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Sample records for randomly occurring mutations

  1. IDH1 mutated low grade astrocytoma occurring in MSH2 mutated Lynch syndrome family

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    Alaa Alkhotani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is an autosomal dominant tumour predisposition syndrome caused by a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes.Patients with these mutations have an increased risk of brain tumours, the vast majority of which are glioblastomas and medulloblastomas, and their occurrence has been termed Turcot Syndrome. The case presented herein of a member of a Lynch syndrome family with an MSH2 mutation expands the spectrum of brain tumours occurring in Lynch syndrome to include low grade astrocytomas, and is the first reported case of an IDH1 (R132H mutated brain tumour occurring in a Lynch syndrome family.

  2. p53 mutations occur in aggressive breast cancer.

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    Mazars, R; Spinardi, L; BenCheikh, M; Simony-Lafontaine, J; Jeanteur, P; Theillet, C

    1992-07-15

    Using a polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism approach we analyzed 96 human primary breast tumors for the presence of mutations in exons 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 of the p53 gene. These exons have been shown to comprise highly conserved sequences and the portion including exons 5 through 9 is believed to be the target for over 90% of the acquired mutations in human cancer. Eighteen tumors of the 96 (18.7%) tested showed reproducibly a variant band indicative of a mutation. Most (15 tumors) of the mutations were single nucleotide substitutions and G:C to A:T transitions were prevalent (6 tumors), G:C to T:A transversions came next (4 tumors), and guanines were always on the nontranscribed strand. Concomitant loss of the wild type allele and mutation of the other copy was observed in only 3 of 18 mutated cases; this is consistent with the heterogeneous cellular composition of breast tumors. Furthermore p53 mutations were correlated to estrogen and/or progesterone receptor negative tumors, thus indicating their relationships to aggressive breast cancer. No association could be observed with DNA amplification events in these tumors.

  3. A Naturally Occurring hPMS2 Mutation Can Confer a Dominant Negative Mutator Phenotype

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    Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; Littman, Susan J.; Modrich, Paul; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    1998-01-01

    Defects in mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in a mutator phenotype by inducing microsatellite instability (MI), a characteristic of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC) and a subset of sporadic colon tumors. Present models describing the mechanism by which germ line mutations in MMR genes predispose kindreds to HNPCC suggest a “two-hit” inactivation of both alleles of a particular MMR gene. Here we present experimental evidence that a nonsense mutation at codon 134 of the hPMS2 gene is sufficient to reduce MMR and induce MI in cells containing a wild-type hPMS2 allele. These results have significant implications for understanding the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and the ability to generate mammalian cells with mutator phenotypes. PMID:9488480

  4. Nonsynonymous somatic mitochondrial mutations occur in the majority of cutaneous melanomas.

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    Mithani, Suhail K; Smith, Ian M; Topalian, Suzanne L; Califano, Joseph A

    2008-06-01

    Earlier studies of mitochondrial mutations in melanoma have focused on analysis of selected mitochondrial genes and the displacement loop (D-loop) region using conventional sequencing. In this study we use data from a whole mitochondria-sequencing array, the MitoChip v2.0, to characterize the mutations that are present throughout the mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial genome of DNA derived from 14 fresh melanoma specimens and two melanoma cell lines, and autologous lymphocytes or immortalized B cells, respectively, were sequenced using the MitoChip v2.0. Paired comparative sequence analysis was carried out to define somatic mutations. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations were identified in 12/16 (75%) melanomas, compared with germline lymphocyte DNA. One hundred mutations were present among these 12 melanomas. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Furthermore, 9/16 (56.3%) melanomas carried mutations, which resulted in amino acid substitutions in functional genes. In the 10 samples carrying nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (ND) complex mutations, multiple mutations were present at a rate significantly greater than the expected frequency based on the size of ND complex genes (P=0.028, Fisher's exact test). Mitochondrial mutation is a frequent occurrence in melanoma. The high rate of missense mutations and the propensity for the ND complex implicate a role for alterations in mitochondrial respiratory function in melanoma carcinogenesis. Mutations of the noncoding D-loop are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication. Further studies are needed to delineate the timing and functional significance of these mutations, and their role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. Thyroid cancer and co-occurring RET mutations in Hirschsprung disease.

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    Virtanen, Valtter B; Pukkala, Eero; Kivisaari, Reetta; Salo, Perttu P; Koivusalo, Antti; Arola, Johanna; Miettinen, Päivi J; Rintala, Risto J; Perola, Markus; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of thyroid cancer and co-occurring RET mutations in a population-based cohort of adult Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. All 156 patients operated for HD in a tertiary center during 1950-1986 were followed for thyroid malignancies up to 2010 through the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. Ninety-one individuals participated in clinical and genetic screening, which included serum calcitonin and thyroid ultrasound (US) with cytology. Exons 10, 11, 13, and 16 were sequenced in all, and all exons of RET in 43 of the subjects, including those with thyroid cancer, RET mutations, suspicious clinical findings, and familial or long-segment disease. Through the cancer registry, two cases (aged 35 and 37 years) of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) were observed; the incidence for MTC was 340-fold (95% CI 52-1600) compared with average population. These individuals had C611R and C620R mutations in exon 10. One papillary thyroid cancer without RET mutations was detected by clinical screening. Four subjects (aged 31-50 years) with co-occurring RET mutations in exons 10 (C609R; n=1) and 13 (Y791F, n=3) had sporadic short-segment HD with normal thyroid US and serum calcitonin. Three novel mutations and five single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found outside exons 10 and 13 without associated signs of thyroid cancer. MTC-associated RET mutations were restricted to exons 10 and 13 affecting ∼5% of unselected adults with HD. Clinical thyroid assessment did not improve accuracy of genetic screening, which should not be limited to patients with familial or long-segment disease.

  6. Repair of naturally occurring mismatches can induce mutations in flanking DNA

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    Chen, Jia; Miller, Brendan F; Furano, Anthony V

    2014-01-01

    ‘Normal’ genomic DNA contains hundreds of mismatches that are generated daily by the spontaneous deamination of C (U/G) and methyl-C (T/G). Thus, a mutagenic effect of their repair could constitute a serious genetic burden. We show here that while mismatches introduced into human cells on an SV40-based episome were invariably repaired, this process induced mutations in flanking DNA at a significantly higher rate than no mismatch controls. Most mutations involved the C of TpC, the substrate of some single strand-specific APOBEC cytidine deaminases, similar to the mutations that can typify the ‘mutator phenotype’ of numerous tumors. siRNA knockdowns and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that TpC preferring APOBECs mediate the mutagenesis, and siRNA knockdowns showed that both the base excision and mismatch repair pathways are involved. That naturally occurring mispairs can be converted to mutators, represents an heretofore unsuspected source of genetic changes that could underlie disease, aging, and evolutionary change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02001.001 PMID:24843013

  7. The ubiquitous ‘cancer mutational signature’ 5 occurs specifically in cancers with deleted FHIT alleles

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    Volinia, Stefano; Druck, Teresa; Paisie, Carolyn A.; Schrock, Morgan S.; Huebner, Kay

    2017-01-01

    The FHIT gene is located at the fragile FRA3B locus where activation by carcinogen-induced and endogenous replication stress causes FHIT deletions even in normal cells over a lifetime. Our lab has shown that loss of FHIT expression causes genome instability and provides single-strand DNA substrates for APOBEC3B hypermutation, in line with evidence that FHIT locus deletions occur in many cancers. Based on these biological features, we hypothesized that FHIT loss drives development of COSMIC mutational signature 5 and here provide evidence, including data mining of >6,500 TCGA samples, that FHIT is the cancer-associated gene with copy number alterations correlating most significantly with signature 5 mutation rate. In addition, tissues of Fhit-deficient mice exhibit a mutational signature strongly resembling signature 5 (cosine similarity value = 0.89). We conclude that FHIT loss is a molecular determinant for signature 5 mutations, which occur in all cancer types early in cancer development, are clock-like, and accelerated by carcinogen exposure. Loss of FHIT caretaker function may be a predictive and preventive marker for cancer development. PMID:29254236

  8. The ubiquitous 'cancer mutational signature' 5 occurs specifically in cancers with deleted FHIT alleles.

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    Volinia, Stefano; Druck, Teresa; Paisie, Carolyn A; Schrock, Morgan S; Huebner, Kay

    2017-11-24

    The FHIT gene is located at the fragile FRA3B locus where activation by carcinogen-induced and endogenous replication stress causes FHIT deletions even in normal cells over a lifetime. Our lab has shown that loss of FHIT expression causes genome instability and provides single-strand DNA substrates for APOBEC3B hypermutation, in line with evidence that FHIT locus deletions occur in many cancers. Based on these biological features, we hypothesized that FHIT loss drives development of COSMIC mutational signature 5 and here provide evidence, including data mining of >6,500 TCGA samples, that FHIT is the cancer-associated gene with copy number alterations correlating most significantly with signature 5 mutation rate. In addition, tissues of Fhit-deficient mice exhibit a mutational signature strongly resembling signature 5 (cosine similarity value = 0.89). We conclude that FHIT loss is a molecular determinant for signature 5 mutations, which occur in all cancer types early in cancer development, are clock-like, and accelerated by carcinogen exposure. Loss of FHIT caretaker function may be a predictive and preventive marker for cancer development.

  9. Naturally Occurring Missense Mutation in Plasma PAF-AH Among the Japanese Population.

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    Karasawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism in the plasma PAF-AH enzyme, i.e., G994T, which causes the substitution of Val at amino acid 279 with Phe (V279F), has been found in the Japanese population. This enzyme preferentially degrades oxidatively modulated or truncated phospholipids; therefore, it has been suggested that this enzyme may prevent the accumulation of proinflammatory and proatherogenic oxidized phospholipids. This hypothesis is supported by the higher prevalence of the V279F mutation in patients with asthmatic and atherosclerotic diseases, as compared with healthy controls. This mutation is rare in the Caucasian population. The plasma PAF-AH mass and enzyme activity are distributed over a wide range in the plasma and they are positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. However, several clinical studies in the Caucasian population have suggested that this enzyme has the opposite role. This enzyme plays an active role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis via proinflammatory and proatherogenic lysophosphatidylcholine and oxidized fatty acids produced through the oxidation of LDL by this enzyme. Thus, plasma PAF-AH is a unique enzyme with dual roles in human inflammatory diseases. In this chapter, on the basis of recent findings we describe the association between a naturally occurring missense mutation in plasma PAF-AH and human diseases especially including atherosclerosis and asthma. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR, and PIK3CA genes in urachal carcinoma: Occurence and prognostic significance.

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    Módos, Orsolya; Reis, Henning; Niedworok, Christian; Rübben, Herbert; Szendröi, Attila; Szász, Marcell A; Tímár, József; Baghy, Kornélia; Kovalszky, Ilona; Golabek, Tomasz; Chlosta, Piotr; Okon, Krzysztof; Peyronnet, Benoit; Mathieu, Romain; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Hollósi, Péter; Nyirády, Péter; Szarvas, Tibor

    2016-06-28

    Targeted therapy represents an attractive alternative for rare tumors such as urachal carcinoma (UrC). The aim of this study was to assess the mutations of the most commonly affected 5 genes in the targetable EGFR-pathway in UrC and comapre their frequencies to those of found in urothelial and colorectal cancer. Mutational hot-spots of selected genes were tested in 22 UrC samples by pyrosequencing. Mutational patterns were compared to those published for colorectal and urothelial cancers. Furthermore, we sought correlations between mutations and clinicopathological and follow-up data. We found 11 mutations in 10 of 22 (45%) patients. The most frequently mutated gene was KRAS (27%) followed by BRAF (18%) and NRAS (5%), while no mutations were detected in the EGFR and PIK3CA genes. No correlation was found between the mutation status and clinicopathological parameters (Sheldon/Mayo stage, tumor grade, metastases). Furthermore, none of the mutations correlated with progression-free or overall survival. The mutation pattern of UrC is more similar to colorectal than to urothelial cancer. However, the mutation characteristics of UrC seems to be unique suggesting that clinical decision-making for UrC cannot be simply adopted from urothelial or colorectal carcinoma. The high occurence of EGFR-pathway mutations warrants the testing for KRAS and BRAF mutations when considering anti-EGFR therapy in UrC.

  11. Statistical theory of neutral protein evolution by random site mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alternatively, a self-consistent mean-field based theory is developed to evaluate the protein neutrality through random single-point and multiple-point mutations by calculating the pair-wise probability profile of the amino acid residues in a library of sequences, consistent with a particular foldability criterion. The theory ...

  12. TERT promoter mutations: a genetic signature of benign and malignant thyroid tumours occurring in the context of tinea capitis irradiation.

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    Boaventura, Paula; Batista, Rui; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mendes, Adélia; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and molecular characteristics of TERTp mutations in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas occurring in the low-dose radiation exposure tinea capitis setting. Twenty-seven patients with 34 well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas and 28 patients with 29 follicular adenomas diagnosed in a Portuguese tinea capitis cohort were studied. Blood samples were obtained from all the patients. Screening for TERTp mutations was performed by PCR amplification followed by Sanger sequencing. A series of 33 sporadic thyroid adenomas was used as control. TERTp mutations were detected in six of the 28 patients with adenoma (21.4%) and in four of the 27 patients with carcinoma (14.8%). Three tumours (two carcinomas and one adenoma) had the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA (30.0%), whereas the remaining seven had the -124G > A. The 20.7% frequency of TERTp mutations in adenomas contrasts with the absence of mutations in the adenomas from the control group and from most series on record, whereas the one found in carcinomas (11.8%) is similar to those reported in the literature for sporadic carcinomas. TERTp mutations, including the tandem mutation -124/-125 GG>AA not described previously in thyroid tumours, appear to represent a genetic signature for thyroid tumours in patients submitted to low-dose X-ray irradiation. The high frequency of TERTp mutations in the adenomas of our cohort contrasts with their absence in sporadically occurring, as well as in adenomas of the Chernobyl series. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  13. Mutations in fibroblast growth-factor receptor 3 in sporadic cases of achondroplasia occur exclusively on the paternally derived chromosome.

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    Wilkin, D J; Szabo, J K; Cameron, R; Henderson, S; Bellus, G A; Mack, M L; Kaitila, I; Loughlin, J; Munnich, A; Sykes, B; Bonaventure, J; Francomano, C A

    1998-01-01

    More than 97% of achondroplasia cases are caused by one of two mutations (G1138A and G1138C) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which results in a specific amino acid substitution, G380R. Sporadic cases of achondroplasia have been associated with advanced paternal age, suggesting that these mutations occur preferentially during spermatogenesis. We have determined the parental origin of the achondroplasia mutation in 40 sporadic cases. Three distinct 1-bp polymorphisms were identified in the FGFR3 gene, within close proximity to the achondroplasia mutation site. Ninety-nine families, each with a sporadic case of achondroplasia in a child, were analyzed in this study. In this population, the achondroplasia mutation occurred on the paternal chromosome in all 40 cases in which parental origin was unambiguous. This observation is consistent with the clinical observation of advanced paternal age resulting in new cases of achondroplasia and suggests that factors influencing DNA replication or repair during spermatogenesis, but not during oogenesis, may predispose to the occurrence of the G1138 FGFR3 mutations. PMID:9718331

  14. A rare mutation in MYH7 gene occurs with overlapping phenotype.

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    Ruggiero, Lucia; Fiorillo, Chiara; Gibertini, Sara; De Stefano, Francesco; Manganelli, Fiore; Iodice, Rosa; Vitale, Floriana; Zanotti, Simona; Galderisi, Maurizio; Mora, Marina; Santoro, Lucio

    2015-02-13

    Mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) cause different muscle disorders. The specific molecular pathobiological processes that cause these different phenotypes remains unexplained. We describe three members of a family with an autosomal dominant mutation in the distal rod of MYH7 [c.5401G> A (p.Glu1801Lys)] displaying a complex phenotype characterized by Laing Distal Myopathy like phenotype, left ventricular non compaction cardiomyopathy and Fiber Type Disproportion picture at muscle biopsy. We suggest that this overlapping presentation confirm the phenotypic variability of MYH7 myopathy and may be helpful to improve the genotype phenotype correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Responses to the multitargeted MET/ALK/ROS1 inhibitor crizotinib and co-occurring mutations in lung adenocarcinomas with MET amplification or MET exon 14 skipping mutation.

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    Jorge, Susan E; Schulman, Sol; Freed, Jason A; VanderLaan, Paul A; Rangachari, Deepa; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Huberman, Mark S; Costa, Daniel B

    2015-12-01

    Genomic aberrations involving ALK, ROS1 and MET can be driver oncogenes in lung adenocarcinomas. Identification of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with activity against these tumors and of preclinical systems to model response are warranted. We analyzed cases with lung adenocarcinomas for representative genomic aberrations, evaluated the response to the multitargeted MET/ALK/ROS1 crizotinib TKI in cases with MET aberrations and profiled lung cancer cell lines with the aforementioned genomic changes. Lung cancer cell lines with ALK rearrangement, ROS1 rearrangement or MET amplification had expected in vitro responses to crizotinib and the ALK/ROS1 TKI ceritinib. However, a commercially-available cell line with MET exon 14 skipping mutation and co-occurring PIK3CA-p.Glu545Lys mutation did not respond to crizotinib; suggesting the latter abrogated response. 10% of MET exon 14 skipping mutation co-occurred with PIK3CA mutation in the TCGA cohort. Putative crizotinib-responsive somatic mutations (ALK rearrangements, ROS1 rearrangements, high level MET amplification or MET exon 14 skipping mutations) were present in 10% of lung adenocarcinomas analyzed at our service and in 9.5% of the TCGA lung adenocarcinoma database. One patient each whose advanced tumors harbored high level MET amplification with wild-type PIK3CA or MET exon 14 skipping mutation with PIK3CA-p.Glu542Lys had significant responses to crizotinib; suggesting that PIK3CA co-mutation did not affect clinical response. Approximately 10% of lung adenocarcinomas harbor aberrations that are targetable using the approved multitargeted TKI crizotinib. MET exon 14 skipping mutation predicts for response to MET TKIs in human lung adenocarcinomas but co-occurrence of PIK3CA mutation needs to be better evaluated as a modifier of response to TKI therapy. MET TKIs should not be omitted from MET exon 14 skipping mutated tumors until further preclinical and clinical data can confirm or refute mechanisms of primary or

  16. Lipoprotein lipase S447X: a naturally occurring gain-of-function mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Jaap; Nierman, Melchior C.; Ross, Colin J.; Jukema, Jan Wouter; Hayden, Michael R.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2006-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in the circulation and promotes the hepatic uptake of remnant lipoproteins. Since the gene was cloned in 1989, more than 100 LPL gene mutations have been identified, the majority of which cause loss of enzymatic function. In contrast to this, the

  17. Oncogene mutations, copy number gains and mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI frequently occur together in tumor cells.

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    Junichi Soh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in one allele of an oncogene (heterozygous mutations are widely believed to be sufficient for tumorigenesis. However, mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI has been observed in tumors and cell lines harboring mutations of oncogenes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined 1 mutational status, 2 copy number gains (CNGs and 3 relative ratio between mutant and wild type alleles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and EGFR genes by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR assay in over 400 human tumors, cell lines, and xenografts of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. Examination of a public database indicated that homozygous mutations of five oncogenes were frequent (20% in 833 cell lines of 12 tumor types. Our data indicated two major forms of MASI: 1 MASI with CNG, either complete or partial; and 2 MASI without CNG (uniparental disomy; UPD, due to complete loss of wild type allele. MASI was a frequent event in mutant EGFR (75% and was due mainly to CNGs, while MASI, also frequent in mutant KRAS (58%, was mainly due to UPD. Mutant: wild type allelic ratios at the genomic level were precisely maintained after transcription. KRAS mutations or CNGs were significantly associated with increased ras GTPase activity, as measured by ELISA, and the two molecular changes were synergistic. Of 237 lung adenocarcinoma tumors, the small number with both KRAS mutation and CNG were associated with shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: MASI is frequently present in mutant EGFR and KRAS tumor cells, and is associated with increased mutant allele transcription and gene activity. The frequent finding of mutations, CNGs and MASI occurring together in tumor cells indicates that these three genetic alterations, acting together, may have a greater role in the development or maintenance of the malignant phenotype than any individual alteration.

  18. Analysis of naturally occurring mutations in the human lipodystrophy protein seipin reveals multiple potential pathogenic mechanisms.

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    Sim, M F Michelle; Talukder, M Mesbah Uddin; Dennis, Rowena J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Edwardson, J Michael; Rochford, Justin J

    2013-11-01

    In humans, disruption of the gene BSCL2, encoding the protein seipin, causes congenital generalised lipodystrophy (CGL) with severe insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. While the causative gene has been known for over a decade, the molecular functions of seipin are only now being uncovered. Most pathogenic mutations in BSCL2 represent substantial disruptions including significant deletions and frameshifts. However, several more subtle mutations have been reported that cause premature stop codons or single amino acid substitutions. Here we have examined these mutant forms of seipin to gain insight into how they may cause CGL. We generated constructs expressing mutant seipin proteins and determined their expression and localisation. We also assessed their capacity to recruit the key adipogenic phosphatidic acid phosphatase lipin 1, a recently identified molecular role of seipin in developing adipocytes. Finally, we used atomic force microscopy to define the oligomeric structure of seipin and to determine whether this is affected by the mutations. We show that the R275X mutant of seipin is not expressed in pre-adipocytes. While the other premature stop mutant forms fail to bind lipin 1 appropriately, the point mutants T78A, L91P and A212P all retain this capacity. We demonstrate that wild-type human seipin forms oligomers of 12 subunits in a circular configuration but that the L91P and A212P mutants of seipin do not. Our study represents the most comprehensive analysis so far of mutants of seipin causing lipodystrophy and reveals several different molecular mechanisms by which these mutations may cause disease.

  19. Treatment of Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Suicidality among Adolescents: A Randomized Trial

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    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Spirito, Anthony; Kahler, Christopher W.; Hunt, Jeffrey; Monti, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study tested a cognitive-behavioral treatment protocol for adolescents with a co-occurring alcohol or other drug use disorder (AOD) and suicidality in a randomized clinical trial. Method: Forty adolescents (M[subscript age] = 15 years; 68% female, 89% White) and their families recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital were…

  20. Characterization of a naturally-occurring p27 mutation predisposing to multiple endocrine tumors

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    Pulz Elke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p27Kip1 (p27 is an important negative regulator of the cell cycle and a putative tumor suppressor. The finding that a spontaneous germline frameshift mutation in Cdkn1b (encoding p27 causes the MENX multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome in the rat provided the first evidence that Cdkn1b is a tumor susceptibility gene for endocrine tumors. Noteworthy, germline p27 mutations were also identified in human patients presenting with endocrine tumors. At present, it is not clear which features of p27 are crucial for this tissue-specific tumor predisposition in both rats and humans. It was shown that the MENX-associated Cdkn1b mutation causes reduced expression of the encoded protein, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. To better understand the role of p27 in tumor predisposition and to characterize the MENX animal model at the molecular level, a prerequisite for future preclinical studies, we set out to assess the functional properties of the MENX-associated p27 mutant protein (named p27fs177 in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, p27fs177 retains some properties of the wild-type p27 (p27wt protein: it localizes to the nucleus; it interacts with cyclin-dependent kinases and, to lower extent, with cyclins. In contrast to p27wt, p27fs177 is highly unstable and rapidly degraded in every phase of the cell-cycle, including quiescence. It is in part degraded by Skp2-dependent proteasomal proteolysis, similarly to p27wt. Photobleaching studies showed reduced motility of p27fs177 in the nucleus compared to p27wt, suggesting that in this compartment p27fs177 is part of a multi-protein complex, likely together with the degradation machinery. Studies of primary rat newborn fibroblasts (RNF established from normal and MENX-affected littermates confirmed the rapid degradation of p27fs177 in vivo which can be rescued by Bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor drug. Overexpression of the negative regulators microRNA-221/222 plays no role in

  1. Effects of naturally occurring mutations in CUB-1 domain on synthesis, stability, and activity of ADAMTS-13.

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    Zhou, Zhou; Jing, Hua; Tao, Zhenyin; Choi, Huiwan; Aboulfatova, Khatira; Moake, Joel; Li, Renhao; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2009-07-01

    Upon stimulation, endothelial cells release von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the unusually large (UL) and hyperactive forms that are rapidly cleaved by ADAMTS-13. Mutations in the ADAMTS13 gene result in ULVWF-mediated thrombosis found in patients with familial thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP). ADAMTS-13 fits in the consensus of the ADAMTS family metalloproteases, but also contains two unique C- terminal CUB domains. Studying mutations in CUB domains could provide insights into the functional role of these domains. Three naturally occurring mutations (C1213Y, W1245del and K1256FS) in the CUB-1 domain found in patients with TTP were expressed in Hela cells. The secretion, stability and VWF-cleaving activity of the mutants under static and flow conditions were examined. The mutations impaired secretion of ADAMTS-13 to apical surface, but not to extracellular matrix of transfected Hela cells. C1213Y and K1256FS also accelerated, whereas W1245del delayed, extracellular degradation of the mutants. The mutations also resulted in a moderate decrease in cleaving plasma VWF under static conditions. However, the mutated ADAMTS-13 bound to VWF substrate similarly as the wild-type metalloprotease and remained active in cleaving (UL)VWF under flow conditions. The CUB-1 domain is critical for ADAMTS-13 secretion and stability upon secretion. ADAMTS-13 deficiency found in TTP patients could be resulted from reduced ADAMTS-13 secretion and, in the case of C1213Y and K1256FS accelerated degradation. W1245del is highly resistant to degradation and active in cleaving VWF.

  2. Rules of co-occurring mutations characterize the antigenic evolution of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses.

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    Chen, Haifen; Zhou, Xinrui; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-12-05

    The human influenza viruses undergo rapid evolution (especially in hemagglutinin (HA), a glycoprotein on the surface of the virus), which enables the virus population to constantly evade the human immune system. Therefore, the vaccine has to be updated every year to stay effective. There is a need to characterize the evolution of influenza viruses for better selection of vaccine candidates and the prediction of pandemic strains. Studies have shown that the influenza hemagglutinin evolution is driven by the simultaneous mutations at antigenic sites. Here, we analyze simultaneous or co-occurring mutations in the HA protein of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses to predict potential mutations, characterizing the antigenic evolution. We obtain the rules of mutation co-occurrence using association rule mining after extracting HA1 sequences and detect co-mutation sites under strong selective pressure. Then we predict the potential drifts with specific mutations of the viruses based on the rules and compare the results with the "observed" mutations in different years. The sites under frequent mutations are in antigenic regions (epitopes) or receptor binding sites. Our study demonstrates the co-occurring site mutations obtained by rule mining can capture the evolution of influenza viruses, and confirms that cooperative interactions among sites of HA1 protein drive the influenza antigenic evolution.

  3. Precision therapy for epilepsy due to KCNT1 mutations: A randomized trial of oral quinidine.

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    Mullen, Saul A; Carney, Patrick W; Roten, Annie; Ching, Michael; Lightfoot, Paul A; Churilov, Leonid; Nair, Umesh; Li, Melody; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2018-01-02

    To evaluate quinidine as a precision therapy for severe epilepsy due to gain of function mutations in the potassium channel gene KCNT1. A single-center, inpatient, order-randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of oral quinidine included 6 patients with severe autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) due to KCNT1 mutation. Order was block randomized and blinded. Four-day treatment blocks were used with a 2-day washout between. Dose started at 900 mg over 3 divided doses then, in subsequent participants, was reduced to 600 mg, then 300 mg. Primary outcome was seizure frequency measured on continuous video-EEG in those completing the trial. Prolonged QT interval occurred in the first 2 patients at doses of 900 and 600 mg quinidine per day, respectively, despite serum quinidine levels well below the therapeutic range (0.61 and 0.51 μg/mL, reference range 1.3-5.0 μg/mL). Four patients completed treatment with 300 mg/d without adverse events. Patients completing the trial had very frequent seizures (mean 14 per day, SD 7, median 13, interquartile range 10-18). Seizures per day were nonsignificantly increased by quinidine (median 2, 95% confidence interval -1.5 to +5, p = 0.15) and no patient had a 50% seizure reduction. Quinidine did not show efficacy in adults and teenagers with ADNFLE. Dose-limiting cardiac side effects were observed even in the presence of low measured serum quinidine levels. Although small, this trial suggests use of quinidine in ADNFLE is likely to be ineffective coupled with considerable cardiac risks. Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration Clinical Trial Registry (trial number 2015/0151). This study provides Class II evidence that for persons with severe epilepsy due to gain of function mutations in the potassium channel gene KCNT1, quinidine does not significantly reduce seizure frequency. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. A novel MYH7 mutation occurring independently in French and Norwegian Laing distal myopathy families and de novo in one Finnish patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Behin, Anthony; Suominen, Tiina; Raheem, Olayinka; Penttilä, Sini; Parton, Matt; Eymard, Bruno; Dahl, Arve; Udd, Bjarne

    2011-06-01

    Laing early-onset distal myopathy is a rare autosomal dominant myopathy and caused by mutations in the MYH7 gene, encoding the slow beta myosin heavy chain. We report the first molecularly verified Laing distal myopathy in a French family caused by a novel p.Glu1508del mutation in the MYH7 gene. Interestingly, we identified the identical mutation in an unrelated Norwegian family and, as a de novo mutation, in one sporadic Finnish patient. Described in detail are the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of 5 patients from the French family. The phenotype in the Finnish patient and the Norwegian patients is largely similar. This mutation causes a benign myopathy within the range of previously reported Laing myopathy phenotype variations. Onset of weakness in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles occurred in early childhood in all patients. Finger extensor and neck flexor weakness together with Achilles tendon retractions were other frequent findings. The independent recurrence of the identical mutation without any founder background may reflect a mutational susceptibility of this residue, in accordance with some other MYH7 mutations previously reported. De novo mutations seem to be frequent in Laing distal myopathy. This is of clinical importance since a dominant family history is missing, which may confuse differential diagnostic efforts.

  5. Germline mutations in the PALB2 gene are population specific and occur with low frequencies in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrand, Heide; Sutter, Christian; Honisch, Ellen; Gross, Eva; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Schem, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Ditsch, Nina; Gress, Verena; Kiechle, Marion; Bartram, Claus R; Schmutzler, Rita K; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons

    2011-06-01

    The Partner and Localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2) protein has been linked to Fanconi anemia and breast cancer predisposition. Here we present data of a comprehensive mutation screening of the PALB2 gene in 818 familial cases of breast cancer from Germany. By analyzing the entire coding region of PALB2, we found seven truncating mutations (six of them novel) in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations. In addition, two novel potentially disease causing missense mutations were found. Remarkably, only one mutation reported previously in other populations, was also identified in the German population. No PALB2 mutation carriers were identified in 450 unaffected controls. Thus, our observations indicate a low prevalence of deleterious PALB2 mutations and a specific mutation profile within the German population. As PALB2-deficient tumors were shown to be sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, our study has implications for newly developed, favorable treatment options in familial breast cancer. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Compactness of viral genomes: effect of disperse and localized random mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lošdorfer Božič, Anže; Micheletti, Cristian; Podgornik, Rudolf; Tubiana, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Genomes of single-stranded RNA viruses have evolved to optimize several concurrent properties. One of them is the architecture of their genomic folds, which must not only feature precise structural elements at specific positions, but also allow for overall spatial compactness. The latter was shown to be disrupted by random synonymous mutations, a disruption which can consequently negatively affect genome encapsidation. In this study, we use three mutation schemes with different degrees of locality to mutate the genomes of phage MS2 and Brome Mosaic virus in order to understand the observed sensitivity of the global compactness of their folds. We find that mutating local stretches of their genomes’ sequence or structure is less disruptive to their compactness compared to inducing randomly-distributed mutations. Our findings are indicative of a mechanism for the conservation of compactness acting on a global scale of the genomes, and have several implications for understanding the interplay between local and global architecture of viral RNA genomes.

  7. Statistical theory of neutral protein evolution by random site mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    theory may provide a new perspective in de novo protein design, in-vivo/in-vitro protein evolution and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Keywords. Neutral evolution; protein design; mutations; foldability criteria. 1. Introduction. Understanding the relationship between protein sequences and structures can be partially ...

  8. Effects of naturally occurring missense mutations and G525V in the hydratase domain of human d-bifunctional protein on hydratase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirou Tsuchida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available d-bifunctional protein (d-BP deficiency is thought to lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. To investigate the effect of naturally occurring missense mutations in the hydratase domain in d-BP, we constructed several d-BP hydratase variants and measured their activities. Missense mutations at sites whose conservation rates among 30 eukaryotes were < 70% did not affect hydratase activity. We predicted that missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids would markedly reduce activity. However, R562H and R562L, naturally occurring missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids, did not reduce activity. This result suggests that a missense mutation in a highly conserved amino acid does not always lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. We also investigated the effect of G525V, which had been found in a mildly symptomatic patient with d-BP deficiency who was heterozygous for G525 and G658X. G525V markedly reduced hydratase activity. We had predicted that heterozygous G525V and G658X would lead to severely disordered lipid metabolism. However, the symptoms were inconsistent with this prediction. Characterizing mutations in the d-BP gene and the symptoms of d-BP deficiency may require pleiotropy, not only in vitro, studies.

  9. Neurofibromin 1 (NF1 Defects Are Common in Human Ovarian Serous Carcinomas and Co-occur with TP53 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Sangha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC is the most common and lethal histologic type of ovarian epithelial malignancy. Mutations of TP53 and dysfunction of the Brca1 and/or Brca2 tumor-suppressor proteins have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of a large fraction of OSCs, but frequent somatic mutations in other well-established tumor-suppressor genes have not been identified. Using a genome-wide screen of DNA copy number alterations in 36 primary OSCs, we identified two tumors with apparent homozygous deletions of the NF1 gene. Subsequently, 18 ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines and 41 primary OSCs were evaluated for NF1 alterations. Markedly reduced or absent expression of Nf1 protein was observed in 6 of the 18 cell lines, and using the protein truncation test and sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA, NF1 mutations resulting in deletion of exons and/or aberrant splicing of NF1 transcripts were detected in 5 of the 6 cell lines with loss of NF1 expression. Similarly, NF1 alterations including homozygous deletions and splicing mutations were identified in 9 (22% of 41 primary OSCs. As expected, tumors and cell lines with NF1 defects lacked mutations in KRAS or BRAF but showed Ras pathway activation based on immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated MAPK (primary tumors or increased levels of GTP-bound Ras (cell lines. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene was mutated in all OSCs with documented NF1 mutation, suggesting that the pathways regulated by these two tumor-suppressor proteins often cooperate in the development of ovarian carcinomas with serous differentiation.

  10. Naturally occurring mutations in large surface genes related to occult infection of hepatitis B virus genotype C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms related to occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, particularly those based on genotype C infection, have rarely been determined thus far in the ongoing efforts to determine infection mechanisms. Therefore, we aim to elucidate the mutation patterns in the surface open reading frame (S ORF underlying occult infections of HBV genotype C in the present study. Nested PCRs were applied to 624 HBV surface antigen (HBsAg negative Korean subjects. Cloning and sequencing of the S ORF gene was applied to 41 occult cases and 40 control chronic carriers. Forty-one (6.6% of the 624 Korean adults with HBsAg-negative serostatus were found to be positive for DNA according to nested PCR tests. Mutation frequencies in the three regions labeled here as preS1, preS2, and S were significantly higher in the occult subjects compared to the carriers in all cases. A total of two types of deletions, preS1 deletions in the start codon and preS2 deletions as well as nine types of point mutations were significantly implicated in the occult infection cases. Mutations within the "a" determinant region in HBsAg were found more frequently in the occult subjects than in the carriers. Mutations leading to premature termination of S ORF were found in 16 occult subjects (39.0% but only in one subject from among the carriers (2.5%. In conclusion, our data suggest that preS deletions, the premature termination of S ORF, and "a" determinant mutations are associated with occult infections of HBV genotype C among a HBsAg-negative population. The novel mutation patterns related to occult infection introduced in the present study can help to broaden our understanding of HBV occult infections.

  11. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  12. Mutations of the Spliceosome Complex Genes Occur In Adult Patients but Are Very Rare In Children with Myeloid Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Moetter, Jessica; Yoshida, Kenichi

    patient was diagnosed at age of 17 years with systemic mastocytosis positive for c-kit D816V mutation, and with associated clonal hematological non-mast cell lineage disease: refractory cytopenia with normal cytogenetics. SCT was also performed with success on this patient. To ensure that the low rate...... in methylation and chromatin regulation (TET2, DNMT3A, ASXL1). Although mutations of these genes are present at high frequency in adult cohorts, they are very rare events in children with myeloid disease. Based on the results from a large-scale whole exome sequencing study of adult patients with myeloid....... In summary, re-sequencing of 3 spliceosome gene hotspots revealed the presence of heterozygous mutations in 2/339 children and 4/19 adults with myeloid disease. The analysis of another gene-hotspot implicated in the MDS whole exome study, SF3B1 K700 is ongoing, but all pediatric cases analyzed to date were...

  13. Can Random Mutation Mimic Design?: A Guided Inquiry Laboratory for Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinowski, Steven T.; Taper, Mark L.; Metz, Anneke M.

    2006-01-01

    Complex biological structures, such as the human eye, have been interpreted as evidence for a creator for over three centuries. This raises the question of whether random mutation can create such adaptations. In this article, we present an inquiry-based laboratory experiment that explores this question using paper airplanes as a model organism. The main task for students in this investigation is to figure out how to simulate paper airplane evolution (including reproduction, inheritance, mutat...

  14. Combinatorics of Tandem Duplication Random Loss Mutations on Circular Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Tom; Chu, An-Chiang; Middendorf, Martin; Bernt, Matthias

    2016-09-26

    The tandem duplication random loss operation (TDRL) is an important genome rearrangement operation in metazoan mitochondrial genomes. A TDRL consists of a duplication of a contiguous set of genes in tandem followed by a random loss of one copy of each duplicated gene. This paper presents an analysis of the combinatorics of TDRLs on circular genomes, e.g., the mitochondrial genome. In particular, results on TDRLs for circular genomes and their linear representatives are established. Moreover, the distance between gene orders with respect to linear TDRLs and circular TDRLs is studied. An analysis of the available animal mitochondrial gene orders shows the practical relevance of the theoretical results.

  15. Folded Proteins Occur Frequently in Libraries of Random Amino Acid Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Alan R.; Sauer, Robert T.

    1994-03-01

    A library of synthetic genes encoding 80- to 100-residue proteins composed mainly of random combinations of glutamine (Q), leucine (L), and arginine (R) has been expressed in Escherichia coli. These genes also encode an epitope tag and six carboxyl-terminal histidines. Screening of this library by immunoblotting showed that 5% of these QLR proteins are expressed at readily detectable levels. Three well-expressed QLR proteins were purified and characterized. Each of these proteins has significant α-helical content, is largely resistant to degradation by Pronase, and has a distinct oligomeric structure. In addition, one protein unfolds in a highly cooperative manner. These properties of the QLR proteins demonstrate that they possess folded structures with some native-like properties. The QLR proteins differ from most natural proteins, however, in being remarkably resistant to denaturant-induced and thermal-induced unfolding and in being relatively insoluble in the absence of denaturants.

  16. A naturally occurring mutation in ropB suppresses SpeB expression and reduces M1T1 group A streptococcal systemic virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hollands

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of group A streptococcus (GAS have noted an inverse relationship between SpeB expression and invasive disease. However, the role of SpeB in the course of infection is still unclear. In this study we utilize a SpeB-negative M1T1 clinical isolate, 5628, with a naturally occurring mutation in the gene encoding the regulator RopB, to elucidate the role of RopB and SpeB in systemic virulence. Allelic exchange mutagenesis was used to replace the mutated ropB allele in 5628 with the intact allele from the well characterized isolate 5448. The inverse allelic exchange was also performed to replace the intact ropB in 5448 with the mutated allele from 5628. An intact ropB was found to be essential for SpeB expression. While the ropB mutation was shown to have no effect on hemolysis of RBC's, extracellular DNase activity or survival in the presence of neutrophils, strains with the mutated ropB allele were less virulent in murine systemic models of infection. An isogenic SpeB knockout strain containing an intact RopB showed similarly reduced virulence. Microarray analysis found genes of the SpeB operon to be the primary target of RopB regulation. These data show that an intact RopB and efficient SpeB production are necessary for systemic infection with GAS.

  17. Quantitative analysis of clinically relevant mutations occurring in lymphoid cells harboring γ-retrovirus-encoded hsvtk suicide genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Olszewska, M; Capacio, V; Stefanski, J; Przybylowski, M; Samakoglu, S; Chang, AH; Sadelain, M; Rivière, I

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo regulation of T lymphocyte activity by the activation of a suicide mechanism is an essential paradigm for the safety of adoptive cell therapies. In light of reports showing that γ-retroviral vector-encoded herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (hsvtk) undergoes recombination, we undertook a thorough investigation of the genomic stability of SFG-based vectors using two variants of the wild-type hsvtk gene. In a large panel of independent clones, we demonstrate that both hsvtk genes undergo recombination with molecular signatures indicative of template switching in GC-rich regions displaying homology at the deletion junctions or RNA splicing. In the absence of ganciclovir selection, the frequency of recombination is 3% per retroviral replication cycle. Our results underscore the importance of the five nucleotide difference between the two hsvtk genes that account for the presence of recombinogenic hot spots in one variant and not the other, indicating that the probability of RNA splicing is influenced by minute nucleotide changes in sequences adjacent to the splice donor and acceptor sites. Furthermore, our mutational analysis in an unbiased panel of human lymphoid cells (that is, without immune or ganciclovir-mediated selective pressure) provides a robust in vitro assay to predict and quantify clinically relevant mutations in hsvtk suicide genes, which can be applied to studying and improving the stability of any transgene expressed in γ-retroviral or lentiviral vectors. PMID:18563185

  18. Quantitative analysis of clinically relevant mutations occurring in lymphoid cells harboring gamma-retrovirus-encoded hsvtk suicide genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Olszewska, M; Capacio, V; Stefanski, J; Przybylowski, M; Samakoglu, S; Chang, A H; Sadelain, M; Rivière, I

    2008-11-01

    The in vivo regulation of T lymphocyte activity by the activation of a suicide mechanism is an essential paradigm for the safety of adoptive cell therapies. In light of reports showing that gamma-retroviral vector-encoded herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (hsvtk) undergoes recombination, we undertook a thorough investigation of the genomic stability of SFG-based vectors using two variants of the wild-type hsvtk gene. In a large panel of independent clones, we demonstrate that both hsvtk genes undergo recombination with molecular signatures indicative of template switching in GC-rich regions displaying homology at the deletion junctions or RNA splicing. In the absence of ganciclovir selection, the frequency of recombination is 3% per retroviral replication cycle. Our results underscore the importance of the five nucleotide difference between the two hsvtk genes that account for the presence of recombinogenic hot spots in one variant and not the other, indicating that the probability of RNA splicing is influenced by minute nucleotide changes in sequences adjacent to the splice donor and acceptor sites. Furthermore, our mutational analysis in an unbiased panel of human lymphoid cells (that is, without immune or ganciclovir-mediated selective pressure) provides a robust in vitro assay to predict and quantify clinically relevant mutations in hsvtk suicide genes, which can be applied to studying and improving the stability of any transgene expressed in gamma-retroviral or lentiviral vectors.

  19. Superantigenic activity of emm3 Streptococcus pyogenes is abrogated by a conserved, naturally occurring smeZ mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Turner

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm3 strains have been epidemiologically linked with enhanced infection severity and risk of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, a syndrome triggered by superantigenic stimulation of T cells. Comparison of S. pyogenes strains causing STSS demonstrated that emm3 strains were surprisingly less mitogenic than other emm-types (emm1, emm12, emm18, emm28, emm87, emm89 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating poor superantigenic activity. We identified a 13 bp deletion in the superantigen smeZ gene of all emm3 strains tested. The deletion led to a premature stop codon in smeZ, and was not present in other major emm-types tested. Expression of a functional non-M3-smeZ gene successfully enhanced mitogenic activity in emm3 S. pyogenes and also restored mitogenic activity to emm1 and emm89 S. pyogenes strains where the smeZ gene had been disrupted. In contrast, the M3-smeZ gene with the 13 bp deletion could not enhance or restore mitogenicity in any of these S. pyogenes strains, confirming that M3-smeZ is non-functional regardless of strain background. The mutation in M3-smeZ reduced the potential for M3 S. pyogenes to induce cytokines in human tonsil, but not during invasive infection of superantigen-sensitive mice. Notwithstanding epidemiological associations with STSS and disease severity, emm3 strains have inherently poor superantigenicity that is explained by a conserved mutation in smeZ.

  20. Online interventions for problem gamblers with and without co-occurring mental health symptoms: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Cunningham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbidity between problem gambling and depression or anxiety is common. Further, the treatment needs of people with co-occurring gambling and mental health symptoms may be different from those of problem gamblers who do not have a co-occurring mental health concern. The current randomized controlled trial (RCT will evaluate whether there is a benefit to providing access to mental health Internet interventions (G + MH intervention in addition to an Internet intervention for problem gambling (G-only intervention in participants with gambling problems who do or do not have co-occurring mental health symptoms. Methods Potential participants will be screened using an online survey to identify participants meeting criteria for problem gambling. As part of the baseline screening process, measures of current depression and anxiety will be assessed. Eligible participants agreeing (N = 280 to take part in the study will be randomized to one of two versions of an online intervention for gamblers – an intervention that just targets gambling issues (G-only versus a website that contains interventions for depression and anxiety in addition to an intervention for gamblers (G + MH. It is predicted that problem gamblers who do not have co-occurring mental health symptoms will display no significant difference between intervention conditions at a six-month follow-up. However, for those with co-occurring mental health symptoms, it is predicted that participants receiving access to the G + MH website will display significantly reduced gambling outcomes at six-month follow-up as compared to those provided with G-only website. Discussion The trial will produce information on the best means of providing online help to gamblers with and without co-occurring mental health symptoms. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02800096 ; Registration date: June 14, 2016.

  1. Can random mutation mimic design?: a guided inquiry laboratory for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Steven T; Taper, Mark L; Metz, Anneke M

    2006-11-01

    Complex biological structures, such as the human eye, have been interpreted as evidence for a creator for over three centuries. This raises the question of whether random mutation can create such adaptations. In this article, we present an inquiry-based laboratory experiment that explores this question using paper airplanes as a model organism. The main task for students in this investigation is to figure out how to simulate paper airplane evolution (including reproduction, inheritance, mutation, and selection). In addition, the lab requires students to practice analytic thinking and to carefully delineate the implications of their results.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Intervention for Co-occurring Substance Use and Severe Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Glynn, Shirley M.; Cather, Corrine; Xie, Haiyi; Zarate, Roberto; Smith, Lindy Fox; Clark, Robin E.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Feldman, James

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders have a profound impact on the course of severe mental illnesses and on the family, but little research has evaluated the impact of family intervention for this population. To address this question, a randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing a brief (2–3 mo) Family Education (ED) program with a longer-term (9–18 mo) program that combined education with teaching communication and problem-solving skills, Family Intervention for Dual Disorders (FIDD). A total of 108 clients (77% schizophrenia-spectrum) and a key relative were randomized to either ED or FIDD and assessed at baseline and every 6 months for 3 years. Rates of retention of families in both programs were moderate. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that clients in both programs improved in psychiatric, substance abuse, and functional outcomes, as did key relatives in knowledge of co-occurring disorders, burden, and mental health functioning. Clients in FIDD had significantly less severe overall psychiatric symptoms and psychotic symptoms and tended to improve more in functioning. Relatives in FIDD improved more in mental health functioning and knowledge of co-occurring disorders. There were no consistent differences between the programs in substance abuse severity or family burden. The findings support the utility of family intervention for co-occurring disorders, and the added benefits of communication and problem-solving training, but also suggest the need to modify these programs to retain more families in treatment in order to provide them with the information and skills they need to overcome the effects of these disorders. PMID:22282453

  3. The Jackprot Simulation Couples Mutation Rate with Natural Selection to Illustrate How Protein Evolution Is Not Random

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Avelina; Bai, Chunyan Y.

    2016-01-01

    Protein evolution is not a random process. Views which attribute randomness to molecular change, deleterious nature to single-gene mutations, insufficient geological time, or population size for molecular improvements to occur, or invoke “design creationism” to account for complexity in molecular structures and biological processes, are unfounded. Scientific evidence suggests that natural selection tinkers with molecular improvements by retaining adaptive peptide sequence. We used slot-machine probabilities and ion channels to show biological directionality on molecular change. Because ion channels reside in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, their residue location must be in balance with the membrane's hydrophobic/philic nature; a selective “pore” for ion passage is located within the hydrophobic region. We contrasted the random generation of DNA sequence for KcsA, a bacterial two-transmembrane-domain (2TM) potassium channel, from Streptomyces lividans, with an under-selection scenario, the “jackprot,” which predicted much faster evolution than by chance. We wrote a computer program in JAVA APPLET version 1.0 and designed an online interface, The Jackprot Simulation http://faculty.rwu.edu/cbai/JackprotSimulation.htm, to model a numerical interaction between mutation rate and natural selection during a scenario of polypeptide evolution. Winning the “jackprot,” or highest-fitness complete-peptide sequence, required cumulative smaller “wins” (rewarded by selection) at the first, second, and third positions in each of the 161 KcsA codons (“jackdons” that led to “jackacids” that led to the “jackprot”). The “jackprot” is a didactic tool to demonstrate how mutation rate coupled with natural selection suffices to explain the evolution of specialized proteins, such as the complex six-transmembrane (6TM) domain potassium, sodium, or calcium channels. Ancestral DNA sequences coding for 2TM-like proteins underwent nucleotide

  4. The Jackprot Simulation Couples Mutation Rate with Natural Selection to Illustrate How Protein Evolution Is Not Random.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina; Bai, Chunyan Y

    2011-09-01

    Protein evolution is not a random process. Views which attribute randomness to molecular change, deleterious nature to single-gene mutations, insufficient geological time, or population size for molecular improvements to occur, or invoke "design creationism" to account for complexity in molecular structures and biological processes, are unfounded. Scientific evidence suggests that natural selection tinkers with molecular improvements by retaining adaptive peptide sequence. We used slot-machine probabilities and ion channels to show biological directionality on molecular change. Because ion channels reside in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes, their residue location must be in balance with the membrane's hydrophobic/philic nature; a selective "pore" for ion passage is located within the hydrophobic region. We contrasted the random generation of DNA sequence for KcsA, a bacterial two-transmembrane-domain (2TM) potassium channel, from Streptomyces lividans, with an under-selection scenario, the "jackprot," which predicted much faster evolution than by chance. We wrote a computer program in JAVA APPLET version 1.0 and designed an online interface, The Jackprot Simulation http://faculty.rwu.edu/cbai/JackprotSimulation.htm, to model a numerical interaction between mutation rate and natural selection during a scenario of polypeptide evolution. Winning the "jackprot," or highest-fitness complete-peptide sequence, required cumulative smaller "wins" (rewarded by selection) at the first, second, and third positions in each of the 161 KcsA codons ("jackdons" that led to "jackacids" that led to the "jackprot"). The "jackprot" is a didactic tool to demonstrate how mutation rate coupled with natural selection suffices to explain the evolution of specialized proteins, such as the complex six-transmembrane (6TM) domain potassium, sodium, or calcium channels. Ancestral DNA sequences coding for 2TM-like proteins underwent nucleotide "edition" and gene duplications to generate the 6

  5. Adaptive Mutations That Occurred during Circulation in Humans of H1N1 Influenza Virus in the 2009 Pandemic Enhance Virulence in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, A; Sauter, M; Daxer, M A; McHardy, A C; Klingel, K; Gabriel, G

    2015-07-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, infection attack rates were particularly high among young individuals who suffered from pneumonia with occasional death. Moreover, previously reported determinants of mammalian adaptation and pathogenicity were not present in 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses. Thus, it was proposed that unknown viral factors might have contributed to disease severity in humans. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of two clinical 2009 pandemic H1N1 strains that belong to the very early and later phases of the pandemic. We identified mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) that occurred during pandemic progression and mediate increased virulence in mice. Lethal disease outcome correlated with elevated viral replication in the alveolar epithelium, increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, pneumonia, and lymphopenia in mice. These findings show that viral mutations that have occurred during pandemic circulation among humans are associated with severe disease in mice. In this study, novel determinants of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pathogenicity were identified in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) genes. In contrast to highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, increased virulence in mice did not correlate with enhanced polymerase activity but with reduced activity. Lethal 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection in mice correlated with lymphopenia and severe pneumonia. These studies suggest that molecular mechanisms that mediate 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pathogenicity are distinct from those that mediate avian influenza virus pathogenicity in mice. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Multi-site randomized trial of behavioral interventions for women with co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Denise A.; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Jiang, Huiping; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Cohen, Lisa R.; Miele, Gloria M.; Killeen, Therese; Brigham, Gregory S.; Zhang, Yulei; Hansen, Cheri; Hodgkins, Candace; Hatch-Maillette, Mary; Brown, Chanda; Kulaga, Agatha; Kristman-Valente, Allison; Chu, Melissa; Sage, Robert; Robinson, James A.; Liu, David; Nunes, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of Seeking Safety (SS), an integrated cognitive behavioral treatment for substance use disorder (SUD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), to an active comparison health education group (Women’s Health Education [WHE]) within NIDA’s Clinical Trials Network. We randomized 353 women to receive 12 sessions of SS (M = 6.2 sessions) or WHE (M = 6.0 sessions) with follow-up assessment at post-treatment and 3-, 6-, and 12-months post-treatment. Primary outcomes were the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and PTSD Symptom Scale-Self Report (PSS-SR), and substance use (self-reported abstinence in the prior 7 days and days per week of any substance use). Intention-to-treat analysis showed large, clinically significant reductions in CAPS and PSS-SR symptoms (d = 1.94 and 1.12, respectively), but no reliable difference between conditions. Substance use outcomes were not significantly different over time between the two treatments and at follow-up showed no significant change from baseline, when 46% of participants were abstinent. Study results do not favor SS over WHE as an adjunct to SUD treatment for women with PTSD and reflect considerable opportunity to improve clinical outcomes in community-based treatments for these co-occurring conditions. PMID:19634955

  7. Cloning and Expression of Randomly Mutated Bacillus subtilisα-Amylase Genes in HB101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rabbani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate and express the randomly mutated α-amylase gene from B. subtilis strain 168. BS168F: 5′-gtgtcaagaatgtttgc-3′ and BS168R: 3′-gttttgttaaaagatga-5′ primers were used to amplify the amylase gene using the following cycle in error-prone PCR method: 94°C for 30 s, 40°C for 2 min, and 72°C for 2 min in 30 cycles that were followed with 72°C for 2 min as a post cycle. E. coli XL1 blue was used as host for plasmid construction. Amylase enzyme activity assay was performed using continuous spectrophotometric procedures. Results of sequencing showed that sequence was cloned from the first ATG and with the correct open reading frame. Having confirmed the integrity of the insert, the gene was ligated into expression vector pET-15b and then further confirmed using digestion analysis. Amylase activity showed 3 clones with higher enzymatic activity compared with the wild type. Error-prone PCR method produced a mutated gene that provides amylase activity much higher than that of wild type. Sequencing the mutated genes should shed light on the important region of the genes that could be manipulated in future studies.

  8. Integrated exposure-based therapy for co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance dependence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katherine L; Teesson, Maree; Back, Sudie E; Brady, Kathleen T; Baker, Amanda L; Hopwood, Sally; Sannibale, Claudia; Barrett, Emma L; Merz, Sabine; Rosenfeld, Julia; Ewer, Philippa L

    2012-08-15

    There is concern that exposure therapy, an evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be inappropriate because of risk of relapse for patients with co-occurring substance dependence. To determine whether an integrated treatment for PTSD and substance dependence, Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure (COPE), can achieve greater reductions in PTSD and substance dependence symptom severity compared with usual treatment for substance dependence. Randomized controlled trial enrolling 103 participants who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for both PTSD and substance dependence. Participants were recruited from 2007-2009 in Sydney, Australia; outcomes were assessed at 9 months postbaseline, with interim measures collected at 6 weeks and 3 months postbaseline. Participants were randomized to receive COPE plus usual treatment (n = 55) or usual treatment alone (control) (n = 48). COPE consists of 13 individual 90-minute sessions (ie, 19.5 hours) with a clinical psychologist. Change in PTSD symptom severity as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS; scale range, 0-240) and change in severity of substance dependence as measured by the number of dependence criteria met according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI; range, 0-7), from baseline to 9-month follow-up. A change of 15 points on the CAPS scale and 1 dependence criterion on the CIDI were considered clinically significant. From baseline to 9-month follow-up, significant reductions in PTSD symptom severity were found for both the treatment group (mean difference, -38.24 [95% CI, -47.93 to -28.54]) and the control group (mean difference, -22.14 [95% CI, -30.33 to -13.95]); however, the treatment group demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in PTSD symptom severity (mean difference, -16.09 [95% CI, -29.00 to -3.19]). No significant between-group difference was found in relation to

  9. The potential for induction of autoimmune disease by a randomly-mutated self-antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2007-01-01

    The pathology of most autoimmune diseases is well described. However, the exact event that triggers the onset of the inflammatory cascade leading to disease is less certain and most autoimmune diseases are complex idiopathic diseases with no single gene known to be causative. In many cases......, a relation to an infectious disease is described, and it is thought that microbes can play a direct role in induction of autoimmunity, for instance by molecular mimicry or bystander activation of autoreactive T cells. In contrast, less attention has been given to the possibility that modified self......-antigens can be immunogenic and lead to autoimmunity against wildtype self-antigens. In theory, modified self-antigens can arise by random errors and mutations during protein synthesis and would be recognized as foreign antigens by naïve B and T lymphocytes. Here, it is postulated that the initial auto...

  10. Differential regulation of hepatitis B virus core protein expression and genome replication by a small upstream open reading frame and naturally occurring mutations in the precore region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Li; Qin, Yanli; Jia, Haodi; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Jiming; Wands, Jack R; Tong, Shuping; Li, Jisu

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcribes two subsets of 3.5-kb RNAs: precore RNA for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression, and pregenomic RNA for core and P protein translation as well as genome replication. HBeAg expression could be prevented by mutations in the precore region, while an upstream open reading frame (uORF) has been proposed as a negative regulator of core protein translation. We employed replication competent HBV DNA constructs and transient transfection experiments in Huh7 cells to verify the uORF effect and to explore the alternative function of precore RNA. Optimized Kozak sequence for the uORF or extra ATG codons as present in some HBV genotypes reduced core protein expression. G1896A nonsense mutation promoted more efficient core protein expression than mutated precore ATG, while a +1 frameshift mutation was ineffective. In conclusion, various HBeAg-negative precore mutations and mutations affecting uORF differentially regulate core protein expression and genome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hybrid Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Relaxation Training for Co-Occurring Anxiety and Alcohol Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Matt G.; Maurer, Eric W.; Thuras, Paul; Donahue, Chris; Frye, Brenda; Menary, Kyle R.; Hobbs, Jennifer; Haeny, Angela M.; Van Demark, Joani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD) is far less effective for those with a co-occurring anxiety disorder. Surprisingly, adding an independent anxiety treatment to AUD treatment does not substantially improve the poor alcohol outcomes of these patients. This may reflect the lack of attention from independent treatments to the…

  12. Do placebo effects associated with sham osteopathic procedure occur in newborns? Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Marta; Cardinali, Lucia; Barlafante, Gina; Pizzolorusso, Gianfranco; Renzetti, Cinzia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Placebo effect has been largely studied and debated in medicine. Research focused mainly on children and adults but not on newborns. In osteopathy, few studies documented this effect and no research has been conducted in newborns. To assess the presence of placebo effect in newborns using sham osteopathic manipulative treatment. Randomized control trial. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Italy. Two groups (103 patients each) of preterm infants aged 29-36 weeks without medical complications received routine pediatric care and osteopathic sham therapy was administrated to the study group only for the entire period of hospitalization. Primary end point was the mean reduction of length of stay at discharge. Secondary objective was the change in daily weight gain. 206 newborns entered the study. No difference between sham and control group was found for the primary outcome length of stay (30.0±20.3; 28.8±18.9; p=0.70). Multivariate analysis showed no difference between study and control group on length of stay. A negative association was found for gestational age (-2.33; 95% CI -3.81 to -0.85; p=0.002), birth weight (-0.01; 95% CI -0.02 to -0.01; pplacebo effect on newborns. Further discussions are opened concerning the age when placebo effect starts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations within the gene encoding the alpha1(X) chain of type X collagen (COL10A1) occur in individuals with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, G.A.; Rash, B.; Grant, M.E. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type X collagen is specifically and transiently synthesized by hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. The pattern of expression of type X collagen suggests that mutations within the encoding gene (COL10A1) may cause heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. We have previously identified two point mutations within the COL10A1 gene that would lead to amino acid substitutions within the carboxyl-terminal domain of the alpha1(X) chain in two unrelated individuals with metaphyseal condrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS). We have now used PCR followed by SSCP to analyze the coding and promoter regions of the COL10A1 gene as well as the intron/extron boundaries in six further individuals with MCDS and in eleven individuals with related forms of chondrodysplasia. Using this approach, we identified mono- and dinucleotide deletions in four individuals with MCDS in the region of the gene encoding the carboxyl-terminal domain. In these instances, the deletions led to an alteration in reading frame and premature stop codons that would alter either chain recognition or assembly of the type X collagen molecule. In two individuals with MCDS we did not detect mutations within the COL10A1 gene despite extensive analysis of the coding regions. We also did not detect mutations within COL10A1 in two individuals with MCD type Jansen, one individual with MCD plus melabsorption and neutropenia, three individuals with spondylometaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMD) type Kozlowski and five individuals with the unclassifiable forms of MCD and SMD.

  14. Identification and functional analysis of a naturally occurring E89K mutation in the ABCA1 gene of the WHAM chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attie, Alan D.; Hamon, Yannick; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Gray-Keller, Mark P.; MacDonald, Marcia L. E.; Rigot, Veronique; Tebon, Angie; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Mulligan, Jacob D.; Singaraja, Roshni R.; Bitgood, J. James; Cook, Mark E.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Chimini, Giovanna; Hayden, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The Wisconsin hypoalpha mutant (WHAM) chicken has a >90% reduction in plasma HDL due to hypercatabolism. by the kidney of lipid-poor apoA-I. The WHAM chickens have a recessive white skin phenotype caused by a single-gene mutation that maps to the chicken Z-chromosome. This corresponds to human

  15. Long-acting injectable vs oral risperidone for schizophrenia and co-occurring alcohol use disorder: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alan I; Brunette, Mary F; Dawson, Ree; Buckley, Peter; Wallace, Amy E; Hafez, Hisham; Herz, Marvin; Narasimhan, Meera; Noordsy, Douglas L; O'Keefe, Christopher; Sommi, Roger W; Steinbook, Richard M; Weeks, Marjorie

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorders worsen the course of schizophrenia. Although the atypical antipsychotic clozapine appears to decrease alcohol use in schizophrenia, risperidone does not. We have proposed that risperidone's relatively potent dopamine D2 receptor blockade may partly underlie its lack of effect on alcohol use. Since long-acting injectable (LAI) risperidone both results in lower average steady-state plasma concentrations than oral risperidone (with lower D2 receptor occupancy) and encourages adherence, it may be more likely to decrease heavy alcohol use (days per week of drinking 5 or more drinks per day) than oral risperidone. Ninety-five patients with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of schizophrenia and alcohol use disorder were randomized to 6 months of oral or LAI risperidone between 2005 and 2008. Explanatory (efficacy) analyses were carried out to evaluate the potential benefits of LAI under suitably controlled conditions (in contrast to real-world settings), with intent-to-treat analyses being secondary. Explanatory analyses showed that heavy drinking in the oral group worsened over time (P = .024) and that there was a statistical trend toward significance in the difference between the changes in heavy drinking days in the oral and LAI groups (P = .054). Furthermore, the 2 groups differed in the mean number of drinking days per week (P = .035). The intent-to-treat analyses showed no difference in heavy drinking but did show a difference in average drinking days per week similar to that obtained from the explanatory analyses (P = .018). Neither explanatory nor intent-to-treat analyses showed any between-group differences in alcohol use as measured by intensity or the Alcohol Use Scale. The plasma concentrations of the active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone were significantly lower in patients taking LAI (P risperidone. Nonetheless, our data suggest that injectable risperidone may be a better choice than the oral form for these dual diagnosis patients. Clinical

  16. Random Evolutionary Dynamics Driven by Fitness and House-of-Cards Mutations: Sampling Formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huillet, Thierry E.

    2017-07-01

    We first revisit the multi-allelic mutation-fitness balance problem, especially when mutations obey a house of cards condition, where the discrete-time deterministic evolutionary dynamics of the allelic frequencies derives from a Shahshahani potential. We then consider multi-allelic Wright-Fisher stochastic models whose deviation to neutrality is from the Shahshahani mutation/selection potential. We next focus on the weak selection, weak mutation cases and, making use of a Gamma calculus, we compute the normalizing partition functions of the invariant probability densities appearing in their Wright-Fisher diffusive approximations. Using these results, generalized Ewens sampling formulae (ESF) from the equilibrium distributions are derived. We start treating the ESF in the mixed mutation/selection potential case and then we restrict ourselves to the ESF in the simpler house-of-cards mutations only situation. We also address some issues concerning sampling problems from infinitely-many alleles weak limits.

  17. Randomized noninferiority study evaluating the efficacy of a postmilking teat disinfectant for the prevention of naturally occurring intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godden, S M; Royster, E; Knauer, W; Sorg, J; Lopez-Benavides, M; Schukken, Y; Leibowitz, S; French, E A

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to complete a positive-control, natural exposure, noninferiority design field study to test the efficacy of a novel glycolic acid-based postmilking teat disinfectant as compared with a previously proven iodine-based postmilking teat disinfectant (positive control). The primary outcome of interest was the effect of treatment on incidence of new intramammary infections. Secondary outcomes included the effect of treatment on prevalence of infection, somatic cell count, and teat condition. After blocking by parity, approximately 300 early- to mid-lactation cows on a large Wisconsin dairy farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. For a 12-wk period between May and August 2014, the 2 groups were dipped after each milking with either the experimental (EX) or positive control (PC) product. Individual quarters were sampled to establish bacteriological infection status at the beginning of the study, and every 2 wk thereafter, by use of a 2-stage process evaluating somatic cell count (SCC), and then culturing milk samples only when SCC exceeded a parity-specific threshold. Teat condition scoring was completed at the beginning of the study and on wk 4, 8, and 12. Mixed logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of treatment on dichotomous outcome measures including the odds of acquiring a new infection during a given 2-wk sampling interval (incidence), the odds for presence of infection at sampling (prevalence), and odds for a normal teat skin condition score. Mixed linear regression was used to evaluate the effect of treatment on somatic cell count. For the noninferiority analysis, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for the difference in new infection rate between the 2 treatments (EX - PC), had to be to the left of the critical value d (0.035) to conclude that EX was noninferior relative to PC with respect to risk for new infections. Results showed that the incidence of new infections was not different for quarters

  18. Fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control for the discrete-time system with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, and randomly occurring interval delays and nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaozheng; Wang, Yan; Hu, Manfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control problem is investigated for a class of discrete-time T-S fuzzy systems with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, randomly occurring interval delays (ROIDs) and randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs). A series of variables of the randomly occurring phenomena obeying the Bernoulli distribution is used to govern ROIDs and RONs. Meanwhile, the measurement outputs are subject to the sector nonlinearities (i.e. the sensor saturations) and we assume the system output is [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]. The Lth-order Rice model is utilized to describe the phenomenon of channel fadings by setting different values of the channel coefficients. The aim of this work is to deal with the problem of designing a full-order dynamic fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback controller such that the fuzzy closed-loop system is exponentially mean-square stable and the [Formula: see text] performance constraint is satisfied, by means of a combination of Lyapunov stability theory and stochastic analysis along with LMI methods. The proposed fuzzy controller parameters are derived by solving a convex optimization problem via the semidefinite programming technique. Finally, a numerical simulation is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design technique.

  19. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukat, Alexandra [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Edgar, Daniel [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Bratic, Ivana [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Maiti, Priyanka [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Trifunovic, Aleksandra, E-mail: aleksandra.trifunovic@ki.se [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  20. The basic science and mathematics of random mutation and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alan

    2014-12-20

    The mutation and natural selection phenomenon can and often does cause the failure of antimicrobial, herbicidal, pesticide and cancer treatments selection pressures. This phenomenon operates in a mathematically predictable behavior, which when understood leads to approaches to reduce and prevent the failure of the use of these selection pressures. The mathematical behavior of mutation and selection is derived using the principles given by probability theory. The derivation of the equations describing the mutation and selection phenomenon is carried out in the context of an empirical example. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement versus CBT for co-occurring substance dependence, traumatic stress, and psychiatric disorders: Proximal outcomes from a pragmatic randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia; Tronnier, Christine D; Graves, Rebecca; Kelley, Karen

    2016-02-01

    In many clinical settings, there is a high comorbidity between substance use disorders, psychiatric disorders, and traumatic stress. Novel therapies are needed to address these co-occurring issues efficiently. The aim of the present study was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) to group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) for previously homeless men residing in a therapeutic community. Men with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, as well as extensive trauma histories, were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of group treatment with MORE (n = 64), CBT (n = 64), or TAU (n = 52). Study findings indicated that from pre-to post-treatment MORE was associated with modest yet significantly greater improvements in substance craving, post-traumatic stress, and negative affect than CBT, and greater improvements in post-traumatic stress and positive affect than TAU. A significant indirect effect of MORE on decreasing craving and post-traumatic stress by increasing dispositional mindfulness was observed, suggesting that MORE may target these issues via enhancing mindful awareness in everyday life. This pragmatic trial represents the first head-to-head comparison of MORE against an empirically-supported treatment for co-occurring disorders. Results suggest that MORE, as an integrative therapy designed to bolster self-regulatory capacity, may hold promise as a treatment for intersecting clinical conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Group medical visits in the follow-up of women with a BRCA mutation: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogerbrugge Nicoline

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRCA mutation carriers have a 40-80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer. They may opt for yearly breast cancer surveillance or for prophylactic mastectomy. Both options show increased survival rates. It is a complex choice to be made between these two options. As a result most women experience high levels of distress and high needs for information. To fulfill the needs for psychosocial support and information we have introduced group medical consultations (GMCs. A GMC provides individual medical visits conducted within a group. This 90 minute group-visit with 8-12 patients gives patients the opportunity to spend more time with their clinician and a behavioral health professional and learn from other patients experiencing similar topics. However, it should be noted that group sessions may increase fear in some patients or influence their decision making. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial, 160 BRCA mutation carriers diagnosed maximally 2 years ago are recruited from the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Participants are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either the GMC intervention group (onetime participation in a GMC instead of a standard individual visit or to a usual care control group. Primary outcome measures are empowerment and psychological distress (SCL 90. Secondary outcome measures are fear of cancer, information needs before the consultation and the received information, self-examination of the breasts, patient satisfaction, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Data are collected via self-reported questionnaires 1 week before the visit, and at 1 week and at 3 months follow-up. A pilot study was conducted to test all procedures and questionnaires. Discussion The possibility for interaction with other BRCA mutation carriers within a medical visit is unique. This study will assess the effectiveness of GMCs for BRCA mutation carriers to improve empowerment and decrease distress compared

  3. Random point mutations with major effects on protein-coding genes are the driving force behind premature aging in mtDNA mutator mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgar, D.; Shabalina, I.; Camara, Y.; Wredenberg, A.; Calvaruso, M.A.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Nedergaard, J.; Cannon, B.; Larsson, N.G.; Trifunovic, A.

    2009-01-01

    The mtDNA mutator mice have high levels of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA causing a progressive respiratory chain dysfunction and a premature aging phenotype. We have now performed molecular analyses to determine the mechanism whereby these mtDNA mutations impair respiratory chain

  4. Optimizing Linear Functions with Randomized Search Heuristics - The Robustness of Mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of randomized search heuristics on classes of functions is fundamental for the understanding of the underlying stochastic process and the development of suitable proof techniques. Recently, remarkable progress has been made in bounding the expected optimization time of the simple (1...

  5. An Online Intervention for Co-Occurring Depression and Problematic Alcohol Use in Young People: Primary Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deady, Mark; Mills, Katherine L; Teesson, Maree; Kay-Lambkin, Frances

    2016-03-23

    Depression and problematic alcohol use represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this is associated with increased harm and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective; however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it. The increased availability of eHealth programs presents a unique opportunity to treat these conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an automated Web-based self-help intervention (DEAL Project) in treating co-occurring depressive symptoms and problematic alcohol use in young people. Young people (aged 18 to 25 years) with moderate depression symptoms and drinking at hazardous levels (recruited largely via social media) were randomly allocated to the DEAL Project (n=60) or a Web-based attention-control condition (HealthWatch; n=44). The trial consisted of a 4-week intervention phase with follow-up assessment at posttreatment and at 3 and 6 months postbaseline. The primary outcomes were change in depression severity according to the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as well as quantity and frequency of alcohol use (TOT-AL). The DEAL Project was associated with statistically significant improvement in depression symptom severity (d=0.71) and reductions in alcohol use quantity (d=0.99) and frequency (d=0.76) in the short term compared to the control group. At 6-month follow-up, the improvements in the intervention group were maintained; however, the differences between the intervention and control groups were no longer statistically significant, such that between-group effects were in the small to moderate range at 6 months (depression symptoms: d=0.39; alcohol quantity: d=-0.09; alcohol frequency: d=0.24). Overall, the DEAL Project was associated with more rapid improvement in both depression symptoms and alcohol use outcomes in young

  6. Evolution models with lethal mutations on symmetric or random fitness landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirakosyan, Zara; Saakian, David B; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2010-07-01

    We calculate the mean fitness for evolution models, when the fitness is a function of the Hamming distance from a reference sequence, and there is a probability that this fitness is nullified (Eigen model case) or tends to the negative infinity (Crow-Kimura model case). We calculate the mean fitness of these models. The mean fitness is calculated also for the random fitnesses with logarithmic-normal distribution, reasonably describing sometimes the situation with RNA viruses.

  7. Failure or mutation: A random course after a loss of goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Ruvira Palau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the term "culture" is very polysemic. The concept to which it alludes, even with scarce centuries of existence, is very broad and encompasses a myriad of definitions and connotations, which have been treated by ethologists, anthropologists and educators in their different fields. But almost all of them underlie a vision of knowledge transmission, as well as progressivity and growth. Cultural development can be considered as an imperative of behavior for personal and social development. However, in recent times this imperative seems to be blurred in a looser sense of its meaning, where other spurious meanings fit, giving way to the articulation of discourses that are far from their original goal. Is culture a means to produce development? Or is development a means to produce culture? Should they be the cultural agents or social educators on whom responsibility for righting this drift influenced by the consumer markets? Should these, however, merely redistribute demands and offers? Within the framework of our economic system, perhaps the key to this mutation or failure of culture can be found in a growing practice of cultic activity as a ritual and idle phenomenon, which places greater emphasis on the economic benefit of its practice, leaving Aside their important role in the development and knowledge on different subjects. As an attitude, culture, rather than a laissez faire, should be a dialogue and not an acceptance and submission to a single thought imposed by the system.

  8. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the Ashkenazi-Jewish community: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Loggenberg, Kelly; Sanderson, Saskia; Burnell, Matthew; Wardle, Jane; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; McGuire, Alistair; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)-based testing. In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the population screening (PS) arm with testing those fulfilling standard FH-based clinical criteria (FH arm). Following a targeted community campaign, AJ participants older than 18 years were recruited by self-referral after pretest genetic counseling. The effects of BRCA1/2 genetic testing on acceptability, psychological impact, and quality-of-life measures were assessed by random effects regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. One thousand, one hundred sixty-eight AJ individuals were counseled, 1042 consented, 1034 were randomly assigned (691 women, 343 men), and 1017 were eligible for analysis. Mean age was 54.3 (SD = 14.66) years. Thirteen BRCA1/2 carriers were identified in the PS arm, nine in the FH arm. Five more carriers were detected among FH-negative FH-arm participants following study completion. There were no statistically significant differences between the FH and PS arms at seven days or three months on measures of anxiety, depression, health anxiety, distress, uncertainty, and quality-of-life. Contrast tests indicated that overall anxiety (P = .0001) and uncertainty (P = .005) associated with genetic testing decreased; positive experience scores increased (P = .0001); quality-of-life and health anxiety did not change with time. Overall, 56% of carriers did not fulfill clinical criteria for genetic testing, and the BRCA1/2 prevalence was 2.45%. Compared with FH-based testing, population-based genetic testing in Ashkenazi Jews doesn't adversely affect short-term psychological

  9. Random amino acid mutations and protein misfolding lead to Shannon limit in sequence-structure communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Martin Lisewski

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of genomic information from coding sequence to protein structure during protein synthesis is subject to stochastic errors. To analyze transmission limits in the presence of spurious errors, Shannon's noisy channel theorem is applied to a communication channel between amino acid sequences and their structures established from a large-scale statistical analysis of protein atomic coordinates. While Shannon's theorem confirms that in close to native conformations information is transmitted with limited error probability, additional random errors in sequence (amino acid substitutions and in structure (structural defects trigger a decrease in communication capacity toward a Shannon limit at 0.010 bits per amino acid symbol at which communication breaks down. In several controls, simulated error rates above a critical threshold and models of unfolded structures always produce capacities below this limiting value. Thus an essential biological system can be realistically modeled as a digital communication channel that is (a sensitive to random errors and (b restricted by a Shannon error limit. This forms a novel basis for predictions consistent with observed rates of defective ribosomal products during protein synthesis, and with the estimated excess of mutual information in protein contact potentials.

  10. Random amino acid mutations and protein misfolding lead to Shannon limit in sequence-structure communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisewski, Andreas Martin

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of genomic information from coding sequence to protein structure during protein synthesis is subject to stochastic errors. To analyze transmission limits in the presence of spurious errors, Shannon's noisy channel theorem is applied to a communication channel between amino acid sequences and their structures established from a large-scale statistical analysis of protein atomic coordinates. While Shannon's theorem confirms that in close to native conformations information is transmitted with limited error probability, additional random errors in sequence (amino acid substitutions) and in structure (structural defects) trigger a decrease in communication capacity toward a Shannon limit at 0.010 bits per amino acid symbol at which communication breaks down. In several controls, simulated error rates above a critical threshold and models of unfolded structures always produce capacities below this limiting value. Thus an essential biological system can be realistically modeled as a digital communication channel that is (a) sensitive to random errors and (b) restricted by a Shannon error limit. This forms a novel basis for predictions consistent with observed rates of defective ribosomal products during protein synthesis, and with the estimated excess of mutual information in protein contact potentials.

  11. Peer support and additional information in group medical consultations (GMCs) for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Woldringh, Gwendolyn H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Prins, Judith B.

    2016-01-01

    Group medical consultations (GMCs) provide individual medical visits in the presence of ≤ 7 peer- patients. This study evaluated the efficacy of GMCs in the yearly breast cancer surveillance of BRCA mutation carriers. This randomized controlled trial compared GMCs (intervention group, n = 63) with

  12. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Online Intervention for Co-Occurring Depression and Problematic Alcohol Use in Young People: Primary Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Deady, Mark; Mills, Katherine L.; Teesson, Maree; Kay-Lambkin, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and problematic alcohol use represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this is associated with increased harm and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective; however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it. The increased availability of eHealth programs presents a unique opportunity to treat th...

  14. No Wrong Doors: Findings from a Critical Review of Behavioral Randomized Clinical Trials for Individuals with Co-Occurring Alcohol/Drug Problems and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Tracy L; Lehavot, Keren; Petrakis, Ismene L

    2017-04-01

    Prior reviews of behavioral treatments for individuals with comorbid alcohol and drug use disorders (substance use disorder SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have not systematically considered whether comparison conditions are matched to target treatments on time and attention. A systematic literature search using PubMed MESH terms for alcohol and substance use disorders, PTSD, and treatment identified relevant behavioral randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated PTSD-oriented exposure-based treatments, addiction-focused treatments, and coping-based treatments that do not involve exposure to trauma memories. Information pertaining to within-subject changes over time and between-subject differences, quality of control condition, recruitment efficiency, and assessment and treatment retention was synthesized. Alcohol and drug outcomes were described separately when possible. Twenty-four behavioral RCTs were identified: 7 exposure based, 6 addiction focused, and 11 coping based. Seven studies included SUD intervention comparison conditions matched to the target intervention on time and attention. Most of the 24 studies found that participants in both the experimental and control conditions improved significantly over time on SUD and PTSD outcomes. No study found significant between-group differences in both SUD and PTSD outcomes favoring the experimental treatment. Despite greater treatment dropout, there was greater improvement in some PTSD outcomes for exposure-based interventions than the control conditions, including when the control conditions were matched for time and attention. Addiction-focused and coping-based interventions did not generally show an advantage over comparably robust controls, although some coping-based interventions yielded better drug use outcomes than control conditions. When available, interventions that integrate exposure-based PTSD treatment and behavioral SUD treatment are recommended as they are associated with better

  15. Family intervention for co-occurring substance use and severe psychiatric disorders: participant characteristics and correlates of initial engagement and more extended exposure in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T; Glynn, Shirley M; Cather, Corinne; Zarate, Roberto; Fox, Lindy; Feldman, James; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Clark, Robin E

    2009-10-01

    Clients with severe mental illness and substance use disorder (i.e., dual disorders) frequently have contact with family members, who may provide valuable emotional and material support, but have limited skills and knowledge to promote recovery. Furthermore, high levels of family conflict and stress are related to higher rates of relapse. The present study was a two-site randomized controlled trial comparing a comprehensive, behaviorally-based family intervention for dual disorders program (FIDD) to a shorter-term family psychoeducational program (FPE). The modal family was a single male son in his early 30s diagnosed with both alcohol and drug problems and a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder participating with his middle-aged mother, with whom he lived. Initial engagement rates following consent to participate in the study and the family intervention programs were moderately high for both programs (88% and 84%, respectively), but rates of longer term retention and exposure to the core elements of each treatment model were lower (61% and 55%, respectively). Characteristics of the relatives were the strongest predictors of successful initial engagement in the family programs with the most important predictor being relatives who reported higher levels of benefit related to the relationship with the client. Subsequent successful exposure to the family treatment models was more strongly associated with client factors, including less severity of drug abuse and male client gender. The results suggest that attention to issues of motivating relatives to participate in family intervention, and more focused efforts to address the disruptive effects of drug abuse on the family could improve rates of engagement and retention in family programs for dual disorders.

  16. Selenium deficiency occurs in some patients with moderate-to-severe cirrhosis and can be corrected by administration of selenate but not selenomethionine: a randomized controlled trial123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Raymond F; Hill, Kristina E; Motley, Amy K; Byrne, Daniel W; Norsworthy, Brooke K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selenomethionine, which is the principal dietary form of selenium, is metabolized by the liver to selenide, which is the form of the element required for the synthesis of selenoproteins. The liver synthesizes selenium-rich selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and secretes it into the plasma to supply extrahepatic tissues with selenium. Objectives: We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether cirrhosis is associated with functional selenium deficiency (the lack of selenium for the process of selenoprotein synthesis even though selenium intake is not limited) and, if it is, whether the deficiency is associated with impairment of selenomethionine metabolism. Design: Patients with Child-Pugh (C-P) classes A, B, and C (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively) cirrhosis were supplemented with a placebo or supranutritional amounts of selenium as selenate (200 or 400 μg/d) or as selenomethionine (200 μg/d) for 4 wk. Plasma SEPP1 concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, the latter due largely to the selenoprotein GPX3 secreted by the kidneys, were measured before and after supplementation. Results: GPX activity was increased more by both doses of selenate than by the placebo in C-P class B patients. The activity was not increased more by selenomethionine supplementation than by the placebo in C-P class B patients. Plasma selenium was increased more by 400 μg Se as selenate than by the placebo in C-P class C patients. Within the groups who responded to selenate, there was a considerable variation in responses. Conclusion: These results indicate that severe cirrhosis causes mild functional selenium deficiency in some patients that is associated with impaired metabolism of selenomethionine. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00271245. PMID:26468123

  17. Selenium deficiency occurs in some patients with moderate-to-severe cirrhosis and can be corrected by administration of selenate but not selenomethionine: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Raymond F; Hill, Kristina E; Motley, Amy K; Byrne, Daniel W; Norsworthy, Brooke K

    2015-11-01

    Selenomethionine, which is the principal dietary form of selenium, is metabolized by the liver to selenide, which is the form of the element required for the synthesis of selenoproteins. The liver synthesizes selenium-rich selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and secretes it into the plasma to supply extrahepatic tissues with selenium. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether cirrhosis is associated with functional selenium deficiency (the lack of selenium for the process of selenoprotein synthesis even though selenium intake is not limited) and, if it is, whether the deficiency is associated with impairment of selenomethionine metabolism. Patients with Child-Pugh (C-P) classes A, B, and C (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively) cirrhosis were supplemented with a placebo or supranutritional amounts of selenium as selenate (200 or 400 μg/d) or as selenomethionine (200 μg/d) for 4 wk. Plasma SEPP1 concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, the latter due largely to the selenoprotein GPX3 secreted by the kidneys, were measured before and after supplementation. GPX activity was increased more by both doses of selenate than by the placebo in C-P class B patients. The activity was not increased more by selenomethionine supplementation than by the placebo in C-P class B patients. Plasma selenium was increased more by 400 μg Se as selenate than by the placebo in C-P class C patients. Within the groups who responded to selenate, there was a considerable variation in responses. These results indicate that severe cirrhosis causes mild functional selenium deficiency in some patients that is associated with impaired metabolism of selenomethionine. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00271245. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Group medical visits in the follow-up of women with a BRCA mutation: design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA mutation carriers have a 40-80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer. They may opt for yearly breast cancer surveillance or for prophylactic mastectomy. Both options show increased survival rates. It is a complex choice to be made between these two options. As a result most

  19. Lifestyle intervention in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: study protocol for a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical feasibility trial (LIBRE-1 study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, Marion; Engel, Christoph; Berling, Anika; Hebestreit, Katrin; Bischoff, Stephan; Dukatz, Ricarda; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter; Siniatchkin, Michael; Pfeifer, Katharina; Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Kirsch, Ellen; Niederberger, Uwe; Marter, Nicole; Enders, Ute; Löffler, Markus; Meindl, Alfons; Rhiem, Kerstin; Schmutzler, Rita; Erickson, Nicole; Halle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Women with highly penetrant BRCA mutations have a 55-60% lifetime risk for breast cancer and a 16-59% lifetime risk for ovarian cancer. However, penetrance differs interindividually, indicating that environmental and behavioral factors may modify this risk. These include lifestyle factors such as physical activity status, dietary habits, and body weight. The modification of penetrance by changing lifestyle factors has not thus far been investigated in a randomized trial in BRCA mutation carriers. Therefore, we intend to enroll 60 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in a pilot feasibility study (Lifestyle Intervention Study in Women with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (LIBRE) pilot). This multi-center, prospective, controlled trial aims to randomize (1:1) participants into a (1) multi-factorial lifestyle intervention group (IG) versus (2) the control group with usual care (CG). The primary endpoint is feasibility and acceptance of a structured interdisciplinary lifestyle intervention program over 12 months (at least 70% of the patients to complete the 1-year intervention). Furthermore, the effects on physical fitness, BMI, quality of life, and stress coping capacity will be investigated. During the first 3 months, women in the IG will receive structured, individualized and mainly supervised endurance training of ≥18 MET*h/week (MET = metabolic equivalent task) and personal nutritional counseling based on the Mediterranean diet. During the subsequent 9 months, the IG will receive monthly group training sessions and regular telephone contacts for motivation, whereas the CG will only receive usual care (one general counseling on healthy nutrition and benefits of regular physical activity on health status). At randomization and subsequent time points (3, 6, 12 months), cardiopulmonary fitness will be assessed by spiroergometry and nutritional and psychological status by validated questionnaires. This pilot study will investigate the optimal strategy to improve

  20. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  1. Effects of lifestyle intervention in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers on nutrition, BMI, and physical fitness (LIBRE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, Marion; Engel, Christoph; Berling, Anika; Hebestreit, Katrin; Bischoff, Stephan C; Dukatz, Ricarda; Siniatchkin, Michael; Pfeifer, Katharina; Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Kirsch, Ellen; Niederberger, Uwe; Enders, Ute; Löffler, Markus; Meindl, Alfons; Rhiem, Kerstin; Schmutzler, Rita; Erickson, Nicole; Halle, Martin

    2016-07-29

    Women with highly penetrant BRCA mutations have a 55-60 % lifetime risk for breast cancer and a 16-59 % lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer. However, penetrance differs interindividually, indicating that environmental and behavioral factors may modify this risk. It is well documented that the risk for sporadic breast cancer disease can be modified by changing lifestyle factors that primarily include physical activity, dietary habits, and body weight. It can thus be hypothesized that the modification of these lifestyle factors may also influence the incidence and progression of cancer in BRCA mutation carriers. This multicenter, interdisciplinary, prospective, two-armed, randomized (1:1) controlled trial aims to enroll a minimum of 600 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers to partake in either a lifestyle intervention or usual care. The study primarily aims to demonstrate an improvement of nutritional behavior (adherence to the Mediterranean diet), body mass index, and physical fitness. Furthermore, the effects on quality of life, stress coping capacity, breast cancer incidence, and mortality will be investigated. The intervention group (IG) will receive a structured lifestyle intervention over 12 months, whereas the control group (CG) will only receive information regarding a healthy lifestyle. During the first 3 months, women in the IG will receive structured, individualized, and mainly supervised endurance training with a minimum of 18 MET-h physical activity per week and nutrition education based on the Mediterranean diet. Over the following 9 months, IG monthly group training sessions and regular telephone contacts will motivate study participants. The CG will receive one general training session about healthy nutrition in accordance with the recommendations of the German Society of Nutrition (standard of care in Germany) and the benefits of regular physical activity on health status. At randomization and subsequent time points (3 and 12

  2. UV Signature Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  3. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie S Itsara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5, an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations.

  4. Oxidative Stress Is Not a Major Contributor to Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsara, Leslie S.; Kennedy, Scott R.; Fox, Edward J.; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10−5), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  5. Commentary on the study: impact of depressive symptoms on future alcohol use in patients with co-occurring bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence: a prospective analysis in an 8-week randomized controlled trial of acamprosate (Prisciandaro et al.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Ulrich W

    2012-06-01

    Comorbidity of alcohol abuse and dependence with bipolar disorders is high. The aim of this short commentary is to review a current study investigating the impact of depressive symptoms and craving on alcohol use in individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence. The strengths of Prisciandaro and colleagues' (2012) study are reviewed. The research group collected data as part of an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acamprosate treatment in comorbid individuals. The importance of the study lies in highlighting the complex relationship between bipolar affective disorder symptoms, in particular depression, and alcohol use in a prospective design. It also overcomes several shortcomings of previous studies, since trajectories of both disorders within a short time frame of 1 week were hitherto rarely investigated. While the current study is successfully shedding light on the relationship between depressive symptoms, craving, and alcohol use in comorbid individuals, future studies may also investigate the influence of rapid cycling, mixed states, and psychotic symptoms on alcohol consumption and vice versa. Further, other comorbid samples could be included like first episode versus subjects with multiple affective episodes or comorbidity in males versus females. This research may provide a better basis for future psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy or integrated treatment approaches in these comorbid and severely affected individuals. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. A Naturally Occurring Mutation K220T in the Pleiotropic Activator PrfA of Listeria Monocytogenes Results in a Loss of Virulence Due to Decreasing DNA-Binding Affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velge,P.; Herler, M.; Johansson, J.; Roches, S.; Temoin, S.; Fedorov, A.; Gracieux, P.; Almo, S.; Goebel, W.; Cossart, P.

    2007-01-01

    The sequencing of prfA, encoding the transcriptional regulator of virulence genes, in 26 low-virulence field Listeria monocytogenes strains showed that eight strains exhibited the same single amino-acid substitution: PrfAK220T. These strains exhibited no expression of PrfA-regulated proteins and thus no virulence. This substitution inactivated PrfA, since expression of the PrfAK220T mutant gene in an EGD{Delta}prfA strain did not restore the haemolytic and phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C activities, in contrast to the wild-type prfA gene. The substitution of the lysine at position 220 occurred in the helix H. However, the data showed that the PrfAK220T protein is dimerized just as well as its wild-type counterpart, but does not bind to PrfA-boxes. PrfAK220T did not form a PrfA-DNA complex in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, but low concentrations of CI complexes (PrfAK220T-RNA polymerase-DNA complex) were formed by adding RNA polymerase, suggesting that PrfA interacted with RNA polymerase in solution in the absence of DNA. Formation of some transcriptionally active complexes was confirmed by in vitro runoff transcription assays and quantitative RT-PCR. Crystallographic analyses described the structure of native PrfA and highlighted the key role of allosteric changes in the activity of PrfA and especially the role of the Lys220 in the conformation of the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif.

  7. Peer support and additional information in group medical consultations (GMCs) for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Woldringh, Gwendolyn H; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Prins, Judith B

    2016-01-01

    Group medical consultations (GMCs) provide individual medical visits in the presence of ≤ 7 peer- patients. This study evaluated the efficacy of GMCs in the yearly breast cancer surveillance of BRCA mutation carriers. This randomized controlled trial compared GMCs (intervention group, n = 63) with individual medical visits (control group, n = 59). Between-group differences on the primary outcomes distress and empowerment, were analyzed one week and three months after the visit. Feasibility is evaluated in terms of demand, acceptability and practicability. No between-group differences were found on primary outcomes. More themes were discussed in GMCs. Seventy-five percent of GMC-participants experienced peer support. Carriers reported significantly higher satisfaction with individual visits. GMCs were less time-efficient. This is the first GMC study which reports results in favor of individual visits. The hereditary nature of the condition differentiates our study population from earlier studied GMC groups. Even though most participants experienced peer support and received more information, the lower patient satisfaction may be explained by the lack of individual time with the clinician and disruption of normal surveillance routines. As the need for peer support and additional information is present in a substantial part of carriers, future research should study the process of peer support.

  8. Naturally occurring hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The study of naturally occurring hazardous materials (NOHMs) was conceived as a proactive response to assure that the Oregon : Department of Transportation (ODOT) maintenance and construction activities take the presence of NOHMs into account. The la...

  9. Mutation rules and the evolution of sparseness and modularity in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems exhibit two structural features on many levels of organization: sparseness, in which only a small fraction of possible interactions between components actually occur; and modularity--the near decomposability of the system into modules with distinct functionality. Recent work suggests that modularity can evolve in a variety of circumstances, including goals that vary in time such that they share the same subgoals (modularly varying goals), or when connections are costly. Here, we studied the origin of modularity and sparseness focusing on the nature of the mutation process, rather than on connection cost or variations in the goal. We use simulations of evolution with different mutation rules. We found that commonly used sum-rule mutations, in which interactions are mutated by adding random numbers, do not lead to modularity or sparseness except for in special situations. In contrast, product-rule mutations in which interactions are mutated by multiplying by random numbers--a better model for the effects of biological mutations--led to sparseness naturally. When the goals of evolution are modular, in the sense that specific groups of inputs affect specific groups of outputs, product-rule mutations also lead to modular structure; sum-rule mutations do not. Product-rule mutations generate sparseness and modularity because they tend to reduce interactions, and to keep small interaction terms small.

  10. Evidence of ultraviolet type mutations in xeroderma pigmentosum melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; DiGiovanna, John J.; Stern, Jere B.; Hornyak, Thomas J.; Raffeld, Mark; Khan, Sikandar G.; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Hollander, M. Christine; Dennis, Philip A.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    To look for a direct role of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure in cutaneous melanoma induction, we studied xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients who have defective DNA repair resulting in a 1000-fold increase in melanoma risk. These XP melanomas have the same anatomic distribution as melanomas in the general population. We analyzed laser capture microdissection samples of skin melanomas from XP patients studied at the National Institutes of Health. The tumor suppressor gene PTEN was sequenced and analyzed for UV-induced mutations. Samples from 59 melanomas (47 melanomas in situ and 12 invasive melanomas) from 8 XP patients showed mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene in 56% of the melanomas. Further, 91% of the melanomas with mutations had 1 to 4 UV type base substitution mutations (occurring at adjacent pyrimidines) (P < 0.0001 compared to random mutations). We found a high frequency of amino-acid-altering mutations in the melanomas and demonstrated that these mutations impaired PTEN function; UV damage plays a direct role in induction of mutations and in inactivation of the PTEN gene in XP melanomas including in situ, the earliest stage of melanoma. This gene is known to be a key regulator of carcinogenesis and therefore these data provide solid mechanistic support for UV protection for prevention of melanoma. PMID:19329485

  11. Presence of a consensus DNA motif at nearby DNA sequence of the mutation susceptible CG nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Kaushik; Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Tanu; Sharma, Ankit; Bhagat, Meenakshi; Kamai, Asangla; Ford, Bridget M; Asthana, Shailendra; Mandal, Chandi C

    2018-01-10

    Complexity in tissues affected by cancer arises from somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications in the genome. The mutation susceptible hotspots present within the genome indicate a non-random nature and/or a position specific selection of mutation. An association exists between the occurrence of mutations and epigenetic DNA methylation. This study is primarily aimed at determining mutation status, and identifying a signature for predicting mutation prone zones of tumor suppressor (TS) genes. Nearby sequences from the top five positions having a higher mutation frequency in each gene of 42 TS genes were selected from a cosmic database and were considered as mutation prone zones. The conserved motifs present in the mutation prone DNA fragments were identified. Molecular docking studies were done to determine putative interactions between the identified conserved motifs and enzyme methyltransferase DNMT1. Collective analysis of 42 TS genes found GC as the most commonly replaced and AT as the most commonly formed residues after mutation. Analysis of the top 5 mutated positions of each gene (210 DNA segments for 42 TS genes) identified that CG nucleotides of the amino acid codons (e.g., Arginine) are most susceptible to mutation, and found a consensus DNA "T/AGC/GAGGA/TG" sequence present in these mutation prone DNA segments. Similar to TS genes, analysis of 54 oncogenes not only found CG nucleotides of the amino acid Arg as the most susceptible to mutation, but also identified the presence of similar consensus DNA motifs in the mutation prone DNA fragments (270 DNA segments for 54 oncogenes) of oncogenes. Docking studies depicted that, upon binding of DNMT1 methylates to this consensus DNA motif (C residues of CpG islands), mutation was likely to occur. Thus, this study proposes that DNMT1 mediated methylation in chromosomal DNA may decrease if a foreign DNA segment containing this consensus sequence along with CG nucleotides is exogenously introduced to dividing

  12. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  13. Experimental design to evaluate directed adaptive mutation in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael; Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-12-09

    We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system and have limited preliminary data

  14. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Greaves

    Full Text Available Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whether there are selective constraints, which have been shown to occur in the germline, on the occurrence and expansion of these mtDNA mutations within individual somatic cells. Here we compared the pattern and spectrum of mutations observed in ageing human colon to those observed in the general population (germline variants and those associated with primary mtDNA disease. The pathogenicity of the protein encoding mutations was predicted using a computational programme, MutPred, and the scores obtained for the three groups compared. We show that the mutations associated with ageing are randomly distributed throughout the genome, are more frequently non-synonymous or frameshift mutations than the general population, and are significantly more pathogenic than population variants. Mutations associated with primary mtDNA disease were significantly more pathogenic than ageing or population mutations. These data provide little evidence for any selective constraints on the occurrence and expansion of mtDNA mutations in somatic cells of the human colon during human ageing in contrast to germline mutations seen in the general population.

  15. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Laura C; Elson, Joanna L; Nooteboom, Marco; Grady, John P; Taylor, Geoffrey A; Taylor, Robert W; Mathers, John C; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Turnbull, Doug M

    2012-01-01

    Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whether there are selective constraints, which have been shown to occur in the germline, on the occurrence and expansion of these mtDNA mutations within individual somatic cells. Here we compared the pattern and spectrum of mutations observed in ageing human colon to those observed in the general population (germline variants) and those associated with primary mtDNA disease. The pathogenicity of the protein encoding mutations was predicted using a computational programme, MutPred, and the scores obtained for the three groups compared. We show that the mutations associated with ageing are randomly distributed throughout the genome, are more frequently non-synonymous or frameshift mutations than the general population, and are significantly more pathogenic than population variants. Mutations associated with primary mtDNA disease were significantly more pathogenic than ageing or population mutations. These data provide little evidence for any selective constraints on the occurrence and expansion of mtDNA mutations in somatic cells of the human colon during human ageing in contrast to germline mutations seen in the general population.

  16. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  17. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning.

  18. Limited heterogeneity of known driver gene mutations among the metastases of individual patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makohon-Moore, Alvin P; Zhang, Ming; Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Kundu, Deepanjan; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Wong, Fay; Jiao, Yuchen; Kohutek, Zachary A; Hong, Jungeui; Attiyeh, Marc; Javier, Breanna; Wood, Laura D; Hruban, Ralph H; Nowak, Martin A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A

    2017-03-01

    The extent of heterogeneity among driver gene mutations present in naturally occurring metastases-that is, treatment-naive metastatic disease-is largely unknown. To address this issue, we carried out 60× whole-genome sequencing of 26 metastases from four patients with pancreatic cancer. We found that identical mutations in known driver genes were present in every metastatic lesion for each patient studied. Passenger gene mutations, which do not have known or predicted functional consequences, accounted for all intratumoral heterogeneity. Even with respect to these passenger mutations, our analysis suggests that the genetic similarity among the founding cells of metastases was higher than that expected for any two cells randomly taken from a normal tissue. The uniformity of known driver gene mutations among metastases in the same patient has critical and encouraging implications for the success of future targeted therapies in advanced-stage disease.

  19. Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women with Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2-Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Community Treatment by Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S.; Chapman, Alexander, L.; Dexter-Mazza, Elizabeth T.; Murray, Angela; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were…

  20. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  1. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  2. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  3. Detecting clusters of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Positive selection for protein function can lead to multiple mutations within a small stretch of DNA, i.e., to a cluster of mutations. Recently, Wagner proposed a method to detect such mutation clusters. His method, however, did not take into account that residues with high solvent accessibility are inherently more variable than residues with low solvent accessibility. Here, we propose a new algorithm to detect clustered evolution. Our algorithm controls for different substitution probabilities at buried and exposed sites in the tertiary protein structure, and uses random permutations to calculate accurate P values for inferred clusters. We apply the algorithm to genomes of bacteria, fly, and mammals, and find several clusters of mutations in functionally important regions of proteins. Surprisingly, clustered evolution is a relatively rare phenomenon. Only between 2% and 10% of the genes we analyze contain a statistically significant mutation cluster. We also find that not controlling for solvent accessibility leads to an excess of clusters in terminal and solvent-exposed regions of proteins. Our algorithm provides a novel method to identify functionally relevant divergence between groups of species. Moreover, it could also be useful to detect artifacts in automatically assembled genomes.

  4. Variation in Mutational Robustness between Different Proteins and the Predictability of Fitness Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Peter A; Arvidsson, Lars; Berg, Otto G; Andersson, Dan I

    2017-02-01

    Random mutations in genes from disparate protein classes may have different distributions of fitness effects (DFEs) depending on different structural, functional, and evolutionary constraints. We measured the fitness effects of 156 single mutations in the genes encoding AraC (transcription factor), AraD (enzyme), and AraE (transporter) used for bacterial growth on l-arabinose. Despite their different molecular functions these genes all had bimodal DFEs with most mutations either being neutral or strongly deleterious, providing a general expectation for the DFE. This contrasts with the unimodal DFEs previously obtained for ribosomal protein genes where most mutations were slightly deleterious. Based on theoretical considerations, we suggest that the 33-fold higher average mutational robustness of ribosomal proteins is due to stronger selection for reduced costs of translational and transcriptional errors. Whereas the large majority of synonymous mutations were deleterious for ribosomal proteins genes, no fitness effects could be detected for the AraCDE genes. Four mutations in AraC and AraE increased fitness, suggesting that slightly advantageous mutations make up a significant fraction of the DFE, but that they often escape detection due to the limited sensitivity of commonly used fitness assays. We show that the fitness effects of amino acid substitutions can be predicted based on evolutionary conservation, but those weakly deleterious mutations are less reliably detected. This suggests that large-effect mutations and the fraction of highly deleterious mutations can be computationally predicted, but that experiments are required to characterize the DFE close to neutrality, where many mutations ultimately fixed in a population will occur. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    rates on different STR loci. In the cases where mutations had occured, we found no interaction between kits, STRA loci or sexes. However, we found differences in the mutation rates between the sexes, meaning that the differences in male and female mutation rates can be assumed constant over STR loci...... and kits. Sex and STR locus specific mutation rates were estimated with 95% confidence limits by the method of Clopper and Pearson (1934)....

  6. Domain landscapes of somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrt, Nathan L; Peterson, Thomas A; Park, DoHwan; Kann, Maricel G

    2012-06-18

    Large-scale tumor sequencing projects are now underway to identify genetic mutations that drive tumor initiation and development. Most studies take a gene-based approach to identifying driver mutations, highlighting genes mutated in a large percentage of tumor samples as those likely to contain driver mutations. However, this gene-based approach usually does not consider the position of the mutation within the gene or the functional context the position of the mutation provides. Here we introduce a novel method for mapping mutations to distinct protein domains, not just individual genes, in which they occur, thus providing the functional context for how the mutation contributes to disease. Furthermore, aggregating mutations from all genes containing a specific protein domain enables the identification of mutations that are rare at the gene level, but that occur frequently within the specified domain. These highly mutated domains potentially reveal disruptions of protein function necessary for cancer development. We mapped somatic mutations from the protein coding regions of 100 colon adenocarcinoma tumor samples to the genes and protein domains in which they occurred, and constructed topographical maps to depict the "mutational landscapes" of gene and domain mutation frequencies. We found significant mutation frequency in a number of genes previously known to be somatically mutated in colon cancer patients including APC, TP53 and KRAS. In addition, we found significant mutation frequency within specific domains located in these genes, as well as within other domains contained in genes having low mutation frequencies. These domain "peaks" were enriched with functions important to cancer development including kinase activity, DNA binding and repair, and signal transduction. Using our method to create the domain landscapes of mutations in colon cancer, we were able to identify somatic mutations with high potential to drive cancer development. Interestingly, the

  7. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  8. (A review) Mutation and its role in biotechnology | Sudi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutations is the process by which a gene or chromosome changes; structurally and the end result of that process. All mutations are not harmful' as beneficial mutations occur frequently among various viruses, and bacteria and also in higher organisms. The Biotechnological role of mutations will be reviewed and discussed.

  9. Site-specific genomic (SSG and random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honigberg Saul M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A valuable weapon in the arsenal available to yeast geneticists is the ability to introduce specific mutations into yeast genome. In particular, methods have been developed to introduce deletions into the yeast genome using PCR fragments. These methods are highly efficient because they do not require cloning in plasmids. Results We have modified the existing method for introducing deletions in the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome using PCR fragments in order to target point mutations to this genome. We describe two PCR-based methods for directing point mutations into the yeast genome such that the final product contains no other disruptions. In the first method, site-specific genomic (SSG mutagenesis, a specific point mutation is targeted into the genome. In the second method, random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis, a mutation is introduced at random within a specific domain of a gene. Both methods require two sequential transformations, the first transformation integrates the URA3 marker into the targeted locus, and the second transformation replaces URA3 with a PCR fragment containing one or a few mutations. This PCR fragment is synthesized using a primer containing a mutation (SSG mutagenesis or is synthesized by error-prone PCR (RDL mutagenesis. In SSG mutagenesis, mutations that are proximal to the URA3 site are incorporated at higher frequencies than distal mutations, however mutations can be introduced efficiently at distances of at least 500 bp from the URA3 insertion. In RDL mutagenesis, to ensure that incorporation of mutations occurs at approximately equal frequencies throughout the targeted region, this region is deleted at the same time URA3 is integrated. Conclusion SSG and RDL mutagenesis allow point mutations to be easily and efficiently incorporated into the yeast genome without disrupting the native locus.

  10. Angiodysplasia Occurring in Jejunal Diverticulosis

    OpenAIRE

    Edward A Jones; Hugh Chaun; Phillip Switzer; David J Clow; Ronald J Hancock

    1990-01-01

    The first case of angiodysplasia occurring in acquired jejunal diverticulosis is reported. The patient presented with occult gastrointestinal bleeding and chronic anemia, and was created successfully by resection of a 25 cm long segment of jejunum. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms for both angiodysplasia and jejunal diverticulosis are discussed.

  11. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  12. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  13. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Four hundred and eighty eight patients with advanced NSCLC were included. The mutation status was assessed using the cobas EGFR Mutation Test. Erlotinib was administrated (150 mg/d) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicities occurred. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival....... Secondary endpoints were overall survival and response. RESULTS: Biopsies were retrieved from 467 patients, and mutation results obtained for 462. We identified 57 (12%) patients with EGFR mutations: 33 exon 19 deletions, 13 exon 21 mutations, 5 exon 18 mutations, 3 exon 20 insertions, 1 exon 20 point...

  14. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  15. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Simon, Ronald; Aguiar, Jennifer A.; Alkallas, Rached; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Zhang, Junyan; Watson, John D.; Chua, Melvin L. K.; Fraser, Michael; Favero, Francesco; Lawerenz, Chris; Plass, Christoph; Sauter, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer patients, and identify a median of one mitochondrial single-nucleotide variant (mtSNV) per patient. Some of these mtSNVs occur in recurrent mutational hotspots and associate with aggressive disease. Young...

  16. Guanine holes are prominent targets for mutation in cancer and inherited disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    Full Text Available Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G • C bp in the context of all 64 5'-NGNN-3' motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials. Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease.

  17. Prognostic role of IDH mutations in gliomas: a meta-analysis of 55 observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liang; Wu, Bin; Fu, Zhiquan; Feng, Fang; Qiao, Enqi; Li, Qinglin; Sun, Caixing; Ge, Minghua

    2015-07-10

    IDH (Isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations occur frequently in gliomas, but their prognostic impact has not been fully assessed. We performed a meta-analysis of the association between IDH mutations and survival in gliomas. Pubmed and EMBASE databases were searched for studies reporting IDH mutations (IHD1/2 and IDH1) and survival in gliomas. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS); the secondary outcome was progression-free survival (PFS). Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were determined using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effect modeling. Funnel plot and Egger's test were conducted to examine the risk of publication bias. Fifty-five studies (9487 patients) were included in the analysis. Fifty-four and twenty-seven studies investigated the association between IDH1/2 mutations and OS/PFS respectively in patients with glioma. The results showed that patients possessing an IDH1/2 mutation had significant advantages in OS (HR = 0.39, 95%CI: 0.34-0.45; P IDH mutations have improved OS and PFS, especially for patients with WHO grade III and grade II-III.

  18. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  19. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Luis; Bussey, Kimberly J; Orr, Adam J; Miočević, Milica; Lineweaver, Charles H; Davies, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1) Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]); and 2) genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational response to

  20. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cisneros

    Full Text Available Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1 Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]; and 2 genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational

  1. A new PAX6 mutation in familial aniridia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, I.; Brown, A.; Van Heyningen, V.

    1995-01-01

    Aniridia (lack of iris) is caused by loss of function mutations in one copy of the PAX6 gene. Here we present a new PAX6 splice mutation in a family with autosomal dominant aniridia. The mutation is a single nucleotide change which, although occurring within an exon, affects the splice junction consensus and results in skipping of that exon.

  2. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  3. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  4. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, J.M. de; Luijt, R.B. van der; Pieterman, C.R.; Oostveen, M.P.; Hermus, A.R.; Dekkers, O.M.; Herder, W.W. de; Horst-Schrivers, A.N. van der; Drent, M.L.; Bisschop, P.H.; Havekes, B.; Vriens, M.R.; Valk, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  5. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative patients is

  6. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  7. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  8. Mutation in mitochondrial DNA as a cause of presbyacusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, James O

    2004-01-01

    Much of the hearing loss that occurs in old age is likely to be due to the long-term deterioration of the mitochondria in the different structures of the cochlea. The current review surveys some of the basic information on mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, as a background to their possible involvement in presbyacusis. It is likely that oxygen radicals damage mitochondrial DNA and other components of the mitochondria, such as their proteins and lipids. This further compromises both oxidative phosphorylation and the repair processes in mitochondria, setting up a vicious cycle of degradation. Evidence is presented from inherited point mutations on the possibly most critical sites for mutations in mitochondrial DNA associated with hearing loss. It is suggested that random sorting and clonal expansion of mutations both maintain the integrity of the pool of mitochondrial DNA molecules and give rise to the apoptosis that leads to loss of vulnerable cells, and hence to deafness. It is moreover suggested that apoptosis of the vulnerable cells of the inner ear may to some extent be preventable, or at least delayed. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Covariate Balancing through Naturally Occurring Strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Farrokh; ElRafey, Amr; Avramovic, Ivan

    2016-12-14

    To provide an alternative to propensity scoring (PS) for the common situation where there are interacting covariates. We used 1.3 million assessments of residents of the United States Veterans Affairs nursing homes, collected from January 1, 2000, through October 9, 2012. In stratified covariate balancing (SCB), data are divided into naturally occurring strata, where each stratum is an observed combination of the covariates. Within each stratum, cases with, and controls without, the target event are counted; controls are weighted to be as frequent as cases. This weighting procedure guarantees that covariates, or combination of covariates, are balanced, meaning they occur at the same rate among cases and controls. Finally, impact of the target event is calculated in the weighted data. We compare the performance of SCB, logistic regression (LR), and propensity scoring (PS) in simulated and real data. We examined the calibration of SCB and PS in predicting 6-month mortality from inability to eat, controlling for age, gender, and nine other disabilities for 296,051 residents in Veterans Affairs nursing homes. We also performed a simulation study, where outcomes were randomly generated from treatment, 10 covariates, and increasing number of covariate interactions. The accuracy of SCB, PS, and LR in recovering the simulated treatment effect was reported. In simulated environment, as the number of interactions among the covariates increased, SCB and properly specified LR remained accurate but pairwise LR and pairwise PS, the most common applications of these tools, performed poorly. In real data, application of SCB was practical. SCB was better calibrated than linear PS, the most common method of PS. In environments where covariates interact, SCB is practical and more accurate than common methods of applying LR and PS. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Yu-Tung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-12-13

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analyzed using a panel of 409 cancer-related genes, while a separate group of 40 sporadic CRCs not associated with GISTs served as controls. All 9 of the GISTs had either KIT (8 of 9) or PDGFRA (1 of 9) mutations that were not present in their associated CRCs. Conversely, all but one of the 9 GIST-associated CRCs exhibited an APC mutation, a TP53 mutation or both, while none of their corresponding GISTs harbored either APC or TP53 mutations. The genetic profile of CRCs with and without associated GISTs did not differ. Although population-based studies and case series worldwide, including ours, have unanimously indicated that the GIST-CRC association is nonrandom, our targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveiled a lack of driver-gene mutations linking sporadic GISTs to highly prevalent second primaries. Further studies are needed to elucidate other genetic alterations that may be responsible for this puzzling contradiction.

  11. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B; McGowan, Simon J; Maher, Geoffrey J; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Goriely, Anne

    2013-12-10

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline.

  12. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  13. Cystic fibrosis in Afro-Brazilians: XK haplotypes analysis supports the European origin of p.F508del mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, D A S; Faucz, F R; de Alexandre, R B; Santana, M A; de Souza, E L S; Reis, F J C; Pereira-Ferrari, L; Sotomaior, V S; Culpi, L; Phillips, J A; Raskin, S

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disorder, being the p.F508del the most frequent mutation. Also, a nearby restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) named XK (KM19 and XV2C) is non-randomly associated with specific CF alleles. Our aim was to analyze the occurrence of the p.F508del mutation and XK haplotypes in Afro-Brazilians CF patients and controls, since these data is available for the other two main ethnic groups found in Brazil (Euro-Brazilians and Brazilian Amerindians), contributing for the whole comprehension of these haplotypes in the Brazilian population. A total of 103 patients and 54 controls were studied. PCR and PCR-RFLP methodologies were used to identify the presence of the p.F508del and the XK haplotype in the subjects. The combined data show that 84.2% of p.F508del mutation is associated with haplotype B and only 15.8% with haplotype A; no other haplotypes were found to be associated with this mutation. Our data suggest that the occurrence of p.F508del mutation and haplotype B in Afro-Brazilian patients occurs probably due to admixture with Euro-descendants. Therefore this mutation and haplotype could be used as a admixture marker.

  14. RET mutations in MEN 2 associated diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstra, R.M.W.; Stelwagen, T.; Stulp, R.P. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) comprises three clinically distinct dominantly inherited cancer syndromes namely MEN 2A, MEN 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Germline (point) mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been reported to occur in all these syndromes. In MEN 2A and FMTC patients the mutations occurred within codons specifying cysteine residues in the transition of the RET extracellular and transmembrane domains, while in MEN 2B patients we could detect a single RET mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain in all patients. Also in patients suffering from Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR), mutations in the RET gene have been found. These mutations are spread all over the gene. Several families have been described in which MEN 2 and HSCR are associated. MEN 2A is also found associated with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis (CLA). It might be that specific RET mutations correlate with these disease associations. We therefore scanned DNA from patients from a family with MEN 2A and HSCR, MEN 2A and CLA and CLA only for RET mutations. Results obtained thus far do not support the existence of specific correlations.

  15. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  16. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-04

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  17. Bone metastasis in prostate cancer: Recurring mitochondrial DNA mutation reveals selective pressure exerted by the bone microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rebecca S; Fedewa, Stacey A; Goodman, Michael; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Kissick, Haydn T; Morrissey, Colm; True, Lawrence D; Petros, John A

    2015-09-01

    include a tRNA Arg mutation at n.p. 10436 and a tRNA Thr mutation at n.p. 15928. The tRNA Arg mutation was restricted to bone metastases and occurred in three of 10 patients (30%). Somatic mutation at 15928 was not restricted to the bone and also occurred in three patients. Mitochondrial genomic variation was greater in metastatic sites than in the primary tumor and bone metastases had statistically significantly greater numbers of somatic mutations than either the primary or the soft tissue metastases. The genome was not mutated randomly. At least one mutational "hot-spot" was identified at the individual base level (nucleotide position 10398 in bone metastases) indicating a pervasive selective pressure for bone metastatic cells that had acquired the 10398 mtDNA mutation. Two additional recurrent mutations (tRNA Arg and tRNA Thr) support the concept of bone site-specific "survival of the fittest" as revealed by variation in the mitochondrial genome and selective pressure exerted by the metastatic site. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Absence of ras-gene hot-spot mutations in canine fibrosarcomas and melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murua Escobar, Hugo; Günther, Kathrin; Richter, Andreas; Soller, Jan T; Winkler, Susanne; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2004-01-01

    Point mutations within ras proto-oncogenes, particularly within the mutational hot-spot codons 12, 13 and 61, are frequently detected in human malignancies and in different types of experimentally-induced tumours in animals. So far little is known about ras mutations in naturally occurring canine fibrosarcomas or K-ras mutations in canine melanomas. To elucidate whether ras mutations exist in these naturally occurring tumours in dogs, in the present study we screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas, 2 feline fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot-spots, making this the first study to investigate a large number of canine fibrosarcomas. None of the samples showed a K- or N-ras hot spot mutation. Thus, our data strongly suggest that ras mutations at the hot-spot loci are very rare and do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of the spontaneously occurring canine tumours investigated.

  19. A systematic study of gene mutations in urothelial carcinoma; inactivating mutations in TSC2 and PIK3R1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfrid Sjödahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial carcinoma (UC is characterized by frequent gene mutations of which activating mutations in FGFR3 are the most frequent. Several downstream targets of FGFR3 are also mutated in UC, e.g., PIK3CA, AKT1, and RAS. Most mutation studies of UCs have been focused on single or a few genes at the time or been performed on small sample series. This has limited the possibility to investigate co-occurrence of mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed mutation analyses of 16 genes, FGFR3, PIK3CA, PIK3R1 PTEN, AKT1, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, ARAF, RAF1, TSC1, TSC2, APC, CTNNB1, and TP53, in 145 cases of UC. We show that FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations are positively associated. In addition, we identified PIK3R1 as a target for mutations. We demonstrate a negative association at borderline significance between FGFR3 and RAS mutations, and show that these mutations are not strictly mutually exclusive. We show that mutations in BRAF, ARAF, RAF1 rarely occurs in UC. Our data emphasize the possible importance of APC signaling as 6% of the investigated tumors either showed inactivating APC or activating CTNNB1 mutations. TSC1, as well as TSC2, that constitute the mTOR regulatory tuberous sclerosis complex were found to be mutated at a combined frequency of 15%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a significant association between FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations in UC. Moreover, the identification of mutations in PIK3R1 further emphasizes the importance of the PI3-kinase pathway in UC. The presence of TSC2 mutations, in addition to TSC1 mutations, underlines the involvement of mTOR signaling in UC.

  20. Efficacy of chemotherapy after first-line gefitinib therapy in EGFR mutation-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer-data from a randomized Phase III study comparing gefitinib with carboplatin plus paclitaxel (NEJ002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Inoue, Akira; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Maemondo, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunichi; Oizumi, Satoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Gemma, Akihiko; Saijo, Yasuo; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2015-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective as first-line therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. However, it is unknown whether second-line platinum-based chemotherapy after epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy could lead to better outcomes. We evaluated the efficacy of second-line platinum-based chemotherapy after gefitinib for advanced non-small cell lung cancers harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (the NEJ002 study). Seventy-one non-small cell lung cancers, treated with gefitinib as first-line therapy and then receiving platinum-based chemotherapy as second-line therapy were evaluated in NEJ002. Patients were evaluated for antitumor response to second-line chemotherapy by computed tomography according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors group (version 1.0). Of the 71 patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy after first-line gefitinib, a partial response was documented in 25.4% (18/71), stable disease in 43.7% (31/71) and progression of disease in 21.1% (15/71). The objective response and disease control rates were 25.4% (18/71) and 69% (49/71), respectively. There was no significant difference between first- and second-line chemotherapy in objective response and disease control rates for advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. In the analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation types, the objective responses of deletions in exon 19 and a point mutation in exon 21 (L858R) were 27.3% (9/33) and 28.1% (9/32), respectively, but these differences between objective response rates were not significant. The efficacy of second-line platinum-based chemotherapy followed at progression by gefitinib was similar to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation types did not influence

  1. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Wang

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas (AS are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA, that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma.Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3 demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage.Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  2. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C; Mason, Nicola J; Roth, David B

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  3. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  4. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  5. Biological and clinical evidence for somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 as predictive markers for olaparib response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers in the maintenance setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brian A; Lai, Zhongwu; Hodgson, Darren R; Orr, Maria C M; Hawryluk, Matthew; Sun, James; Yelensky, Roman; Spencer, Stuart K; Robertson, Jane D; Ho, Tony W; Fielding, Anitra; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Barrett, J Carl

    2017-07-04

    To gain a better understanding of the role of somatic mutations in olaparib response, next-generation sequencing (NGS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed as part of a planned retrospective analysis of tumors from a randomized, double-blind, Phase II trial (Study 19; D0810C00019; NCT00753545) in 265 patients with platinum-sensitive high-grade serous ovarian cancer. BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations were found in 55% (114/209) of tumors, were mutually exclusive, and demonstrated high concordance with Sanger-sequenced germline mutations in matched blood samples, confirming the accuracy (97%) of tumor BRCA1/2 NGS testing. Additionally, NGS identified somatic mutations absent from germline testing in 10% (20/209) of the patients. Somatic mutations had >80% biallelic inactivation frequency and were predominantly clonal, suggesting that BRCA1/2 loss occurs early in the development of these cancers. Clinical outcomes between placebo- and olaparib-treated patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations were similar to those with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating that patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations benefit from treatment with olaparib.

  6. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Yu-Tung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analy...

  7. [Inflammatory fibroid polyps are true neoplasms with PDGFRA mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhaus, H-U; Büttner, R; Binot, E; Merkelbach-Bruse, S; Wardelmann, E

    2009-12-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFP) are proliferations of CD34-positive spindle cells in the submucosa and mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract with an inflammatory infiltrate. IFP occur in the stomach, small bowel, colon and esophagus. To date, etiology and pathogenesis are unclear. A total of 29 IFP originating in the stomach, small bowel and colon were examined immunohistochemically, and mutational analyses of PDGFRA exons 10, 12, 14 and 18 were conducted. Activating mutations in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18 were found in 20 cases (69%). The mutational types are related to mutations known from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). D842V was the most frequent mutation. No activating mutations were found in exons 10 and 14. The majority of IFP reveal activating PDGFRA mutations. Our data indicate that IFP are true neoplasms (true benign tumors) and not reactive lesions. In terms of pathogenesis, the relationship between PDGFRA-mutant GISTs and IFP remains to be determined.

  8. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  9. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  10. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-08-07

    The metabolism of solid tumors is associated with high lactate production while growing in oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) suggesting that tumors may have defects in mitochondrial function. The mitochondria produce cellular energy by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by-product, and regulate apoptosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate. In humans, severe mtDNA mutations result in multisystem disease, while some functional population-specific polymorphisms appear to have permitted humans to adapt to new environments. Mutations in the nDNA-encoded mitochondrial genes for fumarate hydratase and succinate dehydrogenase have been linked to uterine leiomyomas and paragangliomas, and cancer cells have been shown to induce hexokinase II which harnesses OXPHOS adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production to drive glycolysis. Germline mtDNA mutations at nucleotides 10398 and 16189 have been associated with breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Tumor mtDNA somatic mutations range from severe insertion-deletion and chain termination mutations to mild missense mutations. Surprisingly, of the 190 tumor-specific somatic mtDNA mutations reported, 72% are also mtDNA sequence variants found in the general population. These include 52% of the tumor somatic mRNA missense mutations, 83% of the tRNA mutations, 38% of the rRNA mutations, and 85% of the control region mutations. Some associations might reflect mtDNA sequencing errors, but analysis of several of the tumor-specific somatic missense mutations with population counterparts appear legitimate. Therefore, mtDNA mutations in tumors may fall into two main classes: (1) severe mutations that inhibit OXPHOS, increase ROS production and promote tumor

  11. Skin prick test reactivity to aeroallergens by filaggrin mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, M G; Johansen, J D; Linneberg, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations are positively associated with sensitization to aero allergens. We hypothesized that FLG mutations would also have an effect on the mean size of positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions as well as the number of positive reactions....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of FLG mutations on the mean size and the number of positive SPT reactions, as well as the association with positive specific IgE. METHODS: A random sample of 3335 adults from the general population in Denmark was genotyped for the R501X and 2282del4 mutations in the FLG....... SPT and specific IgE measurements to common aeroallergens were also performed. RESULTS: FLG mutations did not influence the mean size and number of positive SPT reactions. Also, no association was found between FLG mutations and specific IgE measurements. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that FLG...

  12. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  13. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient...

  14. Non-deletion mutations in Egyptian patients with Duchenne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-04-19

    Apr 19, 2014 ... Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystro- phies affecting approximately 1:3500 male live births. Deletion of the dystrophin gene accounts for approximately 65% of mutations, duplications occur in 6–10% while the remaining 20–30% are point mutations ...

  15. Mutation analysis of hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase region among untreated chronically infected patients in Ahvaz city (South-West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hamidi-Fard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been revealed that mutations can occur spontaneously and naturally in HBV reverse transcriptase (RT region among untreated patients. These HBV mutants pre-exist as minor viral population in naive patients and can emerge as major viral population, conferring drug resistance and treatment failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate and identify prevalent mutations of RT region of hepatitis B virus genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB untreated with antiviral drugs in South-West of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 cases with CHB who did not receive the treatment of lamivudine and any other antivirus drugs within the last one year were randomly chosen. After sample collection and HBV DNA extraction, RT region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Then PCR products were sequenced and HBV RT region mutations and amino acid changes were analyzed either manually or using web-based programs, on the basis of comparison of the obtained sequences with a set of HBV reference sequences. Results: A total of 23 (51.1% mutations and amino acid changes were detected in studied 45 untreated patients. Of these, 3 (6.6% patients had primary resistance mutation (rtM204I, rtA181T and rtA181S and 20 (44.4% patients had secondary resistance mutations. Conclusion: High prevalence of mutations was found in HBV RT region of untreated patients. Most of these mutations were associated with resistance to adefovir and one patient had primary resistance mutation to lamivudine. Awareness of these resistance patterns might help in the antiviral therapy and for predicting clinical outcomes.

  16. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail K Mithani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. METHODOLOGY: The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77% carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6% carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9% with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  18. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Suhail K; Shao, Chunbo; Tan, Marietta; Smith, Ian M; Califano, Joseph A; El-Naggar, Adel K; Ha, Patrick K

    2009-12-30

    The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77%) carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6%) carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9%) with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) complex. Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  19. Somatic Mutation in Immunoglobulin Gene Variable Region in Patients With Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia and Its Influence on Disease Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadighi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a common blood cancer in people aged over 40. In addition to clinical and pathologic staging and blood tests, immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (IgVH mutation analysis is a relevant prognostic factor for CLL. Finding the most prevalent mutation type and conducting a molecular analysis of immunoglobulin in the majority of the patients can contribute to identifying the disease pattern. Objectives In the present study, we used molecular detection methods to find the relationship between clinical and pathologic findings with immunoglobulin heavy chain mutations in CLL patients in Iran. Patients and Methods Patients with CLL were randomly selected from patients referred to Imam Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran. All patients underwent a clinical staging of the disease and had flow cytometric analysis performed on their blood samples. The panels of cell surface markers used for the diagnosis of chronic lymphoid leukemia include CD19, CD3, CD23, CD10, and CD5. The diagnosis confirmed a minimum of 20% positive expression of dual CD5 and CD19 markers. Genomic DNA was then extracted from the patients’ blood and IgVH mutation analysis was conducted with pGEM-T (easy vector cloning kit followed by IgVH sequencing. Results Study patients were 42 to 80 years old, with their mean age of 62 (SE = 1.87 years. About 73% of them were male. The mean white blood cell (WBC count, lymphocytes percentage, average hemoglobin level, and platelet count were 56,000/µL, 85%, 12 g/dL, and 150,000/µL, respectively. According to their molecular analysis, 38.9% of patients were unmutated and 61.1% showed mutation in the variable heavy chain locus. The most common mutation had occurred in IgVH3 allele (66.66%. The mean overall survival rate of patients, mutated and unmutated, was, respectively, 39 (95% CI, 32 to 46 and 31 (95% CI, 26 to 36 months (P = 0.4. Binet stage had statistically significant relationship with patients

  20. Impact of a stress-inducible switch to mutagenic repair of DNA breaks on mutation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Gibson, Janet L; Darrow, Michele C; Gonzalez, Caleb; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2011-08-16

    Basic ideas about the constancy and randomness of mutagenesis that drives evolution were challenged by the discovery of mutation pathways activated by stress responses. These pathways could promote evolution specifically when cells are maladapted to their environment (i.e., are stressed). However, the clearest example--a general stress-response-controlled switch to error-prone DNA break (double-strand break, DSB) repair--was suggested to be peculiar to an Escherichia coli F' conjugative plasmid, not generally significant, and to occur by an alternative stress-independent mechanism. Moreover, mechanisms of spontaneous mutation in E. coli remain obscure. First, we demonstrate that this same mechanism occurs in chromosomes of starving F(-) E. coli. I-SceI endonuclease-induced chromosomal DSBs increase mutation 50-fold, dependent upon general/starvation- and DNA-damage-stress responses, DinB error-prone DNA polymerase, and DSB-repair proteins. Second, DSB repair is also mutagenic if the RpoS general-stress-response activator is expressed in unstressed cells, illustrating a stress-response-controlled switch to mutagenic repair. Third, DSB survival is not improved by RpoS or DinB, indicating that mutagenesis is not an inescapable byproduct of repair. Importantly, fourth, fully half of spontaneous frame-shift and base-substitution mutation during starvation also requires the same stress-response, DSB-repair, and DinB proteins. These data indicate that DSB-repair-dependent stress-induced mutation, driven by spontaneous DNA breaks, is a pathway that cells usually use and a major source of spontaneous mutation. These data also rule out major alternative models for the mechanism. Mechanisms that couple mutagenesis to stress responses can allow cells to evolve rapidly and responsively to their environment.

  1. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple Primary Cancers: Simultaneously Occurring Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... occurring prostate cancer and other primary tumors-our experience and ... tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited ..... Seretis C, Seretis F, Liakos N. Multidisciplinary approach to.

  3. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis in Colorectal Flat Adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Spiertz, Angela J.; Claes, Bart; Mongera, Sandra; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Grabsch, Heike; Kliment, Martin; Rembacken, Bjorn; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Quirke, Philip; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Lambrechts, Diether; van Engeland, Manon; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Flat adenomas are a subgroup of colorectal adenomas that have been associated with a distinct biology and a more aggressive clinical behavior compared to their polypoid counterparts. In the present study, we aimed to compare the mutation spectrum of 14 cancer genes, between these two phenotypes. Methods A consecutive series of 106 flat and 93 polypoid adenomas was analyzed retrospectively for frequently occurring mutations in “hot spot” regions of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS, as well as selected mutations in CTNNB1 (β-catenin), EGFR, FBXW7 (CDC4), PTEN, STK11, MAP2K4, SMAD4, PIK3R1 and PDGFRA using a high-throughput genotyping technique. Additionally, APC was analyzed using direct sequencing. Results APC mutations were more frequent in polypoid adenomas compared to flat adenomas (48.5% versus 30.3%, respectively, p = 0.02). Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, FBXW7 and CTNNB1 showed similar frequencies in both phenotypes. Between the different subtypes of flat adenomas (0-IIa, LST-F and LST-G) no differences were observed for any of the investigated genes. Conclusion The lower APC mutation rate in flat adenomas compared to polypoid adenomas suggests that disruption of the Wnt-pathway may occur via different mechanisms in these two phenotypes. Furthermore, in contrast to previous observations our results in this large well-defined sample set indicate that there is no significant association between the different morphological phenotypes and mutations in key genes of the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. PMID:22848674

  4. Minkowski Polynomials and Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akhtar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Given a Laurent polynomial f, one can form the period of f: this is a function of one complex variable that plays an important role in mirror symmetry for Fano manifolds. Mutations are a particular class of birational transformations acting on Laurent polynomials in two variables; they preserve the period and are closely connected with cluster algebras. We propose a higher-dimensional analog of mutation acting on Laurent polynomials f in n variables. In particular we give a combinatorial description of mutation acting on the Newton polytope P of f, and use this to establish many basic facts about mutations. Mutations can be understood combinatorially in terms of Minkowski rearrangements of slices of P, or in terms of piecewise-linear transformations acting on the dual polytope P* (much like cluster transformations. Mutations map Fano polytopes to Fano polytopes, preserve the Ehrhart series of the dual polytope, and preserve the period of f. Finally we use our results to show that Minkowski polynomials, which are a family of Laurent polynomials that give mirror partners to many three-dimensional Fano manifolds, are connected by a sequence of mutations if and only if they have the same period.

  5. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B

    2013-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed...... selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection...

  6. Familial hypercholesterolemia mutations in Petrozavodsk: no similarity to St. Petersburg mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana Yu; Korneva, Victoria A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana Yu; Golovina, Alexandra S; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Mandelshtam, Michail Yu

    2013-12-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a human monogenic disease induced by a variety of mutations with striking genetic diversity. Despite this variability recurrent mutations occur in each population studied, which allows both elucidating prevalent mutations and developing DNA diagnostic tools for the disease. Recent research of FH in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Novosibirsk (major cities in Russia) demonstrates that each megapolis has its own FH mutation spectrum sharing only small part of mutations with other populations in Russia and Europe. In order to optimize molecular-genetic diagnostic protocols for FH in Russia we studied mutation spectrum in other regions including Petrozavodsk, a smaller town in relatively close proximity to St. Petersburg. The principal method was automated detection of single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by direct PCR amplified DNA sequencing. Twelve different mutations of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were detected in the Petrozavodsk sample (80 patients). Out of these twelve mutations, seven have never been described before (c.192_201delinsGGACTTCA, c. 195_196insT, c. 618 T > G, c. 1340C > G, c. 1686_1693delinsT, c. 1936C > A, c. 2191delG). Other five mutations (c. 58G > A, c. 925_931del, c. 1194C > T, c. 1532 T > C, c. 1920C > T) were previously characterized elsewhere. All new mutations are considered to be a probable cause of the FH in their carriers. Direct evidence of the neutral character of c.58G > A or p. (Gly20Arg) is provided for the first time. Each pathogenic mutation was a trait of its own unique pedigree and so far has not been found in other patients. Strikingly, out of twelve mutations characterized in the Petrozavodsk sample only one mutation, c. 925_931del, has previously been found in patients from St. Petersburg and Finland (most closely located studied populations), suggesting some common roots in origin of these populations in the past or limited

  7. Colorectal cancer and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, MM; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; van der Graaf, WTA; Mulder, MJ; van der Steege, G; Bruinenberg, M; Schaapveld, M; Niessen, RC; Berends, MJW; Sijmons, RH; Hofstra, RMW; de Vries, EGE; Kleibeuker, JH

    The CHEK2 1100delC mutation was recently identified as a low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility allele. The mutation occurred more frequently in families with clustering of breast and colorectal cancers (CRCs) than in families with clustering of breast cancer only. Hence, the 1100delC mutation

  8. Common mutations in G6PD of Vietnamese-Kinh deficient patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DANG THI LAN ANH

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... This study was conducted to identify the common mutations occurring within the G6PD gene in the G6PD -. Vietnamese deficient patients, which may be the main causative mutations of the G6PD deficiency in. Vietnamese-kinh. Sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the coding region of G6PD ...

  9. Common mutations in G6PD of Vietnamese-Kinh deficient patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to identify the common mutations occurring within the G6PD gene in the G6PD - Vietnamese deficient patients, which may be the main causative mutations of the G6PD deficiency in Vietnamese-kinh. Sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the coding region of G6PD gene for 30 ...

  10. TERT promoter mutations and their association with BRAF V600E mutation and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Qu, Shen; Liu, Rengyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Shi, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Guangwu; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Hongyu; Wang, Yangang; Sun, Hui; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xing, Mingzhao

    2014-06-01

    Promoter mutations chr5:1,295,228C>T and chr5:1,295,250C>T (termed C228T and C250T, respectively) in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been reported in various cancers and need to be further investigated in thyroid cancer. The aim of the study was to explore TERT promoter mutations in various thyroid tumors and examine their relationship with BRAF V600E mutation, iodine intake, and clinicopathological behaviors of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter and BRAF mutations were identified by sequencing genomic DNA of primary thyroid tumors from normal- and high-iodine regions in China, and clinicopathological correlation was analyzed. The C228T mutation was found in 9.6% (39 of 408) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), C250T was found in 1.7% (7 of 408) of PTC, and they were collectively found in 11.3% (46 of 408) of PTC. C228T was found in 31.8% (7 of 22) and C250T in 4.6% (1 of 22) of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and they were collectively found in 36.4% (8 of 22) of FTC. No TERT mutation was found in 44 benign thyroid tumors. The two mutations occurred in 3.8% (6 of 158) of BRAF mutation-negative PTC vs 16.0% (40 of 250) of BRAF mutation-positive PTC (P = 5.87 × 10(-4)), demonstrating their association. Unlike BRAF mutation, TERT promoter mutations were not associated with high iodine intake, but they were associated with older patient age, larger tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, and advanced stages III/IV of PTC. Coexisting TERT and BRAF mutations were even more commonly and more significantly associated with clinicopathological aggressiveness. In this large cohort, we found TERT promoter mutations to be common, particularly in FTC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, and associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics.

  11. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  12. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Gene Mutation in Neonatal Jaundice - Mutations in UGT1A1 and OATP2 Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jiang; Jie, Luo; Caiyun, Yang; Ying, Lin; Xuefang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the correlation of UGT1A1, OATP2 gene mutations and hyperbilirubinemia in newborns in Northern China. Gene mutations were analyzed at the 211 locus of UGT1A1 (Gly71Arg) and 388 locus of OATP2 (Asn130Asp). The 226 enrolled infants were divided into high, moderate, and low risk subgroups according to American Academy of Pediatrics guideline. Blood samples of the enrolled infants were collected for the analysis of the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The genotypes and allele frequencies of the polymorphisms were compared in each group. Both UGT1A1 and OATP2 gene mutations occur more often in high risk group and moderate risk group than in low risk group. The results suggested that Gly71Arg and Asn130Asp mutations in UGT1A1 and OATP2 genes might be involved in the development of hyperbilirubinemia in neonates.

  14. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  15. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  16. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  17. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Mou, Beiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic stu...

  18. Percieved functions of naturally occurring autobiographical memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, L. S.; Henriksen, J. R.; Lundhus, S.

    2005-01-01

    The main empirical reference on functions of autobiographical memories is still Hyman & Faries (1992) who used the cue-word-method and retrospective judgements. We used diaries to sample naturally occurring autobiographical memories and participants? perceived use of these. Results partly replicate...... a pattern found by Hyman and Faries, suggest self-related functions to be primary, and indicate possible gender differences...

  19. Down Syndrome: Co-Occuring Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells for various reasons. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people with Down syndrome can have a number of differences that can require special attention. Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Autism spectrum disorder occurs more frequently in individuals ...

  20. Can reinforcement occur with a learned trait?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Helen; Frame, Alicia M; Servedio, Maria R

    2011-07-01

    We use birdsong as a case study to ask whether reinforcement can occur via the spread of a genetically determined female preference for a socially inherited (learned) male trait. We envision secondary contact between two neighboring populations with different song dialects. An individual's ability to learn song is confined by a genetic predisposition: if predispositions are strong, there will be no phenotypic overlap in song between populations, whereas weak predispositions allow phenotypic overlap, or "mixed" song. To determine if reinforcement has occurred, we consider if an allele for within-population female mating preference, based on song, can spread, and whether population specific songs can concurrently be maintained at equilibrium. We model several scenarios, including costs to mating preferences, mating preferences in hybrids, and hybrids having the ability to learn pure songs. We find that when weak predispositions are fixed within a population reinforcement based on song cannot occur. However, when some individuals have strong predispositions, restricting phenotypic overlap between populations in the trait, reinforcement is only slightly inhibited from a purely genetic model. Generalizing beyond the example of song, we conclude that socially learned signals will tend to prohibit reinforcement, but it may still occur if some individuals acquire trait phenotypes genetically. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Chemical and Biological Significance of Naturally Occurring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    and www.bioline.org.br/j a. Chemical and Biological Significance of Naturally Occurring Additives on. African Black Soap and its Performance. IKOTUN, A. ADEBOMI; OGUNDELE, O. FISAYO; KAYODE, O. MOBOLAJI;. *AJAELU, C. JOHN. Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Bowen Univeristy, Iwo, Nigeria.

  2. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Cohen, M.P. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Sexauer, C.L. (Children' s Hospital, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  3. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  4. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Wardle, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)–based testing. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the...

  5. Mutation Rate at Commonly Used Forensic STR Loci: Paternity Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aşıcıoğlua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Paternity tests are carried out by the analysis of hypervariable short tandem repeat DNA loci. These microsatellite sequences mutate at a higher rate than that of bulk DNA. The occurrence of germline mutations at STR loci posses problems in interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We recently analyzed 59–159 parent/child allele transfers at 13 microsatellite loci. We identified 12 mutations in 7 microsatellite loci. No mutations were occurred in other 6 loci. The highest mutation rate was observed with 5 mutations at D8S1179 locus at different alleles. The event was always single repeat related. The mutation rate was between 0 and 1.5 x 10-2 per locus per gamete per generation. The mutation event is very crucial for forensic DNA testing and accumulation of STR mutation data is extremely important for genetic profile interpretation.

  6. Ethical issues occurring within nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marsha D; Davis, Anne J

    2013-03-01

    The large body of literature labeled "ethics in nursing education" is entirely devoted to curricular matters of ethics education in nursing schools, that is, to what ought to be the ethics content that is taught and what theory or issues ought to be included in all nursing curricula. Where the nursing literature actually focuses on particular ethical issues, it addresses only single topics. Absent from the literature, however, is any systematic analysis and explication of ethical issues or dilemmas that occur within the context of nursing education. The objective of this article is to identify the spectrum of ethical issues in nursing education to the end of prompting a systematic and thorough study of such issues, and to lay the groundwork for research by identifying and provisionally typologizing the ethical issues that occur within the context of academic nursing.

  7. Challenging a dogma: co-mutations exist in MAPK pathway genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellety, Thomas; Gros, Audrey; Pedeutour, Florence; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Duranton-Tanneur, Valerie; Italiano, Antoine; Soubeyran, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway proteins in colorectal cancer (CRC) has established as dogma that of the genes in a pathway only a single one is ever mutated. We searched for cases with a mutation in more than one MAPK pathway gene (co-mutations). Tumor tissue samples of all patients presenting with CRC, and referred between 01/01/2008 and 01/06/2015 to three French cancer centers for determination of mutation status of RAS/RAF+/-PIK3CA, were retrospectively screened for co-mutations using Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing. We found that of 1791 colorectal patients with mutations in the MAPK pathway, 20 had a co-mutation, 8 of KRAS/NRAS, and some even with a third mutation. More than half of the mutations were in codons 12 and 13. We also found 3 cases with a co-mutation of NRAS/BRAF and 9 with a co-mutation of KRAS/BRAF. In 2 patients with a co-mutation of KRAS/NRAS, the co-mutation existed in the primary as well as in a metastasis, which suggests that co-mutations occur early during carcinogenesis and are maintained when a tumor disseminates. We conclude that co-mutations exist in the MAPK genes but with low frequency and as yet with unknown outcome implications.

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Stroke Occurring while Bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Oshima, Takeo; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Imai, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Stroke can occur during any human activity. Although cardiac arrests or drowning accidents while bathing have been studied extensively, there are few studies focusing on stroke occurring while bathing. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical characteristics of stroke occurring while bathing and the association between stroke and drowning accidents. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CIs], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICHs], and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAHs]) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing-related strokes to strokes occurring during other activities was evaluated. Moreover, the demographics of these 2 groups were compared in each stroke type. Among the 1939 patients, 78 (CI, 32; ICH, 28; and SAH, 18) sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing to other activities in the SAH group was the highest (8.6%), followed by the ICH group (5.5%), whereas that in the CI group was the lowest (2.6%). Regardless of stroke type, only a minority of patients were found to have collapsed inside the bathtub. The higher ratio of bathing in hemorrhagic strokes may indicate that there is a small risk of hemorrhagic stroke while bathing in vulnerable subjects. This retrospective study did not establish a causal relationship between bathing and stroke nor identify risk factors, which means that future prospective studies are warranted. The finding that the great majority of bathing-related stroke patients were found to have collapsed outside the bathtub suggests that the involvement of stroke in drowning accidents in the bathtub may be small. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Jerky Periods: Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    OpenAIRE

    Buijink, Arthur W.G.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Marina A.J. Tijssen; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    Background In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20?ms. Discussion This appears to be the first descript...

  10. Diverticulitis occurs early after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric S; Khalil, Hassan A; Lin, Anne Y; Russell, Marcia; Ardehali, Abbas; Ross, David; Yoo, James

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation recipients are at an increased risk for developing diverticulitis. However, the incidence and natural history of diverticulitis have not been well characterized. Our objective was to identify patient and transplant-related factors that may be associated with an increased risk of developing diverticulitis in this patient population. This is a retrospective single institution study. All patients who received a lung transplant between May 2008 and July 2013 were evaluated using an existing lung transplantation database. Patient-related factors, the incidence and timing of diverticulitis, and outcomes of medical and surgical management were measured. Of the 314 patients who received a lung transplant, 14 patients (4.5%) developed diverticulitis. All episodes (100%) of diverticulitis occurred within the first 2 y after transplantation. Eight patients (57%) required surgery with a mortality rate of 12.5%. Six patients (43%) were managed medically and did not require surgery with a mean follow-up period of 442 d. Diverticulitis is common after lung transplantation and occurs with a higher incidence compared with the general population. Diverticulitis occurs early in the posttransplant period, and the majority of patients require surgery. Patients who respond promptly to medical treatment may not require elective resection. A greater awareness of the risk of diverticulitis in the early posttransplant period may allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and genetic characterization of manifesting carriers of DMD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Sampson, Jacinda B; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M; Florence, Julaine M; Finkel, Richard S; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda L; Sussman, Michael D; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E; Howard, Michael T; Weiss, Robert B; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2010-08-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in 15 manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X-chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X-chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward non-random in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. De Laat (Joanne M.); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.R.C. Pieterman (Carolina); Oostveen, M.P. (Maria P.); A.R.M.M. Hermus (Ad); O.M. Dekkers (Olaf); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); A.N.A. van der Horst-Schrivers (Anouk); M.L. Drent (Madeleine); P.H. Bisschop (Peter); B. Havekes (Bas); M.R. Vriens (Menno); G.D. Valk (Gerlof)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of

  13. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  14. Activating cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CYSLTR2) mutations in blue nevi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Inga; Murali, Rajmohan; Müller, Hansgeorg; Wiesner, Thomas; Jackett, Louise A; Scholz, Simone L; Cosgarea, Ioana; van de Nes, Johannes Ap; Sucker, Antje; Hillen, Uwe; Schilling, Bastian; Paschen, Annette; Kutzner, Heinz; Rütten, Arno; Böckers, Martin; Scolyer, Richard A; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G

    2017-03-01

    Blue nevi are common melanocytic tumors arising in the dermal layer of the skin. Similar to uveal melanomas, blue nevi frequently harbor GNAQ and GNA11 mutations. Recently, recurrent CYSLTR2 and PLCB4 mutations were identified in uveal melanomas not harboring GNAQ or GNA11 mutations. All four genes (GNAQ, GNA11, CYSLTR2, and PLCB4) code for proteins involved in the same signaling pathway, which is activated by mutations in these genes. Given the related functional consequences of these mutations and the known genetic similarities between uveal melanoma and blue nevi, we analyzed a cohort of blue nevi to investigate whether CYSLTR2 and PLCB4 mutations occur in tumors lacking GNAQ or GNA11 mutations (as in uveal melanoma). A targeted next-generation sequencing assay covering known activating mutations in GNAQ, GNA11, CYSLTR2, PLCB4, KIT, NRAS, and BRAF was applied to 103 blue nevi. As previously reported, most blue nevi were found to harbor activating mutations in GNAQ (59%, n=61), followed by less frequent mutations in GNA11 (16%, n=17). Additionally, one BRAF (1%) and three NRAS (3%) mutations were detected. In three tumors (3%) harboring none of the aforementioned gene alterations, CYSLTR2 mutations were identified. All three CYSLTR2 mutations were the same c.386T>A, L129Q mutation previously identified in uveal melanoma that has been shown to lead to increased receptor activation and signaling. In summary, our study identifies CYSLTR2 L129Q alterations as a previously unrecognized activating mutation in blue nevi, occuring in a mutually exclusive fashion with known GNAQ and GNA11 mutations. Similar to GNAQ and GNA11 mutations, CYSLTR2 mutations, when present, are likely defining pathogenetic events in blue nevi.

  15. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hyun Ahn

    Full Text Available Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS, which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles.

  16. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun Hyun; Hirohata, Kensen; Kohrn, Brendan F.; Fox, Edward J.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic) mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS), which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G) are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G) are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles. PMID:26305705

  17. Role of mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim C R Conibear

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The survival of bacteria in nature is greatly enhanced by their ability to grow within surface-associated communities called biofilms. Commonly, biofilms generate proliferations of bacterial cells, called microcolonies, which are highly recalcitrant, 3-dimensional foci of bacterial growth. Microcolony growth is initiated by only a subpopulation of bacteria within biofilms, but processes responsible for this differentiation remain poorly understood. Under conditions of crowding and intense competition between bacteria within biofilms, microevolutionary processes such as mutation selection may be important for growth; however their influence on microcolony-based biofilm growth and architecture have not previously been explored. To study mutation in-situ within biofilms, we transformed Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells with a green fluorescent protein gene containing a +1 frameshift mutation. Transformed P. aeruginosa cells were non-fluorescent until a mutation causing reversion to the wildtype sequence occurs. Fluorescence-inducing mutations were observed in microcolony structures, but not in other biofilm cells, or in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa cells. Thus microcolonies may represent important foci for mutation and evolution within biofilms. We calculated that microcolony-specific increases in mutation frequency were at least 100-fold compared with planktonically grown cultures. We also observed that mutator phenotypes can enhance microcolony-based growth of P. aeruginosa cells. For P. aeruginosa strains defective in DNA fidelity and error repair, we found that microcolony initiation and growth was enhanced with increased mutation frequency of the organism. We suggest that microcolony-based growth can involve mutation and subsequent selection of mutants better adapted to grow on surfaces within crowded-cell environments. This model for biofilm growth is analogous to mutation selection that occurs during neoplastic progression and tumor

  18. Interactions between Aβ and mutated Tau lead to polymorphism and induce aggregation of Aβ-mutated tau oligomeric complexes.

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    Yoav Raz

    Full Text Available One of the main hallmarks of the fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain as an outcome of the aggregation of mutated tau protein. This process occurs due to a number of genetic mutations in the MAPT gene. One of these mutations is the ∆K280 mutation in the tau R2 repeat domain, which promotes the aggregation vis-à-vis that for the wild-type tau. Experimental studies have shown that in Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide forms aggregates both with itself and with wild-type tau. By analogy, in FTDP-17, it is likely that there are interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated. Thus, to investigate the interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, we constructed fourteen ∆K280 mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes. In seven of the mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited hydrophobic interactions in their core domain, and in the other seven mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited salt-bridge interactions in their core domain. We considered two types of interactions between mutated tau oligomers and Aβ oligomers: interactions of one monomer of the Aβ oligomer with one monomer of the mutated tau oligomer to form a single-layer conformation, and interactions of the entire Aβ oligomer with the entire mutated tau oligomer to form a double-layer conformation. We also considered parallel arrangements of Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers in a single-layer conformation. Our results demonstrate that in the interactions of Aβ and mutated tau oligomers, polymorphic mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes were observed, with a slight preference for the double-layer conformation. Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers constituted a structurally stable confined β-structure, albeit one

  19. Mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; UMEDA, TOMOKO; KAWAI, YUKI; MORI, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; ABE, Hajime; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Tani, Tohru; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Male breast carcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm, accounting for 0.6% of all breast carcinomas. Invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type is the most common type of male breast carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast is extremely rare. In the present study, we report a case of mucinous carcinoma of the male breast and discuss the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. A 63-year-old Japanese male presented with a gradually enlarged nodule in the right breast...

  20. Jerky Periods - Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Buijink

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report: A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion: This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus.

  1. Jerky Periods: Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    Background In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus. PMID:23724361

  2. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-04-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10-7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells.

  3. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  4. Defining "mutation" and "polymorphism" in the era of personal genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Roshan; Pandya, Deep; Elston, Robert C; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-07-15

    The growing advances in DNA sequencing tools have made analyzing the human genome cheaper and faster. While such analyses are intended to identify complex variants, related to disease susceptibility and efficacy of drug responses, they have blurred the definitions of mutation and polymorphism. In the era of personal genomics, it is critical to establish clear guidelines regarding the use of a reference genome. Nowadays DNA variants are called as differences in comparison to a reference. In a sequencing project Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and DNA mutations are defined as DNA variants detectable in >1 % or mutation or polymorphism for the same event (a difference as compared with a reference) can lead to problems of classification. These problems can impact the accuracy of the interpretation and the functional relationship between a disease state and a genomic sequence. We propose to solve this nomenclature dilemma by defining mutations as DNA variants obtained in a paired sequencing project including the germline DNA of the same individual as a reference. Moreover, the term mutation should be accompanied by a qualifying prefix indicating whether the mutation occurs only in somatic cells (somatic mutation) or also in the germline (germline mutation). We believe this distinction in definition will help avoid confusion among researchers and support the practice of sequencing the germline and somatic tissues in parallel to classify the DNA variants thus defined as mutations.

  5. RAS mutations and oncogenesis: not all RAS mutations are created equally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Steven Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any one of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of allele-specific mutation in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype.

  6. Co-occurring protein phosphorylation are functionally associated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications (PTMs add a further layer of complexity to the proteome and regulate a wide range of cellular protein functions. With the increasing number of known PTM sites, it becomes imperative to understand their functional interplays. In this study, we proposed a novel analytical strategy to explore functional relationships between PTM sites by testing their tendency to be modified together (co-occurrence under the same condition, and applied it to proteome-wide human phosphorylation data collected under 88 different laboratory or physiological conditions. Co-occurring phosphorylation occurs significantly more frequently than randomly expected and include many known examples of cross-talk or functional connections. Such pairs, either within the same phosphoprotein or between interacting partners, are more likely to be in sequence or structural proximity, be phosphorylated by the same kinases, participate in similar biological processes, and show residue co-evolution across vertebrates. In addition, we also found that their co-occurrence states tend to be conserved in orthologous phosphosites in the mouse proteome. Together, our results support that the co-occurring phosphorylation are functionally associated. Comparison with existing methods further suggests that co-occurrence analysis can be a useful complement to uncover novel functional associations between PTM sites.

  7. Evolution of mutational robustness in an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Montville

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutational (genetic robustness is phenotypic constancy in the face of mutational changes to the genome. Robustness is critical to the understanding of evolution because phenotypically expressed genetic variation is the fuel of natural selection. Nonetheless, the evidence for adaptive evolution of mutational robustness in biological populations is controversial. Robustness should be selectively favored when mutation rates are high, a common feature of RNA viruses. However, selection for robustness may be relaxed under virus co-infection because complementation between virus genotypes can buffer mutational effects. We therefore hypothesized that selection for genetic robustness in viruses will be weakened with increasing frequency of co-infection. To test this idea, we used populations of RNA phage phi6 that were experimentally evolved at low and high levels of co-infection and subjected lineages of these viruses to mutation accumulation through population bottlenecking. The data demonstrate that viruses evolved under high co-infection show relatively greater mean magnitude and variance in the fitness changes generated by addition of random mutations, confirming our hypothesis that they experience weakened selection for robustness. Our study further suggests that co-infection of host cells may be advantageous to RNA viruses only in the short term. In addition, we observed higher mutation frequencies in the more robust viruses, indicating that evolution of robustness might foster less-accurate genome replication in RNA viruses.

  8. ALS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  9. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  10. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  11. Naturally occurring Tyzzer's disease in a calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, T; Shirota, K; Une, Y; Nomura, Y; Wada, Y; Goto, K; Takakura, A; Itoh, T; Fujiwara, K

    1999-05-01

    Naturally occurring Clostridium piliforme infection (Tyzzer's disease) was found in a calf. Light microscopic examination revealed multifocal coagulative necrosis in the liver, catarrhal gastroenteritis, tracheitis and pneumonia, and thymic atrophy. Warthin-Starry staining clearly showed large filamentous bacilli in bundles or criss-cross patterns within the hepatocytes and epithelium and smooth muscle cells of the ileum and cecum. Immunohistochemistry using anti-C. piliforme RT and MSK strain antisera showed positive reaction against the bacilli. Electron microscopic examination revealed bacilli within the hepatocytes that demonstrated a characteristic vegetative form, with peritrichous flagella, and spores. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) study using the paraffin-embedded liver sections, the 196-bp DNA fragment specific to 16S ribosomal RNA of C. piliforme was amplified. The characteristics of these bacilli are consistent with those of of C. piliforme. The PCR technique using paraffin-embedded sections should be useful for confirming C. piliforme infection in spontaneous cases.

  12. Does dietary learning occur outside awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2004-09-01

    Several forms of dietary learning have been identified in humans. These include flavor-flavor learning, flavor-postingestive learning (including flavor-caffeine learning), and learned satiety. Generally, learning is thought to occur in the absence of contingency (CS-US) or demand awareness. However, a review of the literature suggests that this conclusion may be premature because measures of awareness lack the rigor that is found in studies of other kinds of human learning. If associations do configure outside awareness then this should be regarded as a rare instance of automatic learning. Conversely, if awareness is important, then successful learning may be governed by an individual's beliefs and predilection to attend to stimulus relationships. For researchers of dietary learning this could be critical because it might explain why learning paradigms have a reputation for being unreliable. Since most food preferences are learned, asking questions about awareness can also tell us something fundamental about everyday dietary control.

  13. Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Occurring in the Third Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA is a rare central nervous system tumor that has been included in the 2007 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System. Due to its more aggressive behavior, PMA is classified as Grade II neoplasm by the World Health Organization. PMA predominantly affects the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region and occurs in children (mean age of occurrence = 10 months. We report a case of a 24-year-old man who presented with headache, nausea, and vomiting. Brain CT and MRI revealed a mass occupying only the third ventricle. We performed partial resection. Histological findings, including monophasic growth with a myxoid background, and absence of Rosenthal fibers or eosinophilic granular bodies, as well as the strong positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein were consistent with PMA.

  14. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient....... These mutations lead to C-terminal truncations of the CHMP2B protein and we will review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular effects of these mutant truncated proteins on vesicular fusion events within the endosome-lysosome and autophagy degradation pathways. We will also review the clinical...... features of FTD caused by CHMP2B truncation mutations as well as new brain imaging and neuropathological findings. Finally, we collate the current data on CHMP2B missense mutations, which have been reported in FTD and motor neuron disease....

  15. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Send Us ... As Activated Protein C Resistance APC Resistance Factor V R506Q PT G20210A Factor II 20210 Factor II ...

  16. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  17. Msx1 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  18. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-01-01

    ...). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate...

  19. The role of mutation in the new cancer paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prehn Richmond T

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The almost universal belief that cancer is caused by mutation may gradually be giving way to the belief that cancer begins as a cellular adaptation that involves the local epigenetic silencing of various genes. In my own interpretation of the new epigenetic paradigm, the genes epigenetically suppressed are genes that normally serve in post-embryonic life to suppress and keep suppressed those other genes upon which embryonic development depends. Those other genes, if not silenced or suppressed in the post-embryonic animal, become, I suggest, the oncogenes that are the basis of neoplasia. Mutations that occur in silenced genes supposedly go unrepaired and are, therefore, postulated to accumulate, but such mutations probably play little or no causative role in neoplasia because they occur in already epigenetically silenced genes. These mutations probably often serve to make the silencing, and therefore the cancer, epigenetically irreversible.

  20. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  1. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  2. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  3. Medicinal significance of naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Muna Ali

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive natural products are serendipitous drug candidates, which stimulate synthetic approaches for improving and supporting drug discovery and development. Therefore, the search for bioactive metabolites from different natural sources continues to play an important role in fashioning new medicinal agents. Several cyclic peptides were produced by organisms, such as β-defensins, gramicidin S, and tyrocidine A, and exhibited a wide range of bioactivities, such as antiviral activity against HIV-1, influenza A viruses, or antibacterial activity. Cyclic tetrapeptides are a class of natural products that were found to have a broad range of biological activities, promising pharmacokinetic properties, as well as interesting conformational dynamics and ability of slow inter-conversion to several different structures. Cyclooligopeptides, particularly medium ring-sized peptides, were obtained from marine microorganisms and exhibited a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial and anti-dinoflagellate activities, cytotoxicity, and inhibitory activity against enzyme sortase B. Most of the naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides are obtained from fungi. Some natural cyclic tetrapeptides were found to inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC), which regulate the expression of genes. These compounds are very useful as cancer therapeutics. Various analogues of the natural cyclotetrapeptides were successfully synthesized to find novel lead compounds for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. Therefore, in this review, previously reported novel natural cyclotetrapeptides are briefly discussed, along with their important biological activities as drug candidates, together with their promising therapeutic properties. Moreover, their future perspective in drug discovery as potential therapeutic agents will be determined.

  4. Alanine 501 Mutations in Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Structure, Mechanism, and Effects on Cephalosporin Resistance and Biological Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, Joshua; Fedarovich, Alena; Vincent, Leah R; Jerse, Ann E; Unemo, Magnus; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2017-02-28

    Resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins such as ceftriaxone and cefixime has increased markedly in the past decade. The primary cephalosporin resistance determinant is a mutated penA gene, which encodes the essential peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2). Decreased susceptibility and resistance can be conferred by mosaic penA alleles containing upward of 60 amino acid changes relative to wild-type PBP2, or by nonmosaic alleles with relatively few mutations, the most important of which occurs at Ala501 located near the active site of PBP2. Recently, fully cefixime- and ceftriaxone-resistant clinical isolates that harbored a mosaic penA allele with an A501P mutation were identified. To examine the potential of mutations at Ala501 to increase resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, we randomized codon 501 in a mosaic penA allele and transformed N. gonorrhoeae to increased cefixime resistance. Interestingly, only five substitutions of Ala501 (A501V, A501T, A501P, A501R, and A501S) that increased resistance and preserved essential transpeptidase function were isolated. To understand their structural implications, these mutations were introduced into the nonmosaic PBP2-6140CT, which contains four C-terminal mutations present in PBP2 from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140. The crystal structure of PBP2-6140CT-A501T was determined and revealed ordering of a loop near the active site and a new hydrogen bond involving Thr501 that connects the loop and the SxxK conserved active site motif. The structure suggests that increased rigidity in the active site region is a mechanism for cephalosporin resistance mediated by Ala501 mutations in PBP2.

  5. TERT promoter mutations and telomerase reactivation in urothelial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Borah, Sumit; Xi, Linghe; Zaug, Arthur J.; Powell, Natasha M.; Dancik, Garrett M.; Cohen, Scott; James C Costello; Theodorescu, Dan; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase, the chromosome end-replicating enzyme, drives human cell immortality and cancer. Point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter occur at high frequency in multiple cancers, including urothelial cancer (UC), but their impact on telomerase function has been unclear. In a study of 23 human UC cell lines, we show that these promoter mutations correlate with higher levels of TERT mRNA, TERT protein, telomerase enzymatic activity and telomer...

  6. In silico mutation analysis of non-structural protein-5 (NS5) dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, R. D.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-04-01

    Dengue fever is a world disease. It is endemic in more than 100 countries. Information about the effect of mutations in the virus is important in drug design and development. In this research, we studied the effect of mutation on NS5 dengue virus. NS5 is the large protein containing 67% amino acid similarity in DENV 1-4 and has multifunctional enzymatic activities. Dengue virus is an RNA virus that has very high mutation frequency with an average of 100 times higher than DNA mutations, and the accumulation of mutations will be possible to generate the new serotype. In this study, we report that mutation occurs in NS5 of DENV serotype 3, glutamine mutates into methionine at position 10 and threonine mutates into isoleucine at position 55. These residues are part of the domain named S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methyltransferase (IPR029063).

  7. Common mutations of hepatitis B virus and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Airong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV tends to mutate easily due to its special structure and life cycle. Mutation changes the biological behavior of HBV and its sensitivity to antiviral drugs and even affects therapeutic effect and accelerate disease progression. The point mutations are commonly see in the pre-S/S open reading frame (ORF, which may be associated with immune escape and occult HBV infection. The G1896A mutation is often observed in the pre-C/C-ORF and is associated with the development of HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and severe chronic hepatitis (liver failure. The mutations in P-ORF mainly occur in the reverse transcriptase (RT domain and are closely related to the resistance to nucleos(tide analogues. The A1762T and G1764A mutations occur in the basal core promoter (BCP, which overlaps with X-ORF, and may be associated with HBeAg-negative CHB, HCC, and severe chronic hepatitis (liver failure. Clarification of the association between these mutations and diseases helps to develop tailor-made diagnostic and therapeutic regimens for patients with HBV infection.

  8. Forecasting seizures in dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeffry Howbert

    Full Text Available Seizure forecasting has the potential to create new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, such as providing patient warnings and delivering preemptive therapy. Progress on seizure forecasting, however, has been hindered by lack of sufficient data to rigorously evaluate the hypothesis that seizures are preceded by physiological changes, and are not simply random events. We investigated seizure forecasting in three dogs with naturally occurring focal epilepsy implanted with a device recording continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG. The iEEG spectral power in six frequency bands: delta (0.1-4 Hz, theta (4-8 Hz, alpha (8-12 Hz, beta (12-30 Hz, low-gamma (30-70 Hz, and high-gamma (70-180 Hz, were used as features. Logistic regression classifiers were trained to discriminate labeled pre-ictal and inter-ictal data segments using combinations of the band spectral power features. Performance was assessed on separate test data sets via 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 125 spontaneous seizures were detected in continuous iEEG recordings spanning 6.5 to 15 months from 3 dogs. When considering all seizures, the seizure forecasting algorithm performed significantly better than a Poisson-model chance predictor constrained to have the same time in warning for all 3 dogs over a range of total warning times. Seizure clusters were observed in all 3 dogs, and when the effect of seizure clusters was decreased by considering the subset of seizures separated by at least 4 hours, the forecasting performance remained better than chance for a subset of algorithm parameters. These results demonstrate that seizures in canine epilepsy are not randomly occurring events, and highlight the feasibility of long-term seizure forecasting using iEEG monitoring.

  9. Forecasting seizures in dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howbert, J Jeffry; Patterson, Edward E; Stead, S Matt; Brinkmann, Ben; Vasoli, Vincent; Crepeau, Daniel; Vite, Charles H; Sturges, Beverly; Ruedebusch, Vanessa; Mavoori, Jaideep; Leyde, Kent; Sheffield, W Douglas; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Seizure forecasting has the potential to create new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, such as providing patient warnings and delivering preemptive therapy. Progress on seizure forecasting, however, has been hindered by lack of sufficient data to rigorously evaluate the hypothesis that seizures are preceded by physiological changes, and are not simply random events. We investigated seizure forecasting in three dogs with naturally occurring focal epilepsy implanted with a device recording continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG). The iEEG spectral power in six frequency bands: delta (0.1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low-gamma (30-70 Hz), and high-gamma (70-180 Hz), were used as features. Logistic regression classifiers were trained to discriminate labeled pre-ictal and inter-ictal data segments using combinations of the band spectral power features. Performance was assessed on separate test data sets via 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 125 spontaneous seizures were detected in continuous iEEG recordings spanning 6.5 to 15 months from 3 dogs. When considering all seizures, the seizure forecasting algorithm performed significantly better than a Poisson-model chance predictor constrained to have the same time in warning for all 3 dogs over a range of total warning times. Seizure clusters were observed in all 3 dogs, and when the effect of seizure clusters was decreased by considering the subset of seizures separated by at least 4 hours, the forecasting performance remained better than chance for a subset of algorithm parameters. These results demonstrate that seizures in canine epilepsy are not randomly occurring events, and highlight the feasibility of long-term seizure forecasting using iEEG monitoring.

  10. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  11. Mutations in Exons 9 and 13 of KIT Gene Are Rare Events in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Jerzy; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Rys, Janusz; Kordek, Radzislaw; Nassar, Aziza; Sobin, Leslie H.; Miettinen, Markku

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, typically express the KIT protein. Activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 11) of the c-kit gene have been shown in a subset of GISTs. These mutations lead into ligand-independent activation of the tyrosine kinase of c-kit, and have a transforming effect in vitro. Several groups have studied the clinical implication of the c-kit mutation status of exon 11 in GISTs and a possible relationship between c-kit mutations and malignant behavior has been established. Recently, a 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and missense mutations, 1945A>G in exon 13 of the c-kit gene were reported. The frequency and clinical importance of these findings are unknown. In this study we evaluated 200 GISTs for the presence of mutations in exons 9 and 13 of c-kit. Six cases revealed 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and two cases 1945A>G mutation in exon 13. All tumors with mutations in exon 9 and 13 lacked mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. None of the analyzed tumors had more than one type of c-kit mutation. All but one of the eight tumors with mutations in exon 9 or 13 of the c-kit gene were histologically and clinically malignant. All four of six cases with exon 9 mutation of which location of primary tumor was known, were small intestinal, suggesting that this type of mutation could preferentially occur in small intestinal tumors. Exon 9 and 13 mutations seem to be rare, and they cover only a small portion (8%) of the balance of GISTs that do not have mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. This finding indicates that other genetic alterations may activate c-kit in GISTs, or that KIT is not activated by mutations in all cases. PMID:11021812

  12. Recurring Mutations Found by Sequencing an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R.; Ding, Li; Dooling, David J.; Larson, David E.; McLellan, Michael D.; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; McGrath, Sean D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Locke, Devin P.; Magrini, Vincent J.; Abbott, Rachel M.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Reed, Jerry S.; Robinson, Jody S.; Wylie, Todd; Smith, Scott M.; Carmichael, Lynn; Eldred, James M.; Harris, Christopher C.; Walker, Jason; Peck, Joshua B.; Du, Feiyu; Dukes, Adam F.; Sanderson, Gabriel E.; Brummett, Anthony M.; Clark, Eric; McMichael, Joshua F.; Meyer, Rick J.; Schindler, Jonathan K.; Pohl, Craig S.; Wallis, John W.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Lin, Ling; Schmidt, Heather; Tang, Yuzhu; Haipek, Carrie; Wiechert, Madeline E.; Ivy, Jolynda V.; Kalicki, Joelle; Elliott, Glendoria; Ries, Rhonda E.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H.; Watson, Mark A.; Baty, Jack; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The full complement of DNA mutations that are responsible for the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not yet known. METHODS We used massively parallel DNA sequencing to obtain a very high level of coverage (approximately 98%) of a primary, cytogenetically normal, de novo genome for AML with minimal maturation (AML-M1) and a matched normal skin genome. RESULTS We identified 12 acquired (somatic) mutations within the coding sequences of genes and 52 somatic point mutations in conserved or regulatory portions of the genome. All mutations appeared to be heterozygous and present in nearly all cells in the tumor sample. Four of the 64 mutations occurred in at least 1 additional AML sample in 188 samples that were tested. Mutations in NRAS and NPM1 had been identified previously in patients with AML, but two other mutations had not been identified. One of these mutations, in the IDH1 gene, was present in 15 of 187 additional AML genomes tested and was strongly associated with normal cytogenetic status; it was present in 13 of 80 cytogenetically normal samples (16%). The other was a nongenic mutation in a genomic region with regulatory potential and conservation in higher mammals; we detected it in one additional AML tumor. The AML genome that we sequenced contains approximately 750 point mutations, of which only a small fraction are likely to be relevant to pathogenesis. CONCLUSIONS By comparing the sequences of tumor and skin genomes of a patient with AML-M1, we have identified recurring mutations that may be relevant for pathogenesis. PMID:19657110

  13. Identification of new mutations in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddique, T.; Deng, H.X.; Hentati, A. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease due to motor neuron death in the cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Ten percent of ALS cases are familial (FALS). Previously a subset of FALS families have been mapped to chromosome 21 and mutations in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase gene have been identified in those families. Nineteen different mutations at 16 distinct codons have been documented, of which 12 different mutations were identified in our 29 FALS families. These mutations account for about twenty percent of all FALS families screened. The mutations identified in our FALS families are A4V, A4T, G37R, G41D, H43R, G85R, G93A, E100G, L106V, I113T, L144F, and V148G. Mutation A4V is the most frequent one which occurred in 14 out of our 29 FALS families. In further screening of our FALS families, two new mutations, V14M and L84V, have been identified. Thus a total of 21 different mutations at 18 distinct codon sites have been identified in SOD1.

  14. Understanding TERT Promoter Mutations: A Common Path to Immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert J A; Rube, H Tomas; Xavier-Magalhães, Ana; Costa, Bruno M; Mancini, Andrew; Song, Jun S; Costello, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase (TERT) activation is a fundamental step in tumorigenesis. By maintaining telomere length, telomerase relieves a main barrier on cellular lifespan, enabling limitless proliferation driven by oncogenes. The recently discovered, highly recurrent mutations in the promoter of TERT are found in over 50 cancer types, and are the most common mutation in many cancers. Transcriptional activation of TERT, via promoter mutation or other mechanisms, is the rate-limiting step in production of active telomerase. Although TERT is expressed in stem cells, it is naturally silenced upon differentiation. Thus, the presence of TERT promoter mutations may shed light on whether a particular tumor arose from a stem cell or more differentiated cell type. It is becoming clear that TERT mutations occur early during cellular transformation, and activate the TERT promoter by recruiting transcription factors that do not normally regulate TERT gene expression. This review highlights the fundamental and widespread role of TERT promoter mutations in tumorigenesis, including recent progress on their mechanism of transcriptional activation. These somatic promoter mutations, along with germline variation in the TERT locus also appear to have significant value as biomarkers of patient outcome. Understanding the precise molecular mechanism of TERT activation by promoter mutation and germline variation may inspire novel cancer cell-specific targeted therapies for a large number of cancer patients. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  16. NPM1 mutations in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with uncharacteristic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Tolstrup; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Christiansen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Frameshift mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) were recently reported as a frequently occurring abnormality in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To evaluate the frequency of NPM1 mutations in patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS) and therapy-related AML (t......-/-7, the most frequent abnormalities of t-MDS/t-AML, were not observed (P=0.002). This raises the question whether some of the cases presenting NPM1 mutations were in fact cases of de novo leukemia. The close association to class I mutations and the inverse association to class II mutations suggest...

  17. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.

    2015-01-01

    during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal “actionable” mutations, including BRAF (V600E), IDH1 (R132H), PIK3CA (E545K), EGFR (L858R), and KRAS (G12D......), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)–AKT–mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations...

  18. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-06

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  19. Information Needs While A Disaster Is Occurring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    that rainfall intensity at their homes might be less than the intensity up in the mountains where the debris flows would start. Nor did they know that debris flows travel too quickly to be outrun. These and many other examples indicate need for social and natural scientists to increase awareness of what to expect when the disaster strikes. This information must be solidly understood before the event occurs - while a disaster is unfolding there are no teachable moments. Case studies indicate that even those who come into a disaster well educated about the phenomenon can struggle to apply what they know when the real situation is at hand. In addition, psychological studies confirm diminished ability to comprehend information at times of stress.

  20. Fanconi Anemia Gene Mutations Are Not Involved in Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, Muriel A.; Segers, Heidi; van Mil, Saskia E.; van Helsdingen, Yvette M.; Ameziane, Najim; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wagner, Anja; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kool, Marcel; de Kraker, Jan; Waisfisz, Quinten; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2010-01-01

    Bi-allelic germline mutations of the Fancom anemia (FA) genes, PALB2/FANCN and BRCA2/FANCD1, have been reported in a few Wilms tumor (WT) patients with an atypical FA phenotype Therefore, we screened a random cohort of 47 Dutch WT cases for germline mutations in these two FA-genes by DNA sequencing

  1. Prognostic significance of IDH mutation in adult low-grade gliomas: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hairui; Yin, Lianhu; Li, Showwei; Han, Song; Song, Guangrong; Liu, Ning; Yan, Changxiang

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have been identified in approximately 65-90 % of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Various studies examining the relationship between IDH mutation with the clinical outcome in patients with LGGs have yielded inconclusive results. The purpose of the present meta-analysis of literature is to determine this effect. We conducted a meta-analysis of 10 studies (937 patients) that evaluated the correlation between IDH mutation and overall survival (OS). For the quantitative aggregation of the survival results, the IDH mutation effect was measured by hazard ratio (HR). Overall, the pooled HR was 0.585 (95 % CI, 0.376-0.911, p = 0.025, random effect model) for patients with IDH mutation vs patients without IDH mutation. IDH mutation was associated with better overall survival of LGGs. At least this trend was observed in our analysis.

  2. Differential Evolution with Gaussian Mutation for Economic Dispatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Mousumi; Jena, Chitralekha; Panigrahi, Chinmoy Kumar

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents differential evolution with Gaussian mutation (DEGM) to solve economic dispatch problem of thermal generating units with non-smooth/non-convex cost functions due to valve-point loading, taking into account transmission losses and nonlinear generator constraints such as prohibited operating zones. Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet powerful global optimization technique. It exploits the differences of randomly sampled pairs of objective vectors for its mutation process. This mutation process is not suitable for complex multimodal optimization. This paper proposes Gaussian mutation in DE which improves search efficiency and guarantees a high probability of obtaining the global optimum without significantly impairing the simplicity of the structure of DE. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified on three different test systems. From the comparison with other evolutionary methods, it is found that DEGM based approach is able to provide better solution.

  3. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social conflict, in the form of intraspecific selfish "cheating" has been observed in a number of natural systems. However, a formal, evolutionary genetic theory of social cheating that provides an explanatory, predictive framework for these observations is lacking. Here we derive the kin...... selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...... lineages are transient and do not invade. Instead, cheating lineages are eliminated by kin selection but are constantly reintroduced by mutation, maintaining a stable equilibrium frequency of cheaters. The presence of cheaters at equilibrium creates a "cheater load" that selects for mechanisms of cheater...

  4. Mutations and Rearrangements in the Genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, P.; Garrett, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    of different types of mutation and possible rearrangements that can occur in the genome, the pyrEF locus was examined for mutations that were isolated after selection with 5-fluoroorotic acid. About two-thirds of the 130 mutations resulted from insertions of mobile elements, including insertion sequence (IS...... deletions, insertions, and a duplication, were observed, and about one-fifth of the mutations occurred elsewhere in the genome, possibly in an orotate transporter gene. One mutant exhibited a 5-kb genomic rearrangement at the pyrEF locus involving a two-step IS element-dependent reaction, and its boundaries...

  5. Somatic mutations in ATP1A1 and CACNA1D underlie a common subtype of adrenal hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azizan, E.A.; Poulsen, H.; Tuluc, P.; Zhou, J; Clausen, M.V.; Lieb, A.; Maniero, C.; Garg, S.; Bochukova, E.G.; Zhao, W.; Shaikh, L.H.; Brighton, C.A.; Teo, A.E.; Davenport, A.P.; Dekkers, T.; Tops, B.; Kusters, B.; Ceral, J.; Yeo, G.S.; Neogi, S.G.; McFarlane, I.; Rosenfeld, N.; Marass, F.; Hadfield, J.; Margas, W.; Chaggar, K.; Solar, M.; Deinum, J.; Dolphin, A.C.; Farooqi, I.S.; Striessnig, J.; Nissen, P.; Brown, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    At least 5% of individuals with hypertension have adrenal aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs). Gain-of-function mutations in KCNJ5 and apparent loss-of-function mutations in ATP1A1 and ATP2A3 were reported to occur in APAs. We find that KCNJ5 mutations are common in APAs resembling

  6. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M S; Taylor, Indira B

    2009-01-01

    Genes mutated in congenital malformation syndromes are frequently implicated in oncogenesis, but the causative germline and somatic mutations occur in separate cells at different times of an organism's life. Here we unify these processes to a single cellular event for mutations arising in male germ...

  7. Somatic Mutation Theory - Why it's Wrong for Most Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn L.D.M. Brücher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hysteron proteron reverses both temporal and logical order and this syllogism occurs in carcinogenesis and the somatic mutation theory (SMT: the first (somatic mutation occurs only after the second (onset of cancer and, therefore, observed somatic mutations in most cancers appear well after the early cues of carcinogenesis are in place. It is no accident that mutations are increasingly being questioned as the causal event in the origin of the vast majority of cancers as clinical data show little support for this theory when compared against the metrics of patient outcomes. Ever since the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA, virtually all chronic diseases came to be viewed as causally linked to one degree or another to mutations, even though we now know that genes are not simply blueprints, but rather an assemblage of alphabets that can, under non-genetic influences, be used to assemble a business letter or a work of Shakespearean literature. A minority of all cancers is indeed caused by mutations but the SMT has been applied to all cancers, and even to chemical carcinogenesis, in the absence of hard evidence of causality. Herein, we review the 100 year story of SMT and aspects that show why genes are not just blueprints, how radiation and mutation are associated in a more nuanced view, the proposed risk of cancer and bad luck, and the in vitro and in vivo evidence for a new cancer paradigm. This paradigm is scientifically applicable for the majority of non-heritable cancers and consists of a six-step sequence for the origin of cancer. This new cancer paradigm proclaims that somatic mutations are epiphenomena or later events occurring after carcinogenesis is already underway. This serves not just as a plausible alternative to SMT and explains the origin of the majority of cancers, but also provides opportunities for early interventions and prevention of the onset of cancer as a disease.

  8. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; Hout, A.H. van der; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Kate, L.P. Ten; Menko, F.H.; Veer, L.J. van 't

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  9. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  10. Founder and recurrent CDH1 mutations in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurah, Pardeep; MacMillan, Andrée; Boyd, Niki; Senz, Janine; De Luca, Alessandro; Chun, Nicki; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Zaor, Sonya; Van Manen, Lori; Gilpin, Cathy; Nikkel, Sarah; Connolly-Wilson, Mary; Weissman, Scott; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sebold, Courtney; Greenstein, Robert; Stroop, Jennifer; Yim, Dwight; Panzini, Benoit; McKinnon, Wendy; Greenblatt, Marc; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Fontaine, Daniel; Coit, Daniel; Yoon, Sam; Chung, Daniel; Lauwers, Gregory; Pizzuti, Antonio; Vaccaro, Carlos; Redal, Maria Ana; Oliveira, Carla; Tischkowitz, Marc; Olschwang, Sylviane; Gallinger, Steven; Lynch, Henry; Green, Jane; Ford, James; Pharoah, Paul; Fernandez, Bridget; Huntsman, David

    2007-06-06

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is caused by germline mutations in the epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene and is characterized by an increased risk for diffuse gastric cancer and lobular breast cancer. To determine whether recurring germline CDH1 mutations occurred due to independent mutational events or common ancestry. Thirty-eight families diagnosed clinically with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer were accrued between November 2004 and January 2006 and were analyzed for CDH1 mutations as part of an ongoing study at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Twenty-six families had at least 2 gastric cancer cases with 1 case of diffuse gastric cancer in a person younger than 50 years; 12 families had either a single case of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in a person younger than 35 years or multiple cases of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in persons older than 50 years. Classification of family members as carriers or noncarriers of CDH1 mutations. Haplotype analysis to assess recurring mutations for common ancestry was performed on 7 families from this study and 7 previously reported families with the same mutations. Thirteen mutations (6 novel) were identified in 15 of the 38 families (40% detection rate). The 1137G>A splicing mutation and the 1901C>T (A634V) missense/splicing mutation occurred on common haplotypes in 2 families but on different haplotypes in a third family. The 2195G>A (R732Q) missense/splicing mutation occurred in 2 families on different haplotypes. The 2064-2065delTG mutation occurred on a common haplotype in 2 families. Two families from this study plus 2 additional families carrying the novel 2398delC mutation shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. All 4 families originate from the southeast coast of Newfoundland. Due to concentrations of lobular breast cancer cases, 2 branches of this family had been diagnosed as having hereditary breast cancer and were tested for BRCA mutations. Within these 4 families, the cumulative risk

  11. Clonal mutations in primary human glial tumors: evidence in support of the mutator hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Chitra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A verifiable consequence of the mutator hypothesis is that even low grade neoplasms would accumulate a large number of mutations that do not influence the tumor phenotype (clonal mutations. In this study, we have attempted to quantify the number of clonal mutations in primary human gliomas of astrocytic cell origin. These alterations were identified in tumor tissue, microscopically confirmed to have over 70% neoplastic cells. Methods Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed using a set of fifteen 10-mer primers of arbitrary but definite sequences in 17 WHO grade II astrocytomas (low grade diffuse astrocytoma or DA and 16 WHO grade IV astrocytomas (Glioblastoma Multiforme or GBM. The RAPD profile of the tumor tissue was compared with that of the leucocyte DNA of the same patient and alteration(s scored. A quantitative estimate of the overall genomic changes in these tumors was obtained by 2 different modes of calculation. Results The overall change in the tumors was estimated to be 4.24% in DA and 2.29% in GBM by one method and 11.96% and 6.03% in DA and GBM respectively by the other. The difference between high and lower grade tumors was statistically significant by both methods. Conclusion This study demonstrates the presence of extensive clonal mutations in gliomas, more in lower grade. This is consistent with our earlier work demonstrating that technique like RAPD analysis, unbiased for locus, is able to demonstrate more intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in lower grade gliomas compared to higher grade. The results support the mutator hypothesis proposed by Loeb.

  12. Mutations in JMJD1C are involved in Rett syndrome and intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez, Mauricio A.; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Moutinho, Cátia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Gómez, Antonio; Vidal, Enrique; Petazzi, Paolo; Szczesna, Karolina; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Lucariello, Mario; Lorden, Patricia; Delgado-Morales, Raul; de la Caridad, Olga J.; Huertas, Dori; Gelpí Buchaca, Josep Lluís

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Autism spectrum disorders are associated with defects in social response and communication that often occur in the context of intellectual disability. Rett syndrome is one example in which epilepsy, motor impairment, and motor disturbance may co-occur. Mutations in histone demethylases are known to occur in several of these syndromes. Herein, we aimed to identify whether mutations in the candidate histone demethylase JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C) are implicated in these disor...

  13. Correcting Radiance Data for Randomly Occurring Nonuniform Illumination of the IFOV of Individual Detectors in Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berger, H

    1998-01-01

    .... One class allows estimation of the spatial variation of radiance within pixels using the single digital number irradiances produced by the measurements of the detectors within their instantaneous-fields-of-view (IFOVs...

  14. Nonfragile Gain-Scheduled Control for Discrete-Time Stochastic Systems with Randomly Occurring Sensor Saturations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangyan Li

    2013-01-01

    based on the time-varying Bernoulli distribution with measurable probability in real time. The aim of the paper is to design a nonfragile gain-scheduled controller with probability-dependent gains which can be achieved by solving a convex optimization problem via semidefinite programming method. Subsequently, a new kind of probability-dependent Lyapunov functional is proposed in order to derive the controller with less conservatism. Finally, an illustrative example will demonstrate the effectiveness of our designed procedures.

  15. Characteristics of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia from India: not just missense mutations but insertions and deletions are also associated with TKI resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkar, Nikhil; Ghodke, Kiran; Joshi, Swapnali; Chaudhary, Shruti; Mascerhenas, Russel; Dusseja, Sona; Mahadik, Shashikant; Gaware, Sheetal; Tembhare, Prashant; Gujral, Sumeet; Kabre, Sharayu; Kadam-Amare, Pratibha; Jain, Hasmukh; Dangi, Uma; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Khattry, Navin; Sengar, Manju; Arora, Brijesh; Narula, Gaurav; Banavali, Shripad; Menon, Hari; Subramanian, Papagudi Ganesan

    2016-11-01

    We document the characteristics of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations (KDM) in the largest study from India comprising of 385 patients and demonstrate that more than half (51.9%) of these patients have detectable abnormalities in the KD both in adult and in pediatric chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). These comprise singly occurring missense mutations (25.5%), polyclonal/compound point mutations (4.9%), and insertions/deletions (29.6%). Missense mutations were most commonly seen in the imatinib-binding region followed by the P-loop. The commonest mutation in our dataset was T315I. Other common missense mutations were Y253H, M244V, and F317L. A high prevalence of BCR-ABL exon7 deletion (p.R362fs*) was also seen (25.5% of the entire cohort), whereas the 35bpintron-derived insertion/truncation mutation detected in 12 patients. In the pediatric age group, 58.8% of patients harbored missense mutations, polyclonal/compound mutations as well as insertions and deletions. We detected 11 novel mutations (seven missense mutations and four insertions/deletions).

  16. Consecutive mutational events in a TSHR allele of Arab families with resistance to thyroid stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn; German, Alina; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Refetoff, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Our laboratory identified six distinct inactivating TSHR gene mutations in Arab tribes living in Israel. We recently reported three nucleotide substitutions in exon 3 producing p.[L89L;Q90P] and one in exon 9 of the same allele producing p.P264S in Family A. Family B, reported herein, harbors the identical mutation in exon 3 only. We set to determine whether the mutations have common ancestral origin. Coding regions of the TSHR were sequenced and flanking microsatellite markers spanning 5.3 cM were used for haplotyping. Two siblings of Family B were compound heterozygous for TSHR gene mutations. The paternal allele contained the exon 3 mutation and the maternal allele harbored a mutation in exon 10 (p.L653V). We investigated the possibility of a founder effect with subsequent mutational events for the presence of the same exon 3 mutation in different families. The haplotype of the allele harboring the exon 3 mutation in Family B was identical to that of Family A, also harboring the exon 9 mutation on the same allele, indicating that the latter occurred subsequently. The ancestral wild-type TSHR was present in Family B, suggesting that the mutation in exon 3 was also new in the history of that population. It is more likely that two consecutive mutational events occurred on the ancestral wild-type allele instead of a recombination bringing exon 3 and exon 9 mutations together on the same allele. New mutational events contribute to the high prevalence of TSHR mutations in this population in addition to a founder effect and limited gene pool due to inbreeding.

  17. Adverse events in families with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrke Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in MYBPC3 encoding myosin binding protein C belong to the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and may also lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. MYBPC3 mutations initially were considered to cause a benign form of HCM. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of patients and their relatives with 18 different MYBPC3 mutations. Methods 87 patients with HCM and 71 patients with DCM were screened for MYBPC3 mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Close relatives of mutation carriers were genotyped for the respective mutation. Relatives with mutation were then evaluated by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. A detailed family history regarding adverse clinical events was recorded. Results In 16 HCM (18.4% and two DCM (2.8% index patients a mutation was detected. Seven mutations were novel. Mutation carriers exhibited no additional mutations in genes MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC and TPM1. Including relatives of twelve families, a total number of 42 mutation carriers was identified of which eleven (26.2% had at least one adverse event. Considering the twelve families and six single patients with mutations, 45 individuals with cardiomyopathy and nine with borderline phenotype were identified. Among the 45 patients, 23 (51.1% suffered from an adverse event. In eleven patients of seven families an unexplained sudden death was reported at the age between 13 and 67 years. Stroke or a transient ischemic attack occurred in six patients of five families. At least one adverse event occurred in eleven of twelve families. Conclusion MYBPC3 mutations can be associated with cardiac events such as progressive heart failure, stroke and sudden death even at younger age. Therefore, patients with MYBPC3 mutations require thorough clinical risk assessment.

  18. Nucleotide selectivity defect and mutator phenotype conferred by a colon cancer-associated DNA polymerase δ mutation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, T M; Baranovskiy, A G; Wang, J; Tahirov, T H; Shcherbakova, P V

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in the POLD1 and POLE genes encoding DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ɛ (Polɛ) cause hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and have been found in many sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. Much attention has been focused on POLE exonuclease domain mutations, which occur frequently in hypermutated DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-proficient tumors and appear to be responsible for the bulk of genomic instability in these tumors. In contrast, somatic POLD1 mutations are seen less frequently and typically occur in MMR-deficient tumors. Their functional significance is often unclear. Here we demonstrate that expression of the cancer-associated POLD1-R689W allele is strongly mutagenic in human cells. The mutation rate increased synergistically when the POLD1-R689W expression was combined with a MMR defect, indicating that the mutator effect of POLD1-R689W results from a high rate of replication errors. Purified human Polδ-R689W has normal exonuclease activity, but the nucleotide selectivity of the enzyme is severely impaired, providing a mechanistic explanation for the increased mutation rate in the POLD1-R689W-expressing cells. The vast majority of mutations induced by the POLD1-R689W are GC→︀TA transversions and GC→︀AT transitions, with transversions showing a strong strand bias and a remarkable preference for polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences. The mutational specificity of the Polδ variant matches that of the hypermutated CRC cell line, HCT15, in which this variant was first identified. The results provide compelling evidence for the pathogenic role of the POLD1-R689W mutation in the development of the human tumor and emphasize the need to experimentally determine the significance of Polδ variants present in sporadic tumors.

  19. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  20. Clinical mutation assay of tumors: new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostik, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Mutation detection in tumors started with classical cytogenetics as the method of choice more than 50 years ago. Karyotyping proved to be sensitive enough to detect deletions or duplications of large chromosome segments, and translocations. Over time, new techniques were developed to detect mutations that are much smaller in scope. The availability of Sanger sequencing and the invention of the PCR improved the discriminatory power of mutation detection to just one base change in the genomic DNA sequence. Techniques derived from PCR (allele-specific PCR, qPCR) and improved or modified sequencing methods (capillary electrophoresis, pyrosequencing) considerably increased the efficiency and sample throughput of mutation detection assays. With the advent of massive parallel sequencing [also called next-generation sequencing (NGS)] in the past decade, a major shift to even higher sample throughput and a significant decrease in cost per sequenced base occurred. The application of the new technology provided a whole slew of novel biomarkers and potential therapy targets to improve diagnosis and treatment. It even led to changes in cancer classification as new information on the mutation profile of tumors became available that characterizes some disease entities better than morphology. NGS, which usually interrogates multiple genes at once and is a prime example of a multianalyte assay, started to replace older single analyte assays focused on analysis of one target, one gene. However, the transition to these extremely complex NGS-based assays is associated with multiple challenges. There are issues with adequate tissue source of nucleic acids, sequencing library preparation, bioinformatics, government regulations and oversight, reimbursement, and electronic medical records that need to be resolved to successfully implement the new technology in a clinical laboratory.

  1. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  2. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  3. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  4. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  5. TP53 mutation spectrum in smokers and never smoking lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rita Halvorsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: We analysed tumour tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n=229, squamous cell carcinomas (n=112, large cell carcinomas (n=30 and others (n=23 for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n=394 and next generation sequencing (n=100. Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65% of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3% compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%.Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, as also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers.

  6. Effect of Naturally Occurring nif Reiterations on Symbiotic Effectiveness in Rhizobium phaseoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, David; Singleton, Paul W.; Segovia, Lorenzo; Morett, Enrique; Bohlool, B. Ben; Palacios, Rafael; Dávila, Guillermo

    1988-01-01

    Most naturally occurring strains of Rhizobium phaseoli possess reiteration of the nif genes. Three regions contain nitrogenase structural genes in strain CFN42. Two of these regions (a and b) have copies of nifH, nifD, and nifK, whereas the third region (c) contains only nifH. Strains containing mutations in either nif region a or nif region b had significantly diminished symbiotic effectiveness compared with the wild-type strain on the basis of nodule mass, total nitrogenase activity per plant, nitrogenase specific activity, total nitrogen in the shoot, and percentage of nitrogen. A strain containing mutations in both nif region a and nif region b was totally ineffective. These data indicate that both nif region a and nif region b are needed for full symbiotic effectiveness in R. phaseoli. PMID:16347593

  7. EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E; Noerenberg, D; Mansouri, L; Ljungström, V; Frick, M; Sutton, L-A; Blakemore, S J; Galan-Sousa, J; Plevova, K; Baliakas, P; Rossi, D; Clifford, R; Roos-Weil, D; Navrkalova, V; Dörken, B; Schmitt, C A; Smedby, K E; Juliusson, G; Giacopelli, B; Blachly, J S; Belessi, C; Panagiotidis, P; Chiorazzi, N; Davi, F; Langerak, A W; Oscier, D; Schuh, A; Gaidano, G; Ghia, P; Xu, W; Fan, L; Bernard, O A; Nguyen-Khac, F; Rassenti, L; Li, J; Kipps, T J; Stamatopoulos, K; Pospisilova, S; Zenz, T; Oakes, C C; Strefford, J C; Rosenquist, R; Damm, F

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent mutations within EGR2 were recently reported in advanced-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and associated with a worse outcome. To study their prognostic impact, 2403 CLL patients were examined for mutations in the EGR2 hotspot region including a screening (n=1283) and two validation cohorts (UK CLL4 trial patients, n=366; CLL Research Consortium (CRC) patients, n=490). Targeted deep-sequencing of 27 known/postulated CLL driver genes was also performed in 38 EGR2-mutated patients to assess concurrent mutations. EGR2 mutations were detected in 91/2403 (3.8%) investigated cases, and associated with younger age at diagnosis, advanced clinical stage, high CD38 expression and unmutated IGHV genes. EGR2-mutated patients frequently carried ATM lesions (42%), TP53 aberrations (18%) and NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations (16%). EGR2 mutations independently predicted shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) in the screening cohort; they were confirmed associated with reduced TTFT and OS in the CRC cohort and independently predicted short OS from randomization in the UK CLL4 cohort. A particularly dismal outcome was observed among EGR2-mutated patients who also carried TP53 aberrations. In summary, EGR2 mutations were independently associated with an unfavorable prognosis, comparable to CLL patients carrying TP53 aberrations, suggesting that EGR2-mutated patients represent a new patient subgroup with very poor outcome.

  8. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tomar

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma (RB is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59 while only 42.4% (25/59 of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9% of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1% in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41 of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59 of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and

  9. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  10. Stochastic finite element method with simple random elements

    OpenAIRE

    Starkloff, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    We propose a variant of the stochastic finite element method, where the random elements occuring in the problem formulation are approximated by simple random elements, i.e. random elements with only a finite number of possible values.

  11. Predicting IDH mutation status of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas based on contrast-enhanced CT features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Kong, Weiwei; Mao, Liang; Kong, Wentao; Zhou, Qun; Zhou, Zhengyang; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Zhongqiu; He, Jian; Qiu, Yudong

    2018-01-01

    To explore the difference in contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) features of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) with different isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status. Clinicopathological and contrast-enhanced CT features of 78 patients with 78 ICCs were retrospectively analysed and compared based on IDH mutation status. There were 11 ICCs with IDH mutation (11/78, 14.1%) and 67 ICCs without IDH mutation (67/78, 85.9%). IDH-mutated ICCs showed intratumoral artery more often than IDH-wild ICCs (p = 0.023). Most ICCs with IDH mutation showed rim and internal enhancement (10/11, 90.9%), while ICCs without IDH mutation often appeared diffuse (26/67, 38.8%) or with no enhancement (4/67, 6.0%) in the arterial phase (p = 0.009). IDH-mutated ICCs showed significantly higher CT values, enhancement degrees and enhancement ratios in arterial and portal venous phases than IDH-wild ICCs (all p IDH mutation, with an area under the curve of 0.798 (p = 0.002). ICCs with and without IDH mutation differed significantly in arterial enhancement mode, and the tumour enhancement degree on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT was helpful in predicting IDH mutation status. • IDH mutation occurred frequently in ICCs. • ICCs with and without IDH mutation differed significantly in arterial enhancement mode. • ICCs with IDH mutation enhanced more than those without IDH mutation. • Enhancement ratio and tumour CT value can predict IDH mutation status.

  12. Prognostic and Predictive Roles of KRAS Mutation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Arrington

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RAS gene family is among the most studied and best characterized of the known cancer-related genes. Of the three human ras isoforms, KRAS is the most frequently altered gene, with mutations occurring in 17%–25% of all cancers. In particular, approximately 30%–40% of colon cancers harbor a KRAS mutation. KRAS mutations in colon cancers have been associated with poorer survival and increased tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer lead to resistance to select treatment strategies. In this review we examine the history of KRAS, its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer, and evidence supporting its predictive value in determining appropriate therapies for patients with colorectal cancer.

  13. Spatial Fleming-Viot models with selection and mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    This book constructs a rigorous framework for analysing selected phenomena in evolutionary theory of populations arising due to the combined effects of migration, selection and mutation in a spatial stochastic population model, namely the evolution towards fitter and fitter types through punctuated equilibria. The discussion is based on a number of new methods, in particular multiple scale analysis, nonlinear Markov processes and their entrance laws, atomic measure-valued evolutions and new forms of duality (for state-dependent mutation and multitype selection) which are used to prove ergodic theorems in this context and are applicable for many other questions and renormalization analysis for a variety of phenomena (stasis, punctuated equilibrium, failure of naive branching approximations, biodiversity) which occur due to the combination of rare mutation, mutation, resampling, migration and selection and make it necessary to mathematically bridge the gap (in the limit) between time and space scales.

  14. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with non......-syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non...

  15. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate incidence, clinicopathological features and prognosis of BRAF-mutated conjunctival melanoma in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine BRAF mutations in paired premalignant lesions and evaluate immunohistochemical BRAF V600E oncoprotein detection. Methods: Data from 139 patients...... with conjunctival melanoma (1960–2012) were collected. Archived conjunctival melanoma samples and premalignant lesions were analysed for BRAF mutations using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results were associated with clinicopathological features and compared with BRAF V600E oncoprotein stainings...... with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed...

  16. Are the Somatic Mutation and Tissue Organization Field Theories of Carcinogenesis Incompatible?

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Rosenfeld

    2013-01-01

    Two drastically different approaches to understanding the forces driving carcinogenesis have crystallized through years of research. These are the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and the tissue organization field theory (TOFT). The essence of SMT is that cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has successively accumulated multiple DNA mutations, and that those mutations occur on genes which control cell proliferation and cell cycle. Thus, according to SMT, neoplastic lesions are the r...

  17. Dihydrofolate-Reductase Mutations in Plasmodium knowlesi Appear Unrelated to Selective Drug Pressure from Putative Human-To-Human Transmission in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Grigg

    Full Text Available Malaria caused by zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is an emerging threat in Eastern Malaysia. Despite demonstrated vector competency, it is unknown whether human-to-human (H-H transmission is occurring naturally. We sought evidence of drug selection pressure from the antimalarial sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP as a potential marker of H-H transmission.The P. knowlesi dihdyrofolate-reductase (pkdhfr gene was sequenced from 449 P. knowlesi malaria cases from Sabah (Malaysian Borneo and genotypes evaluated for association with clinical and epidemiological factors. Homology modelling using the pvdhfr template was used to assess the effect of pkdhfr mutations on the pyrimethamine binding pocket.Fourteen non-synonymous mutations were detected, with the most common being at codon T91P (10.2% and R34L (10.0%, resulting in 21 different genotypes, including the wild-type, 14 single mutants, and six double mutants. One third of the P. knowlesi infections were with pkdhfr mutants; 145 (32% patients had single mutants and 14 (3% had double-mutants. In contrast, among the 47 P. falciparum isolates sequenced, three pfdhfr genotypes were found, with the double mutant 108N+59R being fixed and the triple mutants 108N+59R+51I and 108N+59R+164L occurring with frequencies of 4% and 8%, respectively. Two non-random spatio-temporal clusters were identified with pkdhfr genotypes. There was no association between pkdhfr mutations and hyperparasitaemia or malaria severity, both hypothesized to be indicators of H-H transmission. The orthologous loci associated with resistance in P. falciparum were not mutated in pkdhfr. Subsequent homology modelling of pkdhfr revealed gene loci 13, 53, 120, and 173 as being critical for pyrimethamine binding, however, there were no mutations at these sites among the 449 P. knowlesi isolates.Although moderate diversity was observed in pkdhfr in Sabah, there was no evidence this reflected selective antifolate drug pressure in humans.

  18. Identifying uniformly mutated segments within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan; Goldberg, Paul; Berenbrink, Petra; Friedetzky, Tom; Ergun, Funda

    2004-12-01

    Given a long string of characters from a constant size alphabet we present an algorithm to determine whether its characters have been generated by a single i.i.d. random source. More specifically, consider all possible n-coin models for generating a binary string S, where each bit of S is generated via an independent toss of one of the n coins in the model. The choice of which coin to toss is decided by a random walk on the set of coins where the probability of a coin change is much lower than the probability of using the same coin repeatedly. We present a procedure to evaluate the likelihood of a n-coin model for given S, subject a uniform prior distribution over the parameters of the model (that represent mutation rates and probabilities of copying events). In the absence of detailed prior knowledge of these parameters, the algorithm can be used to determine whether the a posteriori probability for n=1 is higher than for any other n>1. Our algorithm runs in time O(l4logl), where l is the length of S, through a dynamic programming approach which exploits the assumed convexity of the a posteriori probability for n. Our test can be used in the analysis of long alignments between pairs of genomic sequences in a number of ways. For example, functional regions in genome sequences exhibit much lower mutation rates than non-functional regions. Because our test provides means for determining variations in the mutation rate, it may be used to distinguish functional regions from non-functional ones. Another application is in determining whether two highly similar, thus evolutionarily related, genome segments are the result of a single copy event or of a complex series of copy events. This is particularly an issue in evolutionary studies of genome regions rich with repeat segments (especially tandemly repeated segments).

  19. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Carlos Eduardo G; Gao, Ziyue; Baker, Zachary; Diesel, José Francisco; Simons, Yuval B; Haque, Imran S; Pickrell, Joseph; Przeworski, Molly

    2017-09-01

    Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to have been included in

  20. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ziyue; Baker, Zachary; Diesel, José Francisco; Simons, Yuval B.; Haque, Imran S.; Pickrell, Joseph; Przeworski, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to have been included in

  1. Mutation in Aldosterone Producing Adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jhong Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of somatic mutations permit the recognition of subtypes of aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs with distinct clinical presentations and pathological features. Catenin β1 (CTNNB1 mutation in APAs has been recently described and discussed in the literature. However, significant knowledge gaps still remain regarding the prevalence, clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and outcomes in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway will further modulate tumorigenesis. We also discuss the recent knowledge of CTNNB1 mutation in adrenal adenomas.

  2. Clinicopathologic features and outcomes of patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring BRAF mutations in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Socinski, Mark A; Abberbock, Shira; Berry, Lynne D; Johnson, Bruce E; Kwiatkowski, David J; Iafrate, A John; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Franklin, Wilbur A; Camidge, D Ross; Sequist, Lecia V; Haura, Eric B; Ladanyi, Mark; Kurland, Brenda F; Kugler, Kelly; Minna, John D; Bunn, Paul A; Kris, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    The advent of effective targeted therapy for BRAF(V600E) -mutant lung adenocarcinomas necessitates further exploration of the unique clinical features and behavior of advanced-stage BRAF-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. Data were reviewed for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas enrolled in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium whose tumors underwent testing for mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), AKT1, BRAF, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog (NRAS), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA); for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations; and for MET amplification. Twenty-one BRAF mutations were identified in 951 patients with adenocarcinomas (2.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4%-3.4%): 17 (81%; 95% CI, 60%-92%) were BRAF(V600E) mutations, and 4 were non-BRAF(V600E) mutations. Among the 733 cases tested for all 10 genes, BRAF mutations were more likely to occur than most other genotypic abnormalities in current or former smokers (BRAF vs sensitizing EGFR, 82% vs 36%, mid-P mutations, 49%, mid-P = .02; BRAF vs patients with more than 1 oncogenic driver [doubleton], 46%, mid-P = .04.) The double-mutation rate was 16% among patients with BRAF mutations but 5% among patients with other genomic abnormalities (mid-P = .045). Differences were not found in survival between patients with BRAF mutations and those with other genomic abnormalities (P > .20). BRAF mutations occurred in 2.2% of advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas, were most commonly V600E, and were associated with distinct clinicopathologic features in comparison with other genomic subtypes and with a high mutation rate in more than 1 gene. These findings underscore the importance of comprehensive genomic profiling in assessing patients with

  3. Motor sequence learning occurs despite disrupted visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Lara A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has demonstrated the importance of proprioception for the development of internal representations of the forces encountered during a task. Evidence also exists for a significant role for proprioception in the execution of sequential movements. However, little work has explored the role of proprioceptive sensation during the learning of continuous movement sequences. Here, we report that the repeated segment of a continuous tracking task can be learned despite peripherally altered arm proprioception and severely restricted visual feedback regarding motor output. Methods Healthy adults practiced a continuous tracking task over 2 days. Half of the participants experienced vibration that altered proprioception of shoulder flexion/extension of the active tracking arm (experimental condition and half experienced vibration of the passive resting arm (control condition. Visual feedback was restricted for all participants. Retention testing was conducted on a separate day to assess motor learning. Results Regardless of vibration condition, participants learned the repeated segment demonstrated by significant improvements in accuracy for tracking repeated as compared to random continuous movement sequences. Conclusion These results suggest that with practice, participants were able to use residual afferent information to overcome initial interference of tracking ability related to altered proprioception and restricted visual feedback to learn a continuous motor sequence. Motor learning occurred despite an initial interference of tracking noted during acquisition practice.

  4. In vivo selection of randomly mutated retroviral genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Klaver, B.

    1993-01-01

    Darwinian evolution, that is the outgrowth of the fittest variants in a population, usually applies to living organisms over long periods of time. Recently, in vitro selection/amplification techniques have been developed that allow for the rapid evolution of functionally active nucleic acids from a

  5. The F130S point mutation in the Arabidopsis high-affinity K+ transporter AtHAK5 increases K+ over Na+ and Cs+ selectivity and confers Na+ and Cs+ tolerance to yeast under heterologous expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eAleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth, development and high yield production of crops. Members of group I of the KT/HAK/KUP family of transporters, such as HAK5, are key components for K+ acquisition by plant roots at low external K+ concentrations. Certain abiotic stress conditions such as salinity or Cs+-polluted soils may jeopardize plant K+ nutrition because HAK5-mediated K+ transport is inhibited by Na+ and Cs+. Here, by screening in yeast a randomly-mutated collection of AtHAK5 transporters, a new mutation in AtHAK5 sequence is identified that greatly increases Na+ tolerance. The single point mutation F130S, affecting an amino acid residue conserved in HAK5 transporters from several species, confers high salt tolerance, as well as Cs+ tolerance. This mutation increases more than 100-fold the affinity of AtHAK5 for K+ and reduces the Ki values for Na+ and Cs+, suggesting that the F130 residue may contribute to the structure of the pore region involved in K+ binding. In addition, this mutation increases the Vmax for K+. All this changes occur without increasing the amount of the AtHAK5 protein in yeast and support the idea that this residue is contributing to shape the selectivity filter of the AtHAK5 transporter.

  6. DNA mismatch repair preferentially protects genes from mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Ding, Zhong Jie; Jamieson, Fiona J C; Visscher, Anne M; Zheng, Shao Jian; Mithani, Aziz; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2017-12-12

    Mutation is the source of genetic variation and fuels biological evolution. Many mutations first arise as DNA replication errors. These errors subsequently evade correction by cellular DNA repair, for example, by the well-known DNA mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Here, we determine the genome-wide effects of MMR on mutation. We first identify almost 9000 mutations accumulated over five generations in eight MMR-deficient mutation accumulation (MA) lines of the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana We then show that MMR deficiency greatly increases the frequency of both smaller-scale insertions and deletions (indels) and of single-nucleotide variant (SNV) mutations. Most indels involve A or T nucleotides and occur preferentially in homopolymeric (poly A or poly T) genomic stretches. In addition, we find that the likelihood of occurrence of indels in homopolymeric stretches is strongly related to stretch length, and that this relationship causes ultrahigh localized mutation rates in specific homopolymeric stretch regions. For SNVs, we show that MMR deficiency both increases their frequency and changes their molecular mutational spectrum, causing further enhancement of the GC to AT bias characteristic of organisms with normal MMR function. Our final genome-wide analyses show that MMR deficiency disproportionately increases the numbers of SNVs in genes, rather than in nongenic regions of the genome. This latter observation indicates that MMR preferentially protects genes from mutation and has important consequences for understanding the evolution of genomes during both natural selection and human tumor growth. © 2018 Belfield et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Analysis of PIK3CA mutations in breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic, Ruza; Lehmann, Annika; Budczies, Jan; Koch, Ines; Prinzler, Judith; Kleine-Tebbe, Anke; Schewe, Christiane; Loibl, Sibylle; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) is a central element of a signaling pathway involved in cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Certain mutations in this pathway result in enhanced PI3K signaling, which is associated with oncogenic cellular transformation and cancer. The aims of this study were to characterize different types of PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 in a series of primary breast carcinomas and to correlate the results with clinicopathologic parameters and survival. We used frozen tissue samples and sequenced exons 9 and 20 for a series of 241 patients with a diagnosis of breast carcinoma. We found that 15.8% of the primary breast carcinomas possessed PIK3CA mutations in either exon 9 or exon 20. The rate of PIK3CA mutations was increased in HR(+)/HER2(-) tumors (18.6%), but this difference did not reach a statistical significance. The lowest rate of mutations was observed in HR(+)/HER2(+) tumors (5.3%). No statistically significant association was found between the presence of PIK3CA mutations and the prognostic/clinical features of breast cancer, including histologic subtype, Her2 status, axillary lymph node involvement, tumor grade, and tumor stage. However, the presence of the H1047R mutation in 10 samples was associated with a statistically significantly worse overall survival. PIK3CA mutation was found to be a frequent genetic change in all breast cancer subtypes but occurred with the highest rate in HR(+)/HER2(-) tumors. Further studies are needed to validate the prognostic impact of different PIK3CA mutations.

  8. The NF1 somatic mutational landscape in sporadic human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Charlotte; Tovell, Hannah; Frayling, Ian M; Cooper, David N; Upadhyaya, Meena

    2017-06-21

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) #162200) is an autosomal dominantly inherited tumour predisposition syndrome. Heritable constitutional mutations in the NF1 gene result in dysregulation of the RAS/MAPK pathway and are causative of NF1. The major known function of the NF1 gene product neurofibromin is to downregulate RAS. NF1 exhibits variable clinical expression and is characterized by benign cutaneous lesions including neurofibromas and café-au-lait macules, as well as a predisposition to various types of malignancy, such as breast cancer and leukaemia. However, acquired somatic mutations in NF1 are also found in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms that are not associated with NF1. Capitalizing upon the availability of next-generation sequencing data from cancer genomes and exomes, we review current knowledge of somatic NF1 mutations in a wide variety of tumours occurring at a number of different sites: breast, colorectum, urothelium, lung, ovary, skin, brain and neuroendocrine tissues, as well as leukaemias, in an attempt to understand their broader role and significance, and with a view ultimately to exploiting this in a diagnostic and therapeutic context. As neurofibromin activity is a key to regulating the RAS/MAPK pathway, NF1 mutations are important in the acquisition of drug resistance, to BRAF, EGFR inhibitors, tamoxifen and retinoic acid in melanoma, lung and breast cancers and neuroblastoma. Other curiosities are observed, such as a high rate of somatic NF1 mutation in cutaneous melanoma, lung cancer, ovarian carcinoma and glioblastoma which are not usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. Somatic NF1 mutations may be critical drivers in multiple cancers. The mutational landscape of somatic NF1 mutations should provide novel insights into our understanding of the pathophysiology of cancer. The identification of high frequency of somatic NF1 mutations in sporadic tumours indicates that neurofibromin is

  9. APC mutations in sporadic coloretal carcinomas from The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Brandt, P.A. van den; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Brink, M.; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de

    2004-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is considered to be a gatekeeper in colorectal tumourigenesis. Inactivating mutations in APC have been reported in 34-70% of sporadic colorectal cancer patients, the majority of which occur in the mutation cluster region (MCR). In this study, tumour tissue

  10. Biological insights into BRAF(V600) mutations in melanoma patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Tamborini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Some experimental evidence indicates that uncommon BRAF mutations consisting in the substitution of 2 adjacent nucleotides within codon 600 are in a cis configuration and associate with BRAF gene amplification. These findings suggest that BRAF(V600) mutations are unlikely to occur as homozygous a...... alterations in clinical melanoma samples, with gene amplification perhaps contributing to mask the heterozygous state....

  11. Investigation of CYP21A2 mutations in Turkish patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and a novel founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Bayram; Ökten, Ayşenur; Kalay, Ersan; Karagüzel, Gülay; Dinçer, Tuba; Açıkgöz, Emel Gül; Karagüzel, Ahmet

    2013-01-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by impaired production of adrenal steroids. Approximately 95% of all CAH are caused by mutations of the CYP21A2 that encodes 21-hydroxylase. In this study, mutation analyses of CYP21A2 were performed in 48 CAH patients from 45 Turkish families with the clinical diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). While in 39 (86.7%) of 21OHD patients, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were identified in both alleles, in two 21OHD patients CYP21A2 mutations were identified only in one allele. In four patients, mutation was not detected at all. In total, seventeen known and one novel, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were observed. Among identified mutations, previously described c.293-13C/A>G, large rearrangements and p.Q319X mutations were the most common mutations accounting for 33.3%, 14.4% and 12.2% of all evaluated chromosomes, respectively. In six families (13.3%) a novel founder mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1?), inactivating the translation initiation codon was found. This mutation is not present in pseudogene CYP21A1P and causes the classical form of the disease in six patients. In addition, depending on the nature of the rearrangements CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras were further classified as CH(c/d), and CH-1(c) was shown to be the most prominent chimera in our study group. In conclusion, with this study we identified a novel founder CYP21A2 mutation and suggest a further classification for CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras depending on the combination of junction site position and whether it is occurred as a result of deletion or conversion. Absence of disease causing mutation of CYP21A2 in ten of screened ninety chromosomes suggests the contribution of regulatory elements in occurrences of CAH due to the 21OHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  13. SDH mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Chiara; Pollard, Patrick J; Tomlinson, Ian

    2011-11-01

    The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD genes encode the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH; mitochondrial complex II), a mitochondrial enzyme involved in two essential energy-producing metabolic processes of the cell, the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain. Germline loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes or assembly factor (SDHAF2) cause hereditary paraganglioma/phaeochromocytoma syndrome (HPGL/PCC) through a mechanism which is largely unknown. Owing to the central function of SDH in cellular energy metabolism it is important to understand its role in tumor suppression. Here is reported an overview of genetics, clinical and molecular progress recently performed in understanding the basis of HPGL/PCC tumorigenesis. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 Mutations in Bladder Tumors Correlate with Low Frequency of Chromosome Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Junker

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of FGFR3 mutations in bladder tumors of different grade and stage and determine the relation of mutations to chromosomal alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. One hundred bladder cancer samples served as templates for manual microdissection. DNA was isolated from dissected samples containing at least 80% tumor cells. Mutations in FGFR3 were analyzed by SNaPshot analysis. CGH was carried out according to standard protocols. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 45 of 92 samples (48.9%. Concerning T-category, the following mutation frequencies occurred: pTa, 69%; pT1, 38%; and pT2-3, 0%. The mutation frequency was significantly associated with tumor grade: G1, 72%; G2, 56%; and G3, 4%. In pTaG1 tumors, mutations were found in 74%. A significantly lower number of genetic alterations per tumor detected by CGH was associated with FGFR3 mutations (2 vs 8. This association was also seen in pTaG1 tumors: 2.5 (with mutation vs 7.5 (without mutation. FGFR3 mutations characterize noninvasive low-risk tumors of low malignancy. The low malignant potential of these tumors is underlined by a low number of genetic alterations per tumor. Therefore, FGFR3 represents a valuable prognostic marker of tumors with low malignant potential and can be used as surrogate marker for the detection of genetically stable bladder tumors.

  16. Two Novel De Novo GARS Mutations Cause Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chu Liao

    Full Text Available Mutations in the GARS gene have been identified in a small number of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V, for whom disease onset typically occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, initially manifesting as weakness and atrophy of the hand muscles. The role of GARS mutations in patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan remains elusive.Mutational analyses of the coding regions of GARS were performed using targeted sequencing of 54 patients with molecularly unassigned axonal CMT, who were selected from 340 unrelated CMT patients. Two heterozygous mutations in GARS, p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg, were identified; one in each patient. Both are novel de novo mutations. The p.Asp146Tyr mutation is associated with a severe infantile-onset neuropathy and the p.Met238Arg mutation results in childhood-onset disability.GARS mutations are an uncommon cause of CMT in Taiwan. The p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg mutations are associated with early-onset axonal CMT. These findings broaden the mutational spectrum of GARS and also highlight the importance of considering GARS mutations as a disease cause in patients with early-onset neuropathies.

  17. Mutation of NRAS is a rare genetic event in ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Deyin; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Zeppernick, Felix; Hannibal, Charlotte G; Kjaer, Susanne K; Vang, Russell; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2017-10-01

    Activating mutations involving the members of the RAS signaling pathway, including KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF, have been reported in ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma and its precursor lesion, serous borderline tumor (SBT). Whether additional genetic alterations in the RAS oncogene family accumulate during the progression of SBT to invasive low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC) remains largely unknown. Although mutations of KRAS and BRAF occur at a very early stage of progression, even preceding the development of SBT, additional driving events, such as NRAS mutations, have been postulated to facilitate progression. In this study, we analyzed NRAS exon 3 mutational status in 98 cases that were diagnosed with SBT/atypical proliferative serous tumor, noninvasive LGSC, or invasive LGSC. Of the latter, NRAS Q61R (CAA to CGA) mutations were detected in only 2 of 56 (3.6%) cases. The same mutation was not detected in any of the SBTs (atypical proliferative serous tumors) or noninvasive LGSCs. Mutational analysis for hotspots in KRAS and BRAF demonstrated a wild-type pattern of KRAS and BRAF in one of the NRAS-mutated cases. Interestingly, another LGSC case with NRAS mutation harbored a concurrent BRAF V600L mutation. These findings indicate that, although recurrent NRAS mutations are present, their low prevalence indicates that NRAS plays a limited role in the development of LGSC. Further studies to identify other oncogenic events that drive LGSC progression are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantum randomness and unpredictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Gregg [Quantum Communication and Measurement Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Division of Natural Science and Mathematics, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Quantum mechanics is a physical theory supplying probabilities corresponding to expectation values for measurement outcomes. Indeed, its formalism can be constructed with measurement as a fundamental process, as was done by Schwinger, provided that individual measurements outcomes occur in a random way. The randomness appearing in quantum mechanics, as with other forms of randomness, has often been considered equivalent to a form of indeterminism. Here, it is argued that quantum randomness should instead be understood as a form of unpredictability because, amongst other things, indeterminism is not a necessary condition for randomness. For concreteness, an explication of the randomness of quantum mechanics as the unpredictability of quantum measurement outcomes is provided. Finally, it is shown how this view can be combined with the recently introduced view that the very appearance of individual quantum measurement outcomes can be grounded in the Plenitude principle of Leibniz, a principle variants of which have been utilized in physics by Dirac and Gell-Mann in relation to the fundamental processes. This move provides further support to Schwinger's ''symbolic'' derivation of quantum mechanics from measurement. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Plant mutation breeding and biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu, Q. Y; Forster, Brian P; Nakagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    ... (FAO / IAEA) Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, with its global coordinating and synergistic roles, that plant mutation breeding became a common tool available to plant breeders worldwide. Since these early days the Joint Division continues to play a considerable role in fostering the use of mutation techni...

  20. Elevated expression of Ki-67 identifies aggressive prostate cancers but does not distinguish BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, A V; Jameson, C; Barbachano, Y

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancers in men with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more aggressive than morphologically similar cancers in men without these mutations. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that enhanced expression of Ki-67, as a surrogate of cell proliferation, is a characteristic...... feature of prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study cohort comprised 20 cases of prostate cancer in mutation carriers and 126 control sporadic prostate cancers. Of the combined sample cohort, 65.7% stained only within malignant tissues while 0.7% stained in both malignant...... a background of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or as sporadic disease. The data suggest that, since elevated Ki-67 does not distinguish prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers from sporadic prostatic malignancies, the effects of these genetic mutations are probably independent. While all...

  1. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  2. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  3. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubert Sylvie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  4. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Alisson M; Aubert, Sylvie; Roelens, Ingele; Lakowski, Bernard

    2009-03-20

    Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin) are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs) in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD). However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC) transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC) transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber) alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  5. Evolutionary Accessibility of Mutational Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Jasper; Klözer, Alexander; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Krug, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Functional effects of different mutations are known to combine to the total effect in highly nontrivial ways. For the trait under evolutionary selection (‘fitness’), measured values over all possible combinations of a set of mutations yield a fitness landscape that determines which mutational states can be reached from a given initial genotype. Understanding the accessibility properties of fitness landscapes is conceptually important in answering questions about the predictability and repeatability of evolutionary adaptation. Here we theoretically investigate accessibility of the globally optimal state on a wide variety of model landscapes, including landscapes with tunable ruggedness as well as neutral ‘holey’ landscapes. We define a mutational pathway to be accessible if it contains the minimal number of mutations required to reach the target genotype, and if fitness increases in each mutational step. Under this definition accessibility is high, in the sense that at least one accessible pathway exists with a substantial probability that approaches unity as the dimensionality of the fitness landscape (set by the number of mutational loci) becomes large. At the same time the number of alternative accessible pathways grows without bounds. We test the model predictions against an empirical 8-locus fitness landscape obtained for the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. By analyzing subgraphs of the full landscape containing different subsets of mutations, we are able to probe the mutational distance scale in the empirical data. The predicted effect of high accessibility is supported by the empirical data and is very robust, which we argue reflects the generic topology of sequence spaces. Together with the restrictive assumptions that lie in our definition of accessibility, this implies that the globally optimal configuration should be accessible to genome wide evolution, but the repeatability of evolutionary trajectories is limited owing to the presence of a

  6. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  7. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  8. Pathophysiological consequences and benefits of HFE mutations: 20 years of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerer, Ina; Bachmann, André; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the HFE (hemochromatosis) gene cause hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder that is hallmarked by excessive accumulation of iron in parenchymal organs. The HFE mutation p.Cys282Tyr is pathologically most relevant and occurs in the Caucasian population with a carrier frequency of up to 1 in 8 in specific European regions. Despite this high prevalence, the mutation causes a clinically relevant phenotype only in a minority of cases. In this review, we summarize historical facts and recent research findings about hereditary hemochromatosis, and outline the pathological consequences of the associated gene defects. In addition, we discuss potential advantages of HFE mutations in asymptomatic carriers. PMID:28280078

  9. Adult classical glioblastoma with a BRAF V600E mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshinobu; Akahane, Toshiaki; Sawada, Takahiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Tempaku, Akira; Yamauchi, Shigeru; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinya; Nitta, Kazumi; Ide, Wataru; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Kamada, Hajime

    2015-03-11

    The B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (B-Raf) is a member of the Raf kinase family. The BRAF V600E mutation occurs frequently in certain brain tumors such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma, and pilocytic astrocytoma, and less frequently in epithelioid and giant cell glioblastoma. BRAF V600E mutation in these cases has been canonically detected using Sanger sequencing or immunohistochemistry but not with next-generation sequencing (NGS). Moreover, to our knowledge, there is no detailed report of the BRAF V600E mutation in an adult glioblastoma with classical histologic features (c-GBM). Therefore, we performed NGS analysis to determine the mutational status of BRAF of 13 glioblastomas (GBMs) (11 primary and 2 secondary cases) and detected one tumor harboring the BRAF V600E mutation. We report here the detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in a patient with c-GBM and describe the patient's clinical course as well as the results of histopathological analysis.

  10. GPR143 gene mutation analysis in pediatric patients with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Hovnik, Tinka; Kovač, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej

    2012-09-01

    X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is difficult to differentiate clinically from other forms of albinism in young patients. X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is caused by mutations in the GPR143 gene, encoding melanosome specific G-protein coupled receptor. Patients typically present with moderately to severely reduced visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the retina, foveal hypoplasia and misrouting of optic nerve fibers at the chiasm. Following clinical ophthalmological evaluation, GPR143 gene mutational analyses were performed in a cohort of 15 pediatric male patients with clinical signs of albinism. Three different mutations in the GPR143 gene were identified in four patients, including a novel c.886G>A (p.Gly296Arg) mutation occurring "de novo" and a novel intronic c.360 + 5G>A mutation, identified in two related boys. Four patients with X-linked ocular albinism type 1 were identified from a cohort of 15 boys with clinical signs of albinism using mutation detection methods. Genetic analysis offers the possibility of early definitive diagnosis of ocular albinism type 1 in a significant portion of boys with clinical signs of albinism.

  11. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-09-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. © 2014 Harris and Nielsen; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas Vaginalis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudabeh Heidari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO to its active form (CPR. Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied.Methods: Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations.Results: In four isolates (8.69% point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine.Conclusion: Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein’s binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole.

  13. Quantitative analysis of clinically relevant mutations occurring in lymphoid cells harboring γ-retrovirus-encoded hsvtk suicide genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Olszewska, M; Capacio, V; Stefanski, J; Przybylowski, M.; Samakoglu, S; Chang, AH; Sadelain, M.; Rivière, I

    2008-01-01

    The in vivo regulation of T lymphocyte activity by the activation of a suicide mechanism is an essential paradigm for the safety of adoptive cell therapies. In light of reports showing that γ-retroviral vector-encoded herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (hsvtk) undergoes recombination, we undertook a thorough investigation of the genomic stability of SFG-based vectors using two variants of the wild-type hsvtk gene. In a large panel of independent clones, we demonstrate that both hsvtk genes...

  14. Novel and recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in early onset and familial breast and ovarian cancer detected in the Program of Genetic Counseling in Cancer of Valencian Community (eastern Spain). Relationship of family phenotypes with mutation prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; García Casado, Zaida; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; López Guerrero, José Antonio; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Chirivella González, Isabel; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Juan Fita, Ma José; Tena García, Isabel; Guillen Ponce, Carmen; Martínez de Dueñas, Eduardo; Romero Noguera, Ignacio; Salas Trejo, Dolores; Goicoechea Sáez, Mercedes; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2013-12-01

    During the first 6 years of the Program of Genetic Counselling in Cancer of Valencia (eastern Spain), 310 mutations (155 in BRCA1 and 155 in BRCA2) in 1,763 hereditary breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) families were identified. Of the mutations found 105 were distinct (53 in BRCA1 and 52 in BRCA2), eight new and 37 recurrent. Two of the novel mutations were frame-shift placed in exons 2 and 11 of BRCA1 and the remaining six were placed in BRCA2; four frame-shift (three in exon 11 and one in exon 23), one deletion of the entire exon 19 and one in the intervening sequence of exon 22. The BRCA1 mutations with higher recurrence were c.66_68delAG, c.5123C > A, c.1961delA, c.3770_3771delAG and c.5152+5G > A that covered 45.2% of mutations of this gene. The age of onset of BCs of c.68_69delAG mutation carriers occurs later than for the other recurrent mutations of this gene (45 vs. 37 years; p = 0.008). The BRCA2 mutations with higher recurrence were c.9026_9030delATCAT, c.3264insT and c.8978_8991del14 which represented 43.2% of all mutations in this gene, being the most recurrent mutation by far c.9026_9030delATCAT that represents 21.3% of BRCA2 mutations and 10.6% of all mutations. Probands with family histories of BC and OC, or OC and/or BC in at least two first degree relatives, were the more likely to have BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations (35.2% of the total mutations). And that most BRCA1mutations (73.19% mutations) occurred in probands with early-onset BC or with family history of OC.

  15. BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations, including 2 novel mutations in imatinib resistant Malaysian chronic myeloid leukemia patients-Frequency and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Marjanu Hikmah; Baba, Abdul Aziz; Azlan, Husin; Rosline, Hassan; Sim, Goh Ai; Padmini, Menon; Fadilah, S Abdul Wahid; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2014-04-01

    Discovery of imatinib mesylate (IM) as the targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has resulted in its use as the frontline therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) across the world. Although high response rates are observed in CML patients who receive IM treatment, a significant number of patients develop resistance to IM. Resistance to IM in patients has been associated with a heterogeneous array of mechanisms of which point mutations within the ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) are the frequently documented. The types and frequencies of mutations reported in different population studies have shown wide variability. We screened 125 Malaysian CML patients on IM therapy who showed either TKI refractory or resistance to IM to investigate the frequency and pattern of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations among Malaysian CML patients undergoing IM therapy and to determine the clinical significance. Mutational screening using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) followed by DNA sequencing was performed on 125 IM resistant Malaysian CML patients. Mutations were detected in 28 patients (22.4%). Fifteen different types of mutations (T315I, E255K, G250E, M351T, F359C, G251E, Y253H, V289F, E355G, N368S, L387M, H369R, A397P, E355A, D276G), including 2 novel mutations were identified, with T315I as the predominant type of mutation. The data generated from clinical and molecular parameters studied were correlated with the survival of CML patients. Patients with Y253H, M351T and E355G TKD mutations showed poorer prognosis compared to those without mutation. Interestingly, when the prognostic impact of the observed mutations was compared inter-individually, E355G and Y253H mutations were associated with more adverse prognosis and shorter survival (P=0.025 and 0.005 respectively) than T315I mutation. Results suggest that apart from those mutations occurring in the three crucial regions (catalytic domain, P-loop and activation-loop), other rare

  16. Compensatory mutations cause excess of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Claus O; Lenski, Richard E; Adami, Christoph

    2003-02-05

    The rate at which fitness declines as an organism's genome accumulates random mutations is an important variable in several evolutionary theories. At an intuitive level, it might seem natural that random mutations should tend to interact synergistically, such that the rate of mean fitness decline accelerates as the number of random mutations is increased. However, in a number of recent studies, a prevalence of antagonistic epistasis (the tendency of multiple mutations to have a mitigating rather than reinforcing effect) has been observed. We studied in silico the net amount and form of epistatic interactions in RNA secondary structure folding by measuring the fraction of neutral mutants as a function of mutational distance d. We found a clear prevalence of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding. By relating the fraction of neutral mutants at distance d to the average neutrality at distance d, we showed that this prevalence derives from the existence of many compensatory mutations at larger mutational distances. Our findings imply that the average direction of epistasis in simple fitness landscapes is directly related to the density with which fitness peaks are distributed in these landscapes.

  17. Compensatory mutations cause excess of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adami Christoph

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The rate at which fitness declines as an organism's genome accumulates random mutations is an important variable in several evolutionary theories. At an intuitive level, it might seem natural that random mutations should tend to interact synergistically, such that the rate of mean fitness decline accelerates as the number of random mutations is increased. However, in a number of recent studies, a prevalence of antagonistic epistasis (the tendency of multiple mutations to have a mitigating rather than reinforcing effect has been observed. Results We studied in silico the net amount and form of epistatic interactions in RNA secondary structure folding by measuring the fraction of neutral mutants as a function of mutational distance d. We found a clear prevalence of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding. By relating the fraction of neutral mutants at distance d to the average neutrality at distance d, we showed that this prevalence derives from the existence of many compensatory mutations at larger mutational distances. Conclusions Our findings imply that the average direction of epistasis in simple fitness landscapes is directly related to the density with which fitness peaks are distributed in these landscapes.

  18. BRCA1/2 mutation analysis in 41 ovarian cell lines reveals only one functionally deleterious BRCA1 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stordal, Britta

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in BRCA1\\/2 increase the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Germline BRCA1\\/2 mutations occur in 8.6-13.7% of unselected epithelial ovarian cancers, somatic mutations are also frequent. BRCA1\\/2 mutated or dysfunctional cells may be sensitive to PARP inhibition by synthetic lethality. The aim of this study is to comprehensively characterise the BRCA1\\/2 status of a large panel of ovarian cancer cell lines available to the research community to assist in biomarker studies of novel drugs and in particular of PARP inhibitors. The BRCA1\\/2 genes were sequenced in 41 ovarian cell lines, mRNA expression of BRCA1\\/2 and gene methylation status of BRCA1 was also examined. The cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors olaparib and veliparib was examined in 20 cell lines. The cell line SNU-251 has a deleterious BRCA1 mutation at 5564G > A, and is the only deleterious BRCA1\\/2 mutant in the panel. Two cell lines (UPN-251 and PEO1) had deleterious mutations as well as additional reversion mutations that restored the protein functionality. Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1\\/2 were relatively common, found in 14.6% of cell lines. BRCA1 was methylated in two cell lines (OVCAR8, A1847) and there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression. The BRCA1 methylated cell lines were more sensitive to PARP inhibition than wild-type cells. The SNU-251 deleterious mutant was more sensitive to PARP inhibition, but only in a long-term exposure to correct for its slow growth rate. Cell lines derived from metastatic disease are significantly more resistant to veliparib (2.0 fold p = 0.03) compared to those derived from primary tumours. Resistance to olaparib and veliparib was correlated Pearsons-R 0.5393, p = 0.0311. The incidence of BRCA1\\/2 deleterious mutations 1\\/41 cell lines derived from 33 different patients (3.0%) is much lower than the population incidence. The reversion mutations and high frequency of heterozygous mutations suggest that there is a selective

  19. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Ideally, familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is diagnosed by testing for mutations that decrease the catabolism of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; however, genetic testing is not universally available. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and predictors of FH...... causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  20. Systematic analysis of disease-related regulatory mutation classes reveals distinct effects on transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Kirsti; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2009-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation is essential in understanding the gene expression in its entirety. Transcription is regulated, among other things, by transcription factors that bind to DNA and can enhance or repress the transcription process. If a transcription factor fails to bind to DNA or binds to a wrong DNA region that can cause severe effects to the gene expression, to the cell and even to the individual. The problems in transcription factor binding can be caused by alterations in DNA structure which often occurs when parts of the DNA strands are mutated. An increasing number of the identified disease-related mutations occur in gene regulatory sequences. These regulatory mutations can disrupt transcription factor binding sites or create new ones. We have studied effects of mutations on transcription factor binding affinity computationally. We have compared our results with experimentally verified cases where a mutation in a gene regulatory region either creates a new transcription factor binding site or deletes a previously existing one. We have investigated the statistical properties of the changes on transcription factor binding affinity according to the mutation type. Our analysis shows that the probability of a loss of a transcription factor binding site and a creation of a new one varies remarkably by the mutation type. Our results demonstrate that computational analysis provides valuable information about the effect of mutations on transcription factor binding sites. The analysis results also give a useful test set for in vitro studies of regulatory mutation effects.

  1. Profiling of Somatic Mutations in Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma by Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At least 12 genes (FH, HIF2A, MAX, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, TMEM127, and VHL have been implicated in inherited predisposition to phaeochromocytoma (PCC, paraganglioma (PGL, or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL and a germline mutation may be detected in more than 30% of cases. Knowledge of somatic mutations contributing to PCC/PGL/HNPGL pathogenesis has received less attention though mutations in HRAS, HIF2A, NF1, RET, and VHL have been reported. To further elucidate the role of somatic mutation in PCC/PGL/HNPGL tumourigenesis, we employed a next generation sequencing strategy to analyse “mutation hotspots” in 50 human cancer genes. Mutations were identified for HRAS (c.37G>C; p.G13R and c.182A>G; p.Q61R in 7.1% (6/85; for BRAF (c.1799T>A; p.V600E in 1.2% (1/85 of tumours; and for TP53 (c.1010G>A; p.R337H in 2.35% (2/85 of cases. Twenty-one tumours harboured mutations in inherited PCC/PGL/HNPGL genes and no HRAS, BRAF, or TP53 mutations occurred in this group. Combining our data with previous reports of HRAS mutations in PCC/PGL we find that the mean frequency of HRAS/BRAF mutations in sporadic PCC/PGL is 8.9% (24/269 and in PCC/PGL with an inherited gene mutation 0% (0/148 suggesting that HRAS/BRAF mutations and inherited PCC/PGL genes mutations might be mutually exclusive. We report the first evidence for BRAF mutations in the pathogenesis of PCC/PGL/HNPGL.

  2. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  3. Mitochondrial mutations are a late event in the progression of head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Suhail K; Taube, Janis M; Zhou, Shaoyu; Smith, Ian M; Koch, Wayne M; Westra, William H; Califano, Joseph A

    2007-08-01

    To determine the timing of mitochondrial mutations in the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-three mitochondrial mutations were identified in 12 tumors using a high-throughput mitochondrial sequencing array. Areas of adjacent dysplastic and normal epithelium adjacent to tumors were sequenced using conventional methods for the presence of mutations that occurred in the corresponding tumor. Two of 23 (8.7%) tumor mitochondrial mutations (2 of 12 tumors) were present in both the areas of adjacent dysplasia and normal epithelium. Five of 23 (21.7%) tumor mitochondrial mutations (4 of 12 tumors) were present in areas of adjacent dysplasia. Eleven of 12 tumors contained nonsynonymous mutations that resulted in protein coding alterations. A significant difference (P < 0.01, chi(2)) was found in the incidence of mitochondrial mutation that occurred after development of cancer compared with adjacent areas dysplasia and normal epithelium. The majority of mitochondrial mutations occur during or after the transition of preneoplastic epithelium to cancer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that these are a late event in head and neck carcinogenesis.

  4. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations and the evolution of primate mitogenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Corrêa Tavares

    Full Text Available Several human diseases have been associated with mutations in mitochondrial genes comprising a set of confirmed and reported mutations according to the MITOMAP database. An analysis of complete mitogenomes across 139 primate species showed that most confirmed disease-associated mutations occurred in aligned codon positions and gene regions under strong purifying selection resulting in a strong evolutionary conservation. Only two confirmed variants (7.1%, coding for the same amino acids accounting for severe human diseases, were identified without apparent pathogenicity in non-human primates, like the closely related Bornean orangutan. Conversely, reported disease-associated mutations were not especially concentrated in conserved codon positions, and a large fraction of them occurred in highly variable ones. Additionally, 88 (45.8% of reported mutations showed similar variants in several non-human primates and some of them have been present in extinct species of the genus Homo. Considering that recurrent mutations leading to persistent variants throughout the evolutionary diversification of primates are less likely to be severely damaging to fitness, we suggest that these 88 mutations are less likely to be pathogenic. Conversely, 69 (35.9% of reported disease-associated mutations occurred in extremely conserved aligned codon positions which makes them more likely to damage the primate mitochondrial physiology.

  5. Frequency and phenotypic implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaoyu; Kachhap, Sushant; Sun, Wenyue; Wu, Guojun; Chuang, Alice; Poeta, Luana; Grumbine, Lawson; Mithani, Suhail K; Chatterjee, Aditi; Koch, Wayne; Westra, William H; Maitra, Anirban; Glazer, Chad; Carducci, Michael; Sidransky, David; McFate, Thomas; Verma, Ajay; Califano, Joseph A

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondrial genomic mutations are found in a variety of human cancers; however, the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in coding regions remains poorly defined, and the functional effects of mitochondrial mutations found in primary human cancers are not well described. Using MitoChip, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial genome in 83 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Forty-one of 83 (49%) tumors contained mtDNA mutations. Mutations occurred within noncoding (D-loop) and coding regions. A nonrandom distribution of mutations was found throughout the mitochondrial enzyme complex components. Sequencing of margins with dysplasia demonstrated an identical nonconservative mitochondrial mutation (A76T in ND4L) as the tumor, suggesting a role of mtDNA mutation in tumor progression. Analysis of p53 status showed that mtDNA mutations correlated positively with p53 mutations (P < 0.002). To characterize biological function of the mtDNA mutations, we cloned NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) mutants based on primary tumor mutations. Expression of the nuclear-transcribed, mitochondrial-targeted ND2 mutants resulted in increased anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, which was accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species production and an aerobic glycolytic metabolic phenotype with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha induction that is reversible by ascorbate. Cancer-specific mitochondrial mutations may contribute to development of a malignant phenotype by direct genotoxic effects from increased reactive oxygen species production as well as induction of aerobic glycolysis and growth promotion.

  6. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  7. PIK3CA mutations may be discordant between primary and corresponding metastatic disease in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont Jensen, Jeanette; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: PIK3CA mutations are frequent in breast cancer and activate the PI3K/Akt pathway. Unexpectedly, PIK3CA mutation appears in general to be associated with better outcome. In a cohort of patients where both primary and metastatic lesions were available the objective was to assess changes...... recurrence than wild type cases (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: PIK3CA mutations occur at high frequency in primary and metastatic breast cancer; these may not necessarily confer increased aggressiveness as mutants had a longer time to recurrence. Because PIK3CA status quite frequently changes between primary...... metastatic breast tumors. Samples were analysed for PIK3CA mutations (exon 9 and 20) as well as immunohistochemical evaluation for PTEN, pAKT, Ki67, ER and HER2. RESULTS: PIK3CA mutation was detected in 45 % of the primary tumors. Overall there was a net gain in mutation in metastatic disease, to 53...

  8. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. (Hebrew Univ. Hadassah-Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)) (and others)

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Prevalence of HFE and TFR2 gene mutation in 118 Ligurian rheumatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, G; Monteforte, P; Buffrini, L; Grignolo, M C; Franchin, F

    2004-12-01

    HFE gene is associated to haemochromatosis, an inherited autosomal recessive disorder responsible of an overload of iron in intestine, liver, pancreas, heart, cutis and joints. Articular and periarticular calcifications may occur. H63D mutation may play a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. DNA of 118 consecutive patients (28 males, 90 females, mean age 58.5+/-13.44) living in Liguria and affected by different rheumatic diseases was examined to evaluate the presence of HFE mutations. Analysis data showed that in 45% (53/118) of patients almost one mutation of HFE gene was present and the presence of H63D mutation in the rheumatic patients was particularly elevated. Data obtained in this study have permitted to reveal that 25 patients of 53 (47.1%) with 1 of 11 HFE mutations suffered from symptomatic or silent chondrocalcinosis. The conclusion is drawn that this mutation may be correlated to various rheumatic diseases.

  10. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Forsberg, R.

    2001-01-01

    was sequenced and compared with the parental strain of the vaccine virus (VR2332). This revealed five mutations that had occurred independently in all three vaccine-derived field isolates, indicating strong parallel selective pressure on these positions in the vaccine virus when used in swine herds. Two...... of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations mig ht be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...... in the vaccine virus sequence during cell-culture adaptation. Evaluation of the remaining mutations in the ORF1 sequence revealed stronger selective pressure for amino acid conservation during spread in pigs than during vaccine production. Furthermore, it was found that the selective pressure did not change...

  11. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Forsberg, R

    2001-01-01

    was sequenced and compared with the parental strain of the vaccine virus (VR2332). This revealed five mutations that had occurred independently in all three vaccine-derived field isolates, indicating strong parallel selective pressure on these positions in the vaccine virus when used in swine herds. Two...... of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations might be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...... in the vaccine virus sequence during cell-culture adaptation. Evaluation of the remaining mutations in the ORF1 sequence revealed stronger selective pressure for amino acid conservation during spread in pigs than during vaccine production. Furthermore, it was found that the selective pressure did not change...

  12. Rare mutations of the DMBT1 gene in human astrocytic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Wolf; Mollenhauer, Jan; Stockhammer, Florian

    2002-01-01

    The Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 gene (DMBT1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene candidate in human brain tumors, based on the observation of homozygous deletions affecting the DMBT1 region or part of the gene. In order to support this hypothesis, we performed a mutational analysis...... of the entire coding region of DMBT1, employing SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing in a series of 79 astrocytic gliomas. Five somatic mutations were detected. Two mutations, one of which resulted in an amino acid exchange, occurred in glioblastomas. One pilocytic astrocytoma carried two missense mutations...... and another pilocytic astrocytoma contained a somatic mutation, not affecting the presumed protein. In addition, 21 of the 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in this study have not been recognized previously. The data indicate, that small mutations are not a frequent finding in gliomas....

  13. Protein-truncating mutations in ASPM cause variable reduction in brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Scott, Sheila; Hampshire, Daniel J; Springell, Kelly; Corry, Peter; Abramowicz, Marc J; Mochida, Ganesh H; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Maher, Eamonn R; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Mubaidin, Ammar; Walsh, Christopher A; Roberts, Emma; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2003-11-01

    Mutations in the ASPM gene at the MCPH5 locus are expected to be the most common cause of human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a condition in which there is a failure of normal fetal brain development, resulting in congenital microcephaly and mental retardation. We have performed the first comprehensive mutation screen of the 10.4-kb ASPM gene, identifying all 19 mutations in a cohort of 23 consanguineous families. Mutations occurred throughout the ASPM gene and were all predicted to be protein truncating. Phenotypic variation in the 51 affected individuals occurred in the degree of microcephaly (5-11 SDs below normal) and of mental retardation (mild to severe) but appeared independent of mutation position.

  14. Nivolumab in previously untreated melanoma without BRAF mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Caroline; Long, Georgina V; Brady, Benjamin; Dutriaux, Caroline; Maio, Michele; Mortier, Laurent; Hassel, Jessica C; Rutkowski, Piotr; McNeil, Catriona; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Savage, Kerry J; Hernberg, Micaela M; Lebbé, Celeste; Charles, Julie; Mihalcioiu, Catalin; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Mauch, Cornelia; Cognetti, Francesco; Arance, Ana; Schmidt, Henrik; Schadendorf, Dirk; Gogas, Helen; Lundgren-Eriksson, Lotta; Horak, Christine; Sharkey, Brian; Waxman, Ian M; Atkinson, Victoria; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2015-01-22

    Nivolumab was associated with higher rates of objective response than chemotherapy in a phase 3 study involving patients with ipilimumab-refractory metastatic melanoma. The use of nivolumab in previously untreated patients with advanced melanoma has not been tested in a phase 3 controlled study. We randomly assigned 418 previously untreated patients who had metastatic melanoma without a BRAF mutation to receive nivolumab (at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks and dacarbazine-matched placebo every 3 weeks) or dacarbazine (at a dose of 1000 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks and nivolumab-matched placebo every 2 weeks). The primary end point was overall survival. At 1 year, the overall rate of survival was 72.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65.5 to 78.9) in the nivolumab group, as compared with 42.1% (95% CI, 33.0 to 50.9) in the dacarbazine group (hazard ratio for death, 0.42; 99.79% CI, 0.25 to 0.73; Psurvival was 5.1 months in the nivolumab group versus 2.2 months in the dacarbazine group (hazard ratio for death or progression of disease, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.56; Psurvival benefit with nivolumab versus dacarbazine was observed across prespecified subgroups, including subgroups defined by status regarding the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Common adverse events associated with nivolumab included fatigue, pruritus, and nausea. Drug-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 11.7% of the patients treated with nivolumab and 17.6% of those treated with dacarbazine. Nivolumab was associated with significant improvements in overall survival and progression-free survival, as compared with dacarbazine, among previously untreated patients who had metastatic melanoma without a BRAF mutation. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; CheckMate 066 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01721772.).

  15. Immunodeficiency associated with FCN3 mutation and ficolin-3 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hummelshøj, Tina; Honoré, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Ficolin-3, encoded by the FCN3 gene and expressed in the lung and liver, is a recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system. Heterozygosity for an FCN3 frameshift mutation (rs28357092), leading to a distortion of the C-terminal end of the molecule, occurs in people without...... disease (allele frequency among whites, 0.01). We describe a patient with recurrent infections who was homozygous for this mutation, who had undetectable serum levels of ficolin-3, and who had a deficiency in ficolin-3-dependent complement activation....

  16. AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-jing Pang

    Full Text Available Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3 are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia.

  17. Glycosphingolipid analysis in a naturally occurring ovine model of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgos, Litsa; Hein, Leanne; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa; Duplock, Stephen; Snel, Marten; Hemsley, Kim; Kuchel, Tim; Smith, Nicholas; Hopwood, John J

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease arises from mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene which encodes an enzyme required for the lysosomal catabolism of glucosylceramide. We have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene in sheep that leads to Gaucher disease with acute neurological symptoms. Here we have examined the clinical phenotype at birth and subsequently quantified lipids in Gaucher lamb brain, in order to characterise the disorder. Enzyme activity assessments showed that a reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase activity to 1-5% of wild-type occurs consistently across newborn Gaucher lamb brain regions. We analyzed glucosylceramide, glucosylsphingosine, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside profiles in brain, liver, and spleen, and observed 30- to 130-fold higher glucosylceramide, and 500- to 2000-fold higher glucosylsphingosine concentrations in Gaucher diseased lambs compared to wild-type. Significant increases of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and gangliosides [GM1, GM2, GM3] concentrations were also detected in the brain. As these glycosphingolipids are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane lipid homeostasis would be expected to impair normal neuronal function. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of glycosphingolipids in various brain regions in a large animal model of neuronal disease, which permits the mechanistic investigation of lipid deregulation and their contribution to neurodegenerative process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  19. Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Problems Occur Frequently Throughout Life in Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Kathleen J.; Caeg, Erwin; Barrish, Judy O.; Geerts, Suzanne; Lane, Jane B.; Percy, Alan K.; Annese, Fran; McNair, Lauren; Skinner, Steven A.; Lee, Hye-Seung; Neul, Jeffrey L.; Glaze, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We conducted a nationwide survey to determine the prevalence of common gastrointestinal and nutritional disorders in Rett syndrome (RTT) based on parental reporting and related the occurrence of these problems to age and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) status. Methods We designed a questionnaire that probed symptoms, diagnoses, diagnostic tests, and treatment interventions related to gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in RTT. The International Rett Syndrome Foundation distributed the questionnaire to 1666 family-based members and forwarded their responses for our review. We interrogated the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network database to supplement findings related to medications used to treat gastrointestinal problems in RTT. Results Parents of 983 RTT females (59%) responded and identified symptoms and diagnoses associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility (92%); chewing and swallowing difficulties (81%); weight deficits or excess (47%); growth deficits (45%); low bone mineral content or fractures (37%); biliary tract disorders (3%). Height, weight, and BMI z-scores decreased significantly with age; height and weight, but not BMI, z-scores were significantly lower in females with MECP2 mutations than those without. Vomiting, nighttime awakening, gastroesophageal reflux, chewing difficulty, and choking with feeding were significantly less likely to occur with increasing age. Short stature, low bone mineral content, fractures, and gastrostomy placement were significantly more likely to occur with increasing age. Chewing difficulty, choking with feeding, and nighttime awakening were significantly less likely to occur, whereas short stature was significantly more likely to occur, in females with MECP2 mutations than those without. Diagnostic evaluations and therapeutic interventions were utilized less frequently than the occurrence of symptoms or diagnoses in the RTT cohort. Conclusion Gastrointestinal and nutritional problems perceived by

  20. Characterizing mutational heterogeneity in a glioblastoma patient with double recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Nickel

    Full Text Available Human cancers are driven by the acquisition of somatic mutations. Separating the driving mutations from those that are random consequences of general genomic instability remains a challenge. New sequencing technology makes it possible to detect mutations that are present in only a minority of cells in a heterogeneous tumor population. We sought to leverage the power of ultra-deep sequencing to study various levels of tumor heterogeneity in the serial recurrences of a single glioblastoma multiforme patient. Our goal was to gain insight into the temporal succession of DNA base-level lesions by querying intra- and inter-tumoral cell populations in the same patient over time. We performed targeted "next-generation" sequencing on seven samples from the same patient: two foci within the primary tumor, two foci within an initial recurrence, two foci within a second recurrence, and normal blood. Our study reveals multiple levels of mutational heterogeneity. We found variable frequencies of specific EGFR, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TP53 base substitutions within individual tumor regions and across distinct regions within the same tumor. In addition, specific mutations emerge and disappear along the temporal spectrum from tumor at the time of diagnosis to second recurrence, demonstrating evolution during tumor progression. Our results shed light on the spatial and temporal complexity of brain tumors. As sequencing costs continue to decline and deep sequencing technology eventually moves into the clinic, this approach may provide guidance for treatment choices as we embark on the path to personalized cancer medicine.

  1. Phenotypic effect of mutations in evolving populations of RNA molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manrubia Susanna C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secondary structure of folded RNA sequences is a good model to map phenotype onto genotype, as represented by the RNA sequence. Computational studies of the evolution of ensembles of RNA molecules towards target secondary structures yield valuable clues to the mechanisms behind adaptation of complex populations. The relationship between the space of sequences and structures, the organization of RNA ensembles at mutation-selection equilibrium, the time of adaptation as a function of the population parameters, the presence of collective effects in quasispecies, or the optimal mutation rates to promote adaptation all are issues that can be explored within this framework. Results We investigate the effect of microscopic mutations on the phenotype of RNA molecules during their in silico evolution and adaptation. We calculate the distribution of the effects of mutations on fitness, the relative fractions of beneficial and deleterious mutations and the corresponding selection coefficients for populations evolving under different mutation rates. Three different situations are explored: the mutation-selection equilibrium (optimized population in three different fitness landscapes, the dynamics during adaptation towards a goal structure (adapting population, and the behavior under periodic population bottlenecks (perturbed population. Conclusions The ratio between the number of beneficial and deleterious mutations experienced by a population of RNA sequences increases with the value of the mutation rate μ at which evolution proceeds. In contrast, the selective value of mutations remains almost constant, independent of μ, indicating that adaptation occurs through an increase in the amount of beneficial mutations, with little variations in the average effect they have on fitness. Statistical analyses of the distribution of fitness effects reveal that small effects, either beneficial or deleterious, are well described by a Pareto

  2. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  3. TALEN-mediated targeted mutagenesis produces a large variety of heritable mutations in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Gou, Feng; Zhang, Jinshan; Liu, Wenshan; Li, Qianqian; Mao, Yanfei; Botella, José Ramón; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN are currently the two systems of choice for genome editing. We have studied the efficiency of the TALEN system in rice as well as the nature and inheritability of TALEN-induced mutations and found important features of this technology. The N287C230 TALEN backbone resulted in low mutation rates (0-6.6%), but truncations in its C-terminal domain dramatically increased efficiency to 25%. In most transgenic T0 plants, TALEN produced a single prevalent mutation accompanied by a variety of low-frequency mutations. For each independent T0 plant, the prevalent mutation was present in most tissues within a single tiller as well as in all tillers examined, suggesting that TALEN-induced mutations occurred very early in the development of the shoot apical meristem. Multigenerational analysis showed that TALEN-induced mutations were stably transmitted to the T1 and T2 populations in a normal Mendelian fashion. In our study, the vast majority of TALEN-induced mutations (~81%) affected multiple bases and ~70% of them were deletions. Our results contrast with published reports for the CRISPR/Cas9 system in rice, in which the predominant mutations affected single bases and deletions accounted for only 3.3% of the overall mutations. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Dynamic changes of driver genes' mutations across clinical stages in nine cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The driver genes play critical roles for tumorigenesis, and the number of identified driver genes reached plateau. But how they act during different cancer development stages is lack of knowledge. We investigated 138 driver genes' mutation changes across clinical stages using 3,477 cases in nine cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and constructed their temporal order relationships. We also examined the codon changes for the widely mutated TP53 and PIK3CA in tumor stages. Combinations of one to three driver genes specifically dominated in each cancer. Across the clinical stages, we categorized three patterns for the behaviors of driver genes' mutation changes in the nine cancer types: recurrently mutated in all the stages and triggering other mutations; certain mutations lost meanwhile other mutations emerged; mutations dominated across entire stages, while other mutations gradually appeared or disappeared. We observed different codon changes dominated in different stages and revealed mutations recurrently occurring on the hotspot regions of the coding sequence may be the core factor for driver genes' tumorigenesis. Our results highlighted the dynamic changes of oncogenesis roles in different clinical stages and suggested different diagnostic decision making according to the clinical stages of patients. © 2016 The Author. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The prognostic implication of SRSF2 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Yao, Dong-Ming; Ma, Ji-Chun; Yang, Lei; Guo, Hong; Wen, Xiang-Mei; Xiao, Gao-Fei; Qian, Zhen; Lin, Jiang; Qian, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Recently, somatic mutations in SRSF2 gene have been discovered in a proportion of hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study was aimed to investigate SRSF2 mutations in Chinese AML patients. High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) was developed to screen SRSF2 mutations in 249 cases with AML, and then direct DNA sequencing was used to verify the results of HRMA. In this study, 3.6 % (9/249) of Chinese AML patients were found with heterozygous SRSF2 mutations. Patients with SRSF2 mutations were older than those with wild-type SRSF2 (P = 0.014). No differences in the sex, blood parameters, French-American-British classification (FAB) subtypes, and karyotypes were observed between AML patients with and without SRSF2 mutations. Although the overall survival (OS) of SRSF2-mutated patients was inferior to those without mutations in both whole AML patients (median 4 vs. 11 months, respectively; P = 0.006) and cytogenetically normal patients (median 2 vs. 12 months, respectively; P = 0.008), multiple analysis disclosed that SRSF2 mutation was not an independent prognostic factor in AML patients. These results suggest that SRSF2 mutation occurs at a low frequency in aged AML patients and might not be associated with adverse prognosis in Chinese AML patients.

  6. Spectrum of Molecular Defects in 216 Chinese Families With Hemophilia A: Identification of Noninversion Mutation Hot Spots and 42 Novel Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiping; Yang, Linhua; Qin, Xiuyu; Liu, Xiue; Zhang, Yaofang

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor VIII gene ( F8). Our aim is to identify the causative mutations in a large HA cohort from China. We studied 216 unrelated HA families. Molecular analyses of F8 were performed using a combination of molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The deleterious consequences of the unreported missense mutations were evaluated using various bioinformatics approaches. Causative mutations in F8 were identified in 209 families, intron 22 inversion (Inv22) was identified in 89 severe families, and intron 1 inversion (Inv1) was positive in 5 severe families; 95 mutations were detected among 115 noninversion families, of which 42 were novel, including 29 null variations and 13 missense mutations for which causality was demonstrated via bioinformatics. Among the 53 previously reported mutations, more nonsense (5 of 9) and missense (10 of 26) mutation sites were found to occur at Arginine (Arg) sites and multiple small deletions/insertions (5 of 10) located within the poly-A runs of the B domain. The majority of these sequence variants frequently recurred in the database. The odds ratios for the likelihood of developing inhibitors significantly increased in the presence of nonsense mutation. Our F8 defect spectrum was heterogeneous. Small deletions/insertions in the poly-A runs of the B domain and nonsense and missense mutations at Arg sites were identified as mutation hot spots. Nonsense mutation increased the risk of developing inhibitors.

  7. Clinical utility of TERT promoter mutations and ALK rearrangement in thyroid cancer patients with a high prevalence of the BRAF V600E mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ja Seong; Kim, Yourha; Jeon, Sora; Kim, Se Hee; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Sohee; Kim, Min-Hee; Lim, Dong Jun; Lee, Youn Soo; Jung, Chan Kwon

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in the TERT promoter, ALK rearrangement, and the BRAF V600E mutation are associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features in thyroid cancers. However, little is known about the impact of TERT promoter mutations and ALK rearrangement in thyroid cancer patients with a high prevalence of BRAF mutations. We performed Sanger sequencing to detect BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations and both immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization to identify ALK rearrangement on 243 thyroid cancers. TERT promoter mutations were not present in 192 well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC) without distant metastasis or in 9 medullary carcinomas. However, the mutations did occur in 40 % (12/30) of WDTC with distant metastasis, 29 % (2/7) of poorly differentiated carcinomas and 60 % (3/5) of anaplastic carcinomas. ALK rearrangement was not present in all thyroid cancers. The BRAF V600E mutation was more frequently found in WDTC without distant metastasis than in WDTC with distant metastasis (p = 0.007). In the cohort of WDTC with distant metastasis, patients with wild-type BRAF and TERT promoter had a significantly higher response rate after radioiodine therapy (p = 0.024), whereas the BRAF V600E mutation was significantly correlated with progressive disease (p = 0.025). The TERT promoter mutation is an independent predictor for distant metastasis of WDTC, but ALK testing is not useful for clinical decision-making in Korean patients with a high prevalence of the BRAF V600E mutation. Radioiodine therapy for distant metastasis of WDTC is most effective in patients without BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations.

  8. Endometrial tumour BRAF mutations and MLH1 promoter methylation as predictors of germline mismatch repair gene mutation status: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Alexander M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that displays high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) can be caused by either germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, or non-inherited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 promoter. A correlation between MLH1 promoter methylation, specifically the 'C' region, and BRAF V600E status has been reported in CRC studies. Germline MMR mutations also greatly increase risk of endometrial cancer (EC), but no systematic review has been undertaken to determine if these tumour markers may be useful predictors of MMR mutation status in EC patients. Endometrial cancer cohorts meeting review inclusion criteria encompassed 2675 tumours from 20 studies for BRAF V600E, and 447 tumours from 11 studies for MLH1 methylation testing. BRAF V600E mutations were reported in 4/2675 (0.1%) endometrial tumours of unknown MMR mutation status, and there were 7/823 (0.9%) total sequence variants in exon 11 and 27/1012 (2.7%) in exon 15. Promoter MLH1 methylation was not observed in tumours from 32 MLH1 mutation carriers, or for 13 MSH2 or MSH6 mutation carriers. MMR mutation-negative individuals with tumour MLH1 and PMS2 IHC loss displayed MLH1 methylation in 48/51 (94%) of tumours. We have also detailed specific examples that show the importance of MLH1 promoter region, assay design, and quantification of methylation. This review shows that BRAF mutations occurs so infrequently in endometrial tumours they can be discounted as a useful marker for predicting MMR-negative mutation status, and further studies of endometrial cohorts with known MMR mutation status are necessary to quantify the utility of tumour MLH1 promoter methylation as a marker of negative germline MMR mutation status in EC patients.

  9. DNA-Mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT): a catalog of clinically relevant cancer mutations to enable genome-directed anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Paul; Chen, Heidi; Andrews, Jenny; Naser, Riyad; Pao, William; Horn, Leora

    2013-04-01

    Tumor gene mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of patients with cancer. A comprehensive catalog of tumor gene-response outcomes from individual patients is needed, especially for actionable mutations and rare variants. We created a proof-of-principle database [DNA-mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT)], starting with lung cancer-associated EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, to provide a resource for clinicians to prioritize treatment decisions based on a patient's tumor mutations at the point of care. A systematic search of literature published between June 2005 and May 2011 was conducted through PubMed to identify patient-level, mutation-drug response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutant tumors. Minimum inclusion criteria included patient's EGFR mutation, corresponding treatment, and an associated radiographic outcome. A total of 1,021 patients with 1,070 separate EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy responses from 116 different publications were included. About 188 unique EGFR mutations occurring in 207 different combinations were identified: 149 different mutation combinations were associated with disease control and 42 were associated with disease progression. Four secondary mutations, in 16 different combinations, were associated with acquired resistance. As tumor sequencing becomes more common in oncology, this comprehensive electronic catalog can enable genome-directed anticancer therapy. DIRECT will eventually encompass all tumor mutations associated with clinical outcomes on targeted therapies. Users can make specific queries at http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/direct to obtain clinically relevant data associated with various mutations. ©2013 AACR.

  10. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Ultra-deep sequencing of mouse mitochondrial DNA: mutational patterns and their origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ameur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of mtDNA are implicated in the aging process, but there is no universally accepted method for their accurate quantification. We have used ultra-deep sequencing to study genome-wide mtDNA mutation load in the liver of normally- and prematurely-aging mice. Mice that are homozygous for an allele expressing a proof-reading-deficient mtDNA polymerase (mtDNA mutator mice have 10-times-higher point mutation loads than their wildtype siblings. In addition, the mtDNA mutator mice have increased levels of a truncated linear mtDNA molecule, resulting in decreased sequence coverage in the deleted region. In contrast, circular mtDNA molecules with large deletions occur at extremely low frequencies in mtDNA mutator mice and can therefore not drive the premature aging phenotype. Sequence analysis shows that the main proportion of the mutation load in heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and their wildtype siblings is inherited from their heterozygous mothers consistent with germline transmission. We found no increase in levels of point mutations or deletions in wildtype C57Bl/6N mice with increasing age, thus questioning the causative role of these changes in aging. In addition, there was no increased frequency of transversion mutations with time in any of the studied genotypes, arguing against oxidative damage as a major cause of mtDNA mutations. Our results from studies of mice thus indicate that most somatic mtDNA mutations occur as replication errors during development and do not result from damage accumulation in adult life.

  12. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  13. Hyperparathyroidism complicating CYP 24A1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyer, Camille; Leroy, Clara; Molin, Arnaud; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Huglo, Damien; Lion, Georges; Ernst, Olivier; Hoffmann, Maxime; Porchet, Nicole; Carnaille, Bruno; Pattou, François; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2016-10-01

    CYP24A1 gene mutations induce infantile hypercalcemia, with high 1,25(OH) 2 D contrasting with low PTH levels. The adult phenotype is not well known. Two unrelated adult patients were referred for nephrolithiasis, hypertension, hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, normal 25-OHD levels, and inappropriate PTH levels (22 to 92pg/mL;N: 15-68) suggesting primary hyperparathyroidism, leading to surgery. Hypercalciuria improved despite persistent hypercalcemia, treated with cinacalcet. The ratio 25-OHD 3 /24-25-(OH)2D 3 >100 (Nhyperparathyroidism with moderately increased PTH level, adenoma and/or slightly increased parathyroid glands. Surgery decreased calciuria and improved kidney function. Cinacalcet was partially effective on hypercalcemia since PTH was inappropriate. This novel phenotype, a phenocopy of hyperparathyroidism, might evolve in few cases towards hyperparathyroidism despite random association of the 2 diseases cannot be excluded. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Markov models for accumulating mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Random triangles

    OpenAIRE

    Matula, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The author summarizes some previous results concerning random triangles. He describes the Gaussian triangle and random triangles whose vertices lie in a unit n-dimensional ball, in a rectangle or in a general bounded convex set. In the second part, the author deals with an inscribed triangle in a triangle - let ABC be an equilateral triangle and let M, N, O be three points, each laying on one side of the ABC. We call MNO inscribed triangle (in an equi- laterral triangle). The median triangle ...

  16. Random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1990-01-01

    Since the publication of Random Matrices (Academic Press, 1967) so many new results have emerged both in theory and in applications, that this edition is almost completely revised to reflect the developments. For example, the theory of matrices with quaternion elements was developed to compute certain multiple integrals, and the inverse scattering theory was used to derive asymptotic results. The discovery of Selberg's 1944 paper on a multiple integral also gave rise to hundreds of recent publications. This book presents a coherent and detailed analytical treatment of random matrices, leading

  17. Binding of Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptide p28 to Wild Type and Mutated p53 as studied by Raman, Atomic Force and Surface Plasmon Resonance spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Sara; Santini, Simona; Yamada, Tohru; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Mutations within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the tumor suppressor p53 are found in >50% of human cancers and may significantly modify p53 secondary structure impairing its function. p28, an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, binds to the DBD through hydrophobic interaction and induces a posttranslational increase in wildtype and mutant p53 restoring functionality. We use mutation analyses to explore which elements of secondary structure may be critical to p28 binding. Molecular modeling, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) were used to identify which secondary structure of site-directed and naturally occurring mutant DBDs are potentially altered by discrete changes in hydrophobicity and the molecular interaction with p28. We show that specific point mutations that alter hydrophobicity within non-mutable and mutable regions of the p53 DBD alter specific secondary structures. The affinity of p28 was positively correlated with the β-sheet content of a mutant DBD, and reduced by an increase in unstructured or random coil that resulted from a loss in hydrophobicity and redistribution of surface charge. These results help refine our knowledge of how mutations within p53-DBD alter secondary structure and provide insight on how potential structural alterations in p28 or similar molecules improve their ability to restore p53 function. Raman spectroscopy, AFS, SPR and computational modeling are useful approaches to characterize how mutations within the p53DBD potentially affect secondary structure and identify those structural elements prone to influence the binding affinity of agents designed to increase the functionality of p53. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  19. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  20. Germline TERT promoter mutations are rare in familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harland, Mark; Petljak, Mia; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela

    2016-01-01

    T>G variant) has been reported in one family. We tested for the TERT promoter variant in 675 multicase families wild-type for the known high penetrance familial melanoma genes, 1863 UK population-based melanoma cases and 529 controls. Germline lymphocyte telomere length was estimated in carriers...... telomere length of a carrier was similar to wild-type cases. We provide evidence confirming that a rare promoter variant of TERT (c.-57 T>G) is associated with high penetrance, early onset melanoma and potentially other cancers, and explains ...Germline CDKN2A mutations occur in 40 % of 3-or-more case melanoma families while mutations of CDK4, BAP1, and genes involved in telomere function (ACD, TERF2IP, POT1), have also been implicated in melanomagenesis. Mutation of the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene (c.-57...

  1. The role of mutations in epigenetic regulators in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Brittany A; Levine, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, genomic studies have identified a number of novel and recurrent somatic mutations that affect epigenetic patterning in patients with myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelodysplastic syndrome, and acute myeloid leukemia. Many of these mutations occur in genes with established roles in the regulation and maintenance of DNA methylation and/or chromatin modifications in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Subsequent genetic and functional studies have revealed that these mutations affect epigenetic patterning in myeloid diseases. In this review, we discuss historical and recent studies implicating epigenetic modifiers in the development and evolution of the various myeloid malignancies and discuss how this knowledge has and will lead to future clinical and biologic insights. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Screening of RET gene mutations in Chinese patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Yongxia; Di, Xuebing; Yang, Yanmei; Yan, Dangui

    2016-01-01

    The rearranged during transfection (RET) gene is a proto-oncogene; active mutations frequently occur in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). This study investigated the spectrum of germline RET mutations and clinical features in Chinese hereditary MTC patients. A total of 53 family members from 11 different hereditary MTC families were recruited for detection of RET exon 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, and 16 mutations, in genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct DNA sequencing. Of the 53 participants, eight different germline RET mutations were detected in 37 individuals. These RET mutations were distributed in exons 10, 11, 13, and 16. The most frequent RET mutation was localized at exon 11 codon 634 (67.6 %; 25/37) and the most prevalent mutation was C634R (37.8 %; 14/37). The most frequent phenotype was multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A). The incidences of MTC, pheochromocytoma, and hyperparathyroidism in the MEN2A patients were 100, 36.4 and 18.2 %, respectively. The phenotype of families with Y606C or L790F mutation was categorized as familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, one proband was identified with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B and carried a de novo mutation of M918T. Two families with C618S/Y mutation were categorized as unclassified multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. Our results further substantiate that most germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene were localized at codon 634 in Chinese hereditary MTC patients and carriers. RET mutation at codon 634 was always associated to the phenotype of MEN2A. Screening of RET mutations should be probably limited to exons 10, 11, 13 and 16 initially to be cost-effective in China.

  3. LRRK2 exon 41 mutations in sporadic Parkinson disease in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Janin, Sabine; Lohmann, Ebba; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Leclere, Laurence; Viallet, François; Pollak, Pierre; Durif, Franck; Thobois, Stéphane; Layet, Valérie; Vidailhet, Marie; Agid, Yves; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Martinez, Maria; Penet, Christiane; Rasco, Olivier; Tison, François; Tranchan, Christine; Vérin, Marc

    2007-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2), particularly the G2019S mutation in exon 41, have been detected in familial and sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) cases. To assess the frequency of LRRK2 exon 41 mutations in a series of sporadic PD cases from Europe and to determine the clinical features of LRRK2 mutation carriers. We analyzed European cases of sporadic PD for the presence of LRRK2 exon 41 mutations. These mutations were screened by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and abnormal chromatograph traces were investigated by direct sequencing to determine the exact nature of the variants. Early-onset sporadic PD cases were also screened for parkin mutations. The haplotypes associated with the G2019S mutation were determined. The clinical characteristics of patients carrying LRRK2 mutations were detailed. French Network for the Study of Parkinson Disease Genetics. Patients Three hundred twenty patients with apparently sporadic PD from Europe. Results of genetic analyses. We found the G2019S mutation in 6 patients and identified 2 new variants (Y2006H and T2031S) in 1 patient each. Their clinical features were similar to those of typical PD. All G2019S mutation carriers shared a common haplotype. The G2019S mutation is almost as frequent in sporadic cases (1.9%) as in previously reported familial cases (2.9%) in Europe and occurs in the same common founder. We identified 2 novel variants. Although the phenotype of LRRK2 mutation carriers closely resembles that of typical PD, the age at onset was younger (29 years in 1 patient) than previously described, and 3 patients were improved by deep brain stimulation.

  4. Significance of somatic mutations and content alteration of mitochondrial DNA in esophageal cancer

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    Wang Yu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of mitochondria in energy metabolism, the generation of ROS, aging, and the initiation of apoptosis have implicated their importance in tumorigenesis. In this study we aim to establish the mutation spectrum and to understand the role of somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancer. Methods The entire mitochondrial genome was screened for somatic mutations in 20 pairs (18 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, one adenosquamous carcinoma and one adenocarcinoma of tumor/surrounding normal tissue of esophageal cancers, using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, followed by direct DNA sequencing to identify the mutations. Results Fourteen somatic mtDNA mutations were identified in 55% (11/20 of tumors analyzed, including 2 novel missense mutations and a frameshift mutation in ND4L, ATP6 subunit, and ND4 genes respectively. Nine mutations (64% were in the D-loop region. Numerous germline variations were found, at least 10 of them were novel and five were missense mutations, some of them occurred in evolutionarily conserved domains. Using real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the mtDNA content was found to increase in some tumors and decrease in others. Analysis of molecular and other clinicopathological findings does not reveal significant correlation between somatic mtDNA mutations and mtDNA content, or between mtDNA content and metastatic status. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancers are frequent. Some missense and frameshift mutations may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of esophageal carcinoma. More extensive biochemical and molecular studies will be necessary to determine the pathological significance of these somatic mutations.

  5. A mitochondrial mutation at nt 9101 in the ATP synthase 6 gene associated with deficient oxidative phosphorylation in a family with leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy

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    Lamninen, T.; Junoven, V.; Aula, P.; Savontaus, M.L. [Univ. of Turku (Finland); Majander, A.; Wikstroem, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-05-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited ocular disease resulting in bilateral optic atrophy in young adults. Several mtDNA point mutations have been proposed as being causative for LHON, all in complex I, III, or IV of the respiratory chain. The ND4/11778 mutation accounts for {approximately}50% of all LHON families, the ND1/3460 mutation is detected in {approximately}15% of cases, and {approximately}10% of LHON families have the ND6/14484 mutation. All these mutations are restricted to LHON families, and they change evolutionary conserved amino acids. Furthermore, these primary mutations have never been observed to occur simultaneously. Besides the primary mutations, several other replacement mutations have been found in LHON families. These mutations are also detected at low frequency in control individuals, and they change evolutionarily less conserved amino acids. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Near East University Genetic Mutation Database (NEU-GD): The first mutation database of Northern Cyprus.

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    Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Pirzada, Rameez Hassan; Arici, Mustafa; Serakinci, Nedime

    2015-10-15

    The health care system is negatively affected by the genetic disorders that lead to an increasing rate of morbidity and neonatal deaths and affect adults as well. These create a substantial government's psychosocial and economic burden on clinicians, patients and their families with the advancement in the field of genetics. There has been a tremendous increase in the rate in which diseases associated with variant DNA sequences are being sought and identified. The goal behind the creation of Near East University Genetic Mutation Database (NEU-GD) is to map and apprehend the patterns of common genetic diversity in the human genetic makeup in order to accelerate the search for the genetic causes of human disease. NEU-GD will allow scientists to generate extraordinarily useful information such as allelic variations among population, and description of the genetic blueprint of mutations occurring in human beings. In this communication we report the construction of the first genetic mutation database for the people belonging to different ethnic groups living in North Cyprus (http://genetics-db.neu.edu.tr/). Therefore NEU-GD can serve as an important tool available online for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorder and persuade for further investigation of novel genetic disorders in North Cyprus population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. De novo SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome and related epileptic encephalopathies are largely of paternal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Sarah E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Iona, Xenia; Zuberi, Sameer M; Birch, Rachael; McMahon, Jacinta M; Bruce, Carla M; Berkovic, Samuel F; Mulley, John C

    2010-02-01

    Dravet syndrome is a severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused in approximately 80% of cases by mutations in the voltage gated sodium channel subunit gene SCN1A. The majority of these mutations are de novo. The parental origin of de novo mutations varies widely among genetic disorders and the aim of this study was to determine this for Dravet syndrome. 91 patients with de novo SCN1A mutations and their parents were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the region surrounding their mutation. Allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on informative SNPs was used to separately amplify and sequence the paternal and maternal alleles to determine in which parental chromosome the mutation arose. The parental origin of SCN1A mutations was established in 44 patients for whom both parents were available and SNPs were informative. The mutations were of paternal origin in 33 cases and of maternal origin in the remaining 11 cases. De novo mutation of SCN1A most commonly, but not exclusively, originates from the paternal chromosome. The average age of parents originating mutations did not differ from that of the general population. The greater frequency of paternally derived mutations in SCN1A is likely to be due to the greater chance of mutational events during the increased number of mitoses which occur during spermatogenesis compared to oogenesis, and the greater susceptibility to mutagenesis of the methylated DNA characteristic of sperm cells.

  8. Clonal architectures and driver mutations in metastatic melanomas.

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    Li Ding

    Full Text Available To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1, protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT, as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2. Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9 with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma.

  9. HFE mutations in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Gavin; Wimperis, Jennie Z; Smith, Katy; Fellows, Ian W; Jennings, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Most individuals diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis have mutations in both copies of the HFE gene, with such mutations being common in populations of north European origin. The number of individuals currently diagnosed and treated for hemochromatosis is small relative to the number carrying two HFE mutations. Studies searching for undiagnosed hemochromatosis cases among disease cohorts have generally failed to find the number of cases that would be expected if disease were the commonest outcome for individuals with two C282Y HFE mutations. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with two HFE mutations would be under-represented in an elderly population because many would have died from disease caused by hemochromatosis before they reached old age. This is a cross-sectional study of elderly patients referred for full blood counts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. We screened blood samples from 1,000 elderly men (aged 85 and over) and women (aged 89 and over) for the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations of the HFE gene. We also analyzed any recent laboratory data relevant to signs of hemochromatosis. None of the ten possible genotypes was significantly under- or over-represented compared to the expected frequency calculated from the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Four C282Y homozygotes were found. There were few significant differences in the laboratory findings between the genotypes. Our data suggest that most people with HFE mutations survive to old age and do not suffer from signs of iron overload and hemochromatosis.

  10. Spectrum of LDLR gene mutations, including a novel mutation causing familial hypercholesterolaemia, in North-western Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakou, Maria; Miltiadous, George; Xenophontos, Stavroulla L; Manoli, Panayiotis; Cariolou, Marios A; Elisaf, Moses

    2011-10-01

    Familial Hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a clinical syndrome characterised by elevated serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, by tendon xanthomata and clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease in early life. Typically, it results from mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene. Furthermore, there are 3 additional genetic disorders that cause clinical syndromes that mimic FH. These are: 1) familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein (apo)-B (FLDH), 2) familial hypercholesterolaemia type 3 (FH3) and 3) autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia (ARH). The aim of this study was to elaborate the impact of the above genetic disorders in Greek patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH. In this study, we assessed the contribution of the LDLR, Apo B, ARH and PCSK9 genes in the expression of FH in North-western Greece. Two hundred and fifty-four (254) probands with a clinical diagnosis of FH were included in the study. One hundred and sixty-nine (169) patients had one of the following LDLR gene mutations: 81T>G, 1775G>A, 517T>C, 858C>A, 1352T>C, 1285G>A, 761A>C, 1195G>A, 1646G>A and a deletion mutation g.387-410del24 in exon 4. We sequenced the Apo B, ARH and PCSK9 genes in 40, randomly selected patients, from the 85 patients with no identified LDLR gene defects. In these 40, randomly selected patients, with the exception of benign single nucleotide polymorphisms, no functional mutations were identified for all the above mentioned sequenced genes. Our results reveal substantial genetic heterogeneity for FH in North-western Greece with at least ten LDLR gene mutations present in the study population. One of these mutations although quite rare is reported here for the first time in the scientific literature. The detection of these mutations is important as they may be used to design multiplex detection assays for large scale population screening programmes to facilitate primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the region

  11. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

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    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  12. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

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    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  13. Evolution of the Insertion-Deletion Mutation Rate Across the Tree of Life

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    Way Sung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations are the ultimate source of variation used for evolutionary adaptation, while also being predominantly deleterious and a source of genetic disorders. Understanding the rate of insertion-deletion mutations (indels is essential to understanding evolutionary processes, especially in coding regions, where such mutations can disrupt production of essential proteins. Using direct estimates of indel rates from 14 phylogenetically diverse eukaryotic and bacterial species, along with measures of standing variation in such species, we obtain results that imply an inverse relationship of mutation rate and effective population size. These results, which corroborate earlier observations on the base-substitution mutation rate, appear most compatible with the hypothesis that natural selection reduces mutation rates per effective genome to the point at which the power of random genetic drift (approximated by the inverse of effective population size becomes overwhelming. Given the substantial differences in DNA metabolism pathways that give rise to these two types of mutations, this consistency of results raises the possibility that refinement of other molecular and cellular traits may be inversely related to species-specific levels of random genetic drift.

  14. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

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    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. Intertumor heterogeneity of non-small-cell lung carcinomas revealed by multiplexed mutation profiling and integrative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daniel S W; Camilleri-Broët, Sophie; Tan, Eng Huat; Alifano, Marco; Lim, Wan-Teck; Bobbio, Antonio; Zhang, Shenli; Ng, Quan-Sing; Ang, Mei-Kim; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Takano, Angela; Lim, Kiat Hon; Régnard, Jean-François; Tan, Patrick; Broët, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease, with a burden of genomic alterations exceeding most other tumors. The goal of our study was to evaluate the frequencies of co-occurring mutations and copy-number aberrations (CNAs) within the same tumor and to evaluate their potential clinical impact. Mass-spectrometry based mutation profiling using a customized lung cancer panel evaluating 214 mutations across 26 key NSCLC genes was performed on 230 nonsquamous NSCLC and integrated with genome-wide CNAs and clinical variables. Among the 138 cases having at least one mutation, one-third (41, 29.7%) showed two or more mutations, either in the same gene (double mutation) or in different genes (co-mutations). In epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant cancers, there was a double mutation in 18% and co-mutations in the following genes: TP53 (10%), PIK3CA (8%), STK11 (6%) and MET (4%). Significant relationships were detected between EGFR mutation and 1p, 7p copy gains (harboring the EGFR gene) as well as 13q copy loss. KRAS mutation was significantly related with 1q gain and 3q loss. For Stage I, tumors harboring at least one mutation or PIK3CA mutation were significantly correlated with poor prognosis (p-value = 0.02). When combining CNAs and mutational status, patients having both KRAS mutation and the highest related CNA (3q22.3 copy loss) showed a significant poorer prognosis (p-value = 0.03). Our study highlights the clinical relevance of studying tumor complexity by integrative genomic analysis and the need for developing assays that broadly screen for both "actionable" mutations and copy-number alterations to improve precision of stratified treatment approaches. © 2014 UICC.

  16. Prevalence of JAK29V617F) mutation in intra-abdominal venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Amarapurkar; Punamiya, Sundeep; Patel, Nikhil; Parekh, Sunil; Mehta, Shilpa; Shah, Nirali

    2011-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) (like polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis) are responsible for 50% cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and 35% cases of portal venous thrombosis (PVT) in western series. A point mutation at Val617Phe of Janus kinase 2 tyrosine kinase gene (JAK2(V617F) mutation) occurs in high proportion with MPD. This may be useful in diagnosing overt and latent form of MPD in intra-abdominal venous thrombosis (IAVT), consisting of BCS and PVT. In a 4 year prospective study from 2006 to 2009, JAK2 mutations were assessed in all patients diagnosed with MPD and IAVT attending our institution. Twenty three healthy individuals and 31 patients with non-MPD hematological disorders served as controls. All patients of idiopathic IAVT were tested for the mutation. Test for JAK2(V617F) mutation was carried out by allele specific polymerase chain reaction. JAK2(V617F) mutation was significantly more common in MPD patients (76%) than in non-MPD hematological disorders (0%) and healthy controls (0%). There was no statistical difference in presence of JAK2(V617F) mutation in patients of MPD with or without thrombosis (80% vs. 74%). In 58 patients with IAVT, the JAK2(V617F) mutation was present in 40% with BCS, 14% with PVT and 100% combined BCS+PVT). The JAK2(V617F) mutation occurs at high frequency in patients with MPD and IAVT. All idiopathic IAVT patients must be screened for JAK2(V617F) mutation to detect latent MPD. Detection of latent MPD by JAK2(V61F) mutation in BCS may change treatment strategy and outcome.

  17. Association of a novel point mutation in MSH2 gene with familial multiple primary cancers

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    Hai Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple primary cancers (MPC have been identified as two or more cancers without any subordinate relationship that occur either simultaneously or metachronously in the same or different organs of an individual. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that increases the risk of many types of cancers. Lynch syndrome patients who suffer more than two cancers can also be considered as MPC; patients of this kind provide unique resources to learn how genetic mutation causes MPC in different tissues. Methods We performed a whole genome sequencing on blood cells and two tumor samples of a Lynch syndrome patient who was diagnosed with five primary cancers. The mutational landscape of the tumors, including somatic point mutations and copy number alternations, was characterized. We also compared Lynch syndrome with sporadic cancers and proposed a model to illustrate the mutational process by which Lynch syndrome progresses to MPC. Results We revealed a novel pathologic mutation on the MSH2 gene (G504 splicing that associates with Lynch syndrome. Systematical comparison of the mutation landscape revealed that multiple cancers in the proband were evolutionarily independent. Integrative analysis showed that truncating mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes were significantly enriched in the patient. A mutation progress model that included germline mutations of MMR genes, double hits of MMR system, mutations in tissue-specific driver genes, and rapid accumulation of additional passenger mutations was proposed to illustrate how MPC occurs in Lynch syndrome patients. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that both germline and somatic alterations are driving forces of carcinogenesis, which may resolve the carcinogenic theory of Lynch syndrome.

  18. Germline mutation in BRAF codon 600 is compatible with human development: de novo p.V600G mutation identified in a patient with CFC syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, K J; Bunag, C; Estep, A L; Jones, J R; Bolt, C H; Rogers, R C; Rauen, K A; Everman, D B

    2011-05-01

    BRAF, the protein product of BRAF, is a serine/threonine protein kinase and one of the direct downstream effectors of Ras. Somatic mutations in BRAF occur in numerous human cancers, whereas germline BRAF mutations cause cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome. One recurrent somatic mutation, p.V600E, is frequently found in several tumor types, such as melanoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, colon cancer, and ovarian cancer. However, a germline mutation affecting codon 600 has never been described. Here, we present a patient with CFC syndrome and a de novo germline mutation involving codon 600 of BRAF, thus providing the first evidence that a pathogenic germline mutation involving this critical codon is not only compatible with development but can also cause the CFC phenotype. In vitro functional analysis shows that this mutation, which replaces a valine with a glycine at codon 600 (p.V600G), leads to increased ERK and ELK phosphorylation compared to wild-type BRAF but is less strongly activating than the cancer-associated p.V600E mutation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. IDH2 mutations are frequent in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and associated with NPM1 mutations and FAB-M2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, H-Y; Jia, Z-X; Chen, T; Lu, X-Z; Cen, L; Xiao, R; Jiang, N-K; Ying, J-H; Zhou, M; Zhang, R

    2012-10-01

    Gene mutations play an important role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. Several genes have been identified in AML, such as FLT3, KIT, NPM1, and JAK2. This study investigated the frequency of novel mutations in IDH1 (amino acid R132) and IDH2 (R140 and R172) and analyzed their impact on disease biology and interaction with other mutations in Chinese patients with de novo AML. A total of 195 patients were screened for mutations in the IDH1, IDH2, JAK2 V617F, NPM1, FLT3, and KIT genes, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based and direct sequencing assays. IDH mutations occurred at a considerable frequency of 15.89% in Chinese AML cases; IDH2 R140Q was the most frequent genetic alteration and was associated with older age, normal karyotype, and French-American-British classification M2 at diagnosis. There was a strong association of IDH2 mutation with NPM1 mutations and a trend with FLT3-internal-tandem duplication. IDH mutations may be a novel genetic marker in cytogenetically normal AML and may cooperate in leukemogenesis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Investigation of mutations induced by radiation and restriction endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kim E.

    The effects of gamma radiation and restriction endonuclease (RE) induced DNA double strand breaks (dsb) upon the mutation frequency and the surviving fraction of three Chinese hamster cell lines V79-4, CHO-K1 and an X-ray sensitive dsb repair deficient cell line xrs-5 were studied. The X-ray sensitive xrs-5 cell line was shown to be more sensitive to both the lethal and the mutagenic effects of gamma radiation having a substantially lower surviving fraction and a higher thymidine kinase (tk) mutation frequency per unit dose than the parental CHO-K1 cells. The frequency of induced hprt- mutations in the V79-4 cell line was comparable to the induced frequency of tk mutations in the CHO-K1 cells. The effect of blunt- and cohesive- ended dsb upon the surviving fraction and the induced mutation frequency was studied by porating different Chinese hamster cell lines (CHO-K1, V79-4 and xrs-5) with RE using Streptolysin O (SLO). The surviving fraction of the different cell lines was reduced with increasing concentrations of Pvu II. Increases in the concentration of Pvu II produced increases in the frequency of hypoxyanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations in the V79-4 cells and tk mutations in the CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells. However, the xrs-5 cells were shown to be hypomutable to Pvu II compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. EcoR1 was ineffective at inducing tk mutations in the CHO-Kl cells but was as effective as Pvu II at inducing hprt mutations in the V79-4 cells. None of the spontaneously induced V79-4 hprt- mutant cells were shown to have observable molecular deletions when analysed by PCR deletion screening. One third of the radiation induced hprt - mutants were shown to be deletions. However, too few mutant cells were analysed for any non-random distribution of deletions to be observed. Half of the hprt- mutants induced by SLO poration alone were shown to be due to deletions of oi\\e or more exons. The distribution of the DNA deletions in SLO hprt

  1. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

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    Murati Anne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute (acute myeloid leukemia stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS, transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1, epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX, tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53, and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2. Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach.

  2. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

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    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  3. Ordered accumulation of mutations conferring resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in the Plasmodium falciparum parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshihiro; Ohashi, Jun; Venkatesan, Meera; Marma, Aung Swi Prue; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Plowe, Christopher V; Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the prevalence of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum is essential for effective malaria control. Resistance to pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine increases as mutations accumulate in the parasite genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps), respectively. Although parasites are exposed to these antifolate drugs simultaneously, it remains virtually unknown whether dhfr and dhps mutations accumulate along interrelated paths. We investigated the order of step-wise accumulation in dhfr and dhps by cumulative analyses using binomial tests in 575 P. falciparum isolates obtained from 7 countries in Asia and Melanesia. An initial step in the accumulation of mutations preferentially occurred in dhfr (2 mutations), followed by 1 mutation in dhps. In a subsequent step, mutations were estimated separately for 5 dhfr/dhps-resistant lineages identified using 12 microsatellites flanking dhfr and dhps. Among these lineages, we found 3 major mutational paths, each of which follows a unique stepwise trajectory to produce the most highly resistant form with 4 mutations in dhfr and 3 in dhps. The ordered accumulation of mutations in dhfr and dhps elucidated here will assist in predicting the status and progression of antifolate resistance in malaria-endemic regions where antifolate drugs are used for intermittent preventive treatment.

  4. Clinical and biological characteristics of cervical neoplasias with FGFR3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiery Jean

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported activating mutations of the gene coding for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 in invasive cervical carcinoma. To further analyze the role of FGFR3 in cervical tumor progression, we extended our study to screen a total of 75 invasive tumors and 80 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (40 low-grade and 40 high-grade lesions. Results Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP followed by DNA sequencing, we found FGFR3 mutation (S249C in all cases in 5% of invasive cervical carcinomas and no mutation in intraepithelial lesions. These results suggest that, unlike in bladder carcinoma, FGFR3 mutation does not or rarely occur in non invasive lesions. Compared to patients with wildtype FGFR3 tumor, patients with S249C FGFR3 mutated tumors were older (mean age 64 vs. 49.4 years, P = 0.02, and were more likely to be associated with a non-16/18 HPV type in their tumor. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that FGFR3 mutated tumors were associated with higher FGFR3b mRNA expression levels compared to wildtype FGFR3 tumors. Supervised analysis of Affymetrix expression data identified a significant number of genes specifically differentially expressed in tumors with respect to FGFR3 mutation status. Conclusion This study suggest that tumors with FGFR3 mutation appear to have distinctive clinical and biological characteristics that may help in defining a population of patients for FGFR3 mutation screening.

  5. Mutations in TERT promoter and FGFR3 and telomere length in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, Ismail; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Heidenreich, Barbara; de Verdier, Petra J; Ryk, Charlotta; Steineck, Gunnar; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) genes constitute the most recurrent somatic alterations in urothelial carcinoma of bladder. In this study, we screened DNA from 327 urothelial bladder carcinomas from well-documented patients, with different stages and grades and known TERT promoter mutational status, for FGFR3 alterations and measured relative telomere length (RTL). Although, the frequency of the TERT promoter mutations was higher than those in FGFR3; however, the alterations at the two loci occurred together more frequently than per chance [Odds ratio (OR) = 4.93, 95% CI = 2.72-8.92, p FGFR3 mutations had shorter RTL than those without mutations (p FGFR3 mutations than without mutations implies mechanistic relevance of telomere biology in cancer progression. The observed association with recurrence and survival shows that the TERT promoter mutations can potentially be used as markers to refine selection of patients for different treatments. The overwhelming frequency of the TERT promoter mutations also represents a case for development of an eventual therapeutic target. © 2015 UICC.

  6. Sporadic Nonautoimmune Neonatal Hyperthyroidism Due to A623V Germline Mutation in the Thyrotropin Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Ceylaner, Serdar; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Peltek Kendirici, Havva Nur

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder and occurs in two forms. An autoimmune form is associated with maternal Graves' disease, resulting from transplacental passage of maternal thyroid−stimulating antibodies and a nonautoimmune form is caused by gain of function mutations in the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene. Thyrotoxicosis caused by germline mutations in the TSHR gene may lead to a variety of clinical consequences. To date, 55 activating mutations of the TSHR gene have been documented. Fourteen cases with sporadic activating TSHR germline mutations have been described. Here we report a male infant with nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism due to an activating germline TSHR mutation (A623V), whose clinical picture started in the newborn period with severe hyperthyroidism. His parents did not have the same mutation. This mutation had been previously detected as a somatic mutation in patients with toxic adenomas. This is the first report of a sporadic case of nonautoimmune congenital hyperthyroidism associated with A623V mutation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274318

  7. Low prevalence of the somatic M918T RET mutation in micro-medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, Cristina; Ugolini, Clara; Cosci, Barbara; Torregrossa, Liborio; Vivaldi, Agnese; Ciampi, Raffaele; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Materazzi, Gabriele; Miccoli, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of RET somatic mutations in sporadic medullary thyroid cancer (MTCs) is ∼40%-50%, and the most frequent somatic mutation is M918T. RET-positive MTCs have been demonstrated to have a more advanced stage at diagnosis and a worse outcome. The aim of the present work was to compare the prevalence of RET somatic mutations in sporadic microMTCs (1 and 2 and 3 cm. The overall prevalence of the somatic M918T RET mutation was 19.4% (31/160). RET mutations were distributed differently among the four groups. The prevalence was 11.3% (6/53) in group A, 11.8% (8/68) in group B, 31.8% (7/22) in group C, and 58.8% (10/17) in group D, exhibiting an increase with increasing size of the tumor. When comparing the prevalence of mutations in the four groups, we found a lower prevalence in microMTCs (p<0.0001). The overall prevalence of RET somatic mutations was lower than expected, and the prevalence of the somatic M918T RET mutation was significantly lower in microMTCs than in larger tumors. To explain this finding, we can hypothesize either that other oncogene(s) might be responsible for the majority of microMTC, thus identifying a tumor subset, or that the RET mutation might, or might not, occur later during tumor progression.

  8. Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin Mutations in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Karimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutation are not common but they are involved in pediatric thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of factor V Leiden & prohtrombin mutation in healthy population of Shiraz, south of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study 195 healthy people (97 female and 98 male were randomly selected. Peripheral white blood cells obtained from 5 ml blood contained 1-2 mg/ml K2- EDTA. Genomic DNA extraction was performed following the protocol described by Miller et al. PCR amplification was carried out in 25μl reaction volume containing 0.5 units Taq polymerase, 200μM dNTP, 500 μM of each of the previously described primers. After initial denaturation, 35 cycles at 95◦c for 30s, and 72◦c for 20s and followed extention by 72 for 10 min were performed. About 10μl of PDR product was digested with MNI I or Mbo restriction enzymes. Results: In this study we determined factor V Leiden in 8 (4.1% and prothrombin mutation in 6 individual (3.07% of 198 cases in heterozygous form. No homozygous was seen for any of the mutations. Only one case presented a double heterozygous for factor V and prothrombin in this cohort. Conclusion: Several studies of factor V leiden and prothrombin mutations in the East of Asia showed the higher frequency of these mutations in Iran.

  9. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  11. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  12. TERT promoter mutations contribute to IDH mutations in predicting differential responses to adjuvant therapies in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Ding, Xiao-Jie; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Hong, Christopher S; Chen, Ling-Chao; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Fang-Ping; Wang, Yin; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Zhuang, Zhengping; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yan, Hai; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying

    2015-09-22

    IDH mutations frequently occur in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas and have favorable prognosis compared to wild-type tumors. However, whether IDH mutations in WHO grade II and II diffuse gliomas predict enhanced sensitivity to adjuvant radiation (RT) or chemotherapy (CHT) is still being debated. Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in gliomas. We previously demonstrated that TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers in glioma survival prognostication when combined with IDH mutations. This study analyzed IDH and TERT promoter mutations in 295 WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas treated with or without adjuvant therapies to explore their impact on the sensitivity of tumors to genotoxic therapies. IDH mutations were found in 216 (73.2%) patients and TERT promoter mutations were found in 112 (38%) patients. In multivariate analysis, IDH mutations (p IDH and TERT promoter mutations were not significant prognostic factors in patients who did not receive genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were factors independently impacting PFS (RT p = 0.001, CHT p = 0.026) in IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas but not in IDH wild-type group. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated TERT promoter mutations further stratified IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were significant parameters influencing PFS in the IDH wt/TERT mut subgroup (RT p = 0.015, CHT p = 0.015) but not in the IDH wt/TERT wt subgroup. Our data demonstrated that IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas had better PFS and OS than their IDH wild-type counterparts when genotoxic therapies were administered after surgery. Importantly, we also found that TERT promoter mutations further stratify IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to

  13. Mutational signature of the proximate bladder carcinogen N-hydroxy-4-acetylaminobiphenyl: inconsistency with the p53 mutational spectrum in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Bates, Steven E; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2002-08-01

    We studied the mutagenicity of the proximate bladder carcinogen, N-hydroxy-4-acetylaminobiphenyl (N-OH-AABP) in embryonic fibroblasts of the Big Blue mouse. Treatment of these cells with increasing concentrations of N-OH-AABP for 24 h resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency of the cII transgene up to 12.8-fold over the background. Single base substitutions comprised 86% of the N-OH-AABP-induced mutations and 74% of the spontaneous cII mutations (sequenced number of mutant plaques, 141 and 145, respectively). Of these, 63 and 36%, respectively, occurred at guanine residues along the cII gene. Whereas G to T transversions predominated in the induced cII mutations (47%), insertion was the most spontaneously derived cII mutation (19%). Mapping of N-OH-AABP-induced DNA adducts along the cII gene by terminal transferase-dependent PCR showed the formation of DNA adducts at specific nucleotide positions. Five preferential DNA adduction sites were established, of which four were major mutation sites for N-OH-AABP, especially for G to T transversions. This unique mutational signature of N-OH-AABP in the cII gene was, however, in sharp contrast with the mutational spectrum of the p53 gene in human bladder cancer. G to A transitions are the dominant type of p53 mutations (53%), being also prevalent in almost all of its five mutational hotspots (codons 175, 248, 273, 280, and 285). In addition, the majority of mutations in three of these hotspots (codons 175, 248, and 273) are at a methylated CpG site, whereas in the cII gene neither the preferential N-OH-AABP DNA adduction sites nor the induced mutational hotspots are biased toward methylated CpG dinucleotides. We conclude that N-OH-AABP leaves a characteristic mutational signature in the cII transgene, which is consistent with its preferential DNA adduction profile. However, the pattern of mutation induced by N-OH-AABP in the cII gene is largely at odds with the mutational spectrum of the p53 gene in human

  14. JAK2 Exon 12 Mutations in Polycythemia Vera and Idiopathic Erythrocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Linda M.; Tong, Wei; Levine, Ross L.; Scott, Mike A.; Beer, Philip A.; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Erber, Wendy N.; McMullin, Mary Frances; Harrison, Claire N.; Warren, Alan J.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Lodish, Harvey F.; Green, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The V617F mutation, which causes the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 617 of the Janus kinase (JAK) 2 gene (JAK2), is often present in patients with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis. However, the molecular basis of these myeloproliferative disorders in patients without the V617F mutation is unclear. METHODS We searched for new mutations in members of the JAK and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) gene families in patients with V617F-negative polycythemia vera or idiopathic erythrocytosis. The mutations were characterized biochemically and in a murine model of bone marrow transplantation. RESULTS We identified four somatic gain-of-function mutations affecting JAK2 exon 12 in 10 V617F-negative patients. Those with a JAK2 exon 12 mutation presented with an isolated erythrocytosis and distinctive bone marrow morphology, and several also had reduced serum erythropoietin levels. Erythroid colonies could be grown from their blood samples in the absence of exogenous erythropoietin. All such erythroid colonies were heterozygous for the mutation, whereas colonies homozygous for the mutation occur in most patients with V617F-positive polycythemia vera. BaF3 cells expressing the murine erythropoietin receptor and also carrying exon 12 mutations could proliferate without added interleukin-3. They also exhibited increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2, as compared with cells transduced by wild-type JAK2 or V617F JAK2. Three of the exon 12 mutations included a substitution of leucine for lysine at position 539 of JAK2. This mutation resulted in a myeloproliferative phenotype, including erythrocytosis, in a murine model of retroviral bone marrow transplantation. CONCLUSIONS JAK2 exon 12 mutations define a distinctive myeloproliferative syndrome that affects patients who currently receive a diagnosis of polycythemia vera or idiopathic erythrocytosis

  15. POMT1 and POMT2 mutations in CMD patients: a multicentric Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, S; Mora, M; Pegoraro, E; Pini, A; Mongini, T; D'Amico, A; Pane, M; Aiello, C; Bruno, C; Biancheri, R; Berardinelli, A; Boito, C; Farina, L; Morandi, L; Moroni, I; Pezzani, R; Pichiecchio, A; Ricci, E; Ruggieri, A; Saredi, S; Scuderi, C; Tessa, A; Toscano, A; Tortorella, G; Trevisan, C P; Uggetti, C; Santorelli, F M; Bertini, E; Mercuri, E

    2008-07-01

    Mutations in POMT1 and POMT2 genes were originally identified in Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and subsequently reported in patients with milder phenotypes characterised by mental retardation with or without brain abnormalities and without ocular malformations. As part of a multicentric Italian study we screened the POMT1 and POMT2 genes in 61 congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) patients with alpha-dystroglycan reduction on muscle biopsy and/or clinical and radiological findings suggestive of the known forms of CMD with alpha-dystroglycan deficiency. The aim of the study was to establish how frequently mutations in POMT1 and POMT2 occur in CMD patients in the Italian population and to evaluate the spectrum of associated phenotypes. Thirteen patients showed mutations in POMT1 and five harboured mutations in POMT2, accounting for a total of 20 different mutations, eight of which were novel (two in POMT1 and six in POMT2). Normal brain MRI associated with mental retardation and microcephaly was the most frequent finding in patients with mutations in POMT1 (six out of 13), but was also found in a patient with POMT2 mutations. Predominant cerebellar hypoplasia was also frequent both in patients with POMT1 (three out of 13) and POMT2 (three out of 5) mutations. A MEB phenotype with frontal cortical dysplasia and pons abnormalities was found in two patients with POMT1 and in one with POMT2 mutations, while a WWS phenotype was only found in a case with mutations in POMT1. Mutations causing frameshifts and stop codons were responsible for the more severe phenotypes. Our results provide further evidence that, as previously reported for FKRP, the array of mutations in POMT1 and POMT2 is ample and the spectrum of associated phenotypes is wider than initially thought.

  16. Potential Pitfalls of SDH Immunohistochemical Detection in Paragangliomas and Phaeochromocytomas Harbouring Germline SDHx Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Raffaella; Rapizzi, Elena; Canu, Letizia; Ercolino, Tonino; Baroni, Gianna; Fucci, Rossella; Costa, Giuseppe; Mannelli, Massimo; Nesi, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    Germline mutations in any of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes result in destabilization of the SDH protein complex and loss of SDHB expression at immunohistochemistry. SDHA is lost together with SDHB in SDHA-mutated tumours, but its expression is retained in tumours with other SDH mutations. We investigated whether SDHA/SDHB immunohistochemistry is able to identify SDH-related tumours in a retrospective case series of phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs). SDHA and SDHB immunostaining was performed in 13 SDH gene-mutated tumours (SDHB: n=3; SDHC: n=1; SDHD: n=9) and 16 wild-type tumours. Protein expression by western blot analysis and enzymatic activity were also assessed. Tumours harbouring SDH gene mutations demonstrated a significant reduction in enzymatic activity and protein expression when compared to wild-type tumours. SDHB immunostaining detected 76.9% of SDH mutated PCCs/PGLs (3/3 SDHB-mutated samples; 1/1 SDHC-mutated sample; 6/9 SDHD-mutated samples). In three SDHD-related tumours with the same mutation (p.Pro81Leu), positive (n=2) or weakly diffuse (n=1) SDHB staining was observed. All wild-type PCCs/PGLs exhibited SDHB immunoreactivity, while immunostaining for SDHA was positive in 93.8% cases and weakly diffuse in one (6.2%). SDHA protein expression was preserved in all tumours with mutations. SDHA and SDHB immunohistochemistry should be interpreted with caution, due to possible false-positive or false-negative results, and ideally in the setting of quality assurance provided by molecular testing. In SDHD mutation, weak non-specific cytoplasmic staining occurs commonly, and this pattern of staining can be difficult to interpret with certainty. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Mosaic mutations of the LIS1 gene cause subcortical band heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicca, F; Kelemen, A; Genton, P; Das, S; Mei, D; Moro, F; Dobyns, W B; Guerrini, R

    2003-10-28

    Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) is a neuronal migration disorder. DCX mutations are responsible for almost all familial cases, 80% of sporadic female cases, and 25% of sporadic male cases of SBH, and are associated with more severe gyral and migration abnormality over the anterior brain regions. Somatic mosaicism has previously been hypothesized in a patient with posteriorly predominant SBH and a mutation of the LIS1 gene, which is usually mutated in patients with severe lissencephaly. The authors identified mosaic mutations of LIS1 in two patients (Patients 1 and 2) with predominantly posterior SBH. After ruling out DCX mutations, the authors performed sequencing of the LIS1 gene in lymphocyte DNA. Because sequence peaks in both patients were suggestive of mosaic mutations, they followed up with denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis on blood and hair root DNA and compared the areas of heteroduplex and homoduplex peaks. A third patient showing the same mutation as Patient 2 but with no evidence of mosaicism was used for comparing the phenotype of mosaic vs full mutation. The two patients with posterior SBH harbored a missense (Arg241Pro) and a nonsense (R8X) mosaic mutation of LIS1. The rate of mosaicism in Patient 1 was 18% in the blood and 21% in the hair roots, whereas in Patient 2 it was 24% and 31% in the same tissues. The patient with a full R8X mutation of LIS1 had severe lissencephaly. Subcortical band heterotopia can occur with mosaic mutations of the LIS1 gene. Mutation analysis of LIS1, using highly sensitive techniques such as denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography, should be considered for patients with posteriorly predominant subcortical band heterotopia and pachygyria.

  18. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Random walks as well as diffusions in random media are considered. Methods are developed that allow one to establish large deviation results for both the 'quenched' and the 'averaged' case. Keywords. Large deviations; random walks in a random environment. 1. Introduction. A random walk on Zd is a stochastic ...

  19. RDEL: Restart Differential Evolution algorithm with Local Search Mutation for global numerical optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Wagdy Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel version of Differential Evolution (DE algorithm based on a couple of local search mutation and a restart mechanism for solving global numerical optimization problems over continuous space is presented. The proposed algorithm is named as Restart Differential Evolution algorithm with Local Search Mutation (RDEL. In RDEL, inspired by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, a novel local mutation rule based on the position of the best and the worst individuals among the entire population of a particular generation is introduced. The novel local mutation scheme is joined with the basic mutation rule through a linear decreasing function. The proposed local mutation scheme is proven to enhance local search tendency of the basic DE and speed up the convergence. Furthermore, a restart mechanism based on random mutation scheme and a modified Breeder Genetic Algorithm (BGA mutation scheme is combined to avoid stagnation and/or premature convergence. Additionally, an exponent increased crossover probability rule and a uniform scaling factors of DE are introduced to promote the diversity of the population and to improve the search process, respectively. The performance of RDEL is investigated and compared with basic differential evolution, and state-of-the-art parameter adaptive differential evolution variants. It is discovered that the proposed modifications significantly improve the performance of DE in terms of quality of solution, efficiency and robustness.

  20. Filaggrin mutations are strongly associated with contact sensitization in individuals with dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Linneberg, Allan; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2013-05-01

    Although heterozygous filaggrin gene (FLG) mutation carriers seem to have an increased risk of atopic, irritant and allergic nickel dermatitis, it remains unclear whether the risk of contact sensitization to allergens other than nickel is also elevated in FLG mutation carriers. We hypothesized that heterozygous FLG mutation carriers who suffer from dermatitis will have strongly reduced or even absent filaggrin levels during episodes of inflammation, potentially increasing the penetration of contact allergens, and hence the risk of becoming sensitized. During 2006-2008, 3335 randomly invited 18-69-year-old adult Danes participated in a general health examination, filled out a questionnaire, and were genotyped for the R501X and 2282del4 mutations in FLG. A logistic regression analysis restricted to individuals who reported atopic dermatitis and frequent episodes of hand eczema showed a strong association between FLG mutations and contact sensitization to allergens other than nickel (odds ratio 5.71; 95% confidence interval 1.31-24.94). In participants without dermatitis, no association was found between contact sensitization and FLG mutations. FLG mutation carriers with self-reported dermatitis have an increased risk of contact sensitization to substances other than nickel, whereas FLG mutations alone may not, or may only slightly, increase the risk of sensitization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Canavan disease: a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Harald; Luetschg, Juerg; Hoeliner, Isabella; Kalb, Stefanie; Simma, Burkhard

    2011-10-01

    Canavan disease, an autosomal recessive inherited leukodystrophy caused by an aspartoacylase deficiency, is common among children of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. We report on a non-Jewish female infant who presented at age 6 months with progressive macrocephaly and developmental delay. A sequence analysis of the aspartoacylase gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a known mutation and for the mutation c.432G>A in exon 2, which has not yet been described in Canavan disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy and pseudoxanthoma elasticum can be caused by mutations in either ENPP1 or ABCC6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nitschke, Y.; Baujat, G.; Botschen, U.; Wittkampf, T.; du Moulin, M.; Stella, J.; Le Merrer, M.; Guest, G.; Lambot, K.; Tazarourte-Pinturier, M.F.; Chassaing, N.; Roche, O.; Feenstra, I.; Loechner, K.; Deshpande, C.; Garber, S.J.; Chikarmane, R.; Steinmann, B.; Shahinyan, T.; Martorell, L.; Davies, J.; Smith, W.E.; Kahler, S.G.; McCulloch, M.; Wraige, E.; Loidi, L.; Hohne, W.; Martin, L.; Hadj-Rabia, S.; Terkeltaub, R.; Rutsch, F.

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous pathologic arterial calcifications in childhood can occur in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) or in pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). GACI is associated with biallelic mutations in ENPP1 in the majority of cases, whereas mutations in ABCC6 are known to cause PXE.

  3. The prognostic IDH1( R132 ) mutation is associated with reduced NADP+-dependent IDH activity in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Atai, Nadia A.; Lamba, Simona; Jonker, Ard; Rijkeboer, Denise; Bosch, Klazien S.; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Troost, Dirk; Vandertop, W. Peter; Bardelli, Alberto; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1) occur at high frequency in gliomas and seem to be a prognostic factor for survival in glioblastoma patients. In our set of 98 glioblastoma patients, IDH1 ( R132 ) mutations were associated with improved survival of 1 year on average,

  4. Mechanism for Mutational Inactivation of the Tumor Suppressor Smad2

    OpenAIRE

    Prunier, Celine; Ferrand, Nathalie; Frottier, Bertrand; Pessah, Marcia; Atfi, Azeddine

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a potent natural antiproliferative agent that plays an important role in suppressing tumorigenicity. In numerous tumors, loss of TGF-β responsiveness is associated with inactivating mutations that can occur in components of this signaling pathway, such as the tumor suppressor Smad2. Although a general framework for how Smads transduce TGF-β signals has been proposed, the physiological relevance of alterations of Smad2 functions in promoting tumorigenesi...

  5. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. METHODS: We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging.......5), with progressively severe myoclonus and rare tonic-clonic seizures. Ataxia was present early, but quickly became overshadowed by myoclonus; 10 patients were wheelchair-bound by their late teenage years. Mild cognitive decline occurred in half. Early death was not observed. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed...

  6. Mutation accumulation and the catastrophic senescence of Pacific salmon

    CERN Document Server

    Penna, T J P; Stauffer, D; Stauffer, Dietrich

    1995-01-01

    The bit-string model of biological aging is used to simulate the catastrophic senescence of Pacific Salmon. We have shown that reproduction occuring only once and at a fixed age is the only ingredient needed to explain the catastrophic senescence according the mutation accumulation theory. Several results are presented, some of them with up to 10^8 fishes, showing how the survival rates in catastrophic senescence are affected by changes in the parameters of the model.

  7. nfxB as a novel target for analysis of mutation spectra in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela R Monti

    Full Text Available nfxB encodes a negative regulator of the mexCD-oprJ genes for drug efflux in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Inactivating mutations in this transcriptional regulator constitute one of the main mechanisms of resistance to ciprofloxacin (Cip(r. In this work, we evaluated the use of nfxB/Cip(r as a new test system to study mutation spectra in P. aeruginosa. The analysis of 240 mutations in nfxB occurring spontaneously in the wild-type and mutator backgrounds or induced by mutagens showed that nfxB/Cip(r offers several advantages compared with other mutation detection systems. Identification of nfxB mutations was easy since the entire open reading frame and its promoter region were sequenced from the chromosome using a single primer. Mutations detected in nfxB included all transitions and transversions, 1-bp deletions and insertions, >1-bp deletions and duplications. The broad mutation spectrum observed in nfxB relies on the selection of loss-of-function changes, as we confirmed by generating a structural model of the NfxB repressor and evaluating the significance of each detected mutation. The mutation spectra characterized in the mutS, mutT, mutY and mutM mutator backgrounds or induced by the mutagenic agents 2-aminopurine, cisplatin and hydrogen peroxide were in agreement with their predicted mutational specificities. Additionally, this system allowed the analysis of sequence context effects since point mutations occurred at 85 different sites distributed over the entire nfxB. Significant hotspots and preferred sequence contexts were observed for spontaneous and mutagen-induced mutation spectra. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of a luminescence-based reporter for identification of nfxB mutants previous to sequencing analysis. Thus, the nfxB/Cip(r system in combination with the luminescent reporter may be a valuable tool for studying mutational processes in Pseudomonas spp. wherein the genes encoding the NfxB repressor and

  8. Analysis of the fitness effect of compensatory mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liqing; Watson, Layne T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends previous work on the Darwinian evolutionary fitness effect of the fixation of deleterious mutations by incorporating compensatory mutations, which are mutations (deleterious by themselves) that ameliorate other deleterious mutations, thus reducing the genetic load of populations. Since having compensatory mutations essentially changes the distributional shapes of deleterious mutations, the effect of compensatory mutations is studied by comparing distributions of deleterious...

  9. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  10. Naturally occurring BRCA2 alternative mRNA splicing events in clinically relevant samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackenthal, James D; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Zhang, Bifeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two principal tumour suppressor genes associated with inherited high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Genetic testing of BRCA1/2 will often reveal one or more sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance, some of which may affect normal splicing...... patterns and thereby disrupt gene function. mRNA analyses are therefore among the tests used to interpret the clinical significance of some genetic variants. However, these could be confounded by the appearance of naturally occurring alternative transcripts unrelated to germline sequence variation...... or defects in gene function. To understand which novel splicing events are associated with splicing mutations and which are part of the normal BRCA2 splicing repertoire, a study was undertaken by members of the Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortium...

  11. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam F Greenbury

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps-a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure-to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i If a particular (non-neutral phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i and ii reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration

  12. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Louis, Ard A

    2016-03-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps-a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure-to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  13. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbel Harpak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The site frequency spectrum (SFS has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the "phylogenetically-conditioned SFS" or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC, combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans.

  14. Mutation of NRAS is a Rare Genetic Event in Ovarian Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Deyin; Rahmanto, Yohan Suryo; Zeppernick, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Activating mutations involving the members of the RAS signaling pathway, including KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF, have been reported in ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma and its precursor lesion, serous borderline tumor (SBT). Whether additional genetic alterations in the RAS oncogene family accumulate...... during the progression of serous borderline tumor (SBT) to invasive low grade serous carcinoma (LGSC) remains largely unknown. While mutations of KRAS and BRAF occur at a very early stage of progression, even preceding the development of SBT, additional driving events, such as NRAS mutations, have been...... postulated to facilitate progression. In this study, we analyzed NRAS exon 3 mutational status in 98 cases that were diagnosed with SBT/atypical proliferative serous tumor (SBT/APST), non-invasive LGSC (niLGSC), or invasive LGSC (iLGSC). Of the latter, NRAS Q61R (CAA to CGA) mutations were detected in only 2...

  15. Research progress of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-shan ZHANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gene mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2 mainly occur in astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma and secondary glioblastoma. The IDH1/2 gene mutation can alter proteinase function, consume α-ketoglutarate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-reduced (NADPH and thus produce carcinogenic metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate. The intracellular accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate will induce a series of downstream effects which may result in the development of gliomas mentioned above. Both IDH1/2 mutations and other concomitant hereditary variations are biomarkers for differential diagnosis and IDH1/2 mutations are also independent factors for the prognosis of gliomas. The molecular targeting therapy for IDH1/2 mutations has become the research focus of glioma treatment. This review summarizes the recent progress of this field. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.017

  16. A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation associated with type I-A (tyroinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oetting, W.S.; Witkop, C.J. Jr.; Brown, S.A.; Fryer, J.P.; Bloom, K.E.; King, R.A. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)); Colomer, R. (Servicio Medico de Empressa de la ONCE, Canary Islands (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The authors have determined the mutations in the tyrosinase gene from 12 unrelated Puerto Rican individuals who have type I-A (tyrosinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). All but one individual are of Hispanic descent. Nine individuals were homozygous for a missense mutation (G47D) in exon I at codon 47. Two individuals were heterozygous for the G47D mutation, with one having a missense mutation at codon 373 (T373K) in the homologous allele and the other having an undetermined mutation in the homologous allele. One individual with negroid features was homozygous for a nonsense mutation (W236X). The population migration between Puerto Rico and the Canary Islands is well recognized. Analysis of three individuals with OCA from the Canary Islands showed that one was a compound heterozygote for the G47D mutation and for a novel missense mutation (L216M), one was homozygous for a missense mutation (P81L), and one was heterozygous for the missense mutation P81L. The G47D and P81L missense mutations have been previously described in extended families in the United States. Haplotypes were determined using four polymorphisms linked to the tyrosinase locus. Haplotype analysis showed that the G47D mutation occurred on a single haplotype, consistent with a common founder for all individuals having this mutation. Two different haplotypes were found associated with the P81L mutation, suggesting that this may be either a recurring mutation for the tyrosinase gene or a recombination between haplotypes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Prevalence of von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma: results from the Netherlands cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalken Jack A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biallelic von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene defects, a rate-limiting event in the carcinogenesis, occur in approximately 75% of sporadic clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC. We studied the VHL mutation status in a large population-based case group. Methods Cases were identified within the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer, which includes 120,852 men and women. After 11.3 years of follow-up, 337 incident cases with histologically confirmed epithelial cancers were identified. DNA was isolated from paraffin material collected from 51 pathology laboratories and revised by one pathologist, leaving material from 235 cases. VHL mutational status was assessed by SSCP followed by direct sequencing, after testing SSCP as a screening tool in a subsample. Results The number of mutations was significantly higher for clear-cell RCC compared to other histological types. We observed 131 mutations in 114 out of 187 patients (61% with clear-cell RCC. The majority of mutations were truncating mutations (47%. The mean tumor size was 72.7 mm for mutated tumors compared to 65.3 mm for wildtype tumors (p = 0.06. No statistically significant differences were observed for nuclear grade, TNM distribution or stage. In other histological types, we observed 8 mutations in 7 out of 48 patients (15%, 1 mutation in 1 of 6 oncocytoma, 3 mutations in 2 of 7 chromophobe RCC, 2 mutations in 2 of 30 papillary RCC, no mutations in 1 collecting duct carcinoma and 2 mutations in 2 of 4 unclassified RCC. Conclusion VHL mutations were detected in 61% of sporadic clear-cell RCC. VHL mutated and wildtype clear-cell RCC did not differ with respect to most parameters.

  18. A naturally occurring omega current in a Kv3 family potassium channel from a platyhelminth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Andrew N

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins containing a selective pore that allows permeable ions to transit the membrane in response to a change in the transmembrane voltage. The typical selectivity filter in potassium channels is formed by a tetrameric arrangement of the carbonyl groups of the conserved amino-acid sequence Gly-Tyr-Gly. This canonical pore is opened or closed by conformational changes that originate in the voltage sensor (S4, a transmembrane helix with a series of positively charged amino acids. This sensor moves through a gating pore formed by elements of the S1, S2 and S3 helices, across the plane of the membrane, without allowing ions to pass through the membrane at that site. Recently, synthetic mutagenesis studies in the Drosophila melanogaster Shaker channel and analysis of human disease-causing mutations in sodium channels have identified amino acid residues that are integral parts of the gating-pore; when these residues are mutated the proteins allow a non-specific cation current, known as the omega current, to pass through the gating-pore with relatively low selectivity. Results The N.at-Kv3.2 potassium channel has an unusual weak inward rectifier phenotype. Several mutations of two amino acids in the voltage sensing (S4 transmembrane helix change the phenotype to a typical delayed rectifier. The inward rectifier channels (wild-type and mutant are sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP but not tetra-ethyl ammonium (TEA, whereas the delayed rectifier mutants are sensitive to TEA but not 4-AP. The inward rectifier channels also manifest low cation selectivity. The relative selectivity for different cations is sensitive to specific mutations in the S4 helix, Conclusion N.at-Kv3.2, a naturally occurring potassium channel of the Kv3 sequence family, mediates ion permeation through a modified gating pore, not the canonical, highly selective pore typical of potassium channels. This channel has evolved to

  19. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  20. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  1. Cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of nibrin by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gina; Cilli, Domenica; Berardinelli, Francesco; Viganotti, Mara; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio; di Masi, Alessandra

    2012-10-01

    The Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in NBN gene and characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiations (IR). The N-terminus of nibrin (NBN) contains a tandem breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domain that represents one of the major mediators of phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions in processes related to cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair functions. Patients with NBS compound heterozygous for the 657del5 hypomorphic mutation and for the Arg215Trp missense mutation (corresponding to the 643C>T gene mutation) display a clinical phenotype more severe than that of patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. Here, we show that both the 657del5 and Arg215Trp mutations, occurring within the tandem BRCT domains of NBN, although not altering the assembly of the MRE11/RAD50/NBN (MRN) complex, affect the MRE11 IR-induced nuclear foci (IRIF) formation and the DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling via the phosphorylation of both ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM downstream targets (e.g., SMC1 and p53). Remarkably, data obtained indicate that the cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of NBN by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation. Indeed, the 70-kDa NBN fragment, arising from the 657del5 mutation, maintains the capability to interact with MRE11 and γ-H2AX and to form IRIF. Altogether, the role of the tandem BRCT domains of NBN in the localization of the MRN complex at the DNA DSB and in the activation of the damage response is highlighted. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. THE RATE OF SPONTANEOUS MUTATION

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Rate of Spontaneous Mutation of a Human Gene. (Published on 1935 J. Genet. 31, 317-326). J. B. S. Haldane. J. Genet. Classic Volume 83 Issue 3 December 2004 pp 235-244. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/083/03/0235-0244. Author Affiliations.

  3. Causative mutations in FKBP10

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to the current project, contact was made with medical colleagues in other centres in SA, and they were offered molecular genetic screening for mutations in their patients with OI-3 by the. Division of Human Genetics at UCT. The clinicians caring for affected persons with OI-3 and their families submitted blood or saliva.

  4. Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... thalassemia mutation (3.7 single gene deletions in 1 patient, anti-3.7 gene triplication in 4 patients) was determined at the same time. Finally ... inherited disorder of hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in the world, with gene ..... Peykar DP, Akhavan-Niaki H, Tamaddoni A, Ghawidel-Parsa S, Naieni. KH, Rahmani M ...

  5. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  6. identification of a novel mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in children and it mostly affects the liver, muscle and heart. (Koshy et al. 2006). GSDs can be differentiated ... novel mutation; Azeri Turkish sequencing. Journal of Genetics, DOI 10.1007/s12041-016-0734-y, Vol. ... patients were screened by their physicians at a children's hospital in Tabriz between February 2011 and July ...

  7. [Usefulness of JAK2 mutation assessment in recurrent deep venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacki, J; Carmoi, T; Lecoules, S; Sekkach, Y; Peter, A-L; Billhot, M; Algayres, J-P

    2010-07-01

    The search of JAK2 V617F mutation is a useful tool for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). This case report highlights the potential usefulness of this testing in recurrent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of lower limb. We report a 73-year-old man who presented with three spontaneous episodes of lower limb DVT. The third episode occured while he was receiving fluindione. MPD was suspected because of an increased hematocrit (55 %) and hemoglobin (17g/dl) level. Red cell blood volume was increased and a JAK2 V617F mutation was detected confirming the diagnosis of polycythemia vera. The usefulness of JAK2 mutation for the diagnosis of MPD has been widely demonstrated. Also, some studies confirmed its usefulness in apparently idiopathic abdominal venous thrombosis. This report highlights the possible interest of JAK2 mutation in unexplained recurrent lower limb DVT, especially when it occurs under anticoagulant therapy.

  8. Colorectal cancers from distinct ancestral populations show variations in BRAF mutation frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C Hanna

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated for some cancers that the frequency of somatic oncogenic mutations may vary in ancestral populations. To determine whether key driver alterations might occur at different frequencies in colorectal cancer, we applied a high-throughput genotyping platform (OncoMap to query 385 mutations across 33 known cancer genes in colorectal cancer DNA from 83 Asian, 149 Black and 195 White patients. We found that Asian patients had fewer canonical oncogenic mutations in the genes tested (60% vs Black 79% (P = 0.011 and White 77% (P = 0.015, and that BRAF mutations occurred at a higher frequency in White patients (17% vs Asian 4% (P = 0.004 and Black 7% (P = 0.014. These results suggest that the use of genomic approaches to elucidate the different ancestral determinants harbored by patient populations may help to more precisely and effectively treat colorectal cancer.

  9. Prevalence and implications of TERT promoter mutation in uveal and conjunctival melanoma and in benign and premalignant conjunctival melanocytic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Anna E; Ober, Kimberley; Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Paridaens, Dion; Naus, Nicole C; Belunek, Stephan; Krist, Bart; Post, Edward; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; de Klein, Annelies; Verdijk, Robert M

    2014-08-26

    Hot-spot mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations) occur frequently in cutaneous and conjunctival melanoma and are exceedingly rare in uveal melanoma. No information is available on the presence of these mutations in the conjunctival melanocytic precursor lesion primary acquired melanosis (PAM). We tested a cohort of uveal and conjunctival melanomas as well as conjunctival benign and premalignant melanocytic lesions for TERT promoter mutations in order to elucidate the role of these mutations in tumor progression. TERT promoter mutation analysis on fresh tumor DNA and DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens was performed by SNaPshot analysis in 102 uveal melanomas, 39 conjunctival melanomas, 26 PAM with atypia, 14 PAM without atypia, and 56 conjunctival nevi. Mutations of the TERT promoter were not identified in conjunctival nevi or PAM without atypia, but were detected in 2/25 (8%) of PAM with atypia and 16/39 (41%) of conjunctival melanomas. A single TERT promoter mutation was detected in 102 uveal melanomas (1%). We present the second documented case of TERT promoter mutation in uveal melanoma. In comparison with other types of melanoma, TERT promoter mutations occur at extremely low frequency in uveal melanoma. TERT promoter mutations are frequent in conjunctival melanoma and occur at lower frequency in PAM with atypia but were not detected in benign conjunctival melanocytic lesions. These findings favor a pathogenetic tumor progression role for TERT promoter mutations in conjunctival melanocytic lesions. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  10. Novel mutations highlight the key role of the ankyrin repeat domain in TRPV4-mediated neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jeremy M; Zimanyi, Christina M; Aisenberg, William; Bears, Breanne; Chen, Dong-Hui; Day, John W; Bird, Thomas D; Siskind, Carly E; Gaudet, Rachelle; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2015-12-01

    To characterize 2 novel TRPV4 mutations in 2 unrelated families exhibiting the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C (CMT2C) phenotype. Direct CMT gene testing was performed on 2 unrelated families with CMT2C. A 4-fold symmetric tetramer model of human TRPV4 was generated to map the locations of novel TRPV4 mutations in these families relative to previously identified disease-causing mutations (neuropathy, skeletal dysplasia, and osteoarthropathy). Effects of the mutations on TRPV4 expression, localization, and channel activity were determined by immunocytochemical, immunoblotting, Ca(2+) imaging, and cytotoxicity assays. Previous studies suggest that neuropathy-causing mutations occur primarily at arginine residues on the convex face of the TRPV4 ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). Further highlighting the key role of this domain in TRPV4-mediated hereditary neuropathy, we report 2 novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4-ARD convex face (p.Arg237Gly and p.Arg237Leu). Generation of a model of the TRPV4 homotetramer revealed that while ARD residues mutated in neuropathy (including Arg237) are likely accessible for intermolecular interactions, skeletal dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations occur at sites suggesting disruption of intramolecular and/or intersubunit interactions. Like previously described neuropathy-causing mutations, the p.Arg237Gly and p.Arg237Leu substitutions do not alter TRPV4 subcellular localization in transfected cells but cause elevations of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and marked cytotoxicity. These findings expand the number of ARD residues mutated in TRPV4-mediated neuropathy, providing further evidence of the central importance of this domain to TRPV4 function in peripheral nerve.

  11. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  12. AID-initiated purposeful mutations in immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Myron F; Scharff, Matthew D; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    Exposure brings risk to all living organisms. Using a remarkably effective strategy, higher vertebrates mitigate risk by mounting a complex and sophisticated immune response to counter the potentially toxic invasion by a virtually limitless army of chemical and biological antagonists. Mutations are almost always deleterious, but in the case of antibody diversification there are mutations occurring at hugely elevated rates within the variable (V) and switch regions (SR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that are responsible for binding to and neutralizing foreign antigens throughout the body. These mutations are truly purposeful. This chapter is centered on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID is required for initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the V regions and class switch recombination (CSR) in the SR portions of Ig genes. By converting C --> U, while transcription takes place, AID instigates a cascade of mutational events involving error-prone DNA polymerases, base excision and mismatch repair enzymes, and recombination pathways. Together, these processes culminate in highly mutated antibody genes and the B cells expressing antibodies that have achieved optimal antigenic binding undergo positive selection in germinal centers. We will discuss the biological role of AID in this complex process, primarily in terms of its biochemical properties in relation to SHM in vivo. The chapter also discusses recent advances in experimental methods to characterize antibody dynamics as a function of SHM to help elucidate the role that the AID-induced mutations play in tailoring molecular recognition. The emerging experimental techniques help to address long-standing conundrums concerning evolution-imposed constraints on antibody structure and function.

  13. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  14. OCCURANCE OF HISTAMINE IN FISH PRODUCTS ON MARKET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mancusi, R; Bini, R.M; Cecchini, M; Delle Donne, G; Rosmini, R; Trevisani, M

    2012-01-01

    Histamine fish poisoning is quite common and occur in consequence of microbial decarboxylase whose activity begin early in the post-mortem but are triggered in consequence of abuse in the shelf life of fish products...

  15. Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167078.html Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds ... FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with Parkinson's disease are about four times more likely to ...

  16. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  17. Glomus Tumor of Thumb Occurring at Unusual Location

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . These are benign tumors that arise from one of the subcutaneous glomus bodies. These account for approximately 1% of all hand tumors and occur more commonly in women.[2] Their most common location is the subungual region of digits.

  18. Internet Censorship in China: Where Does the Filtering Occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueyang; Mao, Z. Morley; Halderman, J. Alex

    China filters Internet traffic in and out of the country. In order to circumvent the firewall, it is helpful to know where the filtering occurs. In this work, we explore the AS-level topology of China's network, and probe the firewall to find the locations of filtering devices. We find that even though most filtering occurs in border ASes, choke points also exist in many provincial networks. The result suggests that two major ISPs in China have different approaches placing filtering devices.

  19. Mutations of Different Molecular Origins Exhibit Contrasting Patterns of Regional Substitution Rate Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Navin Elango; Seong-Ho Kim; Eric Vigoda; Yi, Soojin V

    2008-01-01

    Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, referred to as "CpG substitutions", are a major mutational input into vertebrate genomes and a leading cause of human genetic disease. The prevalence of CpG substitutions is due to their mutational origin, which is dependent on DNA methylation. In comparison, other single nucleotide substitutions (for example those occurring at GpC dinucleotides) mainly arise from errors during DNA replication. Here we analyzed high quality BAC-based data from human, chimpanz...

  20. Comparative analysis of the GNAQ, GNA11, SF3B1, and EIF1AX driver mutations in melanoma and across the cancer spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Douglas B.; Roszik, Jason; Shoushtari, Alexander N.; Eroglu, Zeynep; Balko, Justin; Higham, Catherine; Puzanov, Igor; Patel, Sapna P.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Woodman, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is characterized by recurrent mutations in GNAQ, GNA11, SF3B1, and EIF1AX, as well as a low total mutational burden. The frequency and clinical significance of these mutations in non-uveal melanoma and other cancers is not well described. We identified that GNAQ/GNA11 mutations occur in 0.5–1% of non-uveal melanomas and are essentially melanoma-specific. Further, these mutations are associated with a lack of other typical melanoma mutations (BRAF, NRAS, KIT, NF1), a low mutational burden, and, in a small subset, lack of response to immunotherapy. We suggest that GNAQ/GNA11 mutations characterize an uncommon but distinct subtype of non-uveal melanomas. PMID:27089234

  1. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-04-25

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers.

  2. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation...... carrying the prevalent 985A > G mutation are at risk of developing life-threatening attacks. In SCAD/ethylmalonic aciduria, on the other hand, the presence of the prevalent susceptibility variations, 625A and 511T, in the SCAD gene seems to require additional genetic and cellular factors to be present...... in order to result in a phenotype. For the prevalent mutations in the LCHAD and CPT II genes further data are needed to evaluate the penetrance and risk of manifest disease when carrying these mutations. CONCLUSION: Assessment of the prevalence of a prevalent mutation in the mutation spectrum...

  3. Microarray-based mutation detection and phenotypic characterization in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cinoo; Kim, Kwang Joong; Bok, Jeong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Dong-Joon; Oh, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Pyo; Shin, Joo Young; Lee, Jong-Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate microarray-based genotyping technology for the detection of mutations responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to perform phenotypic characterization of patients with pathogenic mutations. Methods DNA from 336 patients with RP and 360 controls was analyzed using the GoldenGate assay with microbeads containing 95 previously reported disease-associated mutations from 28 RP genes. Mutations identified by microarray-based genotyping were confirmed by direct sequencing. Segregation analysis and phenotypic characterization were performed in patients with mutations. The disease severity was assessed by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic perimetry. Results Ten RP-related mutations of five RP genes (PRP3 pre-mRNA processing factor 3 homolog [PRPF3], rhodopsin [RHO], phosphodiesterase 6B [PDE6B], peripherin 2 [PRPH2], and retinitis pigmentosa 1 [RP1]) were identified in 26 of the 336 patients (7.7%) and in six of the 360 controls (1.7%). The p.H557Y mutation in PDE6B, which was homozygous in four patients and heterozygous in nine patients, was the most frequent mutation (2.5%). Mutation segregation was assessed in four families. Among the patients with missense mutations, the most severe phenotype occurred in patients with p.D984G in RP1; less severe phenotypes occurred in patients with p.R135W in RHO; a relatively moderate phenotype occurred in patients with p.T494M in PRPF3, p.H557Y in PDE6B, or p.W316G in PRPH2; and a mild phenotype was seen in a patient with p.D190N in RHO. Conclusions The results reveal that the GoldenGate assay may not be an efficient method for molecular diagnosis in RP patients with rare mutations, although it has proven to be reliable and efficient for high-throughput genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The clinical features varied according to the mutations. Continuous effort to identify novel RP genes and mutations in a population is needed to improve the efficiency and

  4. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Pyloric Atresia and Aplasia Cutis in a Newborn Due to Homozygous Mutation in ITGB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayki, Gozdem; Bozkaya, Davut; Ozaltin, Fatih; Orhan, Diclehan; Kaymaz, Figen; Korkmaz, Emine; Yigit, Sule

    2017-08-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in ITGA6 and/or ITGB4, resulting in altered expression of α6β4 integrin. EB-PA can also occur with aplasia cutis. We present a newborn with EB-PA and aplasia cutis, born of consanguineous parents, with a homozygous c.3793+1G>A mutation affecting ITGB4, previously described only in the heterozygous state with other mutations. The previously unreported homozygous c.3793+1G>A mutation affecting ITGB4 causes a severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia and aplasia cutis.

  5. Heterogeneity in Li-Fraumeni families: p53 mutation analysis and immunohistochemical staining.

    OpenAIRE

    MacGeoch, C; Turner, G; Bobrow, L G; Barnes, D M; Bishop, D T; Spurr, N K

    1995-01-01

    We have screened two families for constitutional TP53 mutations, one family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and the other with features of this syndrome. We report a germline mutation in exon 7 of the TP53 gene in the family with "Li-Fraumeni-like" syndrome. The mutation occurred at codon 245 and causes a Gly-Ser amino acid change. It was inherited by both affected and unaffected subjects. Malignant tumours from all members of this family showed strong positive nuclear immunohistochemical staining ...

  6. Screening for and verification of novel mutations associated with drug resistance in the HIV type 1 subtype B(' in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanping Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mutations associated with HIV drug resistance have been extensively characterized at the HIV-1 polymerase domain, but more studies have verified that mutations outside of the polymerase domain also results in resistance to antiviral drugs. In this study, mutations were identified in 354 patients experiencing antiretroviral therapy (ART failure and in 97 naïve-therapy patients. Mutations whose impact on antiviral drugs was unknown were verified by phenotypic testing. METHODS: Pol sequences of HIV subtype B(' obtained from patients experiencing ART failure and from naïve-therapy patients were analyzed for mutations distinct between two groups. Mutations that occurred at a significantly higher frequency in the ART failure than the naïve-therapy group were submitted to the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database (SHDB to analyze the correlation between HIV mutations and drug resistance. For mutations whose impact on the antiviral drug response is unknown, the site-directed mutagenesis approach was applied to construct plasmids containing the screened mutations. 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50 to AZT, EFV and NVP was measured to determine the response of the genetically constructed viruses to antiviral drugs. RESULTS: 7 mutations at 6 positions of the RT region, D123E, V292I, K366R, T369A, T369V, A371V and I375V, occurred more frequently in the ART failure group than the naïve-therapy group. Phenotypic characterization of these HIV mutants revealed that constructed viruses with mutations A371V and T369V exhibited dual resistance to AZT and EFV respectively, whereas the other 5 mutations showed weak resistance. Although the impact of the other six mutations on response to NVP was minimal, mutation T369V could enhance resistance to NVP. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that mutations at the RT C-terminal in subtype B' could result in resistance to RT inhibitors if the mutations occurred alone, but that some mutations could promote

  7. Mutations in exons 9 and 13 of KIT gene are rare events in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A study of 200 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, J; Wozniak, A; Sarlomo-Rikala, M; Rys, J; Kordek, R; Nassar, A; Sobin, L H; Miettinen, M

    2000-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, typically express the KIT protein. Activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 11) of the c-kit gene have been shown in a subset of GISTs. These mutations lead into ligand-independent activation of the tyrosine kinase of c-kit, and have a transforming effect in vitro. Several groups have studied the clinical implication of the c-kit mutation status of exon 11 in GISTs and a possible relationship between c-kit mutations and malignant behavior has been established. Recently, a 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and missense mutations, 1945A>G in exon 13 of the c-kit gene were reported. The frequency and clinical importance of these findings are unknown. In this study we evaluated 200 GISTs for the presence of mutations in exons 9 and 13 of c-kit. Six cases revealed 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and two cases 1945A>G mutation in exon 13. All tumors with mutations in exon 9 and 13 lacked mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. None of the analyzed tumors had more than one type of c-kit mutation. All but one of the eight tumors with mutations in exon 9 or 13 of the c-kit gene were histologically and clinically malignant. All four of six cases with exon 9 mutation of which location of primary tumor was known, were small intestinal, suggesting that this type of mutation could preferentially occur in small intestinal tumors. Exon 9 and 13 mutations seem to be rare, and they cover only a small portion (8%) of the balance of GISTs that do not have mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. This finding indicates that other genetic alterations may activate c-kit in GISTs, or that KIT is not activated by mutations in all cases.

  8. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P L

    1998-01-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution. PMID:9560365

  9. Spectrum of mutations in CRM-positive and CRM-reduced hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, M.J.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Bi, L.; Antonarakis, S.E. (John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hoyer, L.W. (American Red Cross Blood Services, Rockville, MD (United States)); Inaba, H. (Tokyo Medical College (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    Hemophilia A is due to the functional deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII, gene locus F8C). Although half the patients have no detectable FVIII protein in their plasma, the more rare patients ([approximately]5%) have normal levels of a dysfunctional FVIII and are termed cross-reacting material (CRM)-positive. More commonly ([approximately]45%), patients have plasma FVIII protein reduced to an extent roughly comparable to the level of FVIII activity and are designated CRM-reduced. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations within the F8C gene of 11 patients (6CRM-positive, 5 CRM-reduced) and identified 9 different mutations in 9 patients after analyses of all 26 exons, the promoter region, and the polyadenylation site. Six mutations have not been described previously. Five weree missense (Ser289Leu, Ser558Phe, Val634Ala, Val634Met, Asn1441Lys), and the sixth was a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]Phe652). A review of the literature and the assay of FVIII antigen in 5 hemophilia A patients with previously identified missense mutations from this laboratory yielded a total of 20 other unique CRM-reduced and CRM-positive mutations. Almost all CRM-positive/reduced mutations (24/26) were missense, and many (12/26) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. We examined 19 missense mutation for evolutionary conservation using the portions of the porcine and murine F8C sequences that are known, and 18/19 amino acid residue altered by mutation in these patients wer conserved. Almost 50% of mutations (11/26) clustered in the A2 domain, suggesting that this region is critical for the function of FVIII. The results indicate a nonrandom distribution of mutations and suggest that mutations in a limited number of FVIII regions may cause CRM-positive and CRM-reduced heomphilia A. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Interplay between pleiotropy and secondary selection determines rise and fall of mutators in stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyoung Heo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutators are clones whose mutation rate is about two to three orders of magnitude higher than the rate of wild-type clones and their roles in adaptive evolution of asexual populations have been controversial. Here we address this problem by using an ab initio microscopic model of living cells, which combines population genetics with a physically realistic presentation of protein stability and protein-protein interactions. The genome of model organisms encodes replication controlling genes (RCGs and genes modeling the mismatch repair (MMR complexes. The genotype-phenotype relationship posits that the replication rate of an organism is proportional to protein copy numbers of RCGs in their functional form and there is a production cost penalty for protein overexpression. The mutation rate depends linearly on the concentration of homodimers of MMR proteins. By simulating multiple runs of evolution of populations under various environmental stresses--stationary phase, starvation or temperature-jump--we find that adaptation most often occurs through transient fixation of a mutator phenotype, regardless of the nature of stress. By contrast, the fixation mechanism does depend on the nature of stress. In temperature jump stress, mutators take over the population due to loss of stability of MMR complexes. In contrast, in starvation and stationary phase stresses, a small number of mutators are supplied to the population via epigenetic stochastic noise in production of MMR proteins (a pleiotropic effect, and their net supply is higher due to reduced genetic drift in slowly growing populations under stressful environments. Subsequently, mutators in stationary phase or starvation hitchhike to fixation with a beneficial mutation in the RCGs, (second order selection and finally a mutation stabilizing the MMR complex arrives, returning the population to a non-mutator phenotype. Our results provide microscopic insights into the rise and fall of mutators in

  11. KCNC3: phenotype, mutations, channel biophysics-a study of 260 familial ataxia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P; Minassian, Natali A; Stevanin, Giovanni; Waters, Michael; Garibyan, Vartan; Forlani, Sylvie; Strzelczyk, Adam; Bürk, Katrin; Brice, Alexis; Dürr, Alexandra; Papazian, Diane M; Pulst, Stefan M

    2010-02-01

    We recently identified KCNC3, encoding the Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel, as the gene mutated in SCA13. One g.10684G>A (p.Arg420His) mutation caused late-onset ataxia resulting in a nonfunctional channel subunit with dominant-negative properties. A French early-onset pedigree with mild mental retardation segregated a g.10767T>C (p.Phe448Leu) mutation. This mutation changed the relative stability of the channel's open conformation. Coding exons were amplified and sequenced in 260 autosomal-dominant ataxia index cases of European descent. Functional analyses were performed using expression in Xenopus oocytes. The previously identified p.Arg420His mutation occurred in three families with late-onset ataxia. A novel mutation g.10693G>A (p.Arg423His) was identified in two families with early-onset. In one pedigree, a novel g.10522G>A (p.Arg366His) sequence variant was seen in one index case but did not segregate with affected status in the respective family. In a heterologous expression system, the p.Arg423His mutation exhibited dominant-negative properties. The p.Arg420His mutation, which results in a nonfunctional channel subunit, was recurrent and associated with late-onset progressive ataxia. In two families the p.Arg423His mutation was associated with early-onset slow-progressive ataxia. Despite a phenotype reminiscent of the p.Phe448Leu mutation, segregating in a large early-onset French pedigree, the p.Arg423His mutation resulted in a nonfunctional subunit with a strong dominant-negative effect. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. KCNC3: Phenotype, mutations, channel biophysics – a study of 260 familial ataxia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Minassian, Natali A.; Stevanin, Giovanni; Waters, Michael; Garibyan, Vartan; Forlani, Sylvie; Strzelczyk, Adam; Bűrk, Katrin; Brice, Alexis; Dűrr, Alexandra; Papazian, Diane M.; Pulst, Stefan-M

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified KCNC3, encoding the Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel, as the gene mutated in SCA13. One g.10684G>A (p.Arg420His) mutation caused late-onset ataxia resulting in a non-functional channel subunit with dominant-negative properties. A French early-onset pedigree with mild mental retardation segregated a g.10767T>C (p.Phe448Leu) mutation. This mutation changed the relative stability of the channel’s open conformation. Coding exons were amplified and sequenced in 260 autosomal-dominant ataxia index cases of European descent. Functional analyses were performed using expression in Xenopus oocytes. The previously identified p.Arg420His mutation occurred in three families with late-onset ataxia. A novel mutation g.10693G>A (p.Arg423His) was identified in two families with early-onset. In one pedigree, a novel g.10522G>A (p.Arg366His) sequence variant was seen in one index case but did not segregate with affected status in the respective family. In a heterologous expression system, the p.Arg423His mutation exhibited dominant negative properties. The p.Arg420His mutation, results in a non-functional channel subunit was recurrent and associated with late-onset progressive ataxia. In two families the p.Arg423His mutation was associated with early-onset slow progressive ataxia. Despite a phenotype reminiscent of the p.Phe448Leu mutation, segregating in a large early-onset French pedigree, the p.Arg423His mutation resulted in a nonfunctional subunit with a strong dominant-negative effect. PMID:19953606

  13. Apparent segregation distortion for the SOD1 mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmer, J.B.; Pericak-Vance, M.A. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hentati, A. [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a short duration form onset to death. Approximately 15% of all ALS cases are familial. Of this a subset of families ({approximately}20%) are caused by mutations in the SOD1 gene on chromosome 21. The recent identification of SOD1 as the causative factor in a subset of families has enabled us to classify at-risk as well as symptomatic SOD1 mutation carriers in completed sibships. Our investigations suggest that the transmission of the SOD1 mutation from parent to child occurs substantially more often than 50% of the time. At the present time we have examined this phenomena in 17 SOD1/ALS families with mutations in exons 1 (N=6 families), 2 (N=2), 4 (N=8) and 5 (N=1). In fully ascertained sibships from a mutation-carrying parent, there were 318 offspring available for mutation evaluation. Of these, 195 were found to have the SOD1 mutation, while 123 were without the mutation. These data result in a segregation ratio of 0.61 [chi-square = 16.3, P<0.0001]. Analysis of the individual exon mutation types indicated that the majority of the distortion was occurring in the exon 4 mutation families [chi-square=13.4, p<0.001 vs. non-4, chi-square=4.97, p<0.05]. These findings are of interest in light of the recent report of meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus, a CTG repeat expansion, variable onset, neurological disorder on chromosome 19. Additional SOD1/ALS mutation families are presently under study and these data will be similarily evaluated. Future studies include the genotyping of human sperm specimens for SOD1 mutation-bearing males. The possibility that over 66% of children of a mutation carrier could inherit the mutation preferentially would dramatically alter the counseling risk in such families. These studies provide further evidence of the occurrence of segregation distortion in humans.

  14. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo G Amorim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to

  15. Randomness in retrospect: exploring the interactions between memory and randomness cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivola, Christopher Y; Oppenheimer, Daniel M

    2008-10-01

    People tend to believe that sequences of random events produce fewer and shorter streaks than is actually the case. Although this error has been demonstrated repeatedly and in many forms, nearly all studies of randomness cognition have focused on how people think about random events occurring in the present or future. This article examines how our biased beliefs about randomness interact with properties of memory to influence our judgments about and memory for past random events. We explore this interaction by examining how beliefs about randomness affect our memory for random events and how certain properties of memory alter our tendency to categorize events as random. Across three experiments, we demonstrate an interaction between randomness cognition and three well-established but distinct properties of memory: (1) the reconstructive nature of memory, (2) primacy and recency effects, and (3) duration neglect. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  16. Study of modifiers factors associated to mitochondrial mutations in individuals with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Vanessa Cristine Sousa; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Andrade, Paula Baloni; Câmara, Marília Fontenele; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2009-04-03

    Hearing impairment is the most prevalent sensorial deficit in the general population. Congenital deafness occurs in about 1 in 1000 live births, of which approximately 50% has hereditary cause in development countries. Non-syndromic deafness can be caused by mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mutations in mtDNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic deafness in many families worldwide. However, the nuclear background influences the phenotypic expression of these pathogenic mutations. Indeed, it has been proposed that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in the MTRNR1 gene. The both putative nuclear modifiers genes TRMU and MTO1 encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial related to tRNA modification. It has been hypothesizes that human TRMU and also MTO1 nuclear genes may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of deafness-associated mitochondrial mutations. The aim of this work was to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial mutations, nuclear modifier genes mutations and aminoglycoside exposure in the deafness phenotype. Our findings suggest that the genetic background of individuals may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deafness-associated with mitochondrial mutation and aminoglycoside-induced.

  17. Is mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(UCN)) T7501C mutation associated with cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Huang, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are increasingly recognized as an important cause of cardiovascular diseases, point mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes being the largest group among them. Most recently, mutation at position 7501 in mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene has been reported to be associated with human cardiovascular diseases including cardiomyopathy, sudden cardiac death (SCD) and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). However, its direct pathogenic role remained poorly understood. In this study, we performed an extensive web-based search for the published resources concerning this association. Through the application of bioinformatics tool, we observed that this mutation altered the mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) secondary structure, in addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of this mutation indicated that this mutation is highly conserved between different species. Notably, the T7501C mutation belonging to human mitochondrial haplogroup U8a1a1, a rare subgroup of U8, was present only in European population and was absent in Han Chinese population. Taken together, our result indicated that the T7501C mutation may occur infrequently and was probably pathogenic in cardiovascular disease development.

  18. Animal Models to Study the Mutational Landscape for Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Spiotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cancer is likely caused by alterations in gene structure or expression. Recently, next generation sequencing has documented mutations in 106 head and neck squamous cell cancer genomes, suggesting several new candidate genes. However, it remains difficult to determine which mutations directly contributed to cancer. Here, summarize the animal models which have already validated and may test cancer causing mutations identified by next generation sequencing approaches. Material and Methods: We reviewed the existing literature on genetically engineered mouse models and next generation sequencing (NGS, as it relates to animal models of squamous cell cancers of the head and neck (HNSCC in PubMed. Results: NSG has identified an average of 19 to 130 distinct mutations per HNSCC specimen. While many mutations likely had biological significance, it remains unclear which mutations were essential to, or “drive,” carcinogenesis. In contrast, “passenger” mutations also exist that provide no selection advantage. The genes identified by NGS included p53, RAS, Human Papillomavirus oncogenes, as well as novel genes such as Notch1, Dicer and SYNE1,2. Animal models of HNSCC have already validated some of these common gene mutations identified by NGS. Conclusions: The advent of next generation sequencing will provide new leads to the genetic changes occurring in squamous cell cancers of the head and neck. Animal models will enable us to validate these new leads in order to better elucidate the biology of squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.

  19. A novel autosomal recessive GJA1 missense mutation linked to Craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

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    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1 coding for connexin 43 (Cx43. We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850 and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100, the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated.

  20. A Novel Missense Mutation of GATA4 in a Chinese Family with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Bo; Chen, Sun; Fu, Qihua; Sun, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent type of birth defect in human, with high morbidity in infant. Several genes essential for heart development have been identified. GATA4 is a pivotal transcription factor that can regulate the cardiac development. Many GATA4 mutations have been identified in patients with different types of CHD. In this study, the NKX2-5, HAND1 and GATA4 coding regions were sequenced in a family spanning three generations in which seven patients had CHD. Disease-causing potential variation in this family was evaluated by bioinformatics programs and the transcriptional activity of mutant protein was analyzed by the dual luciferase reporter assay. A novel GATA4 mutation, c.C931T (p.R311W), was identified and co-segregated with the affected patients in this family. The bioinformatics programs predicted this heterozygous mutation to be deleterious and the cross-species alignment of GATA4 sequences showed that the mutation occurred within a highly conserved amino acid. Even though it resided in the nuclear localization signal domain, the mutant protein didn't alter its intracellular distribution. Nevertheless, further luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that the p.R311W mutation reduced the ability of GATA4 to activate its downstream target gene. Our study identified a novel mutation in GATA4 that likely contributed to the CHD in this family. This finding expanded the spectrum of GATA4 mutations and underscored the pathogenic correlation between GATA4 mutations and CHD.

  1. Deriving a mutation index of carcinogenicity using protein structure and protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Espinosa

    Full Text Available With the advent of Next Generation Sequencing the identification of mutations in the genomes of healthy and diseased tissues has become commonplace. While much progress has been made to elucidate the aetiology of disease processes in cancer, the contributions to disease that many individual mutations make remain to be characterised and their downstream consequences on cancer phenotypes remain to be understood. Missense mutations commonly occur in cancers and their consequences remain challenging to predict. However, this knowledge is becoming more vital, for both assessing disease progression and for stratifying drug treatment regimes. Coupled with structural data, comprehensive genomic databases of mutations such as the 1000 Genomes project and COSMIC give an opportunity to investigate general principles of how cancer mutations disrupt proteins and their interactions at the molecular and network level. We describe a comprehensive comparison of cancer and neutral missense mutations; by combining features derived from structural and interface properties we have developed a carcinogenicity predictor, InCa (Index of Carcinogenicity. Upon comparison with other methods, we observe that InCa can predict mutations that might not be detected by other methods. We also discuss general limitations shared by all predictors that attempt to predict driver mutations and discuss how this could impact high-throughput predictions. A web interface to a server implementation is publicly available at http://inca.icr.ac.uk/.

  2. Frequent somatic reversion of KRT1 mutations in ichthyosis with confetti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Keith A; Lu, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Elias, Peter M; Zaidi, Samir; Paller, Amy S; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Crumrine, Debra; Milstone, Leonard M; Lifton, Richard P

    2015-04-01

    Widespread reversion of genetic disease is rare; however, such events are particularly evident in some skin disorders in which normal clones develop on a background of affected skin. We previously demonstrated that mutations in keratin 10 (KRT10) cause ichthyosis with confetti (IWC), a severe dominant disorder that is characterized by progressive development of hundreds of normal skin spots via revertant mosaicism. Here, we report on a clinical and histological IWC subtype in which affected subjects have red, scaly skin at birth, experience worsening palmoplantar keratoderma in childhood, and develop hundreds of normal skin spots, beginning at around 20 years of age, that increase in size and number over time. We identified a causal de novo mutation in keratin 1 (KRT1). Similar to IWC-causing KRT10 mutations, this mutation in KRT1 resulted in a C-terminal frameshift, replacing 22 C-terminal amino acids with an alternate 30-residue peptide. Mutant KRT1 caused partial collapse of the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network and mislocalized to the nucleus. As with KRT10 mutations causing IWC, reversion of KRT1 mutations occurred via mitotic recombination. Because reversion is not observed with other disease-causing keratin mutations, the results of this study implicate KRT1 and KRT10 C-terminal frameshift mutations in the high frequency of revertant mosaicism in IWC.

  3. Biological evolution model with conditional mutation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Ghazaryan, Makar; Bratus, Alexander; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2017-05-01

    We consider an evolution model, in which the mutation rates depend on the structure of population: the mutation rates from lower populated sequences to higher populated sequences are reduced. We have applied the Hamilton-Jacobi equation method to solve the model and calculate the mean fitness. We have found that the modulated mutation rates, directed to increase the mean fitness.

  4. DNA evolved to minimize frameshift mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Agoni, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Point mutations can surely be dangerous but what is worst than to lose the reading frame?! Does DNA evolved a strategy to try to limit frameshift mutations?! Here we investigate if DNA sequences effectively evolved a system to minimize frameshift mutations analyzing the transcripts of proteins with high molecular weights.

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    patient education Fact Sheet PFS007: BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations OCTOBER 2017 BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations Cancer is caused by several different factors. A ... parent to child. Changes in genes are called mutations . Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is ...

  6. Heterogeneity within AML with CEBPA mutations; only CEBPA double mutations, but not single CEBPA mutations are associated with favourable prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pabst, T; Eyholzer, M; Fos, J; Mueller, B U

    2009-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) mutations in AML are associated with favourable prognosis and are divided into N- and C-terminal mutations. The majority of AML patients have both types of mutations. We assessed the prognostic significance of single (n=7) and double (n=12) CEBPA mutations among 224 AML patients. Double CEBPA mutations conferred a decisively favourable overall (P=0.006) and disease-free survival (P=0.013). However, clinical outcome of patients with single CEBPA mut...

  7. Phage-associated mutator phenotype in group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julie; Thompson-Mayberry, Prestina; Lahmamsi, Stephanie; King, Catherine J; McShan, W Michael

    2008-10-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) occur frequently in natural populations of pathogenic and commensal bacteria, resulting in a mutator phenotype. We identified a unique genetic element in Streptococcus pyogenes strain SF370 that controls MMR via a dynamic process of prophage excision and re