WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomly located releases

  1. Competitive Facility Location with Fuzzy Random Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2010-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops, with uncertainty and vagueness including demands for the facilities in a plane. By representing the demands for facilities as fuzzy random variables, the location problem can be formulated as a fuzzy random programming problem. For solving the fuzzy random programming problem, first the α-level sets for fuzzy numbers are used for transforming it to a stochastic programming problem, and secondly, by using their expectations and variances, it can be reformulated to a deterministic programming problem. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic oscillation. The efficiency of the proposed method is shown by applying it to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  2. Competitive Facility Location with Random Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops and stores, with uncertain demands in the plane. By representing the demands for facilities as random variables, the location problem is formulated to a stochastic programming problem, and for finding its solution, three deterministic programming problems: expectation maximizing problem, probability maximizing problem, and satisfying level maximizing problem are considered. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic vibration. Efficiency of the solution method is shown by applying to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  3. Use of Particle Tracking to Determine Optimal Release Dates and Locations for Rehabilitated Neonate Sea Turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A. Robson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea turtles found stranded on beaches are often rehabilitated before being released back into the wild. The location and date of release is largely selected on an informal basis, which may not maximize the chance of survival. As oceanic conditions have a large influence on the movements of neonate sea turtles, this study aimed to identify the best locations and months to release rehabilitated sea turtles that would assist in their transport by ocean currents to the habitat and thermal conditions required for their survival. A particle tracking model, forced by ocean surface velocity fields, was used to simulate the dispersal pathways of millions of passively drifting particles released from different locations in Western Australia. The particles represented rehabilitated, neonate turtles requiring oceanic habitats [green (Chelonia mydas, hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata and loggerheads (Caretta caretta] and flatback turtles (Natator depressus which require neritic habitats. The results clearly identified regions and months where ocean currents were more favorable for transport to suitable habitats. Tantabiddi, near Exmouth on the north-west coast, was consistently the best location for release for the oceanic species, with dominant offshore-directed currents and a very narrow continental shelf reducing the time taken for particles to be transported into deep water. In contrast, release locations with more enclosed geography, wide continental shelves, and/or proximity to cooler ocean temperatures were less successful. Our results produced a decision support system for the release of neonate marine turtles in Western Australia and our particle tracking approach has global transferability.

  4. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  5. School-Located Influenza Vaccinations: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Schaffer, Stanley; Rand, Cynthia M; Vincelli, Phyllis; Eagan, Ashley; Goldstein, Nicolas P N; Hightower, A Dirk; Younge, Mary; Blumkin, Aaron; Albertin, Christina S; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Humiston, Sharon G

    2016-11-01

    Assess impact of offering school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) clinics using both Web-based and paper consent upon overall influenza vaccination rates among elementary school children. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial (stratified by suburban/urban districts) in upstate New York in 2014-2015. We randomized 44 elementary schools, selected similar pairs of schools within districts, and allocated schools to SLIV versus usual care (control). Parents of children at SLIV schools were sent information and vaccination consent forms via e-mail, backpack fliers, or both (depending on school preferences) regarding school vaccine clinics. Health department nurses conducted vaccine clinics and billed insurers. For all children registered at SLIV/control schools, we compared receipt of influenza vaccination anywhere (primary outcome). The 44 schools served 19 776 eligible children in 2014-2015. Children in SLIV schools had higher influenza vaccination rates than children in control schools county-wide (54.1% vs 47.4%, P vaccination in previous season) confirmed bivariate findings. Among parents who consented for SLIV, nearly half of those notified by backpack fliers and four-fifths of those notified by e-mail consented online. In suburban districts, SLIV did not substitute for primary care influenza vaccination. In urban schools, some substitution occurred. SLIV raised seasonal influenza vaccination rates county-wide and in both suburban and urban settings. SLIV did not substitute for primary care vaccinations in suburban settings where pediatricians often preorder influenza vaccine but did substitute somewhat in urban settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Role of origin and release location in pre-spawning distribution and movements of anadromous alewife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Holly J.; Mather, M. E.; Smith, Joseph M.; Muth, Robert M.; Finn, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Capturing adult anadromous fish that are ready to spawn from a self sustaining population and transferring them into a depleted system is a common fisheries enhancement tool. The behaviour of these transplanted fish, however, has not been fully evaluated. The movements of stocked and native anadromous alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus (Wilson), were monitored in the Ipswich River, Massachusetts, USA, to provide a scientific basis for this management tool. Radiotelemetry was used to examine the effect of origin (native or stocked) and release location (upstream or downstream) on distribution and movement during the spawning migration. Native fish remained in the river longer than stocked fish regardless of release location. Release location and origin influenced where fish spent time and how they moved. The spatial mosaic of available habitats and the entire trajectory of freshwater movements should be considered to restore effectively spawners that traverse tens of kilometres within coastal rivers.

  7. Physiochemical Control of Composition and Location for Fundamental Studies of Biofouling Resistant, High Fouling Release Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    brushes with chemically complex architectures. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS Polymer Brushes; Lithography; Patterning; Photochemistry; Flow Chemistry ; Anti-Fouling...Location for Fundamental Studies of Biofouling Resistant, High Fouling Release Surfaces Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-15-1-2281 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...dial in any desirable surface property with precise spatial control. This enables the continuous fabrication of hierarchically patterned polymer

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Methadone Maintenance for Prisoners: Results at One-Month Post- Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O’Grady, Kevin; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.; Wilson, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite its effectiveness, methadone maintenance is rarely provided in American correctional facilities. This study is the first randomized clinical trial in the US to examine the effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment provided to prisoners with pre-incarceration heroin addiction. Methods A three-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between September 2003 and June 2005. Two hundred-eleven Baltimore pre-release inmates who were heroin dependent during the year prior to incarceration were enrolled in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to the following: Counseling Only: counseling in prison, with passive referral to treatment upon release (n = 70); Counseling + Transfer: counseling in prison with transfer to methadone maintenance treatment upon release (n = 70); and Counseling + Methadone: methadone maintenance and counseling in prison, continued in a community-based methadone maintenance program upon release (n = 71). Results Two hundred participants were located for follow-up interviews and included in the current analysis. The percentages of participants in each condition that entered community-based treatment were, respectively, Counseling Only 7.8%, Counseling + Transfer 50.0%, and Counseling + Methadone 68.6%, p prison appears to have beneficial short-term impact on community treatment entry and heroin use. This intervention may be able to fill an urgent treatment need for prisoners with heroin addiction histories. PMID:17628351

  9. Effectiveness of myofascial release: systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajimsha, M S; Al-Mudahka, Noora R; Al-Madzhar, J A

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial release (MFR) is a form of manual therapy that involves the application of a low load, long duration stretch to the myofascial complex, intended to restore optimal length, decrease pain, and improve function. Anecdotal evidence shows great promise for MFR as a treatment for various conditions. However, research to support the anecdotal evidence is lacking. To critically analyze published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the effectiveness of MFR as a treatment option for different conditions. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), with key words myofascial release and myofascial release therapy. No date limitations were applied to the searches. Articles were selected based upon the use of the term myofascial release in the abstract or key words. The final selection was made by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text. Studies were included if they were English-language, peer-reviewed RCTs on MFR for various conditions and pain. Data collected were number of participants, condition being treated, treatment used, control group, outcome measures and results. Studies were analyzed using the PEDro scale and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence scale. The literature regarding the effectiveness of MFR was mixed in both quality and results. Although the quality of the RCT studies varied greatly, the result of the studies was encouraging, particularly with the recently published studies. MFR is emerging as a strategy with a solid evidence base and tremendous potential. The studies in this review may help as a respectable base for the future trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Probabilistic Analysis of Facility Location on Random Shortest Path Metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, Stefan; Manthey, Bodo

    The facility location problem is an NP-hard optimization problem. Therefore, approximation algorithms are often used to solve large instances. Probabilistic analysis is a widely used tool to analyze such algorithms. Most research on probabilistic analysis of NP-hard optimization problems involving

  11. Spatial location identification of structural nonlinearities from random data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, A.; Magnevall, M.; Ahlin, K.; Broman, G.

    2012-02-01

    With growing demands on product performance and growing complexity of engineering structures, efficient tools for analyzing their dynamic behavior are essential. Linear techniques are well developed and often utilized. However, sometimes the errors due to linearization are too large to be acceptable, making it necessary to take nonlinear effects into account. In many practical applications it is common and reasonable to assume that the nonlinearities are highly local and thus only affect a limited set of spatial coordinates. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach to finding the spatial location of nonlinearities from measurement data, as this may not always be known beforehand. This information can be used to separate the underlying linear system from the nonlinear parts and create mathematical models for efficient parameter estimation and simulation. The presented approach builds on the reverse-path methodology and utilizes the coherence functions to determine the location of nonlinear elements. A systematic search with Multiple Input/Single Output models is conducted in order to find the nonlinear functions that best describe the nonlinear restoring forces. The obtained results indicate that the presented approach works well for identifying the location of local nonlinearities in structures. It is verified by simulation data from a cantilever beam model with two local nonlinearities and experimental data from a T-beam experimental set-up with a single local nonlinearity. A possible drawback is that a relatively large amount of data is needed. Advantages of the approach are that it only needs a single excitation point that response data at varying force amplitudes is not needed and that no prior information about the underlying linear system is needed.

  12. The release and characterization of some periplasm-located enzymes of Pseudomona aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, A R; DeVoe, I W; Ingram, J M

    1976-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 9027) releases four periplasm-located enzymes, i.e., ribonuclease (EC 3.1.4.22; EC 3.1.4.23), alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), cyclic-2', 3'-phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.d), and 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5) into the medium during growth. Ribonuclease and alkaline phosphatase are classed as enzymes which are readily extracted by osmotic shock and spheroplast formation whereas cyclic-2',3'-phosphodiesterase and 5'-nucleotidase are classed as enzymes which are not readily extracted by these procedures. In view of the relative ease of extraction of the former enzymes it is suggested that the lattter enzymes, cyclic-2',3'-phosphodiesterase and 5'-nucleotidase, are bound and located in the periplasm in a manner different to ribonuclease and alkaline phosphatase.

  13. Bayesian inverse modeling and source location of an unintended 131I release in Europe in the fall of 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tichý

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the fall of 2011, iodine-131 (131I was detected at several radionuclide monitoring stations in central Europe. After investigation, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA was informed by Hungarian authorities that 131I was released from the Institute of Isotopes Ltd. in Budapest, Hungary. It was reported that a total activity of 342 GBq of 131I was emitted between 8 September and 16 November 2011. In this study, we use the ambient concentration measurements of 131I to determine the location of the release as well as its magnitude and temporal variation. As the location of the release and an estimate of the source strength became eventually known, this accident represents a realistic test case for inversion models. For our source reconstruction, we use no prior knowledge. Instead, we estimate the source location and emission variation using only the available 131I measurements. Subsequently, we use the partial information about the source term available from the Hungarian authorities for validation of our results. For the source determination, we first perform backward runs of atmospheric transport models and obtain source-receptor sensitivity (SRS matrices for each grid cell of our study domain. We use two dispersion models, FLEXPART and Hysplit, driven with meteorological analysis data from the global forecast system (GFS and from European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF weather forecast models. Second, we use a recently developed inverse method, least-squares with adaptive prior covariance (LS-APC, to determine the 131I emissions and their temporal variation from the measurements and computed SRS matrices. For each grid cell of our simulation domain, we evaluate the probability that the release was generated in that cell using Bayesian model selection. The model selection procedure also provides information about the most suitable dispersion model for the source term reconstruction. Third, we select the most

  14. Bayesian inverse modeling and source location of an unintended 131I release in Europe in the fall of 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek; Šindelářová, Kateřina; Hýža, Miroslav; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    In the fall of 2011, iodine-131 (131I) was detected at several radionuclide monitoring stations in central Europe. After investigation, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was informed by Hungarian authorities that 131I was released from the Institute of Isotopes Ltd. in Budapest, Hungary. It was reported that a total activity of 342 GBq of 131I was emitted between 8 September and 16 November 2011. In this study, we use the ambient concentration measurements of 131I to determine the location of the release as well as its magnitude and temporal variation. As the location of the release and an estimate of the source strength became eventually known, this accident represents a realistic test case for inversion models. For our source reconstruction, we use no prior knowledge. Instead, we estimate the source location and emission variation using only the available 131I measurements. Subsequently, we use the partial information about the source term available from the Hungarian authorities for validation of our results. For the source determination, we first perform backward runs of atmospheric transport models and obtain source-receptor sensitivity (SRS) matrices for each grid cell of our study domain. We use two dispersion models, FLEXPART and Hysplit, driven with meteorological analysis data from the global forecast system (GFS) and from European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) weather forecast models. Second, we use a recently developed inverse method, least-squares with adaptive prior covariance (LS-APC), to determine the 131I emissions and their temporal variation from the measurements and computed SRS matrices. For each grid cell of our simulation domain, we evaluate the probability that the release was generated in that cell using Bayesian model selection. The model selection procedure also provides information about the most suitable dispersion model for the source term reconstruction. Third, we select the most probable location of

  15. Fault-Tolerant Facility Location: A Randomized Dependent LP-Rounding Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrka, Jaroslaw; Srinivasan, Aravind; Swamy, Chaitanya

    We give a new randomized LP-rounding 1.725-approximation algorithm for the metric Fault-Tolerant Uncapacitated Facility Location problem. This improves on the previously best known 2.076-approximation algorithm of Swamy & Shmoys. To the best of our knowledge, our work provides the first application of a dependent-rounding technique in the domain of facility location. The analysis of our algorithm benefits from, and extends, methods developed for Uncapacitated Facility Location; it also helps uncover new properties of the dependent-rounding approach.

  16. Location and multi-depot vehicle routing for emergency vehicles using tour coverage and random sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Goli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Distribution and optimum allocation of emergency resources are the most important tasks, which need to be accomplished during crisis. When a natural disaster such as earthquake, flood, etc. takes place, it is necessary to deliver rescue efforts as quickly as possible. Therefore, it is important to find optimum location and distribution of emergency relief resources. When a natural disaster occurs, it is not possible to reach some damaged areas. In this paper, location and multi-depot vehicle routing for emergency vehicles using tour coverage and random sampling is investigated. In this study, there is no need to visit all the places and some demand points receive their needs from the nearest possible location. The proposed study is implemented for some randomly generated numbers in different sizes. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed method was capable of reaching desirable solutions in reasonable amount of time.

  17. Identify source location and release time for pollutants undergoing super-diffusion and decay: Parameter analysis and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Sun, HongGuang; Lu, Bingqing; Garrard, Rhiannon; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2017-09-01

    Backward models have been applied for four decades by hydrologists to identify the source of pollutants undergoing Fickian diffusion, while analytical tools are not available for source identification of super-diffusive pollutants undergoing decay. This technical note evaluates analytical solutions for the source location and release time of a decaying contaminant undergoing super-diffusion using backward probability density functions (PDFs), where the forward model is the space fractional advection-dispersion equation with decay. Revisit of the well-known MADE-2 tracer test using parameter analysis shows that the peak backward location PDF can predict the tritium source location, while the peak backward travel time PDF underestimates the tracer release time due to the early arrival of tracer particles at the detection well in the maximally skewed, super-diffusive transport. In addition, the first-order decay adds additional skewness toward earlier arrival times in backward travel time PDFs, resulting in a younger release time, although this impact is minimized at the MADE-2 site due to tritium's half-life being relatively longer than the monitoring period. The main conclusion is that, while non-trivial backward techniques are required to identify pollutant source location, the pollutant release time can and should be directly estimated given the speed of the peak resident concentration for super-diffusive pollutants with or without decay.

  18. APPROXIMATION TO OPTIMAL STOPPING RULES FOR GUMBEL RANDOM VARIABLES WITH UNKNOWN LOCATION AND SCALE PARAMETERS

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Tzu-Sheng; Lee, Shen-Ming

    2006-01-01

    An optimal stopping rule is a rule that stops the sampling process at a sample size n that maximizes the expected reward. In this paper we will study the approximation to optimal stopping rule for Gumbel random variables, because the Gumbel-type distribution is the most commonly referred to in discussions of extreme values. Let $X_1, X_2,\\cdots X_n,\\cdots$ be independent, identically distributed Gumbel random variables with unknown location and scale parameters,$\\alpha$ and $\\beta$. If we def...

  19. Distributed Detection of Randomly Located Targets in Mobility-Assisted Sensor Networks with Node Mobility Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaweera SudharmanK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance gain achieved by adding mobile nodes to a stationary sensor network for target detection depends on factors such as the number of mobile nodes deployed, mobility patterns, speed and energy constraints of mobile nodes, and the nature of the target locations (deterministic or random. In this paper, we address the problem of distributed detection of a randomly located target by a hybrid sensor network. Specifically, we develop two decision-fusion architectures for detection where in the first one, impact of node mobility is taken into account for decisions updating at the fusion center, while in the second model the impact of node mobility is taken at the node level decision updating. The cost of deploying mobile nodes is analyzed in terms of the minimum fraction of mobile nodes required to achieve the desired performance level within a desired delay constraint. Moreover, we consider managing node mobility under given constraints.

  20. 77 FR 23409 - Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting for Facilities Located in Indian Country and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, is not placed on the Internet and will be... the issuance of any patent, and including rights-of-way running through the reservation; all dependent... the software tools with which individuals can access and analyze the releases on or near their...

  1. A randomized clinical trial of methadone maintenance for prisoners: findings at 6 months post-release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims This study examined the effectiveness of methadone maintenance initiated prior to or just after release from prison at 6 months post-release. Design A three-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between September 2003 and June 2005. Setting A Baltimore pre-release prison. Participants Two hundred and eleven adult pre-release inmates who were heroin-dependent during the year prior to incarceration. Intervention Participants were assigned randomly to the following: counseling only: counseling in prison, with passive referral to treatment upon release (n = 70); counseling + transfer: counseling in prison with transfer to methadone maintenance treatment upon release (n = 70); and counseling + methadone: methadone maintenance and counseling in prison, continued in a community-based methadone maintenance program upon release (n = 71). Measurements Addiction Severity Index at study entry and follow-up. Additional assessments at 6 months post-release were treatment record review; urine drug testing for opioids, cocaine and other illicit drugs. Findings Counseling + methadone participants were significantly more likely than both counseling only and counseling + transfer participants to be retained in drug abuse treatment (P = 0.0001) and significantly less likely to have an opioid-positive urine specimen compared to counseling only participants (P = 0.002). Furthermore, counseling + methadone participants reported significantly fewer days of involvement in self-reported heroin use and criminal activity than counseling only participants. Conclusions Methadone maintenance, initiated prior to or immediately after release from prison, increases treatment entry and reduces heroin use at 6 months post-release compared to counseling only. This intervention may be able to fill an urgent treatment need for prisoners with heroin addiction histories. PMID:18855822

  2. Selection of locations of knots for linear splines in random regression test-day models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrozik, J; Bohmanova, J; Schaeffer, L R

    2010-04-01

    Using spline functions (segmented polynomials) in regression models requires the knowledge of the location of the knots. Knots are the points at which independent linear segments are connected. Optimal positions of knots for linear splines of different orders were determined in this study for different scenarios, using existing estimates of covariance functions and an optimization algorithm. The traits considered were test-day milk, fat and protein yields, and somatic cell score (SCS) in the first three lactations of Canadian Holsteins. Two ranges of days in milk (from 5 to 305 and from 5 to 365) were taken into account. In addition, four different populations of Holstein cows, from Australia, Canada, Italy and New Zealand, were examined with respect to first lactation (305 days) milk only. The estimates of genetic and permanent environmental covariance functions were based on single- and multiple-trait test-day models, with Legendre polynomials of order 4 as random regressions. A differential evolution algorithm was applied to find the best location of knots for splines of orders 4 to 7 and the criterion for optimization was the goodness-of-fit of the spline covariance function. Results indicated that the optimal position of knots for linear splines differed between genetic and permanent environmental effects, as well as between traits and lactations. Different populations also exhibited different patterns of optimal knot locations. With linear splines, different positions of knots should therefore be used for different effects and traits in random regression test-day models when analysing milk production traits.

  3. Opioid treatment at release from jail using extended-release naltrexone: a pilot proof-of-concept randomized effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joshua D; McDonald, Ryan; Grossman, Ellie; McNeely, Jennifer; Laska, Eugene; Rotrosen, John; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2015-06-01

    Relapse to addiction following incarceration is common. We estimated the feasibility and effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) as relapse prevention among opioid-dependent male adults leaving a large urban jail. Eight-week, proof-of-concept, open-label, non-blinded randomized effectiveness trial. New York City jails and Bellevue Hospital Center Adult Primary Care clinics, USA. From January 2010 to July 2013, 34 opioid-dependent adult males with no stated interest in agonist treatments (methadone, buprenorphine) received a counseling and referral intervention and were randomized to XR-NTX (n = 17) versus no medication (n = 17) within one week prior to jail release. XR-NTX (Vivitrol(®) ; Alkermes Inc.), a long-acting injectable mu opioid receptor antagonist. The primary intent-to-treat outcome was post-release opioid relapse at week 4, defined as ≥10 days of opioid misuse by self-report and urine toxicologies. Secondary outcomes were proportion of urine samples negative for opioids and rates of opioid abstinence, intravenous drug use (IVDU), cocaine use, community treatment participation, re-incarceration and overdose. Acceptance of XR-NTX was high; 15 of 17 initiated treatment. Rates of the primary outcome of week 4 opioid relapse were lower among XR-NTX participants: 38 versus 88% [P<0.004; odds ratio (OR) = 0.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.01-0.48]; more XR-NTX urine samples were negative for opioids, 59 versus 29% (P<0.009; OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.4-8.5). There were no significant differences in the remaining secondary outcomes, including rates of IVDU, cocaine use, re-incarceration and overdose. Extended-release naltrexone is associated with significantly lower rates of opioid relapse among men in the United States following release from jail when compared with a no medication treatment-as-usual condition. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Covert Communication in MIMO-OFDM System Using Pseudo Random Location of Fake Subcarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Pratama Hudhajanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM is the most used wireless transmission scheme in the world. However, its security is the interesting problem to discuss if we want to use this scheme to transmit a sensitive data, such as in the military and commercial communication systems. In this paper, we propose a new method to increase the security of MIMO-OFDM system using the change of location of fake subcarrier. The fake subcarriers’ location is generated per packet of data using Pseudo Random sequence generator. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme does not decrease the performance of conventional MIMO-OFDM. The attacker or eavesdropper gets worse Bit Error Rate (BER than the legal receiver compared to the conventional MIMO-OFDM system.

  5. All-Direction Random Routing for Source-Location Privacy Protecting against Parasitic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Zeng, Jiwen

    2017-03-17

    Wireless sensor networks are deployed to monitor the surrounding physical environments and they also act as the physical environments of parasitic sensor networks, whose purpose is analyzing the contextual privacy and obtaining valuable information from the original wireless sensor networks. Recently, contextual privacy issues associated with wireless communication in open spaces have not been thoroughly addressed and one of the most important challenges is protecting the source locations of the valuable packages. In this paper, we design an all-direction random routing algorithm (ARR) for source-location protecting against parasitic sensor networks. For each package, the routing process of ARR is divided into three stages, i.e., selecting a proper agent node, delivering the package to the agent node from the source node, and sending it to the final destination from the agent node. In ARR, the agent nodes are randomly chosen in all directions by the source nodes using only local decisions, rather than knowing the whole topology of the networks. ARR can control the distributions of the routing paths in a very flexible way and it can guarantee that the routing paths with the same source and destination are totally different from each other. Therefore, it is extremely difficult for the parasitic sensor nodes to trace the packages back to the source nodes. Simulation results illustrate that ARR perfectly confuses the parasitic nodes and obviously outperforms traditional routing-based schemes in protecting source-location privacy, with a marginal increase in the communication overhead and energy consumption. In addition, ARR also requires much less energy than the cloud-based source-location privacy protection schemes.

  6. Areal location of hazardous atmospheres simulation on toxic chemical release: A scenario-based case study from Ray, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Farin; Ardalan, Ali; Aguirre, Benigno; Mansouri, Nabiollah; Mohammadfam, Iraj

    2017-10-01

    Chemical accidents cause significant danger for residents living close to chemical facilities. For this reason, this study assessed the impacts of a simulated chemical accident on surrounding residents in the city of Ray, Iran. In this scenario-based case study in 2015, the Areal Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA) model was applied to simulate a toxic chemical release from a chlorine warehouse in Shourabad, Ray, Iran. The population of the area was calculated based on the latest census in Iran, 2011. The atmospheric variables included were wind speed, air temperature, and relative humidity. We also included data on pollution source such as diameter, length and volume, and condition of chemicals. The simulation was repeated for each seasonal period. The simulated threat zones were mapped using Geographical Information System. The percentage of residents sustaining injuries and death was calculated using probit. The maximum and minimum simulated threat zones by chlorine release are during summer and winter at 8.8 and 6.4 kilometers respectively. The total affected population was estimated at approximately 30,000 people. The greater percent of injuries and death was estimated to occur in the winter and autumn, compared to summer and spring, because of greater climatic instability. The number of individuals affected by chlorine release in the spring, summer, autumn and winter at 8.3, 8.8, 7.6 and 6.4 kilometers, are estimated at 22,500, 25,000, 28,100 and 27,500, respectively. Populations located in hot and warm zones of toxic chemical releases should have access to medical resources. The results showed that relevant factors impact human vulnerability, and these should be examined to mitigate the harmful consequences of chemical accidents. Establishing a multi-level Emergency Response Program is also recommended in the area under study.

  7. Once-Daily, Controlled-Release Tramadol and Sustained-Release Diclofenac Relieve Chronic Pain due to Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André D Beaulieu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study was a randomized, parallel, double-blind comparison between controlled-release (CR tramadol and sustained-release (SR diclofenac in patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis of the hips and/or knees.

  8. Network Location-Aware Service Recommendation with Random Walk in Cyber-Physical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuyu; Yu, Fangzheng; Xu, Yueshen; Yu, Lifeng; Mu, Jinglong

    2017-09-08

    Cyber-physical systems (CPS) have received much attention from both academia and industry. An increasing number of functions in CPS are provided in the way of services, which gives rise to an urgent task, that is, how to recommend the suitable services in a huge number of available services in CPS. In traditional service recommendation, collaborative filtering (CF) has been studied in academia, and used in industry. However, there exist several defects that limit the application of CF-based methods in CPS. One is that under the case of high data sparsity, CF-based methods are likely to generate inaccurate prediction results. In this paper, we discover that mining the potential similarity relations among users or services in CPS is really helpful to improve the prediction accuracy. Besides, most of traditional CF-based methods are only capable of using the service invocation records, but ignore the context information, such as network location, which is a typical context in CPS. In this paper, we propose a novel service recommendation method for CPS, which utilizes network location as context information and contains three prediction models using random walking. We conduct sufficient experiments on two real-world datasets, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods and verify that the network location is indeed useful in QoS prediction.

  9. Volatiles released by Chinese liquorice roots mediate host location behaviour by neonate Porphyrophora sophorae (Hemiptera: Margarodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Fu; Chen, Hong-Hao; Li, Jun-Kai; Zhang, Rong; Turlings, Ted Cj; Chen, Li

    2016-10-01

    The cochineal scale, Porphyrophora sophorae (Hemiptera: Coccoidea, Margarodidae), is one of the most serious arthropod pests of Chinese liquorice, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (Fabaceae), an important medicinal herb. The adult females tend to deposit the ovisacs in soil relatively far away from liquorice plants. After hatching, neonates move out of the soil and may use chemical cues to search for new hosts. We collected and analysed the volatiles from soils with and without liquorice roots, and chromatographic profiles revealed hexanal, β-pinene and hexanol as potential host-finding cues for P. sphorae. The attractiveness of these compounds to neonates was studied in the laboratory using four-arm olfactometer bioassays. The larvae showed a clear preference for β-pinene over hexanal and hexanol, as well as all possible combinations of the three compounds. In addition, a field experiment confirmed that β-pinene was significantly more attractive than hexanal and hexanol. Newly eclosed larvae of P. sphorae exploit root volatiles as chemical cues to locate their host plant. β-Pinene proved to be the major chemical cue used by P. sphorae neonates searching for roots of their host plant. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A hybrid flower pollination algorithm based modified randomized location for multi-threshold medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhou, Yongquan; Zhao, Chengyan; Wu, Haizhou

    2015-01-01

    Multi-threshold image segmentation is a powerful image processing technique that is used for the preprocessing of pattern recognition and computer vision. However, traditional multilevel thresholding methods are computationally expensive because they involve exhaustively searching the optimal thresholds to optimize the objective functions. To overcome this drawback, this paper proposes a flower pollination algorithm with a randomized location modification. The proposed algorithm is used to find optimal threshold values for maximizing Otsu's objective functions with regard to eight medical grayscale images. When benchmarked against other state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms, the new algorithm proves itself to be robust and effective through numerical experimental results including Otsu's objective values and standard deviations.

  12. Effect of lipolysis on drug release from self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) with different core/shell drug location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbin; Lv, Yan; Zhao, Shan; Wang, Bing; Tan, Mingqian; Xie, Hongguo; Lv, Guojun; Ma, Xiaojun

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of lipolysis on the release of poorly water-soluble drug from SMEDDS in the perspective of drug core/shell location. For this purpose, four SMEDDS formulations with various core/shell properties were developed based on long-chain lipid or medium-chain lipid as well as different surfactant/oil ratios. Poorly water-soluble drugs, hymecromone and resveratrol, were significantly solubilized in all SMEDDS formulations and the diluted microemulsions. Fluorescence spectra analysis indicated that hymecromone was mainly located in the shell of microemulsions, while resveratrol was located in the core. The effect of lipolysis on the release rates of drugs with different core/shell locations were investigated by a modified in vitro drug release model. For the drug located in the shell, hymecromone, the release profiles were not affected during the lipolysis process and no significant differences were observed among four formulations. For the drug located in the core, resveratrol, the release rates were increased to various degrees depending on the extent of digestion. In conclusion, the drug core/shell location plays an important role for determining the effect of lipolysis on drug release from SMEDDS formulation.

  13. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  14. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wampler Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS; Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. Methods The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. Results A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. Conclusions The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only

  15. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Peter J; Rediske, Richard R; Molla, Azizur R

    2013-01-18

    A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS); Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only rarely was local knowledge required to identify and locate households. This

  16. Myofascial Release Therapy in the Treatment of Occupational Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Parallel Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Iván; De Toro, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Meijide-Faílde, Rosa; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac Manuel

    2016-07-01

    As myofascial release therapy is currently under development, the objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy with manual therapy for treating occupational mechanical neck pain. A randomized, single-blind parallel group study was developed. The sample (n = 59) was divided into GI, treated with manual therapy, and GII, treated with myofascial release therapy. Variables studied were intensity of neck pain, cervical disability, quality of life, craniovertebral angle, and ranges of cervical motion. At five sessions, clinical significance was observed in both groups for all the variables studied, except for flexion in GI. At this time point, an intergroup statistical difference was observed, which showed that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.014), flexion (P = 0.021), extension (P = 0.003), right side bending (P = 0.001), and right rotation (P = 0.031). A comparative analysis between therapies after intervention showed statistical differences indicating that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.000), right (P = 0.000) and left (P = 0.009) side bending, right (P = 0.024) and left (P = 0.046) rotations, and quality of life. The treatment of occupational mechanical neck pain by myofascial release therapy seems to be more effective than manual therapy for correcting the advanced position of the head, recovering range of motion in side bending and rotation, and improving quality of life.

  17. Random Forest Based Coarse Locating and KPCA Feature Extraction for Indoor Positioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast developing of mobile terminals, positioning techniques based on fingerprinting method draw attention from many researchers even world famous companies. To conquer some shortcomings of the existing fingerprinting systems and further improve the system performance, on the one hand, in the paper, we propose a coarse positioning method based on random forest, which is able to customize several subregions, and classify test point to the region with an outstanding accuracy compared with some typical clustering algorithms. On the other hand, through the mathematical analysis in engineering, the proposed kernel principal component analysis algorithm is applied for radio map processing, which may provide better robustness and adaptability compared with linear feature extraction methods and manifold learning technique. We build both theoretical model and real environment for verifying the feasibility and reliability. The experimental results show that the proposed indoor positioning system could achieve 99% coarse locating accuracy and enhance 15% fine positioning accuracy on average in a strong noisy environment compared with some typical fingerprinting based methods.

  18. Postprison release HIV-risk behaviors in a randomized trial of methadone treatment for prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Monique E; Kinlock, Timothy W; Gordon, Michael S; O'Grady, Kevin E; Schwartz, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    This secondary analysis examined the impact of methadone initiated in prison on postrelease HIV risk behaviors. The parent study was a three-group randomized clinical trial in which participants received drug abuse counseling in prison and were randomly assigned to: (1) passive referral to substance abuse treatment upon release; (2) guaranteed methadone treatment admission upon release; and (3) methadone in prison and guaranteed continuation of methadone upon release. Participants were 211 adult males with preincarceration histories of opiate dependence. The AIDS Risk Assessment was administered at baseline (in prison) and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month postrelease. Data were analyzed for the entire sample (N = 211) as well as the subsamples who reported injecting drugs in the 30 days prior to incarceration (n = 131) and who reported having unprotected sex in that time frame (n = 144) using generalized linear mixed model on an intent-to-treat basis. There were no significant changes in sex- or drug-risk by Condition over Time. There were significant Time and Condition main effects for the total sample as well as the injector subsample for drug-risk behaviors. There were no significant Condition main effects for HIV sex-risk behaviors, but there were significant Time main effects. Methadone initiated in prison or immediately postrelease is associated with reduced HIV drug-risk compared to counseling in prison without methadone and passive referral to treatment at release. Participation in several drug- and sex-risk behaviors also showed significant declines during the postrelease time periods. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  19. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms.

  20. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  1. Human abuse potential of immediate-release/extended-release versus immediate-release hydrocodone bitartrate/acetaminophen: a randomized controlled trial in recreational users of prescription opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Krishna; Kostenbader, Kenneth; Zheng, Yanping; Montgomery, Jeannie B; Barrett, Thomas; Young, Jim L; Webster, Lynn R

    2015-01-01

    The abuse potential of prescription opioids is well established. This study compared positive, subjective drug effects of single, equal doses of biphasic immediate release (IR)/extended release (ER) hydrocodone bitartrate (HB)/acetaminophen (acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]) 7.5/325 mg tablets versus IR HB/APAP 7.5/325-mg tablets and placebo. Healthy adult recreational users of prescription opioids entered this randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active- and placebo-controlled, seven-way crossover study. Participants received single, total doses of IR/ER HB/APAP 22.5/975 mg (intact; three active tablets) and 45/1950 mg (intact and crushed [encapsulated]; six active tablets), IR HB/APAP 22.5/975 mg (intact; three active tablets) and 45/1950 mg (intact and crushed [encapsulated]; six active tablets), and placebo. Peak subjective effects (E(max)); time to peak effects (TE(max)); and area under the drug-effect curves for drug liking, high, and good drug effects were measured using visual analog scales. Median values with 95% confidence interval (CI) were compared using analysis of variance. Among completers (n = 52), IR/ER HB/APAP produced delayed and lower peak effects compared to equal doses of IR HB/APAP. Comparing intact tablets, the drug liking E(max) (median [95% CI]) was significantly lower for IR/ER HB/APAP 45/1950 mg (78.0 [73.0, 81.0]) than an equal dose of IR HB/APAP (89.5 [85.0, 93.0]; difference, -8.5 [-12.0, -6.0]; P effects compared with an equal dose of crushed IR HB/APAP and intact IR/ER HB/APAP. IR/ER HB/APAP resulted in lower subjective positive drug effects than an equal dose of IR HB/APAP. Crushing IR/ER HB/APAP also delayed the onset of subjective effects compared with intact IR/ER HB/APAP. These findings suggest that biphasic IR/ER HB/APAP has lower abuse potential than IR HB/APAP in single equal doses. This Phase I clinical trial conducted in the USA was not registered.

  2. Effectiveness of myofascial release in the management of plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajimsha, M S; Binsu, D; Chithra, S

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that stretching of the calf musculature and the plantar fascia are effective management strategies for plantar heel pain (PHP). However, it is unclear whether myofascial release (MFR) can improve the outcomes in this population. To investigate whether myofascial release (MFR) reduces the pain and functional disability associated with plantar heel pain (PHP) in comparison with a control group receiving sham ultrasound therapy (SUST). Randomized, controlled, double blinded trial. Nonprofit research foundation clinic in India. Sixty-six patients, 17 men and 49 women with a clinical diagnosis of PHP were randomly assigned into MFR or a control group and given 12 sessions of treatment per client over 4 weeks. The Foot Function Index (FFI) scale was used to assess pain severity and functional disability. The primary outcome measure was the difference in FFI scale scores between week 1 (pretest score), week 4 (posttest score), and follow-up at week 12 after randomization. Additionally, pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the affected gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and over the calcaneus, by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation. The simple main effects analysis showed that the MFR group performed better than the control group in weeks 4 and 12 (P<0.001). Patients in the MFR and control groups reported a 72.4% and 7.4% reduction, respectively, in their pain and functional disability in week 4 compared with that in week 1, which persisted as 60.6% in the follow-up at week 12 in the MFR group compared to the baseline. The mixed ANOVA also revealed significant group-by-time interactions for changes in PPT over the gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and the calcaneus (P<0.05). This study provides evidence that MFR is more effective than a control intervention for PHP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Location, Location, Location!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  4. Clinical outcomes do not support arthroscopic posterior capsular release in addition to anterior release for shoulder stiffness: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Park, In-Joo

    2014-05-01

    Arthroscopic capsular release is an effective treatment for shoulder stiffness, yet its extent is controversial. To compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic capsular release in patients with and without posterior extended capsular release for shoulder stiffness. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Between January 2008 and March 2011, 75 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for shoulder stiffness were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups. In group I (n = 37), capsular release was performed, including release of the rotator interval and anterior and inferior capsule. In group II (n = 38), capsular release was extended to the posterior capsule. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Simple Shoulder Test, visual analog scale for pain, and range of motion (ROM) were used for the evaluation before surgery and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and at the last follow-up. Preoperative demographic data of age, sex, symptom duration, and clinical outcomes showed no significant differences (P > .05). The average follow-up was 18.4 months. Both groups showed significantly increased ROM at the last follow-up compared with preoperative ROM (P .05) between groups I and II in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (91.3 vs. 79.5), Simple Shoulder Test (83.3 vs. 83.3), and visual analog scale (1.5 vs. 2.2). There were also no statistical differences between the 2 groups at the last follow-up (P > .05) in ROM: forward flexion, 145.2° vs. 143.3°; external rotation with 90° of abduction, 88.1° vs. 86.2°; external rotation at side, 88.9° vs. 82.9°; and internal rotation, 9.1° vs. 8.3°. Posterior extended capsular release might not be necessary in arthroscopic surgery for shoulder stiffness.

  5. Effects of immediate-release opioid on memory functioning: a randomized-controlled study in patients receiving sustained-release opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, S K; Conroy, L; Tookman, A; Carroll, E; Jones, L; Curran, H V

    2014-11-01

    The effects of opioid medication on cognitive functioning in patients with cancer and non-cancer pain remain unclear. In this mechanistic randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study of patients (n = 20) receiving sustained-release and immediate-release opioid medication as part of their palliative care, we examine memory effects of an additional dose of participants' immediate-release medication (oxycodone or morphine) or placebo. Immediate prose recall and recall of related and unrelated word pairs was assessed pre-and post-drug (placebo or immediate-release opioid). Memory for these stimuli was also tested after a delay on each testing occasion. Finally, performance on an 'interference' word pair task was assessed on the two testing occasions since proactive interference has been posited as a mechanism for acute opioid-induced memory impairment. Unlike previous work, we found no evidence of memory impairment for material presented before or after individually tailored, 'breakthrough' doses of immediate-release opioid. Furthermore, immediate-release opioid did not result in increased memory interference. On the other hand, we found enhanced performance on the interference word pair task after immediate-release opioid, possibly indicating lower levels of interference. These results suggest that carefully titrated immediate-release doses of opioid drugs may not cause extensive memory impairment as previously reported, and in fact, may improve memory in certain circumstances. Importantly, our findings contrast strikingly with those of a study using the same robust design that showed significant memory impairment. We propose that factors, such as depressive symptoms, education level and sustained-release opioid levels may influence whether impairment is observed following immediate-release opioid treatment. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  6. Bupropion sustained release for pregnant smokers: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Oncken, Cheryl; Fokina, Valentina M; Feinn, Richard S; Clark, Shannon M; West, Holly; Jain, Sunil K; Ahmed, Mahmoud S; Hankins, Gary D V

    2017-04-01

    Bupropion is used to treat depression during pregnancy. However, its usefulness as a smoking cessation aid for pregnant women is not fully known. The objective of the study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of bupropion sustained release for smoking cessation during pregnancy. We conducted a randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. Pregnant women who smoked daily received individualized behavior counseling and were randomly assigned to a 12 week, twice-a-day treatment with 150 mg bupropion sustained release or placebo. The primary study objectives were to determine whether bupropion sustained release reduces nicotine withdrawal symptoms on the quit date and during the treatment period compared with placebo and whether it increases 7 day point prevalence abstinence at the end of the treatment period and at the end of pregnancy. Subjects in the bupropion (n = 30) and placebo (n = 35) groups were comparable in age, smoking history, number of daily smoked cigarettes, and nicotine dependence. After controlling for maternal age and race, bupropion sustained release reduced cigarette cravings (1.5 ± 1.1 vs 2.1 ± 1.2, P = .02) and total nicotine withdrawal symptoms (3.8 ± 4.3 vs 5.4 ± 5.1, P = .028) during the treatment period. Administration of bupropion sustained release reduced tobacco exposure, as determined by levels of carbon monoxide in exhaled air (7.4 ± 6.4 vs 9.1 ± 5.8, P = .053) and concentrations of cotinine in urine (348 ± 384 ng/mL vs 831 ± 727 ng/mL, P = .007) and increased overall abstinence rates during treatment (19% vs 2%, P = .003). However, there was no significant difference in 7 day point prevalence abstinence rates between the 2 groups at the end of medication treatment (17% vs 3%, P = .087) and at the end of pregnancy (10% vs 3%, P = .328). Individual smoking cessation counseling along with the twice-daily use of 150 mg bupropion

  7. Effects of Myofascial Release in Non-specific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguisuelas, Maria Dolores; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Martínez-Hurtado, Isabel; Doménech-Fernández, Julio

    2016-09-09

    Double-blind, randomized parallel sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to treat analysis. To investigate the effects of an isolate Myofascial Release protocol (MFR) on pain, disability and fear- avoidance beliefs in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). MFR is a form of manual medicine widely used by physiotherapists in the management of different musculoskeletal pathologies. Up to this moment, no previous studies have reported the effects of an isolated MFR treatment in patients with CLBP. Fifty four participants, with nonspecific CLBP, were randomized to MFR group (n = 27) receiving four sessions of myofascial treatment, each lasting 40 minutes, and to control group (n = 27) receiving a sham MFR. Variables studied were pain measured by means Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and visual analogue scale (VAS), disability measured with Roland Morris questionnaire and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs measured with FAB questionnaire (FABQ). Subjects receiving MFR displayed significant improvements in pain (SF-MPQ) (mean difference -7.8; 95% CI: -14.5 to -1.1, P = 0.023) and sensory SF-MPQ subscale (mean difference -6.1; 95% CI: -10.8 to -1.5, P = 0.011) compared to the sham group, but no differences were found in VAS between groups. Disability and the FABQ score also displayed a significant decrease in the MFR group (P Myofascial Release Therapy produced a significant improvement in both pain and disability. However, as the minimal clinically important differences in pain and disability are included in the 95% IC, we can not know if this improvement is clinically relevant. 2.

  8. Effects of myofascial release after high-intensity exercise: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Olea, Nicolas; Martinez, Manuel; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo

    2008-03-01

    The usefulness of massage as a recovery method after high-intensity exercise has yet to be established. We aimed to investigate the effects of whole-body massage on heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure (BP) after repeated high-intensity cycling exercise under controlled and standardized pretest conditions. The study included 62 healthy active individuals. After baseline measurements, the subjects performed standardized warm-up exercises followed by three 30-second Wingate tests. After completing the exercise protocol, the subjects were randomly assigned to a massage (myofascial release) or placebo (sham treatment with disconnected ultrasound and magnetotherapy equipment) group for a 40-minute recovery period. Holter recording and BP measurements were taken after exercise protocol and after the intervention. After the exercise protocol, both groups showed a significant decrease in normal-to-normal interval, HRV index, diastolic BP (P > .001), and low-frequency domain values (P = .006). After the recovery period, HRV index (P = .42) and high-frequency (HF) (P = .94) values were similar to baseline levels in the massage group, whereas the HRV index tended (P = .05) to be lower and the HF was significantly (P Myofascial release massage favors the recovery of HRV and diastolic BP after high-intensity exercise (3 Wingate tests) to preexercise levels.

  9. NESHAP Area-Specific Dose-Release Factors for Potential Onsite Member-of-the-Public Locations at SRS using CAP88-PC Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimor, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer model CAP88-PC to estimate the total effective doses (TED) for demonstrating compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 2006), the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. As such, CAP88 Version 4.0 was used to calculate the receptor dose due to routine atmospheric releases at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For estimation, NESHAP dose-release factors (DRFs) have been supplied to Environmental Compliance and Area Closure Projects (EC&ACP) for many years. DRFs represent the dose to a maximum receptor exposed to 1 Ci of a specified radionuclide being released into the atmosphere. They are periodically updated to include changes in the CAP88 version, input parameter values, site meteorology, and location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI). In this report, the DRFs were calculated for potential radionuclide atmospheric releases from 13 SRS release points. The three potential onsite MEI locations to be evaluated are B-Area, Three Rivers Landfill (TRL), and Savannah River Ecology Lab Conference Center (SRELCC) with TRL’s onsite workers considered as members-of-the-public, and the potential future constructions of dormitories at SRELCC and Barracks at B-Area. Each MEI location was evaluated at a specified compass sector with different area to receptor distances and was conducted for both ground-level and elevated release points. The analysis makes use of area-specific meteorological data (Viner 2014). The resulting DRFs are compared to the 2014 NESHAP offsite MEI DRFs for three operational areas; A-Area, H-Area, and COS for a release rate of 1 Ci of tritium oxide at 0 ft. elevation. CAP88 was executed again using the 2016 NESHAP MEI release rates for 0 and 61 m stack heights to determine the radionuclide dose at TRL from the center-of-site (COS).

  10. Exact simulation of Brown-Resnick random fields at a finite number of locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieker, Ton; Mikosch, Thomas Valentin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an exact simulation method for Brown-Resnick random fields, building on new representations for these stationary max-stable fields. The main idea is to apply suitable changes of measure....

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Maintain Suppression of HIV Viremia After Prison Release: The imPACT Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, David A; Golin, Carol E; Knight, Kevin; Gould, Michele; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Groves, Jennifer S; Napravnik, Sonia; Cole, Stephen R; White, Becky L; Fogel, Cathie; Rosen, David L; Mugavaro, Michael J; Pence, Brian W; Flynn, Patrick M

    2017-05-01

    HIV-infected individuals transitioning from incarceration to the community are at risk for loss of viral suppression. We compared the effects of imPACT, a multidimensional intervention to promote care engagement after release, to standard care on sustaining viral suppression after community re-entry. This trial randomized 405 HIV-infected inmates being released from prisons in Texas and North Carolina with HIV-1 RNA levels HIV-1 RNA HIV-1 RNA 0.99). Higher rates of HIV suppression and medical care engagement than expected based on previous literature were observed among HIV-infected patients with suppressed viremia released from prison. Randomization to a comprehensive intervention to motivate and facilitate HIV care access after prison release did not prevent loss of viral suppression. A better understanding of the factors influencing prison releasees' linkage to community care, medication adherence, and maintenance of viral suppression is needed to inform policy and other strategic approaches to HIV prevention and treatment.

  12. Microstructural descriptors and cellular automata simulation of the effects of non-random nuclei location on recrystallization in two dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rangel Rios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of non-random nuclei location and the efficiency of microstructural descriptors in assessing such a situation are studied. Cellular automata simulation of recrystallization in two dimensions is carried out to simulate microstrutural evolution for nuclei distribution ranging from a periodic arrangement to clusters of nuclei. The simulation results are compared in detail with microstrutural descriptors normally used to follow transformation evolution. It is shown that the contiguity is particularly relevant to detect microstructural deviations from randomness. This work focuses on recrystallization but its results are applicable to any nucleation and growth transformation.

  13. Timing of Etonogestrel-Releasing Implants and Growth of Breastfed Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Lilian Sheila de Melo Pereira; Braga, Giordana Campos; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Vieira, Carolina Sales

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the growth of breastfed infants whose mothers had inserted an etonogestrel-releasing implant in the immediate postpartum period. An open, randomized controlled, and parallel trial of postpartum women who were block-randomized to early (up to 48 hours postpartum before discharge) or conventional (at 6 weeks postpartum) insertion of an etonogestrel implant. The primary outcome was average infant weight at 12 months (360 days) and a difference of equal to or greater than 10% between groups was considered clinically significant. The secondary outcomes were infant's height and head and arm circumferences. These variables were measured at baseline and at 14, 40, 90, 180, 270, and 360 days postpartum. The mixed-effects linear regression model was used to evaluate the outcomes with a power of 80% and a significance level of 1% for the primary outcome and 0.3% for secondary outcomes as a result of correction for multiple hypothesis testing. From June to August 2015, a total of 100 women were randomized: 50 to early and 50 to conventional postpartum etonogestrel insertion. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar between the groups, except for educational attainment. The conventional insertion group included a higher proportion of women with 8 or more years of formal education than the early insertion group (88% [44/50] compared with 70% [35/50], P=.02). There was no difference in infant weight at 360 days between the groups (early [mean±standard deviation] 10.1±1.2 kg compared with conventional 9.8±1.3 kg, mean difference estimate 0.3 kg, 95% confidence interval 0-0.7 kg). Growth curves, height, and head and arm circumferences did not differ between the groups. There is no difference in growth at 12 months among breastfed infants whose mothers underwent early compared with conventional postpartum insertion of the etonogestrel implant. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02469454.

  14. The price of privately releasing contingency tables, and the spectra of random matrices with correlated rows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasiviswanathan, Shiva [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudelson, Mark [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Smith, Adam [PENNSYLVANIA STATE U

    2009-01-01

    Contingency tables are the method of choice of government agencies for releasing statistical summaries of categorical data. In this paper, we consider lower bounds on how much distortion (noise) is necessary in these tables to provide privacy guarantees when the data being summarized is sensitive. We extend a line of recent work on lower bounds on noise for private data analysis [10, 13. 14, 15] to a natural and important class of functionalities. Our investigation also leads to new results on the spectra of random matrices with correlated rows. Consider a database D consisting of n rows (one per individual), each row comprising d binary attributes. For any subset of T attributes of size |T| = k, the marginal table for T has 2{sup k} entries; each entry counts how many times in the database a particular setting of these attributes occurs. Imagine an agency that wishes to release all (d/k) contingency tables for a given database. For constant k, previous work showed that distortion {tilde {Omicron}}(min{l_brace}n, (n{sup 2}d){sup 1/3}, {radical}d{sup k}{r_brace}) is sufficient for satisfying differential privacy, a rigorous definition of privacy that has received extensive recent study. Our main contributions are: (1) For {epsilon}- and ({epsilon}, {delta})-differential privacy (with {epsilon} constant and {delta} = 1/poly(n)), we give a lower bound of {tilde {Omega}}(min{l_brace}{radical}n, {radical}d{sup k}{r_brace}), which is tight for n = {tilde {Omega}}(d{sup k}). Moreover, for a natural and popular class of mechanisms based on additive noise, our bound can be strengthened to {Omega}({radical}d{sup k}), which is tight for all n. Our bounds extend even to non-constant k, losing roughly a factor of {radical}2{sup k} compared to the best known upper bounds for large n. (2) We give efficient polynomial time attacks which allow an adversary to reconstruct sensitive infonnation given insufficiently perturbed contingency table releases. For constant k, we obtain a

  15. Beamforming in sparse, random, 3D array antennas with fluctuating element locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Lager, Ioan E.; Bosma, Sjoerd; Bruinsma, Wessel P.; Hes, Robin P.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the fluctuations in the locations of elementary radiators on the radiation properties of three dimensional(3D) array antennas is studied. The principal radiation features (sidelobes level, beam squint) are examined based on illustrative examples. Some atypical behaviours, that are

  16. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke J J Klinkenberg

    Full Text Available Cardiac troponin is the biochemical gold standard to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. Interestingly however, elevated cardiac troponin concentrations are also frequently observed during and after endurance-type exercise. Oxidative stress associated with prolonged exercise has been proposed to contribute to cardiac troponin release. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of 4 week astaxanthin supplementation (a potent cartenoid antioxidant on antioxidant capacity and exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists.Thirty-two well-trained male cyclists (age 25±5, weight 73±7 kg, maximum O2 uptake 60±5 mL·kg(-1·min(-1, Wmax 5.4±0.5 W·kg(-1; mean ± SD were repeatedly subjected to a laboratory based standardized exercise protocol before and after 4 weeks of astaxanthin (20 mg/day, or placebo supplementation in a double-blind randomized manner. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at 60 min of cycling and immediately post-exercise (≈ 120 min.The pre-supplementation cycling trial induced a significant rise of median cardiac troponin T concentrations from 3.2 (IQR 3.0-4.2 to 4.7 ng/L (IQR 3.7-6.7, immediately post-exercise (p<0.001. Four weeks of astaxanthin supplementation significantly increased mean basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations from non-detectable values to 175±86 µg·kg(-1. However, daily astaxanthin supplementation had no effect on exercise-induced cardiac troponin T release (p = 0.24, as measured by the incremental area under the curve. Furthermore, the elevation in basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations was not reflected in changes in antioxidant capacity markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, uric acid, and malondialdehyde. Markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase were equally unaffected by astaxanthin supplementation.Despite substantial increases in plasma astaxanthin concentrations

  17. Psychophysiological effects of massage-myofascial release after exercise: a randomized sham-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Olea, Nicolas; Martínez, Marin Manuel; Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Concepción; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of massage on neuromuscular recruitment, mood state, and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) after high-intensity exercise. This was a prospective randomized clinical trial using between-groups design. The study was conducted at a university-based sports medicine clinic. Sixty-two (62) healthy active students age 18-26 participated. Participants, randomized into two groups, performed three 30-second Wingate tests and immediately received whole-body massage-myofascial induction or placebo (sham ultrasound/magnetotherapy) treatment. The duration (40 minutes), position, and therapist were the same for both treatments. Dependent variables were surface electromyography (sEMG) of quadriceps, profile of mood states (POMS) and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) of trapezius and masseter muscles. These data were assessed at baseline and after exercise and recovery periods. Generalized estimating equations models were performed on dependent variables to assess differences between groups. Significant differences were found in effects of treatment on sEMG of Vastus Medialis (VM) (p = 0.02) and vigor subscale (p = 0.04). After the recovery period, there was a significant decrease in electromyographic (EMG) activity of VM (p = 0.02) in the myofascial-release group versus a nonsignificant increase in the placebo group (p = 0.32), and a decrease in vigor (p < 0.01) in the massage group versus no change in the placebo group (p = 0.86). Massage reduces EMG amplitude and vigor when applied as a passive recovery technique after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Massage may induce a transient loss of muscle strength or a change in the muscle fiber tension-length relationship, influenced by alterations of muscle function and a psychological state of relaxation.

  18. Effects of Myofascial Release in Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguisuelas, María D; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Martínez-Hurtado, Isabel; Doménech-Fernández, Julio

    2017-05-01

    Double-blind, randomized parallel sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to treat analysis. To investigate the effects of an isolate myofascial release (MFR) protocol on pain, disability, and fear-avoidance beliefs in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). MFR is a form of manual medicine widely used by physiotherapists in the management of different musculoskeletal pathologies. Up to this moment, no previous studies have reported the effects of an isolated MFR treatment in patients with CLBP. Fifty-four participants, with nonspecific CLBP, were randomized to MFR group (n = 27) receiving four sessions of myofascial treatment, each lasting 40 minutes, and to control group (n = 27) receiving a sham MFR. Variables studied were pain measured by means Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and visual analog scale (VAS), disability measured with Roland Morris Questionnaire, and fear-avoidance beliefs measured with Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Subjects receiving MFR displayed significant improvements in pain (SF-MPQ) (mean difference -7.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -14.5 to -1.1, P = 0.023) and sensory SF-MPQ subscale (mean difference -6.1; 95% CI: -10.8 to -1.5, P = 0.011) compared to the sham group, but no differences were found in VAS between groups. Disability and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire score also displayed a significant decrease in the MFR group (P < 0.05) as compared to sham MFR. MFR therapy produced a significant improvement in both pain and disability. Because the minimal clinically important differences in pain and disability are, however, included in the 95% CI, we cannot know whether this improvement is clinically relevant. 2.

  19. Effects of myofascial release techniques on pain, physical function, and postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Saavedra-Hernández, Manuel; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    To determine the effect of myofascial release techniques on pain symptoms, postural stability and physical function in fibromyalgia syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Eighty-six patients with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a placebo group. Patients received treatments for 20 weeks. The experimental group underwent 10 myofascial release modalities and the placebo group received sham short-wave and ultrasound electrotherapy. Outcome variables were number of tender points, pain, postural stability, physical function, clinical severity and global clinical assessment of improvement. Outcome measures were assessed before and immediately after, at six months and one year after the last session of the corresponding intervention. After 20 weeks of myofascial therapy, the experimental group showed a significant improvement (P  myofascial release techniques can be a complementary therapy for pain symptoms, physical function and clinical severity but do not improve postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

  20. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.

    2015-01-01

    -coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...

  1. Image reconstruction of the location of macro-inhomogeneity in random turbid medium by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler, Boris A.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Meglinski, Igor V.

    2007-07-01

    Nowadays the artificial neural network (ANN), an effective powerful technique that is able denoting complex input and output relationships, is widely used in different biomedical applications. In present study the applying of ANN for the determination of characteristics of random highly scattering medium (like bio-tissue) is considered. Spatial distribution of the backscattered light calculated by Monte Carlo method is used to train ANN for multiply scattering regimes. The potential opportunities of use of ANN for image reconstruction of an absorbing macro inhomogeneity located in topical layers of random scattering medium are presented. This is especially of high priority because of new diagnostics/treatment developing that is based on the applying gold nano-particles for labeling cancer cells.

  2. A permutation test to analyse systematic bias and random measurement errors of medical devices via boosting location and scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Andreas; Schmid, Matthias; Pfahlberg, Annette; Uter, Wolfgang; Gefeller, Olaf

    2017-06-01

    Measurement errors of medico-technical devices can be separated into systematic bias and random error. We propose a new method to address both simultaneously via generalized additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) in combination with permutation tests. More precisely, we extend a recently proposed boosting algorithm for GAMLSS to provide a test procedure to analyse potential device effects on the measurements. We carried out a large-scale simulation study to provide empirical evidence that our method is able to identify possible sources of systematic bias as well as random error under different conditions. Finally, we apply our approach to compare measurements of skin pigmentation from two different devices in an epidemiological study.

  3. Pseudo-random Spray Release to Measure World-wide Transfer Functions of Cloud Albedo Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Institute for Energy Systems, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh. S.Salter@ed.ac.uk Previous climate models of Latham's proposal to reverse global warming by using sub-micron sea spray to increase cloud albedo have used a variety of spray patterns. Kettles forced CCN concentration to be 375/cm3 everywhere. Rasch et al used the 20% and 70% most susceptible regions. Bala and Caldeira used an even spread. Jones et al. concentrated spray in the 3.3% oceans with the highest susceptibility All used the same rate through the year. We want to choose a scheme for a climate-modelling experiment designed to identify simultaneously the effects of cloud albedo control at various seasons of the year from spray at all regions of the world on climates of all other regions the world. In particular we want to know seasons and spray places which might have an undesirable effect on precipitation. The spray systems in various regions of a numerical climate model will be modulated on an off with different but known pseudo-random sequences and a selection of seasons. The mean value of the resulting weather records of the parameters of interest, mainly temperature and water run-off, at each region will be subtracted from each value of the record so as to give just the alternating component with an average value of zero. This will be correlated with each of the chosen pseudo-random sequences to give the magnitude and polarity of the effect of a treatment at each input area and selected seasons of the year with the resulting effects on all regions. By doing a time-shifted correlation we can account for phase-shift and time delay. The signal-to-noise ratio should improve with the square root of the analysis time and so we may be able to measure the transfer function with quite a small stimulus. The results of a Mathcad simulation of the process with statistical distributions approximating to natural variations temperature and precipitation show that a single run of a climate

  4. A randomized clinical trial of buprenorphine for prisoners: Findings at 12-months post-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; Vocci, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether starting buprenorphine treatment prior to prison and after release from prison would be associated with better drug treatment outcomes and whether males and females responded differently to the combination of in-prison treatment and post-release service setting. Study design was a 2 (In-Prison Treatment: Condition: Buprenorphine Treatment: vs. Counseling Only)×2 [Post-Release Service Setting Condition: Opioid Treatment: Program (OTP) vs. Community Health Center (CHC)]×2 (Gender) factorial design. The trial was conducted between September 2008 and July 2012. Follow-up assessments were completed in 2014. Participants were recruited from two Baltimore pre-release prisons (one for men and one for women). Adult pre-release prisoners who were heroin-dependent during the year prior to incarceration were eligible. Post-release assessments were conducted at 1, 3, 6, and 12-month following prison release. Participants (N=211) in the in-prison treatment condition effect had a higher mean number of days of community buprenorphine treatment compared to the condition in which participants initiated medication after release (P=0.005). However, there were no statistically significant hypothesized effects for the in-prison treatment condition in terms of: days of heroin use and crime, and opioid and cocaine positive urine screening test results (all Ps>0.14) and no statistically significant hypothesized gender effects (all Ps>0.18). Although initiating buprenorphine treatment in prison compared to after-release was associated with more days receiving buprenorphine treatment in the designated community treatment program during the 12-months post-release assessment, it was not associated with superior outcomes in terms of heroin and cocaine use and criminal behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Controlled-release oxycodone relieves neuropathic pain: a randomized controlled trial in painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C Peter N; Moulin, Dwight; Watt-Watson, Judith; Gordon, Allan; Eisenhoffer, John

    2003-09-01

    Painful neuropathy is one of the most common long-term complications of diabetes mellitus and often proves difficult to relieve. Patients with diabetic neuropathy with moderate or greater pain for at least 3 months, were evaluated for efficacy, safety and health-related quality of life (QOL) while receiving controlled-release (CR) oxycodone (OxyContin) or active placebo. Patients underwent washout from all opioids 2-7 days before randomization to 10 mg CR oxycodone or active placebo (0.25 mg benztropine) q12h. The dose was increased, approximately weekly, to a maximum of 40 mg q12h CR oxycodone or 1 mg q12h benztropine, with crossover to the alternate treatment after a maximum of 4 weeks. Acetaminophen, 325-650 mg q4-6h prn was provided as rescue. Thirty-six patients were evaluable for efficacy (21 men, 15 women, mean age 63.0+/-9.4 years). CR oxycodone resulted in significantly lower (P=0.0001) mean daily pain (21.8+/-20.7 vs. 48.6+/-26.6 mm VAS), steady pain (23.5+/-23.0 vs. 47.6+/-30.7 mm VAS), brief pain (21.8+/-23.5 vs. 46.7+/-30.8 mm VAS), skin pain (14.3+/-20.4 vs. 43.2+/-31.3 mm VAS), and total pain and disability (16.8+/-15.6 vs. 25.2+/-16.7; P=0.004). Scores from 6 of the 8 SF-36 domains and both summary scales, Standardized Physical Component (P=0.0002) and Standardized Mental Component (P=0.0338) were significantly better during CR oxycodone treatment. The number needed to treat to obtain one patient with at least 50% pain relief is 2.6 and clinical effectiveness scores favoured treatment with CR oxycodone over placebo (P=0.0001). CR oxycodone is effective and safe for the management of painful diabetic neuropathy and improves QOL.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Miniscalpel-Needle Release versus Dry Needling for Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare ultrasound-guided miniscalpel-needle (UG-MSN release versus ultrasound-guided dry needling (UG-DN for chronic neck pain. Methods. A total of 169 patients with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive either UG-MSN release or UG-DN. Before treatment and at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, pain was measured using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS. Neck function was examined using the neck disability index. Health-related quality of life was examined using the physical component score (PCS and mental component score (MCS of the SF-36 health status scale. Results. Patients in the UG-MSN release had greater improvement on the VAS (by 2 points at 3 months and 0.9 points at 6 months versus in the UG-DN arm; (both P<0.0001. Patients receiving UG-MSN release also showed significantly lower scores on the adjusted neck disability index, as well as significantly lower PCS. No severe complications were observed. Conclusion. UG-MSN release was superior to UG-DN in reducing pain intensity and neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain and was not associated with severe complications. The procedural aspects in the two arms were identical; however, we did not verify the blinding success. As such, the results need to be interpreted with caution.

  7. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Methadone Maintenance for Prisoners: Results at Twelve-Months Post-Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of prison-initiated methadone maintenance at 12-months post-release. Males with pre-incarceration heroin dependence (n=204) were randomly assigned to: 1) Counseling Only: counseling in prison, with passive referral to treatment upon release; 2) Counseling+Transfer: counseling in prison with transfer to methadone maintenance treatment upon release; and 3) Counseling+Methadone: counseling and methadone maintenance in prison, continued in the community upon release. The mean number of days in community-based drug abuse treatment were, respectively, Counseling Only 23.1, Counseling+Transfer 91.3, and Counseling+Methadone 166.0, p <.01; all pairwise comparisons were statistically significant (all ps < .01). Counseling+Methadone participants were also significantly less likely than participants in each of the other two groups to be opioid-positive or cocaine-positive according to urine drug testing. These results support the effectiveness of prison-initiated methadone for males in the United States. Further study is required to confirm the findings for women. PMID:19339140

  8. The effect of night extension orthoses following surgical release of Dupuytren contracture: a single-center, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Julie; Collocott, Shirley; Hing, Wayne; Kelly, Edel

    2013-07-01

    To clarify the efficacy and detrimental effects of orthoses used to maintain finger extension following surgical release of Dupuytren contracture. We conducted a single-center, randomized, controlled trial to investigate the effect of night extension orthoses on finger range of motion and hand function for 3 months following surgical release of Dupuytren contracture. We also wanted to determine how well finger extension was maintained in the total sample. We randomized 56 patients to receive a night extension orthosis plus hand therapy (n = 26) or hand therapy alone (n = 30). The primary outcome was total active extension of the operated fingers (°). Secondary outcomes were total active flexion of the operated fingers (°), active distal palmar crease (cm), grip strength (kg), and self-reported hand function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (0-100 scale). There were no statistically significant differences between the no-orthosis and orthosis groups for total active extension or for any of the secondary outcomes. Between the first postoperative measure and 3 months after surgery, 62% of little fingers had maintained or improved total active extension. The use of a night extension orthosis in combination with standard hand therapy has no greater effect on maintaining finger extension than hand therapy alone in the 3 months following surgical release of Dupuytren contracture. Our results indicate that the practice of providing every patient with a night extension orthosis following surgical release of Dupuytren contracture may not be justified except for cases in which extension loss occurs after surgery. Our results also challenge clinicians to research ways of maintaining finger extension in a greater number of patients. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glass ionomer ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in fissure caries prevention--results from a randomized clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Bao Ying; Xiao, Yue; Chu, Chun Hung; Lo, Edward Chin Man

    2014-01-01

    The relative performance of ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in preventing fissure caries in permanent molars was compared in a randomized clinical trial conducted in southern China (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01829334...

  10. Efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin in insomnia patients with diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garfinkel D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Doron Garfinkel1, Mariana Zorin2, Julio Wainstein2, Zipora Matas3, Moshe Laudon4, Nava Zisapel4,51Geriatric Palliative Department, Shoham Geriatric Medical Center, Pardes Hana, Israel; 2Diabetes Unit, 3Biochemistry Laboratory, The E Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel; 4Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, 5Department of Neurobiology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelBackground: Diabetes is a major comorbidity in insomnia patients. The efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg in the treatment of glucose, lipid metabolism, and sleep was studied in 36 type 2 diabetic patients with insomnia (11 men, 25 women, age 46–77 years.Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, the subjects were treated for 3 weeks (period 1 with prolonged-release melatonin or placebo, followed by a one-week washout period, and then crossed over for another 3 weeks (period 2 of treatment with the other preparation. All tablets were taken 2 hours before bedtime for a period of 3 weeks. In an extension period of 5 months, prolonged-release melatonin was given nightly to all patients in an open-label design. Sleep was objectively monitored in a subgroup of 22 patients using wrist actigraphy. Fasting glucose, fructosamine, insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and some antioxidants, as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. All concomitant medications were continued throughout the study.Results: No significant changes in serum glucose, fructosamine, insulin, C-peptide, antioxidant levels or blood chemistry were observed after 3 weeks of prolonged-release melatonin treatment. Sleep efficiency, wake time after sleep onset, and number of awakenings improved significantly with prolonged-release melatonin as compared with placebo. Following 5 months of prolonged-release melatonin treatment, mean HbA1c (±standard deviation was

  11. An integrated classifier for computer-aided diagnosis of colorectal polyps based on random forest and location index strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yifan; Han, Hao; Zhu, Wei; Li, Lihong; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Feature classification plays an important role in differentiation or computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of suspicious lesions. As a widely used ensemble learning algorithm for classification, random forest (RF) has a distinguished performance for CADx. Our recent study has shown that the location index (LI), which is derived from the well-known kNN (k nearest neighbor) and wkNN (weighted k nearest neighbor) classifier [1], has also a distinguished role in the classification for CADx. Therefore, in this paper, based on the property that the LI will achieve a very high accuracy, we design an algorithm to integrate the LI into RF for improved or higher value of AUC (area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics -- ROC). Experiments were performed by the use of a database of 153 lesions (polyps), including 116 neoplastic lesions and 37 hyperplastic lesions, with comparison to the existing classifiers of RF and wkNN, respectively. A noticeable gain by the proposed integrated classifier was quantified by the AUC measure.

  12. Tapentadol prolonged-release for moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis knee pain: a double-blind, randomized, placebo- and oxycodone controlled release-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrie, Alain; Lange, Bernd; Steup, Achim

    2017-08-01

    To assess efficacy and safety of tapentadol prolonged release (PR) for moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis knee pain. Patients (n = 990) were randomized (1:1:1) to tapentadol PR, oxycodone controlled release (CR; reference compound for assay sensitivity), or placebo for a double-blind 3-week titration and 12-week maintenance period. Primary efficacy end-points were change from baseline in average pain intensity at week 12 of maintenance (US end-point) and over the entire maintenance period (non-US end-point) with "last observation carried forward" as imputation method for missing scores. Both primary end-points were not significantly different for tapentadol PR nor for oxycodone CR vs placebo at week 12 (least squares [LS] mean difference = -0.3 [95% CI = -0.61-0.09]; p = 0.152 and 0.2 [95% CI = -0.16-0.54]; p = 0.279, respectively) and over the maintenance period (LS mean difference = -0.2 [95% CI = -0.55-0.07]; p = 0.135 and 0.1 [95% CI = -0.18-0.44]; p = 0.421, respectively). Considerably more patients receiving tapentadol PR than oxycodone CR completed the trial (58.3% vs 36.6%). This is consistent with better results with tapentadol PR on the overall health status (PGIC) compared to oxycodone CR. Indeed, respectively, 56% and 42.5% rated at least "much improved" at the end of treatment. Incidences of gastrointestinal adverse events were higher for both active treatments compared to placebo. Tapentadol PR was associated with a better gastrointestinal tolerability profile with incidences of constipation (17.9% vs 35%) and of the composite of nausea and/or vomiting (23.8% vs 46.8%) significantly lower vs oxycodone CR (p tapentadol PR were not met can, thus, not be interpreted. Tapentadol PR was better tolerated than oxycodone CR, largely due to fewer gastrointestinal side-effects.

  13. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Namvar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain have been entered the study by the available sampling method and have been located randomly into two groups of myofascial release therapy group, and control group. Pressure pain threshold, pain intensity, disability and isometric power of neck extensor muscles before and after intervention were registered through pressure algometer, visual analogue scale, neck disability index, and pressure biofeedback. The treatment was performed for 4 sessions and each session for 20 minutes. The paired t-tests and independent t-test were used for within group and between group comparison respectively. Comparing the mean of pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, neck disability index in the intervention group compared with control group showed significant reduction (P0.05. Myofascial Release is one of the effective manual therapy techniques in reducing pain, disability, improving the isometric extension strength of neck in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain.

  14. Randomized comparison of health-related quality of life in women with ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy of unknown location treated with systemic methotrexate or expectant management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mello, Norah M.; Mol, Femke; Hajenius, Petra J.; Ankum, Willem M.; Mol, Ben Willem; van der Veen, Fulco; van Wely, Madelon

    2015-01-01

    To study the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of treatment with systemic methotrexate (MTX) or expectant management in women with ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy of unknown location (PUL) with low and plateauing serum hCG concentrations. HRQoL was assessed alongside a randomized

  15. Randomized controlled trial of a protein substitute with prolonged release on the protein status of children with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Marcello; Riva, Enrica; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Cefalo, Graziella; Radaelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether a phenylalanine-free protein substitute with prolonged release may be beneficial to the protein status of children with phenylketonuria (PKU) compared to conventional substitutes. Sixty children with PKU, 7 to 16 years of age, were randomly allocated to receive either a prolonged-release (test) or the current conventional protein substitute for 30 days. Subjects were additionally sex and age matched with 60 subjects with mild hyperphenylalaninemia and 60 unaffected subjects. The protein status in children with PKU was assessed by albumin, transthyretin, and retinol-binding protein (RBP), and changes throughout the trial period were the primary outcome measures. Children with PKU did not differ in anthropometry from children with mild hyperphenylalaninemia or unaffected children but they ingested lower amounts of proteins (p substitute for macronutrient intake. Albumin and RBP concentrations were within the age-specific reference range for all children. The rate of protein insufficiency (transthyretin concentration less than 20 mg/dL) did not differ statistically between children receiving test or conventional substitute (recruitment 51.8% vs 53.6%; end of the trial 44.4% vs 50.0%) but mean transthyretin recovered over 20 mg/dL in children who received the test substitute, increasing from 19.1 to 20.7 mg/dL (mean change, 1.6 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 2.8 mg/dL). In children receiving conventional substitute mean transthyretin changed from 19.0 to 19.2 mg/dL (0.2; -0.2 to 0.6) mg/dL. Protein substitutes with prolonged release might be beneficial to protein status in children with phenylketonuria.

  16. Hormonal Add-Back Therapy for Females Treated With Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist for Endometriosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVasta, Amy D; Feldman, Henry A; Sadler Gallagher, Jenny; Stokes, Natalie A; Laufer, Marc R; Hornstein, Mark D; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether add-back therapy with norethindrone acetate or norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens is superior to maintain bone health in adolescents and young women using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for endometriosis. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are associated with deleterious effects on bone. Hormonal add-back may mitigate these effects. Adolescents and young women (n=51) received a random, double-blind assignment to add-back with norethindrone acetate (5 mg/day) plus conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg/day) or norethindrone acetate plus placebo for 12 months. Body composition, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density (BMD) were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry every 6 months. Quality-of-life measures were collected every 3 months. Intention-to-treat comparison of outcomes was conducted by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Thirty-four adolescents and young women completed the trial; dropouts did not differ from those who completed the trial. Bone mineral density was normal at baseline. At 12 months, total body bone mineral content and BMD had increased in the norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens group (bone mineral content +37 g, Padd-back successfully preserved bone health and improved quality of life for adolescents and young women with endometriosis during 12 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy. Combination norethindrone acetate plus conjugated equine estrogens add-back appears to be more effective for increasing total body bone mineral content, areal BMD, and lean mass than norethindrone acetate monotherapy. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00474851. I.

  17. Splinting after contracture release for Dupuytren's contracture (SCoRD): protocol of a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Shepstone, Lee; Chojnowski, Adrian J; Larson, Debbie

    2008-04-30

    Splinting as part of the overall post-surgical management of patients after release of Dupuytren's contracture has been widely reported, though there is variation in practice and criteria for using it. The evidence on its effectiveness is sparse, of poor quality and contradictory with studies reporting negative and positive effects. A multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial is being conducted to evaluate the effect of static night splinting for six months on hand function, range of movement, patient satisfaction and recurrence at 1 year after fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy. Using a centrally administered computer randomization system consented patients will be allocated to one of two groups: i) splint group who will be given a static splint at approximately 10 to 14 days after surgery to be worn for 6 months at night time only as well as hand therapy; ii) non-splint group, who will receive hand therapy only. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Disabilities of the Arm, Hand and Shoulder Questionnaire (DASH). Secondary outcomes are total active flexion and extension of fingers, patient satisfaction and recurrence of contracture. Outcome measures will be collected prior to surgery, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Using the DASH as the primary outcome measure, where a difference of 15 points is considered to be a clinically important difference a total of 51 patients will be needed in each group for a power of 90%. An intention-to-treat analysis will be used. This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will provide much needed evidence on the clinical effectiveness of post-operative night splinting in patients who have undergone fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy for Dupuytren's contracture of the hand. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 57079614.

  18. Splinting after contracture release for Dupuytren's contracture (SCoRD: protocol of a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnowski Adrian J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splinting as part of the overall post-surgical management of patients after release of Dupuytren's contracture has been widely reported, though there is variation in practice and criteria for using it. The evidence on its effectiveness is sparse, of poor quality and contradictory with studies reporting negative and positive effects. Methods/Design A multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial is being conducted to evaluate the effect of static night splinting for six months on hand function, range of movement, patient satisfaction and recurrence at 1 year after fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy. Using a centrally administered computer randomization system consented patients will be allocated to one of two groups: i splint group who will be given a static splint at approximately 10 to 14 days after surgery to be worn for 6 months at night time only as well as hand therapy; ii non-splint group, who will receive hand therapy only. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Disabilities of the Arm, Hand and Shoulder Questionnaire (DASH. Secondary outcomes are total active flexion and extension of fingers, patient satisfaction and recurrence of contracture. Outcome measures will be collected prior to surgery, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Using the DASH as the primary outcome measure, where a difference of 15 points is considered to be a clinically important difference a total of 51 patients will be needed in each group for a power of 90%. An intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will provide much needed evidence on the clinical effectiveness of post-operative night splinting in patients who have undergone fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy for Dupuytren's contracture of the hand. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 57079614

  19. Phenylephrine hydrochloride modified-release tablets for nasal congestion: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in allergic rhinitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Ratner, Paul H; McGraw, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Over-the-counter phenylephrine hydrochloride (PEH) is used for relief of nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis; however, data to support its efficacy are lacking. The US Food and Drug Administration recommended clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PEH in patients with this condition. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of PEH 30-mg modified-release (MR) tablets in patients with nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis in a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, 2-arm, parallel-group study. Eligible adults at least 18 years old with documented hypersensitivity to fall pollen allergens were randomized to PEH-MR or placebo every 12 hours for 7 days from August 30 to October 12, 2011. The primary end point was mean change from baseline during the entire treatment period in daily reflective nasal congestion score. Secondary end points included changes in other symptom score assessments, time to maximal effect, duration of effect, and quality of life. Safety assessments included adverse events, serious adverse events, vital signs, physical examination, and electrocardiograms. Of 575 patients, 288 received PEH-MR and 287 received placebo. No significant beneficial difference was detected between PEH-MR and placebo for the primary end point (PEH-MR, mean -0.394, SD 0.4880; placebo, mean -0.412, SD 0.5383; P = .2655). Likewise, no significant differences were observed for most secondary end points or quality of life. Overall, 89 of 575 patients (15.5%), equally distributed between the PEH-MR and placebo groups, experienced at least 1 treatment-emergency adverse event. PEH-MR 30-mg tablets taken orally every 12 hours for 7 days is not more efficacious than placebo in relieving nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis. clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01413958, protocol CL2011-06. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Myofascial Release on Pressure Pain Thresholds in Patients With Neck Pain: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Huguet, Manuel; Gil-Salú, José Luis; Rodríguez-Huguet, Pablo; Cabrera-Afonso, Juan Rafael; Lomas-Vega, Rafael

    2017-07-03

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of myofascial release therapy (MRT) for improving pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and pain in patients with mechanical neck pain. Forty-one participants with neck pain were randomly allocated to either a MRT group (five sessions) or a physical therapy (PT) group (ten sessions) for 2 wks. The multimodal PT program included ultrasound therapy (US), transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, and massage. Visual analog scale (VAS) and PPTs in suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles were measured at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at 1 month follow-up. At the end of treatment, significant mean differences in VAS (-0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.82 to -0.16), in both left (0.28, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.50) and right (0.40, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.63) suboccipital PPTs and in the right trapezius PPT (0.38, 95% CI = 0.07 to 0.69) were observed. At 1-month follow-up, significant mean differences were found for VAS (-1.85, 95% CI = -2.76 to -0.94) and both left (0.46, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.80) and right (0.38, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.69) suboccipital PPTs. This study provides evidence that MRT could be better than a multimodal PT program for short-term improvement of pain and PPTs in patients with neck pain.

  1. Paliperidone extended-release tablets in Chinese patients with schizophrenia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai SL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shangli Cai,1,2 Huafei Lu,2 Zhihua Bai,2 Renrong Wu,1 Jingping Zhao1 1Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Hunan, 2Janssen Research and Development, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Previous meta-analyses have compared paliperidone extended-release (ER tablets with other antipsychotics, but none have involved Chinese patients or studies from People’s Republic of China. Further, the results of these meta-analyses may not be applicable to Chinese patients. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of paliperidone ER compared with other second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs for Chinese patients with schizophrenia.Methods: Randomized controlled studies of paliperidone ER and other SGAs as oral monotherapy in the acute phase treatment of schizophrenia were retrieved from Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL, as well as from Chinese databases including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP Information/Chinese Scientific Journals Database. We pooled data on response rates, chance of withdrawal due to adverse events, probability of adverse events, and odds of withdrawal for any reason.Results: Fifty randomized controlled trials were identified. The response rate for paliperidone ER was significantly higher than that of other pooled SGAs (risk ratio [RR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–0.96 and ziprasidone (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.39–0.82. Paliperidone ER significantly reduced the chance of withdrawal due to adverse events and the chance of any adverse events compared with other pooled SGAs (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17–0.58 and RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79–0.97 and risperidone (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14–0.67 and RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.57–0.86. The incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms on paliperidone ER was comparable with

  2. Intensive case management before and after prison release is no more effective than comprehensive pre-release discharge planning in linking HIV-infected prisoners to care: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, David A; Scheyett, Anna; Golin, Carol E; White, Becky; Matuszewski, Jeanine; Bowling, Michael; Smith, Paula; Duffin, Faye; Rosen, David; Kaplan, Andrew; Earp, JoAnne

    2011-02-01

    Imprisonment provides opportunities for the diagnosis and successful treatment of HIV, however, the benefits of antiretroviral therapy are frequently lost following release due to suboptimal access and utilization of health care and services. In response, some have advocated for development of intensive case-management interventions spanning incarceration and release to support treatment adherence and community re-entry for HIV-infected releasees. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a motivational Strengths Model bridging case management intervention (BCM) beginning approximately 3 months prior to and continuing 6 months after release versus a standard of care prison-administered discharge planning program (SOC) for HIV-infected state prison inmates. The primary outcome variable was self-reported access to post-release medical care. Of the 104 inmates enrolled, 89 had at least 1 post-release study visit. Of these, 65.1% of BCM and 54.4% of SOC assigned participants attended a routine medical appointment within 4 weeks of release (P > 0.3). By week 12 post-release, 88.4% of the BCM arm and 78.3% of the SOC arm had at attended at least one medical appointment (P = 0.2), increasing in both arms at week 24-90.7% with BCM and 89.1% with SOC (P > 0.5). No participant without a routine medical visit by week 24 attended an appointment from weeks 24 to 48. The mean number of clinic visits during the 48 weeks post release was 5.23 (SD = 3.14) for BCM and 4.07 (SD = 3.20) for SOC (P > 0.5). There were no significant differences between arms in social service utilization and re-incarceration rates were also similar. We found that a case management intervention bridging incarceration and release was no more effective than a less intensive pre-release discharge planning program in supporting health and social service utilization for HIV-infected individuals released from prison.

  3. The corticotropin releasing hormone-1 (CRH1) receptor antagonist pexacerfont in alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled experimental medicine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwako, Laura E; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Schwandt, Melanie L; Thorsell, Annika; George, David T; Momenan, Reza; Rio, Daniel E; Huestis, Marilyn; Anizan, Sebastien; Concheiro, Marta; Sinha, Rajita; Heilig, Markus

    2015-03-13

    Extensive preclinical data implicate corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), acting through its CRH1 receptor, in stress- and dependence-induced alcohol seeking. We evaluated pexacerfont, an orally available, brain penetrant CRH1 antagonist for its ability to suppress stress-induced alcohol craving and brain responses in treatment seeking alcohol-dependent patients in early abstinence. Fifty-four anxious alcohol-dependent participants were admitted to an inpatient unit at the NIH Clinical Center, completed withdrawal treatment, and were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with pexacerfont (300 mg/day for 7 days, followed by 100 mg/day for 23 days). After reaching steady state, participants were assessed for alcohol craving in response to stressful or alcohol-related cues, neuroendocrine responses to these stimuli, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to alcohol-related stimuli or stimuli with positive or negative emotional valence. A separate group of 10 patients received open-label pexacerfont following the same dosing regimen and had cerebrospinal fluid sampled to estimate central nervous system exposure. Pexacerfont treatment had no effect on alcohol craving, emotional responses, or anxiety. There was no effect of pexacerfont on neural responses to alcohol-related or affective stimuli. These results were obtained despite drug levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that predict close to 90% central CRH1 receptor occupancy. CRH1 antagonists have been grouped based on their receptor dissociation kinetics, with pexacerfont falling in a category characterized by fast dissociation. Our results may indicate that antagonists with slow offset are required for therapeutic efficacy. Alternatively, the extensive preclinical data on CRH1 antagonism as a mechanism to suppress alcohol seeking may not translate to humans.

  4. Responsiveness of Myofascial Trigger Points to Single and Multiple Trigger Point Release Massages: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraska, Albert F; Schmiege, Sarah J; Mann, John D; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of single and multiple massage treatments on pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in people with myofascial pain syndrome expressed as tension-type headache. Individuals (n = 62) with episodic or chronic tension-type headache were randomized to receive 12 twice-weekly 45-min massage or sham ultrasound sessions or wait-list control. Massage focused on trigger point release (ischemic compression) of MTrPs in the bilateral upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles. PPT was measured at MTrPs with a pressure algometer pre and post the first and final (12th) treatments. PPT increased across the study timeframe in all four muscle sites tested for massage, but not sham ultrasound or wait-list groups (P pain threshold of MTrPs have a great capacity to increase; even after multiple massage treatments additional gain in PPT was observed. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand the contribution of myofascial trigger points to myofascial pain; (2) Describe an effective treatment for decreasing tenderness of a myofascial trigger point; and (3) Discuss the relative values of single vs. multiple massage sessions on increasing pressure-pain thresholds at myofascial trigger points. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  5. Imputing at-work productivity loss using results of a randomized controlled trial comparing tapentadol extended release and oxycodone controlled release for osteoarthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Debra; Chang, Hong; Rogers, William H; Benson, Carmela; Chow, Wing; Kim, Myoung S; Biondi, David

    2012-08-01

    : To determine the impact of tapentadol extended release (ER) versus placebo or oxycodone controlled release (CR) on the work productivity of adults with chronic moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis pain. : Using clinical trial data on pain outcomes, a validated methodology imputed treatment group differences in at-work productivity and associated differences in productivity costs (assuming a $100,000 annual salary per participant). : Imputed improvements in at-work productivity were significantly greater for tapentadol ER compared with either placebo (mean, 1.96% vs 1.51%; P = 0.001) or oxycodone CR (mean, 1.96% vs 1.40%; P employees to function better at work and reduce their employers' productivity costs.

  6. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS, an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hilario

    Full Text Available Genotyping by sequencing (GBS is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al.some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS. By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145 of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513 by stdGBS.

  7. Benefits of a self-myofascial release program on health-related quality of life in people with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceca, Diego; Elvira, Laura; Guzmán, José F; Pablos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disease with symptoms that significantly limit the life of affected patients. Earlier studies have shown that the application of self-myofascial release provides benefits in variables such as fatigue, range of motion (ROM) or perceived muscle pain in a healthy population. Despite this, the self-myofascial release technique has not yet been used in people with FM. This study aimed to find out the benefits of applying a self-myofascial release program on health-related quality of life in people with FM. Sixty-six participants with FM were randomized into two groups, intervention (N.=33) and control (N.=33). The intervention group (IG) participated in the self-myofascial release program for twenty weeks. The study assessed the impact of a self-myofascial release program on cervical spine, shoulder and hip ROM and self-reported disease impact. Two measurements were performed, one at baseline (preintervention) and one postintervention. Two-way mixed-effect (between-within) ANOVA was used for the statistical analysis. Significant changes (Pself-myofascial release program can improve the health-related quality of life of people with FM, provided that regular, structured practice is carried out.

  8. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study evaluating the effect of paliperidone extended-release tablets on sleep architecture in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthringer, Remy; Staner, Luc; Noel, Nadine; Muzet, Muriel; Gassmann-Mayer, Cristiana; Talluri, Krishna; Cleton, Adriaan; Eerdekens, Marielle; Battisti, Wendy P; Palumbo, Joseph M

    2007-09-01

    The effects of paliperidone extended-release on sleep architecture in patients with schizophrenia-related insomnia were evaluated in this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Patients received paliperidone extended-release 9 mg/day or matching placebo during the 14-day double-blind phase. Sleep architecture and sleep continuity were evaluated using polysomnograms. Subjective sleep measures were evaluated daily using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Efficacy and safety were also assessed. Thirty-six patients (17 on paliperidone extended-release, 19 on placebo; mean age 32.2 years) completed the study. Paliperidone extended-release treatment vs. placebo resulted in clinically and statistically significant differences in sleep measurements from baseline to endpoint including a reduction in: persistent sleep latency (41 min), sleep onset latency (35 min), number of awakenings after sleep onset (7), time awake in bed (50 min), and stage 1 sleep duration (12 min); prolongation in: total sleep time (53 min), sleep period time (42 min), stage 2 sleep duration (51 min), and rapid eye movement sleep duration (18 min); and an increase in sleep efficiency index (11%). Paliperidone extended-release, compared with placebo, did not exacerbate daytime somnolence and improved symptoms of schizophrenia. Paliperidone extended-release was well tolerated and improved sleep architecture and sleep continuity in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and concomitant insomnia.

  9. A 3-year multicentre randomized controlled trial of etonogestrel- and levonorgestrel-releasing contraceptive implants, with non-randomized matched copper-intrauterine device controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Brache, Vivian; Meirik, Olav; Ali, Moazzam; Habib, Ndema; Landoulsi, Sihem

    2015-11-01

    Is there any difference in the clinical performance of the 3-year one-rod etonogestrel (ENG)- and the 5-year two-rod levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing contraceptive implants during 3 years of insertion, and between implant and intrauterine device (IUD) contraception, in particular complaints possibly related to hormonal contraceptives? The cumulative contraceptive effectiveness after 3 years and method continuation through 2.5 years were not significantly different between ENG and LNG implants, but both outcomes were significantly worse in the non-randomized age-matched group of IUD users than in the combined implant group. ENG- and LNG-releasing implants are safe and highly efficacious contraceptives with pregnancy rates reported to be 0.0-0.5 per 100 women-years (W-Y). No head-to-head comparative study of the two implants has been undertaken, and little information is available on comparisons of complaints of side effects of implant and copper IUD users. This was an open parallel group RCT with 1:1 allocation ratio of the ENG and the LNG implants with non-randomized control group of women choosing TCu380A IUD to address lack of reliable data on common side effects typically attributed to the use of progestogen-only contraceptives. After device(s) placement, follow-ups were at 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and semi-annually thereafter for 3 years or until pregnancy, removal or expulsion of the implant/IUD occurred. The study took place in family planning clinics in Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Hungary, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe. Women seeking long-term contraception were enlisted after an eligibility check and informed consent, and 2982 women were enrolled: 1003, 1005 and 974 in the ENG-implant, LNG-implant and IUD groups, respectively; 995, 997 and 971, respectively, were included in the per protocol analysis reported here. ENG and LNG implants each had the same 3-year cumulative pregnancy rate of 0.4 per 100 W-Y [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-1.4]. A weight

  10. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-month trial of bupropion hydrochloride sustained-release tablets as an aid to smoking cessation in hospital employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgareth, Oli Jacob; Hansen, Niels-Christian Gerner; Søes-Petersen, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Despite changes in smoking behavior, one-third of the Danish population continues to smoke. Many of these smokers are hospital employees. This 6-month, multicenter, parallel group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated treatment with bupropion hydrochloride sustained release...... (Zyban) compared with placebo as an aid to smoking cessation in health care workers. A total of 336 hospital employees who smoked at least 10 cigarettes daily were randomized (2:1) to 7 weeks of treatment with bupropion (n=222) or placebo (n=114). All participants were motivated to quit smoking......% in the bupropion group and 18% in the placebo group, p

  11. Immediate Loading of Two Dental Implants, in Edentulous Mandibles, with Locator® Attachments or Dolder® Bars: First Results from a Prospective Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Eberhard, Lydia; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Rammelsberg, Peter; Eiffler, Constantin

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to evaluate survival and the incidence of complications for pairs of implants placed in the frontal area of edentulous mandibles and immediately loaded with either bar or Locator® (Zest Anchors LLC, Escondido, CA, USA) attachments. Forty-six patients (mean age 69.4 years; 73.9% male) with edentulous mandibles each received two immediately loaded implants in the interforaminal area of the symphysis. Immediately after implant placement, Dolder® bar (Sub-Tec Wirobond; BEGO Implant Systems GmbH & Co. KG, Bremen, Germany) or Locator® attachments, allocated randomly, were attached, and both clips and a framework were incorporated into the denture by the dental technician. The implants were loaded within 72 hours. During a mean observation period of 6 months (maximum 24 months, SD 0.43) eight implants in five patients were lost. Survival was 93.5% for the Locator® group and 89.1% for the bar group. Estimated cumulative survival after 1 year of function was 93.4% for the Locator® group and 87.1% for the bar group. During the observation period, 12 prosthetic complications required aftercare. No superstructure was lost or had to be remade for prosthetic reasons, but five dentures had to be removed or reworked after implant failure. Survival of the original dentures was, therefore, 95.7% for the Locator® group and 93.5% for the bar group. Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading of two implants in the edentulous mandible with either Locator® or bar attachments did hardly differ. Ease of repair and cleaning, in particular, might be arguments for choosing the single attachment system. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Measuring the volume of brain tumour and determining its location in T2-weighted MRI images using hidden Markov random field: expectation maximization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Jafri, Mohd. Zubir; Abdulbaqi, Hayder Saad; Mutter, Kussay N.; Mustapha, Iskandar Shahrim; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2017-06-01

    A brain tumour is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain. Most tumour volume measurement processes are carried out manually by the radiographer and radiologist without relying on any auto program. This manual method is a timeconsuming task and may give inaccurate results. Treatment, diagnosis, signs and symptoms of the brain tumours mainly depend on the tumour volume and its location. In this paper, an approach is proposed to improve volume measurement of brain tumors as well as using a new method to determine the brain tumour location. The current study presents a hybrid method that includes two methods. One method is hidden Markov random field - expectation maximization (HMRFEM), which employs a positive initial classification of the image. The other method employs the threshold, which enables the final segmentation. In this method, the tumour volume is calculated using voxel dimension measurements. The brain tumour location was determined accurately in T2- weighted MRI image using a new algorithm. According to the results, this process was proven to be more useful compared to the manual method. Thus, it provides the possibility of calculating the volume and determining location of a brain tumour.

  13. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  14. Effectiveness of Core Stability Exercises and Recovery Myofascial Release Massage on Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Cantarero-Villanueva; Carolina Fernández-Lao; Rosario del Moral-Avila; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas; María Belén Feriche-Fernández-Castanys; Manuel Arroyo-Morales

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n = 78) breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release) and control (usual health care) groups. The interven...

  15. Sustained Release Formulation of Primaquine for Prevention of Relapse of Plasmodium vivax Malaria: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Comparative, Multicentric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pareek, Anil; Chandurkar, Nitin; Gogtay, Nithya; Deshpande, Alaka; Kakrani, Arjun; Kaneria, Mala; Karmakar, Partha; Jain, Arvind; Kochar, Dhanpat; Chogle, Arun; Ray, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Background. Primaquine is used to eradicate latent Plasmodium vivax parasite from liver, with administration of standard dose daily up to 14 days. We studied efficacy, safety, and tolerability of sustained release (SR) formulation of primaquine in comparison with conventional primaquine in preventing relapse of P. vivax malaria. Methods. Microscopically confirmed cases of P. vivax malaria received chloroquine therapy for three days. Aparasitemic and asymptomatic patients were then randomized ...

  16. ADHERE: randomized controlled trial comparing renal function in de novo kidney transplant recipients receiving prolonged-release tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil or sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummo, Oleg O; Carmellini, Mario; Rostaing, Lionel; Oberbauer, Rainer; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Mousson, Christiane; Langer, Robert M; Citterio, Franco; Charpentier, Bernard; Brown, Malcolm; Kazeem, Gbenga; Lehner, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ADHERE was a randomized, open-label, Phase IV study comparing renal function at Week 52 postkidney transplant, in patients who received prolonged-release tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens. On Days 0-27, patients received prolonged-release tacrolimus (initially 0.2 mg/kg/day), corticosteroids, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Patients were randomized on Day 28 to receive either prolonged-release tacrolimus plus MMF (Arm 1) or prolonged-release tacrolimus (≥25% dose reduction on Day 42) plus sirolimus (Arm 2). The primary endpoint was glomerular filtration rate by iohexol clearance (mGFR) at Week 52. Secondary endpoints included eGFR, creatinine clearance (CrCl), efficacy failure (patient withdrawal or graft loss), and patient/graft survival. Tolerability was analyzed. The full-analysis set comprised 569 patients (Arm 1: 287; Arm 2: 282). Week 52 mean mGFR was similar in Arm 1 versus Arm 2 (40.73 vs. 41.75 ml/min/1.73 m2 ; P = 0.405), as were the secondary endpoints, except composite efficacy failure, which was higher in Arm 2 versus 1 (18.2% vs. 11.5%; P = 0.002) owing to a higher postrandomization withdrawal rate due to adverse events (AEs) (14.4% vs. 5.2%). Results from this study show comparable renal function between arms at Week 52, with fewer AEs leading to study discontinuation with prolonged-release tacrolimus plus MMF (Arm 1) versus lower dose prolonged-release tacrolimus plus sirolimus (Arm 2). © 2016 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of guanfacine extended release in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Joseph; Melmed, Raun D; Patel, Anil; McBurnett, Keith; Konow, Jennifer; Lyne, Andrew; Scherer, Noreen

    2008-01-01

    With this study we assessed the efficacy and safety of an extended-release formulation of guanfacine compared with placebo for the treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dosage escalation study, patients aged 6 to 17 years were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups of guanfacine extended release (2, 3, or 4 mg/day) or placebo for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measurement was the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale IV total score. Secondary measurements included Clinical Global Impression of Improvement, Parent's Global Assessment, Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form, and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form. A total of 345 patients were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 86) or guanfacine extended release 2 mg (n = 87), 3 mg (n = 86), or 4 mg (n = 86) treatment groups. Least-squares mean changes from baseline to the end point in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale IV total scores were significant in all groups of children taking guanfacine extended release: -16.18 in the 2-mg group, -16.43 in the 3-mg group, and -18.87 in the 4-mg group, compared with -8.48 in the placebo group. All groups of children taking guanfacine extended release showed significant improvement on hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattentiveness subscales of the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale IV, Clinical Global Impression of Improvement, Parent's Global Assessment, Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form, and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form assessments compared with placebo. The most commonly reported treatment-emergent adverse events were headache, somnolence, fatigue, upper abdominal pain, and sedation. Small to modest changes in blood pressure, pulse rate, and electrocardiogram parameters were observed but were not clinically meaningful. Guanfacine extended release met the

  18. Controlled-Release Oxycodone and Naloxone in the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For Canadian regulatory purposes, an analgesic study was required to complement previously completed, pivotal studies on bowel effects and analgesia associated with controlled-release (CR oxycodone/CR naloxone.

  19. Release of growth factors after mechanical and chemical pleurodesis for treatment of malignant pleural effusion: a randomized control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojski Aljaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growth factors are key inducers of fibrosis but can also mediate inflammatory responses resulting in increasing pleural effusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The primary aim of the study was to analyse growth factors release after performing chemical and mechanical pleurodesis in the first 48 hours at the patients with malignant pleural effusion. The secondary endpoints were to evaluate the effectiveness of the both pleurodeses, symptoms release and the quality of life of patients after the treatment.

  20. Randomized Comparative Study of the Effects of Treatment with Once-Daily, Niacin Extended-Release/Lovastatin and with Simvastatin on Lipid Profile and Fibrinolytic Parameters in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Lin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia can be effectively treated either with niacin or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin, or a combination of both. Few reports showed the effects of the combination regimen with niacin and statin on hemostatic functions. We conducted a single-center, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, two-arm study to assess the effects of the niacin extended-release/lovastatin therapy in a fixed-dose formulation and of simvastatin on lipid lowering and two fibrinolytic parameters, fibrinogen and d-dimer. All patients were enrolled according to NCEP-ATP III guidelines and underwent a placebo run-in period of 4 weeks before being randomized to either niacin extended-release/lovastatin tablets (500/20 mg once daily (n = 36 or simvastatin capsule (20 mg once daily (n = 34. After 16 weeks of treatment, both groups of patients showed significantly reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol (LDL-C, p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively, p = 0.159 between the groups; TC, p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively, p = 0.018 between the groups. Both drugs were well tolerated. Only in the group treated with niacin extended-release/lovastatin was fibrinogen concentration significantly reduced after treatment (2.48 ± 0.65 to 1.99 ± 0.62 g/L, p = 0.008. No difference was found with d-dimer in either group. This study shows that both niacin extended-release/ lovastatin and simvastatin are effective and well-tolerated lipid-lowering drugs in Taiwanese patients with dyslipidemia. A combinational treatment with niacin extended-release/lovastatin may provide additional benefit in fibrinolysis.

  1. Take-home emergency naloxone to prevent heroin overdose deaths after prison release: rationale and practicalities for the N-ALIVE randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, John; Bird, Sheila M; Parmar, Mahesh K B

    2013-10-01

    The naloxone investigation (N-ALIVE) randomized trial commenced in the UK in May 2012, with the preliminary phase involving 5,600 prisoners on release. The trial is investigating whether heroin overdose deaths post-prison release can be prevented by prior provision of a take-home emergency supply of naloxone. Heroin contributes disproportionately to drug deaths through opiate-induced respiratory depression. Take-home emergency naloxone is a novel preventive measure for which there have been encouraging preliminary reports from community schemes. Overdoses are usually witnessed, and drug users themselves and also family members are a vast intervention workforce who are willing to intervene, but whose responses are currently often inefficient or wrong. Approximately 10% of provided emergency naloxone is thought to be used in subsequent emergency resuscitation but, as yet, there have been no definitive studies. The period following release from prison is a time of extraordinarily high mortality, with heroin overdose deaths increased more than sevenfold in the first fortnight after release. Of prisoners with a previous history of heroin injecting who are released from prison, 1 in 200 will die of a heroin overdose within the first 4 weeks. There are major scientific and logistical challenges to assessing the impact of take-home naloxone. Even in recently released prisoners, heroin overdose death is a relatively rare event: hence, large numbers of prisoners need to enter the trial to assess whether take-home naloxone significantly reduces the overdose death rate. The commencement of pilot phase of the N-ALIVE trial is a significant step forward, with prisoners being randomly assigned either to treatment-as-usual or to treatment-as-usual plus a supply of take-home emergency naloxone. The subsequent full N-ALIVE trial (contingent on a successful pilot) will involve 56,000 prisoners on release, and will give a definitive conclusion on lives saved in real-world application

  2. Randomized comparison of health-related quality of life in women with ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy of unknown location treated with systemic methotrexate or expectant management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mello, Norah M; Mol, Femke; Hajenius, Petra J; Ankum, Willem M; Mol, Ben Willem; van der Veen, Fulco; van Wely, Madelon

    2015-09-01

    To study the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of treatment with systemic methotrexate (MTX) or expectant management in women with ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy of unknown location (PUL) with low and plateauing serum hCG concentrations. HRQoL was assessed alongside a randomized clinical trial (RCT) with the use of standard self-administered psychometric measure questionnaires. All women who participated in the multicenter RCT comparing treatment with systemic MTX to expectant management in women with ectopic pregnancy or persisting PUL were eligible for the HRQoL measurements. HRQoL measures of three standardized questionnaires (SF-36, RSCL, HADS). Data were available for 64 of 73 women (78%) randomized in the RCT. We found no difference in HRQoL between the two treatment groups. The need for additional treatment, i.e. additional MTX injections or surgical intervention, had no impact on HRQoL. Women treated with MTX or expectant management for an ectopic pregnancy or persisting PUL have comparable quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located...

  4. Marginal Bone Response Around Immediate- and Delayed-Loading Implants Supporting a Locator-Retained Mandibular Overdenture: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schincaglia, Gian Pietro; Rubin, Satoko; Thacker, Sejal; Dhingra, Ajay; Trombelli, Leonardo; Ioannidou, Effie

    2016-01-01

    Implant-supported mandibular overdentures (OVDs) have been proposed as the gold standard for the treatment of edentulous mandibles. There is limited evidence on the clinical outcomes of immediate loading of two unsplinted implants supporting a mandibular OVD. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the performance of two unsplinted implants supporting a Locator-retained mandibular OVD over 12 months loaded immediately or after a delay. Each patient received two implants 4.0 mm in diameter and 8 to 15 mm long. Locator-retained mandibular OVDs were connected to the implants either immediately (IL) or 3 months postsurgery (DL). The primary response variable was radiographic bone loss (RBL) at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Implant length, insertion torque, implant failure, prevalence of maintenance visits, and prosthetic complications were also recorded. Thirty participants (15 in the IL and 15 in the DL groups) were evaluated at 12 months. The implant cumulative survival rates were 100% and 93% for DL and IL, respectively. The mean RBL from baseline to 1 year was 0.54 (± 0.5) mm and 0.25 (± 0.5) mm for DL and IL, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed at 12 months, with less RBL in the IL group. Insertion torque and implant length were not correlated with RBL. Also, no difference in frequency of maintenance visits and prosthetic complications was reported between the groups. Immediate loading of two unsplinted implants supporting a Locator-retained mandibular OVD seems to be a suitable treatment option. Significantly less RBL was observed after 1 year of loading around IL implants than around DL implants. Furthermore, neither implant length nor insertion torque seemed to affect RBL 1 year after surgical placement.

  5. Dependence of intake fraction on release location in a multi-media framework: A case study of four contaminants in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Bennett, Deborah H.; Perem, Merike; Maddalena, Randy L.; M cKone, Thomas E.; Mackay, Don

    2003-03-01

    The extent of human exposure to persistent anthropogenic environmental contaminants is a complex function of the amount of chemical emitted, its physico-chemical properties and reactivity, the nature of the environment, and the characteristics of the pathways for human exposure, such as inhalation, intake of food and water and dermal contact. For some chemicals, the location of emissions relative to areas of high population density or intense food production may also be an important factor. The relative importance of these variables is explored using the regionally segmented BETR North America contaminant fate model and data for food production patterns and population density for North America. The model is applied to four contaminants emitted to air: benzene, carbon tetrachloride, benzo[a]pyrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo dioxin. The total continental intake fraction (iF), relating exposure quantity to emission quantity, is employed as a metric for assessing population exposure to environmental contaminants. The results show that the use of continentally averaged parameters for population density and food production provides an accurate estimate of the median of iF calculated for emissions in individual regions, however iF can range from this median by up to 3 orders of magnitude, especially for chemicals transferred to humans through the food pathway. The location of population relative to food production and emissions of chemicals are important variables that should be considered in assessing the public health implications of chemical emissions.

  6. An optimized inverse modelling method for determining the location and strength of a point source releasing airborne material in urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, George C.; Kovalets, Ivan V.; Venetsanos, Alexandros; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Argyropoulos, Christos D.; Kakosimos, Konstantinos

    2017-12-01

    An improved inverse modelling method to estimate the location and the emission rate of an unknown point stationary source of passive atmospheric pollutant in a complex urban geometry is incorporated in the Computational Fluid Dynamics code ADREA-HF and presented in this paper. The key improvement in relation to the previous version of the method lies in a two-step segregated approach. At first only the source coordinates are analysed using a correlation function of measured and calculated concentrations. In the second step the source rate is identified by minimizing a quadratic cost function. The validation of the new algorithm is performed by simulating the MUST wind tunnel experiment. A grid-independent flow field solution is firstly attained by applying successive refinements of the computational mesh and the final wind flow is validated against the measurements quantitatively and qualitatively. The old and new versions of the source term estimation method are tested on a coarse and a fine mesh. The new method appeared to be more robust, giving satisfactory estimations of source location and emission rate on both grids. The performance of the old version of the method varied between failure and success and appeared to be sensitive to the selection of model error magnitude that needs to be inserted in its quadratic cost function. The performance of the method depends also on the number and the placement of sensors constituting the measurement network. Of significant interest for the practical application of the method in urban settings is the number of concentration sensors required to obtain a ;satisfactory; determination of the source. The probability of obtaining a satisfactory solution - according to specified criteria -by the new method has been assessed as function of the number of sensors that constitute the measurement network.

  7. Immediate loading of four interforaminal implants supporting a locator-retained mandibular overdenture in the elderly. Results of a 3-year randomized, controlled, prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acham, Stephan; Rugani, Petra; Truschnegg, Astrid; Wildburger, Angelika; Wegscheider, Walther A; Jakse, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    Implant-retained overdentures have become a standard option for the prosthetic treatment of the edentulous mandible in the elderly. This prospective study aimed to compare immediate and conventional loading of four interforaminal implants supporting a Locator-retained mandibular overdenture in elderly patients regarding implant survival, implant stability, and implant-related complications. The study population comprised 20 completely edentulous patients (11 males) aged 60 years and older with severe mandible resorption. Each patient received four interforaminal implants (Neoss Ltd., Harrogate, UK). Following randomization, implants were loaded either immediately after dental implant surgery or 3 months after implant placement with the Locator-abutment system. At follow-up visits 3, 6 12, 24, and 36 months after loading, implant stability was evaluated with Periotest and Ostell. Twenty patients received 80 implants. In eight patients, 32 implants were loaded immediately. Two patients had to be switched from the immediate to the conventional loading group due to insufficient primary stability (≤30 Ncm). Implant survival was similar in both groups after 36 months. No implant was lost. Decreasing Periotest, and accordingly, increasing Ostell measurements indicated adequate osseointegration in both groups. The course of treatment was not significantly different in the two groups. There were comparable incidences of postoperative complaints like swelling, hematoma, or wound dehiscence, as well as need for prosthetic treatment due to abutment loosening or occlusal discrepancies. Incidence of pressure marks and number of patient visits were significantly higher in the conventional loading group. With sufficient primary stability, immediate loading of four interforaminal implants in the edentulous mandible might be the preferential choice in the elderly, reducing total treatment time, and number of patient visits. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Glass ionomer ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in fissure caries prevention – results from a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The relative performance of ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in preventing fissure caries in permanent molars was compared in a randomized clinical trial conducted in southern China (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01829334). Methods After obtaining ethical approval, healthy schoolchildren who had permanent first molars with occlusal fissures which were sound but deep or presented with only incipient caries were recruited for the study. Included molars were randomly allocated into one of four parallel study groups in units of left/right teeth per mouth. Two of the four groups adopted the methods of ART or fluoride-releasing resin sealant placement while the other two groups adopted the topical fluoride application methods. Fissure status of the molars in each group was evaluated every 6 months. Development of dentine caries and sealant retention over 24 months in the molars in the two sealant-using groups was compared in this report. Outcome on cost-effectiveness of all four groups over 36 months will be reported elsewhere. Results At baseline, a total of 280 children (383 molars) with mean age 7.8 years were involved for the two sealant groups. After 24 months, 261 children (357 molars) were followed. Proportions of molars with dentine caries were 7.3% and 3.9% in the ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant groups, respectively (chi-square test, p = 0.171). Life-table survival analysis showed that sealant retention (full and partial) rate over 24 months for the resin sealant (73%) was significantly higher than that (50%) for the ART sealant (p ART sealant (93%) and fluoride-releasing resin sealant (96%) groups were not significantly different (p = 0.169). Multilevel logistic regression (GEE modeling) accounting for the effects of data clustering and confounding factors confirmed this finding. Conclusions Though the retention of fluoride-releasing resin sealant was better than that of the ART sealant, their effectiveness in

  9. Perforator-Based Interposition Flaps Perform Better Than Full-Thickness Grafts for the Release of Burn Scar Contractures: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Jaspers, Mariëlle E H; Jongen, Sandra J M; Baas, Dominique C; Gardien, Kim L M; Hiddingh, Jakob; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2017-02-01

    Burn scar contractures remain a significant problem for the severely burned patient. Reconstructive surgery is often indicated to improve function and quality of life. Skin grafts (preferably full-thickness grafts) are frequently used to cover the defect that remains after scar release. Local flaps are also used for this purpose and provide healthy skin subcutaneous tissue. The vascularization and versatility of local flaps can be further improved by enclosing a perforator at the base of the flap. Until now, no randomized controlled trial has been performed to determine which technique has the best effectiveness in burn scar contracture releasing procedures. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness of perforator-based interposition flaps to full-thickness skin grafts for the treatment of burn scar contractures. The primary outcome parameter was change in the surface area of the flap or full-thickness skin graft. Secondary outcome parameters were width, elasticity, color, Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale score, and range of motion. Measurements were performed after 3 and 12 months. The mean surface area between flaps (n = 16) and full-thickness skin grafts (n = 14) differed statistically significantly at 3 months (123 percent versus 87 percent; p Scar Assessment Scale observer score and color), interposition flaps showed superior results compared with full-thickness skin grafts. Perforator-based interposition flaps result in a more effective scar contracture release than full-thickness skin grafts and should therefore be preferred over full-thickness skin grafts when possible. Therapeutic, I.

  10. History of early abuse as a predictor of treatment response in patients with fibromyalgia : A post-hoc analysis of a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pae, Chi-Un; Masand, Prakash S.; Marks, David M.; Krulewicz, Stan; Han, Changsu; Peindl, Kathleen; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a post-hoc analysis to determine whether a history of physical or sexual abuse was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in fibromyalgia. Methods. A randomized, double-blind,

  11. ICE Online Detainee Locator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Online Detainee Locator datasets provide the location of a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was release from ICE custody for any reason with the...

  12. Slow-release L-Cysteine (Acetium®) Lozenge Is an Effective New Method in Smoking Cessation. A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, Kari; Eronen, Katja; Hendolin, Panu; Paloheimo, Lea; Eklund, Carita; Bäckström, Anna; Suovaniemi, Osmo

    2017-07-01

    Because of the major health problems and annual economic burden caused by cigarette smoking, effective new tools for smoking intervention are urgently needed. Our previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) provided promising results on the efficacy of slow-release L-cysteine lozenge in smoking intervention, but the study was not adequately powered. To confirm in an adequately-powered study the results of the previous RCT implicating that effective elimination of acetaldehyde in saliva by slow-release L-cysteine (Acetium® lozenge, Biohit Oyj, Helsinki), would assist in smoking cessation by reducing acetaldehyde-enhanced nicotine addiction. On this matter, we undertook a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing Acetium® lozenge and placebo in smoking intervention. A cohort of 1,998 cigarette smokers were randomly allocated to intervention (n=996) and placebo arms (n=1,002). At baseline, smoking history was recorded by a questionnaire, with nicotine dependence testing according to the Fagerström scale (FTND). The subjects used smoking diary recording the daily numbers of cigarettes, lozenges and subjective sensations of smoking. The data were analysed separately for point prevalence of abstinence (PPA) and prolonged abstinence (PA) endpoints. Altogether, 753 study subjects completed the trial per protocol (PP), 944 with violations (mITT), and the rest (n=301) were lost to follow-up (LTF). During the 6-month intervention, 331 subjects stopped smoking; 181 (18.2%) in the intervention arm and 150 (15.0%) in the placebo arm (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.09-1.88); p=0.010). In the PP group, 170 (45.3%) quitted smoking in the intervention arm compared to 134 (35.4%) in the placebo arm (OR=1.51, 95%CI=1.12-2.02; p=0.006). In multivariate (Poisson regression) model, decreased level of smoking pleasure (p=0.010) and "smoking sensations changed" were powerful independent predictors of quit events (IRR=12.01; 95%CI=1.5-95.6). Acetium® lozenge, herein confirmed in an

  13. Extended Release Quetiapine Fumarate (Quetiapine XR) as Adjunct Therapy in Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and a History of Inadequate Treatment Response: A Randomized, Double-Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arifulla; Atkinson, Sarah; Mezhebovsky, Irina; She, Fahua; Leathers, Todd; Pathak, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of adjunct extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and inadequate response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/ serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SNRIs). Methods 11-week (1-week single-blind placebo run-in; 8-week randomized treatment; 2-week post-treatment period), double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomized to quetiapine XR or placebo adjunct to SSRI/SNRI. 50 mg initial dose; 150 mg/day, Day 3; 300 mg/day, Weeks × and 4 if indicated (Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness [CGI-S] ≥ 4; 150 mg/day tolerated). Primary endpoint: change from randomization to Week 8 in HAM-A total score. Secondary variables: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) psychic/somatic clusters, response and remission; and CGI-S. Results 409 patients were randomized to quetiapine XR (n = 209) or placebo (n = 200); 41% and 55% of patients, respectively, had dose increases (300 mg/day). Week 8 mean change in HAM-A total score was not statistically significant for quetiapine XR (–10.74; p = 0.079) versus placebo (–9.61). Secondary variables were generally consistent with the primary analysis, except a significant reduction in HAM-A total score at Week 1 (–6.45, quetiapine XR versus –4.47, placebo; p psychic cluster (p < 0.05) and CGI-S total (p < 0.05) scores at Week 8. Adverse events (.10% either group) were dry mouth, somnolence, sedation, headache, and dizziness. Conclusions In patients with GAD and inadequate response to SSRI/SNRI, adjunct quetiapine XR did not show a statistically significant effect for the primary endpoint at Week 8, although some secondary endpoints were statistically significant versus placebo. Quetiapine XR was generally well tolerated. PMID:27738353

  14. Triggering ovulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist versus human chorionic gonadotropin in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Hassaan Farag

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare GnRH agonist to hCG for triggering ovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome treated with clomiphene citrate. Study design: Prospective randomized study. Materials & methods: Eighty five infertile women with PCOS participated in a randomized allocation concealed prospective trial and had induction of ovulation with clomiphene citrate. GnRH agonist 0.2 mg subcutaneously (group 1 or hCG 10,000 IU intramuscularly (group 2 was given to trigger ovulation. Primary outcome was mid-luteal serum progesterone, while secondary outcomes were ovulation rates and clinical pregnancy rates along 3 cycles. Results: No difference was found between group 1 and group 2 regarding mean serum progesterone and clinical pregnancy rates in each cycle. Cumulative pregnancy rates were similar (17.14% versus 20% respectively; P = 0.332. Ovulation rates were 80% versus 68.6% (P = 0.413; 94.3% versus 90.9% (P = 0.669; 97.1% versus 93.7% (P = 0.603 in the two groups respectively. However, a significant rise in number of patients with mid-luteal serum progesterone >10 ng/mL was noted in the 3rd cycle between both groups, (P < 0.0001 for group 1 while P = 0.007 for group 2. Conclusion: Triggering ovulation with GnRH-a after treatment with clomiphene citrate in PCOS, in view of its known protective effect against OHSS, may be an effective physiological alternative to conventional hCG without compromising luteal function and pregnancy rates after repeated cycles of treatment.

  15. Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, using a nitric oxide releasing patch: PATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Federico A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus constitutes one of the most important public health problems due to its high prevalence and enormous social and economic consequences. Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and constitute the most important cause of non-traumatic amputation of inferior limbs. It is estimated that 15% of the diabetic population will develop an ulcer sometime in their lives. Although novel therapies have been proposed, there is no effective treatment for this pathology. Naturally produced nitric oxide participates in the wound healing process by stimulating the synthesis of collagen, triggering the release of chemotactic cytokines, increasing blood vessels permeability, promoting angiogenic activity, stimulating the release of epidermical growth factors, and by interfering with the bacterial mitochondrial respiratory chain. Topically administered nitric oxide has demonstrated to be effective and safe for the treatment of chronic ulcers secondary to cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, due to their unstable nitric oxide release, the topical donors needed to be applied frequently, diminishing the adherence to the treatment. This difficulty has led to the development of a multilayer polymeric transdermal patch produced by electrospinning technique that guarantees a constant nitric oxide release. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this novel nitric oxide releasing wound dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods and design A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, including 100 diabetic patients was designed. At the time of enrollment, a complete medical evaluation and laboratory tests will be performed, and those patients who meet the inclusion criteria randomly assigned to one of two groups. Over the course of 90 days group 1 will receive active patches and group 2 placebo patches. The patients will be seen by the

  16. Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, using a nitric oxide releasing patch: PATHON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sandra Y; Rueda, Ligia C; Márquez, Gustavo A; López, Marcos; Smith, Daniel J; Calderón, Carlos A; Castillo, Juan C; Matute, Jaime; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Orduz, Arturo; Silva, Federico A; Kampeerapappun, Piyaporn; Bhide, Mahesh; López-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2007-09-26

    Diabetes Mellitus constitutes one of the most important public health problems due to its high prevalence and enormous social and economic consequences. Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and constitute the most important cause of non-traumatic amputation of inferior limbs. It is estimated that 15% of the diabetic population will develop an ulcer sometime in their lives. Although novel therapies have been proposed, there is no effective treatment for this pathology. Naturally produced nitric oxide participates in the wound healing process by stimulating the synthesis of collagen, triggering the release of chemotactic cytokines, increasing blood vessels permeability, promoting angiogenic activity, stimulating the release of epidermical growth factors, and by interfering with the bacterial mitochondrial respiratory chain. Topically administered nitric oxide has demonstrated to be effective and safe for the treatment of chronic ulcers secondary to cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, due to their unstable nitric oxide release, the topical donors needed to be applied frequently, diminishing the adherence to the treatment. This difficulty has led to the development of a multilayer polymeric transdermal patch produced by electrospinning technique that guarantees a constant nitric oxide release. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this novel nitric oxide releasing wound dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, including 100 diabetic patients was designed. At the time of enrollment, a complete medical evaluation and laboratory tests will be performed, and those patients who meet the inclusion criteria randomly assigned to one of two groups. Over the course of 90 days group 1 will receive active patches and group 2 placebo patches. The patients will be seen by the research group at least every two weeks until the healing of the

  17. Mnemonic strategy training improves memory for object location associations in both healthy elderly and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampstead, Benjamin M; Sathian, Krish; Phillips, Pamela A; Amaraneni, Akshay; Delaune, William R; Stringer, Anthony Y

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of mnemonic strategy training versus a matched-exposure control condition and to examine the relationship between training-related gains, neuropsychological abilities, and medial temporal lobe volumetrics in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and age-matched healthy controls. Twenty-three of 45 screened healthy controls and 29 of 42 screened patients with aMCI were randomized to mnemonic strategy or matched-exposure groups. Groups were run in parallel, with participants blind to the other intervention. All participants completed five sessions within 2 weeks. Memory testing for object-location associations (OLAs) was performed during sessions one and five and at a 1-month follow-up. During Sessions 2-4, participants received either mnemonic strategy training or a matched number of exposures with corrective feedback for a total of 45 OLAs. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed in most participants, and medial temporal lobe volumetrics were acquired. Twenty-one healthy controls and 28 patients with aMCI were included in data analysis. Mnemonic strategy training was significantly more beneficial than matched exposure immediately after training, p = .006, partial η2 = .16, and at 1 month, p Mnemonic strategy-related improvement was correlated positively with baseline memory and executive functioning and negatively with inferior lateral ventricle volume in patients with aMCI; no significant relationships were evident in matched-exposure patients. Mnemonic strategies effectively improve memory for specific content for at least 1 month in patients with aMCI.

  18. Effectiveness of core stability exercises and recovery myofascial release massage on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Del Moral-Avila, Rosario; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, María Belén; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n = 78) breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release) and control (usual health care) groups. The intervention period was 8 weeks. Mood state, fatigue, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength were determined at baseline, after the last treatment session, and at 6 months of followup. Immediately after treatment and at 6 months, fatigue, mood state, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength exhibited greater improvement within the experimental group compared to placebo group. This paper showed that a multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and massage reduced fatigue, tension, depression, and improved vigor and muscle strength after intervention and 6 months after discharge.

  19. Quetiapine extended-release (Seroquel-XR) versus amitriptyline monotherapy for treating patients with fibromyalgia: a 16-week, randomized, flexible-dose, open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandre, Elena P; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Galán, Jaime; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Vilchez, Juan S; Rodriguez-Lopez, Carmen M; Hidalgo-Tallon, Javier; Morillas-Arques, Piedad

    2014-06-01

    Previous open-label studies have suggested that quetiapine could be a valuable alternative for treating fibromyalgia. This study aims to compare the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release quetiapine with amitriptyline for treating fibromyalgia. This study was a randomized, open-label, flexible-dose, non-inferiority trial. Patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to receive quetiapine extended-release (XR) (N = 45) (50 to 300 mg daily) or amitriptyline (N = 45) (10 to 75 mg daily) for 16 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to endpoint in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) total score; the non-inferiority threshold was established at 8 points. The secondary outcomes included sleep quality, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Twenty-two (49%) patients in the quetiapine group and 34 (76%) patients in the amitriptyline group completed the study. We found a reduction of 9.8 points in the total FIQ score at the endpoint for the quetiapine-treated patients compared to 13.9 points for the amitriptyline-treated patients, for a difference of 4.14 points (80% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 8.98). No significant differences were found between the quetiapine XR and amitriptyline groups for any of the secondary outcomes. The proportion of patients discontinuing treatment due to adverse events was higher in the quetiapine group (n = 14, 31.1%) than the amitriptyline group (n = 3, 6.6%). Our results appear to indicate that quetiapine XR does not provide similar efficacy to amitriptyline for treating patients with fibromyalgia. Quetiapine XR had a worse tolerability than amitriptyline in this population, possibly due to a relatively high starting dose.

  20. The effect of myofascial release and microwave diathermy combined with acupuncture versus acupuncture therapy in tension-type headache patients: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoudis, George; Felah, Bledjana; Nikolaidis, Pantelis; Damigos, Dimitrios

    2017-12-20

    Nonpharmacological therapies for tension-type headache (TTH) and cervicogenic cephalalgia are often a treatment choice, despite the weak to moderate evidence. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an acupuncture/stretching protocol versus acupuncture/stretching plus physiotherapy techniques, in patients with TTH cephalalgia. A single-blind, prospective, multicentre, randomized controlled trial was designed considering the pragmatic situation of administering such protocols and treating the 44 headache patients participating in this study. The patients were randomly assigned in 2 treatment groups (control group, n = 20, acupuncture/stretching; experimental group, n = 24, acupuncture/stretching plus physiotherapy) and completed 10 treatment sessions within 4 weeks with measurements taking place before treatment, after the fifth treatment and after the 10th treatment. The mechanical pressure pain threshold (PPT) was considered as the main outcome measure, using a mechanical algometer to measure 7 bilateral somatic points. Acupuncture in both groups included 17-20 acupuncture points, whereas stretching was initially taught and subsequently self-administered (self-stretches), following a standardized set of movements of the cervical spine. Physiotherapy consisted of microwave diathermy and myofascial release with hands-on techniques. An improvement was noted in both groups/treatments regarding the main outcome measure PPT, all the way from the first to fifth and the 10th treatment, at all measuring sites and at all measurements in both groups (p acupuncture and stretching but further PPT improvements were evidenced when physiotherapy hands-on techniques were added. In clinical terms, the combination of physiotherapy in the form of myofascial release and microwave diathermy with acupuncture and stretching in order to improve the analgesic effect (PPT) is strongly recommended. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Efficacy and safety of tapentadol prolonged release for moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis knee pain: a pooled analysis of two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and oxycodone controlled release-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Bernd; von Zabern, Detlef; Elling, Christian; Dubois, Cecile

    2017-08-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of tapentadol prolonged-release (PR) and oxycodone-controlled release (CR) in moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis knee pain. Data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and oxycodone CR-controlled phase 3 studies with a 3-week titration period and 12-week controlled dose adjustment maintenance period were pooled. Primary efficacy end-points were change from baseline in average pain intensity at week 12 (US end-point) and over the entire maintenance period (non-US end-point). A total of 2,010 patients were assessed. For both primary end-points, tapentadol PR was significantly more effective than oxycodone CR (LS mean difference of -0.41 [95% CI = -0.65, -0.16; p = 0.001] at week 12 and -0.35 [95% CI = -0.58, -0.12; p = 0.003] over 12 weeks of maintenance [last observation carried forward]). Significantly better outcomes than for oxycodone CR were also observed for patient global impression of change, both Short Form-36 component scores, and EuroQoL-5Dimensions health status index (all p tapentadol PR than for oxycodone CR. A higher proportion of oxycodone CR patients discontinued treatment (64% vs 42.2% for tapentadol PR); time to treatment discontinuation due to an adverse event was significantly shorter for oxycodone CR (p tapentadol PR provided superior pain relief and a more improved overall health status than oxycodone CR in a large patient population with moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis pain. Compared to oxycodone CR, tapentadol PR showed a more favorable tolerability profile with better gastrointestinal tolerability.

  2. Extended-release naltrexone to prevent relapse among opioid dependent, criminal justice system involved adults: rationale and design of a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Boney, Tamara Y; Hoskinson, Randall A; McDonald, Ryan; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T; Bonnie, Richard J; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Cornish, James W; O'Brien, Charles P

    2015-03-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX, Vivitrol; Alkermes Inc.) is an injectable monthly sustained-release mu opioid receptor antagonist. XR-NTX is a potentially effective intervention for opioid use disorders and as relapse prevention among criminal justice system (CJS) populations. This 5-site open-label randomized controlled effectiveness trial examines whether XR-NTX reduces opioid relapse compared with treatment as usual (TAU) among community dwelling, non-incarcerated volunteers with current or recent CJS involvement. The XR-NTX arm receives 6 monthly XR-NTX injections at Medical Management visits; the TAU group receives referrals to available community treatment options. Assessments occur every 2 weeks during a 24-week treatment phase and at 12- and 18-month follow-ups. The primary outcome is a relapse event, defined as either self-report or urine toxicology evidence of ≥10 days of opioid use in a 28-day (4 week) period, with a positive or missing urine test counted as 5 days of opioid use. We describe the rationale, specific aims, and design of the study. Alternative design considerations and extensive secondary aims and outcomes are discussed. XR-NTX is a potentially important treatment and relapse prevention option among persons with opioid dependence and CJS involvement. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00781898. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Media Coverage, Journal Press Releases and Editorials Associated with Randomized and Observational Studies in High-Impact Medical Journals: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T M Wang

    Full Text Available Publication of clinical research findings in prominent journals influences health beliefs and medical practice, in part by engendering news coverage. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs should be most influential in guiding clinical practice. We determined whether study design of clinical research published in high-impact journals influences media coverage.We compared the incidence and amount of media coverage of RCTs with that of observational studies published in the top 7 medical journals between 1 January 2013 and 31 March 2013. We specifically assessed media coverage of the most rigorous RCTs, those with >1000 participants that reported 'hard' outcomes. There was no difference between RCTs and observational studies in coverage by major newspapers or news agencies, or in total number of news stories generated (all P>0.63. Large RCTs reporting 'hard' outcomes did not generate more news coverage than small RCTs that reported surrogate outcomes and observational studies (all P>0.32. RCTs were more likely than observational studies to attract a journal editorial (70% vs 46%, P = 0.003, but less likely to be the subject of a journal press release (17% vs 50%, P0.99, nor were they more likely to be the subject of a journal press release (14% vs 38%, P = 0.14.The design of clinical studies whose results are published in high-impact medical journals is not associated with the likelihood or amount of ensuing news coverage.

  4. Paroxetine controlled-release formulation in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Japan and Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Teruhiko; Hong, Jin Pyo; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kunitomi, Taro; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of paroxetine controlled-release (CR) formulation compared to placebo. A secondary objective was to test the hypothesis that the CR decreases selective-serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors-induced nausea as its formulation allows more distal gastrointestinal absorption than the paroxetine immediate-release (IR) formulation. We conducted this study in Japanese and Korean patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in order to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of paroxetine CR compared with placebo. The primary efficacy end-point was the adjusted mean change from baseline in the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score at Week 8. A total of 416 patients with MDD were randomly assigned to the CR, IR and placebo groups. The mean change from baseline in the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was -12.8 in the CR group, -12.5 in the IR group, and -10.4 in the placebo group, which showed a statistically significant difference compared to placebo in CR (P treatment period, when initiated from 12.5 mg, the incidence of nausea in the CR group was 6%, which was comparable with that of placebo (5%). Paroxetine CR is efficacious in the acute treatment of MDD and may have the potential benefit of decreasing the incidence of nausea in the early treatment period. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic enhances salivary release of secretory IgA: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Yasushi; Sato, Norimasa; Azuma, Takayuki; Hasumi, Keiji

    2016-07-01

    Several previous studies have provided evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of garlic and black vinegar on human health, including benefits to immune function. The preliminary study indicated that the intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food, created from aged garlic pickled in the mash of black vinegar, enhanced the release of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in the saliva. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the food in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. The trial was conducted in subjects aged between 30 and 60 years whose rate of salivary sIgA release was moderately low. Subjects consumed 2.49 g of placebo or black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food (active food) daily for 8 weeks. The data obtained with 54 eligible subjects (n=28 and 26 for placebo and active, respectively) were analyzed for efficacy. The rates of salivary sIgA release in the active food group (35.9±84.6 and 47.9±123.4 µg/min at weeks 4 and 8 of intake; changes from pretrial value) were higher compared to the respective rates in the placebo food group (-12.3±72.1 and -3.2±85.9 µg/min, P=0.028 and 0.082, respectively). These findings indicate that intake of black-vinegar-mash-garlic-containing food enhanced the intraoral immune response. There was no adverse event associated with the intake of active food.

  6. Efficacy of single-dose, extended-release naproxen sodium 660 mg in postsurgical dental pain: two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurora, Irene; An, Robert

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel formulation of extended-release/immediate-release (ER) naproxen sodium over 24 h in a dental pain model. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in moderate to severe pain after extraction of one or two impacted third molars (at least one partial mandibular bony impaction). Treatment comprised oral ER naproxen sodium 660 mg (single dose), placebo (both studies) or immediate-release (IR) naproxen sodium 220 mg tid (study 2). Primary efficacy endpoint: 24-h summed pain intensity difference (SPID). Secondary variables included total pain relief (TOTPAR), use of rescue medication. All treatment-emergent adverse events were recorded. NCT00720057 (study 1), NCT01389284 (study 2). Primary efficacy analyses: pain intensity was significantly lower over 24 h with ER naproxen sodium vs. placebo (p patients required rescue medication vs. ER and IR naproxen sodium from 2-24 h post-dose. Once daily ER naproxen sodium was generally safe and well tolerated, with a similar safety profile to IR naproxen sodium tid. The studies were single dose, with limited ability to assess efficacy or safety of multiple doses over time. As the imputed pain score meant that estimated treatment differences may have been biased in favor of ER naproxen sodium, a post hoc analysis evaluated the robustness of the results for pain relief. A single dose of ER naproxen sodium 660 mg significantly reduced moderate to severe dental pain vs. placebo and was comparable to IR naproxen sodium 220 mg tid. Significant pain relief was experienced from 15 min and sustained over 24 h, resulting in a reduced need for rescue medication. ER naproxen sodium 660 mg once daily is a convenient and effective therapy providing 24 h relief of pain.

  7. Improved cortisol exposure-time profile and outcome in patients with adrenal insufficiency: a prospective randomized trial of a novel hydrocortisone dual-release formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, G; Nilsson, A G; Bergthorsdottir, R; Burman, P; Dahlqvist, P; Ekman, B; Engström, B E; Olsson, T; Ragnarsson, O; Ryberg, M; Wahlberg, J; Biller, B M K; Monson, J P; Stewart, P M; Lennernäs, H; Skrtic, S

    2012-02-01

    Patients with treated adrenal insufficiency (AI) have increased morbidity and mortality rate. Our goal was to improve outcome by developing a once-daily (OD) oral hydrocortisone dual-release tablet with a more physiological exposure-time cortisol profile. The aim was to compare pharmacokinetics and metabolic outcome between OD and the same daily dose of thrice-daily (TID) dose of conventional hydrocortisone tablets. We conducted an open, randomized, two-period, 12-wk crossover multicenter trial with a 24-wk extension at five university hospital centers. The trial enrolled 64 adults with primary AI; 11 had concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM). The same daily dose of hydrocortisone was administered as OD dual-release or TID. We evaluated cortisol pharmacokinetics. Compared with conventional TID, OD provided a sustained serum cortisol profile 0-4 h after the morning intake and reduced the late afternoon and the 24-h cortisol exposure. The mean weight (difference = -0.7 kg, P = 0.005), systolic blood pressure (difference = -5.5 mm Hg, P = 0.0001) and diastolic blood pressure (difference: -2.3 mm Hg; P = 0.03), and glycated hemoglobin (absolute difference = -0.1%, P = 0.0006) were all reduced after OD compared with TID at 12 wk. Compared with TID, a reduction in glycated hemoglobin by 0.6% was observed in patients with concomitant DM during OD (P = 0.004). The OD dual-release tablet provided a more circadian-based serum cortisol profile. Reduced body weight, reduced blood pressure, and improved glucose metabolism were observed during OD treatment. In particular, glucose metabolism improved in patients with concomitant DM.

  8. Sustained Release Formulation of Primaquine for Prevention of Relapse of Plasmodium vivax Malaria: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Comparative, Multicentric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Pareek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primaquine is used to eradicate latent Plasmodium vivax parasite from liver, with administration of standard dose daily up to 14 days. We studied efficacy, safety, and tolerability of sustained release (SR formulation of primaquine in comparison with conventional primaquine in preventing relapse of P. vivax malaria. Methods. Microscopically confirmed cases of P. vivax malaria received chloroquine therapy for three days. Aparasitemic and asymptomatic patients were then randomized to receive either conventional primaquine 15 mg for 14 days or primaquine SR 15 mg for 14 days, or primaquine SR 30 mg for seven days. Results. Of the 360 patients, who received chloroquine therapy, 358 patients were randomized. Two-hundred eighty-eight patients completed six-month follow-up and four patients (three: conventional primaquine 15 mg (2.86%, one: primaquine SR 30 mg (0.93% showed relapse confirmed by PCR genotyping. Drug compliance was significantly better in primaquine SR 30 mg group (95.57%, p=0.039 without any serious adverse events. Conclusion. Primaquine SR 15 mg and primaquine SR 30 mg could be an effective alternative to conventional primaquine 15 mg due to their comparable cure rates and safety profile. Shorter treatment duration with primaquine SR 30 mg may increase patient compliance and may further reduce relapse rates. Clinical Trial Registration. This trial is registered with CTRI/2010/091/000245.

  9. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of ADS-5102 (amantadine) extended-release capsules for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (EASE LID 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Wolfgang; Eggert, Karla; Pahwa, Rajesh; Tanner, Caroline M; Hauser, Robert A; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Ehret, Reinhard; Azulay, Jean Philippe; Isaacson, Stuart; Felt, Larissa; Stempien, Mary Jean

    2017-08-21

    The treatment of levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD) is an unmet need with no approved drug therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of 274 mg ADS-5102 (amantadine) extended-release capsules (equivalent to 340-mg amantadine HCl) for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a randomized controlled trial. PD patients with ≥1 hour of troublesome dyskinesia and at least mild functional impact were randomized to placebo or ADS-5102 once daily at bedtime for 13 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis was based on change from baseline to week 12 on the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale total score in the modified intent-to-treat population. OFF time was a key secondary measure. At week 12, least-squares mean change in the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale was -20.7 (standard error 2.2) for ADS-5102 (n = 37) and -6.3 (standard error 2.1) for placebo (n = 38; treatment difference -14.4, 95% confidence interval -20.4 to -8.3, P Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. A randomized clinical trial of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and a low-dose combined oral contraceptive for fibroid-related menorrhagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Gamal H; Zakherah, Mahmoud S; El-Nashar, Sherif A; Shaaban, Mamdouh M

    2011-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with that of a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (COC) in reducing fibroid-related menorrhagia. In this single-center, open, randomized clinical trial, 58 women with menorrhagia who desired contraception were randomized to receive a LNG-IUS or COC. The outcomes included treatment failure, defined as the need for another treatment; menstrual blood loss (MBL) by the alkaline hematin method and a pictorial assessment chart (PBAC); hemoglobin levels; and "lost days." Treatment failed in 6 women (23.1%) in the LNG-IUS group and 11 (37.9%) in the COC group, for a hazard ratio of 0.46 (95% CI, 0.17-1.17, P=0.101). Using the alkaline hematin test, the reduction of MBL was significantly greater in the LNG-IUS group (90.9% ± 12.8% vs 13.4% ± 11.1%; Pmenorrhagia. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Randomized, controlled clinical study to evaluate efficacy of novel indigenously designed controlled release flurbiprofen gel system for management of periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj C Deshpande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This randomized, controlled clinical study was planned to evaluate the use of anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen in the form of locally delivered controlled release gel in the treatment of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The flurbiprofen gel was indigenously prepared in the concentration of 0.3%. The 30 patients with localized periodontal pockets measuring ≥5 mm were randomly divided into three groups. The groups received flurbiprofen gel, flurbiprofen gel after prophylaxis, and placebo gel after oral prophylaxis, respectively. The clinical parameters for plaque and gingival inflammation were evaluated at baseline, 7 th day, and 14 th day. Results: The results of the study suggested the statistically significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in the gingival status of the patients with the use of flurbiprofen gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing as compared to oral prophylaxis or gel alone. Conclusion: The data demonstrated that the additional use of local drug delivery of flurbiprofen through gel media enhances the positive effects of scaling and root planing and helps in faster resolution of the inflammation.

  12. Safety and tolerability of tapentadol extended release in moderate to severe chronic osteoarthritis or low back pain management: pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etropolski, Mila; Kuperwasser, Brigitte; Flügel, Maren; Häufel, Thomas; Lange, Bernd; Rauschkolb, Christine; Laschewski, Frank

    2014-06-01

    This analysis of pooled data from four randomized, controlled-dose adjustment, phase 3 studies (three 15-week, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled studies and a 1-year, open-label, active-controlled safety study) in patients with chronic osteoarthritis hip or knee pain or low back pain evaluated the safety and tolerability of tapentadol extended release (ER) for the management of moderate to severe, chronic pain. In the three 15-week studies, patients were randomized (1:1:1) to twice-daily (bid) doses of placebo, tapentadol ER (100-250 mg), or oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) controlled release (CR; 20-50 mg). In the 1-year safety study, patients were randomized (4:1) to tapentadol ER (100-250 mg bid) or oxycodone HCl CR (20-50 mg bid). Adverse events (AEs) and discontinuations were recorded in each study; pooled results were analyzed by treatment group. In the placebo (n = 993), tapentadol ER (n = 1,874), and oxycodone CR (n = 1,224) groups, respectively, 40.7%, 48.4%, and 62.3% of patients discontinued treatment prematurely and 58.7%, 79.0%, and 86.6% of patients experienced ≥ 1 treatment-emergent AE (TEAE). Incidences of gastrointestinal TEAEs in the placebo, tapentadol ER, and oxycodone CR groups, respectively, were 26.6%, 47.3%, and 65.4%; incidences of nervous system TEAEs were 22.5%, 42.6%, and 45.1%, respectively. Moderate or severe gastrointestinal TEAEs were reported for 10.9% of patients who received placebo, 25.3% of patients who received tapentadol ER, and 42.3% of patients who received oxycodone CR, and moderate or severe nervous system TEAEs were reported for 10.6%, 22.1%, and 25.2% of patients, respectively. In the placebo, tapentadol ER, and oxycodone CR groups, respectively, incidences of gastrointestinal TEAEs leading to study discontinuation were 2.1%, 8.3%, and 24.1%; incidences of nervous system TEAEs leading to discontinuation were 1.4%, 7.9%, and 16.3%, respectively. Results from this large patient population showed that tapentadol

  13. A randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR monotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gang Wang,1 Alexander McIntyre,2 Willie R Earley,3 Shane R Raines,3 Hans Eriksson4 1Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Psychiatry, Penticton Regional Hospital, Penticton, BC, Canada; 3AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE, USA; 4AstraZeneca R&D, Södertälje, Sweden Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR monotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD. Patients and methods: This was a 10-week (8-week active treatment/2-week post-treatment randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study (D1448C00004. Patients received quetiapine XR 150 mg/day, escitalopram 10 mg/day, or placebo; patients with an inadequate response (<20% improvement in Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score at week two received double-dose treatment. The primary end point was week eight change from randomization in MADRS total score. Secondary end points included MADRS response (≥50% improvement and remission (score ≤8; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total and item 1; Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety total, psychic, and somatic; Clinical Global Impressions – Severity of Illness total; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI global; and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire – Short Form percentage maximum total scores. Tolerability was assessed throughout. Results: A total of 471 patients was randomized. No significant improvements in MADRS total score were observed at week eight (last observation carried forward with either active treatment (quetiapine XR, -17.21 [P=0.174]; escitalopram, -16.73 [P=0.346] versus placebo (-15.61. There were no significant differences in secondary end points versus placebo, with the exception of week-eight change in PSQI global score (quetiapine XR, -4.96 [P<0.01] versus placebo, -3.37. Mixed-model repeated

  14. Effect of extended-release niacin on plasma lipoprotein(a) levels: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhosssein; Reiner, Željko; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Ferretti, Gianna; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2016-11-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is a proatherogenic and prothrombotic lipoprotein. Our aim was to quantify the extended-release nicotinic acid Lp(a) reducing effect with a meta-analysis of the available randomized clinical trials. A meta-analysis and random-effects meta-regression were performed on data pooled from 14 randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials published between 1998 and 2015, comprising 17 treatment arms, which included 9013 subjects, with 5362 in the niacin arm. The impact of ER niacin on plasma Lp(a) concentrations was reported in 17 treatment arms. Meta-analysis suggested a significant reduction of Lp(a) levels following ER niacin treatment (weighted mean difference - WMD: -22.90%, 95% CI: -27.32, -18.48, p<0.001). Results also remained similar when the meta-analysis was repeated with standardized mean difference as summary statistic (WMD: -0.66, 95% CI: -0.82, -0.50, p<0.001). When the studies were categorized according to the administered dose, there was a comparable effect between the subsets of studies with administered doses of <2000mg/day (WMD: -21.85%, 95% CI: -30.61, -13.10, p<0.001) and ≥2000mg/day (WMD: -23.21%, 95% CI: -28.41, -18.01, p<0.001). The results of the random-effects meta-regression did not suggest any significant association between the changes in plasma concentrations of Lp(a) with dose (slope: -0.0001; 95% CI: -0.01, 0.01; p=0.983), treatment duration (slope: -0.40; 95% CI: -0.97, 0.17; p=0.166), and percentage change in plasma HDL-C concentrations (slope: 0.44; 95% CI: -0.48, 1.36; p=0.350). In this meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials, treatment with nicotinic acid was associated with a significant reduction in Lp(a) levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy and tolerability of extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) monotherapy in elderly patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katila, Heikki; Mezhebovsky, Irina; Mulroy, Amy; Berggren, Lovisa; Eriksson, Hans; Earley, Willie; Datto, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) monotherapy in elderly patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). An 11-week (9-week randomized; 2-week posttreatment phase), double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase III study (D1448C00014). A total of 53 centers in Argentina, Estonia, Finland, Russia, Ukraine, and the United States. A total of 338 patients (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnosis of MDD, age ≥66 years, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HAM-D] total score ≥22, HAM-D Item 1 [depressed mood] score ≥2) were randomized (mean age: 71.3 years). Patients were randomized to quetiapine XR (n = 166; flexible-dosing 50-300 mg/day) or placebo (n = 172). Primary outcome was Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score change from randomization at Week 9. At Week 9, quetiapine XR (least squares [LS] means: -16.33, standard error [SE]: 0.95; mean change: -16.0, standard deviation [SD]: 9.3) significantly reduced MADRS total score from randomization versus placebo (LS means [SE]: -8.79 [0.94]; mean [SD]: -9.0 [9.9]); significant improvements were also seen at Week 1 (LS means [SE]: -4.65 [0.53] versus -2.56 [0.53], respectively; mean [SD]: -4.3 [5.1] versus -2.4 [3.7], respectively). At Week 9, secondary outcome variables significantly improved with quetiapine XR versus placebo, including MADRS response (≥50% reduction in total score); MADRS remission (total score ≤8); HAM-D total, HAM-A total, HAM-A psychic and somatic cluster, and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) total scores; proportion of patients with CGI-Improvement score of 2 or less; Q-LES-Q-SF% maximum total, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global, and pain Visual Analog Scale scores. Common adverse events (>10% patients with quetiapine XR) were somnolence, headache, dry mouth, and dizziness. In elderly patients with MDD

  16. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Namvar; Gholamreza olyaei; Behrouz Attarbashi Moghadam; Mohammad Hosseinifar

    2016-01-01

    The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chr...

  17. Long-term effects of delayed-release dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis: Interim analysis of ENDORSE, a randomized extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ralf; Arnold, Douglas L; Bar-Or, Amit; Hutchinson, Michael; Kappos, Ludwig; Havrdova, Eva; MacManus, David G; Yousry, Tarek A; Pozzilli, Carlo; Selmaj, Krysztof; Sweetser, Marianne T; Zhang, Ray; Yang, Minhua; Potts, James; Novas, Mark; Miller, David H; Kurukulasuriya, Nuwan C; Fox, Robert J; Phillips, Theodore J

    2017-02-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) demonstrated strong efficacy and a favorable benefit-risk profile for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in phase 3 DEFINE/CONFIRM studies. ENDORSE is an ongoing long-term extension of DEFINE/CONFIRM. We report efficacy and safety results of a 5-year interim analysis of ENDORSE (2 years DEFINE/CONFIRM; minimum 3 years ENDORSE). In ENDORSE, patients randomized to DMF 240 mg twice (BID) or thrice daily (TID) in DEFINE/CONFIRM continued this dosage, and those initially randomized to placebo (PBO) or glatiramer acetate (GA) were re-randomized to DMF 240 mg BID or TID. For patients continuing DMF BID (BID/BID), annualized relapse rates were 0.202, 0.163, 0.139, 0.143, and 0.138 (years 1-5, respectively) and 63%, 73%, and 88% were free of new or enlarging T2 hyperintense lesions, new T1 hypointense lesions, and gadolinium-enhanced lesions, respectively, at year 5. Adverse events (AEs; serious adverse events (SAEs)) were reported in 91% (22%; BID/BID), 95% (24%; PBO/BID), and 88% (16%; GA/BID) of the patients. One case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was reported in the setting of severe, prolonged lymphopenia. Treatment with DMF was associated with continuously low clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disease activity in patients with RRMS. These interim data demonstrate a sustained treatment benefit and an acceptable safety profile with DMF.

  18. Effect of extended-release dexmethylphenidate and mixed amphetamine salts on sleep: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study in youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, J A; Stein, M A; Bergmame, L; Gruber, R

    2014-09-01

    We sought to determine the dose-response effects of extended-release (ER) dexmethylphenidate (d-MPH) and ER mixed amphetamine salts (MAS) on objective measures of sleep. This was an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, two period, crossover study of youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as confirmed by the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). Children aged 10-17 years were recruited from clinical practice, colleague referrals, and flyers. Participants were randomized to initially receive either d-MPH or MAS. During each 4-week drug period, children received three dose levels (10, 20, and 25/30 mg) in ascending order, with placebo substituted for active medication in a randomized fashion during 1 week of the study. After 4 weeks, participants were switched to the alternative medication for another 4 weeks of treatment. The main outcome measure was sleep duration as measured by actigraphy. Children, parents, and researchers were blinded to drug, dose, and placebo status. Sixty-five participants met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. Of these, 37 participants with sufficient sleep data for analysis were included. Sleep schedule measures showed a significant effect for dose on sleep start time (F(1,36) = 6.284; p sleep start time when children were receiving 20- or 30-mg doses, compared with placebo (p sleep duration (F(1,36) = 8.112; p sleep duration for subjects receiving 30 mg compared with those receiving placebo (p sleep duration or sleep schedule between the two stimulant medications. The trial is complete and closed to follow-up. Higher stimulant doses were associated with reduced sleep duration and later sleep start times, regardless of medication class. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00393042.

  19. The effect of hysterectomy or levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system on premenstrual symptoms in women treated for menorrhagia: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leminen, Henri; Heliövaara-Peippo, Satu; Halmesmäki, Karoliina; Teperi, Juha; Grenman, Seija; Kivelä, Aarre; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Paavonen, Jorma; Hurskainen, Ritva

    2012-03-01

    To study the effect of hysterectomy or levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on premenstrual symptoms in women treated for menorrhagia. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Five university hospitals in Finland. A cohort of 236 women, aged 35-49 years (mean 43 years) referred for menorrhagia between 1994 and 1997. Women were not diagnosed with premenstrual syndrome. Women were randomized to treatment by hysterectomy (n=117) or LNG-IUS (n=119). Analyses were performed using the intention-to-treat and actual treatment principles. Women using estrogen therapy and women who underwent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were excluded from the analyses. The occurrence of premenstrual symptoms evaluated by questionnaires at baseline and at follow-up visits six and 12 months after the treatment and five years after the randomization. Premenstrual symptoms decreased significantly in both groups by six months (p≤0.028) without significant differences between the groups, except that in the LNG-IUS group the decrease of breast tenderness was seen first by 12 months (p=0.048). Even though 42% of the women assigned to treatment with LNG-IUS were hysterectomized during the follow-up period, the results of intention-to-treat and actual treatment analyses were comparable. Both hysterectomy and LNG-IUS seem to alleviate premenstrual symptoms of women treated for menorrhagia, while the effect of these treatments on premenstrual syndrome remains unsettled. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Esmolol before cardioplegia and as cardioplegia adjuvant reduces cardiac troponin release after cardiac surgery. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Franco, Annalisa; Gerli, Chiara; De Luca, Monica; Monaco, Fabrizio; Landoni, Giovanni; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Cardioplegic solutions are the standard in myocardial protection during cardiac surgery, since they interrupt the electro-mechanical activity of the heart and protect it from ischemia during aortic cross-clamping. Nevertheless, myocardial damage has a strong clinical impact. We tested the hypothesis that the short-acting beta-blocker esmolol, given immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass and as a cardioplegia additive, would provide an extra protection to myocardial tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass by virtually reducing myocardial activity and, therefore, oxygen consumption to zero. This was a single-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase IV trial. Adult patients undergoing elective valvular and non-valvular cardiac surgery with end diastolic diameter >60 mm and ejection fraction <50% were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either esmolol, 1 mg/kg before aortic cross-clamping and 2 mg/kg with Custodiol® crystalloid cardioplegia or equivolume placebo. The primary end-point was peak postoperative troponin T concentration. Troponin was measured at Intensive Care Unit arrival and at 4, 24 and 48 hours. Secondary endpoints included ventricular fibrillation after cardioplegic arrest, need for inotropic support and intensive care unit and hospital stay. We found a reduction in peak postoperative troponin T, from 1195 ng/l (690-2730) in the placebo group to 640 ng/l (544-1174) in the esmolol group (p=0.029) with no differences in Intensive Care Unit stay [3 days (1-6) in the placebo group and 3 days (2-5) in the esmolol group] and hospital stay [7 days (6-10) in the placebo group and 7 days (6-12) in the esmolol group]. Troponin peak occurred at 24 hours for 12 patients (26%) and at 4 hours for the others (74%). There were no differences in other secondary end-points. Adding esmolol to the cardioplegia in high-risk patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery reduces peak postoperative troponin levels. Further investigation

  1. Tapentadol immediate-release for acute postbunionectomy pain: a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeung-Jen; Chiang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Peng-Ju; Huang, Jason; Karcher, Keith; Li, Honglan

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of tapentadol immediate-release (IR) for treating acute pain following orthopedic bunionectomy surgery in a Taiwanese population. This was a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group bridging study in which Taiwanese patients (N = 60) with moderate-to-severe pain following bunionectomy were randomized (1:1:1) to receive tapentadol IR 50 or 75 mg or placebo orally every 4-6 hours over a 72 hour period. The primary endpoint was the sum of pain intensity difference over 48 hours (SPID48), analyzed using analysis of variance. Out of 60 patients randomized (mainly women [96.7%]; median age 44 years), 41 (68.3%) completed the treatment. Mean SPID48 values were significantly higher for tapentadol IR (p ≤ 0.006: 50 mg, p ≤ 0.004: 75 mg) compared with placebo. Between-group differences in LS means of SPID48 (vs. placebo) were tapentadol IR 50 mg: 105.6 (95% CI: 32.0; 179.2); tapentadol IR 75 mg: 126.6 (95% CI: 49.5; 203.7). Secondary endpoints including SPID at 12, 24, and 72 hours, time to first use of rescue medication, cumulative distribution of responder rates, total pain relief and sum of total pain relief and sum of pain intensity difference at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours, and patient global impression of change showed numerically better results supporting that tapentadol IR (50 and 75 mg) was more efficacious than placebo in relieving acute pain. The most frequent treatment emergent adverse events reported in ≥ 10% patients in either group were dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. A limitation of this study may possibly include more controlled patient monitoring through 4-6 hour dosing intervals, which reflects optimal conditions and thus may not approximate real-world clinical practice. However, all treatment groups would be equally affected by such bias of frequent monitoring, if any, since it was a randomized and double-blind study. Tapentadol IR treatment significantly relieved acute postoperative

  2. Effectiveness of Myofascial Release with Foam Roller Versus Static Stretching in Healthy Individuals with Hip Adductor Tightness: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kage Vijay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hip adductors are a group of muscles that stabilize the pelvis during weight transfer in lower limbs in a gait cycle. This muscle group commonly goes into tightness as the full available range of motion is scarcely used which in turn may be a predisposing factor in the development of knee and low back pain. Aim: Traditional method of static stretching has proved to be effective in reducing tightness. Foam roller is an upcoming method used for stretching of various muscle groups which has shown superior results. The aim of the study was to compare the treatment methods. Methods: Thirty young healthy individuals were selected after screening for bilateral hip adductor tightness using smartphone inclinometer for hip abduction range of motion. They were randomized to either the foam roller or static stretching group. Subjects attended a baseline session, followed by 5 days intervention, and reassessment on the 5th day post intervention. Outcome measures used were hip abduction range of motion using smartphone inclinometer, single leg hop test and 8 direction star excursion balance test for dynamic postural stability. Results: Both the groups showed significant improvements in hip abduction range of motion, single leg hop test and SEBT. When compared, the foam roller group showed marginally better results than static stretching. The results also showed significant prepost differences within the respective groups. Conclusion: Treatments have shown significant results in both groups however, myofascial release with foam roller has proved to be marginally more effective than static stretching in releasing hip adductor tightness, increasing hip abduction range of motion and improving dynamic balance.

  3. Nursing case management, peer coaching, and hepatitis a and B vaccine completion among homeless men recently released on parole: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa E; Zhang, Sheldon; Farabee, David; Hall, Betsy; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Leake, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are vaccine-preventable diseases, few homeless parolees coming out of prisons and jails have received the hepatitis A and B vaccination series. The study focused on completion of the HAV and HBV vaccine series among homeless men on parole. The efficacy of three levels of peer coaching (PC) and nurse-delivered interventions was compared at 12-month follow-up: (a) intensive peer coaching and nurse case management (PC-NCM); (b) intensive PC intervention condition, with minimal nurse involvement; and (c) usual care (UC) intervention condition, which included minimal PC and nurse involvement. Furthermore, we assessed predictors of vaccine completion among this targeted sample. A randomized control trial was conducted with 600 recently paroled men to assess the impact of the three intervention conditions (PC-NCM vs. PC vs. UC) on reducing drug use and recidivism; of these, 345 seronegative, vaccine-eligible subjects were included in this analysis of completion of the Twinrix HAV/HBV vaccine. Logistic regression was added to assess predictors of completion of the HAV/HBV vaccine series and chi-square analysis to compare completion rates across the three levels of intervention. Vaccine completion rate for the intervention conditions were 75.4% (PC-NCM), 71.8% (PC), and 71.9% (UC; p = .78). Predictors of vaccine noncompletion included being Asian and Pacific Islander, experiencing high levels of hostility, positive social support, reporting a history of injection drug use, being released early from California prisons, and being admitted for psychiatric illness. Predictors of vaccine series completion included reporting having six or more friends, recent cocaine use, and staying in drug treatment for at least 90 days. Findings allow greater understanding of factors affecting vaccination completion in order to design more effective programs among the high-risk population of men recently released from

  4. Evaluation of a 12-Hour Sustained-Release Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Formulation: A Randomized, 3-Way Crossover Pharmacokinetic and Safety Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yong; Collaku, Agron; Liu, Dongzhou J

    2018-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a first-line treatment for mild and moderate pain. A twice-daily sustained-release (SR) formulation may be more convenient for chronic users than standard immediate-release (IR) acetaminophen. This randomized, 3-way crossover study evaluated pharmacokinetics and safety of single-dose 1500- and 2000-mg SR acetaminophen formulations and 2 doses of IR acetaminophen 1000 mg given 6 hours apart in healthy adults (n = 14). Primary outcome was time that plasma acetaminophen concentration was ≥4 μg/mL (T C≥4μg/mL ). Key secondary outcomes were area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to time t, when plasma acetaminophen was detectable (AUC 0-t ), AUC from 0 to infinity (AUC 0-inf ), and maximum plasma acetaminophen concentration (C max ). T C≥4μg/mL from 2000-mg SR acetaminophen was similar to that from 2 doses of IR acetaminophen, whereas T C≥4μg/mL for 1500-mg SR acetaminophen was significantly shorter than that for IR acetaminophen (P = .004). The extent of acetaminophen absorption from 2000-mg SR and 2 doses of the IR formulation was similar and within bioequivalence limits with regard to AUC 0-12 , AUC 0-t , and AUC 0-inf . The extent of acetaminophen absorption from 1500-mg SR was significantly lower than that from IR acetaminophen. The 2000-mg SR represents a potential candidate formulation for 12-hour dosing with acetaminophen. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Reduction Osteotomy vs Pie-Crust Technique as Possible Alternatives for Medial Release in Total Knee Arthroplasty and Compared in a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyun; Yang, Tae Yeong; Lee, Jang Yun

    2016-07-01

    To compare the gap change between the pie-crust technique and reduction osteotomy to determine their effects on flexion and extension gaps and their success rates in achieving ligament balancing during total knee arthroplasty. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, 106 total knee arthroplasties were allocated to each group with 53 cases. If there was a narrow medial gap with an imbalance of ≥3 mm after the initial limited medial release, either reduction osteotomy or pie-crust technique was performed. The changes of extension and flexion medial gaps along with the success rate of mediolateral balancing were compared. There was a significant difference in the change of medial gap in knee extension with mean changes of 3.5 ± 0.5 mm and 2.3 ± 0.8 mm in the reduction osteotomy and pie-crust groups, respectively (P pie-crust group compared with the reduction osteotomy group; the mean medial gap changes in knee flexion were 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.3 ± 1.2 mm in the reduction osteotomy and pie-crust groups, respectively. The success rates were 90.6% and 67.9% in reduction osteotomy and pie-crust groups, respectively (P = .007). As an alternative medial release method, reduction osteotomy was more effective in extension gap balancing, and pie-crust technique was more effective in flexion gap balancing. The overall success rate of mediolateral ligament balancing was higher in the reduction osteotomy group than in the pie-crust group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of the gastrointestinal prokinetic agent erythromycin on the pharmacokinetics of pregabalin controlled-release in healthy individuals: a phase I, randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Marci L; Plotka, Anna; Alvey, Christine W; Pitman, Verne W; Alebic-Kolbah, Tanja; Scavone, Joseph M; Bockbrader, Howard N

    2015-05-01

    The controlled-release (CR) formulation of pregabalin is designed to remain in the stomach for a prolonged period while slowly releasing pregabalin for absorption in the small intestine. This study evaluated the effect of the gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, erythromycin, on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of pregabalin CR 330 mg administered following an evening meal and the safety and tolerability of a single dose of pregabalin CR 330 mg when administered with and without multiple doses of erythromycin 500 mg. This was a phase I, open-label, randomized, two-period, two-treatment crossover study. Participants received (in a randomized sequence) a single oral dose of pregabalin CR 330 mg alone and pregabalin CR 330 mg co-administered with multiple doses of erythromycin 500 mg. The CR formulation was administered immediately following a standardized 600-750 calorie 30 % fat evening meal. Erythromycin 500 mg was administered orally approximately 1 h prior to pregabalin CR, as well as 6 and 12 h following the first erythromycin dose. Blood samples were collected up to 48 h post-pregabalin CR dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from concentration-time data using standard noncompartmental methods. Adverse events were monitored throughout. Eighteen healthy participants (aged 19-52 years) received pregabalin CR. Co-administration of pregabalin CR with erythromycin resulted in a 17 % decrease in total exposure [area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC∞)] and a 13 % decrease in peak plasma concentrations (C max) relative to pregabalin CR administered alone. The 90 % CI for the ratio of the adjusted geometric mean AUC∞ was 76.5-89.2 % (outside the 80-125 % range prespecified for bioequivalence). Adverse events were of mild to moderate severity and the adverse event profile was similar for pregabalin CR administered with and without erythromycin. Co-administration of multiple high doses of erythromycin resulted in 17

  7. Double blind, randomized controlled trial, to evaluate the effectiveness of a controlled nitric oxide releasing patch versus meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis [NCT00317629

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Federico A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a worldwide disease, endemic in 88 countries, that has shown an increasing incidence over the last two decades. So far, pentavalent antimony compounds have been considered the treatment of choice, with a percentage of cure of about 85%. However, the high efficacy of these drugs is counteracted by their many disadvantages and adverse events. Previous studies have shown nitric oxide to be a potential alternative treatment when administered topically with no serious adverse events. However, due to the unstable nitric oxide release, the topical donors needed to be applied frequently, making the adherence to the treatment difficult. The electrospinning technique has allowed the production of a multilayer transdermal patch that produces a continuous and stable nitric oxide release. The main objective of this study is to evaluate this novel nitric oxide topical donor for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods and design A double-blind, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial, including 620 patients from endemic areas for Leishmaniasis in Colombia was designed to investigate whether this patch is as effective as meglumine antimoniate for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis but with less adverse events. Subjects with ulcers characteristic of cutaneous leishmaniasis will be medically evaluated and laboratory tests and parasitological confirmation performed. After checking the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the patients will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. During 20 days Group 1 will receive simultaneously meglumine antimoniate and placebo of nitric oxide patches while Group 2 will receive placebo of meglumine antimoniate and active nitric oxide patches. During the treatment visits, the medications will be daily administered and the presence of adverse events assessed. During the follow-up, the research group will visit the patients at days 21, 45, 90 and 180. The

  8. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of once-daily cyclobenzaprine extended release: a randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2011-06-01

    The single-dose pharmacokinetic profile of cyclobenzaprine extended-release (CER) has been previously characterized and compared with the pharmacokinetics of cyclobenzaprine immediate-release (CIR) administered 3 times daily for 3 doses. The objective of this study was to characterize the multiple-dose pharmacokinetic properties of once-daily CER 30 mg and CIR 10 mg TID formulations in healthy volunteers. In this double-blind, single-center, 2-period crossover study, healthy subjects were randomized to dosing sequences with once-daily CER 30 mg or CIR 10 mg TID for 7 days. Subjects crossed over to the alternative regimen following a 14-day washout period. Pharmacokinetic assessments at steady state included area under the plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC(0-τ,ss)), peak plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration (C(max,ss)), time to observed C(max) (T(max,ss)), observed minimum cyclobenzaprine concentration (C(min,ss)), average cyclobenzaprine concentration (C(avg,ss)), accumulation ratio (R(ac)), and terminal elimination half-life (t(½)). Tolerability and safety assessments were conducted. A total of 36 subjects were randomized; 34 completed both dosing periods (1 subject was lost to follow-up, 1 withdrew consent). Steady state was reached for CER 30 mg on day 7. Mean C(max,ss), C(min,ss), and C(avg,ss) were 41.1, 21.4, and 31.4 ng/mL, respectively. The median T(max,ss) for CER 30 mg was 7.0 hours, with a mean t(½) of 34.8 hours. At steady state, CER produced a sustained plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration with a single peak in plasma concentration during the 24-hour dose interval. The R(ac) for CER was 2.65. Because of a protocol violation (insufficient data), no steady-state pharmacokinetic assessments could be performed for CIR. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in intensity. Somnolence was the most frequently reported adverse event (100% of subjects) in those receiving CER, followed by dry mouth (58

  9. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system vs oral progestins for non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hashim, Hatem; Ghayaty, Essam; El Rakhawy, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with oral progestins for treatment of non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia (EH). Searches were conducted on PubMed, SCOPUS, and CENTRAL databases to August 2014, and reference lists of relevant articles were screened. The search was limited to articles conducted on human beings and females. The PRISMA Statement was followed. Seven randomized controlled trials (n = 766 women) were included. Main outcome measures were the therapeutic effect rate (histological response) after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months of treatment; rate of irregular vaginal bleeding; and the hysterectomy rate per woman randomized. The Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was used for quality assessment. Metaanalysis was performed with fixed effects model. LNG-IUS achieved a highly significant therapeutic response rate compared with oral progestins after 3 months of treatment (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-3.82; P = .001, 5 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 376), after 6 months of treatment (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.84-5.45; P therapeutic response following LNG-IUS compared with oral progestins for non-atypical simple as well as complex EH (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.14-5.53; P = .02, 6 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 290; and OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.62-6.74; P = .001, 4 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 216, respectively). Compared with oral progestins, LNG-IUS achieved significantly fewer hysterectomies (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.15-0.45; P therapeutic effect rates and lower hysterectomy rates than oral progestins and should be offered as an alternative to oral progestins in these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy and safety of Myofascial-meridian Release Acupuncture (MMRA) for chronic neck pain: a study protocol for randomized, patient- and assessor-blinded, sham controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Nam, Dongwoo; Leem, Jungtae; Han, Gajin; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Junhee

    2016-02-02

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of myofascial-meridian release acupuncture (MMRA) in the treatment of chronic neck pain compared with sham acupuncture. A protocol for a randomized, patient- and assessor-blinded, sham controlled parallel trial is presented. Seventy-four participants with a ≥3 month history of neck pain and a score of ≥4 on the 11-point pain intensity numerical rating scale (PI-NRS) will be randomly assigned to the MMRA group (n = 37) or sham acupuncture group (n = 37). The participants will receive the MMRA treatment or sham acupuncture treatment twice per week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome is the mean change in the PI-NRS (0 = no pain and 10 = worst possible pain, 11-point Likert scale) from baseline to 4 weeks. The secondary outcomes are the mean change from baseline on the clinical relevance of the pain (ratio of changes greater than 1.5 or with percentiles greater than 30 % and 50 % in the PI-NRS), function (Neck Disability Index and Cervical Range of Motion), autonomic and psychometric measurements (Heart Rate Variability and Perceived Stress Scale), quality of life (EuroQol), global assessment (Patient Global Impression of Change), semi-objective outcomes (pressure pain threshold, consumption of rescue medicine and days of restricted activity) and immunologic/stress biomarkers. Adverse events will be evaluated at every visit. The results of this trial will provide evidence to confirm the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic neck pain. The trial is registered with the Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS), Republic of Korea: KCT0001573 .

  11. A randomized withdrawal, placebo-controlled study evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of tapentadol extended release in patients with chronic painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Shapiro, Douglas Y; Rauschkolb, Christine; Lange, Bernd; Karcher, Keith; Pennett, Deborah; Etropolski, Mila S

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of tapentadol extended release (ER) for the management of chronic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Adults with moderate to severe DPN pain were titrated to tapentadol ER 100-250 mg bid during a 3-week open-label period; patients with ≥1-point reduction in pain intensity (11-point numerical rating scale) at end of titration were randomized to receive placebo or tapentadol ER (optimal dose from titration) for 12 weeks (double-blind, fixed-dose maintenance phase). The primary end point was mean change in average pain intensity from the start to week 12 (last observation carried forward [LOCF]) of the double-blind maintenance phase. A total of 358 patients completed the titration period; 318 patients (placebo, n = 152; tapentadol ER, n = 166) were randomized and received one or more doses of double-blind study medication. Mean (SD) pain intensity (observed case) was 7.33 (1.30) at the start and 4.16 (2.12) at week 3 of the open-label titration period (mean [SD] change, -3.22 [1.97]). The mean (SD) change in pain intensity (LOCF) from start of double-blind treatment to week 12 was as follows: placebo, 1.30 (2.43); tapentadol ER, 0.28 (2.04; least squares mean difference, -0.95 [95% CI -1.42 to -0.49]; P tapentadol ER group during the double-blind maintenance phase were nausea (21.1%) and vomiting (12.7%). Tapentadol ER (100-250 mg bid) was effective and well tolerated for the management of moderate to severe chronic pain associated with DPN. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Ovarian suppression using luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists during chemotherapy to preserve ovarian function and fertility of breast cancer patients: a meta-analysis of randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, M; Ceppi, M; Poggio, F; Peccatori, F A; Azim, H A; Ugolini, D; Pronzato, P; Loibl, S; Moore, H C F; Partridge, A H; Bruzzi, P; Del Mastro, L

    2015-12-01

    The role of temporary ovarian suppression with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced premature ovarian failure (POF) is still controversial. Our meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) investigates whether the use of LHRHa during chemotherapy in premenopausal breast cancer patients reduces treatment-related POF rate, increases pregnancy rate, and impacts disease-free survival (DFS). A literature search using PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, and the proceedings of major conferences, was conducted up to 30 April 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for POF (i.e. POF by study definition, and POF defined as amenorrhea 1 year after chemotherapy completion) and for patients with pregnancy, as well hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CI for DFS, were calculated for each trial. Pooled analysis was carried out using the fixed- and random-effects models. A total of 12 RCTs were eligible including 1231 breast cancer patients. The use of LHRHa was associated with a significant reduced risk of POF (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.23-0.57; P chemotherapy completion, the addition of LHRHa reduced the risk of POF (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.41-0.73, P chemotherapy-induced POF and seems to increase the pregnancy rate, without an apparent negative consequence on prognosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of extended release quetiapine fumarate monotherapy on sleep disturbance in patients with major depressive disorder: a pooled analysis of four randomized acute studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Bandelow, Borwin; Demyttenaere, Koen; Papakostas, George I; Papakosts, George I; Szamosi, Johan; Earley, Willie; Eriksson, Hans

    2013-09-01

    Effects of once-daily extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) monotherapy on sleep quality and disturbance in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were evaluated. Pooled data from four 6- or 8-wk placebo-controlled quetiapine XR (50-300 mg/d) monotherapy studies (D1448C00001; D1448C00002; D1448C00003; D1448C00004) were analysed. Primary efficacy end-point was change from randomization in Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score. Post hoc analyses of secondary end-points were conducted for change from randomization in: MADRS item 4 (reduced sleep); Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) items 4 (insomnia-early), 5 (insomnia-middle), 6 (insomnia-late) and sleep disturbance factor (items 4 + 5+6) scores; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) global scores. MADRS total score change was also evaluated in patients experiencing high and low baseline sleep disturbance (HAMD sleep disturbance factor scores ⩾4 and sleep disturbance factor score and PSQI global scores from baseline vs. placebo (p sleep disturbance (n = 865, quetiapine XR; n = 514, placebo), quetiapine XR improved MADRS total score vs. placebo at all visits (p sleep disturbance (n = 252, quetiapine XR; n = 121, placebo), quetiapine XR improved MADRS total score vs. placebo at weeks 2 (p sleep disturbance vs. placebo in patients with MDD, including those with either high or low baseline sleep disturbance levels.

  14. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of once-daily cyclobenzaprine extended release 30 mg versus cyclobenzaprine immediate release 10 mg three times daily in healthy young adults : a randomized, open-label, two-period crossover, single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Hellriegel, Edward T; Xie, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Cyclobenzaprine immediate release (CIR) has shown efficacy in the treatment of muscle spasm associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions. An extended-release formulation of cyclobenzaprine (CER) has been developed to provide effective muscle spasm relief with once-daily dosing. The objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of CER and CIR. This was a single-centre study of 18 healthy young adults (aged 18-45 years). Healthy volunteers were assigned to receive either a single dose of CER 30 mg or three doses of CIR 10 mg on days 1 and 15 (separated by a 14-day washout) in an open-label, two-period crossover study. Pharmacokinetic parameters were monitored through 168 hours after the last dose in each dose period; adverse events (AEs) were monitored during the study through 3 weeks after the last dose of study drug. Cyclobenzaprine was administered as a single oral 30 mg dose of CER or three 10 mg oral doses of CIR given every 8 hours over 24 hours. Statistical tests were conducted against a two-sided alternative hypothesis at a 0.05 level of significance with equivalence limits of 80% and 125%. Measures included area under the plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration versus time curve (AUC) to 168 hours and infinity, maximum plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration (C(max)), and time to observed C(max) (t(max)). Eighteen subjects were randomized and 17 completed both periods of the study. CER exhibited a consistent concentration-time profile with a single peak, in contrast to the pharmacokinetic profile for CIR, which displayed multiple peaks and troughs over the 24-hour period. The pharmacokinetic profile of CER 30 mg was characterized by an absorption phase with a median t(max) of approximately 6 hours, compared with the initial peak of CIR (following the first dose) of about 4 hours. Mean plasma concentrations at 4 hours were comparable (12.1 ng/mL for CER; 12.4 ng/mL for CIR). Systemic cyclobenzaprine exposure (AUC and C(max)) was similar

  15. Pharmacokinetics of a new once-daily controlled-release formulation of aceclofenac in Korean healthy subjects compared with immediate-release aceclofenac and the effect of food: a randomized, open-label, three-period, crossover, single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hwan; Lee, Hae Won; Seong, Sook Jin; Shin, Su-Yeon; Lee, Sang Hun; Lim, Mi-Sun; Yoon, Young-Ran; Lee, Hye Jung

    2012-02-01

    A new controlled-release formulation of aceclofenac 200 mg (Clanza CR®) developed by Korea United Pharm., Inc., South Korea, for once-daily (od) dosing provides biphasic aceclofenac release consisting of immediate release of 85 mg followed by sustained release of 115 mg. Food has been known to affect the rate and extent of absorption of several drugs, in both immediate-release and controlled-release formulations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative bioavailability of a new controlled-release formulation of aceclofenac (200 mg od; Clanza CR®) in comparison with immediate-release aceclofenac (100 mg twice daily [bid], Airtal®) and to assess the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of the new controlled-release aceclofenac formulation. This study was designed as a randomized, open-label, three treatment-period, crossover, single-centre study with a 1-week washout in 41 healthy adults. The three treatments consisted of immediate-release aceclofenac 100 mg bid administered under fasting conditions; controlled-release aceclofenac 200 mg od administered under fasting conditions; and controlled-release aceclofenac 200 mg od administered immediately after a standardized high-fat breakfast. Plasma concentrations of aceclofenac were determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. In the fasted state, the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the least squares geometric mean ratios (GMRs) for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 hours (AUC(24)) and the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of aceclofenac for the controlled-release and immediate-release formulations of aceclofenac were all within the bioequivalence criteria range of 0.8-1.25. The 90% CIs of the GMRs for the AUC(24) and C(max) of aceclofenac for the controlled-release formulation of aceclofenac in the fed and fasted states were also within the bioequivalence range. Both aceclofenac formulations were well tolerated in all subjects

  16. The Effects of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Combined with Add-Back Therapy on Quality of Life for Adolescents with Endometriosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler Gallagher, Jenny; Feldman, Henry A; Stokes, Natalie A; Laufer, Marc R; Hornstein, Mark D; Gordon, Catherine M; DiVasta, Amy D

    2017-04-01

    Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) to treat endometriosis can cause mood and vasomotor side effects. "Add-back therapy," the combination of low-dose hormones, limits side effects but research is limited to adults. We sought to characterize quality of life (QOL) before treatment and to compare an add-back regimen of norethindrone acetate (NA) with conjugated estrogens (CEE) to NA alone for preventing side effects of GnRHa therapy in female adolescents with endometriosis. Twelve-month double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Pediatric Gynecology clinic in Boston, Massachusetts. Fifty female adolescents (aged 15-22 years) with surgically confirmed endometriosis initiating treatment with GnRHa. Subjects were randomized to: NA (5 mg/d) with CEE (0.625 mg/d) or NA (5 mg/d) with placebo. All subjects received leuprolide acetate depot every 3 months. The Short Form-36 v2 Health Survey, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Menopause Rating Scale were completed at repeated intervals. At baseline, subjects reported impaired physical health-related QOL compared with national norms (all P add-back therapy led to improved QOL, with no worsening of mood or menopausal side effects. NA with CEE was superior to NA alone for improving physical health-related QOL. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the effects of ketamine and memantine on prolactin and cortisol release in men. a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergovich, N; Singer, E; Agneter, E; Eichler, H G; Graselli, U; Simhandl, C; Jilma, B

    2001-05-01

    N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonists decrease neurotoxicity by inhibiting Ca2+ influx which is of interest for the treatment of acute cerebrovascular insults and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Currently, there is no surrogate marker for quantification of NMDA-receptor-mediated drug effects, which hampers dose-finding clinical studies. As prolactin and cortisol liberation is in part influenced through NMDA-receptors we investigated whether the elevation of prolactin or cortisol plasma levels is a class effect of NMDA-antagonists and might be an appropriate marker for studying NMDA-antagonistic potency. Fifteen healthy male volunteers participated in this placebo-controlled, randomized, three-way crossover trial. Ketamine (0.5mg/kg), memantine (0.16 mg/kg; i.e., a well tolerated standard dose) or placebo were infused over 60 min. Ketamine increased serum prolactin and cortisol levels (p < 0.001), whereas memantine and placebo did not affect hormone levels. Further studies are needed to define whether higher doses of memantine or other NMDA antagonists can induce hormone release.

  18. Quality of life and costs of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or hysterectomy in the treatment of menorrhagia: a 10-year randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heliövaara-Peippo, Satu; Hurskainen, Ritva; Teperi, Juha; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Grénman, Seija; Halmesmäki, Karoliina; Jokela, Markus; Kivelä, Aarre; Tomás, Eija; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Paavonen, Jorma

    2013-12-01

    Menorrhagia is a common problem impairing the quality of life (QOL) of many women. Both levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and hysterectomy are effective treatment modalities but no long-term comparative studies of QOL and costs exist. The objective of this study was to compare QOL and costs of LNG-IUS or hysterectomy in the treatment of menorrhagia during 10-year follow-up. A total of 236 women, aged 35-49 years, referred for menorrhagia to 5 university hospitals in Finland were randomly assigned to treatment with LNG-IUS (n = 119) or hysterectomy (n = 117) and were monitored for 10 years. The main outcome measures were health-related QOL (HRQOL), psychosocial well-being, and cost-effectiveness. A total of 221 (94%) women were followed for 10 years. Although 55 (46%) women assigned to the LNG-IUS subsequently underwent hysterectomy, the overall costs in the LNG-IUS group ($3423) were substantially lower than in the hysterectomy group ($4937). Overall, levels of HRQOL and psychosocial well-being improved during first 5 years but diminished between 5 years and 10 years and the improved HRQOL returned close to the baseline level. There were no significant differences between LNG-IUS and hysterectomy groups. Both LNG-IUS and hysterectomy improved HRQOL. The improvement was most striking during the first 5 years. Although many women eventually had hysterectomy, LNG-IUS remained cost-effective. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of Core Stability Exercises and Recovery Myofascial Release Massage on Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cantarero-Villanueva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n=78 breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release and control (usual health care groups. The intervention period was 8 weeks. Mood state, fatigue, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength were determined at baseline, after the last treatment session, and at 6 months of followup. Immediately after treatment and at 6 months, fatigue, mood state, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength exhibited greater improvement within the experimental group compared to placebo group. This paper showed that a multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and massage reduced fatigue, tension, depression, and improved vigor and muscle strength after intervention and 6 months after discharge.

  20. Add-on-Statin Extended Release Nicotinic Acid/Laropiprant but Not the Switch to High-Dose Rosuvastatin Lowers Blood Pressure: An Open-Label Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastazia Kei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nicotinic acid (NA and statins have been associated with reductions in blood pressure (BP. Patients and Methods. We recruited 68 normotensive and hypertensive dyslipidemic patients who were treated with a conventional statin dose and had not achieved lipid targets. Patients were randomized to switch to high-dose rosuvastatin (40 mg/day or to add-on current statin treatment with extended release (ER NA/laropiprant (1000/20 mg/day for the first 4 weeks followed by 2000/40 mg/day for the next 8 weeks for 3 months. Results. Switching to rosuvastatin 40 mg/day was not associated with significant BP alterations. In contrast, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to current statin treatment resulted in a 7% reduction of systolic BP (from 134±12 to 125±10 mmHg, <.001 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group and a 5% reduction of diastolic BP (from 81±9 to 77±6 mmHg, =.009 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group. These reductions were significant only in the subgroup of hypertensives and were independent of the hypolipidemic effects of ER-NA/laropiprant. Conclusions. Contrary to the switch to high-dose rosuvastatin, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to statin treatment was associated with significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic BP.

  1. ADS-5102 (Amantadine) Extended-Release Capsules for Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinson Disease (EASE LID Study): A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Rajesh; Tanner, Caroline M; Hauser, Robert A; Isaacson, Stuart H; Nausieda, Paul A; Truong, Daniel D; Agarwal, Pinky; Hull, Keith L; Lyons, Kelly E; Johnson, Reed; Stempien, Mary Jean

    2017-08-01

    Medical treatment of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson disease (PD) is an unmet need. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ADS-5102 (amantadine) extended-release 274-mg capsules for treatment of LID in patients with PD. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted between May 7, 2014, and July 22, 2015, at 44 North American sites among patients with PD treated with levodopa who experienced at least 1 hour of troublesome dyskinesia per day with at least mild functional impact. Patients were randomized to receive placebo or 274 mg of ADS-5102 administered orally at bedtime for up to 25 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis was the change from baseline to week 12 in the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale total score for ADS-5102 vs placebo in the modified intent-to-treat population. OFF time (amount of time the PD medication is not controlling motor symptoms) was a key secondary end point. Safety analyses included all patients who received the study drug (ADS-5102 or placebo). A total of 189 patients were screened, and 126 were randomized; the modified intent-to-treat population included 121 patients (51 women and 70 men; mean [SD] age, 64.7 [9.1] years). At week 12, the least-squares mean (SE) change in the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale score was -15.9 (1.6) for ADS-5102 (n = 63) and -8.0 (1.6) for placebo (n = 58) (treatment difference, -7.9; 95% CI, -12.5 to -3.3; P < .001). OFF time decreased by a mean (SE) of 0.6 (0.3) hours for ADS-5102 and increased by 0.3 (0.3) hours for placebo (treatment difference, -0.9 hours; 95% CI, -1.6 to -0.2; P = .02). Common adverse events for ADS-5102 vs placebo included visual hallucinations (15 [23.8%] vs 1 [1.7%]), peripheral edema (15 [23.8%] vs 0), and dizziness (14 [22.2%] vs 0). Adverse events led to treatment discontinuation for 13 patients receiving ADS-5102 (20.6%) vs 4 patients receiving placebo (6.9%). ADS-5102, 274 mg at bedtime, may be an effective treatment

  2. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Locating genes on a chromosome is important for understanding the gene function and its linkage and recombination. Knowledge of gene positions on chromosomes is necessary for annotation. The study is essential for disease genetics and genomics, among other aspects. Currently available...... software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...

  3. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours. The map below does not display...

  4. Real-world utilization of once-daily extended-release abuse deterrent formulation of hydrocodone: a comparison with the pre-approval randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taber L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Louise Taber,1 T Christopher Bond,2 Xuezhe Wang,2 Aditi Kadakia,2 Tracy J Mayne2 1Arizona Research Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 2Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, CT, USA Background and objective: Hydrocodone bitartrate extended release (Hysingla® ER, HYD was previously studied in a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and a 52-week open-label safety study. Both of these preapproval studies allowed dose titration to efficacy. The purpose of the present analysis was to compare dosing and utilization patterns in these previous clinical trials with real-world data (RWD usage in a retrospective claim analysis performed 12–14 months post approval in the US.Methods: In the claim analysis (Truven Health Analytics MarketScan® Research Database, patients prescribed HYD between January 1, 2015, and April 30, 2016, were followed for up to 6 months of continuous HYD use. Daily average consumption (DACON, initial dose, rescue opioid use and total milligram dose over time were also evaluated.Results: HYD daily dose stabilized at ~60 mg dose once daily across all three studies. There was also a reduced need for rescue medication with HYD, resulting in a lower total opioid milligram dose over time. In the claim analysis, the mean monthly HYD dose increased from 49 to 55 mg in month 2 and then remained stable through month 6. The mean (standard deviation [SD] time on drug was 79.5 days (61.42 days, and DACON was 1.04 pills/day, corresponding to the approved full prescribing information (FPI and once-daily dosing.Conclusion: In 12–14 months post approval, real-world dosing and utilization of HYD mirrored registration and open-label study findings, with stable once-daily dosing of ~60 mg and no increase in rescue medicine utilization. Keywords: chronic low back pain, hydrocodone, bitartrate extended release, opioid, Hysingla ER, NCT01452529, NCT01400139 

  5. Immediate Loading of Dental Implants in Edentulous Mandibles by Use of Locator® Attachments or Dolder® Bars: Two-Year Results from a Prospective Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Eberhard, Lydia; Rammelsberg, Peter; Eiffler, Constantin

    2016-08-01

    The study aims to evaluate survival and incidence of complications for pairs of implants placed in the front region of edentulous mandibles and immediately loaded with either bar or Locator attachments. Forty-six patients with edentulous mandibles (mean age 69.4 years at inclusion in the study; 73.9% male) received two implants in the interforaminal area of the symphysis. Dolder bar or Locator attachments, allocated randomly, were then attached immediately, and both clips and a framework were fastened to the denture by the dental technician within 72 hours. During the first 3 months of the 2-year period of observation, eight implants in five patients were lost, and were removed. Survival was 89.1% and 93.5% for the bar and Locator groups, respectively. During the entire period of observation, 38 prosthetic complications required aftercare. Five dentures had to be removed or reworked after implant failure, but no superstructure was lost or had to be remade for prosthetic reasons. Survival of the original dentures was 93.5% and 95.7% for the bar and Locator groups, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, results from immediate loading of two implants in the edentulous mandible with either Locator or bar attachments hardly differed. Prosthetic complications and aftercare measures in the Locator group were frequent but easy to handle. Ease of repair and cleaning, in particular, might be reasons for choosing the single-attachment system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Crime Location Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    Most behavior of interest to social scientists is choice behavior: actions people commit while they could also have done something else. In geographical and environmental criminology, a new framework has emerged for analyzing individual crime location choice. It is based on the principle of random

  7. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life. Methods/Design Randomized, blinded, two-armed, parallel superiority trial. We plan to include 80 consenting outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 18-55 years of age, treated with antipsychotic drug(s) and at least one benzodiazepine derivative for the last three months before inclusion. Exclusion criteria: currently under treatment for alcohol or drug abuse, aggressive or violent behavior, known mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder, dementia, epilepsy, terminal illness, severe co morbidity, inability to understand Danish, allergy to melatonin, lactose, starch, gelatin, or talc, hepatic impairment, pregnancy or nursing, or lack of informed consent. After being randomized to prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin®) 2 mg daily or matching placebo, participants are required to slowly taper off their benzodiazepine dose. The primary outcome measure is benzodiazepine dose at 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include sleep, psychophysiological, and neurocognitive measures. Data are collected at baseline and at 6 months follow-up regarding medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, sleep, laboratory tests, adverse events, psychopathology, social function, and quality of life. Data on medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, adverse events, social function, and quality of life are also collected at 2 and 4 months follow-up. Discussion

  8. Generic-reference and generic-generic bioequivalence of forty-two, randomly-selected, on-market generic products of fourteen immediate-release oral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; De Padua, Sophia J S; Hussein, Rajaa; Al Gaai, Eman; Khodr, Nesrine A; Al-Swayeh, Reem; Alvi, Syed N; Binhashim, Nada

    2017-12-08

    The extents of generic-reference and generic-generic average bioequivalence and intra-subject variation of on-market drug products have not been prospectively studied on a large scale. We assessed bioequivalence of 42 generic products of 14 immediate-release oral drugs with the highest number of generic products on the Saudi market. We conducted 14 four-sequence, randomized, crossover studies on the reference and three randomly-selected generic products of amlodipine, amoxicillin, atenolol, cephalexin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, fluconazole, metformin, metronidazole, paracetamol, omeprazole, and ranitidine. Geometric mean ratios of maximum concentration (Cmax) and area-under-the-concentration-time-curve, to last measured concentration (AUCT), extrapolated to infinity (AUCI), or truncated to Cmax time of reference product (AUCReftmax) were calculated using non-compartmental method and their 90% confidence intervals (CI) were compared to the 80.00%-125.00% bioequivalence range. Percentages of individual ratios falling outside the ±25% range were also determined. Mean (SD) age and body-mass-index of 700 healthy volunteers (28-80/study) were 32.2 (6.2) years and 24.4 (3.2) kg/m2, respectively. In 42 generic-reference comparisons, 100% of AUCT and AUCI CIs showed bioequivalence, 9.5% of Cmax CIs barely failed to show bioequivalence, and 66.7% of AUCReftmax CIs failed to show bioequivalence/showed bioinequivalence. Adjusting for 6 comparisons, 2.4% of AUCT and AUCI CIs and 21.4% of Cmax CIs failed to show bioequivalence. In 42 generic-generic comparisons, 2.4% of AUCT, AUCI, and Cmax CIs failed to show bioequivalence, and 66.7% of AUCReftmax CIs failed to show bioequivalence/showed bioinequivalence. Adjusting for 6 comparisons, 2.4% of AUCT and AUCI CIs and 14.3% of Cmax CIs failed to show bioequivalence. Average geometric mean ratio deviation from 100% was ≤3.2 and ≤5.4 percentage points for AUCI and Cmax, respectively, in both generic

  9. Efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate versus controlled-release carbamazepine monotherapy in newly diagnosed epilepsy: A phase III double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Kowacs, Pedro A; Elger, Christian; Keller, Birgit; Löffler, Kurt; Rocha, José Francisco; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2018-01-25

    We assessed the efficacy and safety of once-daily eslicarbazepine acetate in comparison with twice-daily (BID) controlled-release carbamazepine (carbamazepine-CR) monotherapy in newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patients. This randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial (NCT01162460) utilized a stepwise design with 3 dose levels. Patients who remained seizure-free for the 26-week evaluation period (level A: eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg/carbamazepine-CR 200 mg BID) entered a 6-month maintenance period. If a seizure occurred during the evaluation period, patients were titrated to the next target level (level B: eslicarbazepine acetate 1200 mg/carbamazepine-CR 400 mg BID, level C: eslicarbazepine acetate 1600 mg/carbamazepine-CR 600 mg BID) and the evaluation period began again. The primary endpoint was the proportion of seizure-free patients for 6 months after stabilization in the per protocol set. The predefined noninferiority criteria were -12% absolute and -20% relative difference between treatment groups. Eight hundred fifteen patients were randomly assigned; 785 (388 in the eslicarbazepine acetate group and 397 in the carbamazepine-CR group) were included in the per protocol set, and 813 (401 in the eslicarbazepine acetate group and 412 in the carbamazepine-CR group) were included in the full analysis set for the primary analysis. Overall, 71.1% of eslicarbazepine acetate-treated patients and 75.6% of carbamazepine-CR-treated patients were seizure-free for ≥6 months at the last evaluated dose (average risk difference = -4.28%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -10.30 to 1.74; relative risk difference = -5.87%, 95% CI = -13.50 to 2.44) in the per protocol set. Rates of treatment-emergent adverse events were similar between groups for patients in the safety set. Noninferiority was also demonstrated in the full analysis set, as 70.8% of patients with eslicarbazepine acetate and 74.0% with carbamazepine-CR were seizure-free at the last evaluated dose

  10. Aceneuramic Acid Extended Release Administration Maintains Upper Limb Muscle Strength in a 48-week Study of Subjects with GNE Myopathy: Results from a Phase 2, Randomized, Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argov, Zohar; Caraco, Yoseph; Lau, Heather; Pestronk, Alan; Shieh, Perry B.; Skrinar, Alison; Koutsoukos, Tony; Ahmed, Ruhi; Martinisi, Julia; Kakkis, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Background: GNE Myopathy (GNEM) is a progressive adult-onset myopathy likely caused by deficiency of sialic acid (SA) biosynthesis. Objective: Evaluate the safety and efficacy of SA (delivered by aceneuramic acid extended-release [Ace-ER]) as treatment for GNEM. Methods: A Phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating Ace-ER 3 g/day or 6 g/day versus placebo was conducted in GNEM subjects (n = 47). After the first 24 weeks, placebo subjects crossed over to 3 g/day or 6 g/day for 24 additional weeks (dose pre-assigned during initial randomization). Assessments included serum SA, muscle strength by dynamometry, functional assessments, clinician- and patient-reported outcomes, and safety. Results: Dose-dependent increases in serum SA levels were observed. Supplementation with Ace-ER resulted in maintenance of muscle strength in an upper extremity composite (UEC) score at 6 g/day compared with placebo at Week 24 (LS mean difference +2.33 kg, p = 0.040), and larger in a pre-specified subgroup able to walk ≥200 m at Screening (+3.10 kg, p = 0.040). After cross-over, a combined 6 g/day group showed significantly better UEC strength than a combined 3 g/day group (+3.46 kg, p = 0.0031). A similar dose-dependent response was demonstrated within the lower extremity composite score, but was not significant (+1.06 kg, p = 0.61). The GNEM-Functional Activity Scale demonstrated a trend improvement in UE function and mobility in a combined 6 g/day group compared with a combined 3 g/day group. Patients receiving Ace-ER tablets had predominantly mild-to-moderate AEs and no serious adverse events. Conclusions: This is the first clinical study to provide evidence that supplementation with SA delivered by Ace-ER may stabilize muscle strength in individuals with GNEM and initiating treatment earlier in the disease course may lead to better outcomes. PMID:27854209

  11. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranje Bob

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life. Methods/Design Randomized, blinded, two-armed, parallel superiority trial. We plan to include 80 consenting outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 18-55 years of age, treated with antipsychotic drug(s and at least one benzodiazepine derivative for the last three months before inclusion. Exclusion criteria: currently under treatment for alcohol or drug abuse, aggressive or violent behavior, known mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder, dementia, epilepsy, terminal illness, severe co morbidity, inability to understand Danish, allergy to melatonin, lactose, starch, gelatin, or talc, hepatic impairment, pregnancy or nursing, or lack of informed consent. After being randomized to prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin® 2 mg daily or matching placebo, participants are required to slowly taper off their benzodiazepine dose. The primary outcome measure is benzodiazepine dose at 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include sleep, psychophysiological, and neurocognitive measures. Data are collected at baseline and at 6 months follow-up regarding medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, sleep, laboratory tests, adverse events, psychopathology, social function, and quality of life. Data on medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, adverse events, social function, and quality of life are also collected at 2 and 4

  12. Nightly treatment of primary insomnia with prolonged release melatonin for 6 months: a randomized placebo controlled trial on age and endogenous melatonin as predictors of efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Alan G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melatonin is extensively used in the USA in a non-regulated manner for sleep disorders. Prolonged release melatonin (PRM is licensed in Europe and other countries for the short term treatment of primary insomnia in patients aged 55 years and over. However, a clear definition of the target patient population and well-controlled studies of long-term efficacy and safety are lacking. It is known that melatonin production declines with age. Some young insomnia patients also may have low melatonin levels. The study investigated whether older age or low melatonin excretion is a better predictor of response to PRM, whether the efficacy observed in short-term studies is sustained during continued treatment and the long term safety of such treatment. Methods Adult outpatients (791, aged 18-80 years with primary insomnia, were treated with placebo (2 weeks and then randomized, double-blind to 3 weeks with PRM or placebo nightly. PRM patients continued whereas placebo completers were re-randomized 1:1 to PRM or placebo for 26 weeks with 2 weeks of single-blind placebo run-out. Main outcome measures were sleep latency derived from a sleep diary, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Quality of Life (World Health Organzaton-5 Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I and adverse effects and vital signs recorded at each visit. Results On the primary efficacy variable, sleep latency, the effects of PRM (3 weeks in patients with low endogenous melatonin (6-sulphatoxymelatonin [6-SMT] ≤8 μg/night regardless of age did not differ from the placebo, whereas PRM significantly reduced sleep latency compared to the placebo in elderly patients regardless of melatonin levels (-19.1 versus -1.7 min; P = 0.002. The effects on sleep latency and additional sleep and daytime parameters that improved with PRM were maintained or enhanced over the 6-month period with no signs of tolerance. Most adverse events were mild in severity with no clinically

  13. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized clinical trial - the SMART trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jennum, Poul; Lublin, Henrik; Hansen, Jane L; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Oranje, Bob; Glenthoj, Birte Y

    2011-10-05

    Treatment of schizophrenia frequently includes prolonged benzodiazepine administration despite a lack of evidence of its use. It is often difficult to discontinue benzodiazepines because of the development of dependence. We aim to assess if melatonin can facilitate the withdrawal of prolonged benzodiazepine administration in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the association of benzodiazepine dose reduction with the following clinically important variables: sleep, psychophysiology, cognition, social function, and quality of life. Randomized, blinded, two-armed, parallel superiority trial. We plan to include 80 consenting outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 18-55 years of age, treated with antipsychotic drug(s) and at least one benzodiazepine derivative for the last three months before inclusion. currently under treatment for alcohol or drug abuse, aggressive or violent behavior, known mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorder, dementia, epilepsy, terminal illness, severe co morbidity, inability to understand Danish, allergy to melatonin, lactose, starch, gelatin, or talc, hepatic impairment, pregnancy or nursing, or lack of informed consent. After being randomized to prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin®) 2 mg daily or matching placebo, participants are required to slowly taper off their benzodiazepine dose. The primary outcome measure is benzodiazepine dose at 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include sleep, psychophysiological, and neurocognitive measures. Data are collected at baseline and at 6 months follow-up regarding medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, sleep, laboratory tests, adverse events, psychopathology, social function, and quality of life. Data on medical treatment, cognition, psychophysiology, adverse events, social function, and quality of life are also collected at 2 and 4 months follow-up. The results from this trial will examine whether melatonin

  14. Quetiapine fumarate extended-release for the treatment of major depression with comorbid fibromyalgia syndrome: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Alexander; Paisley, David; Kouassi, Edouard; Gendron, Alain

    2014-02-01

    Fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder (MDD) frequently co-occur. Quetiapine fumarate extended-release (quetiapine XR) has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of MDD and has been shown to have analgesic properties in patients with depression. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of quetiapine XR on depressive and pain symptoms in patients with MDD and comorbid fibromyalgia, and to assess its safety and tolerability. This was an 8-week, single-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. A total of 120 nonpsychotic adult outpatients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnostic criteria for MDD and whose diagnosis of fibromyalgia was confirmed according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were enrolled. The primary end point was the mean change from baseline to week 8 on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating (HAM-D) scale. Secondary end points included other depression-rating scores, pain scores, fibromyalgia scores, measures of quality of life and global functioning, and adverse events. The mean change in the HAM-D score from baseline to week 8 was significantly greater in the quetiapine XR group compared with the placebo group (-10.0 versus -5.8; P = 0.001). Improvements in most secondary outcomes were also significantly greater in the quetiapine XR group. Quetiapine XR was generally well tolerated. This study is the first to demonstrate that measures of depression, pain, and quality of life are significantly improved with quetiapine XR compared with placebo in patients with a dual diagnosis of MDD and fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Evaluation of dual trigger with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin in improving oocyte maturity rates: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mature oocytes are prerequisite for achieving the process of in vitro fertilization. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is the standard trigger used for stimulating ovulation but is associated with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger achieves oocyte maturation and lowers the incidence of OHSS, but it has limitations of higher pregnancy loss rate and miscarriage rates. Coadministration of both hormones is found to improve the pregnancy rates and the number of mature oocytes retrieved. We aimed to assess if the dual trigger is better than the conventional hCG in triggering oocyte maturation. METHODOLOGY: The study included 76 female patients aged 24–43 years who were randomly divided into two groups with 38 patients in each arm. The study included patients with antimullerian hormone (AMH 4 ng/ml and AFC/ovary >12 to avoid OHSS risk with hCG trigger. RESULTS: The study showed statistically insignificant differences between dual group versus hCG group in terms of the number of oocytes retrieved (10.0 ± 5.6 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0; P = 0.2816, the number of mature oocytes recovered (8.4 ± 5.0 vs. 7.2 ± 4.0; P = 0.2588, fertilization rate (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 5.6 ± 3.3; P = 0.7390, and the number of usable embryos on day 3 (4.0 ± 3.0 vs. 4.0 ± 2.4; P = 0.8991. CONCLUSION: The dual trigger is equivalent to hCG in triggering oocyte maturation.

  16. Comparison of low and moderate dosages of extended-release quetiapine in borderline personality disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W; Zanarini, Mary C; Romine, Ann; Shaw, Martha; Allen, Jeff; Schulz, S Charles

    2014-11-01

    The authors compared the efficacy and tolerability of low and moderate dosages of extended-release quetiapine in adults with borderline personality disorder. Ninety-five participants with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg/day of quetiapine (the low-dosage group; N=33), 300 mg/day of quetiapine (the moderate-dosage group; N=33), or placebo (N=29). Total score over time on the clinician-rated Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder ("Zanarini scale") was analyzed in a mixed-effects model accounting for informative dropout. Participants in the low-dosage quetiapine group had significant improvement on the Zanarini scale compared with those in the placebo group. Time to response (defined as a reduction of 50% or more on the Zanarini scale total score) was significantly shorter for both the low-dosage quetiapine group (hazard ratio=2.54, p=0.007) and the moderate-dosage quetiapine group (hazard ratio=2.37, p=0.011) than for the placebo group. Among participants who completed the study, 82% in the low-dosage quetiapine group were rated as "responders," compared with 74% in the moderate-dosage group and 48% in the placebo group. Treatment-emergent adverse events included sedation, change in appetite, and dry mouth. The overall completion rate for the 8-week double-blind treatment phase was 67% (67% for the low-dosage quetiapine group, 58% for the moderate-dosage quetiapine group, and 79% for the placebo group). Participants who experienced sedation were more likely to drop out. Participants treated with 150 mg/day of quetiapine had a significant reduction in the severity of borderline personality disorder symptoms compared with those who received placebo. Adverse events were more likely in participants taking 300 mg/day of quetiapine.

  17. A Naturalistic Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Extended-Release Metformin to Prevent Weight Gain Associated With Olanzapine in a US Community-Dwelling Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, Jeffrey; von Ammon Cavanaugh, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    This 24-week pilot study assessed the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of adjunctive metformin versus placebo for the prevention of olanzapine-associated weight gain in community-dwelling adult patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, or major depression with psychotic features. In a double-blind study, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive 24 weeks of either olanzapine plus metformin or olanzapine plus placebo. Metformin extended release was titrated to 2000 mg daily as tolerated. No other antipsychotics were allowed, whereas psychotropic medications including antidepressants and mood stabilizers were permitted. The primary outcome measures were change in body weight and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance from baseline to week 24. The intent-to-treat population comprised patients who had 1 or more post-baseline visit. Mean change in body weight for the olanzapine plus metformin (O/M) group was 5.5 lb, which was less than the 12.8 lb gain for the olanzapine plus placebo (O/P) group (P < 0.05). Compared with O/P group who gained 7% of their body weight, patients in the O/M group gained 3% (P < 0.037). Body mass index change in the O/M group was 0.85 versus 2.02 in the O/P group (P < 0.045). There was a trend for a greater increase in baseline to end point homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance and waist circumference in the O/P group versus the O/M group. In this naturalistic sample of typical US community-dwelling patients, metformin was effective and well tolerated for the prevention of olanzapine-associated weight gain. Adjunctive metformin should be studied in a similar but larger population to determine its role in the prevention of olanzapine-associated weight gain.

  18. Guide of the CSN about methodology of radiological Checking of location and general levels of release; Guia del CSN sobre metodologia de comprobacion del estado radiologico de un emplazamiento y niveles genericos de liberacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Alduan, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    The guide aims to recommend a methodology for checking radiological status of a site with a view to his release, complete and with a reasonable, statistically representative number of measures. Checking of the radiological situation of a site allows to determine if it is contaminated and, if so, whether, after cleaning performances, has reached a level of residual contamination, allowing their release with or without restrictions. Generic levels for the release without restrictions on the grounds of sites recommended for this verification of nuclear installations on the basis of the radiological dose criteria laid down in the instruction of the CSN IS-13. I agree with the IS-13, the site includes terrain, structures and facilities described in the authorization of exploitation, as well as any area has been released prior to the closing statement. The Guide recommends only the levels of release of land, regardless of the structures and facilities. (Author)

  19. Differential pharmacokinetics of diclofenac potassium for oral solution vs immediate-release tablets from a randomized trial: effect of fed and fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuiping; Bujanover, Shay; Kareht, Stephanie; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetics of, and food effect on, diclofenac potassium delivered as an oral solution vs an immediate-release tablet. Diclofenac potassium for oral solution is the only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved as monotherapy for the acute treatment of migraine attacks with or without aura in adults 18 years of age or older. It is formulated with potassium bicarbonate as a buffering agent to raise the pH and consequently increase the aqueous solubility of diclofenac in the acidic environment of the stomach following oral administration. The dosage is 50 mg of powdered diclofenac potassium dissolved in 1 to 2 ounces (30 to 60 mL) of water prior to administration, with dosing time in relation to food intake not specified - this was the case for the pivotal efficacy and safety trials in subjects with acute migraine attacks in which the primary endpoints were achieved. For acute treatment of migraine attacks, rapid onset of pain relief is desirable and is likely related to a rapid appearance of an effective concentration of the drug in the systemic circulation. The rate at which an orally administered drug reaches the blood is affected by both its formulation and the presence of food in the stomach. The present study was designed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 2 formulations of diclofenac potassium, an immediate-release tablet and an oral solution, and to ascertain the effect of food. This was an open-label, randomized, single-center, crossover trial in healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized using computer-generated list to 1:1:1:1 ratio. They received a single 50-mg dose of diclofenac potassium in 4 sequences (ABCD, BADC, CDBA, and DCAB) during each of the 4 treatment periods. The 4 treatments were: A, oral solution fasting; B, tablet fasting; C, oral solution fed; and D, tablet fed. There was a ≥7-day washout period between dosing. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken for up to 12 hours post-dose and

  20. The design and protocol of heat-sensitive moxibustion for knee osteoarthritis: a multicenter randomized controlled trial on the rules of selecting moxibustion location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhenhai

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Complementary and alternative medical approaches have been employed to relieve symptoms and to avoid the side effects of conventional medication. Moxibustion has been widely used to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis. Our past researches suggested heat-sensitive moxibustion might be superior to the conventional moxibustion. Our objective is to investigate the effectiveness of heat-sensitive moxibustion compared with conventional moxibustion or conventional drug treatment. Methods This study consists of a multi-centre (four centers in China, randomised, controlled trial with three parallel arms (A: heat-sensitive moxibustion; B: conventional moxibustion; C: conventional drug group. The moxibustion locations are different from A and B. Group A selects heat-sensitization acupoint from the region consisting of Yin Lingquan(SP9, Yang Lingquan(GB34, Liang Qiu(ST34, and Xue Hai (SP10. Meanwhile, fixed acupoints are used in group B, that is Xi Yan (EX-LE5 and He Ding (EX-LE2. The conventional drug group treats with intra-articular Sodium Hyaluronate injection. The outcome measures above will be assessed before the treatment, the 30 days of the last moxibustion session and 6 months after the last moxibustion session. Discussion This trial will utilize high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. It will provide evidence for the effectiveness of moxibustion as a treatment for moderate and severe knee osteoarthritis. Moreover, the result will clarify the rules of heat-sensitive moxibustion location to improve the therapeutic effect with suspended moxibustion, and propose a new concept and a new theory of moxibustion to guide clinical practices. Trial Registration The trial is registered at Controlled Clinical Trials: ChiCTR-TRC-00000600.

  1. Design of a randomized controlled trial of extended-release naltrexone versus daily buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid dependence in Norway (NTX-SBX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Opheim, Arild; Solli, Kristin Klemmetsby; Gaulen, Zhanna; Sharma-Haase, Kamni; Latif, Zill-E-Huma; Tanum, Lars

    2016-04-28

    Current guidelines for opioid dependence recommend daily maintenance of physical dependence with methadone or buprenorphine, and discourage abstinence due to the high risk of relapse and overdose. Extended-release formulations of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (XR-NTX) block heroin and other opioid agonists competitively for around 4 weeks per administration. XR-NTX thus enables opioid users to experience abstinence from opioid agonists with greatly reduced risk of overdose compared to medication-free abstinence. While XR-NTX has shown promise compared to placebo and daily naltrexone tablets, there is limited information on long-term safety and its performance compared to daily maintenance treatment. In this five-hospital RCT with long-term follow-up, we aim to recruit n = 180 patients in treatment for opioid dependence and allocate them in an open, randomized manner (1:1) to receive either 4-week XR-NTX or daily buprenorphine-naloxone (BP-NLX) for the duration of 12 weeks. Allocation is open-label due to the risk of overdose during attempts to self-unmask allocation using heroin. Urine drug tests are scheduled every week with follow-up visits & assessment every 4 weeks. Primary outcomes are abstinence from illicit opioids in urine drug tests and self-report, as well as retention in treatment. Secondary outcomes include other substance use, injecting behavior, drug craving, mental health, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, abstinence motivation, opioid agonist effect rating, insomnia, and pain. Observation is continued for another 36 weeks in order to assess longer-term safety, adherence and effectiveness. The study is an investigator-initiated trial, funded by public grants and approved by an Independent Ethical Committee (the Regional Ethical Committee for Research South-East B # 2011/1320) and the Norwegian Medicines Agency. Despite minor implementation problems, the protocol appears sufficiently robust to generate results of high interest to

  2. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  3. Simulation of the K-function in the analysis of spatial clustering for non-randomly distributed locations-Exemplified by bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2009-01-01

    The K-function is often used to detect spatial clustering in spatial point processes, e.g. clustering of infected herds. Clustering is identified by testing the observed K-function for complete spatial randomness modelled, e.g. by a homogeneous Poisson process. The approach provides information a...... of the herd locations in general. The approach also overcomes edge effects and problems with complex shapes of the study region. An application to bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection in Denmark is described....

  4. Selection of 12-Hour Sustained-Release Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Formulation Through Comparison of Pharmacokinetic Profiles of 4 Sustained-Release Prototype Formulations and Standard Acetaminophen Formulation: An Open-Label, Randomized, Proof-of-Principle Pharmacokinetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yong; Liu, Dongzhou J

    2017-08-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP; paracetamol), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic, is available in modified-release and immediate-release (IR) formulations requiring 3- or 4-times-daily dosing. This phase 1 open-label crossover study compared pharmacokinetic profiles of single 2000-mg doses of 4 different sustained-release (SR) formulations of APAP (designed to allow twice-daily dosing) against two 1000-mg doses (taken 6 hours apart) of standard IR APAP in 14 healthy volunteers. The primary end point was duration of time that plasma APAP concentration exceeded a plasma concentration (TC ) of 4 μg/mL. Of the 4 SR APAP formulations studied, a single 2000-mg dose of a bilayer SR formulation had the longest mean TC>4μg/mL (8.1 hours), similar to that of 2 doses of IR APAP (8.3 hours). Mean TC>4μg/mL was 7.3 hours with a single-layer SR APAP, 7.5 hours with another single-layer SR APAP formulation using a different excipient, and 7.1 hours with an enteric-coated SR APAP coupled with a fast-dissolving IR APAP. Secondary pharmacokinetic analyses showed a similar extent of absorption and lower peak concentration for the bilayer SR formulation compared with IR APAP. Adverse events were all mild. Based on these results, the bilayer SR APAP formulation was selected for further development. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of an oral, extended-release formulation of phentermine/topiramate for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, David H; Bowden, Charles H; DiDonato, Karen P; McCullough, Pamela A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate safety and efficacy of phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg for treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in obese adults. This phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 2-week screening and 28-week treatment periods. Overnight polysomnography was performed at baseline, Week 8, and Week 28. Single-center study conducted from August 2008 to September 2009. Forty-five subjects with moderate to severe OSA not receiving positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment with body mass index of 30-40 kg/m(2). Subjects were randomized to receive placebo (n = 23) or phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg (n = 22). Both groups received lifestyle-modification counseling. Primary endpoint, change in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), significantly favored phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg (-31.5 events/h, 95% CI: -40.0, -22.9) over placebo (-16.6 events/h, 95% CI: -25.0, -8.2) at Week 28 (P =0.0084). At Week 28, there was a 10.2% (95% CI: -12.7, -7.6; 10.8 kg, 95% CI: -13.5, -8.0) mean decrease in weight in the phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg group compared with 4.3% (95% CI: -6.6, -2.0; 4.7 kg, 95% CI: -7.2, -2.2) in the placebo group (P = 0.0006) and a positive, significant (P = 0.0003) correlation between percent change in weight and change in AHI. Significant improvements in overnight oxygen saturation and reduction in blood pressure compared with placebo were observed. Phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg was well tolerated with low adverse event rates. Phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg induced significant weight reductions and concomitant improvements in OSA and related symptoms vs placebo. This suggests weight loss mediated by phentermine 15 mg plus extended-release topiramate 92 mg may be useful in treatment of moderate to severe OSA in obese subjects unable or unwilling to comply with PAP treatment.

  6. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Divalproex Extended-Release in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karen Dineen; Redden, Laura; Kowatch, Robert A.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Segal, Scott; Chang, Kiki; Wozniak, Patricia; Vigna, Namita V.; Abi-Saab, Walid; Saltarelli, Mario

    2009-01-01

    A double-blind study that involves 150 patients aged 10-17 on the effect of divalproex extended-release in the treatment of bipolar disorder shows that the drug was similar to placebo based on adverse events and that no treatment effect was observed in the drug. The drug is not suitable for treatment of youths with bipolar I disorder, mixed or…

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Paula D.; Winhusen, Theresa; Davies, Robert D.; Leimberger, Jeffrey D.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan; Klein, Constance; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lohman, Michelle; Bailey, Genie L.; Haynes, Louise; Jaffee, William B.; Haminton, Nancy; Hodgkins, Candace; Whitmore, Elizabeth; Trello-Rishel, Kathlene; Tamm, Leanne; Acosta, Michelle C.; Royer-Malvestuto, Charlotte; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc; Holmes, Beverly W.; Kaye, Mary Elyse; Vargo, Mark A.; Woody, George E.; Nunes, Edward V.; Liu, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of osmotic-release methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) compared with placebo for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the impact on substance treatment outcomes in adolescents concurrently receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders (SUD). Method: This was a…

  8. Immediate and delayed loading of two-piece reduced-diameter implants with locator-analog attachments in edentulous mandibles: One-year results from a randomized clinical trial examining clinical outcome and patient expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Ariaans, Kirsten; Eberhard, Lydia; Klotz, Anna-Luisa; Oh, Keunyoung; Kappel, Stefanie

    2017-08-01

    Prosthetic management of thin alveolar ridges in the edentulous mandibles of elderly patients, especially the time of loading, the number of implants needed, and patient expectations and perception, is a challenge in implant dentistry. Survival of conventionally and immediately loaded 2-piece reduced-diameter implants in the interforaminal region of the edentulous mandible supporting locator-analog attachments was evaluated. Prosthetic complications and peri-implant hygiene were also studied, and patient expectation and subjective evaluation of the treatment were documented. Twenty-five patients with adapted complete dentures received 4 reduced-diameter implants. All anterior implants were immediately loaded. Three months later, patients were allocated by randomization to 1 of 2 treatment groups: 2 locator-analog attachments on the anterior implants (Group A); or 4 locator-analog attachments (Group B). After another 3 months patient allocation was changed (crossover design) for the next 3 months. Questionnaires with Likert scales and numeric rating scales were used to assess patients' expectations and subjective overdenture-related variables, respectively. One implant was lost in the immediate-loading group. Survival was 98% and 100% for immediate and delayed loading, respectively. During 12-month observation, 8 complications required aftercare. At the beginning of treatment, patients' expectations were highly positive. Subjective assessment of overdenture-related variables 3 months after immediate loading of 2 implants revealed a statistically significant improvement for most of the variables studied; this was maintained 1 year later. In the subjective assessments, there were no statistically significant differences between Groups A and B. Immediate loading of reduced-diameter implants supporting locator-analog attachments resulted in high implant survival, few prosthetic complications, good oral hygiene, and improvement of subjective denture perception in the

  9. Residual stand damage from crop tree release felling operations in white oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey W. Stringer; Gary W. Miller; H. Clay Smith

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted at the University of Kentucky's Robinson Forest located in Breathitt, Knott, and Perry counties in eastern Kentucky. Three treatments including two levels of croptree release, leaving 20 and 34 crop trees per acre, and a control treatment were replicated 4 times and randomly distributed among l.2 white oak (Quercus alba...

  10. The influence of patient attitude toward massage on pressure pain sensitivity and immune system after application of myofascial release in breast cancer survivors: a randomized, controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Sánchez-Salado, Carmen; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of patient's attitudes toward massage on pressure pain sensitivity and the immune effects of myofascial release in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Twenty BCS participated. They presented to the laboratory at the same time of the day on 2 occasions separated by 2 weeks. At each session, they received either a myofascial release technique or control (special attention) intervention. Salivary flow rate, cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations, and α-amylase activity were obtained before and immediately after intervention from saliva samples. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the cervical spine and temporalis muscle were assessed bilaterally. The attitude toward massage (ATOM) scale was collected before the first session in all BCS. The analysis of covariance revealed a significant intervention × time interaction for salivary flow rate (P = .010), but not α-amylase (P = .111), IgA (P = .655), and cortisol (P = .363) in favor of the experimental group: BCS exhibited an increase of salivary flow rate after myofascial release intervention. When the ATOM scale was included in the analysis, significant influence on IgA (P = .001) was found: BCS with positive attitude had a significant increase in IgA (P > .05). The analysis of covariance did not find a significant intervention × time interaction for PPT over the cervical spine or temporalis muscle, with no effect of ATOM scales for PPT (P > .05). The current study suggests that myofascial release may lead to an immediate increase in salivary flow rate in BCS with cancer-related fatigue. We also found that the effect of myofascial release on immune function was modulated by a positive patient's attitude toward massage. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ririe Dam Release Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes 1420 Ririe Dam Ririe Dam 119,880 Gates opened and initial release started. 1455 115th St...16°F air temperature. Table A2. Observations made on 11 February 2013. Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes...ERDC/CRREL TR-13-10 52 Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes Travel Time* (sec) Vel.** (fps) 1224 5th

  12. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopic...

  13. Design and methods of a double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of extended-release naltrexone for HIV-infected, opioid dependent prisoners and jail detainees who are transitioning to the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Angela; Lincoln, Thomas; Skiest, Daniel J; Desabrais, Maureen; Altice, Frederick L; Springer, Sandra A

    2014-11-01

    People with opioid dependence and HIV are concentrated within criminal justice settings (CJS). Upon release, however, drug relapse is common and contributes to poor HIV treatment outcomes, increased HIV transmission risk, reincarceration and mortality. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) is an evidence-based treatment for opioid dependence, yet is not routinely available for CJS populations. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of XR-NTX for HIV-infected inmates transitioning from correctional to community settings is underway to assess its impact on HIV and opioid-relapse outcomes. We describe the methods and early acceptability of this trial. In addition we provide protocol details to safely administer XR-NTX near community release and describe logistical implementation issues identified. Study acceptability was modest, with 132 (66%) persons who consented to participate from 199 total referrals. Overall, 79% of the participants had previously received opioid agonist treatment before this incarceration. Thus far, 65 (49%) of those agreeing to participate in the trial have initiated XR-NTX or placebo. Of the 134 referred patients who ultimately did not receive a first injection, the main reasons included a preference for an alternative opioid agonist treatment (37%), being ineligible (32%), not yet released (10%), and lost upon release before receiving their injection (14%). Study findings should provide high internal validity about HIV and opioid treatment outcomes for HIV-infected prisoners transitioning to the community. The large number of patients who ultimately did not receive the study medication may raise external validity concerns due to XR-NTX acceptability and interest in opioid agonist treatments. NCT01246401. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A randomized, open-label, multicenter trial comparing once-a-day AVINZA (morphine sulfate extended-release capsules) versus twice-a-day OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride controlled-release tablets) for the treatment of chronic, moderate to severe low back pain: improved physical functioning in the ACTION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Bookbinder, Stephen A; Bunker, Timothy R; Alftine, Christopher D; Gershon, Steven; de Jong, Egbert; Negro-Vilar, Andres; Ghalie, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This multicenter trial compared the efficacy, safety, and effect on quality of life and work limitation of once-daily extended-release morphine sulfate capsules (AVINZA, A-MQD) and twice-daily controlled-release oxycodone HCI tablets (OxyContin, O-ER) in subjects with chronic, moderate to severe low back pain. After randomization and a period of opioid dose titration, subjects (n=266) underwent an eight-week evaluation phase and an optionalf our-month extension phase (n=174 in extension phase). Subjects were assessed using the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ). In both groups, significant improvements were observed in the SF-12 mean scores forp hysicalf unctioning (p OxyContin, once-daily A VINZA resulted in significantly better and earlier improvement ofp hysicalf unction and ability to work.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of three years growth hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment in children with idiopathic short stature and intrauterine growth retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Kamp; D. Mul (Dick); J.J.J. Waelkens (Johan); M. Jansen (Maarten); H.A. Delemarre-van de Waal (Henriette); L. Verhoeven-Wind; M. Frölich (Marijke); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); J.M. Wit (Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe assessed the effectiveness and safety of 3 yr combined GH and GnRH agonist (GnRHa) treatment in a randomized controlled study in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) or intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Gonadal suppression, GH reserve, and

  16. A Calculus of Located Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Compagnoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We define BioScapeL, a stochastic pi-calculus in 3D-space. A novel aspect of BioScapeL is that entities have programmable locations. The programmer can specify a particular location where to place an entity, or a location relative to the current location of the entity. The motivation for the extension comes from the need to describe the evolution of populations of biochemical species in space, while keeping a sufficiently high level description, so that phenomena like diffusion, collision, and confinement can remain part of the semantics of the calculus. Combined with the random diffusion movement inherited from BioScape, programmable locations allow us to capture the assemblies of configurations of polymers, oligomers, and complexes such as microtubules or actin filaments. Further new aspects of BioScapeL include random translation and scaling. Random translation is instrumental in describing the location of new entities relative to the old ones. For example, when a cell secretes a hydronium ion, the ion should be placed at a given distance from the originating cell, but in a random direction. Additionally, scaling allows us to capture at a high level events such as division and growth; for example, daughter cells after mitosis have half the size of the mother cell.

  17. Improved insomnia symptoms and sleep-related next-day functioning in patients with comorbid major depressive disorder and insomnia following concomitant zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg and escitalopram treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Maurizio; Asnis, Gregory M; Shrivastava, Ram K; Lydiard, Bruce; Bastani, Bijan; Sheehan, David V; Roth, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    This investigation was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of zolpidem extended-release in patients with insomnia associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients (N = 385) received open-label escitalopram 10 mg/d and were randomized to concomitant zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg/night or placebo for 8 weeks (phase 1) in a randomized, parallel-group, multicenter trial. Responders (≥ 50% in 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS(17)] score) continued 16 weeks of double-blind treatment (phase 2); escitalopram only was given during a 2-week run-out period. The study was conducted between February 2006 and June 2007. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in subjective total sleep time. Secondary efficacy measures included subjective sleep-onset latency, number of awakenings, wake time after sleep onset, sleep quality, sleep-related next-day functioning, HDRS(17), Sleep Impact Scale score, Patient and Clinical Global Impressions of Insomnia Treatment, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study; sleep measures were also evaluated during the run-out period. Throughout phase 1, zolpidem extended-release led to significantly greater improvements in total sleep time (P sleep onset, sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and sleep quality (P ≤ .0003), and some measures of sleep-related next-day functioning but not in depressive symptoms or quality of life. During phase 2, improvements with the zolpidem extended-release/escitalopram group occurred for total sleep time (significant [P depressive symptoms or quality of life. The most common adverse events associated with combination treatment included nausea, somnolence, dry mouth, dizziness, fatigue, and amnesia. Zolpidem extended-release administered concomitantly with escitalopram for up to 24 weeks was well tolerated

  18. The Granting of Work Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, William E.; Humphrey, John A.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzed the process of granting work release. Administrative data on a 10 percent random sample of incarcerated males provided the basis for a path analysis. High custody grade was found to have a very strong direct path with granting of work releases. Other variables had weaker paths. (Author)

  19. A randomized clinical trial of a therapeutic community treatment for female inmates: outcomes at 6 and 12 months after prison release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, JoAnn Y; McKendrick, Karen; Hamilton, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    This random assignment study compared female offenders (n = 468) with substance use disorders in a prison therapeutic community program with those in a cognitive-behavioral intervention. The study demonstrates that all women benefitted from gender-sensitive prison treatment, but the therapeutic community was more effective in reducing drug use, criminal activity, and exposure to trauma and increasing mental health functioning and time until reincarceration during the year after prison. In addition, the ability to sustain and even improve behavior change after the women leave prison highlights the importance of providing accessible community-based continuity of mental health and substance abuse services during reentry.

  20. The ACTION study: a randomized, open-label, multicenter trial comparing once-a-day extended-release morphine sulfate capsules (AVINZA) to twice-a-day controlled-release oxycodone hydrochloride tablets (OxyContin) for the treatment of chronic, moderate to severe low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Bookbinder, Stephen A; Bunker, Timothy R; Alftine, Christopher D; Ghalie, Richard; Negro-Vilar, Andres; de Jong, Egbert; Gershon, Steven

    2006-01-01

    This large, open-label, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study compared two oral sustained-release opioids (SROs)--AVINZA (A-MQD), morphine sulfate extended-release capsules given once a day, and OxyContin (O-ER), oxycodone modified-release tablets given twice a day--in SRO-naive subjects ages 30 to 70 with chronic, moderate to severe low back pain. Of the 392 subjects enrolled and randomized, 266 (132 in the A-MQD group and 134 in the O-ER group) completed the opioid dose titration phase and entered an eight-week evaluation phase. During the evaluation phase, A-MQD achieved significantly better pain control than O-ER, as demonstrated by a greater decrease from baseline in pain scores obtained four times daily during weeks one, four, and eight (p = 0.002). The number of breakthrough-pain rescue medication doses adjusted for the number of patient days was significantly lower in the A-MQD group (p < 0.0001). Better pain control with A-MQD was achieved with a significantly lower daily opioid dose than with O-ER (mean 69.9 mg and 91 mg morphine equivalents, respectively; p = 0.0125). Quality of sleep was significantly better with A-MQD for the entire evaluation phase (p = 0.0026). The incidence and severity of elicited opioid side effects were similar in the two groups. This trial demonstrated that once-daily A-MQD provides consistent around-the-clock pain relief in patients with low back pain. In patients who completed opioid dose titration, A-MQD was significantly better than O-ER for reducing pain and improving sleep, while requiring a lower daily opioid dose.

  1. Efficacy and safety of different doses of a slow-release corticosteroid implant for macular edema: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu QY

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Qingyu Liu,1,2,* Mengmei He,1,2,* Hui Shi,1,3 Qianyi Wang,1,2 Yaru Du,1,3 Junling Liu,1,2 Chengda Ren,1,2 Ding Xu,1 Jing Yu1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, 2Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of First Clinical Medical College, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of intravitreal corticosteroid implants for macular edema. Methods: A total of 3,586 patients from previously reported randomized controlled trials were included. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.2. Summary odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated, employing random-effects or fixed-effects models according to between-study heterogeneity. The main outcome measures were the ORs for effects and safety of intravitreal corticosteroid implants. Results: Four eligible studies were included. Compared with the sham group, the ORs for ≥15 letter improvement of visual acuity in the high-dose and low-dose groups were 1.89 (95% CI 1.33–2.69, P=0.0004 and 1.62 (95% CI 1.10–2.41, P=0.02, respectively. The weight mean differences in central retinal thickness increases were -75.46 (95% CI -90.29, -60.63, P<0.0001 and -46.47 (95% CI -92.08, -0.86, P=0.05, respectively. However, the ORs for increased intraocular pressure in both intervention groups were higher than in the sham group, and were 11.50 (95% CI 7.24–18.28, P<0.00001 and 10.30 (95% CI 6.49–16.36, P<0.00001, respectively. The incidence of cataract was 7.25 (95% CI 5.68–9.25, P<0.00001 and 3.56 (95% CI 1.28–9.96, P=0.02 in the two intervention groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the intervention groups except for the incidence of cataract in which the OR was 1.59 (95% CI 1.28–1.97, P<0.001.  Conclusion: Intravitreal corticosteroid

  2. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy and safety study of ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone) for moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Hale, Martin E; Bass, Almasa; Bramson, Candace; Pixton, Glenn; Wilson, Jacquelyn G; Setnik, Beatrice; Meisner, Paul; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Malhotra, Bimal K; Wolfram, Gernot

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ALO-02, an abuse-deterrent formulation containing pellets of extended-release oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) surrounding sequestered naltrexone HCl, compared with placebo in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. An open-label titration period in which all patients received ALO-02 was followed by a double-blind treatment period where patients meeting treatment response criteria were randomized to either a fixed dose of ALO-02 or placebo. Daily average low back pain was assessed using an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS)-Pain. Of the 663 patients screened, 410 received ALO-02 during the open-label conversion and titration period and 281 patients were randomized to the double-blind treatment period (n = 134, placebo; n = 147, ALO-02). Change in the mean NRS-Pain score from randomization baseline to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period was significantly different favoring ALO-02 compared with placebo (P = 0.0114). Forty-four percent of patients treated with placebo and 57.5% of patients treated with ALO-02 reported ≥30% improvement in weekly average NRS-Pain scores from screening to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period (P = 0.0248). In the double-blind treatment period, 56.8% of patients in the ALO-02 group and 56.0% of patients in the placebo group experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE). The most common treatment-related TEAEs for ALO-02 during the treatment period were nausea, vomiting, and constipation, consistent with opioid therapy. ALO-02 has been demonstrated to provide significant reduction of pain in patients with chronic low back pain and has a safety profile similar to other opioids.

  3. Acute postoperative pain relief with immediate-release tapentadol: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study conducted in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y K; Ko, J S; Rhim, H Y; Lee, E J; Karcher, K; Li, H; Shapiro, D; Lee, H S

    2014-12-01

    To broaden the ethnic groups in which tapentadol IR is evaluated for treating acute postoperative pain to include Asians. In this phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized study, 352 Korean adults with moderate-to-severe pain following hallux valgus surgery received tapentadol IR 50 or 75 mg or placebo orally every 4-6 hours for 72 hours. Patients requesting other (rescue) analgesics during this period were discontinued for lack of efficacy. The primary endpoint, sum of pain intensity difference (SPID) over 48 hours, was evaluated based on the difference between tapentadol IR and placebo in least squares (LS) mean change from baseline using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Secondary endpoints included the time to first rescue medication use and the distribution of responder rates. A treatment effect, favoring tapentadol IR, was observed for SPID48 (p tapentadol IR 50 mg and 90.6 (95% CI: 65.1, 116.1) for tapentadol IR 75 mg. Time to first rescue medication use was delayed for tapentadol IR (p tapentadol IR (p ≤ 0.001 for both doses vs. placebo; Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test). Dizziness, nausea, and vomiting were each reported in ≥ 10% tapentadol-treated patients and at an incidence ≥ 2-fold higher vs. placebo. The study findings may be limited by study drug dosing every 4 to 6 hours and frequent monitoring during treatment, neither of which mimic pain treatment in clinical practice. However, any potential bias based on this systematic monitoring of patients would be mitigated by the randomized, double-blind nature of the study, with all treatment groups similarly affected by such biases, if any. Tapentadol IR reduced acute pain intensity, significantly more than placebo, after orthopedic surgery in Korean patients. NCT01516008.

  4. A randomized clinical trial to compare levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (Mirena vs trans-cervical endometrial resection for treatment of menorrhagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazizadeh S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shirin Ghazizadeh1, Fatemeh Bakhtiari1, Haleh Rahmanpour2, Fatemeh Davari-Tanha1, Fatemeh Ramezanzadeh11Valie-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Valie-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ayatollah Mousavi Hospital, Zanjan, IranObjective: To compare the acceptability, efficacy, adverse effects, and user satisfaction of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS and trans-cervical resection of the endometrium (TCRE for the treatment of menorrhagia.Method: 104 women with menorrhagia were divided into 2 groups: 52 women had the LNG-IUS inserted and 52 underwent TCRE. Menstrual pattern, pictorial blood loss assessment chart score, adverse effects, and rates of acceptability and satisfaction, were recorded at 6 and 12 months after the procedure.Results: After a year there were reductions of 93.9% and 88.4% in menstrual blood loss in the TCRE and LNG-IUS groups, respectively. Amenorrhea was more common in the TCRE group and spotting and systemic effects in the LNG-IUS group. Satisfaction rates of the TCRE group were higher than the LNG-IUS group (80.8% vs 69.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Although both treatments were found to be equally effective, LNG-IUS was less invasive and can be advised for younger women with a desire to preserve fertility.Keywords: menorrhagia, trans-cervical endometrial resection, levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system

  5. Effect of slow release-Fampridine on muscle strength, rate of force development, functional capacity and cognitive function in an enriched population of MS patients. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H B; Nielsen, J L; Ravnborg, M.

    2016-01-01

    contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) of the lower extremities and 2) to replicate previously published data on the effect of slow release-Fampridine (SR-Fampridine) on the functional capacity of the lower limbs, the upper limb and cognitive function, in persons with multiple sclerosis (pw......-Fampridine on functional capacity of the lower limbs were replicated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01656148.......DESIGN: This study was conducted as a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial preceded by open label enrichment phase. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the effect of SR-Fampridine treatment on muscle strength in terms of maximal voluntary...

  6. The effect of a trunk release maneuver on Peak Pressure Index, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in older adults seated in a High Fowler's position: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Krista L; Desharnais, Guylaine; Boily, Jeanette; Miller, William C; Camp, Pat G

    2012-11-16

    Pressure ulcers pose significant negative individual consequences and financial burden on the healthcare system. Prolonged sitting in High Fowler's position (HF) is common clinical practice for older adults who spend extended periods of time in bed. While HF aids in digestion and respiration, being placed in a HF may increase perceived discomfort and risk of pressure ulcers due to increased pressure magnitude at the sacral and gluteal regions. It is likely that shearing forces could also contribute to risk of pressure ulcers in HF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-tech and time-efficient Trunk Release Manuever (TRM) on sacral and gluteal pressure, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in ambulatory older adults. A randomized controlled trial was used. We recruited community-living adults who were 60 years of age and older using posters, newspaper advertisements and word-of-mouth. Participants were randomly allocated to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 59) received the TRM, while the control group (n = 58) maintained the standard HF position. The TRM group had significantly lower mean (SD) PPI values post-intervention compared to the control group, 59.6 (30.7) mmHg and 79.9 (36.5) mmHg respectively (p = 0.002). There was also a significant difference in trunk displacement between the TRM and control groups, +3.2 mm and -5.8 mm respectively (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in perceived discomfort between the groups. The TRM was effective for reducing pressure in the sacral and gluteal regions and for releasing the trunk at the point of contact between the skin and the support surface, but did not have an effect on perceived discomfort. The TRM is a simple method of repositioning which may have important clinical application for the prevention of pressure ulcers that may occur as a result of HF.

  7. Immediate-release tapentadol or oxycodone for treatment of acute postoperative pain after elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery: a randomized, phase IIIb study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanger, Gary J; Klopfer, Angela M; Xiang, Jim; Benson, Carmela J; Moskovitz, Bruce L; Rosenthal, Norman R

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder surgery can result in substantial postoperative pain. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of tapentadol immediate release (IR) or oxycodone IR in this setting for the treatment of acute pain. Subjects received tapentadol IR 50 or 100 mg or oxycodone IR 5 or 10 mg every 4-6 hours as needed for pain up to 7 days after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Twice daily, subjects recorded pain intensity from 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as you can imagine) and pain relief from 0 (none) to 5 (complete). Final assessments included patient and clinician global impression of change and subject satisfaction with treatment. The primary efficacy endpoint was the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID) over 3 days. Of 378 subjects (192 tapentadol IR, 186 oxycodone IR) who took study medication, 312 (158 tapentadol IR, 154 oxycodone IR) had pain intensity ≥4 before the first dose and were evaluated for efficacy. Mean SPID scores over 3 days were 32.1 and 41.1 in the tapentadol IR and oxycodone IR groups, respectively (least-squares mean difference [95% confidence interval], 9.0 [-18.9, 36.9]; p = 0.527). Secondary analyses of pain intensity, pain relief, and subject satisfaction were similar between groups. Subjects and clinicians reported significantly better global impression of change for tapentadol IR. Adverse events were consistent with established safety profiles for IR opioids. Tapentadol IR and oxycodone IR had similar efficacy for pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, but subjects and clinicians reported greater overall improvement with tapentadol IR.

  8. Positive benefits of theophylline in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study of low-dose, slow-release theophylline in the treatment of COPD for 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yumin; Wang, Xiaoping; Zeng, Xiangyi; Qiu, Rong; Xie, Junfeng; Liu, Shengming; Zheng, Jingping; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin

    2006-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-dose theophylline has anti-inflammatory benefits and is safe in the treatment of COPD. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-dose, slow-release oral theophylline administered over a 1-year period in patients with COPD. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. In total, 110 participants with COPD were randomly assigned to receive slow-release theophylline (100 mg b.i.d.) or placebo for 1 year. Use of medicine and symptoms recorded by diary cards; pulmonary function, exacerbations of COPD, quality of life and the use of rescue medicine were evaluated. Superiority test was used to estimate the efficacy. Of 110 participants, 85 (77.3%) complied with the protocol, with 42 subjects in theophylline and 43 subjects on placebo. In both intention-to-treat and per-protocol population analysis, greater improvement in pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.038 and P = 0.070, respectively), lower frequency of COPD exacerbations (P = 0.047 and P = 0.035, respectively), fewer days of COPD exacerbations (P = 0.045 and P = 0.046, respectively), lower frequency of clinical visits (P = 0.017 and P = 0.039, respectively), greater improvement in satisfaction with treatment (P = 0.014 and P = 0.004, respectively) were found in the theophylline group than in the placebo group. In per-protocol population, greater improvements in quality of life (P = 0.047) were also observed in the theophylline group and the mean time to the first exacerbation was delayed in theophylline group in comparison with placebo group (P = 0.047). Drug-related adverse events such as stomach discomfort (3.51%), headache (3.51%), insomnia (1.75%) and palpitation (1.75%) were found in the theophylline group. Low-dose, slow-release oral theophylline is effective and well-tolerated in the long term treatment of stable COPD, although it does not improve post-bronchodilator lung function.

  9. Computer simulation of the free energy of peptides with the local states method: analogues of gonadotropin releasing hormone in the random coil and stable states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, H; Koerber, S C; Rivier, J E; Hagler, A T

    1994-07-01

    The Helmholtz free energy F (rather than the energy) is the correct criterion for stability; therefore, calculation of F is important for peptides and proteins that can populate a large number of metastable states. The local states (LS) method proposed by H. Meirovitch [(1977) Chemical Physics Letters, Vol. 45, p. 389] enables one to obtain upper and lower bounds of the conformational free energy, FB (b,l) and FA (b,l), respectively, from molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo samples. The correlation parameter b is the number of consecutive dihedral or valence angles along the chain that are taken into account explicitly. The continuum angles are approximated by a discretization parameter l; the larger are b and l, the better the approximations; while FA can be estimated efficiently, it is more difficult to estimate FB. The method is further developed here by applying it to MD trajectories of a relatively large molecule (188 atoms), the potent "Asp4-Dpr10" antagonist [cyclo(4/10)-(Ac-delta 3Pro1-D-pFPhe2-D-Trp3-Asp4-Tyr5-D-Nal6-Leu7-Arg8 -Pro9- Dpr10-NH2)] of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). The molecule was simulated in vacuo at T = 300 K in two conformational states, previously investigated [J. Rizo et al. Journal of the American Chemical Society, (1992) Vol. 114, p. 2860], which differ by the orientation of the N-terminal tail, above (tail up, TU) and below (tail down, TD) the cyclic heptapeptide ring. As in previous applications of the LS method, we have found the following: (1) While FA is a crude approximation for the correct F, results for the difference, delta FA = FA (TD)-FA (TU) converge rapidly to 5.6 (1) kcal/mole as the approximation is improved (i.e., as b and l are increased), which suggests that this is the correct value for delta F; therefore TD is more stable than TU. (The corresponding difference in entropy, T delta SA = 1.3(2) kcal/mole, is equal to the value obtained by the harmonic approximation.) (2) The lowest approximation, which has

  10. Pressure Transducer Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Files are located here, defining the locations of the pressure transducers on the HIRENASD model. These locations also correspond to the locations that analysts...

  11. Effect of low-level laser therapy on inflammatory mediator release during chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a randomized preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Geisa Badauy Lauria; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Othon-Leite, Angélica Ferreira; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Arantes, Adriano Moraes; Bariani, César; Duarte, Luciana Garcia Lobo; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira; Queiroz-Júnior, Celso Martins; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are submitted to a conditioning regimen of high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy, which usually results in oral ulcerations and mucosal barrier breakdown. Oral mucositis (OM) is a common and debilitating toxicity side effect of autologous and allogeneic HSCT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the severity of OM and inflammatory mediator (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β, metalloproteinases, and growth factors) levels in saliva and blood of HSCT patients. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n = 15) and laser (n = 15). LLLT was applied from the first day of the conditioning regimen until day 7 post-HSCT (D + 7). Saliva and blood were collected from patients on admission (AD), D-1, D + 3, D + 7, and on marrow engraftment day (ME). Clinical results showed less severe OM in the laser group (p levels in saliva on D + 7 (p = 0.04). Significant differences were also observed for IL-10 on D + 7 and on ME in blood plasma, when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). No significant differences were seen in saliva or blood for the other inflammatory mediators investigated. LLLT was clinically effective in reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced OM in HSCT patients, and its mechanism of action does not seem to be completely linked to the modulation of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors or matrix metalloproteinases.

  12. A randomized, open-label study of once-a-day AVINZA (morphine sulfate extended-release capsules) versus twice-a-day OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride controlled-release tablets) for chronic low back pain: the extension phase of the ACTION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Bookbinder, Stephen A; Bunker, Timothy R; Alftine, Christopher D; Ghalie, Richard; Negro-Vilar, Andres; de Jong, Egbert; Gershon, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The ACTION trial, an open-label, randomized, multicenter, two-part study, compared the efficacy and safety of two sustained-release opioids (SROs), A VINZA (A-MQD), morphine sulfate extended-release capsules given once a day, and OxyContin (O-ER), oxycodone modified-release tablets given twice a day, in subjects with chronic, moderate to severe low back pain. The first part of the study, the evaluation phase, was followed by an optional four-month extension phase aimed at evaluating the long-term stability of pain control, SRO dose, and quality of sleep. Three hundred and ninety-two subjects were enrolled in the study; 220 completed the evaluation phase, and 174 entered the extensionphase. During the latterphase, subjects in the A-MQD group (n=79) continued to report lower pain scores, better quality of sleep, lower daily morphine-equivalent doses (means of 86 mg versus 119 mg), and a comparable usage of ibuprofen compared to subjects in the O-ER group (n=95). The incidence and severity of elicited opioid side effects were similar between the two groups. Both study drugs resulted in significant pain relief and improved sleep in SRO-naive patients with chronic low back pain, and this outcome was attained with a stable daily SRO dose. In patients who completed opioid dose titration, A VINZA performed significantly better than OxyContin in reducing pain scores and improving sleep-with a lower morphine-equivalent daily dose-during both the evaluation and extension phases.

  13. On location at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    CERN continues to be a very popular candidate for film locations at the moment. Not only has it inspired a German author and a film-maker interested in the more exotic interpretations of the science being worked on at the Organization, but even the recent puppet animation film by the legendary Muppets featured some CERN scenes.   Dr Bunsen Honeydew (far left) and his friends at ATLAS. Beaker, Bunsen's assistant, has just been sucked up the vacuum tube top left... Image courtesy Walt Disney Studios. In “The Muppet Movie”, released in November 2011 in North America and world-wide in January and February this year, Kermit is reuniting his friends who have ended up in some far-flung places since they last worked together 10 years ago. CERN caught the imagination of the film-makers as the perfect place for the Muppet scientists, Dr. Honeydew Bunsen and his hapless assistant Beaker. After a brief scene filmed in front of a backdrop of the ATLAS detector, the rest of the ...

  14. Randomized, Open-Label, Phase 1/2a Study to Determine the Maximum Tolerated Dose of Intraventricular Sustained Release Nimodipine for Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (NEWTON [Nimodipine Microparticles to Enhance Recovery While Reducing Toxicity After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Daniel; Etminan, Nima; Aldrich, Francois; Steiger, Hans Jakob; Mayer, Stephan A; Diringer, Michael N; Hoh, Brian L; Mocco, J; Faleck, Herbert J; Macdonald, R Loch

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, open-label, phase 1/2a, dose-escalation study of intraventricular sustained-release nimodipine (EG-1962) to determine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and clinical effects in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subjects with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage repaired by clipping or coiling were randomized to EG-1962 or enteral nimodipine. Subjects were World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade 2 to 4 and had an external ventricular drain. Cohorts of 12 subjects received 100 to 1200 mg EG-1962 (9 per cohort) or enteral nimodipine (3 per cohort). The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose. Fifty-four subjects in North America were randomized to EG-1962, and 18 subjects were randomized to enteral nimodipine. The maximum tolerated dose was 800 mg. One serious adverse event related to EG-1962 (400 mg) and 2 EG-1962 dose-limiting toxicities were without clinical sequelae. There was no EG-1962-related hypotension compared with 17% (3/18) with enteral nimodipine. Favorable outcome at 90 days on the extended Glasgow outcome scale occurred in 27/45 (60%, 95% confidence interval 46%-74%) EG-1962 subjects (5/9 with 100, 6/9 with 200, 7/9 with 400, 4/9 with 600, and 5/9 with 800 mg) and 5/18 (28%, 95% confidence interval 7%-48%, relative risk reduction of unfavorable outcome; 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.03; P=0.027) enteral nimodipine subjects. EG-1962 reduced delayed cerebral ischemia (14/45 [31%] EG-1962 versus 11/18 [61%] enteral nimodipine) and rescue therapy (11/45 [24%] versus 10/18 [56%]). EG-1962 was safe and tolerable to 800 mg, and in this, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage population was associated with reduced delayed cerebral ischemia and rescue therapy. Overall, the rate of favorable clinical outcome was greater in the EG-1962-treated group. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01893190. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Mining significant semantic locations from GPS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing deployment and use of GPS-enabled devices, massive amounts of GPS data are becoming available. We propose a general framework for the mining of semantically meaningful, significant locations, e.g., shopping malls and restaurants, from such data. We present techniques capable...... of extracting semantic locations from GPS data. We capture the relationships between locations and between locations and users with a graph. Significance is then assigned to locations using random walks over the graph that propagates significance among the locations. In doing so, mutual reinforcement between...

  16. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Oberste

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β ≤.183 for all measured

  17. Do Reported Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Subsequent Higher Cognitive Performances Remain if Tested against an Instructed Self-Myofascial Release Training Control Group? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberste, Max; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hübner, Sven T; Zimmer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests positive effects of acute aerobic exercise (AAE) on subsequent higher cognitive functions in healthy young adults. These effects are widely understood as a result of the ongoing physiological adaptation processes induced by the preceding AAE. However, designs of published studies do not control for placebo, Hawthorne and subject expectancy effects. Therefore, these studies do not, at a high degree of validity, allow attributing effects of AEE on subsequent cognitive performance to exercise induced physical arousal. In the present study, we applied a randomized controlled blinded experiment to provide robust evidence for a physiological basis of exercise induced cognitive facilitation. Beyond that, the dose response relationship between AAE`s intensity and subsequent cognitive performances as well as a potentially mediating role of peripheral lactate in AAE induced cognitive facilitation was investigated. The 121 healthy young subjects who participated in this study were assigned randomly into 3 exercise groups and a self-myofascial release training control group. Exercise groups comprised a low, moderate and high intensity condition in which participants cycled on an ergometer at a heart rate corresponding to 45-50%, 65-70% and 85-90% of their individual maximum heart rate, respectively, for 35 minutes. Participants assigned to the control group completed a 35 minute instructed self-massage intervention using a foam roll. Before and after treatment, participants completed computer based versions of the Stroop task and the Trail Making Test as well as a free recall task. None of the applied exercise regimes exerted a significant effect on participants`performance at any of the applied cognitive testing procedure if compared to self-myofascial release training control group. Post hoc power analyses revealed no effect in the population of f = .2 or larger at a risk of type II error (β) ≤.183 for all measured variables. Our

  18. The effect of a trunk release maneuver on Peak Pressure Index, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in older adults seated in a high Fowler’s position: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Krista L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers pose significant negative individual consequences and financial burden on the healthcare system. Prolonged sitting in High Fowler’s position (HF is common clinical practice for older adults who spend extended periods of time in bed. While HF aids in digestion and respiration, being placed in a HF may increase perceived discomfort and risk of pressure ulcers due to increased pressure magnitude at the sacral and gluteal regions. It is likely that shearing forces could also contribute to risk of pressure ulcers in HF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-tech and time-efficient Trunk Release Manuever (TRM on sacral and gluteal pressure, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in ambulatory older adults. Method A randomized controlled trial was used. We recruited community-living adults who were 60 years of age and older using posters, newspaper advertisements and word-of-mouth. Participants were randomly allocated to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 59 received the TRM, while the control group (n = 58 maintained the standard HF position. Results The TRM group had significantly lower mean (SD PPI values post-intervention compared to the control group, 59.6 (30.7 mmHg and 79.9 (36.5 mmHg respectively (p = 0.002. There was also a significant difference in trunk displacement between the TRM and control groups, +3.2 mm and −5.8 mm respectively (p = 0.005. There were no significant differences in perceived discomfort between the groups. Conclusion The TRM was effective for reducing pressure in the sacral and gluteal regions and for releasing the trunk at the point of contact between the skin and the support surface, but did not have an effect on perceived discomfort. The TRM is a simple method of repositioning which may have important clinical application for the prevention of pressure ulcers that may occur as a result of HF.

  19. A pharmacokinetic comparison of single doses of once-daily cyclobenzaprine extended-release 15 mg and 30 mg: a randomized, double-blind, two-period crossover study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Chang, Steven; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of single oral doses of cyclobenzaprine extended-release (CER) 15- and 30-mg capsules. This was a randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study in healthy adults aged 18 to 40 years. Subjects were assigned to receive a single dose of either CER 15 mg or 30 mg on days 1 and 15, separated by a 14-day washout. Study comparisons included the plasma cyclobenzaprine AUC to 168 hours after dosing (AUC(0-168)), AUC(0-infinity), and C(max). Plasma cyclobenzaprine T(max), terminal elimination t(1/2), and adverse events (AEs) were also assessed. Sixteen subjects (9 women, 7 men) were randomized to receive cyclobenzaprine 15 mg or 30 mg; 13 (81.3%) were white and 3 (18.8%) were black. Mean age and weight were 30.2 years and 70.7 kg, respectively. The shapes of the pharmacokinetic profiles for CER 15 and 30 mg were parallel. Mean observed values for dose-dependent pharmacokinetic parameters of CER 15 and 30 mg were as follows: AUC(0-168), 318.3 and 736.6 ng . h/mL, respectively; AUC(0-infinity)), 354.1 and 779.9 ng . h/mL; and C(max), 8.3 and 19.9 ng/mL. Dose-independent parameters were comparable across doses. Median observed Tmax was 6.0 hours for both CER doses; mean t(1/2) was 33.4 hours for CER 15 mg and 32.0 hours for CER 30 mg. The bioavailability of the 2 doses, as indicated by the least squares mean AUC(0-infinity), was 330.3 ng . h/mL for CER 15 mg and 755.1 ng . h/mL for CER 30 mg. During the CER 15-mg treatment sequence, 5 subjects experienced 5 AEs (headache, dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, dermatitis, and glossodynia); during the CER 30-mg treatment sequence, 2 subjects experienced 2 AEs (somnolence and dysmenorrhea). All AEs were mild in intensity. No serious AEs occurred during the study. Once-daily CER 15 and 30 mg exhibited similarly shaped pharmacokinetic profiles. AUC(0-168), AUC(0-infinity)), and C(max) values for the 30-mg dose were approximately double those for the 15-mg

  20. Direct coronary stenting versus stenting with balloon pre-dilation: incidence of enzyme release and follow-up results of a multicentre, prospective, randomized study. The CK and Troponin I Estimation in direct STenting (CK TEST) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducelli, M; Varani, E; Vecchi, G; Paloscia, L; Manari, A; Santarelli, A; Cappi, B; Shoeib, A; Valenti, S; Maresta, A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the safety of direct coronary stenting, its influence on costs, duration of the procedure, radiation exposure, clinical outcome and the incidence of periprocedural myocardial damage as assessed by enzyme release determination. We randomized 103 patients (109 lesions) to direct stent implant or stent implant following balloon predilatation. Patients with heavily calcified lesions, bifurcations, total occlusions, left main lesions and very tortuous vessels were excluded. Three samples of blood were drawn; before, 12 and 24 h after the procedure and total CK, CK MB mass and troponin I determination was carried out in a single centralized laboratory. Direct stenting was successful in 62/62 lesions (100%). No single loss or embolization of the stent occurred. All stents in the group with predilatation were effectively deployed. The immediate post procedure angiographic results were similar with both techniques. Contrast media consumption and procedural time were significantly lower in direct stenting (150+/-82 cc and 30+/-13 min) than in pre-dilated stenting (184+/-85 cc and 36+/-14 min) (P=0.04 and P=0.036 respectively) while fluoroscopy time was similar (9.1+/-12 vs 9.19+/-15 min, P=0.97). The incidence of enzyme release was similar in the groups with only three non Q MI all in the pre-dilated group (P=0.149). Any elevation of CK MB and troponin I occurred in 7% of direct stent vs 12% of pre-dilated group (P=0.66), isolated troponin I elevation in 21% of both groups. Major adverse cardiac events during hospitalization were 0 in direct and 3 in pre-dilated stenting (P=0.66), but there were no significant differences at follow-up at 1, 6 and 12 months between the 2 groups (target lesion revascularization at 12 months 11 vs 14% in the 2 groups respectively). Direct stenting is as safe as pre-dilated stenting in selected coronary lesions. Acute results and myocardial damage as assessed by enzyme release determination are similar, but

  1. A Location Privacy Aware Friend Locator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Thomsen, Jeppe Rishede; Saltenis, Simonas

    2009-01-01

    to trade their location privacy for quality of service, limiting the attractiveness of the services. The challenge is to develop a communication-efficient solution such that (i) it detects proximity between a user and the user’s friends, (ii) any other party is not allowed to infer the location of the user...

  2. Effect of slow release-Fampridine on muscle strength, rate of force development, functional capacity and cognitive function in an enriched population of MS patients. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, H B; Nielsen, J L; Ravnborg, M; Dalgas, U; Aagaard, P; Stenager, E

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted as a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial preceded by open label enrichment phase. The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the effect of SR-Fampridine treatment on muscle strength in terms of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) of the lower extremities and 2) to replicate previously published data on the effect of slow release-Fampridine (SR-Fampridine) on the functional capacity of the lower limbs, the upper limb and cognitive function, in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Previously identified responders to SR-Fampridine were randomized to SR- Fampridine or placebo treatment for four weeks. On days 0 and 26-28 participants underwent testing by isokinetic dynamometry, Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Six Spot Step Test (SSST), Timed 25 Foot Walk Test (T25FW) and 5-Times Sit-to-Stand (5-STS). A statistical significant effect of SR-Fampridine on MVC was demonstrated during knee extension, knee flexion and hip flexion of the weakest leg, as well as on RFD during knee extension and knee flexion of the weakest leg. Furthermore, a significant effect of SR-Fampridine on T25FW, SSST and 5-STS was demonstrated. Gold standard dynamometry assessment of muscle strength showed improved MVC and RFD in persons with MS treated with SR-Fampridine compared to placebo. Furthermore, previous findings on the effects of SR-Fampridine on functional capacity of the lower limbs were replicated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01656148. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Short-term therapy with combination dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin/metformin extended release (XR) is superior to saxagliptin or metformin XR monotherapy in prediabetic women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a single-blind, randomized, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Paterson, Martha S; Seidemann, Ericka L; Gutowski, Hanh C

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy with the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin (SAXA), metformin extended release (MET), and combination (SAXA-MET) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and impaired glucose regulation. Prospective, randomized, single-blind drug study. Outpatient clinic. Patients (n = 38) with PCOS (aged 18-42 years) and prediabetic hyperglycemia determined by a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test. Patients were randomized to SAXA-MET (5 mg/2,000 mg), SAXA (5 mg), or MET (2,000 mg) for 16 weeks. Fasting and mean blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and insulin secretion-sensitivity index (IS-SI) by oral glucose tolerance tests. Free androgen index and lipid levels, average menstrual interval, and anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/height ratio). The study was completed by 34 patients. Nineteen patients had normal glucose tolerance: 3 of 12 (25%) on MET; 6 of 11 (55%) on SAXA; and 10 of 11 (91%) on SAXA-MET (SAXA-MET statistically superior to MET) at study completion. Body mass index, waist circumference, waist/height ratio, free androgen index, insulin sensitivity, IS-SI, and menses improved in all groups; however, IS-SI and menstrual regularity were significantly better with SAXA-MET vs. MET treatment. Triglyceride, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and mean blood glucose significantly declined in the SAXA-MET and SAXA groups only. This pilot work provides the first evidence regarding the effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alone and in combination with MET in this patient population. Treatment with SAXA-MET was superior to either drug alone in terms of clinical and metabolic benefits in prediabetic patients with PCOS. NCT02022007. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A randomized, rater-blinded, crossover study of the effects of oxymorphone extended release, fed versus fasting, on cognitive performance as tested with CANTAB in opioid-tolerant subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Volkerts, Edmund R; Heitland, Ivo; Thomson, Heather

    2014-02-01

    The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) of oxymorphone extended release (ER) 20 mg and 40 mg is approximately 50% higher in fed than in fasted subjects, with most of the difference in area-under-the-curve (AUC) occurring in the first 4 hours post-dose. Hence, the US FDA recommends in the approved labeling that oxymorphone ER is taken at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating. In order to determine the potential impact on cognitive performance of the increased absorption of oxymorphone ER, fed versus fasting, we conducted a randomized, rater-blinded, crossover study in 30 opioid-tolerant subjects, using tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). The subjects randomly received 40 mg oxymorphone ER after a high-fat meal of approximately 1,010 kCal or after fasting for 8-12 hours, and were tested 1 hour and 3 hours post-dose. The CANTAB tests, Spatial Recognition Memory (SRM) and Spatial Working Memory (SWM), showed no statistically significant differences between the fed and fasting conditions. However, sustained attention, as measured by the Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP) CANTAB test, showed a statistically significant interaction of fed versus fasting and post-dose time of testing (F[1,28] = 6.88, P = 0.01), suggesting that 40 mg oxymorphone ER after a high-fat meal versus fasting mitigates the learning effect in this particular cognition domain from 1 hour to 3 hours post-dose. Oxymorphone 40 mg ER affected cognitive performance similarly within 3 hours post-dose, whether given on an empty stomach or after a high-fat meal, suggesting that the effect of food on plasma concentration may not be relevant in the medication's impact on cognition. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effectiveness and Tolerability of a Moderate Dose of Tapentadol Prolonged Release for Managing Severe, Chronic Low Back Pain with a Neuropathic Component: An Open-label Continuation Arm of a Randomized Phase 3b Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Kern, Uwe; Müller, Matthias; Dubois, Cecile; Falke, Dietmar; Steigerwald, Ilona

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of tapentadol prolonged release (PR) for severe, chronic low back pain with a neuropathic component in a subpopulation that achieved adequate pain relief with tapentadol PR 300 mg/day in a randomized, double-blind, phase 3b study. Patients with painDETECT "unclear" or "positive" ratings and pain intensity ≥ 6 (11-point NRS-3 [average 3-day pain intensity]) were titrated to tapentadol PR 300 mg/day over 3 weeks. A subpopulation with pain intensity pain intensity ≥ 4 were randomized to tapentadol PR 500 mg/day or tapentadol PR 300 mg/day plus pregabalin 300 mg/day during a concurrent 8-week, double-blind comparative period. From baseline to end of titration and to final evaluation, significant improvements were observed in pain intensity (mean [SD] changes from baseline to: end of titration; - 5.3 [1.78]; final evaluation; - 5.2 [2.39]; both P pain symptoms, and quality-of-life measures in the open-label continuation arm, with greater improvements in this selected subpopulation than in either group in the primary study population. A favorable tolerability profile was observed, with incidences of all individual treatment-emergent adverse events ≤ 5.1% during the continuation period. A subpopulation of patients with low back pain with a neuropathic component responded very well to tapentadol PR 300 mg/day, with significant improvements in pain intensity, neuropathic pain-related symptoms, and quality of life. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with a very positive treatment response. © 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  6. Effects of hormone therapy on the endometrium in postmenopausal women: a one year randomized trial of low dose oral estradiol in association with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or drospirenone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Schvartzman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to compare the endometrial effects and uterine bleeding patterns associated with treatment using (1 levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS and estradiol (1 mg/day, p.o. or (2 orally administered drospirenone (2 mg/day andestradiol (1 mg/day. METHODS: thirty-four patients (aged 52.53 ± 4.44 in the LNG-IUS group and 53.15 ± 4.018 in the DRSP group were randomized. The severity of menopausal symptoms was evaluated using the Kupperman index every three months. Transvaginal ultrasound, hysteroscopy and histological evaluation were repeated after 12 months. During this period, patients kept menstrual calendars. All categorical variables were described as percentages. Variables were tested for normal distribution and Student's t test was applied for independent samples and ANOVA forrepeated measures when appropriate. Data were considered to be significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: slight vaginal bleeding was reported in the first month of treatment by 53.3% of patients from the LNG-IUS/estradiol group compared with 7.7% of patients from the drospirenone/estradiol group. There were no differences in endometrial thickness between the two groups throughout the study period. End-of-study histological findings showed atrophic endometrium in 53.3% of patients in the LNG-IUS/estradiol group compared with 76.9% of patients in the drospirenone/estradiol group. CONCLUSIONS: our results suggest good endometrial protection with both HT regimens.

  7. History of depressive and/or anxiety disorders as a predictor of treatment response: a post hoc analysis of a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Chi-Un; Masand, Prakash S; Marks, David M; Krulewicz, Stan; Peindl, Kathleen; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A

    2009-08-31

    Despite of a high comorbidity of depressive and/or anxiety disorders with fibromyalgia, information on the clinical implications of this comorbidity is limited but antidepressants are commonly prescribed to treat fibromyalgia in clinical practice. We investigated whether a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorders was associated with response to paroxetine controlled release (CR) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. One hundred sixteen (116) fibromyalgia subjects were randomized to receive paroxetine CR or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was treatment response defined as >or=25% reduction in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score. In multivariate logistic regression, we determined if a history of depression and/or anxiety disorders was an independent predictor of response to paroxetine CR. In logistic regression, the history of depression and/or anxiety did not predict treatment response as measured by >or=25% reduction in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score (OR=0.66, 95% CI=.29-1.49, Wald=0.97, p=0.32), while the drug status (paroxetine CR) was significantly associated with treatment response (OR=2.57, CI=1.2-5.61, Wald=5.5, p=0.02). A significant proportion of patients with fibromyalgia had a history of anxiety and or depressive disorders. However response to treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms with paroxetine CR was not associated with a history of depressive and/or anxiety disorders. Our findings need to be confirmed in more adequately-powered and well-designed subsequent studies.

  8. Randomized, 6-Week, Placebo-Controlled Study of Treatment for Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Individualized Dosing of Osmotic-Release Oral System (OROS) Methylphenidate With a Goal of Symptom Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, David W; Starr, H Lynn; Ma, Yi-Wen; Rostain, Anthony L; Ascher, Steve; Armstrong, Robert B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of individualized dosing within the approved dose range for osmotic-release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate hydrochloride in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A double-blind, 6-week trial was conducted between July 2009 and February 2010 at 35 US sites. Adults with ADHD (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and a screening ADHD Investigator Symptom Rating Scale (AISRS) score > 24 were randomly assigned to OROS methylphenidate 18 mg or matching placebo. Treatment dose could be increased at 18 mg increments, up to 72 mg/d, until an optimal dose was achieved. AISRS score changes from baseline to end point (primary outcome) were analyzed using analysis of covariance. At baseline, the intent-to-treat population of 169 OROS methylphenidate and 172 placebo subjects (mean age = 35.8 years) had mean (standard deviation [SD]) AISRS scores of 37.8 (6.94) and 37.0 (7.51), respectively. OROS methylphenidate-treated subjects exhibited a significantly greater mean (SD) AISRS score improvement than placebo subjects (-17.1 [12.44] vs -11.7 [13.30]; P ADHD. OROS methylphenidate treatment with individualized doses titrated to achieve symptom remission demonstrated greater ADHD symptom reduction than placebo treatment. These data support the overall efficacy of OROS methylphenidate treatment in the management of adults with ADHD and provide new possibilities for additional intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00937040.

  9. Effects of pomegranate extract in supplementing gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy on idiopathic central precocious puberty in Chinese girls: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinsheng; Tang, Jiulai

    2017-02-22

    Central precocious puberty (CPP) without organic abnormality is called idiopathic CPP (ICPP). The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effects of pomegranate extract in supplementing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy on ICPP-affected girls in the Chinese population. 286 girls, diagnosed with ICPP were initially enrolled into this trial, and among them 225 eligible patients were randomized to receive a combinational GnRH analog treatment supplemented with either a placebo or pomegranate extract on a daily basis for a period of 3 months. Their demographics, secondary sexual characteristics and hormone profiles were analyzed at baseline and end of trial. After 3 months of treatment, demographic profiles including bone age, growth velocity and height standard deviation score for bone age, and secondary sexual characteristics including uterus and ovary volume, as well as serum hormone profiles including estradiol, peak luteinizing hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 were all significantly improved in girls receiving a combinational treatment of both GnRH analog and pomegranate extract. Daily consumption of pomegranate extract was able to supplement and improve the treatment outcomes of the GnRH analog therapy for ICPP in Chinese girls.

  10. WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations in the Western Pacific Region (WHO Standard was released in 2008. Initially, there were 92/361 controversial acupuncture points (acupoints. Through seven informal consultations and four task force team meetings, 86 points were agreed upon among the 92 controversial acupoints, leaving 6 remaining controversial acupoints, demanding active research in the future. This will enhance the reproducibility and validity of acupuncture studies. It will also lead to a better understanding of acupuncture mechanisms in order to optimize its clinical efficacy for a range of diseases and syndromes. This book has two parts: General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations and WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations. First of all, familiarity with the General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations in this book can help the reader to understand and use the contents of this book in depth. I would like to thank all of the participating experts and scholars for this great work, who have overcome the limits of previous acupuncture references. I also appreciate the dedicated effort and harmonious leadership of Dr Choi Seung-hoon, former Regional Adviser in Traditional Medicine of Western Pacific Office, WHO.

  11. Law Enforcement Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Law Enforcement Locations in Kansas Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law enforcement agencies "are...

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over pilot study to assess the effects of long-term opioid drug consumption and subsequent abstinence in chronic noncancer pain patients receiving controlled-release morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, David T; Wilson-Barnett, Jenifer; Griffiths, Peter; Vaughan, David J A; Gondhia, Anjalee; Allan, Laurie G

    2005-01-01

    The long-term use of strong opioid analgesics among chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients remains controversial because of concerns over problematic drug use. However, previous surveys suggest that this is not necessarily the case. Therefore, we designed a controlled study to generate evidence in support of these findings. Ten CNCP patients attending the pain clinic in a district general hospital had been taking an average daily dose of 40 mg controlled-release morphine sulphate (mean 40, range 10-90, SD 21 mg), for an average of 2 years (mean 2.175, range 2-2.25, SD 0.2 years). Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study. The study was based on the premise that abrupt cessation of opioid drugs is most likely to highlight problematic use and the consequent inability to stop using opioids. Morphine was substituted with placebo for 60-hour periods to compare the effects of abstinence with those of continued use. Assessment of morphine cessation and abstinence effects was through direct observation, physiological measurements, questionnaire responses, and Brief Pain Inventory scores. Following cessation and abstinence, there were no indications of psychological dependence or drug craving, but there was evidence of the detrimental effects of pain intensity on activity, mood, relationships, sleep, and enjoyment of life. Three patients (30%) reported opioid drug withdrawal symptoms. Pharmacokinetic data demonstrated compliance with abstinence by all patients. The results suggest the existence of a group of CNCP patients whose long-term opioid consumption can be beneficial and remain moderate without them suffering from the consequences of problematic opioid drug use.

  13. Shapley Facility Location Games

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Porat, Omer; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Facility location games have been a topic of major interest in economics, operations research and computer science, starting from the seminal work by Hotelling. Spatial facility location models have successfully predicted the outcome of competition in a variety of scenarios. In a typical facility location game, users/customers/voters are mapped to a metric space representing their preferences, and each player picks a point (facility) in that space. In most facility location games considered i...

  14. Efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (Adderall XR) in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adolescent patients: a 4-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J; Wilens, Timothy E; Biederman, Joseph; Weisler, Richard H; Read, Stephanie C; Pratt, Raymond

    2006-02-01

    The ability to recognize and diagnose attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased in recent years. The persistence of ADHD symptoms puts adolescents with ADHD at risk for long-term adverse psychosocial outcomes. The primary goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (MAS XR) in the management of adolescents with ADHD. This was a 4-week, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose-titration study. Adolescents aged 13 to 17 years with ADHD were randomized to 1 of 4 active treatments (MAS XR 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg/d) or to placebo. All doses were given in the morning. This study used a forced-dose-titration design in which patients randomized to the 10-mg/d group received 1 dose of 10 mg/d for 4 weeks. Patients randomized to the 20-mg/d group received 1 dose of 10 mg/d for the first week and 1 dose of 20 mg/d for the remaining weeks; patients randomized to the 30-mg/d group received 1 dose of 10 mg/d for the first week, 1 dose of 20 mg/d for the second week, and 1 dose of 30 mg/d for the remaining 2 weeks; and patients randomized to the 40-mg/d group received 1 dose of 10 mg/d for the first week, 1 dose of 20 mg/d for the second week, 1 dose of 30 mg/d for the third week, and 1 dose of 40 mg/d for the fourth week. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to end point in the ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV) score. The secondary efficacy measure was the score on the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale for ADHD. ADHD-RS-IV total scores were analyzed post hoc in patients with low baseline ADHD-RS-IV severity (ie, patients with baseline ADHD-RS-IV total scores less than the median) and high baseline ADHD-RS-IV severity (ie, patients with baseline ADHD-RS-IV total scores greater than the median). Safety was assessed by recording adverse events, vital signs, and body weight at all study visits and 30 days after drug

  15. Random Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Rob; Rinaldo, Alessandro; Wasserman, Larry

    2011-01-01

    We propose a relaxed privacy definition called {\\em random differential privacy} (RDP). Differential privacy requires that adding any new observation to a database will have small effect on the output of the data-release procedure. Random differential privacy requires that adding a {\\em randomly drawn new observation} to a database will have small effect on the output. We show an analog of the composition property of differentially private procedures which applies to our new definition. We sh...

  16. Location, Location, Location: Where Do Location-Based Services Fit into Your Institution's Social Media Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekritz, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Foursquare is a location-based social networking service that allows users to share their location with friends. Some college administrators have been thinking about whether and how to take the leap into location-based services, which are also known as geosocial networking services. These platforms, which often incorporate gaming elements like…

  17. Location, location, location: the BRMS1 protein and melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riker Adam I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metastasis suppressor, BRMS1, has been demonstrated to cause dramatic regression of metastatic lesions without blocking orthotopic tumor growth. The role of BRMS1 is well-documented for several non-melanoma malignancies, such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer. However, its role in melanoma is just beginning to be understood, with a recent article by Slipicevic et al. highlighting the levels of expression of BRMS1 in benign nevi, primary and metastatic melanoma samples. Their findings emphasize that the intracellular location of BRMS1 protein (cytoplasmic or nuclear, appears to have a significant impact upon the metastatic capacity of melanoma cells. Interestingly, this selective localization translates into a statistically significant decrease in the relapse-free period in melanoma patients, further associated with a thicker Breslow's depth of primary melanomas. However, and more importantly, this study begins to define a clearer role for BRMS1 in melanoma that is strictly dependent upon its cellular location, with nuclear expression associated with invasive and metastatic capacity and cytoplasmic expression resulting in repressive effects upon progression and metastasis. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/12/73

  18. Smartphones as locative media

    CERN Document Server

    Frith, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone adoption has surpassed 50% of the population in more than 15 countries, and there are now more than one million mobile applications people can download to their phones. Many of these applications take advantage of smartphones as locative media, which is what allows smartphones to be located in physical space. Applications that take advantage of people's location are called location-based services, and they are the focus of this book. Smartphones as locative media raise important questions about how we understand the complicated relationship between the Internet and physical space

  19. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  20. Robustness in facility location

    OpenAIRE

    Van Lokven, Sander W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Facility location concerns the placement of facilities, for various objectives, by use of mathematical models and solution procedures. Almost all facility location models that can be found in literature are based on minimizing costs or maximizing cover, to cover as much demand as possible. These models are quite efficient for finding an optimal location for a new facility for a particular data set, which is considered to be constant and known in advance. In a real world situation, input da...

  1. Lost in Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    performance, the article examines how the growing locative media industry can learn from the location-aware performative strategies employed by artists who create situated and urban performances for the curious participant. The academic frames employed in the analysis draw on psychogeography, site......-specific performance, social and cultural geography, and aspects of phenomenology....... traversed. While becoming destination aware, the individual loses her location awareness. The article proposes that the reason people get lost when using sat-nav is due to a wrong location-performative paradigm. As an alternative, the article introduces and analyzes two performance-related examples...

  2. Smart Location Database - Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  3. Smart Location Database - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  4. Generic Network Location Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laban Mwansa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the Generic Network Location Service based on the Chord implementation utilizing data structures called distributed hash tables (DHT or structured overlay networks, which are used to build scalable self-managing distributed systems. The provided algorithms guarantee resilience in the presence of dynamism: they guarantee consistent lookup results in the presence of nodes failing and leaving. Generic Network Location Service provides a Location Service system based on DHT technology, which is storing device location records in nodes within a Chord DHT. Location records are consisting of network device identification keys as attributes, which are used to create replicas of additional location records through established Chord hashing mechanisms. Storing device location records, in places address-able (using the DHT lookup by individual location record keys provides a simple way of implementing transla¬tion functions similar to well¬ known network services (e.g. ARP, DNS, ENUM. The generic network location ser¬vice presented in the paper is not supposed to be a substitu¬tion of the existing translation techniques (e.g. ARP, DNS, ENUM, but it is considered as an overlay service that uses data available in existing systems and provides some translations currently unavailable.

  5. Effectiveness of Tapentadol Prolonged Release (PR) Compared with Oxycodone/Naloxone PR for the Management of Severe Chronic Low Back Pain with a Neuropathic Component: A Randomized, Controlled, Open-Label, Phase 3b/4 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Likar, Rudolf; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Blanco, Francisco J; Kennes, Lieven; Müller, Matthias; Falke, Dietmar; Steigerwald, Ilona

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of tapentadol prolonged release (PR) vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR in non-opioid-pretreated patients with severe chronic low back pain with a neuropathic pain component. Eligible patients (average pain intensity [numerical rating scale-3 (NRS-3)] ≥6; painDETECT positive/unclear) were randomized to twice-daily tapentadol PR 50 mg or oxycodone/naloxone PR 10 mg/5 mg. After a 21-day titration (maximum twice-daily doses: tapentadol PR 250 mg, or oxycodone/naloxone PR 40 mg/20 mg plus oxycodone PR 10 mg), target doses were continued for 9 weeks. The primary effectiveness endpoint was the change in NRS-3 from baseline to final evaluation; the exact repeated confidence interval (RCI) for tapentadol PR minus oxycodone/naloxone PR was used to establish noninferiority (upper limit tapentadol PR was noninferior to oxycodone/naloxone PR (97.5% RCI: [-1.820, -0.184]; P tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR (significantly greater reduction in pain intensity; P = 0.003). Improvements (baseline to final evaluation) in painDETECT and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory scores were significantly greater with tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR (all P ≤ 0.005). The study was formally shown to be positive and demonstrated, in the primary effectiveness endpoint, the noninferiority for tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR. The effectiveness of tapentadol PR was superior to that of oxycodone/naloxone PR by means of clinical relevance and statistical significance (confirmatory evidence of superiority). Tapentadol PR was associated with significantly greater improvements in neuropathic pain-related symptoms and global health status than oxycodone/naloxone PR and with a significantly better gastrointestinal tolerability profile. Tapentadol PR may be considered a first-line option for managing severe chronic low back pain with a neuropathic pain component. © 2015 The authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  6. Efficacy and safety investigation of Kuntai capsule for the add-back therapy of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist administration to endometriosis patients: a randomized, double-blind, blank- and tibolone-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Ming; Gao, Hong-Yan; Ding, Yi; Yuan, Xia; Wang, Qing; Li, Qin; Jiang, Guo-Hua

    2015-02-20

    As a Chinese Traditional Medicine product, Kuntai capsule could improve the peri-menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women. But it is still not clear whether Kuntai capsule has a good effect on alleviating peri-menopausal symptoms induced by gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and safety of Kuntai capsule, on peri-menopausal symptoms in endometriosis (EMS) patients, with postoperative GnRH-a treatment. Ninety EMS ovarian cyst women with postoperative GnRH-a administration were enrolled in the study, and were randomly divided into Kuntai group, Tibolone group, or blank Control group. The therapeutic strategy in Kuntai group was 4 Kuntai capsules tid,po for 12 weeks after the first GnRH-a injection, while Tibolone 2.5 mg qd, po for 12 weeks in Tibolone group. There was no drug addition in Control group. Climacteric complaints were evaluated by Kupperman menopausal index (KMI) and hot flash/sweating score. Liver and renal functions, lipid profile, serum sex hormone levels and endometrial thickness were measured, and the frequency of adverse events in Kuntai and Tibolone groups was recorded. (1) Before GnRH-a therapy, the baseline parameter results were comparable in the three groups (P > 0.05). (2) After GnRH-a therapy, KMI and hot flash/sweating scores in all the three groups increased significantly (P KMI and hot flash/sweating score results were as follows: Control group > Kuntai group > Tibolone group (P KMI and hot flash/sweating score in Control group were significantly higher than the other two groups (P 0.05). (3) No statistical change took place in the liver and renal functions and lipid profile in all the three groups after the treatment (P > 0.05). (4) The posttherapeutic serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2) level and endometrial thickness decreased significantly in all the three groups (P < 0.05). After therapy

  7. Two-step irradiance schedule versus single-dose tramadol sustained-release tablets for pain control during topical 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy of condyloma acuminatum in Chinese patients: a randomized comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchepange, Uwesu O; Huang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yi; Tu, Ya-Ting; Tao, Juan

    2014-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT) offers promising results for the treatment of condyloma acuminatum. However, patients have to dwell with pain to benefit from this otherwise effective and safe "off-label" treatment modality. Several techniques have been explored to control ALA-PDT-induced pain, but the desperate search for a universally accepted method is still ongoing. This study compares the two-step irradiance approach with single-dose administration of 100 mg tramadol sustained-release tablets for pain induced by ALA-PDT of condyloma acuminatum in Chinese patients. Adult Chinese patients with condyloma acuminatum were enrolled in a randomized comparative study. Pain levels were compared using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at pre-defined assessment points during and after irradiation. The pain was dominated by characteristics such as burning and pricking and was almost always local and superficial. The median pain scores were lower in the two-step irradiance group at 1 minute (U = 621.5, P = 0.002) but higher at 20 minutes (U = 585.5, P = 0.002). The median pain scores between the two groups did not differ significantly at other assessment points. The pain was moderate in both groups and peaked earlier in the analgesics group (median: 5 minutes) but later in the two-step irradiance group (median: 15 minutes). The pain was generally mild. The median pain scores were equal at each assessment point, except at 3 hours where the median was lower in the analgesics group (1.0) as compared with the two-step irradiance group (2.0) (U = 725.0, P = 0.056). Pain in the two-step irradiance protocol is irradiance-dependent. The two-step irradiance approach produces significant benefits over analgesics during the initial stages of therapy but analgesics offer significant benefits thereafter. There are potential benefits of combining the two approaches in minimizing ALA-PDT-induced pain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals

  8. Bioequivalence of single and multiple doses of venlafaxine extended-release tablets and capsules in the fasted and fed states: four open-label, randomized crossover trials in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Clinton W; Aikman, Mark S; Werts, Erica; Seabolt, Julia; Haeusler, Jean-Marc C

    2009-11-01

    Venlafaxine extended-release (ER) tablets use osmotic pressure to deliver venlafaxine hydrochloride at a controlled rate over approximately 24 hours. These studies were conducted to evaluate the bioequivalence of venlafaxine ER tablets and capsules based on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) definition. Four pharmacokinetic studies of the capsule (reference) and tablet (test) formulations were conducted in healthy adult volunteers. The first 2 were randomized, single-dose, 4-way crossover studies of either a 37.5-mg dose (study A) or a 75-mg dose (study B) of the reference and test products under fasting and fed conditions. The other 2 were randomized, 2-way crossover studies of either a single dose (study C) or multiple doses (study D) of venlafaxine ER 225 mg, delivered as one venlafaxine ER 225-mg tablet or one 150-mg + one 75-mg venlafaxine ER capsules under fed conditions. The primary outcome measures were the log-transformed C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-infinity). If the 90% CIs for the ratios of the least squares means of the primary outcome measures between the reference and test formulations fell within the regulatory range (80%-125%), the 2 formulations would be considered bioequivalent according to the FDA definition. Thirty-six subjects (21 men, 15 women; mean [SD] age, 28.0 [8.7] years; mean weight, 161.0 [26.0] lb) were enrolled in study A and completed all treatment periods. Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in study B, of whom 30 (22 men, 8 women; mean age, 33.5 [9.6] years; mean weight, 172.7 [23.9] lb) completed all treatment periods. Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in study C, of whom 28 (16 men, 12 women; mean age, 33.1 [12.9] years; mean weight, 160.6 [29.6] lb) completed the study. Thirty-four subjects were enrolled in study D, of whom 33 (29 men, 4 women; mean age, 26.0 [8.1] years; mean weight, 178.0 [30.3] lb) completed the study. In study A, the 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratio (test vs reference) of C(max), AUC(0-t), and AUC

  9. Industrial location and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brakman (Steven); J.H. Garretsen (Harry); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe interaction between the extent of location advantages and the intensity of firm competition relative to the size of the market jointly determines the location of industrial activity. Technology, factor endowments, geography, and scale economies are influential for determining

  10. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  11. Global Volcano Locations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a database of over 1,500 volcano locations obtained from the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, Volcanoes of the World publication. The...

  12. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  13. SGA Project Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The stream geomorphic assessment is a physical assessment competed by geomorphologists to determine the condition and sensitivity of a stream. The SGA locations...

  14. Waste Recovery Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Locations where City residents are encouraged to drop off and dispose or recycle of unwanted materials. Information provided is subject to change. Please call ahead...

  15. USAID Activity Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID Activities dataset is a snapshot of activities supported by USAID including their geographical locations within countries at the time of the snapshot. The...

  16. Smart Location Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Smart Location Database, Access to Jobs and Workers via Transit, and National Walkability Index tools can help assess indicators related to the built environment, transit accessibility, and walkability.

  17. Allegheny County Dam Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the point locations of dams in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  18. VT Hospital Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of...

  19. Location and logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Alumura, Sibel A.; Karab, Bahar Y.; Melo, M. Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Facility location decisions play a critical role in designing logistics networks. This article provides some guidelines on how location decisions and logistics functions can be integrated into a single mathematical model to optimize the configuration of a logistics network. This will be illustrated by two generic models, one supporting the design of a forward logistics network and the other addressing the specific requirements of a reverse logistics network. Several special cases and extensio...

  20. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  1. Long-term efficacy of modified-release recombinant human thyrotropin augmented radioiodine therapy for benign multinodular goiter: results from a multicenter, international, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-selection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Pacini, Furio; Pinchera, Aldo; Leung, Angela M; Vaisman, Mario; Reiners, Christoph; Wemeau, Jean-Louis; Huysmans, Dyde A; Harper, William; Rachinsky, Irina; de Souza, Hevelyn Noemberg; Castagna, Maria G; Antonangeli, Lucia; Braverman, Lewis E; Corbo, Rossana; Düren, Christian; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Marriott, Christopher; Driedger, Albert; Grupe, Peter; Watt, Torquil; Magner, James; Purvis, Annie; Graf, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced reduction of multinodular goiter (MNG) can be achieved by stimulation with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) before radioiodine ((131)I) therapy. The objective was to compare the long-term efficacy and safety of two low doses of modified release rhTSH (MRrhTSH) in combination with (131)I therapy. In this phase II, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 95 patients (57.2 ± 9.6 years old, 85% women, 83% Caucasians) with MNG (median size 96.0 mL; range 31.9-242.2 mL) were randomized to receive placebo (n=32), 0.01 mg MRrhTSH (n=30), or 0.03 mg MRrhTSH (n=33) 24 hours before a calculated (131)I activity. Thyroid volume (TV) and smallest cross-sectional area of trachea (SCAT) were measured (by computed tomography scan) at baseline, six months, and 36 months. Thyroid function and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated at three-month and yearly intervals respectively. At six months, TV reduction was enhanced in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (32.9% vs. 23.1% in the placebo group; p=0.03) but not in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group. At 36 months, the mean percent TV reduction from baseline was 44 ± 12.7% (SD) in the placebo group, 41 ± 21.0% in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group, and 53 ± 18.6% in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, with no statistically significant differences among the groups, p=0.105. In the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, the subset of patients with basal (131)I uptake TV reduction at 36 months than the corresponding subset of patients in the placebo group (p=0.01). At 36 months, the largest relative increase in SCAT was observed in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (13.4 ± 23.2%), but this was not statistically different from the increases observed in the placebo or the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group (p=0.15). Goiter-related symptoms were reduced and QoL improved, without any enhanced benefit from using MRrhTSH. At three years, the prevalence of permanent hypothyroidism was 13%, 33%, and 45% in the placebo, 0.01 mg, and 0.03 mg MRrhTSH groups respectively. The overall safety profile of

  2. Prophet: A Context-Aware Location Privacy-Preserving Scheme in Location Sharing Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Location sharing service has become an indispensable part in mobile social networks. However, location sharing may introduce a new class of privacy threats ranging from localizing an individual to profiling and identifying him based on the places he shared. Although users may avoid releasing geocontent in sensitive locations, it does not necessarily prevent the adversary from inferring users’ privacy through space-temporal correlations and historical information. In this paper, we design a Prophet framework, which provides an effective security scheme for users sharing their location information. First, we define fingerprint identification based on Markov chain and state classification to describe the users’ behavior patterns. Then, we propose a novel location anonymization mechanism, which adopts a ε-indistinguishability strategy to protect user’s sensitive location information published. Finally, experimental results are given to illustrate good performance and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  3. Geostar - Navigation location system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Donald A.

    The author describes the Radiodetermination Satellite Service (RDSS). The initial phase of the RDSS provides for a unique service enabling central offices and headquarters to obtain position-location information and receive short digital messages from mobile user terminals throughout the contiguous United States, southern Canada, and northern Mexico. The system employs a spread-spectrum, CDMA modulation technique allowing multiple customers to use the system simultaneously, without preassigned coordination with fellow users. Position location is currently determined by employing an existing radio determination receiver, such as Loran-C, GPS, or Transit, in the mobile user terminal. In the early 1990s position location will be determined at a central earth station by time-differential ranging of the user terminals via two or more geostationary satellites. A brief overview of the RDSS system architecture is presented with emphasis on the user terminal and its diverse applications.

  4. Robust facility location

    OpenAIRE

    Carrizosa Priego, Emilio José; Nickel, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Let A be a nonempty finite subset of the plane representing the geographical coordinates of a set of demand points (towns, …), to be served by a facility, whose location within a given region S is sought. Assuming that the unit cost for a∈A if the facility is located at x∈S is proportional to dist(x,a) — the distance from x to a — and that demand of point a is given by ωa, minimizing the total transportation cost TC(ω,x) amounts to solving the Weber problem. In practice, it may be the case, h...

  5. Location-based games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    to create meaningful experiences; and of the prerequisites of a meaningful meeting between players and locations. The dissertation contributes to the field of LBG research by offering an enhanced understanding of LBGs, and LBG player experiences, as well as providing an expanded vocabulary describing LBG...... elements. In addition, the dissertation provides design knowledge concerning creating LBGs that uses certain emergent opportunities when combining location-aware technologies with game mechanics to make use of the six dimensions of LBGs and to involve the player’s body – i.e. make a meaningful meeting...

  6. An Internet-supported Physical Activity Intervention Delivered in Secondary Schools Located in Low Socio-economic Status Communities: Study Protocol for the Activity and Motivation in Physical Education (AMPED) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Chris; Lester, Aidan; Owen, Katherine B; White, Rhiannon L; Moyes, Ian; Peralta, Louisa; Kirwan, Morwenna; Maeder, Anthony; Bennie, Andrew; MacMillan, Freya; Kolt, Gregory S; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Gore, Jennifer M; Cerin, Ester; Diallo, Thierno M O; Cliff, Dylan P; Lubans, David R

    2016-01-06

    School-based physical education is an important public health initiative as it has the potential to provide students with regular opportunities to participate in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Unfortunately, in many physical education lessons students do not engage in sufficient MVPA to achieve health benefits. In this trial we will test the efficacy of a teacher professional development intervention, delivered partially via the Internet, on secondary school students' MVPA during physical education lessons. Teaching strategies covered in this training are designed to (i) maximize opportunities for students to be physically active during lessons and (ii) enhance students' autonomous motivation towards physical activity. A two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial with allocation at the school level (intervention vs. usual care control). Teachers and Year 8 students in government-funded secondary schools in low socio-economic areas of the Western Sydney region of Australia will be eligible to participate. During the main portion of the intervention (6 months), teachers will participate in two workshops and complete two implementation tasks at their school. Implementation tasks will involve video-based self-reflection via the project's Web 2.0 platform and an individualized feedback meeting with a project mentor. Each intervention school will also complete two group peer-mentoring sessions at their school (one per term) in which they will discuss implementation with members of their school physical education staff. In the booster period (3 months), teachers will complete a half-day workshop at their school, plus one online implementation task, and a group mentoring session at their school. Throughout the entire intervention period (main intervention plus booster period), teachers will have access to online resources. Data collection will include baseline, post-intervention (7-8 months after baseline) and maintenance phase (14-15 months after baseline

  7. Chemical release module facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  8. The Czech Locative Chameleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarald Taraldsen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that under certain circumstances, the Czech locative prepositions (LOC show up as directional prepositions (DIR and vice versa, (under different circumstances the Czech DIR PPs show up as LOC. We argue that such a chameleon life of the PPs is structurally dependent.

  9. Tracking, say, SKYPE Locations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Tracking, say, SKYPE Locations. Real Time Communication: Peer-to-Peer (P2P). Datagram flows between the two conversing partners; Exposes the IP addresses of all the participants to one another. If A knows B's VoIP ID, she can establish a call with Bob & obtain his current ...

  10. General minisum circle location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Mark; Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    In our paper we approximate a set of given points by a general circle. More precisely, we consider the problem of locating and scaling the unit ball of some given norm k1 with respect to xed points on the plane such that the sum of weighted distances between the circle and the xed points...

  11. ATL: ASA Tutor Locator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Maurice; Brouns, Francis; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    ASA Tutor Locator creates ad hoc transient communities consisting of peer tutors, seeded with document fragments found in the learning network, to answer content questions of students. The sources are available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/asa-atl. Available under the three clause BSD

  12. ATL: A Tutor Locator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, André; Brouwers, Maurice; Brouns, Francis; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Kester, Liesbeth; Sloep, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A Tutor Locator creates ad hoc transient communities consisting of peer tutors, seeded with document fragments found in the learning network, to answer content questions of students. The sources are available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/asa-atl.Available under the three clause BSD licence,

  13. Immigrants' location preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    This paper exploits a spatial dispersal policy for refugee immigrants to estimate the importance of local and regional factors for refugees' location preferences. The main results of a mixed proportional hazard competing risks model are that placed refugees react to high regional unemployment...

  14. RFID Location Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zi Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of social services, people’s living standards improve further requirements, there is an urgent need for a way to adapt to the complex situation of the new positioning technology. In recent years, RFID technology have a wide range of applications in all aspects of life and production, such as logistics tracking, car alarm, security and other items. The use of RFID technology to locate, it is a new direction in the eyes of the various research institutions and scholars. RFID positioning technology system stability, the error is small and low-cost advantages of its location algorithm is the focus of this study.This article analyzes the layers of RFID technology targeting methods and algorithms. First, RFID common several basic methods are introduced; Secondly, higher accuracy to political network location method; Finally, LANDMARC algorithm will be described. Through this it can be seen that advanced and efficient algorithms play an important role in increasing RFID positioning accuracy aspects.Finally, the algorithm of RFID location technology are summarized, pointing out the deficiencies in the algorithm, and put forward a follow-up study of the requirements, the vision of a better future RFID positioning technology.

  15. Optimal Facility-Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A J

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.

  16. Spatiotemporal AED Location Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Timothy C.Y.; Sun, Christopher L.F.; Demirtas, Derya; Morrison, Laurie J.; Brooks, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mathematical optimization can be used to plan future AED placement to maximize out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) coverage. Many public access AEDs are placed in locations without 24/7 access. AED coverage can be overestimated unless temporal availability is considered. Objective: To

  17. Modified-Release Recombinant Human TSH (MRrhTSH) Augments the Effect of 131I Therapy in Benign Multinodular Goiter: Results from a Multicenter International, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, H; Fast, S; Pacini, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) can be used to enhance (131)I therapy for shrinkage of multinodular goiter (MG). Objective, Design, and Setting: The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of 0.01 and 0.03 mg modified-release (MR) rhTSH as an adjuvant to (131)I...

  18. Nickel may be released from laptop computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consumer nickel sensitization and dermatitis is caused by prolonged or repeated skin exposure to items that release nickel, for example jewellery, belts, buttons, watches, and mobile phones (1–3). We recently described a patient in whom primary nickel contact sensitization and dermatitis develope...... following the use of an Apple laptop computer (4). To estimate nickel release from Apple laptop computers, we investigated a random sample of 20 devices....

  19. Locating and Tracking Everything Digital

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Telcos need actual locations for highly localized and targeted ads, location based services. Telcos need actual locations for highly localized and targeted ads, location based services. Governments need to know the location of the buyers for tax – state tax etc. Locating friends ...

  20. Electric current locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul E [Corvallis, OR; Woodside, Charles Rigel [Corvallis, OR

    2012-02-07

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  1. Aquatic Nuisance Species Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program located in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the locations where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel

  2. Production Subcontracting and Location

    OpenAIRE

    Holl, Adelheid

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a panel of Spanish manufacturing firms, I examine factors that explain firms’ production subcontracting decisions and test whether there is any evidence that production subcontracting is facilitated in areas typically associated with higher agglomeration economies. The results show that location matters. Firms in industry agglomerations are more likely to subcontract production activities. While in general, larger and older firms as well as high wage firms show a greater proba...

  3. Choosing locations of landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Špacapan, Matjaž

    2008-01-01

    In my Graduation thesis we deal with the problem of choosing the most appropriate location of landfills and the criteria used in this process. The problem of waste management is one of the most critical areas of environmental protection in Slovenia. In these matters, the existing legislation and law directives in the Republic of Slovenia are followed. After this we have to pay attention to the composition of the waste and the technologies of waste management. Before we place a new facility fo...

  4. Optimal Facility-Location

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall?s research at NBS/NIST.

  5. Fixating at far distance shortens reaction time to peripheral visual stimuli at specific locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Masahiro; Ando, Soichi; Oda, Shingo

    2017-11-07

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the fixation distance in real three-dimensional space affects manual reaction time to peripheral visual stimuli. Light-emitting diodes were used for presenting a fixation point and four peripheral visual stimuli. The visual stimuli were located at a distance of 45cm and at 25° in the left, right, upper, and lower directions from the sagittal axis including the fixation point. Near (30cm), Middle (45cm), Far (90cm), and Very Far (300cm) fixation distance conditions were used. When one of the four visual stimuli was randomly illuminated, the participants released a button as quickly as possible. Results showed that overall peripheral reaction time decreased as the fixation distance increased. The significant interaction between fixation distance and stimulus location indicated that the effect of fixation distance on reaction time was observed at the left, right, and upper locations but not at the lower location. These results suggest that fixating at far distance would contribute to faster reaction and that the effect is specific to locations in the peripheral visual field. The present findings are discussed in terms of viewer-centered representation, the focus of attention in depth, and visual field asymmetry related to neurological and psychological aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  7. Relative bioavailability of griseofulvin lyophilized dry emulsion tablet vs. immediate release tablet: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, six-period, crossover study in healthy adult volunteers in the fasted and fed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Iman Saad; Aboul-Einien, Mona Hassan; Mohamed, Osama Hussein; Farid, Samar Farghali

    2008-10-02

    The oral bioavailability of griseofulvin (GF) formulated as a fast disintegrating lyophilized dry emulsion (LDE) tablet was studied and compared to the commercially available immediate release (IR) tablet, as a reference, in both the fasted and fed states in nine healthy volunteers after a single oral dose (125 mg) in a crossover design. Furthermore the LDE tablets were ingested with and without water under both the fasted and fed states. In the fasted state, the rate of absorption was found to be significantly faster from LDE tablets, in the presence and absence of water, as shown by a higher C(max) (more than two times higher, p=0.0001) and a shorter t(max) (by more than 3h, p=0.0001) compared to IR tablets. The extent of absorption, expressed as AUC, from LDE tablets in the presence and absence of water was 65% and 77% larger and statistically significantly different relative to the mean AUC from IR tablets (p=0.006). In the fed state, C(max) from LDE tablets ingested with and without water was found to be about 30% and 50% higher, respectively, than the immediate release tablets. A shorter t(max) was also shown whether LDE tablets were ingested with or without water in the fed state as compared to immediate release tablets. The mean AUC from LDE tablets under fed conditions in the presence of water was about 21% larger and was not statistically significantly different from AUC from immediate release tablets (p=0.517). When ingested without water, AUC from LDE tablets was about 43% larger and statistically significantly different relative to AUC from IR tablets (p=0.033). The mean AUC from the LDE tablet ingested with water under fed conditions relative to AUC from LDE tablet ingested without water was not statistically significantly different (p=0.454). Results show that the food effect of the high fat meal is very pronounced in case of the immediate release tablets, Fulvin, than in case of LDE tablets whether given with or without water.

  8. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  9. Location of Planet X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    Observed positions of Uranus and Neptune along with residuals in right ascension and declination are used to constrain the location of a postulated tenth planet. The residuals are converted into residuals in ecliptic longitude and latitude. The results are then combined into seasonal normal points, producing average geocentric residuals spaced slightly more than a year apart that are assumed to represent the equivalent heliocentric average residuals for the observed oppositions. Such a planet is found to most likely reside in the region of Scorpius, with considerably less likelihood that it is in Taurus. 8 references.

  10. Locating Nordic Noir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft; Waade, Anne Marit

    such as Beck, The Killing, Trapped and The Bridge as well as a range of other important Nordic Noir cases. The book positions the development of Nordic Noir on the global market for popular television drama and places the international attention towards Nordic crime dramas within regional development of drama......This book is a comprehensive study of Nordic Noir television drama from the 1990’s until today. The authors introduce the history of contemporary Nordic Noir from the perspective of place, production and location studies. The chapters include readings of well-known television crime dramas...

  11. The LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L

    2004-01-01

    LHCb is an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), dedicated to the study of b-hadron physics. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a sub-detector which reconstructs primary and secondary vertices, which is of importance for the processes under study. It is a silicon micro-strip detector operated in a harsh radiation environment with demands of high read-out speed and the use of minimal material. In this paper, the LHCb VELO is introduced and the technology choices of the detector are motivated. We report on the present status of the project and one possible upgrade technology is presented.

  12. Locating Nordic Noir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft; Waade, Anne Marit

    This book is a comprehensive study of Nordic Noir television drama from the 1990’s until today. The authors introduce the history of contemporary Nordic Noir from the perspective of place, production and location studies. The chapters include readings of well-known television crime dramas...... production in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Iceland. Consequently, Nordic Noir is read as both a transnational financial and creative phenomenon and as a local possibility for community building. The book is aimed at readers with an interest in crime drama as well as television scholars and students...

  13. Competitive facility location models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononov, A. V.; Kochetov, Yu. A.; Plyasunov, A. V.

    2009-06-01

    Two classes of competitive facility location models are considered, in which several persons (players) sequentially or simultaneously open facilities for serving clients. The first class consists of discrete two-level programming models. The second class consists of game models with several independent players pursuing selfish goals. For the first class, its relationship with pseudo-Boolean functions is established and a novel method for constructing a family of upper and lower bounds on the optimum is proposed. For the second class, the tight PLS-completeness of the problem of finding Nash equilibriums is proved.

  14. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  15. 1,500 IU human chorionic gonadotropin administered at oocyte retrieval rescues the luteal phase when gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist is used for ovulation induction: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær; Ejdrup Bredkjaer, Helle; Westergaard, Lars Grabow

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively assess the reproductive outcome with a small bolus of hCG administered on the day of oocyte retrieval after ovulation induction with a GnRH agonist (GnRHa). DESIGN: Prospective, randomized trial. SETTING: Three hospital-based IVF clinics. PATIENT(S): Three hundred five...

  16. Indoor Location Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on the special challenges posed by accurately pinpointing a location indoors, this volume reflects the distance we have come in the handful of decades since the germination of GPS technology. Not only can we locate a signal to within a meter’s accuracy, but we now have this technology in the most basic mobile phone. Tracing recent practical developments in positioning technology and in the market it supplies, the author examines the contributions of the varied research—in silicon, signal and image processing, radio communications and software—to a fast-evolving field. The book looks forward to a time when, in addition to directing your road journey, positioning systems can peer indoors and guide you to an available photocopier in your office building. Featuring standalone chapters each dealing with a specific aspect of the subject, including treatments of systems such as Zebra, Awarepoint, Aeroscout, IEEE 802.11, etc. This study has all the detail needed to get up to speed on a key modern techn...

  17. Locating Nordic Noir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft; Waade, Anne Marit

    This book is a comprehensive study of Nordic Noir television drama from the 1990’s until today. The authors introduce the history of contemporary Nordic Noir from the perspective of place, production and location studies. The chapters include readings of well-known television crime dramas...... such as Beck, The Killing, Trapped and The Bridge as well as a range of other important Nordic Noir cases. The book positions the development of Nordic Noir on the global market for popular television drama and places the international attention towards Nordic crime dramas within regional development of drama...... production in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Iceland. Consequently, Nordic Noir is read as both a transnational financial and creative phenomenon and as a local possibility for community building. The book is aimed at readers with an interest in crime drama as well as television scholars and students...

  18. Locating Nordic Noir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft; Waade, Anne Marit

    This book is a comprehensive study of Nordic Noir television drama from the 1990’s until today. The authors introduce the history of contemporary Nordic Noir from the perspective of place, production and location studies. The chapters include readings of well-known television crime dramas...... production in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Iceland. Consequently, Nordic Noir is read as both a transnational financial and creative phenomenon and as a local possibility for community building. The book is aimed at readers with an interest in crime drama as well as television scholars and students...... of television drama, and it offers a comprehensible, scholarly and methodologically original approach to the popularity of Nordic television crime dramas....

  19. Demographics and remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppus, G. [Dynawise Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Within the next decade, the number of people leaving the workforce will exceed the number of new entrants. The demand for workers is expected to increase in Alberta due to oil sands industry growth. Sixty-four per cent of all responding federal, provincial, and municipal government organizations have reported shortages in their work environments, and almost 8 in 10 organizations predict they will continue to be understaffed in the next 3 to 5 years. Tightness in the general labour market will have an impact on employers in remote locations, and planning is essential to avoid the creation of a mercenary culture and a reliance on compensation. Challenges found in remote locations include high turnover rates among recent hires; critical gaps in service length; aggressive retirement; and the fact that the local population is often seen as unqualified for many industrial jobs. This Power Point presentation suggested that although decisions to join or quit a company are often based on considerations such as the organizational environment and amount of compensation, the relationship between employees and management is the most important attribute in many career decisions. Rigorous quantitative analysis of current demographics combined with forecasting analysis may help to forestall recruitment difficulties for many companies. Productivity analyses, and the effects of work overload on absenteeism, attrition and quality of workmanship must also be examined. Many companies are now focusing on retention and development strategies on mid-career staff to address depletion, as well as redesigning procedures to operate with less skilled staff. It was concluded that extra efforts are now being made to attract non-traditional employees, and non-traditional employment models are being considered by some companies. refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Coverage of space by random sets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Consider the non-negative integer line. For each integer point we toss a coin. If the toss at location i is a. Heads we place an interval (of random length) there and move to location i + 1,. Tails we move to location i + 1. Coverage of space by random sets – p. 2/29 ...

  1. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  2. Comparative pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of tapentadol following oral administration of immediate- and prolonged-release formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gohler, K.; Brett, M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Rengelshausen, J.; Terlinden, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of orally administered tapentadol immediate release (IR) compared with tapentadol prolonged release (PR). METHODS: Three randomized, open-label, crossover studies were conducted in subjects under fasted conditions. Studies 1 and 2

  3. Short-term effects of extended-release niacin with and without the addition of laropiprant on endothelial function in individuals with low HDL-C: a randomized, controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Figueiredo, Valeria; Vendrame, Felipe; Colontoni, Bruno A; Quinaglia, Thiago; Roberto Matos-Souza, Jose; Azevedo Moura, Filipe; Coelho, Otavio R; de Faria, Eliana C; Sposito, Andrei C

    2014-06-01

    Reduced plasma concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is associated with vulnerability to oxidative stress and propensity to endothelial dysfunction. Niacin directly activates both GPR-109A in leukocytes and the heme oxygenase-1 pathway, promoting strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects, as well as induces immediate production of prostaglandin D2, leading to endothelial vasodilation. This study investigated the short-term effects of extended-release niacin (ERN) administered with or without the prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonist laropiprant on endothelial function in patients with low HDL-C. Asymptomatic men and women aged between 20 and 60 years who had plasma HDL-C levels niacin on endothelial function. Based on these findings, short-term niacin treatment might improve endothelial function in patients with low HDL-C levels. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01942291. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Skifter Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a survey carried out in Denmark that asked a random sample of the population about their preferences for home surroundings and locations. It shows that the characteristics of social surroundings are very important and can be divided into three independent dimensions: avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific preferences for surroundings.

  5. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  6. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fifth Data Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunder, Andrea; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; Zwitter, Tomaž; McMillan, Paul J.; Casagrande, Luca; Enke, Harry; Wojno, Jennifer; Valentini, Marica; Chiappini, Cristina; Matijevič, Gal; Siviero, Alessandro; de Laverny, Patrick; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; Bijaoui, Albert; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Binney, James; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, Amina; Jofre, Paula; Antoja, Teresa; Gilmore, Gerard; Siebert, Arnaud; Famaey, Benoit; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Navarro, Julio F.; Munari, Ulisse; Seabroke, George; Anguiano, Borja; Žerjal, Maruša; Minchev, Ivan; Reid, Warren; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kos, Janez; Sharma, Sanjib; Watson, Fred; Parker, Quentin A.; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter; Burton, Donna; Cass, Paul; Hartley, Malcolm; Fiegert, Kristin; Stupar, Milorad; Ritter, Andreas; Hawkins, Keith; Gerhard, Ortwin; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Miglio, A.; Mosser, B.

    2017-01-01

    Data Release 5 (DR5) of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the fifth data release from a magnitude-limited (9randomly selected in the Southern Hemisphere. The RAVE medium-resolution spectra (R˜ 7500) covering the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) span the complete time

  7. Polymer Percolation Threshold in HPMC Extended Release Formulation of Carbamazepine and Verapamil HCl

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonçalves-Araújo, Tamara; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Caraballo, Isidoro

    2010-01-01

    ...) extended release matrix tablets containing carbamazepine and verapamil HCl. This statistical theory studies disordered or chaotic systems where the components are randomly distributed in a lattice...

  8. Indoor Space Location Model Based on Location Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Zeng, G.; Huang, Y.; Yang, X.

    2017-10-01

    Location is the basis for the realization of location services, the integrity of the location information and its way of representation in indoor space model directly restricts the quality of location services. The construction of the existing indoor space model is mostly for specific applications and lack of uniform representation of location information. Several geospatial standards have been developed to meet the requirement of the indoor spatial information system, among which CityGML LOD4 and IndoorGML are the most relevant ones for indoor spatial information. However, from the perspective of Location Based Service (LBS), the CityGML LOD4 is more inclined to visualize the indoor space. Although IndoorGML is mainly used for indoor space navigation and has description (such as geometry, topology, and semantics) benefiting for indoor LBS, this standard model lack explicit representation of indoor location information. In this paper, from the perspective of Location Based Service (LBS), based on the IndoorGML standard, an indoor space location model (ISLM) conforming to human cognition is proposed through integration of the geometric and topological and semantic features of the indoor spatial entity. This model has the explicit description of location information which the standard indoor space model of IndoorGML and CityGML LOD4 does not have, which can lay the theoretical foundation for indoor location service such as indoor navigation, indoor routing and location query.

  9. VT Transportation Project Point Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Project information for project that are located off system or on system at a discrete location. The projects in this data set represent the active projects in the...

  10. Duality in constrained location problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik; Love, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    The dual of a facility location problem with general norms, distance constraints, and linear constraints is formulated.......The dual of a facility location problem with general norms, distance constraints, and linear constraints is formulated....

  11. Does continuous endurance exercise in water elicit a higher release of ANP and BNP and a higher plasma concentration of FFAs in pre-obese and obese men than high intensity intermittent endurance exercise? - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karner-Rezek, Klaus; Knechtle, Beat; Fenzl, Matthias; Gredig, Joeri; Rosemann, Thomas

    2013-10-10

    Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) and Brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) stimulate fat cell plasma membrane receptors. They are potent lipolytic agents on isolated fat cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue. The physiological effects of continuous endurance exercise on ANP release and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations have been well described. The enhancement of fat metabolism using high intensity intermittent exercise protocols has been assessed in more recent investigations. The combined effects of endurance exercise and water immersion on ANP and FFA plasma concentration and the magnitude of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) might be further enhanced by choosing the most effective exercise protocol. Exercise modalities may play a significant role in the future prevention and treatment of obesity. The two testing trials will be performed according to a randomized and cross-over design. Twenty healthy sedentary pre-obese and obese class-1 men will be scrutinized with regard to their metabolic responses to continuous exercise in water and to high intensity endurance exercise in water. Both trials will be matched for energy expenditure. After preliminary testing, the tests will be conducted as repeated measurements. The two different exercise protocols will be compared. The aims of the study are to investigate (1) whether continuous endurance exercise or high intensity intermittent endurance exercise in water elicits both a higher release of ANP and BNP and a higher plasma concentration of glycerol and (2) to determine whether continuous endurance exercise in water or a high intensity intermittent endurance exercise in water would lead to a more pronounced short term (two hours) EPOC effect. If our hypothesis would be confirmed, the most effective exercise protocol based on the combined effects of high intensity endurance exercise and water immersion on ANP and BNP release and glycerol plasma concentrations can be identified. Moreover, the

  12. Effectiveness and Safety of Tapentadol Prolonged Release (PR) Versus a Combination of Tapentadol PR and Pregabalin for the Management of Severe, Chronic Low Back Pain With a Neuropathic Component: A Randomized, Double-blind, Phase 3b Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Müller, Matthias; Dubois, Cecile; Falke, Dietmar; Steigerwald, Ilona

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of tapentadol PR monotherapy versus tapentadol PR/pregabalin combination therapy for severe, chronic low back pain with a neuropathic component. Eligible patients had painDETECT "unclear" or "positive" ratings and average pain intensity ≥ 6 (11-point NRS-3 [average 3-day pain intensity]) at baseline. Patients were titrated to tapentadol PR 300 mg/day over 3 weeks. Patients with ≥ 1-point decrease in pain intensity and average pain intensity ≥ 4 were randomized to tapentadol PR (500 mg/day) or tapentadol PR (300 mg/day)/pregabalin (300 mg/day) during an 8-week comparative period. In the per-protocol population (n = 288), the effectiveness of tapentadol PR was clinically and statistically comparable to tapentadol PR/pregabalin based on the change in pain intensity from randomization to final evaluation (LOCF; LSMD [95% CI], -0.066 [-0.57, 0.43]; P pain and quality-of-life measures improved significantly in both groups. Tolerability was good in both groups, in line with prior trials in the high dose range of 500 mg/day for tapentadol PR monotherapy, and favorable compared with historical combination trials of strong opioids and anticonvulsants for combination therapy. The incidence of the composite of dizziness and/or somnolence was significantly lower with tapentadol PR (16.9%) than tapentadol PR/pregabalin (27.0%; P = 0.0302). Tapentadol PR 500 mg is associated with comparable improvements in pain intensity and quality-of-life measures to tapentadol PR 300 mg/pregabalin 300 mg, with improved central nervous system tolerability, suggesting that tapentadol PR monotherapy may offer a favorable treatment option for severe low back pain with a neuropathic component. © 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  13. Effect of Photobiomodulation on Transforming Growth Factor-β1, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB, and Interleukin-8 Release in Palatal Wounds After Free Gingival Graft Harvesting: A Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiner, Ilker; Lutfioğlu, Muge; Aydogdu, Ahmet; Saygun, N Isil; Serdar, Muhittin A

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the impact of photobiomodulation (PBM) on the healing of the donor palatal area following free gingival graft (FGG) harvesting by examining changes in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, and interleukin (IL)-8 levels in palatal wound fluid (PWF). Thirty patients were selected and randomly assigned to receive PBM (laser group) or PBM sham (sham group) in the palatine area after FGG harvesting. A neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) was applied to the test sites immediately after surgery and every 24 h thereafter for 4 days. PWF was collected on Days 7 and 12, and PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were significantly lower on Day 12 than on Day 7 for both groups. PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels of the laser group were significantly higher than those of sham group on Day 7 (p BB and IL-8 levels between groups on Day 12 were statistically nonsignificant. Observed increases in PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels suggest that PBM may accelerate wound healing by stimulating production of selected mediators.

  14. Location theory a unified approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Although modern location theory is now more than 90 years old, the focus of researchers in this area has been mainly problem oriented. However, a common theory, which keeps the essential characteristics of classical location models, is still missing.This monograph addresses this issue. A flexible location problem called the Ordered Median Problem (OMP) is introduced. For all three main subareas of location theory (continuous, network and discrete location) structural properties of the OMP are presented and solution approaches provided. Numerous illustrations and examples help the reader to bec

  15. Tolerability, Safety, and Quality of Life with Tapentadol Prolonged Release (PR) Compared with Oxycodone/Naloxone PR in Patients with Severe Chronic Low Back Pain with a Neuropathic Component: A Randomized, Controlled, Open-label, Phase 3b/4 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Jansen, Jan-Peter; Binder, Andreas; Pombo-Suarez, Manuel; Kennes, Lieven; Müller, Matthias; Falke, Dietmar; Steigerwald, Ilona

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate tolerability, safety, and quality-of-life outcomes in non-opioid-pretreated patients with severe chronic low back pain with a neuropathic component receiving tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR. Eligible patients (average pain intensity [numerical rating scale] ≥ 6; painDETECT positive/unclear ratings) were randomized to twice-daily tapentadol PR 50 mg or oxycodone/naloxone PR 10 mg/5 mg. After a 21-day titration (maximum twice-daily doses: tapentadol PR 250 mg, or oxycodone/naloxone PR 40 mg/20 mg plus oxycodone PR 10 mg), target doses were continued for 9 weeks. Change in the Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptoms (PAC-SYM) total score from baseline to final evaluation was a primary endpoint. For the primary tolerability-related endpoint, the 97.5% exact repeated confidence interval for tapentadol PR minus oxycodone/naloxone PR for the PAC-SYM total score was [-0.259, 0.121], showing noninferiority (upper limit tapentadol PR than oxycodone/naloxone PR (P ≤ 0.045). Confirmatory superiority based on formal noninferiority was shown for the primary effectiveness endpoint (change from baseline to final evaluation in pain intensity) for tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR (presented separately). Improvements in the Short Form-12 physical component summary and EuroQol-5 Dimension health status index and health state assessment were significantly greater with tapentadol PR vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR (P ≤ 0.024). Tapentadol PR had a minimal impact on bowel function (noninferior to oxycodone/naloxone PR) and, along with superior effectiveness (presented separately), was associated with significantly lower incidences of constipation and vomiting and significant improvements in quality-of-life measures vs. oxycodone/naloxone PR. © 2015 The authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  16. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  17. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luohao Tang

    Full Text Available This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  18. Location of Urban Logistic Terminals as Hub Location Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Pašagić Škrinjar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problems of locating urban logistic terminals are studied as hub location problems that due to a large number of potential nodes in big cities belong to hard non-polynomial problems, the so-called NP-problems. The hub location problems have found wide application in physical planning of transport and telecommunication systems, especially systems of fast delivery, networks of logistic and distribution centres and cargo traffic terminals of the big cities, etc. The paper defines single and multiple allocations and studies the numerical examples. The capacitated single allocation hub location problems have been studied, with the provision of a mathematical model of selecting the location for the hubs on the network. The paper also presents the differences in the possibilities of implementing the exact and heuristic methods to solve the actual location problems of big dimensions i.e. hub problems of the big cities.

  19. The Ibibio Locative Copular Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonna Anyanwu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ibibio language, a member of the Lower Cross group of languages is predominantly spoken in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Ibibio has two types of copular construction. One is locative while the other is predicative. Using a purely descriptive approach/method, this paper provides a descriptive account of the copular locative constructions in Ibibio. This study is based on a database collected from adult speakers of Ibibio by the author using an elicitation list. The database includes both actual and potential words/sentences, which standard Ibibio speakers found to be in consistent with their language rules.The paper has observed that Ibibio copular locatives make use of locative copular verbs which have semantic content, but are however, with indeterminate locative precision except when they co- occur with an appropriate locative complement. It has further observed that in Ibibio, the location of a subject entity can be marked with locative elements in two ways. In the first instance, a locative copular verb which can be dórò, ‘be on’ síne ‘be in’ bà ‘be at’ obligatorily co-occurs with a deitic locative complement or a locative prepositional phrase (PP complement headed by a multipurpose preposition (P, ké. The P is semantically, interpreted as either on, in, at or under depending on the particular locative copular verb that it co-occurs with. In the second instance, in addition to the locative copular verb and the locative PP complement headed by the P ké, there is also within the PP complement (headed by the P ké , a locative relational noun modifier which, modifies the head noun, a complement to the locative P ké. Based on Ameka andOgbonna Anyanwu71Levinson’s (2007 cross-linguistic classification of positional and locative verbs, the paper concludes that Ibibio belongs to the multi-verb type of languages with inherently locative copular verbs which are used to express the spatial locative orientation of subject

  20. Location Systems An Introduction to the Technology Behind Location Awareness

    CERN Document Server

    LaMarca, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Advances in electronic location technology and the coming of age of mobile computing have opened the door for location-aware applications to permeate all aspects of everyday life. Location is at the core of a large number of high-value applications ranging from the life-and-death context of emergency response to serendipitous social meet-ups. For example, the market for GPS products and services alone is expected to grow to US200 billion by 2015. Unfortunately, there is no single location technology that is good for every situation and exhibits high accuracy, low cost, and universal coverage.

  1. Algorithm for Detecting Significant Locations from Raw GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Nobuharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Baba, Teruyuki; Yoshikawa, Takashi

    We present a fast algorithm for probabilistically extracting significant locations from raw GPS data based on data point density. Extracting significant locations from raw GPS data is the first essential step of algorithms designed for location-aware applications. Assuming that a location is significant if users spend a certain time around that area, most current algorithms compare spatial/temporal variables, such as stay duration and a roaming diameter, with given fixed thresholds to extract significant locations. However, the appropriate threshold values are not clearly known in priori and algorithms with fixed thresholds are inherently error-prone, especially under high noise levels. Moreover, for N data points, they are generally O(N 2) algorithms since distance computation is required. We developed a fast algorithm for selective data point sampling around significant locations based on density information by constructing random histograms using locality sensitive hashing. Evaluations show competitive performance in detecting significant locations even under high noise levels.

  2. Miniature Release Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to design, build and functionally test a miniature release mechanism for CubeSats and other small satellites. The WFF 6U satellite structure will be...

  3. The 2017 Release Cloudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, G. J.; Chatzikos, M.; Guzmán, F.; Lykins, M. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Abel, N. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Keenan, F. P.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the 2017 release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, summarizing the many improvements to the scope and accuracy of the physics which have been made since the previous release. Exporting the atomic data into external data files has enabled many new large datasets to be incorporated into the code. The use of the complete datasets is not realistic for most calculations, so we describe the limited subset of data used by default, which predicts significantly more lines than the previous release of Cloudy. This version is nevertheless faster than the previous release, as a result of code optimizations. We give examples of the accuracy limits using small models, and the performance requirements of large complete models. We summarize several advances in the H- and He-like iso-electronic sequences and use our complete collisional-radiative models to establish the densities where the coronal and local thermodynamic equilibrium approximations work.

  4. Mechanisms of renin release from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Salomonsson, Max; Sellerup Persson, Anja

    1991-01-01

    In microdissected, nonperfused afferent arterioles changes in intravascular pressure did not affect renin secretion. On the contrary, renin release from isolated afferent arterioles perfused in a free-flow system has been reported to be sensitive to simultaneous changes in luminal pressure and flow....... Hence local blood flow may be involved in the baroreceptor control of renin release. If flow is sensed, the sensor is likely to be located near the endothelial cell layer, where ion channels have been shown to be influenced by variations in shear stress....

  5. A randomized prospective trial comparing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist/recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) versus GnRH-agonist/rFSH in women pretreated with oral contraceptives before in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmat, Larry I; Chantilis, Samuel J; Hurst, Bradley S; Dickey, Richard P

    2005-02-01

    To compare the effects of oral contraceptive (OC) pill pretreatment in recombinant FSH/GnRH-antagonist versus recombinant FSH/GnRH-agonist stimulation in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, and to evaluate optimization of retrieval day. Prospective, randomized, multicenter study. Private practice and university centers. Eighty patients undergoing IVF who met the appropriate inclusion criteria. Four study centers recruited 80 patients. The OC regimen began on cycle days 2 to 4 and was discontinued on a Sunday after 14 to 28 days. The recombinant FSH regimen was begun on the following Friday. The GnRH-agonist group was treated with a long protocol; the GnRH-antagonist was initiated when the lead follicle reached 12 to 14 mm. When two follicles had reached 16 to 18 mm, hCG was administered. The primary outcome measures were the number of cumulus-oocyte complexes, day of the week for oocyte retrieval, and total dose and days of stimulation of recombinant FSH. Secondary efficacy variables included pregnancy and implantation rate; serum E(2) levels on stimulation day 1; serum E(2), P, and LH levels on the day of hCG administration; follicle size on day 6 and day of hCG administration; the total days of GnRH-analogue treatment; total days on OC; total days from end of OC to oocyte retrieval; and the cycle cancellation rate. Patient outcomes were similar for the days of stimulation, total dose of gonadotropin used, two-pronuclei embryos, pregnancy (44.4% GnRH-antagonist vs. 45.0% GnRH-agonist, P=.86) and implantation rates (22.2% GnRH-antagonist vs. 26.4% GnRH-agonist, P=.71). Oral contraceptive cycle scheduling resulted in 78% and 90% of retrievals performed Monday through Friday for GnRH-antagonist and GnRH-agonist. A one day delay in OC discontinuation and recombinant FSH start would result in over 90% of oocyte retrievals occurring Monday through Friday in both groups. The OC pretreatment in recombinant FSH/GnRH-antagonist protocols provides a patient

  6. Required Information Release

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Stephen N

    2010-01-01

    Many computer systems have a functional requirement to release information. Such requirements are an important part of a system’s information security requirements. Current information-flow control techniques are able to reason about permitted information flows, but not required information flows. In this paper, we introduce and explore the specification and enforcement of required information release in a language-based setting. We define semantic security conditions that express both what i...

  7. Required Information Release

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Stephen N

    2012-01-01

    Many computer systems have a functional requirement to release information. Such requirements are an important part of a system's information security requirements. Current information-flow control techniques are able to reason about permitted information flows, but not required information flows. In this paper, we introduce and explore the specification and enforcement of required information release in a language-based setting. We define semantic security conditions that express both wha...

  8. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowrey, Justin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McIntyre, Justin I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prichard, Andrew W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression

  9. Quarter Dates Location(s) Purpose Transportation and Travel ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Location(s). Purpose. Transportation and Travel. Accommodation,. Meals and Other. Hospitality. Total. Expenses. Quarter 1. April 15 to 17. Ottawa, ON. Functions. April 24 to 28. London, England. Meeting. April 30 to May 1. Montreal, QC. Event. 7,540.72. 4,132.54. 408.14. 12,081.40. May 12 to 23. Ghana, Botswana, South ...

  10. Location and the multinational enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    John Cantwell

    2009-01-01

    In the early development of the international business field, the focus of attention moved from the country level to the firm level, and interest in location issues declined. More recently, firm-based research has itself become increasingly concerned with the study of firm–location interactions. When examining two-way knowledge flows or spillovers between multinational enterprises (MNEs) and other actors in specific locations, the diversity or heterogeneity of firms matters, as does the diver...

  11. Clinical evaluation of the first oxycodone once daily prolonged release tablet in moderate to severe chronic pain: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, cross-over, non-inferiority study to investigate efficacy and safety in comparison with an established oxycodone twice daily prolonged release tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Eberhard Albert; Janecki, Marcin; Maritz, Martina Alice

    2014-11-01

    The first oxycodone once daily (OOD) has been developed and after successful pharmacokinetic characterization, therapeutic efficacy and safety were compared to an established oxycodone twice daily (OTD: Oxygesic/OxyContin, Mundipharma). A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, cross-over, non-inferiority study was conducted in patients (n = 68) with chronic malignant or non-malignant pain. The new OOD was compared to OTD at identical total daily doses (TDD: 40-120 mg/day) employing intensive, five times daily current pain (0-100 mm visual analog scale, VAS) and twice daily 12 h recalled pain assessments as well as safety parameters such as nausea and sedation (VAS) over 5 days for each treatment (after a 5 day run-in phase). There was no significant difference in analgesic potency detected between the two treatments based on 95% CI for difference in the daily mean current pain (-2.09 mm VAS) over 5 days, determined as -5.09 to 0.91 mm VAS. A difference ≤12 mm VAS indicated non-inferiority of OOD, i.e. lack of clinically relevant difference in analgesia. Intake of rescue medication had no effect on study results as evaluated by ANCOVA. The difference in adverse events (AEs) between the two treatments did not reach significance, as 19.1% and 23.5% of patients experienced treatment-related AEs while on OOD and OTD, respectively. Advantages for OOD regarding consistency of analgesia (i.e. use of rescue medication, current and recalled pain) and sedation did not reach statistical significance in this limited study population. Despite the small number of patients and short study duration, the results support the conclusion that new OOD is (at least) equivalent to established OTD regarding safety and efficacy.

  12. Regulation of the hypothalamic release of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.M. Rondeel (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe tripeptide TRH has diverse endocrine and non-endocrine functions and is ubiquitously located in the body. Its endocrine functions relate to its role as a hypothalamic factor which stimulates the release of TSH and PRL from the adenohypophysial thyrotroph and lactotroph,

  13. Family ties and residential locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.H.; Cooke, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, and in the Special Issue it introduces, the focus is on the role of family ties in residential location choice and, conversely, the role of residential locations in maintaining family ties. Not only do events in the nuclear family trigger residential relocations, but nearby family

  14. Locations in Television Drama Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the analysis of the increasingly significant role of location as a key element in television drama. In recent years, the popularity of serial television has progressively been tied to the expanded use of location as a central element in productions, both...

  15. Improved Dynamic Planar Point Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Arge, Lars; Georgiadis, Loukas

    2006-01-01

    We develop the first linear-space data structures for dynamic planar point location in general subdivisions that achieve logarithmic query time and poly-logarithmic update time.......We develop the first linear-space data structures for dynamic planar point location in general subdivisions that achieve logarithmic query time and poly-logarithmic update time....

  16. Cold War Geopolitics: Embassy Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Ingolf

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the geopolitics of the Cold War can be illustrated by the diplomatic ties among countries, particularly the superpowers and their respective allies. Describes a classroom project in which global patterns of embassy locations are examined and compared. Includes five maps and a chart indicating types of embassy locations. (CFR)

  17. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  18. Modeling discrete competitive facility location

    CERN Document Server

    Karakitsiou, Athanasia

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an up-to-date review of modeling and optimization approaches for location problems along with a new bi-level programming methodology which captures the effect of competition of both producers and customers on facility location decisions. While many optimization approaches simplify location problems by assuming decision making in isolation, this monograph focuses on models which take into account the competitive environment in which such decisions are made. New insights in modeling, algorithmic and theoretical possibilities are opened by this approach and new applications are possible. Competition on equal term plus competition between market leader and followers are considered in this study, consequently bi-level optimization methodology is emphasized and further developed. This book provides insights regarding modeling complexity and algorithmic approaches to discrete competitive location problems. In traditional location modeling, assignment of customer demands to supply sources are made ...

  19. Tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma: an unusual location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calişaneller, Tarkan; Ozen, Ozlem; Altinörs, Nur; Caner, Hakan

    2008-07-01

    A 60-year-old female was admitted to our clinic complaining of a long-lasting headache. Cranial magnetic resonance imagining examination of the patient revealed a 22x24 mm extra-axial, well-demarcated, mass lesion based on the left tentorium. The patient underwent a craniotomy and the tumor was totally excised with the adjacent tentorium. The histopathological examination of the tumor complied with the diagnosis of schwannoma. The rest of the clinical course was uneventful and the patient was released from the hospital without any neurological deficit. Intracranial schwannomas can rarely originate from atypical dural locations and radiological techniques are not always helpful in distinguishing tentorial schwannoma from tentorial meningioma. We presented a patient with a tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma and discussed the current literature.

  20. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  1. Assessment of the bioequivalence of two formulations of clarithromycin extended-release 500-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period, two-way crossover study in healthy Jordanian male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalidi, Bashar A; Tamimi, Jaafar J; Salem, Isam I; Ibrahim, Husain; Sallam, Alsayed Alarabi I

    2008-10-01

    Clarithromycin extended-release tablets are indicated for the treatment of adults with acute maxillary sinusitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, or Streptococcus pneumoniae; acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis due to H influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, M catarrhalis, or S pneumoniae; or community acquired pneumonia due to H influenzae, H parainfluenzae, M catarrhalis, S pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. This study was conducted to assess the bioequivalence of test and reference formulations of clarithromycin extended-release 500-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions. This was a single-dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period, 2-way crossover study with a 1-week washout period between doses. Separate bioequivalence studies (fasting and fed) were performed in 2 groups of healthy male Jordanian volunteers. Eighteen blood samples were obtained from each volunteer over 38 hours after drug administration. Clarithromycin concentrations were determined in plasma using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method with electrochemical detection. Pharmacokinetic parameters of clarithromycin (C(max), T(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-infinity), lambda(z) [first-order elimination rate constant], and t((1/2))) were calculated and analyzed statistically. Tolerability was assessed based on changes in vital signs and laboratory tests, and by questioning subjects about adverse events. Thirty-eight volunteers each participated in the fasting and fed studies. The mean ages of participants in the fasting and fed studies were 26.7 and 27.6 years, respectively; their mean weight was 71.2 and 70.9 kg and mean height was 171.3 and 179.0 cm. Under fasting conditions, the arithmetic mean (SD) C(max) was 569.4 (189.3) ng/mL for the test formulation and 641.2 (202.0) ng/mL for the reference formulation, with a geometric mean ratio of 0.88. The arithmetic mean AUC(0-t) was 8602.9 (4105.1) and 8245.3 (4122.4) ng . h

  2. LocateP: Genome-scale subcellular-location predictor for bacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Miaomiao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, various protein subcellular-location (SCL predictors have been developed. Most of these predictors, like TMHMM 2.0, SignalP 3.0, PrediSi and Phobius, aim at the identification of one or a few SCLs, whereas others such as CELLO and Psortb.v.2.0 aim at a broader classification. Although these tools and pipelines can achieve a high precision in the accurate prediction of signal peptides and transmembrane helices, they have a much lower accuracy when other sequence characteristics are concerned. For instance, it proved notoriously difficult to identify the fate of proteins carrying a putative type I signal peptidase (SPIase cleavage site, as many of those proteins are retained in the cell membrane as N-terminally anchored membrane proteins. Moreover, most of the SCL classifiers are based on the classification of the Swiss-Prot database and consequently inherited the inconsistency of that SCL classification. As accurate and detailed SCL prediction on a genome scale is highly desired by experimental researchers, we decided to construct a new SCL prediction pipeline: LocateP. Results LocateP combines many of the existing high-precision SCL identifiers with our own newly developed identifiers for specific SCLs. The LocateP pipeline was designed such that it mimics protein targeting and secretion processes. It distinguishes 7 different SCLs within Gram-positive bacteria: intracellular, multi-transmembrane, N-terminally membrane anchored, C-terminally membrane anchored, lipid-anchored, LPxTG-type cell-wall anchored, and secreted/released proteins. Moreover, it distinguishes pathways for Sec- or Tat-dependent secretion and alternative secretion of bacteriocin-like proteins. The pipeline was tested on data sets extracted from literature, including experimental proteomics studies. The tests showed that LocateP performs as well as, or even slightly better than other SCL predictors for some locations and outperforms

  3. Effects of fluvastatin extended-release (80 mg) alone and in combination with ezetimibe (10 mg) on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and inflammatory parameters in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia: a 12-week, multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sala, Luis A; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Masana, Luis; Suarez, Carmen; Pinilla, Blanca; Plana, Nuria; Trias, Ferran; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Gambus, Gemma; Lahera, Vicente; Pintó, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Combining lipid-lowering agents with complementary mechanisms of action can provide greater cholesterol reductions than using either agent alone, improving achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of fluvastatin extended-release (XL) 80 mg/d administered alone or combined with ezetimibe 10 mg/d on plasma lipid levels and inflammatory parameters in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. The tolerability of both regimens was also evaluated. In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study, patients with hypercholesterolemia were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive fluvastatin XL 80 mg/d alone or in combination with ezetimibe 10 mg/d for 12 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage change from baseline to week 12 in LDL-C level with fluvastatin XL + ezetimibe combination therapy compared with fluvastatin XL alone. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers were measured at baseline and week 12. Proportions of patients who achieved National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) LDL-C goals were calculated. Tolerability was assessed by the monitoring and recording of all adverse events (AEs) and laboratory values. A total of 82 patients were enrolled (mean [SD] age, 50.0 [12.0] years; 44% male; 100% white; mean [SD] weight, 73.5 [14.9] kg; combination group, 38 patients; monotherapy group, 44). Fluvastatin XL + ezetimibe and fluvastatin XL monotherapy were associated with significant decreases from baseline in mean LDL-C level (by 49.9% and 35.2%, respectively; between-group difference, P cholesterol (38.2% vs 27.5% P 2 mg/L; P 1 cardiovascular risk factor (P effective, allowing the majority (87%) of these patients with primary hypercholesterolemia to achieve current treatment goals, and reduced hs-CRP levels in patients at higher cardiovascular risk.

  4. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  5. CBP List of Preclearance Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — CBP Preclearance provides for the U.S. border inspection and clearance of commercial air passengers and their goods at (15) locations in (6) foreign countries. CBP...

  6. Allegheny County Blazed Trails Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the location of blazed trails in all Allegheny County parks. This is the same data used in the Allegheny County Parks Trails Mobile App, available for Apple...

  7. Allegheny County Public Building Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of municipal facilities in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  8. Allegheny County WIC Vendor Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program vendors. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data...

  9. Locative inferences in medical texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, P S; Bailey, G H; Mayer, R J; Hillis, A; Dvoracek, J E

    1987-06-01

    Medical research relies on epidemiological studies conducted on a large set of clinical records that have been collected from physicians recording individual patient observations. These clinical records are recorded for the purpose of individual care of the patient with little consideration for their use by a biostatistician interested in studying a disease over a large population. Natural language processing of clinical records for epidemiological studies must deal with temporal, locative, and conceptual issues. This makes text understanding and data extraction of clinical records an excellent area for applied research. While much has been done in making temporal or conceptual inferences in medical texts, parallel work in locative inferences has not been done. This paper examines the locative inferences as well as the integration of temporal, locative, and conceptual issues in the clinical record understanding domain by presenting an application that utilizes two key concepts in its parsing strategy--a knowledge-based parsing strategy and a minimal lexicon.

  10. VT School Locations - K-12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) FacilitiesSchools_PTSCHOOL is designed to provide point locations of every Vermont School along with the established school ID (PSID) for...

  11. WHERE2 Location Aided Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Armin; Agapiou, George; Brunel, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of preliminary results of investigations within the WHERE2 Project on identifying promising avenues for location aided enhancements to wireless communication systems. The wide ranging contributions are organized according to the following targeted systems: cellular...... networks, mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) and cognitive radio. Location based approaches are found to allevi- ate significant signaling overhead in various forms of modern communication paradigms that are very information hungry in terms of channel state information at the transmitter...

  12. Two-sided Facility Location

    OpenAIRE

    Alijani, Reza; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Gollapudi, Sreenivas; Kollias, Kostas; Munagala, Kamesh

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the rise of many successful e-commerce marketplace platforms like the Amazon marketplace, AirBnB, Uber/Lyft, and Upwork, where a central platform mediates economic transactions between buyers and sellers. Motivated by these platforms, we formulate a set of facility location problems that we term Two-sided Facility location. In our model, agents arrive at nodes in an underlying metric space, where the metric distance between any buyer and seller captures the quality...

  13. Name, location, and length of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release is a spreadsheet including the name, location, and length of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California....

  14. Residential Location, Job Location, and Wages: Theory and Empirics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    I develop a stylized partial on-the-job equilibrium search model which incorporate a spatial dimension. Workers reside on a circle and can move at a cost. Each point on the circle has a wage distribution. Implications about wages and job mobility are drawn from the model and tested on Danish...... matched employer-employee data. The model predictions hold true. I find that workers working farther away from their residence earn higher wages. When a worker is making a job-to-job transition where he changes workplace location he experiences a higher wage change than a worker making a job-to-job...... transition without changing workplace location. However, workers making a job-to-job transition which makes the workplace location closer to the residence experiences a wage drop. Furthermore, low wage workers and workers with high transportation costs are more likely to make job-to-job transitions, but also...

  15. Asymmetrical access to color and location in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajsic, Jason; Wilson, Daryl E

    2014-10-01

    Models of visual working memory (VWM) have benefitted greatly from the use of the delayed-matching paradigm. However, in this task, the ability to recall a probed feature is confounded with the ability to maintain the proper binding between the feature that is to be reported and the feature (typically location) that is used to cue a particular item for report. Given that location is typically used as a cue-feature, we used the delayed-estimation paradigm to compare memory for location to memory for color, rotating which feature was used as a cue and which was reported. Our results revealed several novel findings: 1) the likelihood of reporting a probed object's feature was superior when reporting location with a color cue than when reporting color with a location cue; 2) location report errors were composed entirely of swap errors, with little to no random location reports; and 3) both colour and location reports greatly benefitted from the presence of nonprobed items at test. This last finding suggests that it is uncertainty over the bindings between locations and colors at memory retrieval that drive swap errors, not at encoding. We interpret our findings as consistent with a representational architecture that nests remembered object features within remembered locations.

  16. Oceanographic studies off Beypore Port, west coast of India to locate a dredge dumping site

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Vethamony, P.; Babu, M.T.; Srinivas, K.; Thottam, T.J.

    (GPS) over different stages of the tide to obtain the trajectories of surface currents. The representative trajectories obtained for releases at the start LOCATING A DUMPING SITE ALONG THE WEST COAST OF INDIA 279 Figure 12. Progressive vector diagram... with significant offshore movement during flood tides. Trajectories of the drogue released at these depths during ebb moved in the westerly direction initially and then showed a southerly drift. Drogue trajectories for the drogue released during ebb and flood tides...

  17. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Martins Roberto S.; Siqueira Mario G.; Simplício Hougelli

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist imobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuosly for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment...

  18. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  19. Comparing methods for Earthquake Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaya, Semih; Bodin, Thomas; Sylvander, Matthieu; Parroucau, Pierre; Manchuel, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    There are plenty of methods available for locating small magnitude point source earthquakes. However, it is known that these different approaches produce different results. For each approach, results also depend on a number of parameters which can be separated into two main branches: (1) parameters related to observations (number and distribution of for example) and (2) parameters related to the inversion process (velocity model, weighting parameters, initial location etc.). Currently, the results obtained from most of the location methods do not systematically include quantitative uncertainties. The effect of the selected parameters on location uncertainties is also poorly known. Understanding the importance of these different parameters and their effect on uncertainties is clearly required to better constrained knowledge on fault geometry, seismotectonic processes and at the end to improve seismic hazard assessment. In this work, realized in the frame of the SINAPS@ research program (http://www.institut-seism.fr/projets/sinaps/), we analyse the effect of different parameters on earthquakes location (e.g. type of phase, max. hypocentral separation etc.). We compare several codes available (Hypo71, HypoDD, NonLinLoc etc.) and determine their strengths and weaknesses in different cases by means of synthetic tests. The work, performed for the moment on synthetic data, is planned to be applied, in a second step, on data collected by the Midi-Pyrénées Observatory (OMP).

  20. peripheral location of the human late x and"? homologous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have now performed this type of analysis on H3-thyn1idine radioautographs, a ... quantitative study of the location of the inactive X has not to our knowledge yet ... With the use of simple random sampling methods a group of 25 metaphases.

  1. Multiple Chemical Sources Localization Using Virtual Physics-Based Robots with Release Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Yuli Zhang; Xiaoping Ma; Yanzi Miao

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method of simultaneously locating chemical sources by a virtual physics-based multirobot system with a release strategy. The proposed release strategy includes setting forbidden area, releasing the robots from declared sources and escaping from it by a rotary force and goal force. This strategy can avoid the robots relocating the same source which has been located by other robots and leading them to move toward other sources. Various turbulent plume environments ar...

  2. Location and activity specific site-management for military locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, L.; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2009-01-01

    pace is limited in the Netherlands and military activities, that may cause nuisance or environmental hazards, should therefore be considered and evaluated during the use of military locations. The last few years TNO and Deltares have worked on a research program on environmental effects due to

  3. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  4. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  5. Hydra Code Release

    OpenAIRE

    Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Thomas, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Comment: A new version of the AP3M-SPH code, Hydra, is now available as a tar file from the following sites; http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html , http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/~pat/hydra/hydra.html . The release now also contains a cosmological initial conditions generator, documentation, an installation guide and installation tests. A LaTex version of the documentation is included here

  6. Sudden releases of gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloupecká Hana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  7. Releasable suture technique for trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Pushpa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of the releasable suture technique on immediate postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP. Nine eyes of nine patients with glaucoma had trabeculectomy with a releasable suture. In the six eyes that did not receive antimitotics, the suture was released by the fifth postoperative day; in the others suture release was delayed up to the fourteenth day. Of the nine patients, one had an acceptable postoperative IOP and did not need suture release; in another the suture broke and could not be released. In the remaining seven patients, the difference between the pre-release and post-release IOP was statistically significant (p < 0.001. The complications of this technique include failed suture release, subconjunctival hematoma and a distinctive "windshield wiper" keratopathy.

  8. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  9. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  10. Arbitrary mandibular hinge axis locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J W; Hesby, R A; Pfeifer, D L; Pelleu, G B

    1984-06-01

    This study compared selected arbitrary hinge axis locations with the kinematic axis location. Fifty subjects were studied, and the data were statistically analyzed. Results showed significant differences between the location of experimental arbitrary axis point and those of Beyron, Gysi, and Bergstrom in relation to the kinematic axis. The arbitrary points of Beyron, Gysi, and Bergstrom showed directional tendencies, whereas the experimental arbitrary points were evenly distributed around the kinematic axis. This study indicates that the experimental arbitrary axis point more closely and consistently approximated the kinematic axis than the arbitrary points of Beyron, Gysi, and Bergstrom. The finding suggests that the clinical use of a point on Camper's line, 10 mm from the superior border of the tragus, results in a more accurate transfer of the maxillary cast to the articulator.

  11. Locating the LCROSS Impact Craters

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, William; Moratto, Zachary; Colaprete, Anthony; Neumann, Gregory; Smith, David; Hensley, Scott; Wilson, Barbara; Slade, Martin; Kennedy, Brian; Gurrola, Eric; Harcke, Leif; 10.1007/s11214-011-9765-0

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observations and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket stage into a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The Sheperding Spacecraft (SSC) separated \\sim9 hours before impact and performed a small braking maneuver in order to observe the Centaur impact plume, looking for evidence of water and other volatiles, before impacting itself. This paper describes the registration of imagery of the LCROSS impact region from the mid- and near-infrared cameras onboard the SSC, as well as from the Goldstone radar. We compare the Centaur impact features, positively identified in the first two, and with a consistent feature in the third, which are interpreted as a 20 m diameter crater surrounded by a 160 m diameter ejecta region. The images are registered to Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) topographical data which allows determination of the impact location. This location is compared with the impact location derived from ground-based tracking and propagation of...

  12. Nonparametric estimation of location and scale parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Potgieter, C.J.

    2012-12-01

    Two random variables X and Y belong to the same location-scale family if there are constants μ and σ such that Y and μ+σX have the same distribution. In this paper we consider non-parametric estimation of the parameters μ and σ under minimal assumptions regarding the form of the distribution functions of X and Y. We discuss an approach to the estimation problem that is based on asymptotic likelihood considerations. Our results enable us to provide a methodology that can be implemented easily and which yields estimators that are often near optimal when compared to fully parametric methods. We evaluate the performance of the estimators in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of PAPP-A in the IGF system: location, location, location

    OpenAIRE

    Oxvig, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Although discovered as a placental protein present abundantly in the circulation of pregnant women, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is widely expressed in multiple tissues. PAPP-A is a highly specific metalloproteinase binding tightly to glycosaminoglycans present on the surface of cells. By cleaving a subset of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), PAPP-A thus functions within tissues as a growth-promoting enzyme, releasing bioactive IGF in close proximity to t...

  14. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  15. Exploring the Effects of Sampling Locations for Calibrating the Huff Model Using Mobile Phone Location Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the Huff model is of critical significance in many fields, including urban transport, optimal location planning, economics and business analysis. Moreover, parameters calibration is a crucial procedure before using the model. Previous studies have paid much attention to calibrating the spatial interaction model for human mobility research. However, are whole sampling locations always the better solution for model calibration? We use active tracking data of over 16 million cell phones in Shenzhen, a metropolitan city in China, to evaluate the calibration accuracy of Huff model. Specifically, we choose five business areas in this city as destinations and then randomly select a fixed number of cell phone towers to calibrate the parameters in this spatial interaction model. We vary the selected number of cell phone towers by multipliers of 30 until we reach the total number of towers with flows to the five destinations. We apply the least square methods for model calibration. The distribution of the final sum of squared error between the observed flows and the estimated flows indicates that whole sampling locations are not always better for the outcomes of this spatial interaction model. Instead, fewer sampling locations with higher volume of trips could improve the calibration results. Finally, we discuss implications of this finding and suggest an approach to address the high-accuracy model calibration solution.

  16. Short-term fate of rehabilitated orphan black bears released in New Hampshire

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Wesley E.; Pekins, Peter J.; Timmins, Andrew A.; Kilham, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the release of rehabilitated, orphan black bears (Ursus americanus) in northern New Hampshire. Eleven bears (9 males, 2 females; 40–45 kg) were outfitted with GPS radio-collars and released during May and June of 2011 and 2012. Bears released in 2011 had higher apparent survival and were not observed or reported in any nuisance behavior, whereas no bears released in 2012 survived, and all were involved in minor nuisance behavior. Analysis of GPS locations indicated that bears in ...

  17. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  18. Locations in television drama series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    , and reflect the growing academic and business interests, respectively, on places in a global media and consumption culture (Falkheimer & Jansson, 2006). Based on empirical location studies of three crime series, Wallander (Yellow Bird, 2008-2012), The Bridge (SVT1 & DR1, 2011-2013) and Dicte (Misofilm/TV2...

  19. Part Objects and Their Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1992-01-01

    The notion of location of part objects is introduced, yielding a reference to the containing object. Combined with locally defined objects and classes (block structure), singularly defined part objects, and references to part objects, it is a powerful language mechanism for defining objects...... with different aspects or roles. The use of part objects for inheritance of code is also explored....

  20. Smart location system; Sistema de localizacao inteligente Smart Location System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Augusto Pereira da; Antunes, Rodrigo de Castro; Azevedo, Fabio Augusto Ferreira de [PipeWay Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Afonso, Orlando de Jesus Ribeiro [Instituto de Pesquisas da Marinha, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Matsuura, Minoru; Santa Cruz, Sergio de Freitas [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transportes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jose Alberto Costa dos; Hashiguchi, Decio Issao [GDK Engenharia (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the technology used in the Intelligent Location System developed by Pipeway and includes some of the results already obtained optimizing repair time and logistic costs during the location of anomalies detected by intelligent pigs, a joint operation within the scope of the contract for Sub sea Pipeline Recovery in the Guanabara Bay with PETROBRAS/TRANSPETRO and GDK Engenharia. The system uses the ELF (Extra Low Frequency) transmission and reception technology at points near a pipe, with or without concrete coating, whose signals are recorded in the inspection tool memory to accurately establish reference points, thus preventing excessive dig work or dredging when human and operational risks tend to be high. (author)

  1. Global Locator, Local Locator, and Identifier Split (GLI-Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menth

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The locator/identifier split is an approach for a new addressing and routing architecture to make routing in the core of the Internet more scalable. Based on this principle, we developed the GLI-Split framework, which separates the functionality of current IP addresses into a stable identifier and two independent locators, one for routing in the Internet core and one for edge networks. This makes routing in the Internet more stable and provides more flexibility for edge networks. GLI-Split can be incrementally deployed and it is backward-compatible with the IPv6 Internet. We describe its architecture, compare it to other approaches, present its benefits, and finally present a proof-of-concept implementation of GLI-Split.

  2. Release strategies for rehabilitated sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGange, Anthony R.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Bayha, Keith; Williams, Terrie M.; Davis, Randall W.

    1995-01-01

    According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ (USFWS) Response Plan for sea otters (USFWS, in preparation), in the event of an oil spill, the decision to release sea otters from rehabilitation centers following treatment will be linked to the decision on whether to capture sea otters for treatment. Assuming a scenario similar to the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), once the decision to capture sea otters is made, the ultimate goal is to return as many sea otters to the wild as possible, even though the rescue may not be expected to produce results significant at the population level. The decision by the USFWS to proceed with capture, rehabilitation, and release will be made on a case-by-case basis (USFWS, in preparation). Many factors will influence the decision. Perhaps the most important factors in deciding when and where to release sea otters are the location and availability of suitable release sites and verification that the otters are free of diseases that might be transmitted to the wild population.Alternative release strategies for sea otters will be contained in the sea otter response portion of the USFWS’s oil spill contingency plans for Alaska and California that are being developed as required by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Public review of these plans before they are implemented will help to reduce public concern about the survival of rehabilitated otters, their biological effect on the release area, and the potential introduction or spread of disease into the wild sea otter population.The objective of this chapter is to review alternative strategies for the disposition of rehabilitated sea otters. Our assumption is that returning as many animals to the wild as possible, whether it be for humanitarian or biological reasons, is the ultimate goal of this effort (Figure 10.1).

  3. Quantifying randomness in real networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M.; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks--the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain--and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs.

  4. Slab avalanche release area estimation: a new GIS tool

    OpenAIRE

    Veitinger, Jochen; Sovilla, Betty; Purves, Ross S.

    2014-01-01

    Location and extent of avalanche starting zones are of crucial importance to correctly estimate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or other infrastructure. Presently, release area assessment is based on terrain analysis combined with expert judgment. Tools for the automatic definition of release areas are scarce and exclusively based on parameters derived from summer topography, such as slope and curvature. This leads to several limitations concerning the performance...

  5. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  6. Quality of life and psychosocial and physical well-being among 1,023 women during their first assisted reproductive technology treatment: secondary outcome to a randomized controlled trial comparing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist and GnRH agonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toftager, Mette; Sylvest, Randi; Schmidt, Lone; Bogstad, Jeanette; Løssl, Kristine; Prætorius, Lisbeth; Zedeler, Anne; Bryndorf, Thue; Pinborg, Anja

    2018-01-01

    To compare self-reported quality of life, psychosocial well-being, and physical well-being during assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in 1,023 women allocated to either a short GnRH antagonist or long GnRH agonist protocol. Secondary outcome of a prospective phase 4, open-label, randomized controlled trial. Four times during treatment a questionnaire on self-reported physical well-being was completed. Further, a questionnaire on self-reported quality of life and psychosocial well-being was completed at the day of hCG testing. Fertility clinics at university hospitals. Women referred for their first ART treatment were randomized in a 1:1 ratio and started standardized ART protocols. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue; 528 women allocated to a short GnRH antagonist protocol and 495 women allocated to a long GnRH agonist protocol. Self-reported quality of life, psychosocial well-being, and physical well-being based on questionnaires developed for women receiving ART treatment. Baseline characteristics were similar, and response rates were 79.4% and 74.3% in the GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist groups, respectively. Self-reported quality of life during ART treatment was rated similar and slightly below normal in both groups. However, women in the GnRH antagonist group felt less emotional (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.69), less limited in their everyday life (AOR 0.74), experienced less unexpected crying (AOR 0.71), and rated quality of sleep better (AOR 1.55). Further, women receiving GnRH agonist treatment felt worse physically. Women in a short GnRH antagonist protocol rated psychosocial and physical well-being during first ART treatment better than did women in a long GnRH agonist protocol. However, the one item on self-reported general quality of life was rated similarly. NCT00756028. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  8. A vacuum microgripping tool with integrated vibration releasing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weibin; Fan, Zenghua; Wang, Lefeng; Xie, Hui; Sun, Lining

    2014-08-01

    Pick-and-place of micro-objects is a basic task in various micromanipulation demands. Reliable releasing of micro-objects is usually disturbed due to strong scale effects. This paper focuses on a vacuum micro-gripper with vibration releasing functionality, which was designed and assembled for reliable micromanipulation tasks. Accordingly, a vibration releasing strategy of implementing a piezoelectric actuator on the vacuum microgripping tool is presented to address the releasing problem. The releasing mechanism was illustrated using a dynamic micro contact model. This model was developed via theoretical analysis, simulations and pull-off force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Micromanipulation experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the vacuum micro-gripper. The results show that, with the assistance of the vibration releasing, the vacuum microgripping tool can achieve reliable release of micro-objects. A releasing location accuracy of 4.5±0.5 μm and a successful releasing rate of around 100% (which is based on 110 trials) were achieved for manipulating polystyrene microspheres with radius of 35-100 μm.

  9. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  10. Multiple criteria facility location problems: A survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farahani, Reza Zanjirani; SteadieSeifi, Maryam; Asgari, Nasrin

    2010-01-01

    .... There are many decision making problems whose information is spatial (geographical). These kinds of decisions are called location decisions. Location decisions are now a major part of operations research and management science (named location science). Facility location, location science and location models are terms that can be used instead. Facility lo...

  11. Monomer release from nanofilled and microhybrid dental composites after bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites.80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate, TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate, UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05.Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001; TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001. Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001. Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001. Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001. Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952. Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000. The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003; while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824. Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001. Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972 and (P=0.811 respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002, as well as polishing (P=0.024.Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled.

  12. Mechanisms of HSP72 release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-15

    Mar 15, 2007 ... Cancer; Chaperokine; heat shock proteins; inflammation; receptors, signal transduction ... release mechanism, including necrotic cell death, severe blunt trauma, surgery and following infection with lytic viruses, and an active release mechanism which involves the non classical protein release pathway.

  13. Random triangles

    OpenAIRE

    Matula, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The author summarizes some previous results concerning random triangles. He describes the Gaussian triangle and random triangles whose vertices lie in a unit n-dimensional ball, in a rectangle or in a general bounded convex set. In the second part, the author deals with an inscribed triangle in a triangle - let ABC be an equilateral triangle and let M, N, O be three points, each laying on one side of the ABC. We call MNO inscribed triangle (in an equi- laterral triangle). The median triangle ...

  14. Random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1990-01-01

    Since the publication of Random Matrices (Academic Press, 1967) so many new results have emerged both in theory and in applications, that this edition is almost completely revised to reflect the developments. For example, the theory of matrices with quaternion elements was developed to compute certain multiple integrals, and the inverse scattering theory was used to derive asymptotic results. The discovery of Selberg's 1944 paper on a multiple integral also gave rise to hundreds of recent publications. This book presents a coherent and detailed analytical treatment of random matrices, leading

  15. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Compton, Roger; Kramer, Louisa; Ancona, Zach; Norton, Donna

    2017-01-01

    This dataset provides industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. The database has wind turbine records that have been collected, digitized, locationally verified, and internally quality controlled. Turbines from the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, through product release date July 22, 2013, were used as the primary source of turbine data points. The dataset was subsequently revised and reposted as described in the revision histories for the report. Verification of the turbine positions was done by visual interpretation using high-resolution aerial imagery in Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) ArcGIS Desktop. Turbines without Federal Aviation Administration Obstacles Repository System numbers were visually identified and point locations were added to the collection. We estimated a locational error of plus or minus 10 meters for turbine locations. Wind farm facility names were identified from publicly available facility datasets. Facility names were then used in a Web search of additional industry publications and press releases to attribute additional turbine information (such as manufacturer, model, and technical specifications of wind turbines). Wind farm facility location data from various wind and energy industry sources were used to search for and digitize turbines not in existing databases. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in literature, specifications listed in the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, and information on the turbine manufacturer’s Web site. Some facility and turbine information on make and model did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Thus, uncertainty may exist for certain turbine specifications. That uncertainty was rated and a confidence was recorded for both location and attribution data quality.

  16. Adding uncertainty to forest inventory plot locations: effects on analyses using geospatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexia A. Sabor; Volker C. Radeloff; Ronald E. McRoberts; Murray Clayton; Susan I. Stewart

    2007-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service alters plot locations before releasing data to the public to ensure landowner confidentiality and sample integrity, but using data with altered plot locations in conjunction with other spatially explicit data layers produces analytical results with unknown amounts of error. We calculated the...

  17. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  18. It's All about Location, Location, Location: Children's Memory for the "Where'' of Personally Experienced Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Doydum, Ayzit O.; Pathman, Thanujeni; Larkina, Marina; Guler, O. Evren; Burch, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory is defined as the ability to recall specific past events located in a particular time and place. Over the preschool and into the school years, there are clear developmental changes in memory for when events took place. In contrast, little is known about developmental changes in memory for where events were experienced. In the…

  19. MICROGRIDS: THE AGRIA TEST LOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krkoleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the pilot Microgrid in Macedonia, developed within the framework of the MOREMICROGRIDS (EU EP6 projecet, contract No. SES6-019864 project. This Microgrid is the first of its kind being developed in the Western Balkan region and serves as pilot site for introduction and examination of the Microgrids concept in non European Union conditions. The test network consists of a part of the low voltage grid, located on a pig farm. The main electricity source for the Microgrid is a small biogas plant, which uses the biogas produced by a waste water treatment process. The paper addresses the Microgrid design, development of test scenarios and test results from the pilot location.

  20. Location predicting methods for UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Location prediction of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is important for fighting with its enemy and ensuring its normal operation. This paper presents the motion model of UAVs and reduces the state space into 7 dimensions. The Bayesian Network, Markov Chain, Curve Fitting and Neural Network are introduced for designing predicting methods. Then Curve Fitting Predicting method, Markov Chain Predicting method, Bayesian Network Predicting method and Neural Network Predicting method are designed for UAVs. The simulation result shows that 1) Neural Network Predicting method has highest predicting accuracy; 2) Markov Chain Predicting method and Bayesian Network Predicting method methods have similar performance and both are better than Bayesian Network Predicting method methods; 3) Neural Network Predicting method is the first choice when predicting the locations of UAVs.

  1. Computer Model Locates Environmental Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Catherine Huybrechts Burton founded San Francisco-based Endpoint Environmental (2E) LLC in 2005 while she was a student intern and project manager at Ames Research Center with NASA's DEVELOP program. The 2E team created the Tire Identification from Reflectance model, which algorithmically processes satellite images using turnkey technology to retain only the darkest parts of an image. This model allows 2E to locate piles of rubber tires, which often are stockpiled illegally and cause hazardous environmental conditions and fires.

  2. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported...

  3. Rare locations of calcifying tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidecker, A.; Hartweg, H.

    1983-12-01

    5 case-reports illustrate 2 rare locations of calcifying peritendinitis: The insertion of the deltoid tendon in the proximal humreus and the insertion of the gluteus maximus tendon in the femur. Knowledge of these insertion sites on one hand and the possibility of calcifying tendinitis at these sites on the other hand may allow proper diagnosis of certain shoulder- and hip joint pain syndromes and subsequent correct therapy.

  4. Facility Location Using Cross Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Leroy A.

    1995-01-01

    The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. Determining the best base stationing for military units can be modeled as a capacitated facility location problem with sole sourcing and multiple resource categories. Computational experience suggests that cross decomposition, a unification of Benders Decomposition and Lagrangean relaxation, is superior to other contempo...

  5. Location, Location: Jurisdiction & Conflicts in Transborder Contract Litigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    In transborder contract litigation place-based factors are often decisive, both as regards jurisdiction to adjudicate as well as the rules which determine the applicable substantive law. Relevant locations include the place where the contract was made, where the parties reside, transact business...... or own property, the place of delivery, payment or other performance etc. Using concrete case-based examples, Professor Lookofsky explains how rules of jurisdiction and contract conflicts in Europe are tied to rigidly defined, single-place-based factors. In the United States, by contrast...

  6. Efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (adderall XR) in the management of oppositional defiant disorder with or without comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in school-aged children and adolescents: A 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J; Abikoff, Howard B; Connor, Daniel F; Biederman, Joseph; Pliszka, Steven R; Boellner, Samuel; Read, Stephanie C; Pratt, Raymond

    2006-03-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)is associated with a high degree of impairment in social skills, family interaction, and academic functioning. Comorbid ODD is reportedly present in 40% to 70% of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (MAS XR) for the treatment of ODD in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years. This was a 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study. Patients were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/d or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the ODD subscale of the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham-IV (SNAP-IV) parent rating. Primary safety measures included adverse events recorded at each visit and for 30 days after study drug discontinuation, and changes in vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) findings, laboratory tests and physical examinations, and body weight. A post hoc efficacy reanalysis was completed based on the results for the per-protocol population. For this analysis, patients were divided into high and low baseline severity categories according to the dichotomized baseline ODD parent or teacher score or dichotomized baseline ADHD parent or teacher score (high defined as scores at the median or greater and low defined as scores less than the median). A total of 308 children and adolescents (age range, 6-17 years; 213 males, 95 females) were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10 mg/d (n = 60) 20 mg/d (n = 58), 30 mg/d (n = 69), or 40 mg/d (n = 61) or placebo (n = 60). Of the 308 study patients, 244 (79.2%) had comorbid ADHD. A significant change from baseline in the ODD symptoms measured with the SNAP-IV parent rating subscale was found for the MAS XR 30-mg/d (-0.52; P < 0.001) and 40-mg/d (-0.56; P = 0.002) groups in the per-protocol analysis and for the MAS XR

  7. Identification of Hazardous Road Locations on the basis of jerks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Jensen, Robin; Andersen, Camilla Sloth

    2015-01-01

    The dark figures for the Danish traffic safety have increased for decades and are now around 91%. As the Hazardous Road Location (HRL) identification, a cornerstone in the traffic safety work, is based on the registered accidents, the identification is increasingly more random and uncertain...... on data from three months of driving by 380 cars, which is equivalent to a distance of 1.9 million km. This indicates that concentrations of decelerations are located where there are high traffic volumes, but not that the design and furniture of the road on the location can explain an HRL. This also...... indicates that concentrations of jerks can be found where the road has safety problems or is inappropriately designed. This is supported by literature dealing with this topic. On the other hand, jerks are very sensitive to unevenness in the road surface, and data from these locations must be removed...

  8. Optimal location of a mine facility by genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumral, M. [Inonu University, Malatya (Turkey). School of Engineering

    2004-06-01

    When raw material is extracted from multiple mines or faces and when the construction of a mine facility is being planned, the selection for the optimal location of the facility is an important consideration because of high transportation costs. This paper presents an approach for the selection of optimal location of a mining facility based on the genetic algorithms which is a directed random search technique. The technique, simple and easy to apply, is demonstrated for the case of the location of a coal washery plant, whose supply comes from five mines with varying reserves and coal qualities, topographical conditions and mine status. The result shows that the solution produced by the proposed algorithm can be used to find the optimal location of any mining facility.

  9. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  10. Parameters to be Considered in the Simulation of Drug Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Four single crystals of aspirin of varied weight and orthorhombic in shape or their microcapsules also of varied weights were randomly selected for the study. The microcapsules ... At same particle weight the release parameters m, t, and the slopes of the rate order plots compared favourably with the theoretical data.

  11. Locating spilled oil with airborne laser fluorosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.; Nelson, Robert D.; Mullin, Joseph V.

    1999-02-01

    Locating oil in marine and terrestrial environments is a daunting task. There are commercially available off the shelf (COTS) sensors with a wide field-of-view (FOV) which can be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These generic sensors, however, lack the specificity required to positively identify oil and related products. The problem is exacerbated along beach and shoreline environments where a variety of organic and inorganic substrates are present. One sensor that can detect and classify oil in these environments is the laser fluorosensor. Laser fluorosensors have been under development by several agencies around the world for the past two decades. Environment Canada has been involved with laser fluorosensor development since the early 1990s. The prototype system was known as the Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (LEAF). The LEAF has recently been modified to provide real-time oil spill detection and classification. Fluorescence spectra are collected and analyzed at the rate of 100 Hz. Geo-referenced maps showing the locations of oil contamination are produced in real-time onboard the aircraft. While the LEAF has proven to be an excellent prototype sensor and a good operational tool, it has some deficiencies when it comes to oil spill response operations. A consortium including Environment Canada and the Minerals Management Service has recently funded the development of a new fluorosensor, called the Scanning Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (SLEAF). The SLEAF was designed to detect and map oil in shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. Oil tends to pile up in narrow bands along the high tide line on beaches. A nadir-looking, small footprint sensor such as the LEAF would have difficulty locating oil in this situation. The SLEAF employs a pair of conical scanning mirrors to direct the laser beam in a circular pattern below the aircraft. With a sampling rate of 400 Hz and real-time spectral analysis

  12. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  13. New Location Improves Efficiency | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical proximity of the SAIC-Frederick Intellectual Property (IP) Office to the NCI Technology Transfer Center (NCI-TTC) is one of the many benefits of being at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), according to Courtney Silverthorn, Ph.D. Being in one location “has increased the effectiveness of both informal communication and formal meetings. We have already brainstormed solutions for several issues in the hallway during an informal chat,” said Silverthorn, an SAIC-Frederick IP specialist.

  14. Method of locating ground faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L. (Inventor); Rose, Allen H. (Inventor); Cull, Ronald C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  15. On Voting and Facility Location

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Michal; Fiat, Amos; Golomb, Iddan

    2015-01-01

    We study mechanisms for candidate selection that seek to minimize the social cost, where voters and candidates are associated with points in some underlying metric space. The social cost of a candidate is the sum of its distances to each voter. Some of our work assumes that these points can be modeled on a real line, but other results of ours are more general. A question closely related to candidate selection is that of minimizing the sum of distances for facility location. The difference is ...

  16. 76 FR 60781 - Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting for Facilities Located in Indian Country and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ..., a Web-based application that allows facilities to submit a paperless report. EPA would then... government of a city, county, town, school district or special district with a population of less than 50,000...

  17. A General k-Level Uncapacitated Facility Location Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongheng; Huang, Huei-Chuen

    In this paper a general k-level uncapacitated facility location problem(k-GLUFLP) is proposed. It is shown that the 2-level uncapacitated facility location problem with no fixed cost(2-GLUFLNP) is strong NP-complete and a heuristic algorithm with worst case ratio of 3/2 is given for 2-GLUFLNP when the service costs are assumed to be in the metric space. We also present a randomized 3-approximation algorithm for the k-GLUFLP, when k is a fixed integer.

  18. Location invariance in masked repetition priming of letters and words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouki, Yousri; Meeter, Martijn; Grainger, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that information from a prime stimulus can be integrated with target information even when the two stimuli appear at different spatial locations. Here, we examined such location invariance in a masked repetition priming paradigm with single letter and word stimuli. In order to neutralize effects of acuity and spatial attention on prime processing, subliminal prime stimuli always appeared on fixation. Target location varied randomly from trial to trial along the horizontal meridian at one of seven possible locations for letter stimuli (-7° to +7°) and three positions for word stimuli (-4°, 0°, +4°). Speed of responding to letter and word targets was affected by target location, and by priming, but the size of repetition priming effects did not vary as a function of target location. These results suggest that masked repetition priming is mediated by representations that integrate information about object identity independently of object location. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical advantages of endoscopic cubital tunnel release are the short incision, lower risk of nerve damage, reduced manipulation of the nerve and possible faster recovery. We systematically searched Medline (PubMed), Web of Science and Scopus databases using the following keywords: 'endoscopic ulnar nerve', 'endoscopic cubital nerve', 'endoscopic ulnar compression' and 'endoscopic ulnar neuropathy'. Twenty-one studies were included in this review. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodological Score. Endoscopic release is effective for cubital tunnel entrapment and allows adequate visualization of the site of entrapment. There is a negative association between the severity of the compression and reported outcomes. Injury to the medial branch of the antebrachial cutaneous nerve is less frequent thanks to the limited dissection. The most frequent complication is the development of a hematoma. It is unclear whether ulnar nerve instability is a contraindication to simple decompression. The shorter time to return to work and the cosmetic appearance of the scar can be considered advantages of the endoscopic technique. There is a need to perform randomized clinical trials with common and validated scoring system with a longer duration of follow-up. The literature pertinent to endoscopic cubital tunnel release is lacking in the evaluation of the learning curve. Further investigations are necessary to assess the role of ulnar nerve instability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Expectation-Maximization Tensor Factorization for Practical Location Privacy Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Takao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Location privacy attacks based on a Markov chain model have been widely studied to de-anonymize or de-obfuscate mobility traces. An adversary can perform various kinds of location privacy attacks using a personalized transition matrix, which is trained for each target user. However, the amount of training data available to the adversary can be very small, since many users do not disclose much location information in their daily lives. In addition, many locations can be missing from the training traces, since many users do not disclose their locations continuously but rather sporadically. In this paper, we show that the Markov chain model can be a threat even in this realistic situation. Specifically, we focus on a training phase (i.e. mobility profile building phase and propose Expectation-Maximization Tensor Factorization (EMTF, which alternates between computing a distribution of missing locations (E-step and computing personalized transition matrices via tensor factorization (M-step. Since the time complexity of EMTF is exponential in the number of missing locations, we propose two approximate learning methods, one of which uses the Viterbi algorithm while the other uses the Forward Filtering Backward Sampling (FFBS algorithm. We apply our learning methods to a de-anonymization attack and a localization attack, and evaluate them using three real datasets. The results show that our learning methods significantly outperform a random guess, even when there is only one training trace composed of 10 locations per user, and each location is missing with probability 80% (i.e. even when users hardly disclose two temporally-continuous locations.

  1. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these....... Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future...

  2. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wireless networks in which the node locations are random are best modelled as random geometric graphs (RGGs). In addition to their extensive application in the modelling of wireless networks, RGGs find many new applications and are being studied in their own right. In this paper we first provide a brief introduction to the ...

  3. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  4. Arousal-Enhanced Location Memory for Pictures

    OpenAIRE

    Mather, Mara; Nesmith, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments revealed arousal-enhanced location memory for pictures. After an incidental encoding task, participants were more likely to remember the locations of positive and negative arousing pictures than the locations of non-arousing pictures, indicating better binding of location to picture. This arousal-enhanced binding effect did not have a cost for the binding of nearby pictures to their locations. Thus, arousal can enhance binding of an arousing picture’s content to its location ...

  5. A discrete random walk on the hypercube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyuan; Xiang, Yonghong; Sun, Weigang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study the scaling for mean first-passage time (MFPT) of random walks on the hypercube and obtain a closed-form formula for the MFPT over all node pairs. We also determine the exponent of scaling efficiency characterizing the random walks and compare it with those of the existing networks. Finally we study the random walks on the hypercube with a located trap and provide a solution of the Kirchhoff index of the hypercube.

  6. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Random walks as well as diffusions in random media are considered. Methods are developed that allow one to establish large deviation results for both the 'quenched' and the 'averaged' case. Keywords. Large deviations; random walks in a random environment. 1. Introduction. A random walk on Zd is a stochastic ...

  7. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  8. Shock Compression and Release of Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Warren; Neel, Christopher; Chhabildas, Lalit; Borg, John; Reinhart, William

    2011-06-01

    We report of the results of uniaxial strain experiments and computations to discuss the compressed and isentropic release states of aluminum foam ~50% relative density undergoing high velocity impact at up to 10GPa. The initial geometry of the foam was obtained via computed x-ray tomography (XCT) and imported directly into the CTH hydrodynamic code. Simulations of the dynamic response of the foam are compared to experimental measurements and used to build macro scale constitutive relations. The experimental results were obtained utilizing a reverse ballistic plate reverberation technique that obtained shock compression states of the foam. In these experiments, 6061-T6 aluminum, oxygen free copper and tantalum were used as standard witness plates and were shocked by the metal foam projectile at up to 2.0 km/s. The response of the witness plates was monitored by three different velocity interferometers positioned at three different locations on the witness plate to obtain compaction and release behavior. The simulations captured the heterogeneous Hugoniot and release state of the foam extremely well. The resulting constitutive relations built from mesoscale simulations compare favorably to those built from experimental results.

  9. Game location and aggression in rugby league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marc V; Bray, Steven R; Olivier, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    The present study examined the relationship between aggression and game location in rugby league. We videotaped a random sample of 21 professional rugby league games played in the 2000 Super League season. Trained observers recorded the frequency of aggressive behaviours. Consistent with previous research, which used territoriality theories as a basis for prediction, we hypothesized that the home team would behave more aggressively than the away team. The results showed no significant difference in the frequency of aggressive behaviours exhibited by the home and away teams. However, the away teams engaged in substantially more aggressive behaviours in games they lost compared with games they won. No significant differences in the pattern of aggressive behaviours for home and away teams emerged as a function of game time (i.e. first or second half) or game situation (i.e. when teams were winning, losing or drawing). The findings suggest that while home and away teams do not display different levels of aggression, the cost of behaving aggressively (in terms of game outcome) may be greater for the away team.

  10. A novel dissolution method relevant to intestinal release behaviour and its application in the evaluation of modified release mesalazine products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, R.C.A.; Stuurman, F.E.; van der Weert, F.H.J.; Kosterink, J.G.W.; Frijlink, H.W.

    Mesalazine (5-ASA) is a compound being used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Considering the fact that 5-ASA is locally active and that the location of inflammation in IBD may vary, it is recognized that the release profile of 5-ASA drugs is the dominant factor for adequate local

  11. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  12. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  13. The LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumlak, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider beauty LHCb detector is a dedicated flavour physics experiment, designed to efficiently detect decays of b- and c-hadrons to perform precise studies of CP violation and rare decays. At the end of Run 2, many of the LHCb measurements will remain statistically dominated. In order to increase the trigger yield for purely hadronic channels, the hardware trigger will be removed, and the full detector will be read out at 40 MHz. This, in combination with the five-fold increase in luminosity necessitates radical changes to LHCb's electronics with entire subdetector replacements required in some cases. The Vertex Locator (VELO) surrounding the interaction region is used to reconstruct the proton-proton collision points (primary vertices) and decay vertices of long-lived particles (secondary vertices). The upgraded VELO will be equipped with silicon hybrid pixel sensors, each read out by VeloPix ASICs. The highest occupancy ASICs will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhit/s and produce an output data rate of over 15 Gbit/s, with a total rate of 1.6 Tbit/s anticipated for the whole detector. Selected highlights of this challenging and ambitious project are described in this paper.

  14. LHCb VErtex LOcator (VELO) upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. M.; LHCb VELO Group

    2013-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a vital piece of apparatus providing tracking, triggering and vertexing to the LHCb experiment. Its superb impact parameter resolution and high efficiency enable LHCb to make precision measurements and searches for New Physics in the flavour sector. These proceedings focus on the R&D for the future LHCb VELO detector to be installed in the upgraded LHCb experiment. In order to increase hadronic yields and to be able to run at higher luminosities LHCb plans to upgrade the front end electronics, currently limited by a first level hardware trigger. For the silicon vertex detector this implies a complete rebuild of the modules and electronics, with improved cooling capability to cope with the high voltages and currents expected after significant radiation damage has been accrued. This paper presents the design considerations for the vertex detector upgrade together with the two proposed options for the sensor layout, based on strips or pixels. As part of the R&D programme a pixel based tracking telescope has been developed for use in testbeams, to gain experience with pixel tracking and to evaluate the technologies under consideration. This paper presents results from the last years running of the TimePix telescope and describes the integration of various test devices.

  15. Quasiconvex optimization and location theory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos Gromicho, Jaoquim António

    1998-01-01

    grams of which the objective is given by the ratio of a convex by a positive (over a convex domain) concave function. As observed by Sniedovich (Ref. [102, 103]) most of the properties of fractional pro­ grams could be found in other programs, given that the objective function could be written as a particular composition of functions. He called this new field C­ programming, standing for composite concave programming. In his seminal book on dynamic programming (Ref. [104]), Sniedovich shows how the study of such com­ positions can help tackling non-separable dynamic programs that otherwise would defeat solution. Barros and Frenk (Ref. [9]) developed a cutting plane algorithm capable of optimizing C-programs. More recently, this algorithm has been used by Carrizosa and Plastria to solve a global optimization problem in facility location (Ref. [16]). The distinction between global optimization problems (Ref. [54]) and generalized convex problems can sometimes be hard to establish. That is exactly the reason ...

  16. Attention to multiple locations is limited by spatial working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Alex; Sapir, Ayelet; Burnett, Katherine; d'Avossa, Giovanni

    2014-08-21

    What limits the ability to attend several locations simultaneously? There are two possibilities: Either attention cannot be divided without incurring a cost, or spatial memory is limited and observers forget which locations to monitor. We compared motion discrimination when attention was directed to one or multiple locations by briefly presented central cues. The cues were matched for the amount of spatial information they provided. Several random dot kinematograms (RDKs) followed the spatial cues; one of them contained task-relevant, coherent motion. When four RDKs were presented, discrimination accuracy was identical when one and two locations were indicated by equally informative cues. However, when six RDKs were presented, discrimination accuracy was higher following one rather than multiple location cues. We examined whether memory of the cued locations was diminished under these conditions. Recall of the cued locations was tested when participants attended the cued locations and when they did not attend the cued locations. Recall was inaccurate only when the cued locations were attended. Finally, visually marking the cued locations, following one and multiple location cues, equalized discrimination performance, suggesting that participants could attend multiple locations when they did not have to remember which ones to attend. We conclude that endogenously dividing attention between multiple locations is limited by inaccurate recall of the attended locations and that attention poses separate demands on the same central processes used to remember spatial information, even when the locations attended and those held in memory are the same. © 2014 ARVO.

  17. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  18. Workload Control with Continuous Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, B. S. Nguyen; Land, M. J.; Gaalman, G. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Workload Control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept which is suitable for the needs of make-to-order job shops. Release decisions based on the workload norms form the core of the concept. This paper develops continuous time WLC release variants and investigates their due date

  19. Privacy-Preserving Location-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS for short) providers require users' current locations to answer their location-based queries, e.g., range and nearest-neighbor queries. Revealing personal location information to potentially untrusted service providers could create privacy risks for users. To this end, our objective is to design a privacy-preserving…

  20. Arousal-Enhanced Location Memory for Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Nesmith, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments revealed arousal-enhanced location memory for pictures. After an incidental encoding task, participants were more likely to remember the locations of positive and negative arousing pictures than the locations of non-arousing pictures, indicating better binding of location to picture. This arousal-enhanced binding effect did not…

  1. Privacy for location-based services

    CERN Document Server

    Ghinita, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Sharing of location data enables numerous exciting applications, such as location-based queries, location-based social recommendations, monitoring of traffic and air pollution levels, etc. Disclosing exact user locations raises serious privacy concerns, as locations may give away sensitive information about individuals' health status, alternative lifestyles, political and religious affiliations, etc. Preserving location privacy is an essential requirement towards the successful deployment of location-based applications. These lecture notes provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in locatio

  2. Post-release survival and feeding in reared turbot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparrevohn, Claus Reedtz; Støttrup, Josianne

    2007-01-01

    . In 2003 a group called Large turbot (17.1[no-break space]cm total length (LT)) and a group called Intermediate (LT = 11.8[no-break space]cm) were released, and in 2004 two similar-sized groups called Naive and Conditioned (LT = 9.8[no-break space]cm) were released. The Conditioned differed from the Naive...... was estimated to be restricted to three days after release. The only active predators observed in the area were birds. Besides estimating mortality the diffusion model provides an estimate on the catchability of the released turbot when fished with a juvenile flatfish-trawl. Catchabilities varied between 38...... and 52% for all releases except for the 17[no-break space]cm sized turbot released, where catchability was only 12%. The feeding performance of the released fish was also analysed and compared with that of wild fish caught at the same location. These results showed that the proportion of stomachs...

  3. Teleconnection Locator: TeleLoc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, M. K.; Duffy, D.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme climate events, such as tropical storms, droughts, and floods, have an enormous impact on all aspects of society. Being able to detect the causes of such events on a global scale is paramount to being able to predict when and where these events will occur. These teleconnections, where a small change in a closed, complex system creates drastic disturbances elsewhere in the system, are generally represented by an index, one of the most famous being the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, due to the enormity, complexity, and technical challenges surrounding climate and its data, it is hypothesized that many of these teleconnections have as of yet gone undiscovered. TeleLoc (Teleconnection Locator) is a machine-learning framework combining a number of techniques for finding correlations between weather trends and extreme climate events. The current focus is on connecting global trends with tropical cyclones. A combination of two data sets, The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA2), are being utilized. PostGIS is used for raw data storage, and a Python API has been developed as the core of the framework. Cyclones are first clustered using a combination of Symbolic Aggregate ApproXimation (this allows for a symbolic, sequential representation of the various time-series variables of interest) and DBSCAN. This serves to break the events into subcategories, which alleviates computational load for the next step. Events which are clustered together (those with similar characteristics) are compared against global climate variables of interest, which are also converted to a symbolic form, leading up to the event using Association Rule Mining. Results will be shown where cyclones have been clustered, specifically in the West Pacific storm basin, as well as the global variable symbolic subsections with a high support that have been singled out for

  4. Singly applied herbicides for site preparation and release of loblolly pine in central Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller; M. Boyd Edwards

    1995-01-01

    Abstract.Separate studies were installed to evaluate site-preparation and release herbicide treatments for loblolly pine.(Pinus taeda L.).Tests were at four locations each on the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of central Georgia.

  5. Monitoring Location and Angular Orientation of a Pill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, John F.

    2012-01-01

    A mobile pill transmitter system moves through, or adjacent to, one or more organs in an animal or human body, while transmitting signals from its present location and/or present angular orientation. The system also provides signals from which the present roll angle of the pill, about a selected axis, can be determined. When the location coordinates angular orientation and the roll angle of the pill are within selected ranges, an aperture on the pill container releases a selected chemical into, or onto, the body. Optionally, the pill, as it moves, provides a sequence of visually perceptible images. The times for image formation may correspond to times at which the pill transmitter system location or image satisfies one of at least four criteria. This invention provides and supplies an algorithm for exact determination of location coordinates and angular orientation coordinates for a mobile pill transmitter (PT), or other similar device that is introduced into, and moves within, a GI tract of a human or animal body. A set of as many as eight nonlinear equations has been developed and applied, relating propagation of a wireless signal between either two, three, or more transmitting antennas located on the PT, to four or more non-coplanar receiving antennas located on a signal receiver appliance worn by the user. The equations are solved exactly, without approximations or iterations, and are applied in several environments: (1) association of a visual image, transmitted by the PT at each of a second sequence of times, with a PT location and PT angular orientation at that time; (2) determination of a position within the body at which a drug or chemical substance or other treatment is to be delivered to a selected portion of the body; (3) monitoring, after delivery, of the effect(s) of administration of the treatment; and (4) determination of one or more positions within the body where provision and examination of a finer-scale image is warranted.

  6. On the Optimal Location of Sensors for Parametric Identification of Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    1994-01-01

    An outline of the field of optimal location of sensors for parametric identification of linear structural systems is presented. There are few papers devoted to the case of optimal location of sensors in which the measurements are modeled by a random field with non-trivial covariance function...

  7. Chemical cues released by an alien invasive aquatic gastropod drive its invasion success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline L Raw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemical cues provide aquatic organisms with sensory information that guides behavioural responses and thus interactions among themselves, each other and the environment. Chemical cues are considered important for predator avoidance, foraging, larval settlement and broadcast spawning in aquatic environments. However, the significance of their role as drivers of direct interactions between heterospecifics has been largely overlooked. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A video camera and a demarcated arena were used in situ to record behavioural responses of three native gastropod species, Assiminea cf. capensis, Melanoides tuberculata and Coriandria durbanensis, exposed to treatments representing chemical cues released by a non-native invasive gastropod, Tarebia granifera. The responses were measured quantitatively as displacement and orientation of movement at locations in St Lucia Estuary, within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the east coast of South Africa. All native gastropods exhibited a negative taxis response to chemical cues released by T. granifera, while T. granifera individuals responded randomly to conspecifics. Displacement was measured relative to the source of the extract, the number of steps taken were determined with path analysis and orientation was determined from the mean (±95% CIs turning angles, with significant negative turning angles representing negative taxis. Responses to treatments corresponding to the environment and conspecifics were random and undirected, indicating kinesis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents evidence for interactions driven by chemical cues between a non-native invasive gastropod and several gastropods native to South Africa. The results indicate that chemical cues can facilitate invasion success as the behavioural response of native gastropods is to move away allowing additional food and space resources to become available to T. granifera.

  8. [Exaggerated health news: association between exaggeration in university press releases and exaggeration in news media coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schat, J; Bossema, F G; Numans, M E; Smeets, I; Burger, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine how often press releases and news articles contain exaggeration and to locate its origin in the trajectory from research paper to news article. Retrospective quantitative content analysis. We analysed press releases on health-related research published by Dutch universities and university medical centres in 2015 (n = 129) as well as news media articles related to those press releases (n = 185). 20% of press releases and 29% of news articles exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim. Explicit health advice was, when present, exaggerated in 7% of press releases and 10% of news articles. When press releases exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim, 92% of associated news articles contained the same exaggeration. When the conclusion was not exaggerated in the press release, 6% of the news articles was exaggerated. The relative chance for exaggerated news associated with exaggerated press releases was 16.08 (95% CI: 7.35-35.18). Exaggerated press releases were associated with news articles more frequently. The relative chance for news articles to be associated with exaggerated press releases vs. a non-exaggerated press release was 1.45 (95% CI: 1.02-2.04). Exaggeration in health-related news is strongly correlated with exaggeration in the original press release and occurs in more than 1 in 5 articles. Monitoring and, if necessary, improving the accuracy and correctness of academic press releases seem to be important measures to improve the quality of health related news.

  9. Location, Location, Location: Where We Teach Primary Care Makes All the Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Christine; Wilkes, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Creating a new model to train a high-quality primary care workforce is of great interest to American health care stakeholders. There is consensus that effective educational approaches need to be combined with a rewarding work environment, emphasize a good work/life balance, and a focus on achieving meaningful outcomes that center on patients and the public. Still, significant barriers limit the numbers of clinicians interested in pursuing careers in primary care, including low earning potential, heavy medical school debt, lack of respect from physician colleagues, and enormous burdens of record keeping. To enlarge and energize the pool of primary care trainees, we look especially at changes that focus on institutions and the practice environment. Students and residents need training environments where primary care clinicians and interdisciplinary teams play a crucially important role in patient care. For a variety of reasons, many academic medical centers cannot easily meet these standards. The authors propose that a major part of primary care education and training be re-located to settings in high-performing health systems built on comprehensive integrated care models where primary care clinicians play a principle role in leadership and care delivery.

  10. Extended-Release Niacin Acutely Suppresses Postprandial Triglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, M. Haris U.; Qamar, Arman; Gadi, Ramprasad; Lilly, Scott; Goel, Harsh; Hampson, Jaison; Mucksavage, Megan L.; Nathanson, Grace A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Dunbar, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial triglyceridemia predicts cardiovascular events. Niacin might lower postprandial triglycerides (TG) by restricting free fatty acid (FFA). Immediate-release niacin reduced postprandial TGs, but extended-release niacin failed to do so when dosed the night before a fat challenge. Aims 1) Determine whether extended-release niacin dosed before a fat challenge suppresses postprandial TG. 2) Determine whether postprandial TG is related to FFA restriction. Methods Double-blinded, placebo-controlled, random-order crossover experiment, where healthy volunteers took 2 g extended-release niacin or placebo 1 hour before heavy cream. We sampled blood over 12 hours, and report TG and FFA as means±SD for incremental area under the curve (iAUC) and nadir. Results Combining 43 fat challenges from 22 subjects, postprandial TG iAUC was +312±200 on placebo vs +199±200 mg/dL*h on extended-release niacin (33% drop, p= 0.02). The incremental nadir for FFA was −0.07±0.15 on placebo vs −0.27±0.13 mmol/L on extended-release niacin (pniacin (20% drop, p=0.0015). The TG iAUC was strongly related to the post-dose drop in FFA (r=+0.58, p=0.0007). Conclusions Given right before a fat meal, even a single dose of extended-release niacin suppresses postprandial triglyceridemia. This establishes that postprandial TG suppression is an acute pharmacodynamic effect of extended-release niacin, probably the result of marked FFA restriction. Further study is warranted to determine whether mealtime dosing would augment the clinical efficacy of extended-release niacin therapy. PMID:22840917

  11. Tracking Location and Features of Objects within Visual Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Patterson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four studies examined how color or shape features can be accessed to retrieve the memory of an object's location. In each trial, 6 colored dots (Experiments 1 and 2 or 6 black shapes (Experiments 3 and 4 were displayed in randomly selected locations for 1.5 s. An auditory cue for either the shape or the color to-be-remembered was presented either simultaneously, immediately, or 2 s later. Non-informative cues appeared in some trials to serve as a control condition. After a 4 s delay, 5/6 objects were re-presented, and participants indicated the location of the missing object either by moving the mouse (Experiments 1 and 3, or by typing coordinates using a grid (Experiments 2 and 4. Compared to the control condition, cues presented simultaneously or immediately after stimuli improved location accuracy in all experiments. However, cues presented after 2 s only improved accuracy in Experiment 1. These results suggest that location information may not be addressable within visual working memory using shape features. In Experiment 1, but not Experiments 2–4, cues significantly improved accuracy when they indicated the missing object could be any of the three identical objects. In Experiments 2–4, location accuracy was highly impaired when the missing object came from a group of identical rather than uniquely identifiable objects. This indicates that when items with similar features are presented, location accuracy may be reduced. In summary, both feature type and response mode can influence the accuracy and accessibility of visual working memory for object location.

  12. Where Chicagoans tweet the most: Semantic analysis of preferential return locations of Twitter users

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Aiman; Yin, Junjun; Soltani, Kiumars; Padmanabhan, Anand; Wang, Shaowen

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on human mobility show that human movements are not random and tend to be clustered. In this connection, the movements of Twitter users captured by geo-located tweets were found to follow similar patterns, where a few geographic locations dominate the tweeting activity of individual users. However, little is known about the semantics (landuse types) and temporal tweeting behavior at those frequently-visited locations. Furthermore, it is generally assumed that the top two visite...

  13. Accurate source location from P waves scattered by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (> 100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P-coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example. The grid search method is combined with the 3D strain Green's tensor database type method to improve the search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solution. The strain Green's tensor is calculated by the 3D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are then obtained based on the least-square misfit between the 'observed' and predicted P and P-coda waves. A 95% confidence interval of the solution is also provided as a posterior error estimation. We find that the scattered waves are mainly due to topography in comparison with random velocity heterogeneity characterized by the von Kάrmάn-type power spectral density function. When only P wave data is used, the 'best' solution is offset from the real source location mostly in the vertical direction. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces its uncertainty. The solution remains robust with a range of random noises in data, un-modeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors that we tested.

  14. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Modified Release and Immediate Release Tacrolimus Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Simon; Alloway, Rita R

    2017-09-01

    The science of drug delivery has evolved considerably and has led to the development of multiple sustained release formulations. Each of these formulations can present particular challenges in terms of clinical evaluation and necessitate careful study to identify their optimal use in practice. Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive agent that is widely used in organ transplant recipients. However, it is poorly soluble, has an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile subject to important genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions, and has a narrow therapeutic index. For these reasons, it represents an agent that could benefit from modified release formulations to overcome these limitations. The objective of this review is to discuss the clinical evaluation of immediate and modified release tacrolimus formulations in renal transplant recipients. Clinical trials from early development of immediate release tacrolimus to formulation-specific post-marketing trials of modified release tacrolimus formulations are reviewed with an emphasis on key elements relating to trial design end endpoint assessment. Particular elements that can be addressed with formulation alterations, such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, and toxicity and corresponding clinical evaluations are discussed. In addition, current knowledge gaps in the clinical evaluation of immediate and modified release tacrolimus formulations are discussed to highlight potential avenues for the future development of different tacrolimus formulations with outcomes relevant to the regulators, the transplant community, and to transplant recipients. This review shows that new formulations may alter tacrolimus bioavailability, alleviate certain adverse events while potentially enhancing patient convenience.

  16. Location Privacy Protection on Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

    Location information is considered as private in many scenarios. Protecting location information on mobile ad-hoc networks has attracted much research in past years. However, location information protection on social networks has not been paid much attention. In this paper, we present a novel location privacy protection approach on the basis of user messages in social networks. Our approach grants flexibility to users by offering them multiple protecting options. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to protect social network users' location information via text messages. We propose five algorithms for location privacy protection on social networks.

  17. Random fixed points and random differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos S. Papageorgiou

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we study random best approximations to random sets, using fixed point techniques, obtaining this way stochastic analogues of earlier deterministic results by Browder-Petryshyn, KyFan and Reich. Then we prove two fixed point theorems for random multifunctions with stochastic domain that satisfy certain tangential conditions. Finally we consider a random differential inclusion with upper semicontinuous orientor field and establish the existence of random solutions.

  18. Double Difference Earthquake Locations at the Salton Sea Geothermal Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, K L; Hutchings, L J; Bonner, B P; Foxall, W; Kasameyer, P W

    2007-08-08

    The purpose of this paper is to report on processing of raw waveform data from 4547 events recorded at 12 stations between 2001 and 2005 by the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) seismic network. We identified a central region of the network where vertically elongated distributions of hypocenters have previously been located from regional network analysis. We process the data from the local network by first autopicking first P and S arrivals; second, improving these with hand picks when necessary; then, using cross-correlation to provide very precise P and S relative arrival times. We used the HypoDD earthquake location algorithm to locate the events. We found that the originally elongated distributions of hypocenters became more tightly clustered and extend down the extent of the study volume at 10 Km. However, we found the shapes to depend on choices of location parameters. We speculate that these narrow elongated zones of seismicity may be due to stress release caused by fluid flow.

  19. Heparin release from thermosensitive hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutowska, Anna; Bae, You Han; Feijen, Jan; Kim, Sung Wan

    1992-01-01

    Thermosensitive hydrogels (TSH) were synthesized and investigated as heparin releasing polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis. TSH were synthesized with N-isopropyl acrylamide (NiPAAm) copolymerized with butyl methacrylate (BMA) (hydrophobic) or acrylic acid (AAc) (hydrophilic)

  20. In vitro comparison of three electronic apex locators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, George M; Goodell, Gary G; Imamura, Glen M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the Root ZX II Apex Locator (RZX), the Elements Apex Locator (ELE), and the Precision Apex Locator (PAL). Forty single-rooted extracted teeth were decoronated and the root canals coronally flared. Actual canal lengths were determined by inserting a #10 file until the tip was visualized (12.8x magnification) just within the apical foramina. Teeth were mounted in gelatin conducting medium and randomly tested with each electronic apex locator (EAL) to determine the electronic canal length. Differences between the electronic and actual canal lengths were calculated. The mean differences were -0.02 mm, 0.13 mm, and 0.15 mm for the RZX, PAL, and ELE, respectively. One-way analysis of variance showed a highly significant difference among EALs (p = 0.003). Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc analysis found significant differences between the RZX and the PAL and between the RZX and the ELE at p ELE. The proportion of electronic canal length measurements falling within +/-0.5 mm of the actual canal lengths for the EALs was as follows: 97.5% for the RZX, 95% for the PAL, and 90% for the ELE. The RZX was the most accurate at locating the apical foramen compared with the ELE and the PAL. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. PCDD/PCDF release inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, H. [UNEP Chemicals, Chatelaine (Switzerland)

    2004-09-15

    The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) entered into force on 17 May 2004 with 50 Parties. In May 2004, 59 countries had ratified or acceded the Convention. The objective of the Convention is ''to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants''. For intentionally produced POPs, e.g., pesticides and industrial chemicals such as hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, this will be achieved by stop of production and use. For unintentionally generated POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), measures have to be taken to ''reduce the total releases derived from anthropogenic sources''; the final goal is ultimate elimination, where feasible. Under the Convention, Parties have to establish and maintain release inventories to prove the continuous release reduction. Since many countries do not have the technical and financial capacity to measure all releases from all potential PCDD/PCDF sources, UNEP Chemicals has developed the ''Standardized Toolkit for the Identification of Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases'' (''Toolkit'' for short), a methodology to estimate annual releases from a number of sources. With this methodology, annual releases can be estimated by multiplying process-specific default emission factors provided in the Toolkit with national activity data. At the seventh session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, the Toolkit was recommended to be used by countries when reporting national release data to the Conference of the Parties. The Toolkit is especially used by developing countries and countries with economies in transition where no measured data are available. Results from Uruguay, Thailand, Jordan, Philippines, and Brunei Darussalam have been published.

  2. HSIP Law Enforcement Locations in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Law Enforcement Locations Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law Enforcement agencies "are publicly...

  3. CARAVAN: Providing Location Privacy for VANET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sampigethaya, Krishna; Huang, Leping; Li, Mingyan; Poovendran, Radha; Matsuura, Kanta; Sezaki, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    .... This type of tracking leads to threats on the location privacy of the vehicle's user. In this paper, we study the problem of providing location privacy in VANET by allowing vehicles to prevent tracking of their broadcast communications...

  4. Uranium Mines and Mills Location Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Uranium Mines and Mills location database identifies and shows the location of active and inactive uranium mines and mills, as well as mines which principally produced other minerals, but were known to have uranium in the ore.

  5. [Posterior release in congenital talipes equinovarus adductus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Nucamendi, M A; Camarena-Hernández, H P; Bonfil-Ojeda, J R; Martínez-Bonilla, E

    2012-01-01

    To show the utility of posterior release to correct adduct congenital talipes equinovarus (CTE) and describe the surgical technique. This clinical trial was conducted from February 2002 to November 2008. Patients ages 0-24 months old with a diagnosis of adduct CTE were enrolled. Surgical treatment consisted of a posterior approach to the foot with Z-plasty of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus, capsulotomy, adductor hallucis release, and cast immobilization for 8 weeks. The sampling was non-randomized, non-probabilistic; patients were enrolled based on the diagnosis. The statistical analysis included the central trend and scatter measures, the Student "t" test, RR, and homogeneity chi square test. Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 13 females and 12 males, with a total of 30 feet, 10 left and 6 right, and 7 bilateral patients. Median age was 15 years (range 11-24 years). Correction was achieved and maintained in 27 feet. Three cases had adduct relapse and were managed conservatively. The statistical analysis showed the effectiveness of treatment. The result of the Student "t" test and the chi square test was p 18 months was a risk factor for residual adduct with a RR = 3.7.

  6. Multi-Unit Facility Location Games

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Porat, Omer; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by applications in clustering and information retrieval, we extend the classical Hotelling setting to deal with multi-facility location duels. In the classical Hotelling setting, customers' locations are taken from the uniform distribution on the $[0,1]$ segment, and there are two facility owners, each needs to decide on the location of her (single) facility, aiming to maximize the proportion of customers closer to it. We extend the Hotelling setting to multi-unit facility location ...

  7. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  8. Spatial quality, location theory and spatial planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, Mathijs; Groenendijk, Nico

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with spatial quality as a possible factor in location choices made by companies. Actual location decisions as well as location theory have changed over time. In the industrial era primary “hard” cost factors were dominant, to be supplemented by agglomeration factors ever since the

  9. Open Location Management in Automated Warehousing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yugang); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA warehouse needs to have sufficient open locations to be able to store incoming shipments of various sizes. In combination with ongoing load retrievals open locations gradually spread over the storage area. Unfavorable positions of open locations negatively impact the average load

  10. Locating Depots for Capacitated Vehicle Routing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath

    2011-01-01

    We study a location-routing problem in the context of capacitated vehicle routing. The input to k-LocVRP is a set of demand locations in a metric space and a fleet of k vehicles each of capacity Q. The objective is to locate k depots, one for each vehicle, and compute routes for the vehicles so t...

  11. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based model...

  12. Checking in: Location Services for Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethlefsen, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    As always in real estate, everything in technology these days seems to be about location. From Google's recent addition of a "nearby" location limit to its suite of search options to the spate of location-based mobile apps and social networks, physical proximity has become the linchpin of a trend to connect technology to the real world. In this…

  13. Approximation algorithms for facility location problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bumb, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Facility location problems are among the most well-studied problems in optimization literature. The simplest variant is the uncapacitated facility location problem, which we denoted by the UFLP. In the UFLP, we are given a set of possible facility locations and a set of clients. The problem seeks to

  14. Fabrication, characterization and in vitro drug release behavior of electrospun PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Z.X.; Zheng, W.; Li, L. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zheng, Y.F., E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The fenbufen loaded PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning. The hydrophilicity of nanofibrous scaffold was enhanced with the increase of chitosan content. The drug release also is accelerated with chitosan increasing because the higher hydrophilicity makes drug diffusing from scaffold more easily. Research highlights: {yields} The average diameter increased with the increase of chitosan content and then decreased. {yields} The release rate of fenbufen increased with the increase of chitosan. {yields} The aligned nanofibrous scaffold exhibits lower drug release rate. {yields} The drug release could be controlled by crosslinking in glutaraldehyde vapor. - Abstract: In this study both aligned and randomly oriented poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/chitosan nanofibrous scaffold have been prepared by electrospinning. The ratio of PLGA to chitosan was adjusted to get smooth nanofiber surface. Morphological characterization using scanning electron microscopy showed that the aligned nanofiber diameter distribution obtained by electrospinning of polymer blend increased with the increase of chitosan content which was similar to that of randomly oriented nanofibers. The release characteristic of model drug fenbufen (FBF) from the FBF-loaded aligned and randomly oriented PLGA and PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffolds was investigated. The drug release rate increased with the increase of chitosan content because the addition of chitosan enhanced the hydrophilicity of the PLGA/chitosan composite scaffold. Moreover, for the aligned PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffold the release rate was lower than that of randomly oriented PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffold, which indicated that the nanofiber arrangement would influence the release behavior. In addition, crosslinking in glutaraldehyde vapor would decrease the burst release of FBF from FBF-loaded PLGA/chitosan nanofibrous scaffold with a PLGA/chitosan ratio less than 9/1, which

  15. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and dopamine release in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Doris; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Stevanovski, Suzanna; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Le Foll, Bernard; Kish, Stephen; Houle, Sylvain; Mizrahi, Romina; George, Susan R; George, Tony P; Boileau, Isabelle

    2017-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a key component of the neuroendocrine response to stress. In animal models, CRH has been shown to modulate dopamine release, and this interaction is believed to contribute to stress-induced relapse in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we investigated whether CRH administration induces dopamine release in humans, using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight healthy volunteers (5 female, 22-48 years old) completed two PET scans with the dopamine D2/3 receptor radioligand [11C]-(+)-PHNO: once after saline injection, and once after injection of corticorelin (synthetic human CRH). We also assessed subjective reports and measured plasma levels of endocrine hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol). Relative to saline, corticorelin administration decreased binding of the D2/3 PET probe [11C]-(+)-PHNO, suggesting dopamine release. Endocrine stress markers were also elevated, in line with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but we detected no changes in subjective ratings. Preliminary results from this proof-of-concept study suggests that CRH challenge in combination with [11C]-(+)-PHNO PET may serve as an assay of dopamine release, presenting a potential platform for evaluating CRH/dopamine interactions in neuropsychiatric disorders and CRH antagonists as potential treatment avenues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PREDICTING RECIDIVISM FOR RELEASED STATE PRISON OFFENDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Gerald J.; Mennis, Jeremy; Belenko, Steven; Welsh, Wayne N.; Hiller, Matthew L.; Zajac, Gary

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of individual and neighborhood characteristics and spatial contagion in predicting reincarceration on a sample of 5,354 released Pennsylvania state prisoners. Independent variables included demographic characteristics, offense type, drug involvement, various neighborhood variables (e.g., concentrated disadvantage, residential mobility), and spatial contagion (i.e., proximity to others who become reincarcerated). Using geographic information systems (GIS) and logistic regression modeling, our results showed that the likelihood of reincarceration was increased with male gender, drug involvement, offense type, and living in areas with high rates of recidivism. Older offenders and those convicted of violent or drug offenses were less likely to be reincarcerated. For violent offenders, drug involvement, age, and spatial contagion were particular risk factors for reincarceration. None of the neighborhood environment variables were associated with increased risk of reincarceration. Reentry programs need to particularly address substance abuse issues of ex-offenders as well as take into consideration their residential locations. PMID:24443612

  17. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematic identification of high crash locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Federal and state policy makers increasingly emphasize the need to reduce highway crash rates. This emphasis is demonstrated in Iowa's recently released draft Iowa Strategic Highway Safety Plan and by the U.S. Department of Transportation's placement...

  19. On the Privacy Implications of Location Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ağır Berker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile users increasingly make use of location-based online services enabled by localization systems. Not only do they share their locations to obtain contextual services in return (e.g., ‘nearest restaurant’, but they also share, with their friends, information about the venues (e.g., the type, such as a restaurant or a cinema they visit. This introduces an additional dimension to the threat to location privacy: location semantics, combined with location information, can be used to improve location inference by learning and exploiting patterns at the semantic level (e.g., people go to cinemas after going to restaurants. Conversely, the type of the venue a user visits can be inferred, which also threatens her semantic location privacy. In this paper, we formalize this problem and analyze the effect of venue-type information on location privacy. We introduce inference models that consider location semantics and semantic privacy-protection mechanisms and evaluate them by using datasets of semantic check-ins from Foursquare, totaling more than a thousand users in six large cities. Our experimental results show that there is a significant risk for users’ semantic location privacy and that semantic information improves inference of user locations.

  20. Exploring Environmental Inequity in South Korea: An Analysis of the Distribution of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI Facilities and Toxic Releases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Yoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, location data regarding the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI in South Korea was released to the public. This study investigated the spatial patterns of TRIs and releases of toxic substances in all 230 local governments in South Korea to determine whether spatial clusters relevant to the siting of noxious facilities occur. In addition, we employed spatial regression modeling to determine whether the number of TRI facilities and the volume of toxic releases in a given community were correlated with the community’s socioeconomic, racial, political, and land use characteristics. We found that the TRI facilities and their toxic releases were disproportionately distributed with clustered spatial patterning. Spatial regression modeling indicated that jurisdictions with smaller percentages of minorities, stronger political activity, less industrial land use, and more commercial land use had smaller numbers of toxic releases, as well as smaller numbers of TRI facilities. However, the economic status of the community did not affect the siting of hazardous facilities. These results indicate that the siting of TRI facilities in Korea is more affected by sociopolitical factors than by economic status. Racial issues are thus crucial for consideration in environmental justice as the population of Korea becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

  1. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  2. Inferring personal economic status from social network location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shaojun; Morone, Flaviano; Sarraute, Carlos; Travizano, Matías; Makse, Hernán A.

    2017-05-01

    It is commonly believed that patterns of social ties affect individuals' economic status. Here we translate this concept into an operational definition at the network level, which allows us to infer the economic well-being of individuals through a measure of their location and influence in the social network. We analyse two large-scale sources: telecommunications and financial data of a whole country's population. Our results show that an individual's location, measured as the optimal collective influence to the structural integrity of the social network, is highly correlated with personal economic status. The observed social network patterns of influence mimic the patterns of economic inequality. For pragmatic use and validation, we carry out a marketing campaign that shows a threefold increase in response rate by targeting individuals identified by our social network metrics as compared to random targeting. Our strategy can also be useful in maximizing the effects of large-scale economic stimulus policies.

  3. Protein release from collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano; Hojo; Maeda; Fujioka

    1998-05-04

    The effective delivery of protein drugs is an important research subject in the field of pharmacology, and to prolong the effect of protein drugs, many studies are being conducted to control the release of proteins from various carrier materials. Collagen is one of the most useful candidates for this purpose, and many studies have been reported; pharmaceutical formulations containing collagen in gel, film and sponge form are used to incorporate low-molecular-weight compounds such as antibiotics and carcinostatics, and the release of these compounds is controlled by the concentration of the gel as well as the shape and degree of crosslinking of the matrix. However, it is still difficult to retain protein drugs in the collagen. In this article, we report on the controlled release of protein drugs using collagen which exhibits good biocompatibility as a carrier, focusing on a new drug delivery system, the Minipellet, which we have developed.

  4. Training Materials for Release 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hansen, Cecilie; Debus, Kolja

    This document, D7.4 – training materials for release 3, provides an overview of the training material for version 3 of the NEXT-TELL tools and methods. Previous documents submitted as part of work package 7, which is about teacher training, are D7.1 – Training Concept, D7.2 – Training Materials...... for Release 1 and D7.3 – Training Materials for Release 2. D7.4 builds on D7.1 and D7.2 and D7.3. D7.4 contains further development of previous work within WP7, essentially a revised theoretical approach to the teacher training, and expansion of the notion of tool training. The media in use have been expanded......, and the digitalisation of the support material through Moodle courses has been further refined....

  5. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  7. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  8. Developing Network Location Model in Uncertainty Mode (Robust Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMINI Mousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, facility location problem - network design under uncertainty robust mode has been discussed. In this regard a model will be developed, so that the uncertainty in parameters such as demand and problem’s various costs considered. Facility location- network design, unlike classical facility location models, which are assumed that network structure is pre-defined and specified- will also decide on the structure of the network. This has been in many actual applications such as road network, communication systems and etc and finding facility location and main network designing simultaneously has deemed important and the need for simultaneous design and optimization models to meet the mentioned items is felt. Different approaches have been developed in the uncertainty optimization literature. Amongst them, robust and stochastic optimizations are well- known. To deal with uncertainty and problem modeling, in this research robust optimization approach have been used. In addition, by using generated random samples, the proposed model has been tested and computational analysis is presented for various parameters.

  9. Locating and parsing bibliographical references in HTML medical articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jie; Le, Daniel; Thoma, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Bibliographical references that appear in journal articles can provide valuable hints for subsequent information extraction. We describe our statistical machine learning algorithms for locating and parsing such references from HTML medical journal articles. Reference locating identifies the reference sections and then decomposes them into individual references. We formulate reference locating as a two-class classification problem based on text and geometric features. An evaluation conducted on 500 articles from 100 journals achieves near perfect precision and recall rates for locating references. Reference parsing is to identify components, e.g. author, article title, journal title etc., from each individual reference. We implement and compare two reference parsing algorithms. One relies on sequence statistics and trains a Conditional Random Field. The other focuses on local feature statistics and trains a Support Vector Machine to classify each individual word, and then a search algorithm systematically corrects low confidence labels if the label sequence violates a set of predefined rules. The overall performance of these two reference parsing algorithms is about the same: above 99% accuracy at the word level, and over 97% accuracy at the chunk level.

  10. Recourse-based facility-location problems in hybrid uncertain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuming; Watada, Junzo; Pedrycz, Witold

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study facility-location problems in the presence of a hybrid uncertain environment involving both randomness and fuzziness. A two-stage fuzzy-random facility-location model with recourse (FR-FLMR) is developed in which both the demands and costs are assumed to be fuzzy-random variables. The bounds of the optimal objective value of the two-stage FR-FLMR are derived. As, in general, the fuzzy-random parameters of the FR-FLMR can be regarded as continuous fuzzy-random variables with an infinite number of realizations, the computation of the recourse requires solving infinite second-stage programming problems. Owing to this requirement, the recourse function cannot be determined analytically, and, hence, the model cannot benefit from the use of techniques of classical mathematical programming. In order to solve the location problems of this nature, we first develop a technique of fuzzy-random simulation to compute the recourse function. The convergence of such simulation scenarios is discussed. In the sequel, we propose a hybrid mutation-based binary ant-colony optimization (MBACO) approach to the two-stage FR-FLMR, which comprises the fuzzy-random simulation and the simplex algorithm. A numerical experiment illustrates the application of the hybrid MBACO algorithm. The comparison shows that the hybrid MBACO finds better solutions than the one using other discrete metaheuristic algorithms, such as binary particle-swarm optimization, genetic algorithm, and tabu search.

  11. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    of photoresist which is removed using oxygen ashing in a reactive ion etcher (RIE), with CHF3 plasma induced deposition of an fluorocarbon (FC) film acting as an antistiction coating. All in a single RIE sequence. The dry release process is contamination free and batch process compatible. Furthermore......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  12. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  13. Complications of Carpal Tunnel Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, John W; Gancarczyk, Stephanie M; Strauch, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Carpal tunnel release for compression of the median nerve at the wrist is one of the most common and successful procedures in hand surgery. Complications, though rare, are potentially devastating and may include intraoperative technical errors, postoperative infection and pain, and persistent or recurrent symptoms. Patients with continued complaints after carpal tunnel release should be carefully evaluated with detailed history and physical examination in addition to electrodiagnostic testing. For those with persistent or recurrent symptoms, a course of nonoperative management including splinting, injections, occupational therapy, and desensitization should be considered prior to revision surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact location estimation in anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingru; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Impacts are major causes of in-service damage in aerospace structures. Therefore, impact location estimation techniques are necessary components of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). In this paper, we consider impact location estimation in anisotropic composite structures using acoustic emission signals arriving at a passive sensor array attached to the structure. Unlike many published location estimation algorithms, the algorithm presented in this paper does not require the waveform velocity profile for the structure. Rather, the method employs time-of-arrival information to jointly estimate the impact location and the average signal transmission velocities from the impact to each sensor on the structure. The impact location and velocities are estimated as the solution of a nonlinear optimization problem with multiple quadratic constraints. The optimization problem is solved by using first-order optimality conditions. Numerical simulations as well as experimental results demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to accurately estimate the impact location using acoustic emission signals.

  15. The origin of the ie endingless locative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Shields

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented a new hypothesis regarding the development of the so-called "endingless locative" construction of Indo-European. It is argued that locative formations in -ē, and * ī came to appear in the , o-stem nouns through the monophthongization of word-final *-oi and *-ei before word-initial consonants. These formations were analogically extended to the other stem-classes, with the suffix*-ē, frequently hypercharacterized by the locative particles *-i or *-u, becoming the primary marker of the locative function in the i- and u-stems. On the basis of such apparently "endingless" locative constructions, old consonant-stem nominative (-accusative formations in were reinterpreted as locatives as well.

  16. Allocation and Location of Transport Logistics Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mocková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The facility allocation problem sets out to determine the optimal number of facilities to be opened. Based on multiple criteria evaluation, the optimal location of the facilities is usually solved subsequently. Several considerations, e.g. technical parameters, costs and finance must be taken into account. Economic analysis is carried out on the basis of the specific instance of the problem.Let us assume that the number of potentially located facilities is known. Then the problem of the optimal location of a given number of facilities in a network is referred to as the facility location problem. The solution to the problem is a set of facilities optimally located in an area such that this area is fully covered by the required services that the facilities provide. An example of a real-life problem of this type is the location of logistics centers. 

  17. Location-aware News Recommendation System with Using Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nejati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available with release of a huge amount of news on the Internet and the trend of users to Web-based news services.it is necessary to have a recommendation system. To grab attentions to news, news services use a number of criteria that called news values and user location is an important factor for it. In this paper, LONEF is proposed as a tow stage recommendation system. In first stage news are ranked by user’s locations and in second stage news are recommended by location Preferences, recency, Trustworthiness, groups priorities and popularity. To reduce ambiguity these properties is used tow Mamdani fuzzy interference and case-based decision systems. In Mamdani fuzzy interference system, it is tried to increase the system speed by optimizing selection of rules and membership functions and because of ambiguous feedback implementation, a decision making system is used to enable better simulation of user’s activities. Performance of our proposed approach is demonstrated in the experiments on different news groups.

  18. Top Location Anonymization for Geosocial Network Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Amirreza Masoumzadeh; James Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Geosocial networks such as Foursquare have access to users' location information, friendships, and other potentially privacy sensitive information. In this paper, we show that an attacker with access to a naively-anonymized geosocial network dataset can breach users' privacy by considering location patterns of the target users. We study the problem of anonymizing such a dataset in order to avoid re-identification of a user based on her or her friends' location information. We introduce k-a...

  19. High- and Low-Dose Oral Delayed-Release Mesalamine in Children With Mild-to-Moderately Active Ulcerative Colitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Harland S; Krzeski, Piotr; Heyman, Melvin B; Ibarguen-Secchia, Eduardo; Iwanczak, Barbara; Kaczmarski, Maciej; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Kolaček, Sanja; Osuntokun, Bankole; Quiros, J Antonio; Shah, Manoj; Yacyshyn, Bruce; Dunnmon, Preston M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The aim of the study was to assess the safety and efficacy of high- and low-dose oral, delayed-release mesalamine in a randomized, double-blind, active control study of children with mild...

  20. An Empirical Analysis of Humanitarian Warehouse Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander de Leeuw

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to empirically verify characteristics of current warehouse locations of humanitarian organizations (based on public information and to relate those to the model developed by Richardson, de Leeuw and Dullaert (2016. This paper is based on desk research. Public data such as (annual reports and databases are used to determine the features of the location in empirical terms. We find that a significant proportion of our sample co-locates their products at UNHRD premises. This suggests that organizations prefer to cluster their warehouse activities, particularly when there is no fee involved for using the warehouse (as is the case in the UNHRD network. The geographic map of the current warehouses, together with the quantified location factors, provides an overview of the current warehouse locations. We found that the characteristics of the current warehouse locations are aligned with literature on location selection factors. Current location can be characterized by infrastructure characteristics (in particular closeness to airport and safety concerns and by the low occurrence of disasters. Other factors that were considered by us but were not supported by empirical evidence were labor quality and availability as well as the political environment. In our study we were only able to use a limited sample of warehouses. We also focused our research on countries where two or more organizations have their warehouses located. We did not account for warehouse sizes or the kinds of products stored in our analysis.