of the experiment participants were asked to perform self-paced movements to create repetitive patterns, copy pre-specified letter sequences, and generate random movements. To investigate whether the degree of randomness can be manipulated, in the second part of the experiment participants were asked to perform unpredictable movements in the context of a pursuit game, where they received feedback from an online Bayesian predictor guessing their next move. We analyzed symbol sequences representing subjects' motion trajectories with five common complexity measures: predictability, compressibility, approximate entropy, Lempel-Ziv complexity, as well as effective measure complexity. We found that subjects’ self-created patterns were the most complex, followed by drawing movements of letters and self-paced random motion. We also found that participants could change the randomness of their behavior depending on context and feedback. Our results suggest that humans can adjust both complexity and regularity in different movement types and contexts and that this can be assessed with information-theoretic measures of the symbolic sequences generated from movement trajectories.

  6. The role of exon shuffling in shaping protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    França Gustavo S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical protein-protein interaction (PPI is a critical phenomenon for the function of most proteins in living organisms and a significant fraction of PPIs are the result of domain-domain interactions. Exon shuffling, intron-mediated recombination of exons from existing genes, is known to have been a major mechanism of domain shuffling in metazoans. Thus, we hypothesized that exon shuffling could have a significant influence in shaping the topology of PPI networks. Results We tested our hypothesis by compiling exon shuffling and PPI data from six eukaryotic species: Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Arabidopsis thaliana. For all four metazoan species, genes enriched in exon shuffling events presented on average higher vertex degree (number of interacting partners in PPI networks. Furthermore, we verified that a set of protein domains that are simultaneously promiscuous (known to interact to multiple types of other domains, self-interacting (able to interact with another copy of themselves and abundant in the genomes presents a stronger signal for exon shuffling. Conclusions Exon shuffling appears to have been a recurrent mechanism for the emergence of new PPIs along metazoan evolution. In metazoan genomes, exon shuffling also promoted the expansion of some protein domains. We speculate that their promiscuous and self-interacting properties may have been decisive for that expansion.

  7. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  8. INSTRUCTIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE THEORY OF STOCHASTIC PROCESSES: Controlled random sequences and Markov chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkevich, A. A.; Chitashvili, R. Ya

    1982-12-01

    CONTENTSIntroduction Chapter I. Foundations of the general theory of controlled random sequences and Markov chains with the expected reward criterion § 1. Controlled random sequences, Markov chains, and models § 2. Necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality § 3. The Bellman equation for the value function and the existence of (ε-) optimal strategies Chapter II. Some problems in the theory of controlled homogeneous Markov chains § 4. Description of the solutions of the Bellman equation, a characterization of the value function, and the Bellman operator § 5. Sufficiency of stationary strategies in homogeneous Markov models § 6. The lexicographic Bellman equation References

  9. The algorithm of random length sequences synthesis for frame synchronization of digital television systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аndriy V. Sadchenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital television systems need to ensure that all digital signals processing operations are performed simultaneously and consistently. Frame synchronization dictated by the need to match phases of transmitter and receiver so that it would be possible to identify the start of a frame. As a frame synchronization signals are often used long length binary sequence with good aperiodic autocorrelation function. Aim: This work is dedicated to the development of the algorithm of random length sequences synthesis. Materials and Methods: The paper provides a comparative analysis of the known sequences, which can be used at present as synchronization ones, revealed their advantages and disadvantages. This work proposes the algorithm for the synthesis of binary synchronization sequences of random length with good autocorrelation properties based on noise generator with a uniform distribution law of probabilities. A "white noise" semiconductor generator is proposed to use as the initial material for the synthesis of binary sequences with desired properties. Results: The statistical analysis of the initial implementations of the "white noise" and synthesized sequences for frame synchronization of digital television is conducted. The comparative analysis of the synthesized sequences with known ones was carried out. The results show the benefits of obtained sequences in compare with known ones. The performed simulations confirm the obtained results. Conclusions: Thus, the search algorithm of binary synchronization sequences with desired autocorrelation properties received. According to this algorithm, the sequence can be longer in length and without length limitations. The received sync sequence can be used for frame synchronization in modern digital communication systems that will increase their efficiency and noise immunity.

  10. Theoretical study of polymeric mixtures with different sequence statistics. I. Ising class: Linear random copolymers with different statistical sequences and ternary blends of linear random copolymers with homopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Shuyan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chakraborty, Arup K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-01-15

    We derive a Landau free energy functional for polymeric mixtures containing components with different sequence statistics. We then apply this general field theory to two mixtures that belong to the Ising universality class: mixtures of two different linear random copolymers, and ternary systems of linear random copolymers and two homopolymers. We discuss the instability conditions for the homogeneous state of these mixtures, and calculate the structure factors for different components in the homogeneous state. The structure factors show interesting features which can directly be compared with scattering experiments carried out with selectively deuterated samples. We also work out the eigenmodes representing the least stable concentration fluctuations for these mixtures. The nature of these concentration fluctuations provides information regarding the ordered phases and the kinetic pathways that lead to them. We find various demixing modes for different characteristics of the two mixtures (e.g., average compositions, statistical correlation lengths, and volume fractions). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. II: Spike Shuffling Methods on LIF Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Synapses may undergo variable changes during plasticity because of the variability of spike patterns such as temporal stochasticity and spatial randomness. Here, we call the variability of synaptic weight changes during plasticity to be efficacy variability. In this paper, we investigate how four aspects of spike pattern statistics (i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations) influence the efficacy variability under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and synaptic homeostasis (the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded), by implementing spike shuffling methods onto spike patterns self-organized by a network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. With the increase of the decay time scale of the inhibitory synaptic currents, the LIF network undergoes a transition from asynchronous state to weak synchronous state and then to synchronous bursting state. We first shuffle these spike patterns using a variety of methods, each designed to evidently change a specific pattern statistics; and then investigate the change of efficacy variability of the synapses under STDP and synaptic homeostasis, when the neurons in the network fire according to the spike patterns before and after being treated by a shuffling method. In this way, we can understand how the change of pattern statistics may cause the change of efficacy variability. Our results are consistent with those of our previous study which implements spike-generating models on converging motifs. We also find that burstiness/regularity is important to determine the efficacy variability under asynchronous states, while heterogeneity of cross-correlations is the main factor to cause efficacy variability when the network moves into synchronous bursting states (the states observed in epilepsy). PMID:27555816

  12. rMotifGen: random motif generator for DNA and protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardin C Timothy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of short, subtle conserved motif regions within a set of related DNA or amino acid sequences can lead to discoveries about important regulatory domains such as transcription factor and DNA binding sites as well as conserved protein domains. In order to help assess motif detection algorithms on motifs with varying properties and levels of conservation, we have developed a computational tool, rMotifGen, with the sole purpose of generating a number of random DNA or protein sequences containing short sequence motifs. Each motif consensus can be user-defined, randomly generated, or created from a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM. Insertions and mutations within these motifs are created according to user-defined parameters and substitution matrices. The resulting sequences can be helpful in mutational simulations and in testing the limits of motif detection algorithms. Results Two implementations of rMotifGen have been created, one providing a graphical user interface (GUI for random motif construction, and the other serving as a command line interface. The second implementation has the added advantages of platform independence and being able to be called in a batch mode. rMotifGen was used to construct sample sets of sequences containing DNA motifs and amino acid motifs that were then tested against the Gibbs sampler and MEME packages. Conclusion rMotifGen provides an efficient and convenient method for creating random DNA or amino acid sequences with a variable number of motifs, where the instance of each motif can be incorporated using a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM or by creating an instance mutated from its corresponding consensus using an evolutionary model based on substitution matrices. rMotifGen is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/brg/rMotifGen/.

  13. The Effect of Interference on Temporal Order Memory for Random and Fixed Sequences in Nondemented Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolentino, Jerlyn C.; Pirogovsky, Eva; Luu, Trinh; Toner, Chelsea K.; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effect of temporal interference on order memory for fixed and random sequences in young adults and nondemented older adults. The results demonstrate that temporal order memory for fixed and random sequences is impaired in nondemented older adults, particularly when temporal interference is high. However, temporal order…

  14. Distribution of the phenotypic effects of random homologous recombination between two virus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Vuillaume

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination has an evident impact on virus evolution and emergence of new pathotypes, and has generated an immense literature. However, the distribution of phenotypic effects caused by genome-wide random homologous recombination has never been formally investigated. Previous data on the subject have promoted the implicit view that most viral recombinant genomes are likely to be deleterious or lethal if the nucleotide identity of parental sequences is below 90%. We decided to challenge this view by creating a bank of near-random recombinants between two viral species of the genus Begomovirus (Family Geminiviridae exhibiting 82% nucleotide identity, and by testing infectivity and in planta accumulation of recombinant clones randomly extracted from this bank. The bank was created by DNA-shuffling-a technology initially applied to the random shuffling of individual genes, and here implemented for the first time to shuffle full-length viral genomes. Together with our previously described system allowing the direct cloning of full-length infectious geminivirus genomes, it provided a unique opportunity to generate hundreds of "mosaic" virus genomes, directly testable for infectivity. A subset of 47 randomly chosen recombinants was sequenced, individually inoculated into tomato plants, and compared with the parental viruses. Surprisingly, our results showed that all recombinants were infectious and accumulated at levels comparable or intermediate to that of the parental clones. This indicates that, in our experimental system, despite the fact that the parental genomes differ by nearly 20%, lethal and/or large deleterious effects of recombination are very rare, in striking contrast to the common view that has emerged from previous studies published on other viruses.

  15. Expressed sequence tags of randomly selected cDNA clones from Eucalyptus globulus-Pisolithus tinctorius ectomycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagu, D; Martin, F

    1995-01-01

    Random sequencing of cDNA clones from Eucalyptus globulus-Pisolithus tinctorius ectomycorrhizal tissues was carried out to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Database comparisons revealed that 42% of the cDNAs corresponded to previously sequenced genes. These ESTs represent efficient molecular markers to analyze changes in gene expression during the formation of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

  16. NullSeq: A Tool for Generating Random Coding Sequences with Desired Amino Acid and GC Contents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia S Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of over- and under-represented sequence motifs in genomes provides evidence of selective evolutionary pressures on biological mechanisms such as transcription, translation, ligand-substrate binding, and host immunity. In order to accurately identify motifs and other genome-scale patterns of interest, it is essential to be able to generate accurate null models that are appropriate for the sequences under study. While many tools have been developed to create random nucleotide sequences, protein coding sequences are subject to a unique set of constraints that complicates the process of generating appropriate null models. There are currently no tools available that allow users to create random coding sequences with specified amino acid composition and GC content for the purpose of hypothesis testing. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we developed a method that generates unbiased random sequences with pre-specified amino acid and GC content, which we have developed into a python package. Our method is the simplest way to obtain maximally unbiased random sequences that are subject to GC usage and primary amino acid sequence constraints. Furthermore, this approach can easily be expanded to create unbiased random sequences that incorporate more complicated constraints such as individual nucleotide usage or even di-nucleotide frequencies. The ability to generate correctly specified null models will allow researchers to accurately identify sequence motifs which will lead to a better understanding of biological processes as well as more effective engineering of biological systems.

  17. Preliminary concept design of sodium-cooled radial fuel shuffling traveling wave reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, W.; Zheng, M.; Chu, X.; Zhang, D.; Su, G.; Qiu, S. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2014-07-01

    The concept of traveling wave reactor (TWR) has been investigated for several decades and has been applied to kinds of reactors. Radial fuel shuffling TWR is a new TWR concept, which has been put forward for only a few years by Terra Power LCC. In the present paper, a sodium-cooled radial fuel shuffling TWR is preliminarily designed. To perform neutronic and burn-up investigation, a MCNP-ORIGEN coupled code system, called MCORE, is used. The comparison between calculation results of MCORE and benchmark values showed the calculation ability of MCORE. The calculation results of radial fuel shuffling TWR show that the asymptotic κ{sub eff} parabolically varies with the shuffling period, while the burn-up increase linearly with shuffling period. The power peak shifts from the core inside to the core outside. To reduce the power peak, shuffling period 450 days is recognized as the best design. The asymptotic is 1.020 and the average burn-up is about 156 MWd/kg-HM. (author)

  18. PTESFinder: a computational method to identify post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES) events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuogu, Osagie G; Alhasan, Abd A; Alafghani, Hani M; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Elliott, David J; Elliot, David J; Jackson, Michael S

    2016-01-13

    Transcripts, which have been subject to Post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES), have an exon order inconsistent with the underlying genomic sequence. These have been identified in a wide variety of tissues and cell types from many eukaryotes, and are now known to be mostly circular, cytoplasmic, and non-coding. Although there is no uniformly ascribed function, several have been shown to be involved in gene regulation. Accurate identification of these transcripts can, however, be difficult due to artefacts from a wide variety of sources. Here, we present a computational method, PTESFinder, to identify these transcripts from high throughput RNAseq data. Uniquely, it systematically excludes potential artefacts emanating from pseudogenes, segmental duplications, and template switching, and outputs both PTES and canonical exon junction counts to facilitate comparative analyses. In comparison with four existing methods, PTESFinder achieves highest specificity and comparable sensitivity at a variety of read depths. PTESFinder also identifies between 13 % and 41.6 % more structures, compared to publicly available methods recently used to identify human circular RNAs. With high sensitivity and specificity, user-adjustable filters that target known sources of false positives, and tailored output to facilitate comparison of transcript levels, PTESFinder will facilitate the discovery and analysis of these poorly understood transcripts.

  19. Enhancement of bacteriolysis of Shuffled phage PhiX174 gene E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chun-lai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial ghosts that are generated using the regulated PhiX174 lysis gene E offer a new avenue for the study of inactivated vaccines. Here, we constructed a library of mutant gene E using a gene-shuffling technique. After screening and recombination with the prokaryotic non-fusion expression vector pBV220, two lysis plasmids were selected. Among which, a novel mutant E gene (named mE, consisting of a 74-bp non-encoding sequence at 5'-end and a 201-bp gene ΔE, significantly increased the lysis effect on prokaryotic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. Moreover, lysis efficiency, as measured by the OD600 value, reached 1.0 (109 CFU, avoiding the bottleneck problem observed with other bacterial lysis procedures, which results in a low concentration of bacteria in suspension, and consequent low production of bacterial ghosts. Our results may provide a promising avenue for the development of bacterial ghost vaccines.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer from Eukarya to bacteria and domain shuffling: the alpha-amylase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lage, J-L; Feller, G; Janecek, S

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amylases are present in all kingdoms of the living world. Despite strong conservation of the tertiary structure, only a few amino acids are conserved in interkingdom comparisons. Animal alpha-amylases are characterized by several typical motifs and biochemical properties. A few cases of such alpha-amylases have been previously reported in some eubacterial species. We screened the bacterial genomes available in the sequence databases for new occurrences of animal-like alpha-amylases. Three novel cases were found, which belong to unrelated bacterial phyla: Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Microbulbifer degradans, and Thermobifida fusca. All the animal-like alpha-amylases in Bacteria probably result from repeated horizontal gene transfer from animals. The M. degradans genome also contains bacterial-type and plant-type alpha-amylases in addition to the animal-type one. Thus, this species exhibits alpha-amylases of animal, plant, and bacterial origins. Moreover, the similarities in the extra C-terminal domains (different from both the alpha-amylase domain C and the starch-binding domain), when present, also suggest interkingdom as well as intragenomic shuffling.

  1. Engineering cellulosic bioreactors by template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination (TADSir).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leroy K

    2014-10-01

    The current study focuses on development of a bioreactor engineering strategy based on exploitation of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Chimeric A. thaliana glycosyl hydrolase (GH) gene libraries were assembled using a novel directed evolution strategy (TADSir: template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination) that promotes DNA recombination by reassembly of DNA fragments on unique gene templates. TADSir was modeled using a set of algorithms designed to simulate DNA interactions based on nearest neighbor base stacking interactions and Gibb's free energy differences between helical coil and folded DNA states. The algorithms allow for target gene prediction and for in silica analysis of chimeric gene library composition. Further, the study investigated utilization of A. thaliana GH sequence space for bioreactor design by evolving 20 A. thaliana genes representing the GH1, GH3, GH5, GH9 and GH10 gene families. Notably, TADSir achieved streamlined engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and spinach mesophyll protoplast bioreactors capable of processing CM cellulose, Avicel and xylan. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. On the statistical implications of certain Random permutations in Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs) and second order self-similar processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Allan T.; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2000-01-01

    . The implications for the correlation structure when shuffling an exactly second-order self-similar process are examined. We apply the Markovian arrival process (MAP) as a tool to investigate whether general conclusions can be made with regard to the statistical implications of the shuffling experiments......In this paper, we examine the implications of certain random permutations in an arrival process that have gained considerable interest in recent literature. The so-called internal and external shuffling have been used to explain phenomena observed in traffic traces from LANs. Loosely, the internal...... shuffling can be viewed as a way of performing local permutations in the arrival stream, while the external shuffling is a way of performing global permutations. We derive formulas for the correlation structures of the shuffled processes in terms of the original arrival process in great generality...

  3. No evidence that mRNAs have lower folding free energies than random sequences with the same dinucleotide distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Christopher; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1999-01-01

    This work investigates whether mRNA has a lower estimated folding free energy than random sequences. The free energy estimates are calculated by the mfold program for prediction of RNA secondary structures. For a set of 46 mRNAs it is shown that the predicted free energy is not significantly...... different from random sequences with the same dinucleotide distribution. For random sequences with the same mononucleotide distribution it has previously been shown that the native mRNA sequences have a lower predicted free energy, which indicates a more stable structure than random sequences. However......, dinucleotide content is important when assessing the significance of predicted free energy as the physical stability of RNA secondary structure is known to depend on dinucleotide base stacking energies. Even known RNA secondary structures, like tRNAs, can be shown to have predicted free energies...

  4. Hydraulic Analysis of Water Distribution Network Using Shuffled Complex Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Moosavian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic analysis of water distribution networks is an important problem in civil engineering. A widely used approach in steady-state analysis of water distribution networks is the global gradient algorithm (GGA. However, when the GGA is applied to solve these networks, zero flows cause a computation failure. On the other hand, there are different mathematical formulations for hydraulic analysis under pressure-driven demand and leakage simulation. This paper introduces an optimization model for the hydraulic analysis of water distribution networks using a metaheuristic method called shuffled complex evolution (SCE algorithm. In this method, applying if-then rules in the optimization model is a simple way in handling pressure-driven demand and leakage simulation, and there is no need for an initial solution vector which must be chosen carefully in many other procedures if numerical convergence is to be achieved. The overall results indicate that the proposed method has the capability of handling various pipe networks problems without changing in model or mathematical formulation. Application of SCE in optimization model can lead to accurate solutions in pipes with zero flows. Finally, it can be concluded that the proposed method is a suitable alternative optimizer challenging other methods especially in terms of accuracy.

  5. A sequence-based method to predict the impact of regulatory variants using random forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao; Gan, Mingxin; Jiang, Rui

    2017-03-14

    Most disease-associated variants identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) exist in noncoding regions. In spite of the common agreement that such variants may disrupt biological functions of their hosting regulatory elements, it remains a great challenge to characterize the risk of a genetic variant within the implicated genome sequence. Therefore, it is essential to develop an effective computational model that is not only capable of predicting the potential risk of a genetic variant but also valid in interpreting how the function of the genome is affected with the occurrence of the variant. We developed a method named kmerForest that used a random forest classifier with k-mer counts to predict accessible chromatin regions purely based on DNA sequences. We demonstrated that our method outperforms existing methods in distinguishing known accessible chromatin regions from random genomic sequences. Furthermore, the performance of our method can further be improved with the incorporation of sequence conservation features. Based on this model, we assessed importance of the k-mer features by a series of permutation experiments, and we characterized the risk of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the function of the genome using the difference between the importance of the k-mer features affected by the occurrence of the SNP. We conducted a series of experiments and showed that our model can well discriminate between pathogenic and normal SNPs. Particularly, our model correctly prioritized SNPs that are proved to be enriched for the binding sites of FOXA1 in breast cancer cell lines from previous studies. We presented a novel method to interpret functional genetic variants purely base on DNA sequences. The proposed k-mer based score offers an effective means of measuring the impact of SNPs on the function of the genome, and thus shedding light on the identification of genetic risk factors underlying complex traits and diseases.

  6. Random amino acid mutations and protein misfolding lead to Shannon limit in sequence-structure communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Martin Lisewski

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of genomic information from coding sequence to protein structure during protein synthesis is subject to stochastic errors. To analyze transmission limits in the presence of spurious errors, Shannon's noisy channel theorem is applied to a communication channel between amino acid sequences and their structures established from a large-scale statistical analysis of protein atomic coordinates. While Shannon's theorem confirms that in close to native conformations information is transmitted with limited error probability, additional random errors in sequence (amino acid substitutions and in structure (structural defects trigger a decrease in communication capacity toward a Shannon limit at 0.010 bits per amino acid symbol at which communication breaks down. In several controls, simulated error rates above a critical threshold and models of unfolded structures always produce capacities below this limiting value. Thus an essential biological system can be realistically modeled as a digital communication channel that is (a sensitive to random errors and (b restricted by a Shannon error limit. This forms a novel basis for predictions consistent with observed rates of defective ribosomal products during protein synthesis, and with the estimated excess of mutual information in protein contact potentials.

  7. Random amino acid mutations and protein misfolding lead to Shannon limit in sequence-structure communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisewski, Andreas Martin

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of genomic information from coding sequence to protein structure during protein synthesis is subject to stochastic errors. To analyze transmission limits in the presence of spurious errors, Shannon's noisy channel theorem is applied to a communication channel between amino acid sequences and their structures established from a large-scale statistical analysis of protein atomic coordinates. While Shannon's theorem confirms that in close to native conformations information is transmitted with limited error probability, additional random errors in sequence (amino acid substitutions) and in structure (structural defects) trigger a decrease in communication capacity toward a Shannon limit at 0.010 bits per amino acid symbol at which communication breaks down. In several controls, simulated error rates above a critical threshold and models of unfolded structures always produce capacities below this limiting value. Thus an essential biological system can be realistically modeled as a digital communication channel that is (a) sensitive to random errors and (b) restricted by a Shannon error limit. This forms a novel basis for predictions consistent with observed rates of defective ribosomal products during protein synthesis, and with the estimated excess of mutual information in protein contact potentials.

  8. Coleus blumei viroid 6: a new tentative member of the genus Coleviroid derived from natural genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wan-Ying; Li, Shi-Fang; Wu, Zu-Jian; Jiang, Dong-Mei; Sano, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    Coleus blumei can be infected by several viroids of the genus Coleviroid. One year after detecting a mixed infection of coleus blumei viroid 1 (CbVd-1) and 5 (CbVd-5) in coleus seedlings inoculated with these two viroids, we found an additional viroid-like RNA. Sequence analysis revealed a viroid of 342 nucleotides that contains the central conserved region of coleviroids and is a chimera of the left half of CbVd-3 and the right half of CbVd-5. This new viroid, tentatively referred to as coleus blumei viroid 6 (CbVd-6), appears to have arisen from a natural recombination event or genome shuffling.

  9. Cardiorespiratory Kinetics Determined by Pseudo-Random Binary Sequences - Comparisons between Walking and Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Thieschäfer, L; Heine, O; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to compare cardiorespiratory kinetics as a response to a standardised work rate protocol with pseudo-random binary sequences between cycling and walking in young healthy subjects. Muscular and pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics as well as heart rate kinetics were expected to be similar for walking and cycling. Cardiac data and V̇O2 of 23 healthy young subjects were measured in response to pseudo-random binary sequences. Kinetics were assessed applying time series analysis. Higher maxima of cross-correlation functions between work rate and the respective parameter indicate faster kinetics responses. Muscular V̇O2 kinetics were estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V̇O2 using a circulatory model. Muscular (walking vs. cycling [mean±SD in arbitrary units]: 0.40±0.08 vs. 0.41±0.08) and pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics (0.35±0.06 vs. 0.35±0.06) were not different, although the time courses of the cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 showed unexpected biphasic responses. Heart rate kinetics (0.50±0.14 vs. 0.40±0.14; P=0.017) was faster for walking. Regarding the biphasic cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 during walking, the assessment of muscular V̇O2 kinetics via pseudo-random binary sequences requires a circulatory model to account for cardio-dynamic distortions. Faster heart rate kinetics for walking should be considered by comparing results from cycle and treadmill ergometry. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Interference Suppression Performance of Automotive UWB Radars Using Pseudo Random Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pasya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra wideband (UWB automotive radars have attracted attention from the viewpoint of reducing traffic accidents. The performance of automotive radars may be degraded by interference from nearby radars using the same frequency. In this study, a scenario where two cars pass each other on a road was considered. Considering the utilization of cross-polarization, the desired-to-undesired signal power ratio (DUR was found to vary approximately from -10 to 30 dB. Different pseudo random sequences were employed for spectrum spreading the different radar signals to mitigate the interference effects. This paper evaluates the interference suppression provided by maximum length sequence (MLS and Gold sequence (GS through numerical simulations of the radar’s performance in terms of probability of false alarm and probability of detection. It was found that MLS and GS yielded nearly the same performance when the DUR is -10 dB (worst case; for example when fixing the probability of false alarm to 0.0001, the probabilities of detection were 0.964 and 0.946 respectively. The GS are more advantageous than MLS due to larger number of different sequences having the same length in GS than in MLS.

  11. Partial summations of stationary sequences of non-Gaussian random variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Gunnar; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of the sum of a finite number of identically distributed random variables is in many cases easily determined given that the variables are independent. The moments of any order of the sum can always be expressed by the moments of the single term without computational problems...... of convergence of the distribution of a sum (or an integral) of mutually dependent random variables to the Gaussian distribution. The paper is closely related to the work in Ditlevsen el al. [Ditlevsen, O., Mohr, G. & Hoffmeyer, P. Integration of non-Gaussian fields. Prob. Engng Mech 11 (1996) 15-23](2)........ However, in the case of dependency between the terms even calculation of a few of the first moments of the sum presents serious computational problems. By use of computerized symbol manipulations it is practicable to obtain exact moments of partial sums of stationary sequences of mutually dependent...

  12. Post-transcriptional exon shuffling events in humans can be evolutionarily conserved and abundant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balool, Haya H; Weber, David; Liu, Yilei; Wade, Mark; Guleria, Kamlesh; Nam, Pitsien Lang Ping; Clayton, Jake; Rowe, William; Coxhead, Jonathan; Irving, Julie; Elliott, David J; Hall, Andrew G; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Jackson, Michael S

    2011-11-01

    In silico analyses have established that transcripts from some genes can be processed into RNAs with rearranged exon order relative to genomic structure (post-transcriptional exon shuffling, or PTES). Although known to contribute to transcriptome diversity in some species, to date the structure, distribution, abundance, and functional significance of human PTES transcripts remains largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we identify 205 putative human PTES products from 176 genes. We validate 72 out of 112 products analyzed using RT-PCR, and identify additional PTES products structurally related to 61% of validated targets. Sequencing of these additional products reveals GT-AG dinucleotides at >95% of the splice junctions, confirming that they are processed by the spliceosome. We show that most PTES transcripts are expressed in a wide variety of human tissues, that they can be polyadenylated, and that some are conserved in mouse. We also show that they can extend into 5' and 3' UTRs, consistent with formation via trans-splicing of independent pre-mRNA molecules. Finally, we use real-time PCR to compare the abundance of PTES exon junctions relative to canonical exon junctions within the transcripts from seven genes. PTES exon junctions are present at 90% of the levels of canonical junctions, with transcripts from MAN1A2, PHC3, TLE4, and CDK13 exhibiting the highest levels. This is the first systematic experimental analysis of PTES in human, and it suggests both that the phenomenon is much more widespread than previously thought and that some PTES transcripts could be functional.

  13. The evolution of proteins from random amino acid sequences: II. Evidence from the statistical distributions of the lengths of modern protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S H

    1994-04-01

    This paper continues an examination of the hypothesis that modern proteins evolved from random heteropeptide sequences. In support of the hypothesis, White and Jacobs (1993, J Mol Evol 36:79-95) have shown that any sequence chosen randomly from a large collection of nonhomologous proteins has a 90% or better chance of having a lengthwise distribution of amino acids that is indistinguishable from the random expectation regardless of amino acid type. The goal of the present study was to investigate the possibility that the random-origin hypothesis could explain the lengths of modern protein sequences without invoking specific mechanisms such as gene duplication or exon splicing. The sets of sequences examined were taken from the 1989 PIR database and consisted of 1,792 "super-family" proteins selected to have little sequence identity, 623 E. coli sequences, and 398 human sequences. The length distributions of the proteins could be described with high significance by either of two closely related probability density functions: The gamma distribution with parameter 2 or the distribution for the sum of two exponential random independent variables. A simple theory for the distributions was developed which assumes that (1) protoprotein sequences had exponentially distributed random independent lengths, (2) the length dependence of protein stability determined which of these protoproteins could fold into compact primitive proteins and thereby attain the potential for biochemical activity, (3) the useful protein sequences were preserved by the primitive genome, and (4) the resulting distribution of sequence lengths is reflected by modern proteins. The theory successfully predicts the two observed distributions which can be distinguished by the functional form of the dependence of protein stability on length. The theory leads to three interesting conclusions. First, it predicts that a tetra-nucleotide was the signal for primitive translation termination. This prediction is

  14. Genome shuffling of Propionibacterium shermanii for improving vitamin B12 production and comparative proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-Zhong; Huang, Jun-Sheng; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2010-07-20

    Genome shuffling is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of microbial phenotype. Here we improved vitamin B12 production of Propionibacterium shermanii by genome shuffling based on inactivated protoplast fusion. A genome shuffling strain with titer of vitamin B12 of 2.85 mgl(-1), named Propionibacterium shermanii-F2-3, was obtained. The genome shuffled strain produced about 61% improvement of vitamin B12 over the parent strain after 96 h. Comparative analysis of proteome profile was conducted between Propionibacterium shermanii 17 and F2-3. The expression levels of 38 proteins varied significantly in the genome shuffled strain compared with those in the parent strain. Of these proteins, 22 proteins were up-regulated, 16 proteins were down-regulated. Of the up-regulated proteins, 6 proteins (glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnS), Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (HemB), methionine synthase (Meth), riboflavin synthase (RibE), phosphofructo kinase (PfkA) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (Icd) is involved in the vitamin B12 biosynthesis pathway. They may be the key enzymes of vitamin B12 biosynthesis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Comparison of mRNA Sequencing with Random Primed and 3'-Directed Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yuguang; Soumillon, Magali; Wu, Jie; Hansen, Jens; Hu, Bin; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Jayaraman, Gomathi; Lim, Ryan; Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Ornelas, Loren; Bochicchio, Jim; Lenaeus, Lindsay; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Shim, Jaehee; Gomez, Emilda; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive; Thompson, Leslie M; Mahajan, Milind; Iyengar, Ravi; Sobie, Eric A; Azeloglu, Evren U; Birtwistle, Marc R

    2017-11-07

    Creating a cDNA library for deep mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq) is generally done by random priming, creating multiple sequencing fragments along each transcript. A 3'-end-focused library approach cannot detect differential splicing, but has potentially higher throughput at a lower cost, along with the ability to improve quantification by using transcript molecule counting with unique molecular identifiers (UMI) that correct PCR bias. Here, we compare an implementation of such a 3'-digital gene expression (3'-DGE) approach with "conventional" random primed mRNAseq. Given our particular datasets on cultured human cardiomyocyte cell lines, we find that, while conventional mRNAseq detects ~15% more genes and needs ~500,000 fewer reads per sample for equivalent statistical power, the resulting differentially expressed genes, biological conclusions, and gene signatures are highly concordant between two techniques. We also find good quantitative agreement at the level of individual genes between two techniques for both read counts and fold changes between given conditions. We conclude that, for high-throughput applications, the potential cost savings associated with 3'-DGE approach are likely a reasonable tradeoff for modest reduction in sensitivity and inability to observe alternative splicing, and should enable many larger scale studies focusing on not only differential expression analysis, but also quantitative transcriptome profiling.

  16. RSARF: Prediction of residue solvent accessibility from protein sequence using random forest method

    KAUST Repository

    Ganesan, Pugalenthi

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of protein structure from its amino acid sequence is still a challenging problem. The complete physicochemical understanding of protein folding is essential for the accurate structure prediction. Knowledge of residue solvent accessibility gives useful insights into protein structure prediction and function prediction. In this work, we propose a random forest method, RSARF, to predict residue accessible surface area from protein sequence information. The training and testing was performed using 120 proteins containing 22006 residues. For each residue, buried and exposed state was computed using five thresholds (0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%). The prediction accuracy for 0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50% thresholds are 72.9%, 78.25%, 78.12%, 77.57% and 72.07% respectively. Further, comparison of RSARF with other methods using a benchmark dataset containing 20 proteins shows that our approach is useful for prediction of residue solvent accessibility from protein sequence without using structural information. The RSARF program, datasets and supplementary data are available at http://caps.ncbs.res.in/download/pugal/RSARF/. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/89216/article#sthash.pwVGFUjq.dpuf

  17. Screening and breeding of high taxol producing fungi by genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Ping, WenXiang; Zhang, LiNa; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yan; Jin, Tao; Zhou, DongPo

    2008-03-01

    To apply the fundamental principles of genome shuffling in breeding of taxol-producing fungi, Nodulisporium sylviform was used as starting strain in this work. The procedures of protoplast fusion and genome shuffling were studied. Three hereditarily stable strains with high taxol production were obtained by four cycles of genome shuffling. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of taxol produced was confirmed using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and LC-MS. A high taxol producing fungus, Nodulisporium sylviform F4-26, was obtained, which produced 516.37 microg/L taxol. This value is 64.41% higher than that of the starting strain NCEU-1 and 31.52%-44.72% higher than that of the parent strains.

  18. Rapid selection of accessible and cleavable sites in RNA by Escherichia coli RNase P and random external guide sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lundblad, Eirik W.; Xiao, Gaoping; Ko, Jae-hyeong; Altman, Sidney

    2008-01-01

    A method of inhibiting the expression of particular genes by using external guide sequences (EGSs) has been improved in its rapidity and specificity. Random EGSs that have 14-nt random sequences are used in the selection procedure for an EGS that attacks the mRNA for a gene in a particular location. A mixture of the random EGSs, the particular target RNA, and RNase P is used in the diagnostic procedure, which, after completion, is analyzed in a gel with suitable control lanes. Within a few ho...

  19. Pseudo-random-bit-sequence phase modulation for reduced errors in a fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Jacob; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2016-12-15

    Low noise and drift in a laser-driven fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) are demonstrated by interrogating the sensor with a low-coherence laser. The laser coherence was reduced by broadening its optical spectrum using an external electro-optic phase modulator driven by either a sinusoidal or a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) waveform. The noise reduction measured in a FOG driven by a modulated laser agrees with the calculations based on the broadened laser spectrum. Using PRBS modulation, the linewidth of a laser was broadened from 10 MHz to more than 10 GHz, leading to a measured FOG noise of only 0.00073  deg/√h and a drift of 0.023  deg/h. To the best of our knowledge, these are the lowest noise and drift reported in a laser-driven FOG, and this noise is below the requirement for the inertial navigation of aircraft.

  20. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  1. AQUa: An Adaptive Framework for Compression of Sequencing Quality Scores with Random Access Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaens, Tom; Van Wallendael, Glenn; De Neve, Wesley; Lambert, Peter

    2017-09-25

    The past decade has seen the introduction of new technologies that significantly lowered the cost of genome sequencing. As a result, the amount of genomic data that must be stored and transmitted is increasing exponentially. To mitigate storage and transmission issues, we introduce a framework for lossless compression of quality scores. This paper proposes AQUa, an adaptive framework for lossless compression of quality scores. To compress these quality scores, AQUa makes use of a configurable set of coding tools, extended with a Context-Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding scheme (CABAC). When benchmarking AQUa against generic single-pass compressors, file sizes are reduced by up to 38.49% when comparing with GNU Gzip and by up to 6.48% when comparing with 7-Zip at the Ultra Setting, while still providing support for random access. When comparing AQUa with the purpose-built, single-pass, and state-of-the-art compressor SCALCE, which does not support random access, file sizes are reduced by up to 21.14%. When comparing AQUa with the purpose-built, dual-pass, and state-of-the-art compressor QVZ, which does not support random access, file sizes are larger by 6.42% to 33.47%. However, for one test file, the file size is 0.38% smaller, illustrating the strength of our single-pass compression framework. This work has been spurred by the current activity on genomic information representation (MPEG-G) within the ISO/IEC SC29/WG11 technical committee. The software is available on Github: https://github.com/tparidae/AQUa. Tom Paridaens (tom.paridaens@ugent.be).

  2. Simulating California reservoir operation using the classification and regression-tree algorithm combined with a shuffled cross-validation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiantian; Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Li, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The controlled outflows from a reservoir or dam are highly dependent on the decisions made by the reservoir operators, instead of a natural hydrological process. Difference exists between the natural upstream inflows to reservoirs and the controlled outflows from reservoirs that supply the downstream users. With the decision maker's awareness of changing climate, reservoir management requires adaptable means to incorporate more information into decision making, such as water delivery requirement, environmental constraints, dry/wet conditions, etc. In this paper, a robust reservoir outflow simulation model is presented, which incorporates one of the well-developed data-mining models (Classification and Regression Tree) to predict the complicated human-controlled reservoir outflows and extract the reservoir operation patterns. A shuffled cross-validation approach is further implemented to improve CART's predictive performance. An application study of nine major reservoirs in California is carried out. Results produced by the enhanced CART, original CART, and random forest are compared with observation. The statistical measurements show that the enhanced CART and random forest overperform the CART control run in general, and the enhanced CART algorithm gives a better predictive performance over random forest in simulating the peak flows. The results also show that the proposed model is able to consistently and reasonably predict the expert release decisions. Experiments indicate that the release operation in the Oroville Lake is significantly dominated by SWP allocation amount and reservoirs with low elevation are more sensitive to inflow amount than others.

  3. Ultra-Deep Optical Spectroscopy with PMAS. Using the Nod-and-Shuffle Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Martin M.; Fechner, Thomas; Wolter, Dieter; Kelz, Andreas; Becker, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    PMAS, the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer, is a new integral field spectrograph in the optical, which is optimized for good transmissionand high image quality from 350 nm to 1 μm. We present our plan to implementa CCD charge-shuffle mode to allow for beam switching with a very high degreeof sky subtraction accuracy for faint object 3-D spectroscopy.

  4. High-Performance Shuffle Motor Fabricated by Vertical Trench Isolation Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Yamahata, Christophe; Berenschot, Johan W.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Shuffle motors are electrostatic stepper micromotors that employ a built-in mechanical leverage to produce large output forces as well as high resolution displacements. These motors can generally move only over predefined paths that served as driving electrodes. Here, we present the design, modeling

  5. Shuffle motor: a high force, high precision linear electrostatic stepper motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Wissink, Jeroen; Sander, A.F.M.; Sander, Louis; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1997-01-01

    The shuffle motor is a electrostatic stepper motor that employs a mechanical transformation to obtain high forces and small steps. A model has been made to calculate the driving voltage, step size and maximum load to pull as well as the optimal geometry. Tests results are an effective step size of

  6. Rapid selection of accessible and cleavable sites in RNA by Escherichia coli RNase P and random external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Eirik W; Xiao, Gaoping; Ko, Jae-Hyeong; Altman, Sidney

    2008-02-19

    A method of inhibiting the expression of particular genes by using external guide sequences (EGSs) has been improved in its rapidity and specificity. Random EGSs that have 14-nt random sequences are used in the selection procedure for an EGS that attacks the mRNA for a gene in a particular location. A mixture of the random EGSs, the particular target RNA, and RNase P is used in the diagnostic procedure, which, after completion, is analyzed in a gel with suitable control lanes. Within a few hours, the procedure is complete. The action of EGSs designed by an older method is compared with EGSs designed by the random EGS method on mRNAs from two bacterial pathogens.

  7. Fully Automatic Myocardial Segmentation of Contrast Echocardiography Sequence Using Random Forests Guided by Shape Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanwei; Ho, Chin Pang; Toulemonde, Matthieu; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2017-09-26

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is an imaging technique that assesses left ventricle function and myocardial perfusion for the detection of coronary artery diseases. Automatic MCE perfusion quantification is challenging and requires accurate segmentation of the myocardium from noisy and time-varying images. Random forests (RF) have been successfully applied to many medical image segmentation tasks. However, the pixel-wise RF classifier ignores contextual relationships between label outputs of individual pixels. RF which only utilizes local appearance features is also susceptible to data suffering from large intensity variations. In this paper, we demonstrate how to overcome the above limitations of classic RF by presenting a fully automatic segmentation pipeline for myocardial segmentation in full-cycle 2D MCE data. Specifically, a statistical shape model is used to provide shape prior information that guide the RF segmentation in two ways. First, a novel shape model (SM) feature is incorporated into the RF framework to generate a more accurate RF probability map. Second, the shape model is fitted to the RF probability map to refine and constrain the final segmentation to plausible myocardial shapes. We further improve the performance by introducing a bounding box detection algorithm as a preprocessing step in the segmentation pipeline. Our approach on 2D image is further extended to 2D+t sequences which ensures temporal consistency in the final sequence segmentations. When evaluated on clinical MCE datasets, our proposed method achieves notable improvement in segmentation accuracy and outperforms other state-of-the-art methods including the classic RF and its variants, active shape model and image registration.

  8. Parametric and non-parametric masking of randomness in sequence alignments can be improved and leads to better resolved trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Reumont Björn M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods of alignment masking, which refers to the technique of excluding alignment blocks prior to tree reconstructions, have been successful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio in sequence alignments. However, the lack of formally well defined methods to identify randomness in sequence alignments has prevented a routine application of alignment masking. In this study, we compared the effects on tree reconstructions of the most commonly used profiling method (GBLOCKS which uses a predefined set of rules in combination with alignment masking, with a new profiling approach (ALISCORE based on Monte Carlo resampling within a sliding window, using different data sets and alignment methods. While the GBLOCKS approach excludes variable sections above a certain threshold which choice is left arbitrary, the ALISCORE algorithm is free of a priori rating of parameter space and therefore more objective. Results ALISCORE was successfully extended to amino acids using a proportional model and empirical substitution matrices to score randomness in multiple sequence alignments. A complex bootstrap resampling leads to an even distribution of scores of randomly similar sequences to assess randomness of the observed sequence similarity. Testing performance on real data, both masking methods, GBLOCKS and ALISCORE, helped to improve tree resolution. The sliding window approach was less sensitive to different alignments of identical data sets and performed equally well on all data sets. Concurrently, ALISCORE is capable of dealing with different substitution patterns and heterogeneous base composition. ALISCORE and the most relaxed GBLOCKS gap parameter setting performed best on all data sets. Correspondingly, Neighbor-Net analyses showed the most decrease in conflict. Conclusions Alignment masking improves signal-to-noise ratio in multiple sequence alignments prior to phylogenetic reconstruction. Given the robust performance of alignment

  9. Least squares deconvolution for leak detection with a pseudo random binary sequence excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Si Tran Nguyen; Gong, Jinzhe; Lambert, Martin F.; Zecchin, Aaron C.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2018-01-01

    Leak detection and localisation is critical for water distribution system pipelines. This paper examines the use of the time-domain impulse response function (IRF) for leak detection and localisation in a pressurised water pipeline with a pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) signal excitation. Compared to the conventional step wave generated using a single fast operation of a valve closure, a PRBS signal offers advantageous correlation properties, in that the signal has very low autocorrelation for lags different from zero and low cross correlation with other signals including noise and other interference. These properties result in a significant improvement in the IRF signal to noise ratio (SNR), leading to more accurate leak localisation. In this paper, the estimation of the system IRF is formulated as an optimisation problem in which the l2 norm of the IRF is minimised to suppress the impact of noise and interference sources. Both numerical and experimental data are used to verify the proposed technique. The resultant estimated IRF provides not only accurate leak location estimation, but also good sensitivity to small leak sizes due to the improved SNR.

  10. Controlled random sequences: methods of convex analysis and problems with functional constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunovskii, A. B.

    1998-12-01

    ContentsIntroduction § 1. Controlled random sequences: main definitions and traditional approaches § 1.1. Description of the mathematical model § 1.2. Models with integral functionals § 1.3. Homogeneous Markov decision processes with average cost criteria § 2. Application of methods of convex analysis § 2.1. Properties of the space \\mathcal D § 2.2. Existence of optimal policies § 2.3. Sufficiency of selectors § 2.4. Preliminary results. The notion of an occupation measure § 2.5. Markov decision processes with total cost criteria and occupation measures § 2.6. Discounted costs and the corresponding occupation measures § 2.7. Average costs and ergodic occupation measures § 3. Problems with functional constraints § 3.1. General results § 3.2. Preliminary conclusions § 3.3. Markov decision processes with total cost criteria § 3.4. Homogeneous Markov decision processes with discounting § 3.5. Homogeneous Markov decision processes with average cost criteria § 3.6. Other constrained problems, related topics, and future prospectsConclusionAppendix. Elements of convex analysis and measure theory Bibliography

  11. Two-Level Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for a Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients [Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalchev, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ketelsen, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vassilevski, P. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Our paper proposes an adaptive strategy for reusing a previously constructed coarse space by algebraic multigrid to construct a two-level solver for a problem with nearby characteristics. Furthermore, a main target application is the solution of the linear problems that appear throughout a sequence of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of subsurface flow with uncertain permeability field. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method with extensive set of numerical experiments.

  12. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lun, Aaron Tl; Wong, Jason Wh; Downard, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    ... pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible...

  13. Development and evaluation of a non-ribosomal random PCR and next-generation sequencing based assay for detection and sequencing of hand, foot and mouth disease pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh To; Tran, Thanh Tan; Hoang, Van Minh Tu; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Le, Nhu Nguyen Truc; Le, Thanh Thi My; Phan, Qui Tu; Truong, Khanh Huu; Le, Nhan Nguyen Thanh; Ho, Viet Lu; Do, Viet Chau; Ha, Tuan Manh; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; van Doorn, H Rogier; Le, Tan Van

    2016-07-07

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) has become a major public health problem across the Asia-Pacific region, and is commonly caused by enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6), CV-A10 and CV-A16. Generating pathogen whole-genome sequences is essential for understanding their evolutionary biology. The frequent replacements among EV serotypes and a limited numbers of available whole-genome sequences hinder the development of overlapping PCRs for whole-genome sequencing. We developed and evaluated a non-ribosomal random PCR (rPCR) and next-generation sequencing based assay for sequence-independent whole-genome amplification and sequencing of HFMD pathogens. A total of 16 EV-A71/CV-A6/CV-A10/CV-A16 PCR positive rectal/throat swabs (Cp values: 20.9-33.3) were used for assay evaluation. Our assay evidently outperformed the conventional rPCR in terms of the total number of EV-A71 reads and the percentage of EV-A71 reads: 2.6 % (1275/50,000 reads) vs. 0.1 % (31/50,000) and 6 % (3008/50,000) vs. 0.9 % (433/50,000) for two samples with Cp values of 30 and 26, respectively. Additionally the assay could generate genome sequences with the percentages of coverage of 94-100 % of 4 different enterovirus serotypes in 73 % of the tested samples, representing the first whole-genome sequences of CV-A6/10/16 from Vietnam, and could assign correctly serotyping results in 100 % of 24 tested specimens. In all but three the obtained consensuses of two replicates from the same sample were 100 % identical, suggesting that our assay is highly reproducible. In conclusion, we have successfully developed a non-ribosomal rPCR and next-generation sequencing based assay for sensitive detection and direct whole-genome sequencing of HFMD pathogens from clinical samples.

  14. Modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm optimized control for air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the flight control problem of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles and proposes a novel intelligent algorithm optimized control method. To achieve the climbing, cruising and descending flight control of the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle, an engineering-oriented flight control system based on a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID method is designed for the hypersonic vehicle, which including the height loop, the pitch angle loop and the velocity loop. Moreover, as a variant of nature-inspired algorithm, modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm is presented to optimize the flight control parameters and is characterized by better exploration and exploitation than the standard shuffled frog leaping algorithm. A nonlinear model of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is used to verify the dynamic characteristics achieved by the intelligent flight control system. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed swarm intelligence optimized PID controllers are effective in achieving better flight trajectory and velocity control performance than the traditional controllers.

  15. To Shuffle and to Give Again: Construction and Destruction of a Critical Area of Porto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Sonia; Nunes, Flávio

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the debate about the causes and consequences of urban decay and urban deprivation in some parts of developed cities. ‘To shuffle and to give again’ is a wellknown expression that can also be used to describe some urban development strategies applied to these impor......This paper aims to contribute to the debate about the causes and consequences of urban decay and urban deprivation in some parts of developed cities. ‘To shuffle and to give again’ is a wellknown expression that can also be used to describe some urban development strategies applied...... to these important areas. Specifically the urban regeneration process that has been conducted on a social housing district (São João de Deus – SJD) located on the outskirts of Porto, in northern Portugal. The public policies that have been, over the past decades, attempting to deal with this problematic...

  16. Mechanical analysis of the main bus bars in the DFBA shuffling modules

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, D

    2012-01-01

    The main bus bars (13 kA) inside the shuffling modules of the distribution feed boxes powering the LHC arcs (DFBA) are subjected to high Lorentz forces. The structural behaviour of the bus bars under such forces is here analysed. The results are discussed with respect to a risk of structural failure due to excessive deformation or degradation of the electrical insulation by repeated contact with other surfaces.

  17. Improving the specific synthetic activity of a penicillin g acylase using DNA family shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhang, Ai-Hui; Wang, Jing-Ru; Chen, Mao-Lin; Li, Ren-Bao; Yang, Sheng; Yuan, Zhong-Yi

    2003-06-01

    Penicillin G Acylas (PGA) of Providencia rettgeri (ATCC 25599) was evolved using a modified DNA family shuffling method. The identity of pga genes from Escherichia coli, Kluyvera citrophila and Providencia rettgeri ranges from 62.5% to 96.9%. The pga genes from above three species were recombined and shuffled to create interspecies pga gene fusion libraries. By substituting assembled chimaeras for corresponding region of pETPPGA, different recombinants were constructed and expressed in E. coli JM109(DE3). Mutants with obvious beta-lactam synthetic activity were selected from the plates and the ratios of synthesis to hydrolysis (S/H) were determined subsequently. It was shown that the primary structures of selected positives exhibited significant diversity among each library. The best mutant possessed 40% higher synthetic activity than the wild type enzyme of PrPGA. It was further proved in this study that the domain of alpha subunit contributed much more to improve the specific activity of synthesis. Results showed a recombinant PGA with higher synthetic activity was acquired by the method of DNA shuffling.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome shuffling through recursive population mating leads to improved tolerance to spent sulfite liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinel, Dominic; D'Aoust, Frédéric; del Cardayre, Stephen B; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Lee, Hung; Martin, Vincent J J

    2011-07-01

    Spent sulfite liquor (SSL) is a waste effluent from sulfite pulping that contains monomeric sugars which can be fermented to ethanol. However, fermentative yeasts used for the fermentation of the sugars in SSL are adversely affected by the inhibitory substances in this complex feedstock. To overcome this limitation, evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was carried out using genome-shuffling technology based on large-scale population cross mating. Populations of UV-light-induced yeast mutants more tolerant than the wild type to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HWSSL) were first isolated and then recursively mated and enriched for more-tolerant populations. After five rounds of genome shuffling, three strains were isolated that were able to grow on undiluted HWSSL and to support efficient ethanol production from the sugars therein for prolonged fermentation of HWSSL. Analyses showed that greater HWSSL tolerance is associated with improved viability in the presence of salt, sorbitol, peroxide, and acetic acid. Our results showed that evolutionary engineering through genome shuffling will yield robust yeasts capable of fermenting the sugars present in HWSSL, which is a complex substrate containing multiple sources of inhibitors. These strains may not be obtainable through classical evolutionary engineering and can serve as a model for further understanding of the mechanism behind simultaneous tolerance to multiple inhibitors.

  19. Protein Ordered Sequences are Formed by Random Joining of Amino Acids in Protein 0th-Order Structure, Followed by Evolutionary Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Only random processes should occur on the primitive Earth. In contrast, many ordered sequences are synthesized according to genetic information on the present Earth. In this communication, I have proposed an idea that protein 0th-order structures or specific amino acid compositions would mediate the transfer from random process to formation of ordered sequences, after formation of double-stranded genes.

  20. Recombination rates and genomic shuffling in human and chimpanzee--a new twist in the chromosomal speciation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Marta; Micheletti, Diego; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-04-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the effect of recombination in shaping the genomic architecture of organisms and, in particular, how this impacts the speciation process. Despite efforts employed in the last decade, the role of chromosomal reorganizations in the human-chimpanzee speciation process remains unresolved. Through whole-genome comparisons, we have analyzed the genome-wide impact of genomic shuffling in the distribution of human recombination rates during the human-chimpanzee speciation process. We have constructed a highly refined map of the reorganizations and evolutionary breakpoint regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes based on orthologous genes and genome sequence alignments. The analysis of the most recent human and chimpanzee recombination maps inferred from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data revealed that the standardized recombination rate was significantly lower in rearranged than in collinear chromosomes. In fact, rearranged chromosomes presented significantly lower recombination rates than chromosomes that have been maintained since the ancestor of great apes, and this was related with the lineage in which they become fixed. Importantly, inverted regions had lower recombination rates than collinear and noninverted regions, independently of the effect of centromeres. Our observations have implications for the chromosomal speciation theory, providing new evidences for the contribution of inversions in suppressing recombination in mammals.

  1. Quasi-Coherent Noise Jamming to LFM Radar Based on Pseudo-random Sequence Phase-modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel quasi-coherent noise jamming method is proposed against linear frequency modulation (LFM signal and pulse compression radar. Based on the structure of digital radio frequency memory (DRFM, the jamming signal is acquired by the pseudo-random sequence phase-modulation of sampled radar signal. The characteristic of jamming signal in time domain and frequency domain is analyzed in detail. Results of ambiguity function indicate that the blanket jamming effect along the range direction will be formed when jamming signal passes through the matched filter. By flexible controlling the parameters of interrupted-sampling pulse and pseudo-random sequence, different covering distances and jamming effects will be achieved. When the jamming power is equivalent, this jamming obtains higher process gain compared with non-coherent jamming. The jamming signal enhances the detection threshold and the real target avoids being detected. Simulation results and circuit engineering implementation validate that the jamming signal covers real target effectively.

  2. Cryptographic pseudo-random sequences from the chaotic Hénon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimensional discrete-time Hénon map is proposed. Properties of the proposed sequences pertaining to linear complexity, linear complexity profile, correlation and auto-correlation are investigated. All these properties of the sequences suggest a ...

  3. A novel whole genome amplification method using type IIS restriction enzymes to create overhangs with random sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoming; Wan, Baihui; Li, Chunchuan; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jing; Mou, Haijin; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-08-20

    Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) is a whole genome amplification (WGA) method, for which genomic DNA is cleaved into numerous fragments and then all of the fragments are amplified by PCR after attaching a universal end sequence. However, the self-ligation of these fragments could happen and may cause biased amplification and restriction of its application. To decrease the self-ligation probability, here we use type IIS restriction enzymes to digest genomic DNA into fragments with 4-5nt long overhangs with random sequences. After ligation to an adapter with random end sequences to above fragments, PCR is carried out and almost all present DNA sequences are amplified. In this study, whole genome of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was amplified and the amplification efficiency was evaluated by quantitative PCR. The results suggested that our approach could provide sufficient genomic DNA with good quality to meet requirements of various genetic analyses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A Method for Large-Scale Screening of Random Sequence Libraries to Determine the Function of Unstructured Regions from Essential Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millau, Jean-François; Guillemette, Benoit; Gaudreau, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we present a method allowing the screening of random sequences to discover essential aspects of unstructured protein regions in yeast. The approach can be applied to any protein with unstructured peptide sequences for which functions are difficult to decipher, for example the N-terminal tails of histones. The protocol first describes the building and preparation of a large library of random peptides in fusion with a protein of interest. Recent technical advances in oligonucleotide synthesis allow the construction of long random sequences up to 35 residues long. The protocol details the screening of the library in yeast for sequences that can functionally replace an unstructured domain in an essential protein in vivo. Our method typically identifies sequences that, while being totally different from the wild type, retain essential features allowing yeast to live. This collection of proteins with functional synthetic sequences can subsequently be used in phenotypic tests or genetic screens in order to discover genetic interaction.

  5. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS, an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hilario

    Full Text Available Genotyping by sequencing (GBS is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al.some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS. By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145 of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513 by stdGBS.

  6. Shuffled Cards, Messy Desks, and Disorderly Dorm Rooms - Examples of Entropy Increase? Nonsense!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Frank L.

    1999-10-01

    things are not ceaselessly colliding and exchanging energy under the thermal dominance of their environment as are microparticles. A postulate can be derived from this fundamental criterion: The movement of macro objects from one location to another by an external agent involves no change in the objects' physical (thermodynamic) entropy. The agent of movement undergoes a thermodynamic entropy increase in the process. A needed corollary, considering the number of erroneous statements in print, is: There is no spontaneous tendency in groups of macro objects to become disorderly or randomly scattered. The tendency in nature toward increased entropy does not reside in the arrangement of any chemically unchanging objects but rather in the external agent moving them. It is the sole cause of their transport toward more probable locations. The Error There is no more widespread error in chemistry and physics texts than the identification of a thermodynamic entropy increase with a change in the pattern of a group of macro objects. The classic example is that of playing cards. Shuffling a new deck is widely said to result in an increase in entropy in the cards. This erroneous impression is often extended to all kinds of things when they are changed from humanly designated order to what is commonly considered disorder: a group of marbles to scattered marbles, racked billiard balls to a broken rack, neat groups of papers on a desk to the more usual disarray. In fact, there is no thermodynamic entropy change in the objects in the "after" state compared to the "before". Further, such alterations in arrangement have been used in at least one text to support a "law" that is stated, "things move spontaneously in the direction of maximum chaos or disorder".1 The foregoing examples and "law" seriously mislead the student by focusing on macro objects that are only a passive part of a system. They are deceptive in omitting the agent that actually is changed in entropy as it follows the second

  7. Between mathematics and magic: Josephus legend and the down-under shuffle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alegría Ezquerra, Pedro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many links between mathematics and magic: on the one hand, it is usual to see how mathematical principles apply in order to create magic tricks and, on the other hand, several specific techniques in magic give rise to mathematical models providing interesting properties in recreational mathematics. In this work we show this duality relating the famous Josephus problem and its variants with specific card shuffles used in some card tricks. In order to display the educational nature of this problem, we also suggest some teaching activities to develop in a classroom.

  8. KinMutRF: a random forest classifier of sequence variants in the human protein kinase superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pons, Tirso; Vazquez, Miguel; Matey-Hernandez, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    remains challenging: cells tolerate most genomic alterations and only a minor fraction disrupt molecular function sufficiently and drive disease. Results: KinMutRF is a novel random-forest method to automatically identify pathogenic variants in human kinases. Twenty six decision trees implemented......Background: The association between aberrant signal processing by protein kinases and human diseases such as cancer was established long time ago. However, understanding the link between sequence variants in the protein kinase superfamily and the mechanistic complex traits at the molecular level...... as a random forest ponder a battery of features that characterize the variants: a) at the gene level, including membership to a Kinbase group and Gene Ontology terms; b) at the PFAM domain level; and c) at the residue level, the types of amino acids involved, changes in biochemical properties, functional...

  9. A specific brushing sequence and plaque removal efficacy : a randomized split-mouth design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, E.; Slot, D.E.; Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N.L.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2018-01-01

    Aim: It has been propagated by the dental care professionals to start toothbrushing the lingual aspect of teeth first. In general, it is assumed that these surfaces of teeth are more difficult to clean. The evidence to support this recommendation is sparse. Method: In this randomized controlled

  10. Design and characterizations of two novel cellulases through single-gene shuffling of Cel12A (EG3) gene from Trichoderma reseei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenenler, Asli; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2016-06-01

    Cellulases have great potential to be widely used for industrial applications. In general, naturally occurring cellulases are not optimized and limited to meet the industrial needs. These limitations lead to demand for novel cellulases with enhanced enzymatic properties. Here, we describe the enzymatic and structural properties of two novel enzymes, EG3_S1 and EG3_S2, obtained through the single-gene shuffling approach of Cel12A(EG3) gene from Trichoderma reseei EG3_S1 and EG3_S2 shuffled enzymes display 59 and 75% identity in protein sequence with respect to native, respectively. Toward 4-MUC, the minimum activity of EG3_S1 was reported as 5.9-fold decrease in native at 35°C, whereas the maximum activity of EG3_S2 was reported as 15.4-fold increase in native activity at 40°C. Also, the diminished enzyme activity of EG3_S1 was reported within range of 0.6- to 0.8-fold of native and within range of 0.5- to 0.7-fold of native toward CMC and Na-CMC, respectively. For EG3_S2 enzyme, the improved enzymatic activities within range of 1.1- to 1.4-fold of native and within range of 1.1- to 1.6-fold of native were reported toward CMC and Na-CMC, respectively. Moreover, we have reported 6.5-fold increase in the kcat/Km ratio of EG3_S2 with respect to native and suggested EG3_S2 enzyme as more efficient catalysis for hydrolysis reactions than its native counterpart. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. An improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm based evolutionary framework for currency exchange rate prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Rajashree

    2017-11-01

    Forecasting purchasing power of one currency with respect to another currency is always an interesting topic in the field of financial time series prediction. Despite the existence of several traditional and computational models for currency exchange rate forecasting, there is always a need for developing simpler and more efficient model, which will produce better prediction capability. In this paper, an evolutionary framework is proposed by using an improved shuffled frog leaping (ISFL) algorithm with a computationally efficient functional link artificial neural network (CEFLANN) for prediction of currency exchange rate. The model is validated by observing the monthly prediction measures obtained for three currency exchange data sets such as USD/CAD, USD/CHF, and USD/JPY accumulated within same period of time. The model performance is also compared with two other evolutionary learning techniques such as Shuffled frog leaping algorithm and Particle Swarm optimization algorithm. Practical analysis of results suggest that, the proposed model developed using the ISFL algorithm with CEFLANN network is a promising predictor model for currency exchange rate prediction compared to other models included in the study.

  12. Genome shuffling improves thermotolerance and glutamic acid production of Corynebacteria glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pu; Liu, Miao; Liu, Xiao-de; Du, Qiao-Yan; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhi-Hao

    2012-03-01

    Genome shuffling was used to improve the thermotolerance of L: -glutamic acid-producing strain Corynebacteria glutamicum. Five strains with subtle improvements in high temperature tolerance and productivity were selected by ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis. An improved strain (F343) was obtained by three rounds of genome shuffling of the five strains as mentioned above. The cell density of F343 was four times higher than that of ancestor strains after 24 h of cultivation at 44°C, and importantly, the yield of L: -glutamic acid was increased by 1.8-times comparing with that of the ancestor strain at 38°C in a 5-L fermentor. With glucose supplement and two-stage pH control, the L: -glutamate acid concentration of F343 reached 119 g/L after fermentation for 30 h. The genetic diversity between F343 and its ancestors was also evaluated by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results suggest that the phenotypes for both thermotolerance and L: -glutamic acid production in F343 were evolved.

  13. bcc-to-hcp transformation pathways for iron versus hydrostatic pressure: Coupled shuffle and shear modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    2009-04-01

    Using density-functional theory, we calculate the potential-energy surface (PES), minimum-energy pathway (MEP), and transition state (TS) versus hydrostatic pressure σhyd for the reconstructive transformation in Fe from body-centered cubic (bcc) to hexagonal closed-packed (hcp). At fixed σhyd , the PES is described by coupled shear (γ) and shuffle (η) modes and is determined from structurally minimized hcp-bcc energy differences at a set of (η,γ) . We fit the PES using symmetry-adapted polynomials, permitting the MEP to be found analytically. The MEP is continuous and fully explains the transformation and its associated magnetization and volume discontinuity at TS. We show that σhyd (while not able to induce shear) dramatically alters the MEP to drive reconstruction by a shuffle-only mode at ≤30GPa , as observed. Finally, we relate our polynomial-based results to Landau and nudge-elastic-band approaches and show they yield incorrect MEP in general.

  14. Cutting and shuffling of a granular mixture in a spherical tumbler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Lueptow, Richard M.; Ottino, Julio M.; Sturman, Rob; Wiggins, Stephen

    2009-11-01

    Good mixing in a fluid system is usually associated with chaotic advection. For a granular system, good mixing can be achieved through an entirely different mechanism that is well-known to mathematicians and card-players, `cutting and shuffling,' which has theoretical foundations in a relatively new area of mathematics known as ``piecewise isometries'', PWIs. Cutting and shuffling experiments are conducted in a spherical tumbler of diameter D=14cm that is half-filled with two colors of d=1mm glass beads and can be rotated by arbitrary angles periodically about each of two horizontal, orthogonal axes. In order to connect experimental results, which have a finite thickness flowing layer, with theoretical PWI mappings, which have a zero-thickness flowing layer, a continuum model with a variable flowing layer depth is utilized. The PWI theory accurately predicts the experimental mixing in this granular system demonstrating that PWI theory captures the essential kinematic features responsible for the mixing of granular materials in a three-dimensional tumbler. Furthermore, PWI results in mixing without stretching, a characteristic of chaotic mixing.

  15. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regad Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.. Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with

  16. Exact distribution of a pattern in a set of random sequences generated by a Markov source: applications to biological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics it is common to search for a pattern of interest in a potentially large set of rather short sequences (upstream gene regions, proteins, exons, etc.). Although many methodological approaches allow practitioners to compute the distribution of a pattern count in a random sequence generated by a Markov source, no specific developments have taken into account the counting of occurrences in a set of independent sequences. We aim to address this problem by deriving efficient approaches and algorithms to perform these computations both for low and high complexity patterns in the framework of homogeneous or heterogeneous Markov models. Results The latest advances in the field allowed us to use a technique of optimal Markov chain embedding based on deterministic finite automata to introduce three innovative algorithms. Algorithm 1 is the only one able to deal with heterogeneous models. It also permits to avoid any product of convolution of the pattern distribution in individual sequences. When working with homogeneous models, Algorithm 2 yields a dramatic reduction in the complexity by taking advantage of previous computations to obtain moment generating functions efficiently. In the particular case of low or moderate complexity patterns, Algorithm 3 exploits power computation and binary decomposition to further reduce the time complexity to a logarithmic scale. All these algorithms and their relative interest in comparison with existing ones were then tested and discussed on a toy-example and three biological data sets: structural patterns in protein loop structures, PROSITE signatures in a bacterial proteome, and transcription factors in upstream gene regions. On these data sets, we also compared our exact approaches to the tempting approximation that consists in concatenating the sequences in the data set into a single sequence. Conclusions Our algorithms prove to be effective and able to handle real data sets with multiple sequences, as well

  17. Genetic alterations of hepatocellular carcinoma by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and cloning sequencing of tumor differential DNA fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Zhi-Hong; Cong, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the genetic alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to find the tumor related DNA fragments. METHODS: DNA isolated from tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 HCC patients was amplified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with 10 random 10-mer arbitrary primers. The RAPD bands showing obvious differences in tumor tissue DNA corresponding to that of normal tissue were separated, purified, cloned and sequenced. DNA sequences were analyzed and compared with GenBank data. RESULTS: A total of 56 cases of HCC were demonstrated to have genetic alterations, which were detected by at least one primer. The detestability of genetic alterations ranged from 20% to 70% in each case, and 17.9% to 50% in each primer. Serum HBV infection, tumor size, histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with genetic alterations on certain primers. A band with a higher intensity of 480 bp or so amplified fragments in tumor DNA relative to normal DNA could be seen in 27 of 56 tumor samples using primer 4. Sequence analysis of these fragments showed 91% homology with Homo sapiens double homeobox protein DUX10 gene. CONCLUSION: Genetic alterations are a frequent event in HCC, and tumor related DNA fragments have been found in this study, which may be associated with hepatocarcin-ogenesis. RAPD is an effective method for the identification and analysis of genetic alterations in HCC, and may provide new information for further evaluating the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:15996039

  18. Genotypic detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by DNA sequencing: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El mashad Noha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a growing international health concern. It is the biggest killer among the infectious diseases in the world today. Early detection of drug resistance allows starting of an appropriate treatment. Resistance to drugs is due to particular genomic mutations in specific genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Isoniazid (INH and Rifampicin(RIF drug resistance in new and previously treated tuberculosis (TB cases using DNA sequencing. Methods This study was carried out on 153 tuberculous patients with positive Bactec 460 culture for acid fast bacilli. Results Of the 153 patients, 105 (68.6% were new cases and 48 (31.4% were previously treated cases. Drug susceptibility testing on Bactec revealed 50 resistant cases for one or more of the first line antituberculous. Genotypic analysis was done only for rifampicin resistant specimens (23 cases and INH resistant specimens (26 cases to detect mutations responsible for drug resistance by PCR amplification of rpoB gene for rifampicin resistant cases and KatG gene for isoniazid resistant cases. Finally, DNA sequencing was done for detection of mutation within rpoB and KatG genes. Genotypic analysis of RIF resistant cases revealed that 20/23 cases (86.9% of RIF resistance were having rpoB gene mutation versus 3 cases (13.1% having no mutation with a high statistical significant difference between them (P Conclusion We can conclude that rifampicin resistance could be used as a useful surrogate marker for estimation of multidrug resistance. In addition, Genotypic method was superior to that of the traditional phenotypic method which is time-consuming taking several weeks or longer.

  19. Genome Shuffling and Gentamicin-Resistance to Improve ε-Poly-L-Lysine Productivity of Streptomyces albulus W-156.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Xusheng; Wu, Guangyao; Zeng, Xin; Ren, Xidong; Li, Shu; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-12-01

    Genome shuffling has been a recently effective method for screening the desirable phenotypes of industrial strains. Here, we combined genome shuffling and gentamicin resistance to improve the production of ε-poly-L-lysine in Streptomyces albulus W-156. Five starting mutants with higher ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) productivities were firstly obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutagenesis. After three rounds of genome shuffling with increasing concentration of gentamicin for selection, S. albulus AG3-28, was finally got with a production of 3.43 g/L in shaking flask. In a 5-L fermenter, AG3-28 exhibited a higher ε-PL productivity (56.5 g/L) than the initial strain W-156 (37.5 g/L). Key enzyme activities in primary and secondary metabolic pathways were analyzed, and the transcription levels of hrdD and pls were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increase of key enzyme activities and the upregulation of the gene transcriptional levels demonstrated that ε-PL synthetic pathway in AG3-28 was obviously strengthened, which might be responsible for the high productivity. Moreover, hyper-yield strain AG3-28 was found to produce a slightly lower ε-PL polymerization degree than the parent strain. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis reflects the genetic diversity among the derivates after genome shuffling.

  20. Analysis of the Ballot Shuffling Attack on Irish ballot counting for Proportional Representation by Single Transferable Vote (PR-STV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cochran, Dermot Robert

    2015-01-01

    of ballots transferred and the sensitivity of the counting algorithm to the order in which ballots are shuffled. A formal model of PR-STV is used to identify scenarios in which the counting under current electoral laws gives a different result compared to what would have happened using another ordering...

  1. Underwater sonar image detection: A combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmei; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm to detect underwater objects in sonar images. Specifically, for the first time, the problem of inappropriate filtering degree parameter which commonly occurs in non-local spatial information and seriously affects the denoising performance in sonar images, was solved with the method utilizing a novel filtering degree parameter. Then, a quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm based on new search mechanism (QSFLA-NSM) is proposed to precisely and quickly detect sonar images. Each frog individual is directly encoded by real numbers, which can greatly simplify the evolution process of the quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm (QSFLA). Meanwhile, a fitness function combining intra-class difference with inter-class difference is adopted to evaluate frog positions more accurately. On this basis, recurring to an analysis of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA), a new search mechanism is developed to improve the searching ability and detection accuracy. At the same time, the time complexity is further reduced. Finally, the results of comparative experiments using the original sonar images, the UCI data sets and the benchmark functions demonstrate the effectiveness and adaptability of the proposed method.

  2. Underwater sonar image detection: A combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmei Wang

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a combination of non-local spatial information and quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm to detect underwater objects in sonar images. Specifically, for the first time, the problem of inappropriate filtering degree parameter which commonly occurs in non-local spatial information and seriously affects the denoising performance in sonar images, was solved with the method utilizing a novel filtering degree parameter. Then, a quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm based on new search mechanism (QSFLA-NSM is proposed to precisely and quickly detect sonar images. Each frog individual is directly encoded by real numbers, which can greatly simplify the evolution process of the quantum-inspired shuffled frog leaping algorithm (QSFLA. Meanwhile, a fitness function combining intra-class difference with inter-class difference is adopted to evaluate frog positions more accurately. On this basis, recurring to an analysis of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA, a new search mechanism is developed to improve the searching ability and detection accuracy. At the same time, the time complexity is further reduced. Finally, the results of comparative experiments using the original sonar images, the UCI data sets and the benchmark functions demonstrate the effectiveness and adaptability of the proposed method.

  3. Folded Proteins Occur Frequently in Libraries of Random Amino Acid Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Alan R.; Sauer, Robert T.

    1994-03-01

    A library of synthetic genes encoding 80- to 100-residue proteins composed mainly of random combinations of glutamine (Q), leucine (L), and arginine (R) has been expressed in Escherichia coli. These genes also encode an epitope tag and six carboxyl-terminal histidines. Screening of this library by immunoblotting showed that 5% of these QLR proteins are expressed at readily detectable levels. Three well-expressed QLR proteins were purified and characterized. Each of these proteins has significant α-helical content, is largely resistant to degradation by Pronase, and has a distinct oligomeric structure. In addition, one protein unfolds in a highly cooperative manner. These properties of the QLR proteins demonstrate that they possess folded structures with some native-like properties. The QLR proteins differ from most natural proteins, however, in being remarkably resistant to denaturant-induced and thermal-induced unfolding and in being relatively insoluble in the absence of denaturants.

  4. Fire detection system using random forest classification for image sequences of complex background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Onecue; Kang, Dong-Joong

    2013-06-01

    We present a fire alarm system based on image processing that detects fire accidents in various environments. To reduce false alarms that frequently appeared in earlier systems, we combined image features including color, motion, and blinking information. We specifically define the color conditions of fires in hue, saturation and value, and RGB color space. Fire features are represented as intensity variation, color mean and variance, motion, and image differences. Moreover, blinking fire features are modeled by using crossing patches. We propose an algorithm that classifies patches into fire or nonfire areas by using random forest supervised learning. We design an embedded surveillance device made with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene housing for stable fire detection in outdoor environments. The experimental results show that our algorithm works robustly in complex environments and is able to detect fires in real time.

  5. The sequencing of adverbial clauses of time in academic English: Random forest modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rezaee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverbial clauses of time are positioned either before or after their associated main clauses. This study aims to assess the importance of discourse-pragmatics and processing-related constraints on the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in research articles of applied linguistics written by authors for whom English is considered a native language. Previous research has revealed that the ordering is co-determined by various factors from the domains of semantics and discourse-pragmatics (bridging, iconicity, and subordinator and language processing (deranking, length, and complexity. This research conducts a multifactorial analysis on the motivators of the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in 100 research articles of applied linguistics. The study will use a random forest of conditional inference trees as the statistical technique to measure the weights of the aforementioned variables. It was found that iconicity and bridging, which are factors associated with discourse and semantics, are the two most salient predictors of clause ordering.

  6. Probability distribution of intersymbol distances in random symbolic sequences: Applications to improving detection of keywords in texts and of amino acid clustering in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Pedro; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A; Carretero-Campos, Concepción; Coronado, Ana V

    2016-11-01

    Symbolic sequences have been extensively investigated in the past few years within the framework of statistical physics. Paradigmatic examples of such sequences are written texts, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein sequences. In these examples, the spatial distribution of a given symbol (a word, a DNA motif, an amino acid) is a key property usually related to the symbol importance in the sequence: The more uneven and far from random the symbol distribution, the higher the relevance of the symbol to the sequence. Thus, many techniques of analysis measure in some way the deviation of the symbol spatial distribution with respect to the random expectation. The problem is then to know the spatial distribution corresponding to randomness, which is typically considered to be either the geometric or the exponential distribution. However, these distributions are only valid for very large symbolic sequences and for many occurrences of the analyzed symbol. Here, we obtain analytically the exact, randomly expected spatial distribution valid for any sequence length and any symbol frequency, and we study its main properties. The knowledge of the distribution allows us to define a measure able to properly quantify the deviation from randomness of the symbol distribution, especially for short sequences and low symbol frequency. We apply the measure to the problem of keyword detection in written texts and to study amino acid clustering in protein sequences. In texts, we show how the results improve with respect to previous methods when short texts are analyzed. In proteins, which are typically short, we show how the measure quantifies unambiguously the amino acid clustering and characterize its spatial distribution.

  7. Optimal inverse magnetorheological damper modeling using shuffled frog-leaping algorithm–based adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological dampers have become prominent semi-active control devices for vibration mitigation of structures which are subjected to severe loads. However, the damping force cannot be controlled directly due to the inherent nonlinear characteristics of the magnetorheological dampers. Therefore, for fully exploiting the capabilities of the magnetorheological dampers, one of the challenging aspects is to develop an accurate inverse model which can appropriately predict the input voltage to control the damping force. In this article, a hybrid modeling strategy combining shuffled frog-leaping algorithm and adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system is proposed to model the inverse dynamic characteristics of the magnetorheological dampers for improving the modeling accuracy. The shuffled frog-leaping algorithm is employed to optimize the premise parameters of the adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system while the consequent parameters are tuned by a least square estimation method, here known as shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approach. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the inverse modeling results based on the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approach are compared with those based on the adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system and genetic algorithm–based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system approaches. Analysis of variance test is carried out to statistically compare the performance of the proposed methods and the results demonstrate that the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm-based adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system strategy outperforms the other two methods in terms of modeling (training accuracy and checking accuracy.

  8. Baseline shifts in coral skeletal oxygen isotopic composition: a signature of symbiont shuffling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, J. E.; Charles, C. D.; Garren, M.; McField, M.; Norris, R. D.

    2013-06-01

    Decades-long records of the stable isotopic composition of coral skeletal cores were analyzed from four sites on the Mesoamerican Reef. Two of the sites exhibited baseline shifts in oxygen isotopic composition after known coral bleaching events. Changes in pH at the calcification site caused by a change in the associated symbiont community are invoked to explain the observed shift in the isotopic composition. To test the hypothesis that changes in symbiont clade could affect skeletal chemistry, additional coral samples were collected from Belize for paired Symbiodinium identification and skeletal stable isotopic analysis. We found some evidence that skeletal stable isotopic composition may be affected by symbiont clade and suggest this is an important topic for future investigation. If different Symbiodinium clades leave consistent signatures in skeletal geochemical composition, the signature will provide a method to quantify past symbiont shuffling events, important for understanding how corals are likely to respond to climate change.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sharabasy, Sherif F; Soliman, Khaled A

    2017-01-01

    The date palm is an ancient domesticated plant with great diversity and has been cultivated in the Middle East and North Africa for at last 5000 years. Date palm cultivars are classified based on the fruit moisture content, as dry, semidry, and soft dates. There are a number of biochemical and molecular techniques available for characterization of the date palm variation. This chapter focuses on the DNA-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) techniques, in addition to biochemical markers based on isozyme analysis. These techniques coupled with appropriate statistical tools proved useful for determining phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars and provide information resources for date palm gene banks.

  10. Cooperation of deterministic dynamics and random noise in production of complex syntactical avian song sequences: a neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi eYamashita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available How the brain learns and generates temporal sequences is a fundamental issue in neuroscience. The production of birdsongs, a process which involves complex learned sequences, provides researchers with an excellent biological model for this topic. The Bengalese finch in particular learns a highly complex song with syntactical structure. The nucleus HVC (HVC, a premotor nucleus within the avian song system, plays a key role in generating the temporal structures of their songs. From lesion studies, the nucleus interfacialis (NIf projecting to the HVC is considered one of the essential regions that contribute to the complexity of their songs. However, the types of interaction between the HVC and the NIf that can produce complex syntactical songs remain unclear. In order to investigate the function of interactions between the HVC and NIf, we have proposed a neural network model based on previous biological evidence. The HVC is modeled by a recurrent neural network (RNN that learns to generate temporal patterns of songs. The NIf is modeled as a mechanism that provides auditory feedback to the HVC and generates random noise that feeds into the HVC. The model showed that complex syntactical songs can be replicated by simple interactions between deterministic dynamics of the RNN and random noise. In the current study, the plausibility of the model is tested by the comparison between the changes in the songs of actual birds induced by pharmacological inhibition of the NIf and the changes in the songs produced by the model resulting from modification of parameters representing NIf functions. The efficacy of the model demonstrates that the changes of songs induced by pharmacological inhibition of the NIf can be interpreted as a trade-off between the effects of noise and the effects of feedback on the dynamics of the RNN of the HVC. These facts suggest that the current model provides a convincing hypothesis for the functional role of NIf-HVC interaction.

  11. A study of implementing In-Cycle-Shuffle strategy to a decommissioning boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan, E-mail: tuckjason@iner.gov.tw; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shyun-Jung

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A loading pattern strategy ICS (In-Cycle-Shuffle) was implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor. • The best power sharing distribution and ICS timing was found. • A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate ICS strategy. - Abstract: In this paper, a loading pattern strategy In-Cycle-Shuffle (ICS) is implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before decommissioning to save the fuel cycle cost. This method needs a core shutdown during the operation of a cycle to change the loading pattern to gain more reactivity. The reactivity model is used to model the ICS strategy in order to find out the best ICS timing and the optimum power sharing distribution before ICS and after ICS. Several parameters of reactivity model are modified and the effect of burnable poison, gadolinium (Gd), is considered in this research. Three cases are presented and it is found that the best ICS timing is at about two-thirds of total cycle length no matter the poisoning effect of Gd is considered or not. According to the optimum power sharing distribution result, it is suggested to decrease the once burnt power and increase the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible before ICS. After ICS, it is suggested to increase the positive reactivity fuel power and decrease the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible. A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate the special case whose EOC power weighting factor and the burnup accumulation factor in the reactivity model are quite different.

  12. Improvement of Bacillus subtilis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production by genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yanliao; Guo, Ye; Liang, Zhiqun

    2016-11-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a promising microbial polymer with potential applications in industry, agriculture and medicine. The use of high γ-PGA-producing strains is an effective approach to improve productivity of γ-PGA. In this study, we developed a mutant, F3-178, from Bacillus subtilis GXA-28 using genome shuffling. The morphological characteristics of F3-178 and GXA-28 were not identical. Compared with GXA-28 (18.4 ± 0.8 g l-1 ), the yield of γ-PGA was 1.9-fold higher in F3-178 (34.3 ± 1.2 g l-1 ). Results from batch fermentation in 3.7 l fermenter showed that F3-178 was satisfactory for industrial production of γ-PGA. Metabolic studies suggested that the higher γ-PGA yield in F3-178 could be attributed to increased intracellular flux and uptake of extracellular glutamate. Real-time PCR indicated that mRNA level of pgsB in F3-178 was 18.8-fold higher than in GXA-28, suggesting the higher yield might be related to the overexpression of genes involved in γ-PGA production. This study demonstrated that genome shuffling can be used for rapid improvement of γ-PGA strains, and the possible mechanism for the improved phenotype was also explored at the metabolic and transcriptional levels. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Sequence-Based Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins Using Random Forest with Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of RNA-binding proteins is one of the most challenging problems in computation biology. Although some studies have investigated this problem, the accuracy of prediction is still not sufficient. In this study, a highly accurate method was developed to predict RNA-binding proteins from amino acid sequences using random forests with the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR method, followed by incremental feature selection (IFS. We incorporated features of conjoint triad features and three novel features: binding propensity (BP, nonbinding propensity (NBP, and evolutionary information combined with physicochemical properties (EIPP. The results showed that these novel features have important roles in improving the performance of the predictor. Using the mRMR-IFS method, our predictor achieved the best performance (86.62% accuracy and 0.737 Matthews correlation coefficient. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction performance suggested that our method can be a useful approach to identify RNA-binding proteins from sequence information.

  14. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  15. Large-scale robot-assisted genome shuffling yields industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts with increased ethanol tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Snoek, Tim; Picca Nicolino, Martina; Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Mertens, Stijn; Saels, Veerle; Verplaetse, Alex; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Background During the final phases of bioethanol fermentation, yeast cells face high ethanol concentrations. This stress results in slower or arrested fermentations and limits ethanol production. Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with superior ethanol tolerance may therefore allow increased yield and efficiency. Genome shuffling has emerged as a powerful approach to rapidly enhance complex traits including ethanol tolerance, yet previous efforts have mostly relied on a mutagenized pool o...

  16. Difference in muscle activation patterns during high-speed versus standard-speed yoga: A randomized sequence crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potiaumpai, Melanie; Martins, Maria Carolina Massoni; Wong, Claudia; Desai, Trusha; Rodriguez, Roberto; Mooney, Kiersten; Signorile, Joseph F

    2017-02-01

    To compare the difference in muscle activation between high-speed yoga and standard-speed yoga and to compare muscle activation of the transitions between poses and the held phases of a yoga pose. Randomized sequence crossover trial SETTING: A laboratory of neuromuscular research and active aging Interventions: Eight minutes of continuous Sun Salutation B was performed, at a high speed versus a standard-speed, separately. Electromyography was used to quantify normalized muscle activation patterns of eight upper and lower body muscles (pectoralis major, medial deltoids, lateral head of the triceps, middle fibers of the trapezius, vastus medialis, medial gastrocnemius, thoracic extensor spinae, and external obliques) during the high-speed and standard-speed yoga protocols. Difference in normalized muscle activation between high-speed yoga and standard-speed yoga. Normalized muscle activity signals were significantly higher in all eight muscles during the transition phases of poses compared to the held phases (pyoga across the entire session. Our results show that transitions from one held phase of a pose to another produces higher normalized muscle activity than the held phases of the poses and that overall activity is greater during highspeed yoga than standard-speed yoga. Therefore, the transition speed and associated number of poses should be considered when targeting specific improvements in performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics studied by two different pseudo-random binary sequence work rate amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Koschate, J; Schiffer, T; Schneider, S; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the kinetics responses of heart rate (HR), pulmonary (V˙O2pulm) and predicted muscular (V˙O2musc) oxygen uptake between two different pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) work rate (WR) amplitudes both below anaerobic threshold. Eight healthy individuals performed two PRBS WR protocols implying changes between 30W and 80W and between 30W and 110W. HR and V˙O2pulm were measured beat-to-beat and breath-by-breath, respectively. V˙O2musc was estimated applying the approach of Hoffmann et al. (Eur J Appl Physiol 113: 1745-1754, 2013) considering a circulatory model for venous return and cross-correlation functions (CCF) for the kinetics analysis. HR and V˙O2musc kinetics seem to be independent of WR intensity (p>0.05). V˙O2pulm kinetics show prominent differences in the lag of the CCF maximum (39±9s; 31±4s; pkinetics remain unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of the shuffling of Streptococcus pyogenes clones and the fluctuation of scarlet fever cases between 2000 and 2006 in central Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wan-Ling

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of scarlet fever occurrences reported between 2000 and 2006 fluctuated considerably in central Taiwan and throughout the nation. Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes were collected from scarlet fever patients in central Taiwan and were characterized by emm sequencing and a standardized pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE method. National weekly report data were collected for investigating epidemiological trends. Results A total of 23 emm types were identified in 1,218 S. pyogenes isolates. The five most prevalent emm types were emm12 (50.4%, emm4 (23.2%, emm1 (16.4%, emm6 (3.8% and emm22 (3.0%. PFGE analysis with SmaI suggested that, with a few exceptions, strains with a common emm type belonged to the same clone. There were two large emm12 clones, one with DNA resistant to cleavage by SmaI. Each prevalent emm clone had major PFGE strain(s and many minor strains. Most of the minor strains emerged in the population and disappeared soon after. Even some major strains remained prevalent for only 2–3 years before declining. The large fluctuation of scarlet fever cases between 2000 and 2006 was associated with the shuffling of six prevalent emm clones. In 2003, the dramatic drop in scarlet fever cases in central Taiwan and throughout the whole country was associated with the occurrence of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS outbreak that occurred between late-February and mid-June in Taiwan. Conclusion The occurrences of scarlet fever in central Taiwan in 2000–2006 were primarily caused by five emm types, which accounted for 96.8% of the isolates collected. Most of the S. pyogenes strains (as defined by PFGE genotypes emerged and lasted for only a few years. The fluctuation in the number of scarlet fever cases during the seven years can be primarily attributed to the shuffling of six prevalent emm clones and to the SARS outbreak in 2003.

  19. Chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing shuffled multiple envelope genes confers cross-protection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Debin; Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cao, Dianjun; Piñeyro, Pablo; Yugo, Danielle M; Overend, Christopher; Cao, Qian; Lynn Heffron, C; Halbur, Patrick G; Pearce, Douglas S; Calvert, Jay G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The extensive genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains is a major obstacle for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that chimeric PRRSVs in which a single envelope gene (ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 or ORF6) was shuffled via DNA shuffling had an improved heterologous cross-neutralizing ability. In this study, we incorporate all of the individually-shuffled envelope genes together in different combinations into an infectious clone backbone of PRRSV MLV Fostera(®) PRRS. Five viable progeny chimeric viruses were rescued, and their growth characteristics were characterized in vitro. In a pilot pig study, two chimeric viruses (FV-SPDS-VR2,FV-SPDS-VR5) were found to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination/challenge study in 72 pigs revealed that chimeric virus FV-SPDS-VR2 and parental virus conferred partial cross-protection when challenged with heterologous strains NADC20 or MN184B. The results have important implications for future development of an effective PRRSV vaccine that confers heterologous protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ARTP mutation and genome shuffling of ABE fermentation symbiotic system for improvement of butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Genyu; Mai, Shuai; Wu, Pengfei; Wu, Jianrong; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2017-03-01

    Butanol is an ideal renewable biofuel which possesses superior fuel properties. Previously, butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated in our lab, with microoxygen tolerance ability. To boost butanol yield for large-scale industrial production, TSH06 was used as parental strain and subjected to atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) and four rounds of genome shuffling (GS). ARTP mutant and GS strain were co-cultured with facultative anaerobic Bacillus cereus TSH2 to form a symbiotic system with microoxygen tolerance, which was then subjected to fermentation. Relative messenger RNA (mRNA) level of key enzyme gene was measured by real-time PCR. The highest butanol titer of TS4-30 reached 15.63 g/L, which was 34% higher than TSH06 (12.19 g/L). Compared with parental strain, mRNA of acid-forming gene in TS4-30 decreased in acidogenesis phase, while solvent-forming gene increased in solventogenesis phase. This gene expression pattern was consistent with high butanol yield and low acid level in TS4-30. In summary, symbiotic system TS4-30 was obtained with butanol titer improvement and microoxygen tolerance.

  1. Tandem duplications lead to novel expression patterns through exon shuffling in Drosophila yakuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah L Rogers

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One common hypothesis to explain the impacts of tandem duplications is that whole gene duplications commonly produce additive changes in gene expression due to copy number changes. Here, we use genome wide RNA-seq data from a population sample of Drosophila yakuba to test this 'gene dosage' hypothesis. We observe little evidence of expression changes in response to whole transcript duplication capturing 5' and 3' UTRs. Among whole gene duplications, we observe evidence that dosage sharing across copies is likely to be common. The lack of expression changes after whole gene duplication suggests that the majority of genes are subject to tight regulatory control and therefore not sensitive to changes in gene copy number. Rather, we observe changes in expression level due to both shuffling of regulatory elements and the creation of chimeric structures via tandem duplication. Additionally, we observe 30 de novo gene structures arising from tandem duplications, 23 of which form with expression in the testes. Thus, the value of tandem duplications is likely to be more intricate than simple changes in gene dosage. The common regulatory effects from chimeric gene formation after tandem duplication may explain their contribution to genome evolution.

  2. Optimum Parameters for Tuned Mass Damper Using Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessamoddin Meshkat Razavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is investigated the optimum parameters for a tuned mass damper (TMD under the seismic excitation. Shuffled complex evolution (SCE is a meta-heuristic optimization method which is used to find the optimum damping and tuning frequency ratio for a TMD. The efficiency of the TMD is evaluated by decreasing the structural displacement dynamic magnification factor (DDMF and acceleration dynamic magnification factor (ADMF for a specific vibration mode of the structure. The optimum TMD parameters and the corresponding optimized DDMF and ADMF are achieved for two control levels (displacement control and acceleration control, different structural damping ratio and mass ratio of the TMD system. The optimum TMD parameters are checked for a 10-storey building under earthquake excitations. The maximum storey displacement and acceleration obtained by SCE method are compared with the results of other existing approaches. The results show that the peak building response decreased with decreases of about 20% for displacement and 30% for acceleration of the top floor. To show the efficiency of the adopted algorithm (SCE, a comparison is also made between SCE and other meta-heuristic optimization methods such as genetic algorithm (GA, particle swarm optimization (PSO method and harmony search (HS algorithm in terms of success rate and computational processing time. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other meta-heuristic optimization methods.

  3. Nonlinear Rayleigh wave inversion based on the shuffled frog-leaping algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wu, Dun-Shi; Qin, Xiao-Jun

    2017-12-01

    At present, near-surface shear wave velocities are mainly calculated through Rayleigh wave dispersion-curve inversions in engineering surface investigations, but the required calculations pose a highly nonlinear global optimization problem. In order to alleviate the risk of falling into a local optimal solution, this paper introduces a new global optimization method, the shuffle frog-leaping algorithm (SFLA), into the Rayleigh wave dispersion-curve inversion process. SFLA is a swarm-intelligence-based algorithm that simulates a group of frogs searching for food. It uses a few parameters, achieves rapid convergence, and is capability of effective global searching. In order to test the reliability and calculation performance of SFLA, noise-free and noisy synthetic datasets were inverted. We conducted a comparative analysis with other established algorithms using the noise-free dataset, and then tested the ability of SFLA to cope with data noise. Finally, we inverted a real-world example to examine the applicability of SFLA. Results from both synthetic and field data demonstrated the effectiveness of SFLA in the interpretation of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. We found that SFLA is superior to the established methods in terms of both reliability and computational efficiency, so it offers great potential to improve our ability to solve geophysical inversion problems.

  4. Generation of human antibody fragments against Streptococcus mutans using a phage display chain shuffling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common oral diseases and dental caries can be prevented effectively by passive immunization. In humans, passive immunotherapy may require the use of humanized or human antibodies to prevent adverse immune responses against murine epitopes. Therefore we generated human single chain and diabody antibody derivatives based on the binding characteristics of the murine monoclonal antibody Guy's 13. The murine form of this antibody has been used successfully to prevent Streptococcus mutans colonization and the development of dental caries in non-human primates, and to prevent bacterial colonization in human clinical trials. Results The antibody derivatives were generated using a chain-shuffling approach based on human antibody variable gene phage-display libraries. Like the parent antibody, these derivatives bound specifically to SAI/II, the surface adhesin of the oral pathogen S. mutans. Conclusions Humanization of murine antibodies can be easily achieved using phage display libraries. The human antibody fragments bind the antigen as well as the causative agent of dental caries. In addition the human diabody derivative is capable of aggregating S. mutans in vitro, making it a useful candidate passive immunotherapeutic agent for oral diseases.

  5. KinMutRF: a random forest classifier of sequence variants in the human protein kinase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Tirso; Vazquez, Miguel; Matey-Hernandez, María Luisa; Brunak, Søren; Valencia, Alfonso; Izarzugaza, Jose Mg

    2016-06-23

    The association between aberrant signal processing by protein kinases and human diseases such as cancer was established long time ago. However, understanding the link between sequence variants in the protein kinase superfamily and the mechanistic complex traits at the molecular level remains challenging: cells tolerate most genomic alterations and only a minor fraction disrupt molecular function sufficiently and drive disease. KinMutRF is a novel random-forest method to automatically identify pathogenic variants in human kinases. Twenty six decision trees implemented as a random forest ponder a battery of features that characterize the variants: a) at the gene level, including membership to a Kinbase group and Gene Ontology terms; b) at the PFAM domain level; and c) at the residue level, the types of amino acids involved, changes in biochemical properties, functional annotations from UniProt, Phospho.ELM and FireDB. KinMutRF identifies disease-associated variants satisfactorily (Acc: 0.88, Prec:0.82, Rec:0.75, F-score:0.78, MCC:0.68) when trained and cross-validated with the 3689 human kinase variants from UniProt that have been annotated as neutral or pathogenic. All unclassified variants were excluded from the training set. Furthermore, KinMutRF is discussed with respect to two independent kinase-specific sets of mutations no included in the training and testing, Kin-Driver (643 variants) and Pon-BTK (1495 variants). Moreover, we provide predictions for the 848 protein kinase variants in UniProt that remained unclassified. A public implementation of KinMutRF, including documentation and examples, is available online ( http://kinmut2.bioinfo.cnio.es ). The source code for local installation is released under a GPL version 3 license, and can be downloaded from https://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows/KinMut2 . KinMutRF is capable of classifying kinase variation with good performance. Predictions by KinMutRF compare favorably in a benchmark with other state

  6. Web Platform vs In-Person Genetic Counselor for Return of Carrier Results From Exome Sequencing: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara B; Lewis, Katie L; Umstead, Kendall L; Johnston, Jennifer J; Turbitt, Erin; Fishler, Kristen P; Patton, John H; Miller, Ilana M; Heidlebaugh, Alexis R; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2018-01-22

    A critical bottleneck in clinical genomics is the mismatch between large volumes of results and the availability of knowledgeable professionals to return them. To test whether a web-based platform is noninferior to a genetic counselor for educating patients about their carrier results from exome sequencing. A randomized noninferiority trial conducted in a longitudinal sequencing cohort at the National Institutes of Health from February 5, 2014, to December 16, 2016, was used to compare the web-based platform with a genetic counselor. Among the 571 eligible participants, 1 to 7 heterozygous variants were identified in genes that cause a phenotype that is recessively inherited. Surveys were administered after cohort enrollment, immediately following trial education, and 1 month and 6 months later to primarily healthy postreproductive participants who expressed interest in learning their carrier results. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were applied. A web-based platform that integrated education on carrier results with personal test results was designed to directly parallel disclosure education by a genetic counselor. The sessions took a mean (SD) time of 21 (10.6), and 27 (9.3) minutes, respectively. The primary outcomes and noninferiority margins (δNI) were knowledge (0 to 8, δNI = -1), test-specific distress (0 to 30, δNI = +1), and decisional conflict (15 to 75, δNI = +6). After 462 participants (80.9%) provided consent and were randomized, all but 3 participants (n = 459) completed surveys following education and counseling; 398 (86.1%) completed 1-month surveys and 392 (84.8%) completed 6-month surveys. Participants were predominantly well-educated, non-Hispanic white, married parents; mean (SD) age was 63 (63.1) years and 246 (53.6%) were men. The web platform was noninferior to the genetic counselor on outcomes assessed at 1 and 6 months: knowledge (mean group difference, -0.18; lower limit of 97.5% CI, -0.63;

  7. The optimal sequence for bronchial brushing and forceps biopsy in lung cancer diagnosis: a random control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gang; Miao, Yuan; Hu, Xue-Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiu-Yue; Wu, Guang-Ping; Wang, En-Hua; Kang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Optimizing basic techniques in diagnostic bronchoscopy is important for improving medical services in developing countries. In this study, the optimal sequence of bronchial brushing relative to bronchial biopsy for lung cancer diagnosis was evaluated. A total of 420 patients with visible endobronchial tumors were prospectively and randomly enrolled in two groups: a pre-biopsy brushing group, receiving two brushings before biopsy; two brushings which performed afterwards; were set as self-control and compared with the pre-biopsy brushings as the intra-group comparison; and a post-biopsy brushing group, only receiving two brushings after biopsy, which were compared with the pre-biopsy brushings as the inter-group comparison. Diagnostic yield of brushing was compared before and after biopsy, and as well as for different tumor pathologies and bronchoscopic morphologies. The occurrence of treated bleeding which defined as bleeding needed further intervention with argon plasma coagulation and/or anti-coagulation drugs in two groups was also compared. Only patients with a definitive cytological or histological diagnosis of lung cancer based on bronchoscopy or other confirmatory techniques were included. Patients were excluded if they had submucosal lesions, extrinsic compressions, pulmonary metastasis of extrapulmonary malignancies or uncommon non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 362 patients who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Diagnostic yield for pre-biopsy brushing (49.2%, 88/179) was significantly higher than for post-biopsy brushing within the same pre-biopsy brushing group (31.8%, 57/179) (P=0.007) as the intra-group comparison, and significantly higher than for post-biopsy brushing in the post group (30.6%, 56/183) (Pcancer. In cases of endobronchial exophytic tumors, pre-biopsy brushing appears to be superior to post-biopsy brushing.

  8. Chunking during human visuomotor sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Katsuyuki; Kitaguchi, Katsuya; Hikosaka, Okihide

    2003-09-01

    Motor sequence learning is a process whereby a series of elementary movements is re-coded into an efficient representation for the entire sequence. Here we show that human subjects learn a visuomotor sequence by spontaneously chunking the elementary movements, while each chunk acts as a single memory unit. The subjects learned to press a sequence of 10 sets of two buttons through trial and error. By examining the temporal patterns with which subjects performed a visuomotor sequence, we found that the subjects performed the 10 sets as several clusters of sets, which were separated by long time gaps. While the overall performance time decreased by repeating the same sequence, the clusters became clearer and more consistent. The cluster pattern was uncorrelated with the distance of hand movements and was different across subjects who learned the same sequence. We then split a learned sequence into three segments, while preserving or destroying the clusters in the learned sequence, and shuffled the segments. The performance on the shuffled sequence was more accurate and quicker when the clusters in the original sequence were preserved than when they were destroyed. The results suggest that each cluster is processed as a single memory unit, a chunk, and is necessary for efficient sequence processing. A learned visuomotor sequence is hierarchically represented as chunks that contain several elementary movements. We also found that the temporal patterns of sequence performance transferred from the nondominant to dominant hand, but not vice versa. This may suggest a role of the dominant hemisphere in storage of learned chunks. Together with our previous unit-recording and imaging studies that used the same learning paradigm, we predict specific roles of the dominant parietal area, basal ganglia, and presupplementary motor area in the chunking.

  9. Anomalous stress diffusion, Omori's law and Continuous Time Random Walk in the 2010 Efpalion aftershock sequence (Corinth rift, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Efpalion aftershock sequence occurred in January 2010, when an M=5.5 earthquake was followed four days later by another strong event (M=5.4) and numerous aftershocks (Karakostas et al., 2012). This activity interrupted a 15 years period of low to moderate earthquake occurrence in Corinth rift, where the last major event was the 1995 Aigion earthquake (M=6.2). Coulomb stress analysis performed in previous studies (Karakostas et al., 2012; Sokos et al., 2012; Ganas et al., 2013) indicated that the second major event and most of the aftershocks were triggered due to stress transfer. The aftershocks production rate decays as a power-law with time according to the modified Omori law (Utsu et al., 1995) with an exponent larger than one for the first four days, while after the occurrence of the second strong event the exponent turns to unity. We consider the earthquake sequence as a point process in time and space and study its spatiotemporal evolution considering a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with a joint probability density function of inter-event times and jumps between the successive earthquakes (Metzler and Klafter, 2000). Jump length distribution exhibits finite variance, whereas inter-event times scale as a q-generalized gamma distribution (Michas et al., 2013) with a long power-law tail. These properties are indicative of a subdiffusive process in terms of CTRW. Additionally, the mean square displacement of aftershocks is constant with time after the occurrence of the first event, while it changes to a power-law with exponent close to 0.15 after the second major event, illustrating a slow diffusive process. During the first four days aftershocks cluster around the epicentral area of the second major event, while after that and taking as a reference the second event, the aftershock zone is migrating slowly with time to the west near the epicentral area of the first event. This process is much slower from what would be expected from normal diffusion, a

  10. Genome shuffling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced glutathione yield and relative gene expression analysis using fluorescent quantitation reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua; Ma, Yanlin; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo; Liu, Junyan; Zhao, Junfeng; Dong, Jianjun; Yu, Junhong; Chang, Zongming

    2016-08-01

    Genome shuffling is an efficient and promising approach for the rapid improvement of microbial phenotypes. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to enhance the yield of glutathione produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae YS86. Six isolates with subtle improvements in glutathione yield were obtained from populations generated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and nitrosoguanidine (NTG) mutagenesis. These yeast strains were then subjected to recursive pool-wise protoplast fusion. A strain library that was likely to yield positive colonies was created by fusing the lethal protoplasts obtained from both UV irradiation and heat treatments. After two rounds of genome shuffling, a high-yield recombinant YSF2-19 strain that exhibited 3.2- and 3.3-fold increases in glutathione production in shake flask and fermenter respectively was obtained. Comparative analysis of synthetase gene expression was conducted between the initial and shuffled strains using FQ (fluorescent quantitation) RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction). Delta CT (threshold cycle) relative quantitation analysis revealed that glutathione synthetase gene (GSH-I) expression at the transcriptional level in the YSF2-19 strain was 9.9-fold greater than in the initial YS86. The shuffled yeast strain has a potential application in brewing, other food, and pharmaceutical industries. Simultaneously, the analysis of improved phenotypes will provide more valuable data for inverse metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Shuffling cross-validation-bee algorithm as a new descriptor selection method for retention studies of pesticides in biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kobra; Atabati, Morteza; Ahmadi, Monire

    2017-05-04

    Bee algorithm (BA) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the natural foraging behaviour of honey bees to find the optimal solution which can be proposed to feature selection. In this paper, shuffling cross-validation-BA (CV-BA) was applied to select the best descriptors that could describe the retention factor (log k) in the biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) of 79 heterogeneous pesticides. Six descriptors were obtained using BA and then the selected descriptors were applied for model development using multiple linear regression (MLR). The descriptor selection was also performed using stepwise, genetic algorithm and simulated annealing methods and MLR was applied to model development and then the results were compared with those obtained from shuffling CV-BA. The results showed that shuffling CV-BA can be applied as a powerful descriptor selection method. Support vector machine (SVM) was also applied for model development using six selected descriptors by BA. The obtained statistical results using SVM were better than those obtained using MLR, as the root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient (R) for whole data set (training and test), using shuffling CV-BA-MLR, were obtained as 0.1863 and 0.9426, respectively, while these amounts for the shuffling CV-BA-SVM method were obtained as 0.0704 and 0.9922, respectively.

  12. An Improved Fireworks Algorithm Based on Grouping Strategy of the Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Solve Function Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fireworks algorithm (FA is a new parallel diffuse optimization algorithm to simulate the fireworks explosion phenomenon, which realizes the balance between global exploration and local searching by means of adjusting the explosion mode of fireworks bombs. By introducing the grouping strategy of the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA, an improved FA-SFLA hybrid algorithm is put forward, which can effectively make the FA jump out of the local optimum and accelerate the global search ability. The simulation results show that the hybrid algorithm greatly improves the accuracy and convergence velocity for solving the function optimization problems.

  13. A New Method Based On Modified Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm In Order To Solve Nonlinear Large Scale Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Baziar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to handle large scale problems this study has used shuffled frog leaping algorithm. This algorithm is an optimization method based on natural memetics that uses a new two-phase modification to it to have a better search in the problem space. The suggested algorithm is evaluated by comparing to some well known algorithms using several benchmark optimization problems. The simulation results have clearly shown the superiority of this algorithm over other well-known methods in the area.

  14. Use of molecular diversity of Mycoplasma gallisepticum by gene-targeted sequencing (GTS) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Naola M; Hepp, Diego; Sun, Shulei; Ikuta, Nilo; Levisohn, Sharon; Kleven, Stanley H; García, Maricarmen

    2005-06-01

    A total of 67 Mycoplasma gallisepticum field isolates from the USA, Israel and Australia, and 10 reference strains, were characterized by gene-targeted sequencing (GTS) analysis of portions of the putative cytadhesin pvpA gene, the cytadhesin gapA gene, the cytadhesin mgc2 gene, and an uncharacterized hypothetical surface lipoprotein-encoding gene designated genome coding DNA sequence (CDS) MGA_0319. The regions of the surface-protein-encoding genes targeted in this analysis were found to be stable within a strain, after sequencing different in vitro passages of M. gallisepticum reference strains. Gene sequences were first analysed on the basis of gene size polymorphism. The pvpA and mgc2 genes are characterized by the presence of different nucleotide insertions/deletions. However, differentiation of isolates based solely on pvpA/mgc2 PCR size polymorphism was not found to be a reliable method to differentiate among M. gallisepticum isolates. On the other hand, GTS analysis based on the nucleotide sequence identities of individual and multiple genes correlated with epidemiologically linked isolates and with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. GTS analysis of individual genes, gapA, MGA_0319, mgc2 and pvpA, identified 17, 16, 20 and 22 sequence types, respectively. GTS analysis using multiple gene sequences mgc2/pvpa and gapA/MGA_0319/mgc2/pvpA identified 38 and 40 sequence types, respectively. GTS of multiple surface-protein-encoding genes showed better discriminatory power than RAPD analysis, which identified 36 pattern types from the same panel of M. gallisepticum strains. These results are believed to provide the first evidence that typing of M. gallisepticum isolates by GTS analysis of surface-protein genes is a sensitive and reproducible typing method and will allow rapid global comparisons between laboratories.

  15. Observations of Shuffling Rotation of the Earth's Inner Core and its Time Correlation With Geomagnetic Jerks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.; Bodin, T.; Sambridge, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report the first observational evidence that the complex rotational dynamics of the Earth's inner core appear to be in close relationship with the geomagnetic field. We infer from a newly observed collection of earthquake doublets that the Earth's inner core "shuffles", exhibiting both prograde and retrograde rotation in the reference frame of the mantle. Evidence for a complex pattern in the rotation of the inner core characterized by episodes of both prograde and retrograde motion is presented. A key feature of the new analysis is that the number of parameters in the inversion controlling the rotation rate of the Earth's inner core may itself be treated as an unknown, which is robustly constrained by the data itself in a manner consistent with the inherent noise. According to our results, a short time interval (on the order of one to two years) is needed for the inner core to accelerate to a rotation rate of several degrees per year, and typically a slightly longer time is needed to decelerate down to a negligibly small differential rotation rate. These time scales are in agreement with experimental spin-up times obtained when the magnetic torque alone is used to accelerate the inner core. A significant result is that all three time-intervals in which the inner core distinctively accelerates with respect to the rest of the planet are in agreement with known occurrences of geomagnetic jerks. However, we do not find a correlation between the other three reported geomagnetic jerks and the changes in rotation rate. Hence, intriguingly, a geomagnetic jerk appears to be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for a change in the inner core rotation rate. Because there is also a documented correlation between the geomagnetic jerks and the Length of Day time series, this all points to the same source and works in favour of a differential rotation rather than processes at the inner core boundary. Last but not least, when we integrate the rotation rate over different

  16. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas Blázquez

    2016-07-01

    addition, our results demonstrate that the structure/function-based domain shuffling approach is a successful method to construct tailor-made endolysins with higher bactericidal activities than their parental enzymes.

  17. DS/LPI autocorrelation detection in noise plus random-tone interference. [Direct Sequence Low-Probabilty of Intercept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinedi, S.; Polydoros, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present and analyze a frequency-noncoherent two-lag autocorrelation statistic for the wideband detection of random BPSK signals in noise-plus-random-multitone interference. It is shown that this detector is quite robust to the presence or absence of interference and its specific parameter values, contrary to the case of an energy detector. The rule assumes knowledge of the data rate and the active scenario under H0. It is concluded that the real-time autocorrelation domain and its samples (lags) are a viable approach for detecting random signals in dense environments.

  18. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    . The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we......Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues...... use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes...

  19. Investigating the causes and consequences of symbiont shuffling in a multi-partner reef coral symbiosis under environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, R; Silverstein, R N; Baker, A C

    2015-06-22

    Dynamic symbioses may critically mediate impacts of climate change on diverse organisms, with repercussions for ecosystem persistence in some cases. On coral reefs, increases in heat-tolerant symbionts after thermal bleaching can reduce coral susceptibility to future stress. However, the relevance of this adaptive response is equivocal owing to conflicting reports of symbiont stability and change. We help reconcile this conflict by showing that change in symbiont community composition (symbiont shuffling) in Orbicella faveolata depends on the disturbance severity and recovery environment. The proportion of heat-tolerant symbionts dramatically increased following severe experimental bleaching, especially in a warmer recovery environment, but tended to decrease if bleaching was less severe. These patterns can be explained by variation in symbiont performance in the changing microenvironments created by differentially bleached host tissues. Furthermore, higher proportions of heat-tolerant symbionts linearly increased bleaching resistance but reduced photochemical efficiency, suggesting that any change in community structure oppositely impacts performance and stress tolerance. Therefore, even minor symbiont shuffling can adaptively benefit corals, although fitness effects of resulting trade-offs are difficult to predict. This work helps elucidate causes and consequences of dynamism in symbiosis, which is critical to predicting responses of multi-partner symbioses such as O. faveolata to environmental change. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative study on fermentation performance in the genome shuffled Candida versatilis and wild-type salt tolerant yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Guo, Hong-Lian; Wang, Chun-Ling; Hou, Li-Hua; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Jin-Fu; Lu, Fu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    The fermentation performance of a genome-shuffled strain of Candida versatilis S3-5, isolated for improved tolerance to salt, and wild-type (WT) strain were analysed. The fermentation parameters, such as growth, reducing sugar, ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds, were detected during soy sauce fermentation process. The results showed that ethanol produced by the genome shuffled strain S3-5 was increasing at a faster rate and to a greater extent than WT. At the end of the fermentation, malic acid, citric acid and succinic acid formed in tricarboxylic acid cycle after S3-5 treatment elevated by 39.20%, 6.85% and 17.09% compared to WT, respectively. Moreover, flavour compounds such as phenethyl acetate, ethyl vanillate, ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl myristate, ethyl pentadecanoate, ethyl palmitate and phenylacetaldehyde produced by S3-5 were 2.26, 2.12, 2.87, 34.41, 6.32, 13.64, 2.23 and 78.85 times as compared to WT. S3-5 exhibited enhanced metabolic ability as compared to the wild-type strain, improved conversion of sugars to ethanol, metabolism of organic acid and formation of volatile compounds, especially esters, Moreover, S3-5 might be an ester-flavour type salt-tolerant yeast. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Random-effects linear modeling and sample size tables for two special crossover designs of average bioequivalence studies: the four-period, two-sequence, two-formulation and six-period, three-sequence, three-formulation designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisco J; Berg, Michel J; Krebill, Ron; Welty, Timothy; Gidal, Barry E; Alloway, Rita; Privitera, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Due to concern and debate in the epilepsy medical community and to the current interest of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in revising approaches to the approval of generic drugs, the FDA is currently supporting ongoing bioequivalence studies of antiepileptic drugs, the EQUIGEN studies. During the design of these crossover studies, the researchers could not find commercial or non-commercial statistical software that quickly allowed computation of sample sizes for their designs, particularly software implementing the FDA requirement of using random-effects linear models for the analyses of bioequivalence studies. This article presents tables for sample-size evaluations of average bioequivalence studies based on the two crossover designs used in the EQUIGEN studies: the four-period, two-sequence, two-formulation design, and the six-period, three-sequence, three-formulation design. Sample-size computations assume that random-effects linear models are used in bioequivalence analyses with crossover designs. Random-effects linear models have been traditionally viewed by many pharmacologists and clinical researchers as just mathematical devices to analyze repeated-measures data. In contrast, a modern view of these models attributes an important mathematical role in theoretical formulations in personalized medicine to them, because these models not only have parameters that represent average patients, but also have parameters that represent individual patients. Moreover, the notation and language of random-effects linear models have evolved over the years. Thus, another goal of this article is to provide a presentation of the statistical modeling of data from bioequivalence studies that highlights the modern view of these models, with special emphasis on power analyses and sample-size computations.

  2. Development and comparison of algorithms for generating a scan sequence for a random access scanner. [ZAP (and flow charts for ZIP and SCAN), in FORTRAN for DEC-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, R. O.

    1980-09-01

    Many data acquisition systems incorporate high-speed scanners to convert analog signals into digital format for further processing. Some systems multiplex many channels into a single scanner. A random access scanner whose scan sequence is specified by a table in random access memory will permit different scan rates on different channels. Generation of this scan table can be a tedious manual task when there are many channels (e.g. 50), when there are more than a few scan rates (e.g. 5), and/or when the ratio of the highest scan rate to the lowest scan rate becomes large (e.g. 100:1). An algorithm is developed which will generate these scan sequences for the random access scanner and implements the algorithm on a digital computer. Application of number theory to the mathematical statement of the problem led to development of several algorithms which were implemented in FORTRAN. The most efficient of these algorithms operates by partitioning the problem into a set of subproblems. Through recursion they solve each subproblem by partitioning it repeatedly into even smaller parts, continuing until a set of simple problems is created. From this process, a pictorial representation or wheel diagram of the problem can be constructed. From the wheel diagram and a description of the original problem, a scan table can be constructed. In addition, the wheel diagram can be used as a method of storing the scan sequence in a smaller amount of memory. The most efficient partitioning algorithm solved most scan table problems in less than a second of CPU time. Some types of problems, however, required as much as a few minutes of CPU time. 26 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Design of Long Period Pseudo-Random Sequences from the Addition of m -Sequences over 𝔽 p

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Jian

    2004-01-01

    Pseudo-random sequence with good correlation property and large linear span is widely used in code division multiple access (CDMA) communication systems and cryptology for reliable and secure information transmission. In this paper, sequences with long period, large complexity, balance statistics, and low cross-correlation property are constructed from the addition of m -sequences with pairwise-prime linear spans (AMPLS). Using m -sequences as building blocks, the proposed method proved to...

  4. Determining Phylogenetic Relationships Among Date Palm Cultivars Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars is useful for their conservation and genetic improvement. Various molecular markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), simple sequence repeat (SSR), representational difference analysis (RDA), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) have been developed to molecularly characterize date palm cultivars. PCR-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) are powerful tools to determine the relatedness of date palm cultivars that are difficult to distinguish morphologically. In this chapter, the principles, materials, and methods of RAPD and ISSR techniques are presented. Analysis of data generated from these two techniques and the use of these data to reveal phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars are also discussed.

  5. Genome shuffling of Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis YF11 for improving nisin Z production and comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Liu, S Y; Du, Y H; Feng, W J; Liu, J H; Qiao, J J

    2014-05-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative to increase the shelf time of many foods. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to improve nisin Z production of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis YF11 (YF11) via recursive protoplast fusion. Ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis were used to generate parental strains for genome shuffling. After 4 rounds of genome shuffling, the best-performing strain F44 was obtained, which showed dramatic improvements in tolerance to both glucose (ranging from 8 to 15% (wt/vol) and nisin (ranging from 5,000 to 14,000 IU/mL). Fed-batch fermentation showed that the nisin titer of F44 was up to 4,023 IU/mL, which was 2.4 times that of the starting strain YF11. Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of YF11 and F44 revealed the apparent differences in cell morphology. Whereas YF11 displayed long and thin cell morphology, F44 cells were short and thick and with a raised surface in the middle of the cell. With the increasing glucose and nisin content in the medium, cells of both YF11 and F44 tended to become shrunken; however, alterations in YF11 cells were more pronounced than those of F44 cells, especially when cultured in tolerance medium containing both nisin and glucose. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis demonstrated that the structure of nisin from YF11 and F44 was the same. Expression profiling of nisin synthesis related genes by real-time quantitative PCR showed that the transcription level of nisin structural gene nisZ and immunity gene nisI of F44 was 48 and 130% higher than that of the starting strain YF11, respectively. These results could provide valuable insights into the molecular basis underlying the nisin overproduction mechanism in L. lactis, thus facilitating the future construction of industrial strains for nisin production. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis of human neutrophil elastase inhibitors using shuffling classification and regression trees and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi-Baboli, M

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship models for N-benzoylindazole derivatives as inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. These models were developed with the aid of classification and regression trees (CART) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) combined with a shuffling cross-validation technique using interpretable descriptors. More than one hundred meaningful descriptors, representing various structural characteristics for all 51 N-benzoylindazole derivatives in the data set, were calculated and used as the original variables for shuffling CART modelling. Five descriptors of average Wiener index, Kier benzene-likeliness index, subpolarity parameter, average shape profile index of order 2 and folding degree index selected by the shuffling CART technique have been used as inputs of the ANFIS for prediction of inhibition behaviour of N-benzoylindazole derivatives. The results of the developed shuffling CART-ANFIS model compared to other techniques, such as genetic algorithm (GA)-partial least square (PLS)-ANFIS and stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR)-ANFIS, are promising and descriptive. The satisfactory results r2p = 0.845, Q2(LOO) = 0.861, r2(L25%O) = 0.829, RMSE(LOO)  = 0.305 and RMSE(L25%O)  = 0.336) demonstrate that shuffling CART-ANFIS models present the relationship between human neutrophil elastase inhibitor activity and molecular descriptors, and they yield predictions in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  7. A parallel approximate string matching under Levenshtein distance on graphics processing units using warp-shuffle operations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThienLuan Ho

    Full Text Available Approximate string matching with k-differences has a number of practical applications, ranging from pattern recognition to computational biology. This paper proposes an efficient memory-access algorithm for parallel approximate string matching with k-differences on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs. In the proposed algorithm, all threads in the same GPUs warp share data using warp-shuffle operation instead of accessing the shared memory. Moreover, we implement the proposed algorithm by exploiting the memory structure of GPUs to optimize its performance. Experiment results for real DNA packages revealed that the performance of the proposed algorithm and its implementation archived up to 122.64 and 1.53 times compared to that of sequential algorithm on CPU and previous parallel approximate string matching algorithm on GPUs, respectively.

  8. First-principles investigations of homogeneous lattice-distortive strain and shuffles in Ni sub 2 MnGa

    CERN Document Server

    Zayak, A T; Enkovaara, J A; Ayuela, A; Nieminen, R M

    2003-01-01

    A series of first-principles calculations were performed for ferromagnetic Ni sub 2 MnGa using density functional theory and PAW potentials. Theoretically, a tetragonal crystal structure homogeneous lattice-distortive strain is stabilized around c/a = 0.94 with respect to the L2 sub 1 structure when, in addition, modulation shuffles with a period of five atomic planes are taken into account. This is in agreement with the observed structures in experimental works. The modulation appears to be critically important for stability of the tetragonal structure with c/a < 1. Here, we report a new feature which is related to the optimum amplitudes of the modulation in different atomic planes. Related to this are systematic changes in the minority spin density of states near the Fermi surface, like in the formalism of a pseudo-gap.

  9. Solving Energy-Aware Real-Time Tasks Scheduling Problem with Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm on Heterogeneous Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhe Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing energy consumption is becoming very important in order to keep battery life and lower overall operational costs for heterogeneous real-time multiprocessor systems. In this paper, we first formulate this as a combinatorial optimization problem. Then, a successful meta-heuristic, called Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA is proposed to reduce the energy consumption. Precocity remission and local optimal avoidance techniques are proposed to avoid the precocity and improve the solution quality. Convergence acceleration significantly reduces the search time. Experimental results show that the SFLA-based energy-aware meta-heuristic uses 30% less energy than the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO algorithm, and 60% less energy than the Genetic Algorithm (GA algorithm. Remarkably, the running time of the SFLA-based meta-heuristic is 20 and 200 times less than ACO and GA, respectively, for finding the optimal solution.

  10. An area-efficient topology for VLSI implementation of Viterbi decoders and other shuffle-exchange type structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik Nordtorp; Paaske, Erik

    1991-01-01

    A topology for single-chip implementation of computing structures based on shuffle-exchange (SE)-type interconnection networks is presented. The topology is suited for structures with a small number of processing elements (i.e. 32-128) whose area cannot be neglected compared to the area required......- mu m CMOS process using MOSIS-like simplified design rules. The chip operates at speeds up to 19 MHz under worst-case conditions (V/sub DD/=4.75 V and T/sub A/=70 degrees C). The core of the chip (excluding pad cells) is 7.8*5.1 mm/sup 2/ and contains approximately 50000 transistors...

  11. Evolution towards ergodic behavior of stationary fractal random processes with memory: application to the study of long-range correlations of nucleotide sequences in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Schönfisch, Birgitt; Mackey, Michael C.

    1996-02-01

    The possible occurrence of ergodic behavior for large times is investigated in the case of stationary random processes with memory. It is shown that for finite times the time average of a state function is generally a random variable and thus two types of cumulants can be introduced: for the time average and for the statistical ensemble, respectively. In the limit of infinite time a transition from the random to the deterministic behavior of the time average may occur, resulting in an ergodic behavior. The conditions of occurrence of this transition are investigated by analyzing the scaling behavior of the cumulants of the time average. A general approach for the computation of these cumulants is developed; explicit computations are presented both for short and long memory in the particular case of separable stationary processes for which the cumulants of a statistical ensemble can be factorized into products of functions depending on binary time differences. In both cases the ergodic behavior emerges for large times provided that the cumulants of a statistical ensemble decrease to zero as the time differences increase to infinity. The analysis leads to the surprising conclusion that the scaling behavior of the cumulants of the time average is relatively insensitive to the type of memory considered: both for short and long memory the cumulants of the time average obey inverse different from zero for large time differences, then the time averaage is random even as the length of the total time interval tends to infinity and the ergodic behavior no longer holds. The theory is applied to the study of long range correlations of nucleotide sequences in DNA; in this case the length t of a sequence of nucleotides plays the role of the time variable. A proportionality relationship is established between the cumulants of the pyrimidine excess in a sequence of length t and the cumulants of the time (length) average of the probability of occurrence of a pyrimidine. It is shown

  12. Inferring Weighted Directed Association Networks from Multivariate Time Series with the Small-Shuffle Symbolic Transfer Entropy Spectrum Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhu Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex network methodology is very useful for complex system exploration. However, the relationships among variables in complex systems are usually not clear. Therefore, inferring association networks among variables from their observed data has been a popular research topic. We propose a method, named small-shuffle symbolic transfer entropy spectrum (SSSTES, for inferring association networks from multivariate time series. The method can solve four problems for inferring association networks, i.e., strong correlation identification, correlation quantification, direction identification and temporal relation identification. The method can be divided into four layers. The first layer is the so-called data layer. Data input and processing are the things to do in this layer. In the second layer, we symbolize the model data, original data and shuffled data, from the previous layer and calculate circularly transfer entropy with different time lags for each pair of time series variables. Thirdly, we compose transfer entropy spectrums for pairwise time series with the previous layer’s output, a list of transfer entropy matrix. We also identify the correlation level between variables in this layer. In the last layer, we build a weighted adjacency matrix, the value of each entry representing the correlation level between pairwise variables, and then get the weighted directed association network. Three sets of numerical simulated data from a linear system, a nonlinear system and a coupled Rossler system are used to show how the proposed approach works. Finally, we apply SSSTES to a real industrial system and get a better result than with two other methods.

  13. SHuffle, a novel Escherichia coli protein expression strain capable of correctly folding disulfide bonded proteins in its cytoplasm

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    Lobstein Julie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of correctly disulfide bonded proteins to high yields remains a challenge. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli is the popular choice, especially within the research community. While there is an ever growing demand for new expression strains, few strains are dedicated to post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation. Thus, new protein expression strains must be engineered and the parameters involved in producing disulfide bonded proteins must be understood. Results We have engineered a new E. coli protein expression strain named SHuffle, dedicated to producing correctly disulfide bonded active proteins to high yields within its cytoplasm. This strain is based on the trxB gor suppressor strain SMG96 where its cytoplasmic reductive pathways have been diminished, allowing for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. We have further engineered a major improvement by integrating into its chromosome a signal sequenceless disulfide bond isomerase, DsbC. We probed the redox state of DsbC in the oxidizing cytoplasm and evaluated its role in assisting the formation of correctly folded multi-disulfide bonded proteins. We optimized protein expression conditions, varying temperature, induction conditions, strain background and the co-expression of various helper proteins. We found that temperature has the biggest impact on improving yields and that the E. coli B strain background of this strain was superior to the K12 version. We also discovered that auto-expression of substrate target proteins using this strain resulted in higher yields of active pure protein. Finally, we found that co-expression of mutant thioredoxins and PDI homologs improved yields of various substrate proteins. Conclusions This work is the first extensive characterization of the trxB gor suppressor strain. The results presented should help researchers design the appropriate protein expression conditions using

  14. Assessing the amount of quadruplex structures present within G₂-tract synthetic random-sequence DNA libraries.

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    Simon A McManus

    Full Text Available The process of in vitro selection has led to the discovery of many aptamers with potential to be developed into inhibitors and biosensors, but problems in isolating aptamers against certain targets with desired affinity and specificity still remain. One possible improvement is to use libraries enhanced for motifs repeatedly isolated in aptamer molecules. One such frequently observed motif is the two-tiered guanine quadruplex. In this study we investigated whether DNA libraries could be designed to contain a large fraction of molecules capable of folding into two-tiered guanine quadruplexes. Using comprehensive circular dichroism analysis, we found that DNA libraries could be designed to contain a large proportion of sequences that adopt guanine quadruplex structures. Analysis of individual sequences from a small library revealed a mixture of quadruplexes of different topologies providing the diversity desired for an in vitro selection. We also found that primer-binding sites are detrimental to quadruplex formation and devised a method for post-selection amplification of primer-less quadruplex libraries. With the development of guanine quadruplex enriched DNA libraries, it should be possible to improve the chances of isolating aptamers that utilize a quadruplex scaffold and enhance the success of in vitro selection experiments.

  15. Theoretical study of polymeric mixtures with different sequence statistics. II. Brazovskii class: Linear random copolymers with diblock copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Shuyan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chakraborty, Arup K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-01-15

    We use a Landau theory to study the instability of the homogeneous state of a mixture of linear random copolymers and diblock copolymers. Interesting features of the calculated structure factors for different components of the mixture are found, which can be directly compared with scattering experiments with selectively deuterated samples. We also investigate the least stable concentration fluctuations and find four different types of segregation modes at the spinodal depending upon the characteristics of the mixture (e.g., average compositions, statistical correlation lengths and volume fractions). The different segregation modes are also indicative of the kinetic pathways leading to the formation of ordered microstructures. Experiments probing these pathways are suggested. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. A large-scale study of the random variability of a coding sequence: a study on the CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Guido; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Belpinati, Francesca; Giorgi, Silvia; Georges, Marie des; Scotet, Virginie; Pompei, Fiorenza; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Guittard, Caroline; Audrézet, Marie Pierre; Begnini, Angela; Toepfer, Michael; Macek, Milan; Ferec, Claude; Claustres, Mireille; Pignatti, Pier Franco

    2005-02-01

    Coding single nucleotide substitutions (cSNSs) have been studied on hundreds of genes using small samples (n(g) approximately 100-150 genes). In the present investigation, a large random European population sample (average n(g) approximately 1500) was studied for a single gene, the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator). The nonsynonymous (NS) substitutions exhibited, in accordance with previous reports, a mean probability of being polymorphic (q > 0.005), much lower than that of the synonymous (S) substitutions, but they showed a similar rate of subpolymorphic (q < 0.005) variability. This indicates that, in autosomal genes that may have harmful recessive alleles (nonduplicated genes with important functions), genetic drift overwhelms selection in the subpolymorphic range of variability, making disadvantageous alleles behave as neutral. These results imply that the majority of the subpolymorphic nonsynonymous alleles of these genes are selectively negative or even pathogenic.

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from eggplant by mycelial compatibility, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR analyses

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    Fatih Mehmet Tok

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and pathogenicity/virulence among 60 eggplant Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates collected from six different geographic regions of Turkey were analysed using mycelial compatibility groupings (MCGs, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR polymorphism. By MCG tests, the isolates were classified into 22 groups. Out of 22 MCGs, 36% were represented each by a single isolate. The isolates showed great variability for virulence regardless of MCG and geographic origin. Based on the results of RAPD and SSR analyses, 60 S. sclerotiorum isolates representing 22 MCGs were grouped in 2 and 3 distinct clusters, respectively. Analyses using RAPD and SSR markers illustrated that cluster groupings or genetic distance of S. sclerotiorum populations from eggplant were not distinctly relative to the MCG, geographical origin and virulence diversity. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of genetic composition and suggested the occurrence of clonal and sexual reproduction of S. sclerotiorum on eggplant in the areas surveyed.

  18. Fast and cost-effective single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection in the absence of a reference genome using semideep next-generation Random Amplicon Sequencing (RAMseq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerl, Helmut; Kraus, Robert H S; Nowak, Carsten; Foerster, Daniel W; Fickel, Joerns; Kuehn, Ralph

    2017-09-15

    Biodiversity has suffered a dramatic global decline during the past decades, and monitoring tools are urgently needed providing data for the development and evaluation of conservation efforts both on a species and on a genetic level. However, in wild species, the assessment of genetic diversity is often hampered by the lack of suitable genetic markers. In this article, we present Random Amplicon Sequencing (RAMseq), a novel approach for fast and cost-effective detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nonmodel species by semideep sequencing of random amplicons. By applying RAMseq to the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra), we identified 238 putative SNPs after quality filtering of all candidate loci and were able to validate 32 of 77 loci tested. In a second step, we evaluated the genotyping performance of these SNP loci in noninvasive samples, one of the most challenging genotyping applications, by comparing it with genotyping results of the same faecal samples at microsatellite markers. We compared (i) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) success rate, (ii) genotyping errors and (iii) Mendelian inheritance (population parameters). SNPs produced a significantly higher PCR success rate (75.5% vs. 65.1%) and lower mean allelic error rate (8.8% vs. 13.3%) than microsatellites, but showed a higher allelic dropout rate (29.7% vs. 19.8%). Genotyping results showed no deviations from Mendelian inheritance in any of the SNP loci. Hence, RAMseq appears to be a valuable tool for the detection of genetic markers in nonmodel species, which is a common challenge in conservation genetic studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. PrecisePrimer: an easy-to-use web server for designing PCR primers for DNA library cloning and DNA shuffling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthenier, Cyrille; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    PrecisePrimer is a web-based primer design software made to assist experimentalists in any repetitive primer design task such as preparing, cloning and shuffling DNA libraries. Unlike other popular primer design tools, it is conceived to generate primer libraries with popular PCR polymerase buffers proposed as pre-set options. PrecisePrimer is also meant to design primers in batches, such as for DNA libraries creation of DNA shuffling experiments and to have the simplest interface possible. It integrates the most up-to-date melting temperature algorithms validated with experimental data, and cross validated with other computational tools. We generated a library of primers for the extraction and cloning of 61 genes from yeast DNA genomic extract using default parameters. All primer pairs efficiently amplified their target without any optimization of the PCR conditions. PMID:24829457

  20. Features extraction of flotation froth images and BP neural network soft-sensor model of concentrate grade optimized by shuffled cuckoo searching algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Han, Shuang; Shen, Na-na; Li, Shu-xia

    2014-01-01

    For meeting the forecasting target of key technology indicators in the flotation process, a BP neural network soft-sensor model based on features extraction of flotation froth images and optimized by shuffled cuckoo search algorithm is proposed. Based on the digital image processing technique, the color features in HSI color space, the visual features based on the gray level cooccurrence matrix, and the shape characteristics based on the geometric theory of flotation froth images are extracted, respectively, as the input variables of the proposed soft-sensor model. Then the isometric mapping method is used to reduce the input dimension, the network size, and learning time of BP neural network. Finally, a shuffled cuckoo search algorithm is adopted to optimize the BP neural network soft-sensor model. Simulation results show that the model has better generalization results and prediction accuracy.

  1. Features Extraction of Flotation Froth Images and BP Neural Network Soft-Sensor Model of Concentrate Grade Optimized by Shuffled Cuckoo Searching Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-sheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For meeting the forecasting target of key technology indicators in the flotation process, a BP neural network soft-sensor model based on features extraction of flotation froth images and optimized by shuffled cuckoo search algorithm is proposed. Based on the digital image processing technique, the color features in HSI color space, the visual features based on the gray level cooccurrence matrix, and the shape characteristics based on the geometric theory of flotation froth images are extracted, respectively, as the input variables of the proposed soft-sensor model. Then the isometric mapping method is used to reduce the input dimension, the network size, and learning time of BP neural network. Finally, a shuffled cuckoo search algorithm is adopted to optimize the BP neural network soft-sensor model. Simulation results show that the model has better generalization results and prediction accuracy.

  2. A Developmental and Sequenced One-to-One Educational Intervention (DS1-EI for autism spectrum disorder: a randomized single-blind controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANET Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD who also exhibit severe to moderate ranges of intellectual disability (ID still face many challenges (i.e. less evidence-based trials, less inclusion in school with peers.Methods: We implemented a novel model called the Developmental and Sequenced One-to-One Educational Intervention (DS1-EI in 5-9-year-old children with co-occurring ASD and ID. The treatment protocol was adapted for school implementation by designing it using an educational agenda. The intervention was based on intensity, regular assessments, updating objectives, encouraging spontaneous communication, promoting skills through play with peers, supporting positive behaviours, providing supervision, capitalizing on teachers’ unique skills, and providing developmental and sequenced learning. Developmental learning implies that the focus of training is what is close to the developmental expectations given a child’s development in a specific domain. Sequenced learning means that the teacher changes the learning activities every 10-15 minutes to maintain the child’s attention in the context of an anticipated time agenda.We selected 11 French institutions in which we implemented the model in small classrooms. Each institution recruited participants per dyads matched by age, sex and developmental quotient. Patients from each dyad were then randomized to a DS1-EI group or a Treatment as usual (TAU group for 36 months. The primary variables – the Childhood Autism Rating scale (CARS and the psychoeducational profile (PEP-3 – will be blindly assessed by independent raters at the 18-month and 36-month follow-up.Discussion and baseline description: We enrolled 75 participants: 38 were randomized to the DS1-EI and 37 to the TAU groups. At enrolment, we found no significant differences in participants’ characteristics between groups. As expected, exposure to school was the only significant difference (9.4 (±4.1 h/week in

  3. Engineering and Selection of Shuffled AAV Genomes: A New Strategy for Producing Targeted Biological Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wuping; Asokan, Aravind; Wu, Zhijian; Van Dyke, Terry; DiPrimio, Nina; Johnson, Jarrod S.; Govindaswamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Leichtle, Stefan; Eugene Redmond Jr, D; McCown, Thomas J; Petermann, Kimberly B; Sharpless, Norman E.; Samulski, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    We report a DNA shuffling–based approach for developing cell type–specific vectors through directed evolution. Capsid genomes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1–9 were randomly fragmented and reassembled using PCR to generate a chimeric capsid library. A single infectious clone (chimeric-1829) containing genome fragments from AAV1, 2, 8, and 9 was isolated from an integrin minus hamster melanoma cell line previously shown to have low permissiveness to AAV. Molecular modeling studies ...

  4. Genome Shuffling of Mangrove EndophyticAspergillus luchuensisMERV10 for Improving the Cholesterol-Lowering Agent Lovastatin under Solid State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy Abbas Ahmed; Al-Zahrani, Hind A A; El-Bondkly, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    In the screening of marine mangrove derived fungi for lovastatin productivity, endophytic Aspergillus luchuensis MERV10 exhibited the highest lovastatin productivity (9.5 mg/gds) in solid state fermentation (SSF) using rice bran. Aspergillus luchuensis MERV10 was used as the parental strain in which to induce genetic variabilities after application of different mixtures as well as doses of mutagens followed by three successive rounds of genome shuffling. Four potent mutants, UN6, UN28, NE11, and NE23, with lovastatin productivity equal to 2.0-, 2.11-, 1.95-, and 2.11-fold higher than the parental strain, respectively, were applied for three rounds of genome shuffling as the initial mutants. Four hereditarily stable recombinants (F3/3, F3/7, F3/9, and F3/13) were obtained with lovastatin productivity equal to 50.8, 57.0, 49.7, and 51.0 mg/gds, respectively. Recombinant strain F3/7 yielded 57.0 mg/gds of lovastatin, which is 6-fold and 2.85-fold higher, respectively, than the initial parental strain and the highest mutants UN28 and NE23. It was therefore selected for the optimization of lovastatin production through improvement of SSF parameters. Lovastatin productivity was increased 32-fold through strain improvement methods, including mutations and three successive rounds of genome shuffling followed by optimizing SSF factors.

  5. An Effective Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm with Improved Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm for 0-1 Knapsack Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective hybrid cuckoo search algorithm (CS with improved shuffled frog-leaping algorithm (ISFLA is put forward for solving 0-1 knapsack problem. First of all, with the framework of SFLA, an improved frog-leap operator is designed with the effect of the global optimal information on the frog leaping and information exchange between frog individuals combined with genetic mutation with a small probability. Subsequently, in order to improve the convergence speed and enhance the exploitation ability, a novel CS model is proposed with considering the specific advantages of Lévy flights and frog-leap operator. Furthermore, the greedy transform method is used to repair the infeasible solution and optimize the feasible solution. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out on six different types of 0-1 knapsack instances, and the comparative results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and its ability to achieve good quality solutions, which outperforms the binary cuckoo search, the binary differential evolution, and the genetic algorithm.

  6. Seeing the trees through the forest : sequence-based homo- and heteromeric protein-protein interaction sites prediction using random forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Qingzhen; De Geest, Paul F.G.; Vranken, Wim F.; Heringa, Jaap; Feenstra, K. Anton

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: Genome sequencing is producing an ever-increasing amount of associated protein sequences. Few of these sequences have experimentally validated annotations, however, and computational predictions are becoming increasingly successful in producing such annotations. One key challenge remains

  7. DNA shuffling of adeno-associated virus yields functionally diverse viral progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, James T; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Schaffer, David V

    2008-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are extremely effective gene-delivery vehicles for a broad range of applications. However, the therapeutic efficacy of these and other vectors is currently limited by barriers to safe, efficient gene delivery, including pre-existing antiviral immunity, and infection of off-target cells. Recently, we have implemented directed evolution of AAV, involving the generation of randomly mutagenized viral libraries based on serotype 2 and high-throughput selection, to engineer enhanced viral vectors. Here, we significantly extend this capability by performing high-efficiency in vitro recombination to create a large (10(7)), diverse library of random chimeras of numerous parent AAV serotypes (AAV1, 2, 4-6, 8, and 9). In order to analyze the extent to which such highly chimeric viruses can be viable, we selected the library for efficient viral packaging and infection, and successfully recovered numerous novel chimeras. These new viruses exhibited a broad range of cell tropism both in vitro and in vivo and enhanced resistance to human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), highlighting numerous functional differences between these chimeras and their parent serotypes. Thus, directed evolution can potentially yield unlimited numbers of new AAV variants with novel gene-delivery properties, and subsequent analysis of these variants can further extend basic knowledge of AAV biology.

  8. Impact of Sequencing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy on Long-Term Local Toxicity for Early Breast Cancer: Results of a Randomized Study at 15-Year Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Farneti, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia; Landoni, Valeria [Department of Physics, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Marucci, Laura; Petrongari, Maria Grazia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: sanguineti@ifo.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To compare long-term late local toxicity after either concomitant or sequential chemoradiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2002, women aged 18 to 75 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection for early breast cancer and in whom CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy was planned were randomized between concomitant and sequential radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered to the whole breast through tangential fields to 50 Gy in 20 fractions over a period of 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost. Surviving patients were tentatively contacted and examined between March and September 2014. Patients in whom progressive disease had developed or who had undergone further breast surgery were excluded. Local toxicity (fibrosis, telangiectasia, and breast atrophy or retraction) was scored blindly to the treatment received. A logistic regression was run to investigate the effect of treatment sequence after correction for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates on selected endpoints. The median time to cross-sectional analysis was 15.7 years (range, 12.0-17.8 years). Results: Of 206 patients randomized, 154 (74.8%) were potentially eligible. Of these, 43 (27.9%) refused participation and 4 (2.6%) had been lost to follow-up, and for 5 (3.2%), we could not restore planning data; thus, the final number of analyzed patients was 102. No grade 4 toxicity had been observed, whereas the number of grade 3 toxicity events was low (<8%) for each item, allowing pooling of grade 2 and 3 events for further analysis. Treatment sequence (concomitant vs sequential) was an independent predictor of grade 2 or 3 fibrosis according to both the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-12.2; P=.013) and the SOMA (Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic

  9. Intrafamilial, Preferentially Mother-to-Child and Intraspousal, Helicobacter pylori Infection in Japan Determined by Mutilocus Sequence Typing and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Konno, Mutsuko; Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Toita, Nariaki; Takahashi, Michiko; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Shiraishi, Tsukasa

    2015-10-01

    The infection route of Helicobacter pylori has been recognized to be mainly intrafamilial, preferentially mother-to-child, especially in developed countries. To determine the transmission route, we examined whether multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was useful for analysis of intrafamilial infection. The possibility of intraspousal infection was also evaluated. Clonal relationships between strains derived from 35 index Japanese pediatric patients, and their family members were analyzed by two genetic typing procedures, MLST and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. Mostly coincident results were obtained by MLST and RAPD. By MLST, the allele of loci in the isolates mostly matched between the index child and both the father and mother for 9 (25.7%) of the 35 patients, between the index child and the mother for 25 (60.0%) of the 35 patients. MLST is useful for analyzing the infection route of H. pylori as a highly reproducible method. Intrafamilial, especially mother-to-children and sibling, infection is the dominant transmission route. Intraspousal infection is also thought to occur in about a quarter in the Japanese families. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Swaps in protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, Amit; Motro, Benny; Unger, Ron

    2002-08-01

    An important question in protein evolution is to what extent proteins may have undergone swaps (switches of domain or fragment order) during evolution. Such events might have occurred in several forms: Swaps of short fragments, swaps of structural and functional motifs, or recombination of domains in multidomain proteins. This question is important for the theoretical understanding of the evolution of proteins, and has practical implications for using swaps as a design tool in protein engineering. In order to analyze the question systematically, we conducted a large scale survey of possible swaps and permutations among all pairs of protein from the Swissport database. A swap is defined as a specific kind of sequence mutation between two proteins in which two fragments that appear in both sequences have different relative order in the two sequences. For example, aXbYc and dYeXf are defined as a swap, where X and Y represent sequence fragments that switched their order. Identifying such swaps is difficult using standard sequence comparison packages. One of the main problems in the analysis stems from the fact that many sequences contain repeats, which may be identified as false-positive swaps. We have used two different approaches to detect pairs of proteins with swaps. The first approach is based on the predefined list of domains in Pfam. We identified all the proteins that share at least two domains and analyzed their relative order, looking for pairs in which the order of these domains was switched. We designed an algorithm to distinguish between real swaps and duplications. In the second approach, we used Blast to detect pairs of proteins that share several fragments. Then, we used an automatic procedure to select pairs that are likely to contain swaps. Those pairs were analyzed visually, using a graphical tool, to eliminate duplications. Combining these approaches, about 140 different cases of swaps in the Swissprot database were found (after eliminating

  11. Effect of Small-Sided Games and Repeated Shuffle Sprint Training on Physical Performance in Elite Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Ardigò, Luca P; Meckel, Yoav; Padulo, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of small-sided games (SSGs) and repeated shuffle sprint (RSS) training on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and countermovement jump (CMJ) tests performances of elite handball players. Eighteen highly trained players (24.8 ± 4.4 years) were assigned to either SSG or RSS group training protocols twice a week for 8 weeks. The SSG training consisted of 5 small-sided handball games with 3-a-side teams excluding goalkeepers. The RSS consisted of 2 sets of 14-17 of 20-m shuttle sprints and 9-m jump shots interspersed by 20-second recoveries. Before and after training, the following performance variables were assessed: speed on 10-m and 20-m sprint time, agility and RSA time, CMJ height, standing throw, and jump shot speed. Significant pre-to-post treatment improvements were found in all the assessed variables following both training protocols (multivariate analysis of variance, p ≤ 0.05). There was a significantly greater improvement on 10-m sprint, CMJ, and jump shooting, after the RSS in comparison with SSG training (+4.4% vs. +2.4%, +8.6% vs. +5.6%, and +5.5% vs. +2.7%, respectively). Conversely, agility and standing throwing showed lower improvements after RSS in comparison with SSG (+1.0% vs. +7.8% and +1.6% vs. +9.0%, respectively). These results indicate that these training methods are effective for fitness development among elite adult handball players during the last period of the competitive season. Specifically, SSG seems to be more effective in improving agility and standing throw, whereas RSS seems preferable in improving 10-m sprint, CMJ, and jump shot.

  12. The Skeletal Proteome of the Coral Acropora millepora: The Evolution of Calcification by Co-Option and Domain Shuffling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Silva, Paula; Kaandorp, Jaap; Huisman, Lotte; Marie, Benjamin; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Guichard, Nathalie; Miller, David J.; Marin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    In corals, biocalcification is a major function that may be drastically affected by ocean acidification (OA). Scleractinian corals grow by building up aragonitic exoskeletons that provide support and protection for soft tissues. Although this process has been extensively studied, the molecular basis of biocalcification is poorly understood. Notably lacking is a comprehensive catalog of the skeleton-occluded proteins—the skeletal organic matrix proteins (SOMPs) that are thought to regulate the mineral deposition. Using a combination of proteomics and transcriptomics, we report the first survey of such proteins in the staghorn coral Acropora millepora. The organic matrix (OM) extracted from the coral skeleton was analyzed by mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, enabling the identification of 36 SOMPs. These results provide novel insights into the molecular basis of coral calcification and the macroevolution of metazoan calcifying systems, whereas establishing a platform for studying the impact of OA at molecular level. Besides secreted proteins, extracellular regions of transmembrane proteins are also present, suggesting a close control of aragonite deposition by the calicoblastic epithelium. In addition to the expected SOMPs (Asp/Glu-rich, galaxins), the skeletal repertoire included several proteins containing known extracellular matrix domains. From an evolutionary perspective, the number of coral-specific proteins is low, many SOMPs having counterparts in the noncalcifying cnidarians. Extending the comparison with the skeletal OM proteomes of other metazoans allowed the identification of a pool of functional domains shared between phyla. These data suggest that co-option and domain shuffling may be general mechanisms by which the trait of calcification has evolved. PMID:23765379

  13. Dynamical system modeling to simulate donor T cell response to whole exome sequencing-derived recipient peptides: Understanding randomness in alloreactivity incidence following stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Koparde

    Full Text Available Quantitative relationship between the magnitude of variation in minor histocompatibility antigens (mHA and graft versus host disease (GVHD pathophysiology in stem cell transplant (SCT donor-recipient pairs (DRP is not established. In order to elucidate this relationship, whole exome sequencing (WES was performed on 27 HLA matched related (MRD, & 50 unrelated donors (URD, to identify nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. An average 2,463 SNPs were identified in MRD, and 4,287 in URD DRP (p<0.01; resulting peptide antigens that may be presented on HLA class I molecules in each DRP were derived in silico (NetMHCpan ver2.0 and the tissue expression of proteins these were derived from determined (GTex. MRD DRP had an average 3,670 HLA-binding-alloreactive peptides, putative mHA (pmHA with an IC50 of <500 nM, and URD, had 5,386 (p<0.01. To simulate an alloreactive donor cytotoxic T cell response, the array of pmHA in each patient was considered as an operator matrix modifying a hypothetical cytotoxic T cell clonal vector matrix; each responding T cell clone's proliferation was determined by the logistic equation of growth, accounting for HLA binding affinity and tissue expression of each alloreactive peptide. The resulting simulated organ-specific alloreactive T cell clonal growth revealed marked variability, with the T cell count differences spanning orders of magnitude between different DRP. Despite an estimated, uniform set of constants used in the model for all DRP, and a heterogeneously treated group of patients, higher total and organ-specific T cell counts were associated with cumulative incidence of moderate to severe GVHD in recipients. In conclusion, exome wide sequence differences and the variable alloreactive peptide binding to HLA in each DRP yields a large range of possible alloreactive donor T cell responses. Our findings also help understand the apparent randomness observed in the development of alloimmune responses.

  14. The Impact of Whole-Genome Sequencing on the Primary Care and Outcomes of Healthy Adult Patients: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassy, Jason L; Christensen, Kurt D; Schonman, Erica F; Blout, Carrie L; Robinson, Jill O; Krier, Joel B; Diamond, Pamela M; Lebo, Matthew; Machini, Kalotina; Azzariti, Danielle R; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Bates, David W; MacRae, Calum A; Murray, Michael F; Rehm, Heidi L; McGuire, Amy L; Green, Robert C

    2017-06-27

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in asymptomatic adults might prevent disease but increase health care use without clinical value. To describe the effect on clinical care and outcomes of adding WGS to standardized family history assessment in primary care. Pilot randomized trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01736566). Academic primary care practices. 9 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 100 generally healthy patients recruited at ages 40 to 65 years. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a family history report alone (FH group) or in combination with an interpreted WGS report (FH + WGS group), which included monogenic disease risk (MDR) results (associated with Mendelian disorders), carrier variants, pharmacogenomic associations, and polygenic risk estimates for cardiometabolic traits. Each patient met with his or her PCP to discuss the report. Clinical outcomes and health care use through 6 months were obtained from medical records and audio-recorded discussions between PCPs and patients. Patients' health behavior changes were surveyed 6 months after receiving results. A panel of clinician-geneticists rated the appropriateness of how PCPs managed MDR results. Mean age was 55 years; 58% of patients were female. Eleven FH + WGS patients (22% [95% CI, 12% to 36%]) had new MDR results. Only 2 (4% [CI, 0.01% to 15%]) had evidence of the phenotypes predicted by an MDR result (fundus albipunctatus due to RDH5 and variegate porphyria due to PPOX). Primary care physicians recommended new clinical actions for 16% (CI, 8% to 30%) of FH patients and 34% (CI, 22% to 49%) of FH + WGS patients. Thirty percent (CI, 17% to 45%) and 41% (CI, 27% to 56%) of FH and FH + WGS patients, respectively, reported making a health behavior change after 6 months. Geneticists rated PCP management of 8 MDR results (73% [CI, 39% to 99%]) as appropriate and 2 results (18% [CI, 3% to 52%]) as inappropriate. Limited sample size and ancestral and socioeconomic diversity. Adding WGS to primary care

  15. Development of a new method for detection and identification of Oenococcus oeni bacteriophages based on endolysin gene sequence and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Francesca; Napoli, Chiara; Costantini, Antonella; Berta, Graziella; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2013-08-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) is a biochemical transformation conducted by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that occurs in wine at the end of alcoholic fermentation. Oenococcus oeni is the main species responsible for MLF in most wines. As in other fermented foods, where bacteriophages represent a potential risk for the fermentative process, O. oeni bacteriophages have been reported to be a possible cause of unsuccessful MLF in wine. Thus, preparation of commercial starters that take into account the different sensitivities of O. oeni strains to different phages would be advisable. However, currently, no methods have been described to identify phages infecting O. oeni. In this study, two factors are addressed: detection and typing of bacteriophages. First, a simple PCR method was devised targeting a conserved region of the endolysin (lys) gene to detect temperate O. oeni bacteriophages. For this purpose, 37 O. oeni strains isolated from Italian wines during different phases of the vinification process were analyzed by PCR for the presence of the lys gene, and 25 strains gave a band of the expected size (1,160 bp). This is the first method to be developed that allows identification of lysogenic O. oeni strains without the need for time-consuming phage bacterial-lysis induction methods. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis was conducted to type bacteriophages. After the treatment of bacteria with UV light, lysis was obtained for 15 strains, and the 15 phage DNAs isolated were subjected to two randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCRs. By combining the RAPD profiles and lys sequences, 12 different O. oeni phages were clearly distinguished.

  16. Acute incident rapid response at a mass-gathering event through comprehensive planning systems: a case report from the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başdere, Mehmet; Ross, Colleen; Chan, Jennifer L; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Smilowitz, Karen; Chiampas, George

    2014-06-01

    Planning and execution of mass-gathering events involves various challenges. In this case report, the Chicago Model (CM), which was designed to organize and operate such events and to maintain the health and wellbeing of both runners and the public in a more effective way, is described. The Chicago Model also was designed to prepare for unexpected incidents, including disasters, during the marathon event. The model has been used successfully in the planning and execution stages of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle and the Bank of America Chicago Marathon since 2008. The key components of the CM are organizational structure, information systems, and communication. This case report describes how the organizers at the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle used the key components of the CM approach in order to respond to an acute incident caused by a man who was threatening to jump off the State Street Bridge. The course route was changed to accommodate this unexpected event, while maintaining access to key health care facilities. The lessons learned from the incident are presented and further improvements to the existing model are proposed.

  17. Genome shuffling of Colletotrichum lini for improving 3β,7α,15α-trihydroxy-5-androsten-17-one production from dehydroepiandrosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Li, Hui; Ni, Yu; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2017-06-01

    3β,7α,15α-Trihydroxy-5-androsten-17-one (7α,15α-diOH-DHEA) is a key intermediate of the novel oral contraceptive Yasmin. It can be catalyzed from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) through Colletotrichum lini. Improvement of 7α,15α-diOH-DHEA production was performed through recursive protoplast fusion of C. lini ST in a genome shuffling format. 7α,15α-diOH-DHEA yield of the best performing recombinant C. lini ST-F307 reached 6.08 g/L from 10 g/L DHEA, and this was 94.9% higher than that of the initial C. lini ST strain. Through optimized conditions, the 7α,15α-diOH-DHEA yield was increased to 9.32 g/L from 12 g/L DHEA, with 1.5% ethanol as cosolvent. This is the highest reported substrate concentration and 7α,15α-diOH-DHEA production with one-step substrate addition. Moreover, C. lini ST-F307 showed high P450 enzyme activity and gene transcript levels of several cytochrome P450s, and this might contribute to the enhancement of 7α,15α-diOH-DHEA production. Genome shuffling was an efficient approach to breed high-yield strains.

  18. Bioequivalence of generic lamotrigine 100-mg tablets in healthy Thai male volunteers: a randomized, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichaiya, Arunee; Longchoopol, Chaowanee; Oo-Puthinan, Sarawut; Sayasathid, Jarun; Sripalakit, Pattana; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2008-10-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug which has been used in the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. A search of the literature did not find previously published bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic evaluations of lamotrigine in healthy Thai male volunteers. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters between 2 brands of lamotrigine in healthy Thai male volunteers. A randomized, single-dose, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover study design with a 2-week washout period was conducted in healthy Thai males. Subjects were randomized to receive either the test or reference formulation in the first period. All subjects were required to be nonsmokers and without a history of alcohol or drug abuse. Plasma samples were collected over a 120-hour period after 100-mg lamotrigine administration in each period. A validated high-performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet method was used to analyze lamotrigine concentration in plasma. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental method. Bioequivalence between the test and reference products, as defined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is determined when the ratio for the 90% CIs of the difference in the means of the log-transformed AUC(0-t), AUC(0-infinity), and C(max) of the 2 products are within 0.80 and 1.25. Adverse events were determined by measuring vital signs after dosing. Subjects were also asked if they suffered from undesirable effects such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and headache. This bioequivalence study was performed in 24 healthy Thai males (mean [SD] age, 20.5 [1.3] years; range, 19-24 years; weight, 62.5 [7.4] kg; height, 172.8 [6.9] cm; body mass index, 20.9 [2.0] kg/m(2)). The mean (SD) C(max) and T(max) of the test formulation of lamotrigine were 1.7 (0.3) microg/mL and 1.2 (0.9) hours, respectively. The mean (SD) C(max) and T(max) of the reference formulation of lamotrigine were 1.7 (0.3) microg/mL and 1.4 (1.0) hours, respectively. The mean

  19. Sequence based prediction of DNA-binding proteins based on hybrid feature selection using random forest and Gaussian naïve Bayes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangchao Lou

    Full Text Available Developing an efficient method for determination of the DNA-binding proteins, due to their vital roles in gene regulation, is becoming highly desired since it would be invaluable to advance our understanding of protein functions. In this study, we proposed a new method for the prediction of the DNA-binding proteins, by performing the feature rank using random forest and the wrapper-based feature selection using forward best-first search strategy. The features comprise information from primary sequence, predicted secondary structure, predicted relative solvent accessibility, and position specific scoring matrix. The proposed method, called DBPPred, used Gaussian naïve Bayes as the underlying classifier since it outperformed five other classifiers, including decision tree, logistic regression, k-nearest neighbor, support vector machine with polynomial kernel, and support vector machine with radial basis function. As a result, the proposed DBPPred yields the highest average accuracy of 0.791 and average MCC of 0.583 according to the five-fold cross validation with ten runs on the training benchmark dataset PDB594. Subsequently, blind tests on the independent dataset PDB186 by the proposed model trained on the entire PDB594 dataset and by other five existing methods (including iDNA-Prot, DNA-Prot, DNAbinder, DNABIND and DBD-Threader were performed, resulting in that the proposed DBPPred yielded the highest accuracy of 0.769, MCC of 0.538, and AUC of 0.790. The independent tests performed by the proposed DBPPred on completely a large non-DNA binding protein dataset and two RNA binding protein datasets also showed improved or comparable quality when compared with the relevant prediction methods. Moreover, we observed that majority of the selected features by the proposed method are statistically significantly different between the mean feature values of the DNA-binding and the non DNA-binding proteins. All of the experimental results indicate that

  20. Bioequivalence of two tablet formulations of clopidogrel in healthy Argentinian volunteers: a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Guillermo; Czerniuk, Paola; Bertuola, Roberto; Keller, Guillermo A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet activation is a major component in the pathogenesis of coronary thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Thienopyridines, particularly clopidogrel, are highly effective in reducing in-stent thrombosis and functional inhibition of adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet activation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of a new generic formulation of clopidogrel 75-mg tablets (test) and the available branded formulation (reference) to meet regulatory criteria for marketing the test product in Argentina. This was a randomized-sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study conducted in healthy white volunteers in the fasted state. A single oral dose of the test or reference formulation was followed by a 7-day washout period, after which subjects received the alternative formulation. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after dosing. Clopidogrel concentrations were determined using an LC-MS/MS method. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the 90% CI of the geometric mean ratios (test:reference) for C(max) and AUC(0-last) were within the range from 80% to 125%. Adverse events were monitored throughout the study based on clinical parameters and patient reports. Twenty-four volunteers (13 male, 11 female; mean [SD] age, 33.7 [5.2] years [range, 21-42 years]; weight, 72.4 [6.83] kg [range, 59-82 kg]) were enrolled in and completed the study. The geometric mean C(max) for the test and reference formulations was 877.76 and 913.49 pg/mL, respectively. The geometric mean AUC(0-t) was 1911.53 and 2053.09 pg . h/mL, and the geometric mean AUC(0-infinity)) was 2021.33 and 2188.25 pg . h/mL. The geometric mean ratios (test:reference) for C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity)) were 96.09% (90% CI, 90.71-101.78), 93.10% (90% CI, 85.57-101.3), and 92.37% (90% CI, 85.06-100.31), respectively. There were no significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between groups

  1. Relative bioavailability of levodropropizine 60 mg capsule and syrup formulations in healthy male Korean volunteers: a singledose, randomized-sequence, open-label, two-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Seo, Ji-Hyung; Jo, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Cho, Young-Wuk; Yim, Sung-Vin; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-02-01

    Levodropropizine is an oral non-opioid anti-tussive drug used in treatment of cough. A new generic 60 mg capsule formulation of levodropropizine has recently been developed. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of the test (capsule) formulation and reference (syrup) formulation of levodropropizine (60 mg) in healthy, fasted, male Korean volunteers. This was a single-dose, randomized sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study conducted in healthy male Korean volunteers in the fasted state at Kyung Hee University Medical Center (Seoul, Republic of Korea). A single oral dose of the test or reference formulation was followed by a 1-week washout period, after which subjects received the alternative formulation. Blood samples were collected at 0 (predose), 0.17, 0.33, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after study drug administration. Plasma concentration of levodropropizine was determined using a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/ MS) method. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the 90% CIs for C(max), AUC(0-12h) and AUC(0-∞) were within the predetermined bioequivalence range (80 - 125%, according to the guidelines of the Korea Food and Drug Administration (Korea FDA)). Tolerability was evaluated throughout the study based on vital sign measurements, laboratory analysis (blood biochemistry, hematology, hepatic function and urinalysis) and subject interviews concerning adverse events (AEs). A total of 36 male Korean subjects (mean (SD) age, 23.9 (2.4) years (range 19 - 30 years); height, 176.2 (6.1) cm (range 161 - 190 cm); weight, 69.8 (9.1) kg (range 54.0 - 92.2 kg); body mass index, 22.4 (2.1) kg/m2 (range 19.1 - 28.3 kg/m2)) was enrolled and completed the study. The mean values for C(max), t(max), AUC(0-12h), and AUC(0-∞) with the test formulation of levodropropizine were 331.51 ng/ml, 0.60 hours, 784.32 ng×h/ml, and 825.82 ng×h/ml, respectively; for the reference

  2. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  3. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  4. Characterization of constitutive and putative differentially expressed mRNAs by means of expressed sequence tags, differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR from the sand fly vector Lutzomyia longipalpis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Ramalho-Ortigão

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular studies of insect disease vectors are of paramount importance for understanding parasite-vector relationship. Advances in this area have led to important findings regarding changes in vectors' physiology upon blood feeding and parasite infection. Mechanisms for interfering with the vectorial capacity of insects responsible for the transmission of diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease and dengue fever are being devised with the ultimate goal of developing transgenic insects. A primary necessity for this goal is information on gene expression and control in the target insect. Our group is investigating molecular aspects of the interaction between Leishmania parasites and Lutzomyia sand flies. As an initial step in our studies we have used random sequencing of cDNA clones from two expression libraries made from head/thorax and abdomen of sugar fed L. longipalpis for the identification of expressed sequence tags (EST. We applied differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR to characterize differentially expressed mRNA from sugar and blood fed insects, and, in one case, from a L. (V. braziliensis-infected L. longipalpis. We identified 37 cDNAs that have shown homology to known sequences from GeneBank. Of these, 32 cDNAs code for constitutive proteins such as zinc finger protein, glutamine synthetase, G binding protein, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Three are putative differentially expressed cDNAs from blood fed and Leishmania-infected midgut, a chitinase, a V-ATPase and a MAP kinase. Finally, two sequences are homologous to Drosophila melanogaster gene products recently discovered through the Drosophila genome initiative.

  5. Cerebral activation related to skills practice in a double serial reaction time task : striatal involvement in random-order sequence learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, FHCE; de Jong, BM; Maguire, RP; Meiners, LC; Leenders, KL

    We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to examine the distribution of cerebral activation related to prolonged skill practice. In a bimanual variant of the Serial Reaction Time Task (SRT), simultaneous finger movements of the two hands were made in response to randomly ordered pairs of

  6. Realistic artificial DNA sequences as negative controls for computational genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Juan; Smit, Arian F A; Hood, Leroy; Glusman, Gustavo

    2014-07-01

    A common practice in computational genomic analysis is to use a set of 'background' sequences as negative controls for evaluating the false-positive rates of prediction tools, such as gene identification programs and algorithms for detection of cis-regulatory elements. Such 'background' sequences are generally taken from regions of the genome presumed to be intergenic, or generated synthetically by 'shuffling' real sequences. This last method can lead to underestimation of false-positive rates. We developed a new method for generating artificial sequences that are modeled after real intergenic sequences in terms of composition, complexity and interspersed repeat content. These artificial sequences can serve as an inexhaustible source of high-quality negative controls. We used artificial sequences to evaluate the false-positive rates of a set of programs for detecting interspersed repeats, ab initio prediction of coding genes, transcribed regions and non-coding genes. We found that RepeatMasker is more accurate than PClouds, Augustus has the lowest false-positive rate of the coding gene prediction programs tested, and Infernal has a low false-positive rate for non-coding gene detection. A web service, source code and the models for human and many other species are freely available at http://repeatmasker.org/garlic/. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnéa Smeds

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb, and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18 in favour of 'strong' (G, C over 'weak' (A, T alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups.

  8. The hot (invisible? hand: can time sequence patterns of success/failure in sports be modeled as repeated random independent trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Yaari

    Full Text Available The long lasting debate initiated by Gilovich, Vallone and Tversky in [Formula: see text] is revisited: does a "hot hand" phenomenon exist in sports? Hereby we come back to one of the cases analyzed by the original study, but with a much larger data set: all free throws taken during five regular seasons ([Formula: see text] of the National Basketball Association (NBA. Evidence supporting the existence of the "hot hand" phenomenon is provided. However, while statistical traces of this phenomenon are observed in the data, an open question still remains: are these non random patterns a result of "success breeds success" and "failure breeds failure" mechanisms or simply "better" and "worse" periods? Although free throws data is not adequate to answer this question in a definite way, we speculate based on it, that the latter is the dominant cause behind the appearance of the "hot hand" phenomenon in the data.

  9. OPTIMUM STEADY STATE LOAD SHEDDING USING SHUFFLED FROG LEAPING ALGORITHM TO AVERT BLACKOUT IN POWER SYSTEMS DURING OVERLOAD AND GENERATION CONTINGENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. MAGESHVARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During generation and overload contingencies in a power system, the system voltage and frequency will decline due to the deficiency of real and reactive powers. Consequently cascaded failures may occur which will lead to complete blackout of certain parts of the power system. Load shedding is considered as the ultimate step of emergency control action that is necessary to prevent a blackout in the power system. This paper proposes a memetic meta-heuristic algorithm known as shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA to find a solution for the steady state load shedding problem presented here. The optimum steady state load shedding problem uses squares of the difference between the connected active and the reactive load and the supplied active and reactive power. The supplied active and reactive powers are treated as dependent variables modeled as functions of bus voltages only. The proposed algorithm is tested on IEEE 14 and 30 bus test systems. The viability of the proposed method is established by comparison with the other conventional methods presented earlier in terms of solution quality and convergence properties.

  10. Complete mtDNA sequences of two millipedes suggest a new model for mitochondrial gene rearrangements: Duplication and non-random loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Wesley M.

    2001-11-08

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequences of the millipedes Narceus annularus and Thyropygus sp. (Arthropoda: Diplopoda) and identified in both genomes all 37 genes typical for metazoan mtDNA. The arrangement of these genes is identical in the two millipedes, but differs from that inferred to be ancestral for arthropods by the location of four genes/gene clusters. This novel gene arrangement is unusual for animal mtDNA, in that genes with opposite transcriptional polarities are clustered in the genome and the two clusters are separated by two non-coding regions. The only exception to this pattern is the gene for cysteine tRNA, which is located in the part of the genome that otherwise contains all genes with the opposite transcriptional polarity. We suggest that a mechanism involving complete mtDNA duplication followed by the loss of genes, predetermined by their transcriptional polarity and location in the genome, could generate this gene arrangement from the one ancestral for arthropods. The proposed mechanism has important implications for phylogenetic inferences that are drawn on the basis of gene arrangement comparisons.

  11. Information Theory of DNA Sequencing

    CERN Document Server

    Motahari, Abolfazl; Tse, David

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing is the basic workhorse of modern day biology and medicine. Shotgun sequencing is the dominant technique used: many randomly located short fragments called reads are extracted from the DNA sequence, and these reads are assembled to reconstruct the original sequence. By drawing an analogy between the DNA sequencing problem and the classic communication problem, we define an information theoretic notion of sequencing capacity. This is the maximum number of DNA base pairs that can be resolved reliably per read, and provides a fundamental limit to the performance that can be achieved by any assembly algorithm. We compute the sequencing capacity explicitly for a simple statistical model of the DNA sequence and the read process. Using this framework, we also study the impact of noise in the read process on the sequencing capacity.

  12. a randomized controlled trial.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milk, only an estimated one -fourth of neonates in India were breastfed within ... standard of care in India and mothers are informed about. 6 months of ... weeks postpartum. A random number sequence was generated using a com- puter program. Block randomization was used with a fixed block size of four. Concealment of ...

  13. Gene-Based Sequence Diversity Analysis of Field Pea (Pisum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Runchun; Johnson, Richard; Seres, Andrea; Kiss, Gyorgy; Ambrose, Mike J.; Knox, Maggie R.; Ellis, T. H. Noel; Flavell, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence diversity of 39 dispersed gene loci was analyzed in 48 diverse individuals representative of the genus Pisum. The different genes show large variation in diversity parameters, suggesting widely differing levels of selection and a high overall diversity level for the species. The data set yields a genetic diversity tree whose deep branches, involving wild samples, are preserved in a tree derived from a polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in an identical sample set. Thus, gene regions and intergenic “junk DNA” share a consistent picture for the genomic diversity of Pisum, despite low linkage disequilibrium in wild and landrace germplasm, which might be expected to allow independent evolution of these very different DNA classes. Additional lines of evidence indicate that recombination has shuffled gene haplotypes efficiently within Pisum, despite its high level of inbreeding and widespread geographic distribution. Trees derived from individual gene loci show marked differences from each other, and genetic distance values between sample pairs show high standard deviations. Sequence mosaic analysis of aligned sequences identifies nine loci showing evidence for intragenic recombination. Lastly, phylogenetic network analysis confirms the non-treelike structure of Pisum diversity and indicates the major germplasm classes involved. Overall, these data emphasize the artificiality of simple tree structures for representing genomic sequence variation within Pisum and emphasize the need for fine structure haplotype analysis to accurately define the genetic structure of the species. PMID:18073431

  14. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...... and plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  15. Pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence comparison of a single 100-mg dose of cefteram pivoxil powder suspension and tablet formulations: a randomized-sequence, open-label, two-period crossover study in healthy Chinese adult male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianjun; Di, Bin; Wu, Chun Yong; Hu, Qin; Li, Jian Hua; Zhu, Yubing; Fan, Hongwei; Xiao, DaWei; Wang, Guang Ji

    2008-04-01

    Cefteram pivoxil (CFTM-PI) is an oral antibiotic available in powder suspension and tablet formulations indicated in China for the treatment of bacterial infections. Although these 2 formulations are marketed in China, published information regarding their pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence in the Chinese population is not available. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of the powder suspension (test) and tablet (reference) formulations of CFTM-PI 100 mg available in China. This single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study was performed at the Nanjing First Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. Eligible subjects were healthy male volunteers who were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 100-mg dose of the test or reference formulation, followed by a 1-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. The study drugs were administered after a 12-hour overnight fast. Plasma was assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. For analysis of pharmacokinetic properties, including C(max), AUC from time 0 (baseline) to 6 hours (AUC(0-6)), and AUC from baseline to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)), blood samples were obtained at intervals over the 6-hour period after study drug administration. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of C(max) and AUC were within the predetermined equivalence range (80%-125%) as established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Tolerability was assessed by monitoring vital signs and laboratory tests (hematology, blood biochemistry, hepatic function, and urinalysis), and by questioning subjects about adverse events (AEs). Twenty-four Chinese male subjects (mean [range] age,24.2 [23-32] years;weight,64.3 [58-67] kg; height, 172 [167-185] cm) enrolled; all completed the study. No period or sequence effect was observed. The 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of C(max), AUC(0-6;), and

  16. Bioequivalence of two formulations of glucosamine sulfate 500-mg capsules in healthy male Chinese volunteers: an open-label, randomized-sequence, single-dose, fasting, two-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, YuBing; Zou, JianJun; Xiao, DaWei; Fan, HongWei; Yu, CuiXia; Zhang, JingJing; Yang, Jing; Guo, DaQing

    2009-07-01

    Glucosamine sulfate is used for the treatment of arthrosis, especially osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The available evidence suggests differences in its pharmacokinetics in Chinese subjects compared with non-Chinese subjects. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of a test and reference formulation of glucosamine sulfate 500 mg after single oral administration in healthy Chinese volunteers. This open-label, randomized-sequence, single-dose, 2-way crossover study was performed at the First Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Eligible subjects were healthy male volunteers who were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 500-mg dose of the test or reference capsule formulation, followed by a 1-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. The study drugs were administered after a 12-hour overnight fast. Glucosamine sulfate was assayed using a liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. For analysis of pharmacokinetic properties, including C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity)), blood samples were obtained at intervals over a 14-hour period after study drug administration. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of C(max) and AUC were within the predetermined equivalence range (70%-143% for C(max) and 80%-125% for AUC) as established by the State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) of China. Tolerability was assessed by monitoring vital signs and laboratory tests (hematology, blood biochemistry, hepatic function, and urinalysis), and by questioning subjects about adverse events (AEs). Twenty-two healthy male Chinese subjects were enrolled (mean [range] age, 24 [22-26] years; weight, 63.9 [58.5-69.3] kg; height, 172 [167-177] cm); all completed the study. No period or sequence effect was observed. The 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity)) were 93.4 to 127.3, 92.4 to 114

  17. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  18. Novel Bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus plantarum Strains and Their Differentiation by Sequence Analysis of 16S rDNA, 16S-23S and 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer Regions and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Shojaei Moghadam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Six strains of bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus plantarum (TL1, RG11, RS5, UL4, RG14 and RI11 isolated from Malaysian foods were investigated for their structural bacteriocin genes. A new combination of plantaricin EF and plantaricin W bacteriocin structural genes was successfully amplified from all studied strains, suggesting that they were novel bacteriocin-producing L. plantarum strains. A four-base pair variable region was detected in the short 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions of the studied strains by a comparative analysis with 17 L. plantarum strains deposited in the GenBank, implying they were new genotypes. The studied L. plantarum strains were subsequently differentiated into four groups on the basis of the detected four-base pair variable region of the short 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Further analysis of the DNA sequence of 23S-5S intergenic spacer region revealed only one type of 23S-5S intergenic spacer region present in the studied strains, indicating it was highly conserved among the studied L. plantarum strains. Three randomly amplified polymorphic DNA experiments using three different combinations of arbitrary primers successfully differentiated the studied L. plantarum strains from each other, confirming they were different strains. In conclusion, the studied L. plantarum strains were shown to be novel bacteriocin producers and high level of strain discrimination could be achieved with a combination of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and the analysis of the variable region of short 16S-23S intergenic spacer region present in L. plantarum strains.

  19. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  20. What's Next? Judging Sequences of Binary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, An T.; Van Boven, Leaf; McClelland, Gary H.; Hastie, Reid

    2009-01-01

    The authors review research on judgments of random and nonrandom sequences involving binary events with a focus on studies documenting gambler's fallacy and hot hand beliefs. The domains of judgment include random devices, births, lotteries, sports performances, stock prices, and others. After discussing existing theories of sequence judgments,…

  1. A New Artificial Neural Network Enhanced by the Shuffled Complex Evolution Optimization with Principal Component Analysis (SP-UCI) for Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatbini, N.; Faridzad, M.; Yang, T.; Akbari Asanjan, A.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are useful in many fields, including water resources engineering and management. However, due to the non-linear and chaotic characteristics associated with natural processes and human decision making, the use of ANNs in real-world applications is still limited, and its performance needs to be further improved for a broader practical use. The commonly used Back-Propagation (BP) scheme and gradient-based optimization in training the ANNs have already found to be problematic in some cases. The BP scheme and gradient-based optimization methods are associated with the risk of premature convergence, stuck in local optimums, and the searching is highly dependent on initial conditions. Therefore, as an alternative to BP and gradient-based searching scheme, we propose an effective and efficient global searching method, termed the Shuffled Complex Evolutionary Global optimization algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (SP-UCI), to train the ANN connectivity weights. Large number of real-world datasets are tested with the SP-UCI-based ANN, as well as various popular Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs)-enhanced ANNs, i.e., Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-, Genetic Algorithm (GA)-, Simulated Annealing (SA)-, and Differential Evolution (DE)-enhanced ANNs. Results show that SP-UCI-enhanced ANN is generally superior over other EA-enhanced ANNs with regard to the convergence and computational performance. In addition, we carried out a case study for hydropower scheduling in the Trinity Lake in the western U.S. In this case study, multiple climate indices are used as predictors for the SP-UCI-enhanced ANN. The reservoir inflows and hydropower releases are predicted up to sub-seasonal to seasonal scale. Results show that SP-UCI-enhanced ANN is able to achieve better statistics than other EAs-based ANN, which implies the usefulness and powerfulness of proposed SP-UCI-enhanced ANN for reservoir operation, water resources engineering and management

  2. Movement chunking during sequence learning is a dopamine-dependant process: a study conducted in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pierre-Luc; Bedard, Marc-Andre; Langlois, Dominic; Blanchet, Pierre J; Lemay, Martin; Parent, Maxime

    2010-09-01

    Chunking of single movements into integrated sequences has been described during motor learning, and we have recently demonstrated that this process involves a dopamine-dependant mechanism in animal (Levesque et al. in Exp Brain Res 182:499-508, 2007; Tremblay et al. in Behav Brain Res 198:231-239, 2009). However, there is no such evidence in human. The aim of the present study was to assess this question in Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurological condition known for its dopamine depletion in the striatum. Eleven PD patients were tested under their usual levodopa medication (ON state), and following a 12-h levodopa withdrawal (OFF state). Patients were compared with 12 healthy participants on a motor learning sequencing task, requiring pressing fourteen buttons in the correct order, which was determined by visual stimuli presented on a computer screen. Learning was assessed from three blocks of 20 trials administered successively. Chunks of movements were intrinsically created by each participant during this learning period. Then, the sequence was shuffled according to the participant's own chunks, generating two new sequences, with either preserved or broken chunks. Those new motor sequences had to be performed separately in a fourth and fifth blocks of 20 trials. Results showed that execution time improved in every group during the learning period (from blocks 1 to 3). However, while motor chunking occurred in healthy controls and ON-PD patients, it did not in OFF-PD patients. In the shuffling conditions, a significant difference was seen between the preserved and the broken chunks conditions for both healthy participants and ON-PD patients, but not for OFF-PD patients. These results suggest that movement chunking during motor sequence learning is a dopamine-dependent process in human.

  3. Cisco shuffles the WLAN deck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phil Hochmuth

    2005-01-01

    Cisco's $450 million buyout last week of wireless switch start-up Airespace not only represents something of an about-face for Cisco regarding wireless LAN technology, but also is the latest evidence...

  4. Bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic comparison of a single 200-mg dose of meclofenoxate hydrochloride capsule and tablet formulations in healthy Chinese adult male volunteers: a randomized sequence, open-label, two-period crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian-Jun; Ji, Hong-Jian; Wu, Ding-Wei; Yao, Jing; Hu, Qin; Xiao, Da-Wei; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2008-09-01

    Meclofenoxate hydrochloride is a psychostimulant in the nootropic agent group available in capsule and tablet formulations approved for traumatic cataphora, alcoholic poisoning, anoxia neonatorum, and children's enuresis in China. Although these 2 generic formulations are marketed in China, information regarding their pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence in humans has not been published. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic properties and bioequivalence of the capsule (test) and tablet (reference) formulations of meclofenoxate hydrochloride 200 mg in healthy Chinese volunteers. This single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study was performed at the Nanjing First Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Eligible subjects were healthy male volunteers who were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 200-mg dose of the test or reference formulation, followed by a 1-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. The study drugs were administered after a 12-hour overnight fast. As a prodrug, meclofenoxate is hydrolyzed into 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and is not detected in plasma. The active metabolite of meclofenoxate, chlorophenoxyacetic acid, was assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. For analysis of pharmacokinetic properties, including Cmax, AUC0-24, and AUC0-infinity, blood samples were obtained at 0.33, 0.67, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, and 24 hours after administration. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined equivalence range (80%-125%) as established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Subjects were interviewed concerning the occurrence of adverse events including excitement, insomnia, lassitude, and headache. Tolerability was assessed at baseline (before administration) and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hours after administration by monitoring vital signs

  5. Influence of Ginkgo biloba extract on the pharmacodynamic effects and pharmacokinetic properties of ticlopidine: an open-label, randomized, two-period, two-treatment, two-sequence, single-dose crossover study in healthy Korean male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Hyung; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Lee, Yong-Oh; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Jang, In-Jin; Shin, Sang-Goo; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2010-02-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract is an herbal medicine used in the treatment of vascular disorders that may be coadministered with antiplatelet agents such as ticlopidine. Regulatory authorities requested evaluation of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these entities, according to the drug-development guidance for fixed-dose combination formulations in Korea. This study was performed to evaluate the potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between ticlopidine and Ginkgo biloba extract. An open-label, randomized, 2-period, 2-treatment, 2-sequence, single-dose crossover study was conducted in healthy Korean male volunteers. All volunteers were randomly assigned to a sequence group for the 2 treatments, which consisted of ticlopidine 250 mg alone and ticlopidine 250 mg with Ginkgo biloba extract 80 mg, separated by a 1-week washout period between the treatments. Bleeding time was determined just before dosing and at 5, 12, and 48 hours after dosing. Platelet aggregation was evaluated before dosing and at 4, 8, 26, and 48 hours after dosing. Blood samples (8 mL) from each of the volunteers were collected from an indwelling intravenous cannula inserted into a forearm vein before dosing and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after dosing. Ticlopidine concentrations were determined by a validated method using HPLC and ultraviolet detection. Adverse events were identified using general health-related questions, vital signs, physical examinations, ECGs, and laboratory tests. A total of 24 healthy men participated in the study (mean [SD] age, 24.1 [4.3] years; weight, 66.6 [7.4] kg; height, 174.7 [5.0] cm). The baseline corrected bleeding times were not significantly different between the ticlopidine-alone and ticlopidine/ Ginkgo biloba groups, and changes in platelet aggregation were not significantly different between the groups. Likewise, the pharmacokinetic parameters of ticlopidine were not significantly different

  6. Pharmacokinetic properties and bioequivalence of two formulations of arbidol: an open-label, single-dose, randomized-sequence, two-period crossover study in healthy Chinese male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yan; Wang, Shuang; Yao, Wei-Fan; Wu, Hui-zhe; Meng, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Min-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Arbidol is an antiviral drug indicated for the prevention and treatment of all types of influenza infection and some other kinds of acute respiratory infections, specifically against influenza groups A and B, and severe acute respiratory syndrome. It is used to help prevent influenza infection as long as necessary with little risk for influenza mutation rendering it less effective. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic properties and tolerability, and to determine bioequivalence, of a newly developed generic dispersible tablet formulation (test) and a branded capsule formulation (reference) of arbidol 200 mg in healthy Chinese fasted male volunteers. This open-label, single-dose, randomized-sequence, 2-period crossover study was conducted in healthy native Chinese male volunteers. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 200-mg dose of the test or reference formulation, followed by a 1-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. The study drugs were administered after a 12-hour overnight fast. After the study drug administration, serial blood samples were collected for 72 hours after administration. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Several pharmacokinetic pararameters, including C(max), T(max), t((1/2)), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity), were determined from the plasma concentrations of the 2 formulations of arbidol using noncompartmental analysis. The formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if the log-transformed ratios of C(max) and AUC were within the predetermined bioequivalence range of 80% to 125% established by the State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) of the People's Republic of China. Tolerability was assessed by monitoring vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography), laboratory analysis (hematology, blood biochemistry, hepatic function, and

  7. Relative bioavailability of generic and branded acetylcysteine effervescent tablets: A single-dose, open-label, randomized-sequence, two-period crossover study in fasting healthy Chinese male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Liu, Yun; Lu, Chuan; Jia, Jing-Ying; Liu, Gang-Yi; Weng, Li-Ping; Wang, Jia-Yan; Li, Guo-Xiu; Wang, Wei; Li, Shui-Jun; Yu, Chen

    2010-11-01

    Acetylcysteine may be used as a muco- lytic agent for the treatment of chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other pulmonary diseases complicated by the production of viscous mucus. However, little is known of its pharmacokinetic properties when given orally in healthy volunteers, particularly in a Chinese Han population. This study was conducted to provide support for the marketing of a generic product in China. The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of a generic test formulation and a branded reference formulation of acetylcysteine in fasting healthy Chinese male volunteers. A single-dose, open-label, randomized-sequence, 2-period crossover design with a 7-day washout period between doses was used in this study. Healthy Chinese male nonsmokers aged 18 to 40 years with a body mass index (BMI) of 19 to 25 kg/m(2) were selected. Eligible volunteers were randomly assigned to receive acetylcysteine 600 mg PO as either the test formulation (3 tablets of 200 mg each) or reference formulation (1 tablet of 600 mg) under fasting conditions. A total of 15 serial blood samples were collected over a 24-hour interval, and total plasma acetylcysteine concentrations were analyzed by a validated liquid chromatography-isotopic dilution mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), T(max), t(½) AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-∞) were calculated and analyzed statistically. The 2 formulations were considered bioequivalent if the 90% CIs of the log-transformed ratios (test/reference) of C(max) and AUC were within the predetermined bioequivalence ranges (70%-143% for C(max); 80%-125% for AUC), as established by the State Food and Drug Administration of China. Tolerability was determined by vital signs, clinical laboratory tests, 12-lead ECGs, physical examinations, and interviews with the subjects about adverse events (AEs). A total of 24 healthy Chinese Han male volunteers were enrolled in and

  8. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  9. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  10. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by

  11. Evaluating Letrozole and Tamoxifen Alone and in Sequence for Postmenopausal Women with Steroid Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: the BIG 1-98 Randomized Clinical Trial at 8.1 years Median Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Meredith M.; Neven, Patrick; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Goldhirsch, Aron; Ejlertsen, Bent; Mauriac, Louis; Forbes, John F.; Smith, Ian; Láng, István; Wardley, Andrew; Rabaglio, Manuela; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Thürlimann, Beat

    2011-01-01

    clinicaltrials.gov NCT00004205. Findings At a median follow-up of 8.7 years from randomization (range 0–12.4), letrozole monotherapy is significantly better than tamoxifen, whether using IPCW or intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis [IPCW: DFS HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.74–0.92), OS HR 0.79 (0.69–0.900, DRFI HR 0.79 (0.68–0.92), BCFI HR 0.80 (0.70–0.92); ITT: DFS HR 0.86 (0.78–0.96), OS HR 0.87 (0.77–0.999), DRFI HR 0.86 (0.74–0.998), BCFI HR 0.86 (0.76–0.98)]. At a median follow-up of 8.0 years from randomization (range 0–11.2), there were no statistically significant differences in any of the four endpoints for either sequence compared with letrozole monotherapy. Eight-year ITT estimates [each with SE ≤ 1.1%] for letrozole monotherapy, letrozole followed by tamoxifen, and tamoxifen followed by letrozole were 78.6%, 77.8%, 77.3% for DFS; 87.5%, 87.7%, 85.9% for OS; 89.9%, 88.7%, 88.1% for DRFI; and 86.1%, 85.3%, 84.3% for BCFI. Interpretation For postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer, a reduction in breast cancer recurrence and mortality is obtained by letrozole monotherapy when compared to tamoxifen. Sequential treatments involving tamoxifen and letrozole do not improve outcome compared with letrozole monotherapy, but may represent useful strategies considering individual patient’s risk of recurrence and treatment tolerability: more thromboembolic events, vaginal bleeding, hot flushes and night sweats with tamoxifen, while more vaginal dryness, bone fractures, osteoporosis, arthralgia/myalgia, and higher grade cardiac events with letrozole. Funding Novartis, United States National Cancer Institute, International Breast Cancer Study Group. PMID:22018631

  12. Pseudo-random number generator based on asymptotic deterministic randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Kai [Department of Radio Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China)], E-mail: kaiwang@seu.edu.cn; Pei Wenjiang; Xia Haishan [Department of Radio Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Cheung Yiuming [Department of Computer Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-06-09

    A novel approach to generate the pseudorandom-bit sequence from the asymptotic deterministic randomness system is proposed in this Letter. We study the characteristic of multi-value correspondence of the asymptotic deterministic randomness constructed by the piecewise linear map and the noninvertible nonlinearity transform, and then give the discretized systems in the finite digitized state space. The statistic characteristics of the asymptotic deterministic randomness are investigated numerically, such as stationary probability density function and random-like behavior. Furthermore, we analyze the dynamics of the symbolic sequence. Both theoretical and experimental results show that the symbolic sequence of the asymptotic deterministic randomness possesses very good cryptographic properties, which improve the security of chaos based PRBGs and increase the resistance against entropy attacks and symbolic dynamics attacks.

  13. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Nucleotide Sequence Nucleotide sequence of full length cDNA (trimmed sequence) kome_ine_full_se...quence_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db ...

  14. Genetic algorithms with permutation coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Othman, Mohamed Tahar; Abdel-Azim, Gamil

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is one of the topics of bio informatics that has seriously been researched. It is known as NP-complete problem. It is also considered as one of the most important and daunting tasks in computational biology. Concerning this a wide number of heuristic algorithms have been proposed to find optimal alignment. Among these heuristic algorithms are genetic algorithms (GA). The GA has mainly two major weaknesses: it is time consuming and can cause local minima. One of the significant aspects in the GA process in MSA is to maximize the similarities between sequences by adding and shuffling the gaps of Solution Coding (SC). Several ways for SC have been introduced. One of them is the Permutation Coding (PC). We propose a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithms (GAs) with a PC and 2-opt algorithm. The PC helps to code the MSA solution which maximizes the gain of resources, reliability and diversity of GA. The use of the PC opens the area by applying all functions over permutations for MSA. Thus, we suggest an algorithm to calculate the scoring function for multiple alignments based on PC, which is used as fitness function. The time complexity of the GA is reduced by using this algorithm. Our GA is implemented with different selections strategies and different crossovers. The probability of crossover and mutation is set as one strategy. Relevant patents have been probed in the topic.

  15. Nonlinear complexity behaviors of agent-based 3D Potts financial dynamics with random environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yani; Wang, Jun

    2018-02-01

    A new microscopic 3D Potts interaction financial price model is established in this work, to investigate the nonlinear complexity behaviors of stock markets. 3D Potts model, which extends the 2D Potts model to three-dimensional, is a cubic lattice model to explain the interaction behavior among the agents. In order to explore the complexity of real financial markets and the 3D Potts financial model, a new random coarse-grained Lempel-Ziv complexity is proposed to certain series, such as the price returns, the price volatilities, and the random time d-returns. Then the composite multiscale entropy (CMSE) method is applied to the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and the corresponding shuffled data to study the complexity behaviors. The empirical results indicate that the 3D financial model is feasible.

  16. Single-dose bioequivalence assessment of two formulations of polysaccharide iron complex capsules in healthy adult male Chinese volunteers: A sequence-randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Su, Feng; Lui, Ying-Tao; Li, Jun-Feng

    2009-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common nutritional disease worldwide. Iron supplementation is an efficient method for treating patients with IDA. Polysaccharide iron complex is an oral iron supplement that is associated with generally good tolerability and good bioavailability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of 2 branded formulations of polysaccharide iron complex in healthy adult male Chinese volunteers by determining the pharmacokinetic parameters after single-dose oral admi ni strati on. This sequence-randomized, double-blind, 2-way crossover study was carried out in the Affiliated Hospital, Institute of Medical Sciences of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China. Healthy adult male Chinese volunteers were enrolled and evenly randomized to receive 1 of 2 formulations on day 1. Subjects received an oral dose of 150 mg (1 capsule) of polysaccharide iron complex with 150 mL of warm water in the morning. Capsules were of similar size, shape, and color to ensure blinding. Four hours after administration, the subjects were given standardized meals. After a 1-week washout period, the subjects were crossed over to receive the other formulation in a similar manner. The serum iron concentration 12 hours after study drug administration was determined using atomic-absorption spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, Tmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-∞ were obtained and analyzed using the Schuir mann 2 one-sided t test. The 2 formulations were considered bioequi valent if the test/reference ratios of Cmax, AUC0-t, and their 90% CIs were within the range of 70% to 143% for Cmax and within 80% to 125% for AUC0-t. Tolerability was monitored by inquiring whether the subjects had experienced adverse events (AEs), with a focus on gastrointestinal AEs, during the clinic visits during the 24-hour period after drag administration and subsequently via telephone throughout the study. Thirty adult male Chinese volunteers were assessed for inclusion. Twenty healthy

  17. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability comparison of generic and branded citalopram 20 mg tablets: an open-label, randomized-sequence, two-period crossover study in healthy Chinese CYP2C19 extensive metabolizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Rong, Zhengxing; Xu, Yiping; Chen, Bing; Xie, Yifan; Chen, Congying; Lu, Yang; Shen, Yifeng; Li, Huafang; Sun, Jing; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2013-01-01

    Citalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) mainly prescribed to treat major depression. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a new and a branded citalopram 20 mg formulation to support the marketing authorization of the test formulation in China. A single-dose, open-label, randomized-sequence, two-period crossover design was used in this study. Healthy Chinese male cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 extensive metabolizers, aged 18-40 years, were eligible to participate. CYP2C19 poor metabolizers were excluded, based on genotyping of genomic DNA from blood samples. Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to receive the test formulation followed by the reference formulation, and then vice versa. A 2-week washout occurred between study periods. Blood samples were collected for up to 144 h post-dose. Quantification was carried out using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and analysed statistically. The two formulations were considered pharmacokinetically equivalent if the 90 % confidence intervals (CIs) of the log-transformed ratios (test/reference) of the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last measurable concentration (AUC(last)), and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(∞)) were within the predetermined acceptance range (70-143 % for C(max); 80-125 % for AUC(last) and AUC(∞)) according to China State Food and Drug Administration bioequivalence guidelines. Tolerability was monitored by clinical assessment, vital signs, laboratory analysis and interviews with participants about adverse events. A total of 24 participants, with a mean (SD) age of 26 (3) years (range 22-32 years), body weight of 65.2 (5.0) kg (range 53-73 kg), and height of 172.7 (4.9) cm (range 159-182 cm), were enrolled in this

  18. Comparisons of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of fixed-dose combinations of amlodipine besylate/losartan and amlodipine camsylate/losartan in healthy subjects: a randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, YoonJung; Lee, SeungHwan; Cho, Sang-Min; Kang, Won-Ho; Nam, Kyu-Yeol; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2016-01-01

    A fixed-dose combination (FDC) of amlodipine and losartan has been used to reduce blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is not sufficiently controlled with either drug alone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics and tolerability of an FDC of 6.94 mg amlodipine besylate (5 mg as amlodipine)/50 mg losartan potassium compared to an FDC of 5 mg amlodipine camsylate/50 mg losartan potassium in healthy subjects. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover study was conducted on 46 healthy male subjects. Blood concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Blood samples were collected up to 144 hours post dose for each period. PK parameters were calculated in each treatment group using a noncompartmental method. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the geometric mean ratios of the two treatments for the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the concentration curve from time zero to the last quantifiable time point (AUC0-t) were estimated. Tolerability assessments were performed for all subjects who received the drug at least once. The PK profiles of the two treatments were similar. For amlodipine, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs) of amlodipine besylate to amlodipine camsylate for the Cmax and AUC0-t were 0.98 (0.94-1.01) and 0.97 (0.93-1.01), respectively. The corresponding values for losartan were 0.91 (0.81-1.02) and 1.05 (0.98-1.12), respectively. The incidence of adverse events was not significantly different between the two treatments, and both were well tolerated. An FDC of 6.94 mg amlodipine besylate (5 mg as amlodipine)/50 mg losartan potassium produced similar results to an FDC of 5 mg amlodipine camsylate/50 mg losartan potassium treatment with respect to the PK parameters of amlodipine and losartan based on Cmax and AUC0-t values. The amlodipine besylate/losartan potassium combination was well tolerated by healthy male subjects.

  19. Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Iring; Philipp, Andrea M; Gade, Miriam

    2006-04-01

    In a study of the formation of representations of task sequences and its influence on task inhibition, participants first performed tasks in a predictable sequence (e.g., ABACBC) and then performed the tasks in a random sequence. Half of the participants were explicitly instructed about the predictable sequence, whereas the other participants did not receive these instructions. Task-sequence learning was inferred from shorter reaction times (RTs) in predictable relative to random sequences. Persisting inhibition of competing tasks was indicated by increased RTs in n- 2 task repetitions (e.g., ABA) compared with n- 2 nonrepetitions (e.g., CBA). The results show task-sequence learning for both groups. However, task inhibition was reduced in predictable relative to random sequences among instructed-learning participants who formed an explicit representation of the task sequence, whereas sequence learning and task inhibition were independent in the noninstructed group. We hypothesize that the explicit instructions led to chunking of the task sequence, and that n- 2 repetitions served as chunk points (ABA-CBC), so that within-chunk facilitation modulated the inhibition effect.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence evaluation of two different atorvastatin calcium 10-mg tablets: A single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, two-period crossover study in healthy fasted Chinese adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Pu, Hua-Hua; Liu, Gang-Yi; Jia, Jing-Ying; Weng, Li-Ping; Xu, Rong-Jing; Li, Guo-Xiu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Meng-Qi; Lu, Chuan; Yu, Chen

    2010-07-01

    Atorvastatin calcium is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor indicated for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Information on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin in a Chinese population is lacking, and regulatory requirements necessitate a bioequivalence study for the marketing of a generic product in China. The aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of a test and branded reference formulation of atorvastatin calcium 10-mg tablets in healthy fasted Chinese male volunteers. This was a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 2-period crossover study with a 2-week washout period between doses. Healthy Chinese males were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg of either the test or reference formulation, and 13 blood samples were obtained over a 48-hour interval. Plasma concentrations of parent atorvastatin and ortho-hydroxy-atorvastatin (primary active metabolite) were simultaneously determined using a validated liquid chromatography-isotopic dilution mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including C(max), T(max), t((1/2)), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity)), were calculated. The 2 formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if 90% CIs for the log transformed ratios of AUC and C(max) of atorvastatin were within the predetermined bioequivalence range (0.80-1.25 for AUC and 0.70-1.43 for C(max)) as established by the State Food and Drug Administration of China. Tolerability was evaluated throughout the study by vital signs monitoring, physical examinations, 12-lead ECGs, and subject interviews on adverse events (AEs). A total of 66 subjects were assessed for inclusion; 20 were excluded prior to study initiation. Of the 46 healthy subjects (mean [SD] age, 24.1 [2.5] years; height, 170.8 [5.1] cm; weight, 64.6 [6.4] kg; body mass index (BMI), 22.1 [1.7] kg/m(2)) who completed the study, 45 subjects (mean [SD] age, 24.1 [2.5] years; height, 171.1 [4

  1. Pharmacokinetic properties and bioequivalence of two compound formulations of 1500 mg ampicillin (1167 mg)/probenecid (333 mg): a randomized-sequence, single-dose, open-label, two-period crossover study in healthy Chinese male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huizhe; Liu, Mingyan; Wang, Shuang; Feng, Wanyu; Yao, Weifan; Zhao, Haishan; Wei, Minjie

    2010-03-01

    Ampicillin/probenecid is an antimicrobial formulation indicated for the treatment of respiratory, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal infections. Ampicillin sodium is the active antimicrobial ingredient that can act on the phase of bacterial breeding and inhibit the biosynthesis of bacterial mucopeptide in the cell wall. Probenecid acts synergistically by competitively inhibiting an organic anion transporter in renal tubules, increasing the plasma concentrations, and thus extending the plasma elimination t(1/2). The aim of this study was to assess and compare the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, bioavailability, and bioequivalence of a newly developed dispersible tablet formulation (test) of ampicillin/ probenecid with those of an established branded capsule formulation (reference) in healthy Chinese male volunteers. A randomized-sequence, single-dose, open-label, 2-period crossover study was conducted in fasted healthy Chinese male volunteers. Eligible participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive 6 dispersible tablets (test) or branded capsules (reference) (1500 mg total; 250 mg each containing ampicillin 194.5 mg and probenecid 55.5 mg), followed by a 7-day washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. Plasma samples were collected over a 24-hour period following administration and analyzed for ampicillin and probenecid content by HPLC. PK parameters such as C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity) were also determined. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the geometric mean ratios of the log-transformed C(max) and AUC values were within the equivalence range (80%-125%) predetermined by the State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) of the People's Republic of China. Tolerability was based on the observation of adverse events (AEs), monitoring of vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, electrocardiography) and laboratory tests (hematology, blood biochemistry, hepatic function, urinalysis), and subject

  2. Comparisons of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of fixed-dose combinations of amlodipine besylate/losartan and amlodipine camsylate/losartan in healthy subjects: a randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available YoonJung Choi,1 SeungHwan Lee,2 Sang-Min Cho,3 Won-Ho Kang,3 Kyu-Yeol Nam,4 In-Jin Jang,1 Kyung-Sang Yu1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 2Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 3Research Institute, 4Global R&D, Korea United Pharm Inc., Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: A fixed-dose combination (FDC of amlodipine and losartan has been used to reduce blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is not sufficiently controlled with either drug alone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK characteristics and tolerability of an FDC of 6.94 mg amlodipine besylate (5 mg as amlodipine/50 mg losartan potassium compared to an FDC of 5 mg amlodipine camsylate/50 mg losartan potassium in healthy subjects. Subjects and methods: A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover study was conducted on 46 healthy male subjects. Blood concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Blood samples were collected up to 144 hours post dose for each period. PK parameters were calculated in each treatment group using a noncompartmental method. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs of the geometric mean ratios of the two treatments for the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax and the area under the concentration curve from time zero to the last quantifiable time point (AUC0–t were estimated. Tolerability assessments were performed for all subjects who received the drug at least once. Results: The PK profiles of the two treatments were similar. For amlodipine, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs of amlodipine besylate to amlodipine camsylate for the Cmax and AUC0–t were 0.98 (0.94-1.01 and 0.97 (0.93-1.01, respectively. The corresponding values for losartan were 0.91 (0.81-1.02 and 1.05 (0.98-1.12, respectively. The incidence of adverse events was not significantly different between the two

  3. QUASI-RANDOM TESTING OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Yarmolik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modified random testing approaches have been proposed for computer system testing in the black box environment. Their effectiveness has been evaluated on the typical failure patterns by employing three measures, namely, P-measure, E-measure and F-measure. A quasi-random testing, being a modified version of the random testing, has been proposed and analyzed. The quasi-random Sobol sequences and modified Sobol sequences are used as the test patterns. Some new methods for Sobol sequence generation have been proposed and analyzed.

  4. Unraveling the sequence dynamics of the formation of genus-specific satellite DNAs in the family solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, S-H; Park, H-M; Kim, S-M; Kim, H H; Hur, C-G; Choi, D

    2011-05-01

    Tandemly repeated DNAs, referred to as satellite DNAs, often occur in a genome in a genus-specific manner. However, the mechanisms for generation and evolution for these sequences are largely unknown because of the uncertain origins of the satellite DNAs. We found highly divergent genus-specific satellite DNAs that showed sequence similarity with genus-specific intergenic spacers (IGSs) in the family Solanaceae, which includes the genera Nicotiana, Solanum and Capsicum. The conserved position of the IGS between 25S and 18S rDNA facilitates comparison of IGS sequences across genera, even in the presence of very low sequence similarity. Sequence comparison of IGS may elucidate the procedure of the genesis of complex monomer units of the satellite DNAs. Within the IGS of Capsicum species, base substitutions and copy number variation of subrepeat monomers were causes of monomer divergence in IGS sequences. At the level of inter-generic IGS sequences of the family Solanaceae, however, genus-specific motif selection, motif shuffling between subrepeats and differential amplification among motifs were involved in formation of genus-specific IGS. Therefore, the genus-specific satellite DNAs in Solanaceae plants can be generated from differentially organized repeat monomers of the IGS rather than by accumulation of mutations from pre-existent satellite DNAs.

  5. Bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic comparison of two mycophenolate mofetil formulations in healthy Chinese male volunteers: an open-label, randomized-sequence, single-dose, two-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Tao, Yifu; Zhu, Yubing; Zhu, Dingchun

    2010-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an ester prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), so clinical studies measure the circulating plasma MPA concentration instead of MMF. MPA is extensively glucuronidated by several uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases into an inactive 7-O-glucuronide and a pharmacologically active acylglucuronide. Considering the effect of racial differences and genetic factors on the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of drugs, it is necessary to study them in Chinese populations. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical bioequivalence and PK properties of a test (dispersible tablets) and reference (capsules) formulation of MMF 1.0 g in healthy Chinese volunteers. We also established a validated HPLC method for the determination and quantification of MPA in human plasma. The study was required to obtain Chinese regulatory approval for the test formulation. This open-label, randomized-sequence, single-dose, 2-way crossover study was conducted at the First Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. Eligible subjects were healthy male volunteers who were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive a single 1.0-g dose of the test or reference formulation, followed by a 1-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. The plasma concentration of MPA, which is the active metabolite of MMF, was determined using a validated HPLC method. For analysis of PK properties, blood samples were collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 45 minutes, and 1, 1.5, 3, 5, 8, 11, 18, 36, and 48 hour(s). The PK parameters, including C(max), T(max), t((1/2)), AUC(0-48), and AUC(0-infinity), were determined from the plasma concentrations of the 2 formulations by noncompartmental analysis. Tolerability was assessed at baseline (be- fore administration) and at 30 minutes and 1, 5, 18, and 48 hours after administration by monitoring vital signs. Laboratory tests (hematology, blood biochemistry, hepatic function, and urinalysis) were performed for the

  6. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  7. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  8. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  9. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Elżbieta; Płucienniczak, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Magdalena; Dowierciał, Anna; Rode, Wojciech

    2014-04-09

    Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  11. Contributions of the Prion Protein Sequence, Strain, and Environment to the Species Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditi; Bruce, Kathryn L; Chen, Buxin; Gyoneva, Stefka; Behrens, Sven H; Bommarius, Andreas S; Chernoff, Yury O

    2016-01-15

    Amyloid propagation requires high levels of sequence specificity so that only molecules with very high sequence identity can form cross-β-sheet structures of sufficient stringency for incorporation into the amyloid fibril. This sequence specificity presents a barrier to the transmission of prions between two species with divergent sequences, termed a species barrier. Here we study the relative effects of protein sequence, seed conformation, and environment on the species barrier strength and specificity for the yeast prion protein Sup35p from three closely related species of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group; namely, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Through in vivo plasmid shuffle experiments, we show that the major characteristics of the transmission barrier and conformational fidelity are determined by the protein sequence rather than by the cellular environment. In vitro data confirm that the kinetics and structural preferences of aggregation of the S. paradoxus and S. bayanus proteins are influenced by anions in accordance with their positions in the Hofmeister series, as observed previously for S. cerevisiae. However, the specificity of the species barrier is primarily affected by the sequence and the type of anion present during the formation of the initial seed, whereas anions present during the seeded aggregation process typically influence kinetics rather than the specificity of prion conversion. Therefore, our work shows that the protein sequence and the conformation variant (strain) of the prion seed are the primary determinants of cross-species prion specificity both in vivo and in vitro. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...... to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence non-specific learning during...

  13. Comparative analysis of catfish BAC end sequences with the zebrafish genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abernathy Jason

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative mapping is a powerful tool to transfer genomic information from sequenced genomes to closely related species for which whole genome sequence data are not yet available. However, such an approach is still very limited in catfish, the most important aquaculture species in the United States. This project was initiated to generate additional BAC end sequences and demonstrate their applications in comparative mapping in catfish. Results We reported the generation of 43,000 BAC end sequences and their applications for comparative genome analysis in catfish. Using these and the additional 20,000 existing BAC end sequences as a resource along with linkage mapping and existing physical map, conserved syntenic regions were identified between the catfish and zebrafish genomes. A total of 10,943 catfish BAC end sequences (17.3% had significant BLAST hits to the zebrafish genome (cutoff value ≤ e-5, of which 3,221 were unique gene hits, providing a platform for comparative mapping based on locations of these genes in catfish and zebrafish. Genetic linkage mapping of microsatellites associated with contigs allowed identification of large conserved genomic segments and construction of super scaffolds. Conclusion BAC end sequences and their associated polymorphic markers are great resources for comparative genome analysis in catfish. Highly conserved chromosomal regions were identified to exist between catfish and zebrafish. However, it appears that the level of conservation at local genomic regions are high while a high level of chromosomal shuffling and rearrangements exist between catfish and zebrafish genomes. Orthologous regions established through comparative analysis should facilitate both structural and functional genome analysis in catfish.

  14. A measurement of disorder in binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Longyan; Wang, Haihong; Cheng, Weiwen; Zhao, Shengmei

    2015-03-01

    We propose a complex quantity, AL, to characterize the degree of disorder of L-length binary symbolic sequences. As examples, we respectively apply it to typical random and deterministic sequences. One kind of random sequences is generated from a periodic binary sequence and the other is generated from the logistic map. The deterministic sequences are the Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences. In these analyzed sequences, we find that the modulus of AL, denoted by |AL | , is a (statistically) equivalent quantity to the Boltzmann entropy, the metric entropy, the conditional block entropy and/or other quantities, so it is a useful quantitative measure of disorder. It can be as a fruitful index to discern which sequence is more disordered. Moreover, there is one and only one value of |AL | for the overall disorder characteristics. It needs extremely low computational costs. It can be easily experimentally realized. From all these mentioned, we believe that the proposed measure of disorder is a valuable complement to existing ones in symbolic sequences.

  15. Biased mutagenesis in the N-terminal region by degenerate oligonucleotide gene shuffling enhances secretory expression of barley alpha-amylase 2 in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukuda, Kenji; Jensen, Malene Hillerup; Aghajari, Nushin

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant barley alpha-amylase 1 (rAMY1) and 2 (rAMY2), despite 80% sequence identity, are produced in very different amounts of 1.1 and alpha loop 2 that interacts with domain B (beta-->alpha loop 3) protruding from the catalytic (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel. Most remarkably Pichia pastoris strain GS......115 secreted 60 mg/l A42P compared with 3 mg/l of wild-type rAMY2. The crystal structure of A42P rAMY2 was solved and found to differ marginally from the AMY2 structure, suggesting that the high A42P yield stems from stabilization of the mature and/or intermediate form owing to the introduced proline...... residue. Moreover, the G to C substitution for the A42P mutation might have a positive impact on protein translation....

  16. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Amino Acid Sequence Amino Acid sequence of full length cDNA (Longest ORF) kome_ine_full_se...quence_amino_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db ...

  17. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  18. Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  19. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  20. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  1. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  2. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  3. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Yu-Tung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-12-13

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analyzed using a panel of 409 cancer-related genes, while a separate group of 40 sporadic CRCs not associated with GISTs served as controls. All 9 of the GISTs had either KIT (8 of 9) or PDGFRA (1 of 9) mutations that were not present in their associated CRCs. Conversely, all but one of the 9 GIST-associated CRCs exhibited an APC mutation, a TP53 mutation or both, while none of their corresponding GISTs harbored either APC or TP53 mutations. The genetic profile of CRCs with and without associated GISTs did not differ. Although population-based studies and case series worldwide, including ours, have unanimously indicated that the GIST-CRC association is nonrandom, our targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveiled a lack of driver-gene mutations linking sporadic GISTs to highly prevalent second primaries. Further studies are needed to elucidate other genetic alterations that may be responsible for this puzzling contradiction.

  4. Evaluation of Genome Sequencing Quality in Selected Plant Species Using Expressed Sequence Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Lingfei; Han, Jian; Kayesh, Emrul; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Changqing; Pervaiz, Tariq; Wen, Xicheng; Fang, Jinggui

    2013-01-01

    Background With the completion of genome sequencing projects for more than 30 plant species, large volumes of genome sequences have been produced and stored in online databases. Advancements in sequencing technologies have reduced the cost and time of whole genome sequencing enabling more and more plants to be subjected to genome sequencing. Despite this, genome sequence qualities of multiple plants have not been evaluated. Methodology/Principal Finding Integrity and accuracy were calculated to evaluate the genome sequence quality of 32 plants. The integrity of a genome sequence is presented by the ratio of chromosome size and genome size (or between scaffold size and genome size), which ranged from 55.31% to nearly 100%. The accuracy of genome sequence was presented by the ratio between matched EST and selected ESTs where 52.93% ∼ 98.28% and 89.02% ∼ 98.85% of the randomly selected clean ESTs could be mapped to chromosome and scaffold sequences, respectively. According to the integrity, accuracy and other analysis of each plant species, thirteen plant species were divided into four levels. Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays had the highest quality, followed by Brachypodium distachyon, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Glycine max, Sorghum bicolor, Solanum lycopersicum and Fragaria vesca, and Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula and Malus × domestica in that order. Assembling the scaffold sequences into chromosome sequences should be the primary task for the remaining nineteen species. Low GC content and repeat DNA influences genome sequence assembly. Conclusion The quality of plant genome sequences was found to be lower than envisaged and thus the rapid development of genome sequencing projects as well as research on bioinformatics tools and the algorithms of genome sequence assembly should provide increased processing and correction of genome sequences that have already been published. PMID:23922843

  5. Evaluation of genome sequencing quality in selected plant species using expressed sequence tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfei Shangguan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the completion of genome sequencing projects for more than 30 plant species, large volumes of genome sequences have been produced and stored in online databases. Advancements in sequencing technologies have reduced the cost and time of whole genome sequencing enabling more and more plants to be subjected to genome sequencing. Despite this, genome sequence qualities of multiple plants have not been evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Integrity and accuracy were calculated to evaluate the genome sequence quality of 32 plants. The integrity of a genome sequence is presented by the ratio of chromosome size and genome size (or between scaffold size and genome size, which ranged from 55.31% to nearly 100%. The accuracy of genome sequence was presented by the ratio between matched EST and selected ESTs where 52.93% ∼ 98.28% and 89.02% ∼ 98.85% of the randomly selected clean ESTs could be mapped to chromosome and scaffold sequences, respectively. According to the integrity, accuracy and other analysis of each plant species, thirteen plant species were divided into four levels. Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays had the highest quality, followed by Brachypodium distachyon, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Glycine max, Sorghum bicolor, Solanum lycopersicum and Fragaria vesca, and Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula and Malus × domestica in that order. Assembling the scaffold sequences into chromosome sequences should be the primary task for the remaining nineteen species. Low GC content and repeat DNA influences genome sequence assembly. CONCLUSION: The quality of plant genome sequences was found to be lower than envisaged and thus the rapid development of genome sequencing projects as well as research on bioinformatics tools and the algorithms of genome sequence assembly should provide increased processing and correction of genome sequences that have already been published.

  6. A complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm and its comparative analysis with that of normal cytoplasm in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Mizue; Yasumoto, Keita; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Terachi, Toru

    2012-07-31

    Plant mitochondrial genome has unique features such as large size, frequent recombination and incorporation of foreign DNA. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is caused by rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome, and a novel chimeric open reading frame (ORF) created by shuffling of endogenous sequences is often responsible for CMS. The Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm is one of the most extensively studied cytoplasms in Brassicaceae. Although the gene orf138 has been isolated as a determinant of Ogura-type CMS, no homologous sequence to orf138 has been found in public databases. Therefore, how orf138 sequence was created is a mystery. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of two radish mitochondrial genomes, namely, Ogura- and normal-type genomes, and analyzed them to reveal the origin of the gene orf138. Ogura- and normal-type mitochondrial genomes were assembled to 258,426-bp and 244,036-bp circular sequences, respectively. Normal-type mitochondrial genome contained 33 protein-coding and three rRNA genes, which are well conserved with the reported mitochondrial genome of rapeseed. Ogura-type genomes contained same genes and additional atp9. As for tRNA, normal-type contained 17 tRNAs, while Ogura-type contained 17 tRNAs and one additional trnfM. The gene orf138 was specific to Ogura-type mitochondrial genome, and no sequence homologous to it was found in normal-type genome. Comparative analysis of the two genomes revealed that radish mitochondrial genome consists of 11 syntenic regions (length >3 kb, similarity >99.9%). It was shown that short repeats and overlapped repeats present in the edge of syntenic regions were involved in recombination events during evolution to interconvert two types of mitochondrial genome. Ogura-type mitochondrial genome has four unique regions (2,803 bp, 1,601 bp, 451 bp and 15,255 bp in size) that are non-syntenic to normal-type genome, and the gene orf138 was found to be located at the edge of the

  7. A complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm and its comparative analysis with that of normal cytoplasm in radish (Raphanus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yoshiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant mitochondrial genome has unique features such as large size, frequent recombination and incorporation of foreign DNA. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS is caused by rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome, and a novel chimeric open reading frame (ORF created by shuffling of endogenous sequences is often responsible for CMS. The Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm is one of the most extensively studied cytoplasms in Brassicaceae. Although the gene orf138 has been isolated as a determinant of Ogura-type CMS, no homologous sequence to orf138 has been found in public databases. Therefore, how orf138 sequence was created is a mystery. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of two radish mitochondrial genomes, namely, Ogura- and normal-type genomes, and analyzed them to reveal the origin of the gene orf138. Results Ogura- and normal-type mitochondrial genomes were assembled to 258,426-bp and 244,036-bp circular sequences, respectively. Normal-type mitochondrial genome contained 33 protein-coding and three rRNA genes, which are well conserved with the reported mitochondrial genome of rapeseed. Ogura-type genomes contained same genes and additional atp9. As for tRNA, normal-type contained 17 tRNAs, while Ogura-type contained 17 tRNAs and one additional trnfM. The gene orf138 was specific to Ogura-type mitochondrial genome, and no sequence homologous to it was found in normal-type genome. Comparative analysis of the two genomes revealed that radish mitochondrial genome consists of 11 syntenic regions (length >3 kb, similarity >99.9%. It was shown that short repeats and overlapped repeats present in the edge of syntenic regions were involved in recombination events during evolution to interconvert two types of mitochondrial genome. Ogura-type mitochondrial genome has four unique regions (2,803 bp, 1,601 bp, 451 bp and 15,255 bp in size that are non-syntenic to normal-type genome, and the gene orf138

  8. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Random triangles

    OpenAIRE

    Matula, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The author summarizes some previous results concerning random triangles. He describes the Gaussian triangle and random triangles whose vertices lie in a unit n-dimensional ball, in a rectangle or in a general bounded convex set. In the second part, the author deals with an inscribed triangle in a triangle - let ABC be an equilateral triangle and let M, N, O be three points, each laying on one side of the ABC. We call MNO inscribed triangle (in an equi- laterral triangle). The median triangle ...

  10. Random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1990-01-01

    Since the publication of Random Matrices (Academic Press, 1967) so many new results have emerged both in theory and in applications, that this edition is almost completely revised to reflect the developments. For example, the theory of matrices with quaternion elements was developed to compute certain multiple integrals, and the inverse scattering theory was used to derive asymptotic results. The discovery of Selberg's 1944 paper on a multiple integral also gave rise to hundreds of recent publications. This book presents a coherent and detailed analytical treatment of random matrices, leading

  11. Aspects of insertion in random trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Reingold, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method formulated by Yao and used by Brown has yielded bounds on the fraction of nodes with specified properties in trees bult by a sequence of random internal nodes in a random tree built by binary search and insertion, and show that in such a tree about bounds better than those now known. We

  12. Individual Differences Methods for Randomized Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments allow researchers to randomly vary the key manipulation, the instruments of measurement, and the sequences of the measurements and manipulations across participants. To date, however, the advantages of randomized experiments to manipulate both the aspects of interest and the aspects that threaten internal validity have been primarily…

  13. Polynomially Bounded Sequences and Polynomial Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okazaki Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize polynomially bounded sequences that plays an important role in computational complexity theory. Class P is a fundamental computational complexity class that contains all polynomial-time decision problems [11], [12]. It takes polynomially bounded amount of computation time to solve polynomial-time decision problems by the deterministic Turing machine. Moreover we formalize polynomial sequences [5].

  14. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  15. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  16. Deep sequencing to identify the causes of viral encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K Chan

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing allows for a rapid, accurate characterization of microbial DNA and RNA sequences in many types of samples. Deep sequencing (also called next generation sequencing or NGS is being developed to assist with the diagnosis of a wide variety of infectious diseases. In this study, seven frozen brain samples from deceased subjects with recent encephalitis were investigated. RNA from each sample was extracted, randomly reverse transcribed and sequenced. The sequence analysis was performed in a blinded fashion and confirmed with pathogen-specific PCR. This analysis successfully identified measles virus sequences in two brain samples and herpes simplex virus type-1 sequences in three brain samples. No pathogen was identified in the other two brain specimens. These results were concordant with pathogen-specific PCR and partially concordant with prior neuropathological examinations, demonstrating that deep sequencing can accurately identify viral infections in frozen brain tissue.

  17. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  18. Law of iterated logarithm for NA sequences with non-identical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on a law of the iterated logarithm for independent random variables sequences, an iterated logarithm theorem for NA sequences with non-identical distributions is obtained. The proof is based on a Kolmogrov-type exponential inequality.

  19. The LHC Sequencer

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany-Fernandez, Reyes; Gorbonosov, Roman; Khasbulatov, Denis; Lamont, Mike; Le Roux, Pascal; Roderick, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a highly complex system made of many different sub-systems whose operation implies the execution of many tasks with stringent constraints on the order and duration of the execution. To be able to operate such a system in the most efficient and reliable way, the operators in the CERN control room use a high level control system: the LHC Sequencer. The LHC Sequencer system is composed of several components, including an Oracle database where operational sequences are configured, a core server that orchestrates the execution of the sequences, and two graphical user interfaces: one for sequence edition, and another for sequence execution. This paper describes the architecture of the LHC Sequencer system, and how the sequences are prepared and used for LHC operation.

  20. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  1. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  2. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  3. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  4. Randomness in retrospect: exploring the interactions between memory and randomness cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivola, Christopher Y; Oppenheimer, Daniel M

    2008-10-01

    People tend to believe that sequences of random events produce fewer and shorter streaks than is actually the case. Although this error has been demonstrated repeatedly and in many forms, nearly all studies of randomness cognition have focused on how people think about random events occurring in the present or future. This article examines how our biased beliefs about randomness interact with properties of memory to influence our judgments about and memory for past random events. We explore this interaction by examining how beliefs about randomness affect our memory for random events and how certain properties of memory alter our tendency to categorize events as random. Across three experiments, we demonstrate an interaction between randomness cognition and three well-established but distinct properties of memory: (1) the reconstructive nature of memory, (2) primacy and recency effects, and (3) duration neglect. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  5. A dnaN Plasmid Shuffle Strain for Rapid In Vivo Analysis of Mutant Escherichia coli β Clamps Provides Insight Into the Role of Clamp in umuDC-Mediated Cold Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C. PMID:24896652

  6. Algebraic polynomials with random coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Farahmand

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an asymptotic value for the mathematical expected number of points of inflections of a random polynomial of the form a0(ω+a1(ω(n11/2x+a2(ω(n21/2x2+…an(ω(nn1/2xn when n is large. The coefficients {aj(w}j=0n, w∈Ω are assumed to be a sequence of independent normally distributed random variables with means zero and variance one, each defined on a fixed probability space (A,Ω,Pr. A special case of dependent coefficients is also studied.

  7. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Random walks as well as diffusions in random media are considered. Methods are developed that allow one to establish large deviation results for both the 'quenched' and the 'averaged' case. Keywords. Large deviations; random walks in a random environment. 1. Introduction. A random walk on Zd is a stochastic ...

  8. Universality for distances in power-law random graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hofstad, R.; Hooghiemstra, G.

    2008-01-01

    We survey the recent work on phase transition and distances in various random graph models with general degree sequences. We focus on inhomogeneous random graphs, the configuration model, and affine preferential attachment models, and pay special attention to the setting where these random graphs

  9. 32 CFR 1624.1 - Random selection procedures for induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Random selection procedures for induction. 1624... SYSTEM INDUCTIONS § 1624.1 Random selection procedures for induction. (a) The Director of Selective Service shall from time to time establish a random selection sequence for induction by a drawing to be...

  10. Metaheuristic approaches to order sequencing on a unidirectional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the sequencing of orders on a unidirectional picking line is considered. The aim of the order sequencing is to minimise the number of cycles travelled by a picker within the picking line to complete all orders. A tabu search, simulated annealing, genetic algorithm, generalised extremal optimisation and a random ...

  11. Mining olive genome through library sequencing and bioinformatics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the initial steps of olive (Olea europaea L.) genome analysis, a small insert genomic DNA library was constructed (digesting olive genomic DNA with SmaI and cloning the digestion products into pUC19 vector) and randomly picked 83 colonies were sequenced. Analysis of the insert sequences revealed 12 clones ...

  12. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  13. Automated Testing with Targeted Event Sequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Svenning; Prasad, Mukul R.; Møller, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Automated software testing aims to detect errors by producing test inputs that cover as much of the application source code as possible. Applications for mobile devices are typically event-driven, which raises the challenge of automatically producing event sequences that result in high coverage....... Some existing approaches use random or model-based testing that largely treats the application as a black box. Other approaches use symbolic execution, either starting from the entry points of the applications or on specific event sequences. A common limitation of the existing approaches...... is that they often fail to reach the parts of the application code that require more complex event sequences. We propose a two-phase technique for automatically finding event sequences that reach a given target line in the application code. The first phase performs concolic execution to build summaries...

  14. Shuffle dislocation induced magnetic moment in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Sancho, M.P., E-mail: pilar@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Juan, F. de; Vozmediano, M.A.H. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Graphene, a honeycomb arrangement of carbon atoms, is a promising material for nanoelectronics applications due to its unusual electronic properties. Recent experiments performed on suspended graphene indicate the existence of intrinsic defects on the samples. It is known that lattice defects such as vacancies or voids leaving unpaired atoms, lead to the formation of local magnetic moments (Vozmediano et al., 2005). The existence and ordering of these moments is largely determined by the bipartite character of the honeycomb lattice seen as two interpenetrating triangular sublattices. Dislocations made by pentagon-heptagon pairs or octagons with an unpaired atom have been studied recently and found to be stable in the graphene lattice (Carpio et al., 2008). These defects frustrate the sublattice structure and affect the magnetic properties of graphene. We study the magnetic properties of graphene in the presence of these defects. The system is described by a p{sub z} tight-binding model with electron-electron interactions modelled by a Hubbard term. Spin-polarized mean-field solutions are investigated within an unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation.

  15. The colon shuffle : A modified urinary diversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R. P.; Mertens, L. S.; Meinhardt, W.; Verwaal, V. J.; Dik, P.; Horenblas, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the results of a urinary diversion in patients who already have a colostomy or simultaneously require a (rectum) colon resection. The diversion is created from the distal part of the transected colon with a simultaneously created new colostomy contra-laterally (if necessary). This

  16. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  17. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  18. DNA Sequences of RAPD Fragments in the Egyptian cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) is a DNA polymorphism assay based on the amplification of random DNA segments with single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. Despite the fact that the RAPD technique has become a very powerful tool and has found use in numerous applications, yet, the nature of ...

  19. Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yue; Prashad, Shikha; Schoenbrun, Ilana; Clark, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that motor sequences can be learned quickly through online learning. Subsequently, the initial acquisition of a motor sequence is boosted or consolidated by offline learning. However, little is known whether offline learning can drive the fast learning of motor sequences (i.e., initial sequence learning in the first training session). To examine offline learning in the fast learning stage, we asked four groups of young adults to perform the serial reaction time (SRT) task with either a fixed or probabilistic sequence and with or without preliminary knowledge (PK) of the presence of a sequence. The sequence and PK were manipulated to emphasize either procedural (probabilistic sequence; no preliminary knowledge (NPK)) or declarative (fixed sequence; with PK) memory that were found to either facilitate or inhibit offline learning. In the SRT task, there were six learning blocks with a 2 min break between each consecutive block. Throughout the session, stimuli followed the same fixed or probabilistic pattern except in Block 5, in which stimuli appeared in a random order. We found that PK facilitated the learning of a fixed sequence, but not a probabilistic sequence. In addition to overall learning measured by the mean reaction time (RT), we examined the progressive changes in RT within and between blocks (i.e., online and offline learning, respectively). It was found that the two groups who performed the fixed sequence, regardless of PK, showed greater online learning than the other two groups who performed the probabilistic sequence. The groups who performed the probabilistic sequence, regardless of PK, did not display online learning, as indicated by a decline in performance within the learning blocks. However, they did demonstrate remarkably greater offline improvement in RT, which suggests that they are learning the probabilistic sequence offline. These results suggest that in the SRT task, the fast acquisition of a motor sequence is driven

  20. Detection of M-Sequences from Spike Sequence in Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshi Nishitani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In circuit theory, it is well known that a linear feedback shift register (LFSR circuit generates pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS, including an M-sequence with the maximum period of length. In this study, we tried to detect M-sequences known as a pseudorandom sequence generated by the LFSR circuit from time series patterns of stimulated action potentials. Stimulated action potentials were recorded from dissociated cultures of hippocampal neurons grown on a multielectrode array. We could find several M-sequences from a 3-stage LFSR circuit (M3. These results show the possibility of assembling LFSR circuits or its equivalent ones in a neuronal network. However, since the M3 pattern was composed of only four spike intervals, the possibility of an accidental detection was not zero. Then, we detected M-sequences from random spike sequences which were not generated from an LFSR circuit and compare the result with the number of M-sequences from the originally observed raster data. As a result, a significant difference was confirmed: a greater number of “0–1” reversed the 3-stage M-sequences occurred than would have accidentally be detected. This result suggests that some LFSR equivalent circuits are assembled in neuronal networks.

  1. Double sequence core theorems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Patterson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1900, Pringsheim gave a definition of the convergence of double sequences. In this paper, that notion is extended by presenting definitions for the limit inferior and limit superior of double sequences. Also the core of a double sequence is defined. By using these definitions and the notion of regularity for 4-dimensional matrices, extensions, and variations of the Knopp Core theorem are proved.

  2. Efficient probability sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Regnier, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A probability sequence is an ordered set of probability forecasts for the same event. Although single-period probabilistic forecasts and methods for evaluating them have been extensively analyzed, we are not aware of any prior work on evaluating probability sequences. This paper proposes an efficiency condition for probability sequences and shows properties of efficient forecasting systems, including memorylessness and increasing discrimination. These results suggest tests for efficiency and ...

  3. Efficient probability sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Regnier, Eva

    2014-01-01

    DRMI working paper A probability sequence is an ordered set of probability forecasts for the same event. Although single-period probabilistic forecasts and methods for evaluating them have been extensively analyzed, we are not aware of any prior work on evaluating probability sequences. This paper proposes an efficiency condition for probability sequences and shows properties of efficiency forecasting systems, including memorylessness and increasing discrimination. These res...

  4. Classification of periodic, chaotic and random sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-19

    Feb 19, 2015 ... 'Complexity' has several definitions in diverse fields. These measures are indicators of some aspects of ... Silpa S Nair1 Nithin Nagaraj1. Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Amrita School of Engineering, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Amritapuri Campus, Clappana 690 525, India ...

  5. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare these two methods, genetic parameters were computed such as the number of polymorphic bands, average number of alleles per locus, effective number of alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity, effectiveness index of analysis and polymorphism information content (PIC). Better results were provided by ...

  6. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... of polymorphic bands, average number of alleles per locus, effective .... Materials for DNA isolation were obtained from a set of 5 to 7 plants ..... Among factors that might have contributed to ... Inheritance of RAPDs in F1 hybrids of corn. ... by using cluster analysis of RAPD molecular marker, phenotype and.

  7. Long-range correlations and charge transport properties of DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-liang; Ren, Yi; Xie, Qiong-tao; Deng, Chao-sheng; Xu, Hui

    2010-04-01

    By using Hurst's analysis and transfer approach, the rescaled range functions and Hurst exponents of human chromosome 22 and enterobacteria phage lambda DNA sequences are investigated and the transmission coefficients, Landauer resistances and Lyapunov coefficients of finite segments based on above genomic DNA sequences are calculated. In a comparison with quasiperiodic and random artificial DNA sequences, we find that λ-DNA exhibits anticorrelation behavior characterized by a Hurst exponent 0.5sequence displays a transition from correlation behavior to anticorrelation behavior. The resonant peaks of the transmission coefficient in genomic sequences can survive in longer sequence length than in random sequences but in shorter sequence length than in quasiperiodic sequences. It is shown that the genomic sequences have long-range correlation properties to some extent but the correlations are not strong enough to maintain the scale invariance properties.

  8. Long-range correlations and charge transport properties of DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoliang, E-mail: xlliucsu@yahoo.com.c [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Ren, Yi [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xie, Qiong-tao [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education (Hunan Normal University), Changsha 410081 (China); Deng, Chao-sheng; Xu, Hui [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2010-04-26

    By using Hurst's analysis and transfer approach, the rescaled range functions and Hurst exponents of human chromosome 22 and enterobacteria phage lambda DNA sequences are investigated and the transmission coefficients, Landauer resistances and Lyapunov coefficients of finite segments based on above genomic DNA sequences are calculated. In a comparison with quasiperiodic and random artificial DNA sequences, we find that lambda-DNA exhibits anticorrelation behavior characterized by a Hurst exponent 0.5sequence displays a transition from correlation behavior to anticorrelation behavior. The resonant peaks of the transmission coefficient in genomic sequences can survive in longer sequence length than in random sequences but in shorter sequence length than in quasiperiodic sequences. It is shown that the genomic sequences have long-range correlation properties to some extent but the correlations are not strong enough to maintain the scale invariance properties.

  9. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  10. The resistance of randomly grown trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, E. R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    An electrical network with the structure of a random tree is considered: starting from a root vertex, in one iteration each leaf (a vertex with zero or one adjacent edges) of the tree is extended by either a single edge with probability p or two edges with probability 1 - p. With each edge having a resistance equal to 1Ω, the total resistance Rn between the root vertex and a busbar connecting all the vertices at the nth level is considered. A dynamical system is presented which approximates Rn, it is shown that the mean value for this system approaches (1 + p)/(1 - p) as n → ∞, the distribution of Rn at large n is also examined. Additionally, a random sequence construction akin to a random Fibonacci sequence is used to approximate Rn; this sequence is shown to be related to the Legendre polynomials and its mean is shown to converge with | - (1 + p)/(1 - p)| ˜ n-1/2.

  11. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  12. Coverage statistics for sequence census methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Steven N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study the statistical properties of fragment coverage in genome sequencing experiments. In an extension of the classic Lander-Waterman model, we consider the effect of the length distribution of fragments. We also introduce a coding of the shape of the coverage depth function as a tree and explain how this can be used to detect regions with anomalous coverage. This modeling perspective is especially germane to current high-throughput sequencing experiments, where both sample preparation protocols and sequencing technology particulars can affect fragment length distributions. Results Under the mild assumptions that fragment start sites are Poisson distributed and successive fragment lengths are independent and identically distributed, we observe that, regardless of fragment length distribution, the fragments produced in a sequencing experiment can be viewed as resulting from a two-dimensional spatial Poisson process. We then study the successive jumps of the coverage function, and show that they can be encoded as a random tree that is approximately a Galton-Watson tree with generation-dependent geometric offspring distributions whose parameters can be computed. Conclusions We extend standard analyses of shotgun sequencing that focus on coverage statistics at individual sites, and provide a null model for detecting deviations from random coverage in high-throughput sequence census based experiments. Our approach leads to explicit determinations of the null distributions of certain test statistics, while for others it greatly simplifies the approximation of their null distributions by simulation. Our focus on fragments also leads to a new approach to visualizing sequencing data that is of independent interest.

  13. Pierre Robin sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Robin sequence (or syndrome) is a condition in which an infant has a smaller than normal lower jaw, a tongue ... The exact causes of Pierre Robin sequence are unknown. It may be ... jaw develops slowly before birth, but may grow faster during ...

  14. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  15. sequences in Chickpea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Milena

    Author(s) retain the copyright of this article http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB. African Journal of Biotechnology. Full Length Research Paper. Evaluation of genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationship using sequence-tagged microsatellite. (STMS) sequences in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Himanshu ...

  16. Sequences, Series, and Mathematica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the computer algebra system Mathematica can be used to enhance the teaching of the topics of sequences and series. Examines its capabilities to find exact, approximate, and graphically generated approximate solutions to problems from these topics and to understand proofs about sequences. (MDH)

  17. Random fixed points and random differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos S. Papageorgiou

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we study random best approximations to random sets, using fixed point techniques, obtaining this way stochastic analogues of earlier deterministic results by Browder-Petryshyn, KyFan and Reich. Then we prove two fixed point theorems for random multifunctions with stochastic domain that satisfy certain tangential conditions. Finally we consider a random differential inclusion with upper semicontinuous orientor field and establish the existence of random solutions.

  18. Nanotechnology and Nanopore Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing is one of the crucially important tasks in the fields of genetics and cellular biology, which is benefiting from nanotechnology. DNA carries genetic information and sequencing it in a quick way helps researchers in achieving essential goals, including personalized medicine. Solid state nanopores potentially can offer more durability, in sequencing biomolecules, over the proteinbased nanopores. In recent years, various ideas are introduced towards the goal of fast and low cost sequencing. In this review article recent advances presented in journal articles as well as patents in this field, including sequencing methods, membrane materials and their fabrication techniques, drilling methods, and biomolecule translocation speed control ideas are investigated. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Compressive Sensing with Tent Chaotic Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing is a new sampling theory to capture signals at sub-Nyquist rate. To guarantee exact recovery from sparse measurements, specific sensing matrix, which satisfies the Restricted Isometry Property, should be well chosen. Random matrix has been proved to meet the property with high probability; however, the practical implementation is expensive in hardware design. Chaotic matrices which generated by Logistic sequence, Chua and Lorenz dynamical systems have been verified to be Toeplitz-structured and sufficient to satisfy the property. In this paper, we propose that another chaotic sequence - Tent map can also be used to construct the sensing matrix. By numerical performance, we show that, the proposed Tent chaotic sensing matrix has similar performance to random matrix or Logistic chaotic matrix for exact reconstructing compressible signals and images from fewer measurements.

  20. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Law of iterated logarithm for NA sequences with non-identical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are many results about law of iterated logarithm for independent random variables sequences. ... As for negatively associated (NA) random variables, Joag [2] gave the following defi- nition. DEFINITION [2] ... Recently, some authors focused on the problem of limiting behavior of partial sums of. NA sequences. Su et al ...

  2. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas Kenneth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Cristian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  3. Evolution of DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-03-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted in it. Detection of terminated sequences was done radiographically on Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Improvements that have evolved over time in original Sanger sequencing include replacement of radiography with fluorescence, use of separate fluorescent markers for each nucleotide, use of capillary electrophoresis instead of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then introduction of capillary array electrophoresis. However, this technique suffered from few inherent limitations like decreased sensitivity for low level mutant alleles, complexities in analyzing highly polymorphic regions like Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and high DNA concentrations required. Several Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have been introduced by Roche, Illumina and other commercial manufacturers that tend to overcome Sanger sequencing limitations and have been reviewed. Introduction of NGS in clinical research and medical diagnostics is expected to change entire diagnostic approach. These include study of cancer variants, detection of minimal residual disease, exome sequencing, detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and their disease association, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and sequencing of microorganisms genome.

  4. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... to contain 1.0% of purine tracts and also 1.0% of the alternating pyr/pur tracts. In the vast majority of cases, there are more purine tracts than would be expected from a random sequence, with an average of 3.5%, significantly larger than the expectation value. The fraction of the chromosomes containing pyr......, in eukaryotes there is an abundance of long stretches of purines or alternating purine/pyrimidine tracts, which cannot be explained in this way; these sequences are likely to play an important role in eukaryotic chromosome organisation....

  5. Sublinear Time Motif Discovery from Multiple Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Fu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a natural probabilistic model for motif discovery has been used to experimentally test the quality of motif discovery programs. In this model, there are k background sequences, and each character in a background sequence is a random character from an alphabet, Σ. A motif G = g1g2 ... gm is a string of m characters. In each background sequence is implanted a probabilistically-generated approximate copy of G. For a probabilistically-generated approximate copy b1b2 ... bm of G, every character, bi, is probabilistically generated, such that the probability for bi ≠ gi is at most α. We develop two new randomized algorithms and one new deterministic algorithm. They make advancements in the following aspects: (1 The algorithms are much faster than those before. Our algorithms can even run in sublinear time. (2 They can handle any motif pattern. (3 The restriction for the alphabet size is a lower bound of four. This gives them potential applications in practical problems, since gene sequences have an alphabet size of four. (4 All algorithms have rigorous proofs about their performances. The methods developed in this paper have been used in the software implementation. We observed some encouraging results that show improved performance for motif detection compared with other software.

  6. Delayed Sequence Intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weingart, Scott D; Trueger, N Seth; Wong, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    , patients were paralyzed and intubated. The primary outcome of this study was the difference in oxygen saturations after maximal attempts at preoxygenation before delayed sequence intubation compared with saturations just before intubation. Predetermined secondary outcomes and complications were also...... assessed. RESULTS: A total of 62 patients were enrolled: 19 patients required delayed sequence intubation to allow nonrebreather mask, 39 patients required it to allow NIPPV, and 4 patients required it for nasogastric tube placement. Saturations increased from a mean of 89.9% before delayed sequence...... intubation to 98.8% afterward, with an increase of 8.9% (95% confidence interval 6.4% to 10.9%). Thirty-two patients were in a predetermined group with high potential for critical desaturation (pre-delayed sequence intubation saturations ≤93%). All of these patients increased their saturations post...

  7. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  8. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Christian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  9. What's Decidable About Sequences?

    OpenAIRE

    Furia, Carlo A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a first-order theory of sequences with integer elements, Presburger arithmetic, and regular constraints, which can model significant properties of data structures such as arrays and lists. We give a decision procedure for the quantifier-free fragment, based on an encoding into the first-order theory of concatenation; the procedure has PSPACE complexity. The quantifier-free fragment of the theory of sequences can express properties such as sortedness and injectivity, as well as Bool...

  10. EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Ville, Dimitri; Britz, Juliane; Michel, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings identified electroencephalography (EEG) microstates as the electrophysiological correlates of fMRI resting-state networks. Microstates are defined as short periods (100 ms) during which the EEG scalp topography remains quasi-stable; that is, the global topography is fixed but strength might vary and polarity invert. Microstates represent the subsecond coherent activation within global functional brain networks. Surprisingly, these rapidly changing EEG microstates correlate significantly with activity in fMRI resting-state networks after convolution with the hemodynamic response function that constitutes a strong temporal smoothing filter. We postulate here that microstate sequences should reveal scale-free, self-similar dynamics to explain this remarkable effect and thus that microstate time series show dependencies over long time ranges. To that aim, we deploy wavelet-based fractal analysis that allows determining scale-free behavior. We find strong statistical evidence that microstate sequences are scale free over six dyadic scales covering the 256-ms to 16-s range. The degree of long-range dependency is maintained when shuffling the local microstate labels but becomes indistinguishable from white noise when equalizing microstate durations, which indicates that temporal dynamics are their key characteristic. These results advance the understanding of temporal dynamics of brain-scale neuronal network models such as the global workspace model. Whereas microstates can be considered the “atoms of thoughts,” the shortest constituting elements of cognition, they carry a dynamic signature that is reminiscent at characteristic timescales up to multiple seconds. The scale-free dynamics of the microstates might be the basis for the rapid reorganization and adaptation of the functional networks of the brain. PMID:20921381

  11. Sequence Classification: 889154 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud23p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319895 ...

  12. Sequence Classification: 891457 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud32p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6321701 ...

  13. Sequence Classification: 892481 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud20p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323103 ...

  14. Sequence Classification: 891700 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud25p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/13112038 ...

  15. Sequence Classification: 889164 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud31p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319908 ...

  16. Conversion of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conversion of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker UBC#116 linked to Fusarium crown and root rot resistance gene (Frl) into a co-dominant sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for marker-assisted selection of tomato.

  17. Motor sequence chunking is impaired by basal ganglia stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, L A; Edwards, J D; Siengsukon, C S; Vidoni, E D; Wessel, B D; Linsdell, M A

    2009-07-01

    Our main aim was to determine whether individuals with stroke that affected the basal ganglia, organized movement sequences into chunks in the same fashion as neurologically intact individuals. To address this question, we compared motor response times during the performance of repeated sequences that were learned, and thus may be planned in advance, with random sequences where there is minimal if any advance preparation or organization of responses. The pattern of responses illustrated that, after basal ganglia stroke, individuals do not chunk elements of the repeated sequence into functional sub-sequences of movement to the same extent as neurologically intact age-matched people. Limited chunking of learned movements after stroke may explain past findings that show overall slower responses even when sequences of action are learned by this population. Further, our data in combination with other work, suggest that chunking may be a function of the basal ganglia.

  18. Blind sequence-length estimation of low-SNR cyclostationary sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vlok, JD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available system is a BPSK DSSS system, both c and d are sequences with values ±1. The noise sequence is assumed to be a realisation of a standard normal random variable (RV) represented by w ∼ N (0, 1) which contains independent and identically distributed (i... receiver must be equipped with powerful tech- niques to detect the signals and estimate their parameter values at very low SNR levels. The BER that can be tolerated in a system depends on the application; it has been reported that in wireless multimedia...

  19. Adaptive Processing for Sequence Alignment

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for adaptive processing for sequence alignment. In one embodiment, among others, a method includes obtaining a query sequence and a plurality of database sequences. A first portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a central processing unit (CPU) and a second portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a graphical processing unit (GPU) based upon a predetermined splitting ratio associated with the plurality of database sequences, where the database sequences of the first portion are shorter than the database sequences of the second portion. A first alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the CPU based upon the first portion of the plurality of database sequences and a second alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the GPU based upon the second portion of the plurality of database sequences.

  20. Improving randomness characterization through Bayesian model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Hernández Rojas, Rafael; Solís, Aldo; Angulo Martínez, Alí M; U'Ren, Alfred B; Hirsch, Jorge G; Marsili, Matteo; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2017-06-08

    Random number generation plays an essential role in technology with important applications in areas ranging from cryptography to Monte Carlo methods, and other probabilistic algorithms. All such applications require high-quality sources of random numbers, yet effective methods for assessing whether a source produce truly random sequences are still missing. Current methods either do not rely on a formal description of randomness (NIST test suite) on the one hand, or are inapplicable in principle (the characterization derived from the Algorithmic Theory of Information), on the other, for they require testing all the possible computer programs that could produce the sequence to be analysed. Here we present a rigorous method that overcomes these problems based on Bayesian model selection. We derive analytic expressions for a model's likelihood which is then used to compute its posterior distribution. Our method proves to be more rigorous than NIST's suite and Borel-Normality criterion and its implementation is straightforward. We applied our method to an experimental device based on the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion to confirm it behaves as a genuine quantum random number generator. As our approach relies on Bayesian inference our scheme transcends individual sequence analysis, leading to a characterization of the source itself.

  1. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  2. Sequence determinants in human polyadenylation site selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautheret Daniel

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism in higher eukaryotes producing mRNAs with different 3' ends in different contexts. This involves several alternative polyadenylation sites in the 3' UTR, each with its specific strength. Here, we analyze the vicinity of human polyadenylation signals in search of patterns that would help discriminate strong and weak polyadenylation sites, or true sites from randomly occurring signals. Results We used human genomic sequences to retrieve the region downstream of polyadenylation signals, usually absent from cDNA or mRNA databases. Analyzing 4956 EST-validated polyadenylation sites and their -300/+300 nt flanking regions, we clearly visualized the upstream (USE and downstream (DSE sequence elements, both characterized by U-rich (not GU-rich segments. The presence of a USE and a DSE is the main feature distinguishing true polyadenylation sites from randomly occurring A(A/UUAAA hexamers. While USEs are indifferently associated with strong and weak poly(A sites, DSEs are more conspicuous near strong poly(A sites. We then used the region encompassing the hexamer and DSE as a training set for poly(A site identification by the ERPIN program and achieved a prediction specificity of 69 to 85% for a sensitivity of 56%. Conclusion The availability of complete genomes and large EST sequence databases now permit large-scale observation of polyadenylation sites. Both U-rich sequences flanking both sides of poly(A signals contribute to the definition of "true" sites. However, the downstream U-rich sequences may also play an enhancing role. Based on this information, poly(A site prediction accuracy was moderately but consistently improved compared to the best previously available algorithm.

  3. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    information obtained allows well for statistical analysis of the data. This general approach can be integrated into current laboratory practice and has numerous applications. Besides DNA-based predictions of blood group phenotypes, platelet phenotypes, or sickle cell anemia, and the determination of zygosity......, Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...

  4. Some limit theorems for negatively associated random variables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let {Xn,n ≥ 1} be a sequence of negatively associated random vari- ables. The aim of this paper is to establish some limit theorems of negatively associated sequence, which include the Lp-convergence theorem and Marcinkiewicz–Zygmund strong law of large numbers. Furthermore, we consider the strong law of ...

  5. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elsasser, Robert [UNIV OF PADERBORN; Friedrich, Tobias [ICSI/BERKELEY; Sauerwald, Tomas [ICSI/BERKELEY

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  6. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  7. Sequence Classification: 893720 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ial ribosomal protein of the large subunit; MRP51 exhibits genetic interactions with mutations in the COX2 and COX3 mRNA 5'-untransla...ted leader sequences; Mrp51p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6325139 ...

  8. Goldbach Partitions and Sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 11. Goldbach Partitions and Sequences. Subhash Kak. General Article Volume 19 Issue 11 November 2014 pp 1028-1037. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/11/1028-1037 ...

  9. The Compliment Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Anntarie L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes and examines 150 tape-recorded compliment sequences. Reports that the course and outcome of compliments and compliment responses are affected by: (1) the way a compliment is worded; (2) the type of statement that precedes or follows the compliment; and (3) the status and sex of the compliment participants. (RAE)

  10. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene...

  11. Cognitive processing in new and practiced discrete keying sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem B Verwey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the role of cognitive control in the initiation and execution of familiar and unfamiliar movement sequences. To become familiar with two movement sequences participants first practiced two discrete key press sequences by responding to two fixed series of 6 key specific stimuli. In the ensuing test phase they executed these two familiar and also two unfamiliar keying sequences while there was a two-third chance a tone was presented together with one randomly selected key specific stimulus in each sequence. In the counting condition of the test phase participants counted the low pitched (i.e., target tones. By and large the results support the dual processor model in which the prime role of the cognitive processor shifts from executing to initiating sequences while the gradual development of motor chunks allows a motor processor to execute the sequences. Yet, the results extend this simple model by suggesting that with little practice sequence execution is based also on some non-cognitive (perhaps associative learning mechanism and, for some participants, on the use of explicit sequence knowledge. Also, after extensive practice the cognitive processor appears to still contribute to slower responses. The occurrence of long interkey intervals was replicated suggesting that fixed 6-key sequences include several motor chunks. Yet, no indication was found that the cognitive processor is responsible for concatenating these chunks.

  12. Determination of the recognition sequence of Mycobacterium smegmatis topoisomerase I on mycobacterial genomic sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Sikder, Devanjan; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2000-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis topoisomerase I has several distinctive features. The absence of the zinc finger motif found in other prokaryotic type I topoisomerases and the ability of the enzyme to recognise single-stranded and duplex DNA are unique characteristics of the enzyme. We have mapped the strong topoisomerase sites of the enzyme on genomic DNA sequences from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M.smegmatis. The enzyme does not nick DNA in random fashion and DNA cleavage occurred at a few speci...

  13. The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Ariel D.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C.; Alonso, Claudio R.; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C. J.; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K.; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J.; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A.; Green, Jack E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Hunn, Julia P.; Hunnekuhl, Vera S.; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Tamsin E.; Kaiser, Tobias S.; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J.; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L.; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L.; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N.; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J.; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H.; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C.; Robertson, Helen E.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E.; Schurko, Andrew M.; Siggens, Kenneth W.; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J.; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M.; Willis, Judith H.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  14. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel D Chipman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations

  15. Ergodicity of Random Walks on Random DFA

    OpenAIRE

    Balle, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Given a DFA we consider the random walk that starts at the initial state and at each time step moves to a new state by taking a random transition from the current state. This paper shows that for typical DFA this random walk induces an ergodic Markov chain. The notion of typical DFA is formalized by showing that ergodicity holds with high probability when a DFA is sampled uniformly at random from the set of all automata with a fixed number of states. We also show the same result applies to DF...

  16. Sequence Classification: 894257 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mutant that displays a random budding pattern; Bud21p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324652 ... ...mall ribosomal subunit (SSU) processosome that contains U3 snoRNA; originally isolated as bud-site selection

  17. Sequence Classification: 890642 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud14p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/41629669 ... ...in bud-site selection, Bud14p-Glc7p complex functions as a cortical regulator of dynein; diploid mutants display a random budding pat

  18. Sequence Classification: 893197 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB >gi|6324354|ref|NP_014424.1| Protein involved in bud-site select...ion; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type bipolar pattern; Bud17p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324354 ...

  19. Sequence Classification: 891658 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n involved in bud-site selection; diploid mutants display a random budding pattern instead of the wild-type ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6320806|ref|NP_010885.1| Protei

  20. Random fractional Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2007-08-01

    We propose a novel random fractional Fourier transform by randomizing the transform kernel function of the conventional fractional Fourier transform. The random fractional Fourier transform inherits the excellent mathematical properties from the fractional Fourier transform and can be easily implemented in optics. As a primary application the random fractional Fourier transform can be directly used in optical image encryption and decryption. The double phase encoding image encryption schemes can thus be modeled with cascaded random fractional Fourier transformers.

  1. Targeted sequencing of plant genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Huynh

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the field of genetics by providing a means for fast and relatively affordable sequencing. With the advancement of NGS, wholegenome sequencing (WGS) has become more commonplace. However, sequencing an entire genome is still not cost effective or even beneficial in all cases. In studies that do not require a whole-...

  2. Scaling behaviors of CG clusters in coding and noncoding DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Linxi [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)]. E-mail: lxzhang@hzcnc.com; Chen Jin [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)

    2005-04-01

    In this paper the statistical properties of CG clusters in coding and non-coding DNA sequences are investigated through calculating the cluster-size distribution of CG clusters P(S) and the breadth of the distribution of the root-mean-square size of CG clusters {sigma}{sub m} in consecutive, non-overlapping blocks of m bases. There do exist some differences between coding and non-coding sequences. The cluster-size distribution of CG clusters P(S) for both coding and noncoding sequences follows an exponential decay of P(S){proportional_to}e{sup -{alpha}}{sup S}, and the value of {alpha} depends on the percentage of C-G content for coding sequences. It can fit into a linear line regularly but the case is contrary for noncoding sequences. We find that {xi}(m)={sigma}mm of CG clusters all obeys the good power-law decay of {xi}(m){proportional_to}m{sup -{gamma}} in both coding and non-coding sequences, and the value of {gamma} is 0.949+/-0.014 and 0.826+/-0.011 for coding and noncoding sequences, respectively. Therefore, we can distinguish between coding and non-coding sequences on the basis of the value of {gamma}. At the meantime, we also discuss the power-law of {xi}(m){proportional_to}m{sup -{gamma}} for random sequence, and find that the value of {gamma} for random sequence is very close to 1.00. So we can know that the value of {gamma} for coding sequences is more close to the random sequence, and obtain the conclusion that the behavior of coding sequence trends to random sequence more similarly. This investigation can provide some insights into DNA sequences.

  3. Sequence-Dependent Persistence Lengths of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Glowacki, Jaroslaw; Grandchamp, Alexandre E; Manning, Robert S; Maddocks, John H

    2017-04-11

    A Monte Carlo code applied to the cgDNA coarse-grain rigid-base model of B-form double-stranded DNA is used to predict a sequence-averaged persistence length of l F = 53.5 nm in the sense of Flory, and of l p = 160 bp or 53.5 nm in the sense of apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay. These estimates are slightly higher than the consensus experimental values of 150 bp or 50 nm, but we believe the agreement to be good given that the cgDNA model is itself parametrized from molecular dynamics simulations of short fragments of length 10-20 bp, with no explicit fit to persistence length. Our Monte Carlo simulations further predict that there can be substantial dependence of persistence lengths on the specific sequence [Formula: see text] of a fragment. We propose, and confirm the numerical accuracy of, a simple factorization that separates the part of the apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay [Formula: see text] attributable to intrinsic shape, from a part [Formula: see text] attributable purely to stiffness, i.e., a sequence-dependent version of what has been called sequence-averaged dynamic persistence length l̅ d (=58.8 nm within the cgDNA model). For ensembles of both random and λ-phage fragments, the apparent persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of 4 nm over sequence, whereas our dynamic persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of only 1 nm. However, there are notable dynamic persistence length outliers, including poly(A) (exceptionally straight and stiff), poly(TA) (tightly coiled and exceptionally soft), and phased A-tract sequence motifs (exceptionally bent and stiff). The results of our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with both molecular dynamics simulation and diverse experimental data including minicircle cyclization rates and stereo cryo-electron microscopy images.

  4. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 4. Random Walks in a Random Environment. S R S Varadhan. Invited Articles Volume 114 Issue ... Author Affiliations. S R S Varadhan1. Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012, USA ...

  5. New Design of Crypto-Based Pseudo random number generator (CBPRNG) using BLOW FISH cipher

    OpenAIRE

    T.Chalama Reddy; Dr.R.Seshadri

    2013-01-01

    Random Number Generators (RNGs) are an important building block for algorithms and protocols in cryptography. Random number generation is used in a wide variety of cryptographic operations, such as key generation and challenge/response protocols. A random number generator outputs a sequence of 0s and 1s such that at any position, the next bit cannot be expected on the previous bits. However, true random number produces non- deterministic output since if the same random generator is run twice,...

  6. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...

  7. Moebius syndrome (moebius sequence)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Desai; Bansal, Sandeep

    1999-01-01

    Moebius Syndrome is one of the rare disorder amongst the oromandibular limb hypogenesis. It is of a unknown atiology with sporadic occurrence in which there is congenital bilateral facial palsy,-bilateral involvement of abducent nerve along with other cranial nerves like III, V, IX, X, Xllth and the patient having masklike expressionless face. We are reporting a case of Moebius Sequence who presented to us in the department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Baroda.

  8. Moebius syndrome (moebius sequence).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, A A; Bansal, S

    1999-10-01

    Moebius Syndrome is one of the rare disorder amongst the oromandibular limb hypogenesis. It is of a unknown atiology with sporadic occurrence in which there is congenital bilateral facial palsy,-bilateral involvement of abducent nerve along with other cranial nerves like III, V, IX, X, Xllth and the patient having masklike expressionless face. We are reporting a case of Moebius Sequence who presented to us in the department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Baroda.

  9. Random walks on random Koch curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, S; Hoffmann, K H [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Essex, C [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2009-06-05

    Diffusion processes in porous materials are often modeled as random walks on fractals. In order to capture the randomness of the materials random fractals are employed, which no longer show the deterministic self-similarity of regular fractals. Finding a continuum differential equation describing the diffusion on such fractals has been a long-standing goal, and we address the question of whether the concepts developed for regular fractals are still applicable. We use the random Koch curve as a convenient example as it provides certain technical advantages by its separation of time and space features. While some of the concepts developed for regular fractals can be used unaltered, others have to be modified. Based on the concept of fibers, we introduce ensemble-averaged density functions which produce a differentiable estimate of probability explicitly and compare it to random walk data.

  10. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Jena (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  11. Interpolation of missing data in image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaram, A C; Morris, R D; Fitzgerald, W J; Rayner, P W

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a number of model based interpolation schemes tailored to the problem of interpolating missing regions in image sequences. These missing regions may be of arbitrary size and of random, but known, location. This problem occurs regularly with archived film material. The film is abraded or obscured in patches, giving rise to bright and dark flashes, known as "dirt and sparkle" in the motion picture industry. Both 3-D autoregressive models and 3-D Markov random fields are considered in the formulation of the different reconstruction processes. The models act along motion directions estimated using a multiresolution block matching scheme. It is possible to address this sort of impulsive noise suppression problem with median filters, and comparisons with earlier work using multilevel median filters are performed. These comparisons demonstrate the higher reconstruction fidelity of the new interpolators.

  12. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gukov, Sergei [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik,Vivatsgasse 7, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Nawata, Satoshi [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, University of Aarhus,Nordre Ringgade 1, DK-8000 (Denmark); Saberi, Ingmar [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stošić, Marko [CAMGSD, Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Mathematical Institute SANU,Knez Mihajlova 36, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sułkowski, Piotr [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-03-02

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel “sliding” property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  13. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  14. Influence of different copolymer sequences in low band gap polymers on their performance in organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Alexander; Krueger, Hartmut; Ecker, Bernhard; Tunc, Ali Veysel; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Morana, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    The chemical design of a polymer can be tailored by a random or a block sequence of the comonomers in order to influence the properties of the final material. In this work, two sequences, PCPDTBT and F8BT (F8), were polymerized to form a block or a random copolymer. Differences between the various

  15. Re-annotation of the physical map of Glycine max for polyploid-like regions by BAC end sequence driven whole genome shotgun read assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shultz Jeffry

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the world's most important food crops have either polyploid genomes or homeologous regions derived from segmental shuffling following polyploid formation. The soybean (Glycine max genome has been shown to be composed of approximately four thousand short interspersed homeologous regions with 1, 2 or 4 copies per haploid genome by RFLP analysis, microsatellite anchors to BACs and by contigs formed from BAC fingerprints. Despite these similar regions,, the genome has been sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS. Here the aim was to use BAC end sequences (BES derived from three minimum tile paths (MTP to examine the extent and homogeneity of polyploid-like regions within contigs and the extent of correlation between the polyploid-like regions inferred from fingerprinting and the polyploid-like sequences inferred from WGS matches. Results Results show that when sequence divergence was 1–10%, the copy number of homeologous regions could be identified from sequence variation in WGS reads overlapping BES. Homeolog sequence variants (HSVs were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 89% and single nucleotide indels (SNIs 10%. Larger indels were rare but present (1%. Simulations that had predicted fingerprints of homeologous regions could be separated when divergence exceeded 2% were shown to be false. We show that a 5–10% sequence divergence is necessary to separate homeologs by fingerprinting. BES compared to WGS traces showed polyploid-like regions with less than 1% sequence divergence exist at 2.3% of the locations assayed. Conclusion The use of HSVs like SNPs and SNIs to characterize BACs wil improve contig building methods. The implications for bioinformatic and functional annotation of polyploid and paleopolyploid genomes show that a combined approach of BAC fingerprint based physical maps, WGS sequence and HSV-based partitioning of BAC clones from homeologous regions to separate contigs will allow reliable de

  16. Whistle sequences in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Ford, John K B; Thomsen, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Combining different stereotyped vocal signals into specific sequences increases the range of information that can be transferred between individuals. The temporal emission pattern and the behavioral context of vocal sequences have been described in detail for a variety of birds and mammals. Yet, in cetaceans, the study of vocal sequences is just in its infancy. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of sequences of stereotyped whistles in killer whales off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A total of 1140 whistle transitions in 192 whistle sequences recorded from resident killer whales were analyzed using common spectrographic analysis techniques. In addition to the stereotyped whistles described by Riesch et al., [(2006). "Stability and group specificity of stereotyped whistles in resident killer whales, Orcinus orca, off British Columbia," Anim. Behav. 71, 79-91.] We found a new and rare stereotyped whistle (W7) as well as two whistle elements, which are closely linked to whistle sequences: (1) stammers and (2) bridge elements. Furthermore, the frequency of occurrence of 12 different stereotyped whistle types within the sequences was not randomly distributed and the transition patterns between whistles were also nonrandom. Finally, whistle sequences were closely tied to close-range behavioral interactions (in particular among males). Hence, we conclude that whistle sequences in wild killer whales are complex signal series and propose that they are most likely emitted by single individuals.

  17. Sequence signatures of nucleosome positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifu; Wang, Lei; Yang, Meng; Liu, Jiucheng; Xin, Chengqi; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Our recent investigation in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis suggested a DNA sequence periodicity with a unit length of 120.9 nt, which represents a sequence signature for nucleosome positioning. We now extended our observation in higher eukaryotes and identified a similar periodicity of 175 nt in length in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the process of defining the sequence compositional characteristics, we found that the 10.5-nt periodicity, the sequence signature of DNA double helix, may not be sufficient for cross-nucleosome positioning but provides essential guiding rails to facilitate positioning. We further dissected nucleosome-protected sequences and identified a strong positive purine (AG) gradient from the 5'-end to the 3'-end, and also learnt that the nucleosome-enriched regions are GC-rich as compared to the nucleosome-free sequences as purine content is positively correlated with GC content. Sequence characterization allowed us to develop a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm for decoding nucleosome positioning computationally, and based on a set of training data from the fifth chromosome of C. elegans, our algorithm predicted 60%-70% of the well-positioned nucleosomes, which is 15%-20% higher than random positioning. We concluded that nucleosomes are not randomly positioned on DNA sequences and yet bind to different genome regions with variable stability, well-positioned nucleosomes leave sequence signatures on DNA, and statistical positioning of nucleosomes across genome can be decoded computationally based on these sequence signatures. Copyright 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plant DNA sequencing for phylogenetic analyses: from plants to sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Susana S; Forrest, Laura L

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are important sources of data for phylogenetic analysis. Nowadays, DNA sequencing is a routine technique in molecular biology laboratories. However, there are specific questions associated with project design and sequencing of plant samples for phylogenetic analysis, which may not be familiar to researchers starting in the field. This chapter gives an overview of methods and protocols involved in the sequencing of plant samples, including general recommendations on the selection of species/taxa and DNA regions to be sequenced, and field collection of plant samples. Protocols of plant sample preparation, DNA extraction, PCR and cloning, which are critical to the success of molecular phylogenetic projects, are described in detail. Common problems of sequencing (using the Sanger method) are also addressed. Possible applications of second-generation sequencing techniques in plant phylogenetics are briefly discussed. Finally, orientation on the preparation of sequence data for phylogenetic analyses and submission to public databases is also given.

  19. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    restriction fragment length polymorphism; RAPD, random amplified polymorphic DNA; An. step, Anopheles stephensi; An. quad,. Anopheles ... interesting feature of the sequences was a stretch of Ts that distinguished between Aedes and Culex on the one hand, and ... genome structure and complexity of mosquito species.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of inter-simple sequence repeat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iisr

    2013-10-10

    Oct 10, 2013 ... whereas RAPD markers showed segregation based on geographical location as well as species based. Key words: Garcinia, genetic diversity, inter-simple sequence repeats, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, principal component analysis. INTRODUCTION. Garcinia is a large genus with 240 species ...

  1. Flanking region sequence information to refine microRNA target ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    block of four bases or more could be required by the target sites to find suitable interactions with the targeting ... end, and (ii) randomized target UTRs retaining the same nucleotide composition, in order to avoid any ... analysis were the complete target region of 70-base flanking sequences around the microRNA target site.

  2. Psychoacoustic Properties of Fibonacci Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sokoll

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 1202, Fibonacci set up one of the most interesting sequences in number theory. This sequence can be represented by so-called Fibonacci Numbers, and by a binary sequence of zeros and ones. If such a binary Fibonacci Sequence is played back as an audio file, a very dissonant sound results. This is caused by the “almost-periodic”, “self-similar” property of the binary sequence. The ratio of zeros and ones converges to the golden ratio, as do the primary and secondary spectral components intheir frequencies and amplitudes. These Fibonacci Sequences will be characterized using listening tests and psychoacoustic analyses. 

  3. Randomized Prediction Games for Adversarial Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota Bulo, Samuel; Biggio, Battista; Pillai, Ignazio; Pelillo, Marcello; Roli, Fabio

    In spam and malware detection, attackers exploit randomization to obfuscate malicious data and increase their chances of evading detection at test time, e.g., malware code is typically obfuscated using random strings or byte sequences to hide known exploits. Interestingly, randomization has also been proposed to improve security of learning algorithms against evasion attacks, as it results in hiding information about the classifier to the attacker. Recent work has proposed game-theoretical formulations to learn secure classifiers, by simulating different evasion attacks and modifying the classification function accordingly. However, both the classification function and the simulated data manipulations have been modeled in a deterministic manner, without accounting for any form of randomization. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by proposing a randomized prediction game, namely, a noncooperative game-theoretic formulation in which the classifier and the attacker make randomized strategy selections according to some probability distribution defined over the respective strategy set. We show that our approach allows one to improve the tradeoff between attack detection and false alarms with respect to the state-of-the-art secure classifiers, even against attacks that are different from those hypothesized during design, on application examples including handwritten digit recognition, spam, and malware detection.In spam and malware detection, attackers exploit randomization to obfuscate malicious data and increase their chances of evading detection at test time, e.g., malware code is typically obfuscated using random strings or byte sequences to hide known exploits. Interestingly, randomization has also been proposed to improve security of learning algorithms against evasion attacks, as it results in hiding information about the classifier to the attacker. Recent work has proposed game-theoretical formulations to learn secure classifiers, by simulating different

  4. ERP Indices of Stimulus Prediction in Letter Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Kaan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the current focus on anticipation in perception, action and cognition, including language processing, there is a need for a method to tap into predictive processing in situations in which cue and feedback stimuli are not explicitly marked as such. To this aim, event related potentials (ERPs were obtained while participants viewed alphabetic letter sequences (“A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “E”, …, in which the letters were highly predictable, and random sequences (“S”, “B”, “A”, “I”, “F”, “M”, …, without feedback. Occasionally, the presentation of a letter in a sequence was delayed by 300 ms. During this delay period, an increased negativity was observed for predictive versus random sequences. In addition, the early positivity following the delay was larger for predictive compared with random sequences. These results suggest that expectation-sensitive ERP modulations can be elicited in anticipation of stimuli that are not explicit targets, rewards, feedback or instructions, and that a delay can strengthen the prediction for a particular stimulus. Applications to language processing will be discussed.

  5. Novel expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using different bioinformatic criteria, the SUCEST database was used to mine for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Among 42,189 clusters, 1,425 expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in silico. Trinucleotide repeats were the most abundant SSRs detected. Of 212 primer pairs ...

  6. Explicit motor sequence learning with the paretic arm after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Melanie K; Newham, Di J; Rothwell, John C

    2018-02-01

    Motor sequence learning is important for stroke recovery, but experimental tasks require dexterous movements, which are impossible for people with upper limb impairment. This makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the impact of stroke on learning motor sequences. We aimed to test a paradigm requiring gross arm movements to determine whether stroke survivors with upper limb impairment were capable of learning a movement sequence as effectively as age-matched controls. In this case-control study, 12 stroke survivors (10-138 months post-stroke, mean age 64 years) attempted the task once using their affected arm. Ten healthy controls (mean 66 years) used their non-dominant arm. A sequence of 10 movements was repeated 25 times. The variables were: time from target illumination until the cursor left the central square (onset time; OT), accuracy (path length), and movement speed. OT reduced with training (p  0.1). We quantified learning as the OT difference between the end of training and a random sequence; this was smaller for stroke survivors than controls (p = 0.015). Stroke survivors can learn a movement sequence with their paretic arm, but demonstrate impairments in sequence specific learning. Implications for Rehabilitation Motor sequence learning is important for recovery of movement after stroke. Stroke survivors were found to be capable of learning a movement sequence with their paretic arm, supporting the concept of repetitive task training for recovery of movement. Stroke survivors showed impaired sequence specific learning in comparison with age-matched controls, indicating that they may need more repetitions of a sequence in order to re-learn movements. Further research is required into the effect of lesion location, time since stroke, hand dominance and gender on learning of motor sequences after stroke.

  7. Random matrices, random processes and integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This book explores the remarkable connections between two domains that, a priori, seem unrelated: Random matrices (together with associated random processes) and integrable systems. The relations between random matrix models and the theory of classical integrable systems have long been studied. These appear mainly in the deformation theory, when parameters characterizing the measures or the domain of localization of the eigenvalues are varied. The resulting differential equations determining the partition function and correlation functions are, remarkably, of the same type as certain equations appearing in the theory of integrable systems. They may be analyzed effectively through methods based upon the Riemann-Hilbert problem of analytic function theory and by related approaches to the study of nonlinear asymptotics in the large N limit. Associated with studies of matrix models are certain stochastic processes, the "Dyson processes", and their continuum diffusion limits, which govern the spectrum in random ma...

  8. Tuning of the sequence technique

    OpenAIRE

    Laude, Dominique; Baudrie, Véronique; Elghozi, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The sequence method was first described in cats, and applied in different species including humans. Up to now, there is no systematic study of the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) estimated by the sequence method to mice.

  9. Time-dependent ARMA modeling of genomic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Schonfeld, Dan; O'Neill, William

    2008-08-12

    in the nucleotide chain. Specifically, we define a quantitative measure of randomness to assess how far a process deviates from white noise. Our simulation results on various gene sequences show that both the coding and non-coding regions are non-random. However, coding sequences are "whiter" than non-coding sequences as attested by a higher index of randomness. We demonstrate that the proposed TD-ARMA model can be used to provide a stable time series tool for the analysis of non-stationary genomic sequences. The estimated time-varying coefficients are used to define an index of randomness, in order to assess the statistical correlations in coding and non-coding DNA sequences. It turns out that the statistical differences between coding and non-coding sequences are more subtle than previously thought using stationary analysis tools: Both coding and non-coding sequences exhibit statistical correlations, with the coding regions being "whiter" than the non-coding regions. These results corroborate the evolutionary periodogram analysis of genomic sequences and revoke the stationary analysis' conclusion that coding DNA behaves like random sequences.

  10. The complexity of sequences generated by the arc-fractal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoai Nguyen Huynh

    Full Text Available We study properties of the symbolic sequences extracted from the fractals generated by the arc-fractal system introduced earlier by Huynh and Chew. The sequences consist of only a few symbols yet possess several nontrivial properties. First using an operator approach, we show that the sequences are not periodic, even though they are constructed from very simple rules. Second by employing the ϵ-machine approach developed by Crutchfield and Young, we measure the complexity and randomness of the sequences and show that they are indeed complex, i.e. neither periodic nor random, with the value of complexity measure being significant as compared to the known example of logistic map at the edge of chaos. The complexity and randomness of the sequences are then discussed in relation with the properties of associated fractal objects, such as their fractal dimension, symmetry and orientations of the arcs.

  11. The Complexity of Sequences Generated by the Arc-Fractal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hoai Nguyen; Pradana, Andri; Chew, Lock Yue

    2015-01-01

    We study properties of the symbolic sequences extracted from the fractals generated by the arc-fractal system introduced earlier by Huynh and Chew. The sequences consist of only a few symbols yet possess several nontrivial properties. First using an operator approach, we show that the sequences are not periodic, even though they are constructed from very simple rules. Second by employing the ϵ-machine approach developed by Crutchfield and Young, we measure the complexity and randomness of the sequences and show that they are indeed complex, i.e. neither periodic nor random, with the value of complexity measure being significant as compared to the known example of logistic map at the edge of chaos. The complexity and randomness of the sequences are then discussed in relation with the properties of associated fractal objects, such as their fractal dimension, symmetry and orientations of the arcs. PMID:25700034

  12. Sequence Handling by Sequence Analysis Toolbox v1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, Christian Ravnsborg; Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    The fact that mass spectrometry have become a high-throughput method calls for bioinformatic tools for automated sequence handling and prediction. For efficient use of bioinformatic tools, it is important that these tools are integrated or interfaced with each other. The purpose of sequence...... analysis toolbox v1.0 was to have a general purpose sequence analyzing tool that can import sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing methods. The program includes algorithms for calculation or prediction of isoelectric point, hydropathicity index, transmembrane segments, and glycosylphosphatidyl...

  13. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  14. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fagerlund

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern

  15. Misuse of randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Kjaergard, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The quality of randomization of Chinese randomized trials on herbal medicines for hepatitis B was assessed. Search strategy and inclusion criteria were based on the published protocol. One hundred and seventy-six randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving 20,452 patients with chronic hepatitis B....../150) of the studies were imbalanced at the 0.05 level of probability for the two treatments and 13.3% (20/150) imbalanced at the 0.01 level in the randomization. It is suggested that there may exist misunderstanding of the concept and the misuse of randomization based on the review....

  16. Multiple sequence alignments of partially coding nucleic acid sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fried Claudia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High quality sequence alignments of RNA and DNA sequences are an important prerequisite for the comparative analysis of genomic sequence data. Nucleic acid sequences, however, exhibit a much larger sequence heterogeneity compared to their encoded protein sequences due to the redundancy of the genetic code. It is desirable, therefore, to make use of the amino acid sequence when aligning coding nucleic acid sequences. In many cases, however, only a part of the sequence of interest is translated. On the other hand, overlapping reading frames may encode multiple alternative proteins, possibly with intermittent non-coding parts. Examples are, in particular, RNA virus genomes. Results The standard scoring scheme for nucleic acid alignments can be extended to incorporate simultaneously information on translation products in one or more reading frames. Here we present a multiple alignment tool, codaln, that implements a combined nucleic acid plus amino acid scoring model for pairwise and progressive multiple alignments that allows arbitrary weighting for almost all scoring parameters. Resource requirements of codaln are comparable with those of standard tools such as ClustalW. Conclusion We demonstrate the applicability of codaln to various biologically relevant types of sequences (bacteriophage Levivirus and Vertebrate Hox clusters and show that the combination of nucleic acid and amino acid sequence information leads to improved alignments. These, in turn, increase the performance of analysis tools that depend strictly on good input alignments such as methods for detecting conserved RNA secondary structure elements.

  17. Sequence Factorial and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we introduce sequence factorial and use this to study generalized M-bonomial coefficients. For the sequence of natural numbers, the twin concepts of sequence factorial and generalized M-bonomial coefficients, respectively, extend the corresponding concepts of factorial of an integer and binomial coefficients. Some latent properties…

  18. The advantages of SMRT sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard J; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Schatz, Michael C

    2013-07-03

    Of the current next-generation sequencing technologies, SMRT sequencing is sometimes overlooked. However, attributes such as long reads, modified base detection and high accuracy make SMRT a useful technology and an ideal approach to the complete sequencing of small genomes.

  19. Blazar Sequence in Fermi Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper, we review the latest research results on the topic of blazar sequence. It seems that the blazar sequence is phenomenally ruled out, while the theoretical blazar sequence still holds. We point out that black hole mass is a dominated parameter accounting for high-power-high-synchrotron-peaked ...

  20. Allele Re-sequencing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Farrell, Jacqueline Danielle; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has made sequencing an affordable approach for detection of genetic variations associated with various traits. However, the cost of whole genome re-sequencing still remains too high to be feasible for many plant species with large and com...

  1. Region segmentation along image sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchal, L.; Aubry, P.

    1995-12-31

    A method to extract regions in sequence of images is proposed. Regions are not matched from one image to the following one. The result of a region segmentation is used as an initialization to segment the following and image to track the region along the sequence. The image sequence is exploited as a spatio-temporal event. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Children's discrimination of vowel sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Jeffry A.; Kluender, Keith R.; Evans, Julia

    2003-10-01

    Children's ability to discriminate sequences of steady-state vowels was investigated. Vowels (as in ``beet,'' ``bat,'' ``bought,'' and ``boot'') were synthesized at durations of 40, 80, 160, 320, 640, and 1280 ms. Four different vowel sequences were created by concatenating different orders of vowels for each duration, separated by 10-ms intervening silence. Thus, sequences differed in vowel order and duration (rate). Sequences were 12 s in duration, with amplitude ramped linearly over the first and last 2 s. Sequence pairs included both same (identical sequences) and different trials (sequences with vowels in different orders). Sequences with vowel of equal duration were presented on individual trials. Children aged 7;0 to 10;6 listened to pairs of sequences (with 100 ms between sequences) and responded whether sequences sounded the same or different. Results indicate that children are best able to discriminate sequences of intermediate-duration vowels, typical of conversational speaking rate. Children were less accurate with both shorter and longer vowels. Results are discussed in terms of auditory processing (shortest vowels) and memory (longest vowels). [Research supported by NIDCD DC-05263, DC-04072, and DC-005650.

  3. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  4. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  5. LINE-1 retrotransposons: from 'parasite' sequences to functional elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paço, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-02-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINE-1) are the most abundant and active retrotransposons in the mammalian genomes. Traditionally, the occurrence of LINE-1 sequences in the genome of mammals has been explained by the selfish DNA hypothesis. Nevertheless, recently, it has also been argued that these sequences could play important roles in these genomes, as in the regulation of gene expression, genome modelling and X-chromosome inactivation. The non-random chromosomal distribution is a striking feature of these retroelements that somehow reflects its functionality. In the present study, we have isolated and analysed a fraction of the open reading frame 2 (ORF2) LINE-1 sequence from three rodent species, Cricetus cricetus, Peromyscus eremicus and Praomys tullbergi. Physical mapping of the isolated sequences revealed an interspersed longitudinal AT pattern of distribution along all the chromosomes of the complement in the three genomes. A detailed analysis shows that these sequences are preferentially located in the euchromatic regions, although some signals could be detected in the heterochromatin. In addition, a coincidence between the location of imprinted gene regions (as Xist and Tsix gene regions) and the LINE-1 retroelements was also observed. According to these results, we propose an involvement of LINE-1 sequences in different genomic events as gene imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and evolution of repetitive sequences located at the heterochromatic regions (e.g. satellite DNA sequences) of the rodents' genomes analysed.

  6. Sequence space and the ongoing expansion of the protein universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povolotskaya, Inna S; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2010-06-17

    The need to maintain the structural and functional integrity of an evolving protein severely restricts the repertoire of acceptable amino-acid substitutions. However, it is not known whether these restrictions impose a global limit on how far homologous protein sequences can diverge from each other. Here we explore the limits of protein evolution using sequence divergence data. We formulate a computational approach to study the rate of divergence of distant protein sequences and measure this rate for ancient proteins, those that were present in the last universal common ancestor. We show that ancient proteins are still diverging from each other, indicating an ongoing expansion of the protein sequence universe. The slow rate of this divergence is imposed by the sparseness of functional protein sequences in sequence space and the ruggedness of the protein fitness landscape: approximately 98 per cent of sites cannot accept an amino-acid substitution at any given moment but a vast majority of all sites may eventually be permitted to evolve when other, compensatory, changes occur. Thus, approximately 3.5 x 10(9) yr has not been enough to reach the limit of divergent evolution of proteins, and for most proteins the limit of sequence similarity imposed by common function may not exceed that of random sequences.

  7. Alternation Blindness in the Representation of Binary Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ru Qi; Osherson, Daniel; Zhao, Jiaying

    2017-08-17

    Binary information is prevalent in the environment and contains 2 distinct outcomes. Binary sequences consist of a mixture of alternation and repetition. Understanding how people perceive such sequences would contribute to a general theory of information processing. In this study, we examined how people process alternation and repetition in binary sequences. Across 4 paradigms involving estimation, working memory, change detection, and visual search, we found that the number of alternations is underestimated compared with repetitions (Experiment 1). Moreover, recall for binary sequences deteriorates as the sequence alternates more (Experiment 2). Changes in bits are also harder to detect as the sequence alternates more (Experiment 3). Finally, visual targets superimposed on bits of a binary sequence take longer to process as alternation increases (Experiment 4). Overall, our results indicate that compared with repetition, alternation in a binary sequence is less salient in the sense of requiring more attention for successful encoding. The current study thus reveals the cognitive constraints in the representation of alternation and provides a new explanation for the overalternation bias in randomness perception. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Brain potentials index executive functions during random number generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppich, Gregor; Däuper, Jan; Dengler, Reinhard; Johannes, Sönke; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Münte, Thomas F

    2004-06-01

    The generation of random sequences is considered to tax different executive functions. To explore the involvement of these functions further, brain potentials were recorded in 16 healthy young adults while either engaging in random number generation (RNG) by pressing the number keys on a computer keyboard in a random sequence or in ordered number generation (ONG) necessitating key presses in the canonical order. Key presses were paced by an external auditory stimulus to yield either fast (1 press/800 ms) or slow (1 press/1300 ms) sequences in separate runs. Attentional demands of random and ordered tasks were assessed by the introduction of a secondary task (key-press to a target tone). The P3 amplitude to the target tone of this secondary task was reduced during RNG, reflecting the greater consumption of attentional resources during RNG. Moreover, RNG led to a left frontal negativity peaking 140 ms after the onset of the pacing stimulus, whenever the subjects produced a true random response. This negativity could be attributed to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and was absent when numbers were repeated. This negativity was interpreted as an index for the inhibition of habitual responses. Finally, in response locked ERPs a negative component was apparent peaking about 50 ms after the key-press that was more prominent during RNG. Source localization suggested a medial frontal source. This effect was tentatively interpreted as a reflection of the greater monitoring demands during random sequence generation.

  9. Integrated and Differentiated Sequence Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kirişci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate integrated and differentiated sequence spaces which emerge from the concept of the sequence space $\\ell_{1}$. The integrated and differentiated sequence spaces were initiated by Goes and Goes [4]. The main propose of the present paper, we study matrix domains and some properties of the integrated and differentiated sequence spaces. In Section 3, we compute the alpha-, beta- and gamma duals of these spaces. Afterward, we characterize the matrix classes of these spaces with well-known sequence spaces.

  10. Analysis of the genetic polymorphism of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides cerebriformis "Moore" by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and 28S ribosomal DNA sequencing: Paracoccidioides cerebriformis revisited Análise do polimorfismo genético do Paracoccidioides brasiliensis e Paracoccidioides cerebriformis "Moore" pela técnica de amplificação aleatória do polimorfismo do DNA (RAPD e sequenciamento do DNA ribossomal 28S: Paracoccidioides cerebriformis revisitado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Desirée Barbosa Cavalcanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to compare the genetic polymorphism of six samples of P. brasiliensis (113, 339, BAT, T1F1, T3B6, T5LN1, with four samples of P. cerebriformis (735, 741, 750, 361 from the Mycological Laboratory of the Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis (RAPD. RAPD profiles clearly segregated P. brasiliensis and P. cerebriformis isolates. However, the variation on band patterns among P. cerebriformis isolates was high. Sequencing of the 28S rDNA gene showed nucleotide conservancy among P. cerebriformis isolates, providing basis for taxonomical grouping, and disclosing high divergence to P. brasiliensis supporting that they are in fact two distinct species. Moreover, DNA sequence suggests that P. cerebriformis belongs in fact to the Aspergillus genus.Nosso propósito foi comparar o polimorfismo genético de seis amostras de P. brasiliensis (113, 339, BAT, T1F1, T3B6, T5LN1, com quatro amostras de P. cerebriformis (735, 741, 750, 361 do laboratório de micologia do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, utilizando a técnica de Amplificação Aleatória do Polimorfismo de DNA (RAPD. O perfil de bandas do RAPD diferenciou claramente os isolados de P. brasiliensis de P. cerebriformis. Entretanto, ocorreu uma variação significativa no padrão de bandas das amostras de P. cerebriformis. O sequenciamento do gene ribossomal 28S revelou seqüências de nucleotídeos bastante conservadas entre os isolados de P. cerebriformis, fornecendo subsídio para o agrupamento taxonômico destas amostras, diferenciando estas de P. brasiliensis e mostrando que de fato são espécies distintas. A seqüência de DNA sugere que P. cerebriformis pertence ao gênero Aspergillus.

  11. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  12. The resistance of randomly grown trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, E R; Rodgers, G J, E-mail: Ewan.Colman@brunel.ac.uk [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-16

    An electrical network with the structure of a random tree is considered: starting from a root vertex, in one iteration each leaf (a vertex with zero or one adjacent edges) of the tree is extended by either a single edge with probability p or two edges with probability 1 - p. With each edge having a resistance equal to 1{Omega}, the total resistance R{sub n} between the root vertex and a busbar connecting all the vertices at the nth level is considered. A dynamical system is presented which approximates R{sub n}, it is shown that the mean value Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket R{sub n} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket for this system approaches (1 + p)/(1 - p) as n {yields} {infinity}, the distribution of R{sub n} at large n is also examined. Additionally, a random sequence construction akin to a random Fibonacci sequence is used to approximate R{sub n}; this sequence is shown to be related to the Legendre polynomials and its mean is shown to converge with | Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket R{sub n} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket - (1 + p)/(1 - p)| {approx} n{sup -1/2}. (paper)

  13. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA); Koster, Hubert (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-09-28

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include DNA or RNA in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  14. Weight Distributions for Turbo Codes Using Random and Nonrandom Permutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinar, S.; Divsalar, D.

    1995-04-01

    This article takes a preliminary look at the weight distributions achievable for turbo codes using random, nonrandom, and semirandom permutations. Due to the recursiveness of the encoders, it is important to distinguish between self-terminating and non-self-terminating input sequences. The non-self-terminating sequences have little effect on decoder performance, because they accumulate high encoded weight until they are artificially terminated at the end of the block. From probabilistic arguments based on selecting the permutations randomly, it is concluded that the self-terminating weight-2 data sequences are the most important consideration in the design of the constituent codes; higher-weight self-terminating sequences have successively decreasing importance. Also, increasing the number of codes and, correspondingly, the number of permutations makes it more and more likely that the bad input sequences will be broken up by one or more of the permuters. It is possible to design nonrandom permutations that ensure that the minimum distance due to weight-2 input sequences grows roughly as p 2N, where N is the block length. However, these nonrandom permutations amplify the bad effects of higher-weight inputs, and as a result they are inferior in performance to randomly selected permutations. But there are "semirandom" permutations that perform nearly as well as the designed nonrandom permutations with respect to weight-2 input sequences and are not as susceptible to being foiled by higher-weight inputs.

  15. Test on the structure of biological sequences via Chaos Game Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénac, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    In this paper biological sequences are modelled by stationary ergodic sequences. A new family of statistical tests to characterize the randomness of the inputs is proposed and analyzed. Tests for independence and for the determination of the appropriate order of a Markov chain are constructed with the Chaos Game Representation (CGR), and applied to several genomes.

  16. Assessing the Impact of Sequencing Practicums for Welding in Agricultural Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Malcolm; Pate, Michael L.; Lawver, Rebecca G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Dai, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of sequencing practicums for welding on students' ability to perform a 1F (flat position-fillet lap joint) weld on low-carbon steel. Participants were randomly assigned a specific practice sequence of welding for using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). A total of 71 participants…

  17. PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING OPPORTUNITIES IN CARDIOLOGY BASED ON EXOME SEQUENCING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Shcherbakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study what cardiac drugs currently have any comments on biomarkers and what information can be obtained by pharmacogenetic testing using data exome sequencing in patients with cardiac diseases.Material and methods. Exome sequencing in random participant of the ATEROGEN IVANOVO study and bioinformatics analysis of the data were performed. Point mutations were annotated using ANNOVAR program, as well as comparison with a number of specialized databases was done on the basis of user protocols.Results. 11 cardiac drugs and 7 genes which variants can influence cardiac drug metabolism were analyzed. According to exome sequencing of the participant we did not reveal allelic variants that require dose regime correction and careful efficacy control.Conclusion. The exome sequencing application is the next step to a wide range of personalized therapy. Future opportunities for improvement of the risk-benefit ratio in each patient are the main purpose of the collection and analysis of pharmacogenetic data.

  18. Random walks, random fields, and disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Černý, Jiří; Kotecký, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the mathematics that lies at the intersection of probability theory, statistical physics, combinatorics and computer science, this volume collects together lecture notes on recent developments in the area. The common ground of these subjects is perhaps best described by the three terms in the title: Random Walks, Random Fields and Disordered Systems. The specific topics covered include a study of Branching Brownian Motion from the perspective of disordered (spin-glass) systems, a detailed analysis of weakly self-avoiding random walks in four spatial dimensions via methods of field theory and the renormalization group, a study of phase transitions in disordered discrete structures using a rigorous version of the cavity method, a survey of recent work on interacting polymers in the ballisticity regime and, finally, a treatise on two-dimensional loop-soup models and their connection to conformally invariant systems and the Gaussian Free Field. The notes are aimed at early graduate students with a mod...

  19. Hybridization capture using short PCR products enriches small genomes by capturing flanking sequences (CapFlank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Tsangaras

    Full Text Available Solution hybridization capture methods utilize biotinylated oligonucleotides as baits to enrich homologous sequences from next generation sequencing (NGS libraries. Coupled with NGS, the method generates kilo to gigabases of high confidence consensus targeted sequence. However, in many experiments, a non-negligible fraction of the resulting sequence reads are not homologous to the bait. We demonstrate that during capture, the bait-hybridized library molecules add additional flanking library sequences iteratively, such that baits limited to targeting relatively short regions (e.g. few hundred nucleotides can result in enrichment across entire mitochondrial and bacterial genomes. Our findings suggest that some of the off-target sequences derived in capture experiments are non-randomly enriched, and that CapFlank will facilitate targeted enrichment of large contiguous sequences with minimal prior target sequence information.

  20. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  1. Quantum random number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  2. Integrity of Evidence-Based Practice: Are Providers Modifying Practice Content or Practice Sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Alayna L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Regan, Jennifer; Weisz, John R

    2014-01-01

    This study examined patterns of evidence-based treatment (EBT) implementation within community settings by evaluating integrity along separate dimensions of practice content (PC; a session included the prescribed procedure) and practice sequencing (a session occurred in the prescribed sequence) within a recent randomized effectiveness trial. We measured whether sessions showed integrity to PC and to flexible or linear practice sequences. Findings revealed that providers tended to incorporate ...

  3. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanz, Carola; Aldebert, Philippe; Althorpe, Nicola; Baker, Wendy; Baldwin, Alastair; Bates, Kirsty; Browne, Paul; van den Broek, Alexandra; Castro, Matias; Cochrane, Guy; Duggan, Karyn; Eberhardt, Ruth; Faruque, Nadeem; Gamble, John; Diez, Federico Garcia; Harte, Nicola; Kulikova, Tamara; Lin, Quan; Lombard, Vincent; Lopez, Rodrigo; Mancuso, Renato; McHale, Michelle; Nardone, Francesco; Silventoinen, Ville; Sobhany, Siamak; Stoehr, Peter; Tuli, Mary Ann; Tzouvara, Katerina; Vaughan, Robert; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Weimin; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl), maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK, is a comprehensive collection of nucleotide sequences and annotation from available public sources. The database is part of an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA). Data are exchanged daily between the collaborating institutes to achieve swift synchrony. Webin is the preferred tool for individual submissions of nucleotide sequences, including Third Party Annotation (TPA) and alignments. Automated procedures are provided for submissions from large-scale sequencing projects and data from the European Patent Office. New and updated data records are distributed daily and the whole EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database is released four times a year. Access to the sequence data is provided via ftp and several WWW interfaces. With the web-based Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) it is also possible to link nucleotide data to other specialist molecular biology databases maintained at the EBI. Other tools are available for sequence similarity searching (e.g. FASTA and BLAST). Changes over the past year include the removal of the sequence length limit, the launch of the EMBLCDSs dataset, extension of the Sequence Version Archive functionality and the revision of quality rules for TPA data.

  4. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  5. Random Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Rob; Rinaldo, Alessandro; Wasserman, Larry

    2011-01-01

    We propose a relaxed privacy definition called {\\em random differential privacy} (RDP). Differential privacy requires that adding any new observation to a database will have small effect on the output of the data-release procedure. Random differential privacy requires that adding a {\\em randomly drawn new observation} to a database will have small effect on the output. We show an analog of the composition property of differentially private procedures which applies to our new definition. We sh...

  6. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-06-20

    The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST) library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR), and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry.

  7. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles R.; Hubert, Koster

    2014-06-24

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Probes may be affixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  8. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  9. Random roots and lineage sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Payne, Ansel; DeSalle, Rob

    2012-07-01

    Lineage sorting has been suggested as a major force in generating incongruent phylogenetic signal when multiple gene partitions are examined. The degree of lineage sorting can be estimated using the coalescent process and simulation studies have also pointed to a major role for incomplete lineage sorting as a factor in phylogenetic inference. Some recent empirical studies point to an extreme role for this phenomenon with up to 50-60% of all informative genes showing incongruence as a result of lineage sorting. Here, we examine seven large multi-partition genome level data sets over a large range of taxonomic representation. We took the approach of examining outgroup choice and its impact on tree topology, by swapping outgroups into analyses with successively larger genetics distances to the ingroup. Our results indicate a linear relationship of outgroup distance with incongruence in the data sets we examined suggesting a strong random rooting effect. In addition, we attempted to estimate the degree of lineage sorting in several large genome level data sets by examining triads of very closely related taxa. This exercise resulted in much lower estimates of incongruent genes that could be the result of lineage sorting, with an overall estimate of around 10% of the total number of genes in a genome showing incongruence as a result of true lineage sorting. Finally we examined the behavior of likelihood and parsimony approaches on the random rooting phenomenon. Likelihood tends to stabilize incongruence as outgroups get further and further away from the ingroup. In one extreme case, likelihood overcompensates for sequence divergence but increases random rooting causing long branch repulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity ({\\alpha}-helix, \\b{eta}-hairpin, {\\alpha}-helix bundle, and {\\alpha}/\\b{eta}-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly in influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For \\b{eta}-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the \\b{eta}-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on t...

  11. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of biological sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torney, D.C.; Bruno, W.; Detours, V. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objectives of this project involved deriving new capabilities for analyzing biological sequences. The authors focused on tabulating the statistical properties exhibited by Human coding DNA sequences and on techniques of inferring the phylogenetic relationships among protein sequences related by descent.

  13. Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Marquette, Brandeis

    2017-05-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to generation of a desired waveform profile in the form of a spectrum of apparently random noise (e.g., white noise or colored noise), but with precise spectral characteristics. Hence, a waveform profile that could be readily determined (e.g., by a spoofing system) is effectively obscured. Obscuration is achieved by dividing the waveform into a series of chips, each with an assigned frequency, wherein the sequence of chips are subsequently randomized. Randomization can be a function of the application of a key to the chip sequence. During processing of the echo pulse, a copy of the randomized transmitted pulse is recovered or regenerated against which the received echo is correlated. Hence, with the echo energy range-compressed in this manner, it is possible to generate a radar image with precise impulse response.

  14. Assembly sequencing with toleranced parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latombe, J.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Robotics Lab.; Wilson, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1995-02-21

    The goal of assembly sequencing is to plan a feasible series of operations to construct a product from its individual parts. Previous research has thoroughly investigated assembly sequencing under the assumption that parts have nominal geometry. This paper considers the case where parts have toleranced geometry. Its main contribution is an efficient procedure that decides if a product admits an assembly sequence with infinite translations that is feasible for all possible instances of the components within the specified tolerances. If the product admits one such sequence, the procedure can also generate it. For the cases where there exists no such assembly sequence, another procedure is proposed which generates assembly sequences that are feasible only for some values of the toleranced dimensions. If this procedure produces no such sequence, then no instance of the product is assemblable. Finally, this paper analyzes the relation between assembly and disassembly sequences in the presence of toleranced parts. This work assumes a simple, but non-trivial tolerance language that falls short of capturing all imperfections of a manufacturing process. Hence, it is only one step toward assembly sequencing with toleranced parts.

  15. Fast global sequence alignment technique

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-11-01

    Bioinformatics database is growing exponentially in size. Processing these large amount of data may take hours of time even if super computers are used. One of the most important processing tool in Bioinformatics is sequence alignment. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called \\'Alignment By Scanning\\' (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the wellknown sequence alignment algorithms, the \\'GAP\\' (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 51% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the GAP Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-08-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Sanger dideoxy sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah E; Lorsch, Jon

    2013-01-01

    While the ease and reduced cost of automated DNA sequencing has largely obviated the need for manual dideoxy sequencing for routine purposes, specific applications require manual DNA sequencing. For instance, in studies of enzymes or proteins that bind or modify DNA, a DNA ladder is often used to map the site at which an enzyme is bound or a modification occurs. In these cases, the Sanger method for dideoxy sequencing provides a rapid and facile method for producing a labeled DNA ladder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The ontology of biological sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelso Janet

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological sequences play a major role in molecular and computational biology. They are studied as information-bearing entities that make up DNA, RNA or proteins. The Sequence Ontology, which is part of the OBO Foundry, contains descriptions and definitions of sequences and their properties. Yet the most basic question about sequences remains unanswered: what kind of entity is a biological sequence? An answer to this question benefits formal ontologies that use the notion of biological sequences and analyses in computational biology alike. Results We provide both an ontological analysis of biological sequences and a formal representation that can be used in knowledge-based applications and other ontologies. We distinguish three distinct kinds of entities that can be referred to as "biological sequence": chains of molecules, syntactic representations such as those in biological databases, and the abstract information-bearing entities. For use in knowledge-based applications and inclusion in biomedical ontologies, we implemented the developed axiom system for use in automated theorem proving. Conclusion Axioms are necessary to achieve the main goal of ontologies: to formally specify the meaning of terms used within a domain. The axiom system for the ontology of biological sequences is the first elaborate axiom system for an OBO Foundry ontology and can serve as starting point for the development of more formal ontologies and ultimately of knowledge-based applications.

  19. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  20. Quasirandom geometric networks from low-discrepancy sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2017-08-01

    We define quasirandom geometric networks using low-discrepancy sequences, such as Halton, Sobol, and Niederreiter. The networks are built in d dimensions by considering the d -tuples of digits generated by these sequences as the coordinates of the vertices of the networks in a d -dimensional Id unit hypercube. Then, two vertices are connected by an edge if they are at a distance smaller than a connection radius. We investigate computationally 11 network-theoretic properties of two-dimensional quasirandom networks and compare them with analogous random geometric networks. We also study their degree distribution and their spectral density distributions. We conclude from this intensive computational study that in terms of the uniformity of the distribution of the vertices in the unit square, the quasirandom networks look more random than the random geometric networks. We include an analysis of potential strategies for generating higher-dimensional quasirandom networks, where it is know that some of the low-discrepancy sequences are highly correlated. In this respect, we conclude that up to dimension 20, the use of scrambling, skipping and leaping strategies generate quasirandom networks with the desired properties of uniformity. Finally, we consider a diffusive process taking place on the nodes and edges of the quasirandom and random geometric graphs. We show that the diffusion time is shorter in the quasirandom graphs as a consequence of their larger structural homogeneity. In the random geometric graphs the diffusion produces clusters of concentration that make the process more slow. Such clusters are a direct consequence of the heterogeneous and irregular distribution of the nodes in the unit square in which the generation of random geometric graphs is based on.

  1. Quasirandom geometric networks from low-discrepancy sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2017-08-01

    We define quasirandom geometric networks using low-discrepancy sequences, such as Halton, Sobol, and Niederreiter. The networks are built in d dimensions by considering the d-tuples of digits generated by these sequences as the coordinates of the vertices of the networks in a d-dimensional I^{d} unit hypercube. Then, two vertices are connected by an edge if they are at a distance smaller than a connection radius. We investigate computationally 11 network-theoretic properties of two-dimensional quasirandom networks and compare them with analogous random geometric networks. We also study their degree distribution and their spectral density distributions. We conclude from this intensive computational study that in terms of the uniformity of the distribution of the vertices in the unit square, the quasirandom networks look more random than the random geometric networks. We include an analysis of potential strategies for generating higher-dimensional quasirandom networks, where it is know that some of the low-discrepancy sequences are highly correlated. In this respect, we conclude that up to dimension 20, the use of scrambling, skipping and leaping strategies generate quasirandom networks with the desired properties of uniformity. Finally, we consider a diffusive process taking place on the nodes and edges of the quasirandom and random geometric graphs. We show that the diffusion time is shorter in the quasirandom graphs as a consequence of their larger structural homogeneity. In the random geometric graphs the diffusion produces clusters of concentration that make the process more slow. Such clusters are a direct consequence of the heterogeneous and irregular distribution of the nodes in the unit square in which the generation of random geometric graphs is based on.

  2. Random errors revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    the random errors of estimates of the sound intensity in, say, one-third octave bands from the power and cross power spectra of the signals from an intensity probe determined with a dual channel FFT analyser. This is not very practical, though. In this paper it is demonstrated that one can predict the random...

  3. Hashing, Randomness and Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus

    time and memory space. To some extent we also consider lower bounds, i.e., we attempt to show limitations on how efficient algorithms are possible. A central theme in the thesis is randomness. Randomized algorithms play an important role, in particular through the key technique of hashing. Additionally...

  4. Predicting tissue-specific expressions based on sequence characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Paik, Hyojung

    2011-04-30

    In multicellular organisms, including humans, understanding expression specificity at the tissue level is essential for interpreting protein function, such as tissue differentiation. We developed a prediction approach via generated sequence features from overrepresented patterns in housekeeping (HK) and tissue-specific (TS) genes to classify TS expression in humans. Using TS domains and transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs), sequence characteristics were used as indices of expressed tissues in a Random Forest algorithm by scoring exclusive patterns considering the biological intuition; TFBSs regulate gene expression, and the domains reflect the functional specificity of a TS gene. Our proposed approach displayed better performance than previous attempts and was validated using computational and experimental methods.

  5. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkness Ewen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromosome sequence and the search for polymorphisms therein. The genome has been only partially sequenced for one male dog, disallowing mapping of the sequence into specific chromosomes. However, by comparing the male genome sequence to the complete female dog genome sequence, candidate Y-chromosome sequence may be identified by exclusion. Results The male dog genome sequence was analysed by Blast search against the human genome to identify sequences with a best match to the human Y chromosome and to the female dog genome to identify those absent in the female genome. Candidate sequences were then tested for male specificity by PCR of five male and five female dogs. 32 sequences from the male genome, with a total length of 24 kbp, were identified as male specific, based on a match to the human Y chromosome, absence in the female dog genome and male specific PCR results. 14437 bp were then sequenced for 10 male dogs originating from Europe, Southwest Asia, Siberia, East Asia, Africa and America. Nine haplotypes were found, which were defined by 14 substitutions. The genetic distance between the haplotypes indicates that they originate from at least five wolf haplotypes. There was no obvious trend in the geographic distribution of the haplotypes. Conclusion We have identified 24159 bp of dog Y-chromosome sequence to be used for population genetic studies. We sequenced 14437 bp in a worldwide collection of dogs, identifying 14 SNPs for future SNP analyses, and

  6. Discrete Painlev\\'e equations and random matrix averages

    OpenAIRE

    Forrester, P. J.; Witte, N. S.

    2003-01-01

    The $\\tau$-function theory of Painlev\\'e systems is used to derive recurrences in the rank $n$ of certain random matrix averages over U(n). These recurrences involve auxilary quantities which satisfy discrete Painlev\\'e equations. The random matrix averages include cases which can be interpreted as eigenvalue distributions at the hard edge and in the bulk of matrix ensembles with unitary symmetry. The recurrences are illustrated by computing the value of a sequence of these distributions as $...

  7. Random Walks and Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available These notes provide an elementary and self-contained introduction to branching random walks. Section 1 gives a brief overview of Galton–Watson trees, whereas Section 2 presents the classical law of large numbers for branching random walks. These two short sections are not exactly indispensable, but they introduce the idea of using size-biased trees, thus giving motivations and an avant-goût to the main part, Section 3, where branching random walks are studied from a deeper point of view, and are connected to the model of directed polymers on a tree. Tree-related random processes form a rich and exciting research subject. These notes cover only special topics. For a general account, we refer to the St-Flour lecture notes of Peres [47] and to the forthcoming book of Lyons and Peres [42], as well as to Duquesne and Le Gall [23] and Le Gall [37] for continuous random trees.

  8. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  9. Quantum random number generator based on ‘Fermi–Dirac’ statistics of photocounts of faint laser pulses with a 75 Mbit s‑1 rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balygin, K. A.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.; Popova, E.; Vinogradov, S.

    2017-12-01

    We implemented experimentally a quantum random number generator, based on the registration of quasi-single-photon light by a silicon photo-multiplier, which allows one to reliably achieve the Poisson statistics of photocounts. The use of the optimal grouping of photocounts and a polynomial-length sequence of the method for extracting the random sequence 0 and 1 made it possible to achieve the output rate of a provably random sequence up to 75 Mbit s-1 .

  10. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within a network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks under periodic boundary conditions that we call TempoRank. It is known that, in static networks, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node. In contrast, we find that, in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network, a weighted and directed network explicitly constructed from the original sequence of transition matrices. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q, which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node, and on the temporal resolution of the data. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node to be connected to another node with many random walkers (one of the principles of the PageRank) at the right moment, this effect is negligible in practice when the time order of link activation is included.

  11. NAFASS in action: How to control randomness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigmatullin, R. R.; Zhang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    In this paper the original method of transformation of one random function to another one is suggested. The problem of transformation of one random function to another one is based on the NAFASS approach suggested previously by one of the authors (RRN) in paper [1]. The problem can be formulated as follows: is it possible to transform one random function to another one (the functional forms of the both functions are not known) during the fixed segment of time t1? The solution of this problem shown in this paper gives a chance to manage with random functions that describe many complex systems, where the adequate model pretending on their functional or analytical description is not known. This transformation based on the successful solution of the Prony's problem gives unique chances to manage with some chemical processes, technological processes and understand better the general behavior of the different complex systems which cannot be managed by the human being. Besides this solution another solution of this problem related to control of detrended random sequences is considered also.

  12. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A criterion for regular sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    D P PATIL1, U STORCH2 and J ST ¨UCKRAD3. 1Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ... For general notations in com- mutative algebra we also refer to [1]. ... Note that every sequence is a strongly regular as well as regular sequence on the zero module. Further, it is clear that a ...

  14. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahramali, Golnaz [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Goliaei, Bahram, E-mail: goliaei@ut.ac.ir [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minuchehr, Zarrin, E-mail: minuchehr@nigeb.ac.ir [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salari, Ali [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to “helix to strand (HE)”, “helix to coil (HC)” and “strand to coil (CE)” alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garrido-Cardenas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years.

  16. Diesel Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a diesel mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  17. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, S.J.; Dekker, C.

    2016-01-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with

  18. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  19. Combinatorial representations of token sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new representations of token sequences, with and without associated quantities, in Euclidean space. The representations are free of assumptions about the nature of the sequences or the processes that generate them. Algorithms and applications from the domains of structured

  20. Universal Sequencing on a Single Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leah; Levin, Asaf; Marchetti-Spaccamela, Alberto; Megow, Nicole; Mestre, Julián; Skutella, Martin; Stougie, Leen

    We consider scheduling on an unreliable machine that may experience unexpected changes in processing speed or even full breakdowns. We aim for a universal solution that performs well without adaptation for any possible machine behavior. For the objective of minimizing the total weighted completion time, we design a polynomial time deterministic algorithm that finds a universal scheduling sequence with a solution value within 4 times the value of an optimal clairvoyant algorithm that knows the disruptions in advance. A randomized version of this algorithm attains in expectation a ratio of e. We also show that both results are best possible among all universal solutions. As a direct consequence of our results, we answer affirmatively the question of whether a constant approximation algorithm exists for the offline version of the problem when machine unavailability periods are known in advance.

  1. Short barcodes for next generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Mir

    Full Text Available We consider the design and evaluation of short barcodes, with a length between six and eight nucleotides, used for parallel sequencing on platforms where substitution errors dominate. Such codes should have not only good error correction properties but also the code words should fulfil certain biological constraints (experimental parameters. We compare published barcodes with codes obtained by two new constructions methods, one based on the currently best known linear codes and a simple randomized construction method. The evaluation done is with respect to the error correction capabilities, barcode size and their experimental parameters and fundamental bounds on the code size and their distance properties. We provide a list of codes for lengths between six and eight nucleotides, where for length eight, two substitution errors can be corrected. In fact, no code with larger minimum distance can exist.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MRI sequences for pulmonary embolism diagnosis: results of independent sequence readings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, Marie Pierre [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Hotel-Dieu, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Sanchez, Olivier; Meyer, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Respiratory and intensive care and, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM Unite 765, Paris (France); Lefort, Catherine; Couchon, Sophie; Hernigou, Anne; Frija, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Niarra, Ralph [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Chatellier, Gilles [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM CIC-EC E4, Paris (France)

    2013-09-15

    To independently evaluate unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MR sequences for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis. Prospective investigation, including 274 patients who underwent perfusion, unenhanced 2D steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) and contrast-enhanced 3D angiographic MR sequences on a 1.5-T unit, in addition to CTA (CT angiography). Two independent readers evaluated each sequence independently in random order. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-reader agreement were calculated for each sequence, excluding sequences judged inconclusive. Sensitivity was also calculated according to PE location. Contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences showed the highest sensitivity (82.9 and 89.7 %, reader 1 and reader 2, respectively), specificity (98.5 and 100 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.77). Unenhanced angiographic sequences, although less sensitive overall (68.7 and 76.4 %), were sensitive for the detection of proximal PE (92.7 and 100 %) and showed high specificity (96.1 and 99.1 %) and good agreement (kappa value 0.62). Perfusion sequences showed lower sensitivity (75.0 and 79.3 %), specificity (84.8 and 89.7 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.51), and a negative predictive value of 84.8 % at best. Compared with contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences, unenhanced sequences demonstrate lower sensitivity, except for proximal PE, but high specificity and agreement. The negative predictive value of perfusion sequences was insufficient to safely rule out PE. (orig.)

  3. Exome sequencing covers >98% of mutations identified on targeted next generation sequencing panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly LaDuca

    Full Text Available With the expanded availability of next generation sequencing (NGS-based clinical genetic tests, clinicians seeking to test patients with Mendelian diseases must weigh the superior coverage of targeted gene panels with the greater number of genes included in whole exome sequencing (WES when considering their first-tier testing approach. Here, we use an in silico analysis to predict the analytic sensitivity of WES using pathogenic variants identified on targeted NGS panels as a reference.Corresponding nucleotide positions for 1533 different alterations classified as pathogenic or likely pathogenic identified on targeted NGS multi-gene panel tests in our laboratory were interrogated in data from 100 randomly-selected clinical WES samples to quantify the sequence coverage at each position. Pathogenic variants represented 91 genes implicated in hereditary cancer, X-linked intellectual disability, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Marfan syndrome/aortic aneurysms, cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias.When assessing coverage among 100 individual WES samples for each pathogenic variant (153,300 individual assessments, 99.7% (n = 152,798 would likely have been detected on WES. All pathogenic variants had at least some coverage on exome sequencing, with a total of 97.3% (n = 1491 detectable across all 100 individuals. For the remaining 42 pathogenic variants, the number of WES samples with adequate coverage ranged from 35 to 99. Factors such as location in GC-rich, repetitive, or homologous regions likely explain why some of these alterations were not detected across all samples. To validate study findings, a similar analysis was performed against coverage data from 60,706 exomes available through the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC. Results from this validation confirmed that 98.6% (91,743,296/93,062,298 of pathogenic variants demonstrated adequate depth for detection.Results from this in silico analysis suggest that exome sequencing may achieve a diagnostic

  4. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S.K.

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  5. Cluster-Based Multipolling Sequencing Algorithm for Collecting RFID Data in Wireless LANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo-Yong; Chatterjee, Mainak

    2015-03-01

    With the growing use of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), it is becoming important to devise ways to read RFID tags in real time. Access points (APs) of IEEE 802.11-based wireless Local Area Networks (LANs) are being integrated with RFID networks that can efficiently collect real-time RFID data. Several schemes, such as multipolling methods based on the dynamic search algorithm and random sequencing, have been proposed. However, as the number of RFID readers associated with an AP increases, it becomes difficult for the dynamic search algorithm to derive the multipolling sequence in real time. Though multipolling methods can eliminate the polling overhead, we still need to enhance the performance of the multipolling methods based on random sequencing. To that extent, we propose a real-time cluster-based multipolling sequencing algorithm that drastically eliminates more than 90% of the polling overhead, particularly so when the dynamic search algorithm fails to derive the multipolling sequence in real time.

  6. Random numbers spring from alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigerio, N.A.; Sanathanan, L.P.; Morley, M.; Clark, N.A.; Tyler, S.A.

    1980-05-01

    Congruential random number generators, which are widely used in Monte Carlo simulations, are deficient in that the number they generate are concentrated in a relatively small number of hyperplanes. While this deficiency may not be a limitation in small Monte Carlo studies involving a few variables, it introduces a significant bias in large simulations requiring high resolution. This bias was recognized and assessed during preparations for an accident analysis study of nuclear power plants. This report describes a random number device based on the radioactive decay of alpha particles from a /sup 235/U source in a high-resolution gas proportional counter. The signals were fed to a 4096-channel analyzer and for each channel the frequency of signals registered in a 20,000-microsecond interval was recorded. The parity bits of these frequency counts (0 for an even count and 1 for an odd count) were then assembled in sequence to form 31-bit binary random numbers and transcribed to a magnetic tape. This cycle was repeated as many times as were necessary to create 3 million random numbers. The frequency distribution of counts from the present device conforms to the Brockwell-Moyal distribution, which takes into account the dead time of the counter (both the dead time and decay constant of the underlying Poisson process were estimated). Analysis of the count data and tests of randomness on a sample set of the 31-bit binary numbers indicate that this random number device is a highly reliable source of truly random numbers. Its use is, therefore, recommended in Monte Carlo simulations for which the congruential pseudorandom number generators are found to be inadequate. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Comment on "Linguistic features of noncoding DNA sequences"

    CERN Document Server

    Israeloff, N E; Chan, K; Israeloff, N E; Kagalenko, M; Chan, K

    1995-01-01

    In a recent Physical Review Letter, Mantegna et. al., report that certain statistical signatures of natural language can be found in non-coding DNA sequences. In this comment we show that random noise with power-law correlation similar to 1/f noise, exhibits the same "linguistic" signature as those found in non-coding DNA. We conclude that these signa- tures cannot distinguish languages from noise.

  8. First steps in random walks from tools to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klafter, J

    2011-01-01

    The name ""random walk"" for a problem of a displacement of a point in a sequence of independent random steps was coined by Karl Pearson in 1905 in a question posed to readers of ""Nature"". The same year, a similar problem was formulated by Albert Einstein in one of his Annus Mirabilis works. Even earlier such a problem was posed by Louis Bachelier in his thesis devoted to the theory of financial speculations in 1900. Nowadays the theory of random walks has proved useful in physics andchemistry (diffusion, reactions, mixing in flows), economics, biology (from animal spread to motion of subcel

  9. Improved motor sequence retention by motionless listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Amir; Katz, Tal; Chess, Roxanne; Saltzman, Elliot

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of listening to a newly learned musical piece on subsequent motor retention of the piece. Thirty-six non-musicians were trained to play an unfamiliar melody on a piano keyboard. Next, they were randomly assigned to participate in three follow-up listening sessions over 1 week. Subjects who, during their listening sessions, listened to the same initial piece showed significant improvements in motor memory and retention of the piece despite the absence of physical practice. These improvements included increased pitch accuracy, time accuracy, and dynamic intensity of key pressing. Similar improvements, though to a lesser degree, were observed in subjects who, during their listening sessions, were distracted by another task. Control subjects, who after learning the piece had listened to nonmusical sounds, showed impaired motoric retention of the piece at 1 week from the initial acquisition day. These results imply that motor sequences can be established in motor memory without direct access to motor-related information. In addition, the study revealed that the listening-induced improvements did not generalize to the learning of a new musical piece composed of the same notes as the initial piece learned, limiting the effects to musical motor sequences that are already part of the individual's motor repertoire.

  10. Effects of regularity on the processing of sound omission in a tone sequence in musicians and non-musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kentaro; Matsuhashi, Masao; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Altmann, Christian F

    2013-09-01

    Numerous studies have reported that perceptual grouping affects the pre-attentive processing of sound omission in a sequence of tones. However, it remains unclear whether or not the perceptual grouping and musical experience affect the attentive processing of sound omission. To this end, we created a sequence of loud (L) and soft (S) tones grouped as 'LLSLLS…' and a random sequence of the L and S tones. The omission of the L tones was inserted pseudo-randomly in the random sequence, and there were two positions at which it was inserted. For within-group omission, the omission was after the first L tone within the 'LLS' pattern. For between-group omission, the omission was inserted between the patterns. The brain response to the omission in musicians and non-musicians was measured using magnetoencephalography. During the magnetoencephalography measurement, the subjects' performance in a task to detect the omission was faster in the random sequence than in the group sequence. Source analysis showed that the omission in the random sequence caused greater activity than that in the group sequence. The increase was found in the right inferior parietal lobe in musicians, whereas it was found in the left superior temporal gyrus in non-musicians. These results suggest that the attentive processing of perceptual grouping might implicate the left superior temporal gyrus or right inferior parietal lobe, depending on musical experience. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Social intuition as a form of implicit learning: Sequences of body movements are learned less explicitly than letter sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Elisabeth; Price, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    In the current paper, we first evaluate the suitability of traditional serial reaction time (SRT) and artificial grammar learning (AGL) experiments for measuring implicit learning of social signals. We then report the results of a novel sequence learning task which combines aspects of the SRT and AGL paradigms to meet our suggested criteria for how implicit learning experiments can be adapted to increase their relevance to situations of social intuition. The sequences followed standard finite-state grammars. Sequence learning and consciousness of acquired knowledge were compared between 2 groups of 24 participants viewing either sequences of individually presented letters or sequences of body-posture pictures, which were described as series of yoga movements. Participants in both conditions showed above-chance classification accuracy, indicating that sequence learning had occurred in both stimulus conditions. This shows that sequence learning can still be found when learning procedures reflect the characteristics of social intuition. Rule awareness was measured using trial-by-trial evaluation of decision strategy (Dienes & Scott, 2005; Scott & Dienes, 2008). For letters, sequence classification was best on trials where participants reported responding on the basis of explicit rules or memory, indicating some explicit learning in this condition. For body-posture, classification was not above chance on these types of trial, but instead showed a trend to be best on those trials where participants reported that their responses were based on intuition, familiarity, or random choice, suggesting that learning was more implicit. Results therefore indicate that the use of traditional stimuli in research on sequence learning might underestimate the extent to which learning is implicit in domains such as social learning, contributing to ongoing debate about levels of conscious awareness in implicit learning.

  12. EST sequencing of Onychophora and phylogenomic analysis of Metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeding, Falko; Hagner-Holler, Silke; Ruhberg, Hilke; Ebersberger, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Burmester, Thorsten

    2007-12-01

    Onychophora (velvet worms) represent a small animal taxon considered to be related to Euarthropoda. We have obtained 1873 5' cDNA sequences (expressed sequence tags, ESTs) from the velvet worm Epiperipatus sp., which were assembled into 833 contigs. BLAST similarity searches revealed that 51.9% of the contigs had matches in the protein databases with expectation values lower than 10(-4). Most ESTs had the best hit with proteins from either Chordata or Arthropoda (approximately 40% respectively). The ESTs included sequences of 27 ribosomal proteins. The orthologous sequences from 28 other species of a broad range of phyla were obtained from the databases, including other EST projects. A concatenated amino acid alignment comprising 5021 positions was constructed, which covers 4259 positions when problematic regions were removed. Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods place Epiperipatus within the monophyletic Ecdysozoa (Onychophora, Arthropoda, Tardigrada and Nematoda), but its exact relation to the Euarthropoda remained unresolved. The "Articulata" concept was not supported. Tardigrada and Nematoda formed a well-supported monophylum, suggesting that Tardigrada are actually Cycloneuralia. In agreement with previous studies, we have demonstrated that random sequencing of cDNAs results in sequence information suitable for phylogenomic approaches to resolve metazoan relationships.

  13. In silico evidence for sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-10-18

    Nucleosomes represent the basic building block of chromatin and provide an important mechanism by which cellular processes are controlled. The locations of nucleosomes across the genome are not random but instead depend on both the underlying DNA sequence and the dynamic action of other proteins within the nucleus. These processes are central to cellular function, and the molecular details of the interplay between DNA sequence and nudeosome dynamics remain poorly understood. In this work, we investigate this interplay in detail by relying on a molecular model, which permits development of a comprehensive picture of the underlying free energy surfaces and the corresponding dynamics of nudeosome repositioning. The mechanism of nudeosome repositioning is shown to be strongly linked to DNA sequence and directly related to the binding energy of a given DNA sequence to the histone core. It is also demonstrated that chromatin remodelers can override DNA-sequence preferences by exerting torque, and the histone H4 tail is then identified as a key component by which DNA-sequence, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelers could in fact be coupled.

  14. A Computational Module Assembled from Different Protease Family Motifs Identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a Putative Prolyl Peptidase with a Serine Protease Scaffold: e70923

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adela Rendón-Ramírez; Manish Shukla; Masataka Oda; Sandeep Chakraborty; Renu Minda; Abhaya M Dandekar; Bjarni Ásgeirsson; Félix M Goñi; Basuthkar J Rao

    2013-01-01

    .... While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular...

  15. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    .... While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular...

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from......Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS......) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time...

  17. Analisis Teoritis dan Empiris Uji Craps dari Diehard Battery of Randomness Test untuk Pengujian Pembangkit Bilangan Acaksemu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Agustini Hafman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to Kerchoffs (1883, the security system should only rely on cryptographic keys which is used in that system. Generally, the key sequences are generated by a Pseudo Random Number Generator (PRNG or Random Number Generator (RNG. There are three types of randomness sequences that generated by the RNG and PRNG i.e. pseudorandom sequence, cryptographically secure pseudorandom sequences, and real random sequences. Several statistical tests, including diehard battery of tests of randomness, is used to check the type of randomness sequences that generated by PRNG or RNG. Due to its purpose, the principle on taking the testing parameters and the test statistic are associated with the validity of the conclusion produced by a statistical test, then the theoretical analysis is performed by applying a variety of statistical theory to evaluate craps test, one of the test included in the diehard battery of randomness tests. Craps test, inspired by craps game, aims to examine whether a PRNG produces an independent and identically distributed (iid pseudorandom sequences. To demonstrate the process to produce a test statistics equation and to show how craps games applied on that test, will be carried out theoretical analysis by applying a variety of statistical theory. Furthermore, empirical observations will be done by applying craps test on a PRNG in order to check the test effectiveness in detecting the distribution and independency of sequences which produced by PRNG

  18. Random maintenance policies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Exploring random maintenance models, this book provides an introduction to the implementation of random maintenance, and it is one of the first books to be written on this subject.  It aims to help readers learn new techniques for applying random policies to actual reliability models, and it provides new theoretical analyses of various models including classical replacement, preventive maintenance and inspection policies. These policies are applied to scheduling problems, backup policies of database systems, maintenance policies of cumulative damage models, and reliability of random redundant systems. Reliability theory is a major concern for engineers and managers, and in light of Japan’s recent earthquake, the reliability of large-scale systems has increased in importance. This also highlights the need for a new notion of maintenance and reliability theory, and how this can practically be applied to systems. Providing an essential guide for engineers and managers specializing in reliability maintenance a...

  19. Theory of random sets

    CERN Document Server

    Molchanov, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    This monograph, now in a thoroughly revised second edition, offers the latest research on random sets. It has been extended to include substantial developments achieved since 2005, some of them motivated by applications of random sets to econometrics and finance. The present volume builds on the foundations laid by Matheron and others, including the vast advances in stochastic geometry, probability theory, set-valued analysis, and statistical inference. It shows the various interdisciplinary relationships of random set theory within other parts of mathematics, and at the same time fixes terminology and notation that often vary in the literature, establishing it as a natural part of modern probability theory and providing a platform for future development. It is completely self-contained, systematic and exhaustive, with the full proofs that are necessary to gain insight. Aimed at research level, Theory of Random Sets will be an invaluable reference for probabilists; mathematicians working in convex and integ...

  20. A note on the strong law of large numbers for associated sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nezakati

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that the sequence {bn−1∑i=1n(Xi−EXi}n≥1 converges a.e. to zero if {Xn,n≥1} is anassociated sequence of random variables with ∑n=1∞bkn−2Var(∑i=kn−1+1knXi<∞ where {bn,n≥1} is a positive nondecreasing sequence and {kn,n≥1} is a strictly increasing sequence, both tending to infinity as n tends to infinity and 0