WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomly dispersed adatoms

  1. Random Phases and Energy Dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘全慧; 刘天贵; 班卫全

    2003-01-01

    Using 2N + 1 successive stationary states centred at nth, we construct a rectangular wavepacket in which the stationary states are superimposed with the equal weight √2N + 1. With the requirement of the wavepacket to be a quasi-classical state, the number N is determined by minimizing the uncertainty △x△p. Since the stationary state can only be determined to within an arbitrary multiplicative complex phase factor of unit magnitude, a number of N is obtained as a set of the phases are given. For a harmonic oscillator, when all of the phase factors are essentially the same, we have N ≈ [61/3n2/3] with [x] signifying the integral part of positive number x. When every phase in the phase factors is given by a random number generated in a closed interval [0, 2π] and when n ≥ 10, the probability of appearance of N is roughly 1/2N when N = 1 to 7, and does not exceed 0.01 whenN ≥ 8.

  2. Superdiffusive Dispersals Impart the Geometry of Underlying Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburdaev, V.; Fouxon, I.; Denisov, S.; Barkai, E.

    2016-12-01

    It is recognized now that a variety of real-life phenomena ranging from diffusion of cold atoms to the motion of humans exhibit dispersal faster than normal diffusion. Lévy walks is a model that excelled in describing such superdiffusive behaviors albeit in one dimension. Here we show that, in contrast to standard random walks, the microscopic geometry of planar superdiffusive Lévy walks is imprinted in the asymptotic distribution of the walkers. The geometry of the underlying walk can be inferred from trajectories of the walkers by calculating the analogue of the Pearson coefficient.

  3. Turbulent pair dispersion as a continuous-time random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Thalabard, Simon; Bec, Jeremie

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenology of turbulent relative dispersion is revisited. A heuristic scenario is proposed, in which pairs of tracers undergo a succession of independent ballistic separations during time intervals whose lengths fluctuate. This approach suggests that the logarithm of the distance between tracers self-averages and performs a continuous-time random walk. This leads to specific predictions for the probability distribution of separations, that differ from those obtained using scale-dependent eddy-diffusivity models (e.g. in the framework of Richardson's approach). Such predictions are tested against high-resolution simulations and shed new lights on the explosive separation between tracers.

  4. Migration characterization of Ga and In adatoms on dielectric surface in selective MOVPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟杰; 张佰君; 韩小标; 林佳利; 胡国亨; 柳铭岗; 杨亿斌; 陈杰; 吴志盛; 刘扬

    2015-01-01

    Migration characterizations of Ga and In adatoms on the dielectric surface in selective metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated. In the typical MOVPE environment, the selectivity of growth is preserved for GaN, and the growth rate of GaN micro-pyramids is sensitive to the period of the patterned SiO2 mask. A surface migration induced model was adopted to figure out the effective migration length of Ga adatoms on the dielectric surface. Different from the growth of GaN, the selective area growth of InGaN on the patterned template would induce the deposition of InGaN polycrystalline particles on the patterned SiO2 mask with a long period. It was demonstrated with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy that the In adatoms exhibit a shorter migration length on the dielectric surface.

  5. Random walk approach for dispersive transport in pipe networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sämann, Robert; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: particle transport, random walk, pipe, network, HYSTEM-EXTAN, OpenGeoSys After heavy pluvial events in urban areas the available drainage system may be undersized at peak flows (Fuchs, 2013). Consequently, rainwater in the pipe network is likely to spill out through manholes. The presence of hazardous contaminants in the pipe drainage system represents a potential risk to humans especially when the contaminated drainage water reaches the land surface. Real-time forecasting of contaminants in the drainage system needs a quick calculation. Numerical models to predict the fate of contaminants are usually based on finite volume methods. Those are not applicable here because of their volume averaging elements. Thus, a more efficient method is preferable, which is independent from spatial discretization. In the present study, a particle-based method is chosen to calculate transport paths and spatial distribution of contaminants within a pipe network. A random walk method for particles in turbulent flow in partially filled pipes has been developed. Different approaches for in-pipe-mixing and node-mixing with respect to the geometry in a drainage network are shown. A comparison of dispersive behavior and calculation time is given to find the fastest model. The HYSTEM-EXTRAN (itwh, 2002) model is used to provide hydrodynamic conditions in the pipe network according to surface runoff scenarios in order to real-time predict contaminant transport in an urban pipe network system. The newly developed particle-based model will later be coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). References: Fuchs, L. (2013). Gefährdungsanalyse zur Überflutungsvorsorge kommunaler Entwässerungssysteme. Sanierung und Anpassung von Entwässerungssystemen-Alternde Infrastruktur und Klimawandel, Österreichischer Wasser-und Abfallwirtschaftsverband, Wien, ISBN, 978-3. itwh (2002). Modellbeschreibung, Institut für technisch-wissenschaftliche Hydrologie Gmb

  6. Dark soliton interaction in optical time division multiplexed system with randomly varying birefringence and random dispersion map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li(李宏); Tiejun Wang(王铁军); Dexiu Huang(黄德修)

    2004-01-01

    Correlated perturbations caused by both randomly varying birefringence and random dispersion map are considered in optical time division multiplexed dispersion-managed dark soliton system, and their effects on soliton interaction are investigated numerically. These perturbations enhance soliton interaction, and their effects relate to the strength of perturbation, separation, and pulse width. The correlation plays an important role and reinforces these effects. Moreover, there is a stochastic limit between two perturbations in the system, where the effect is the largest and the corresponding interaction distance is the shortest.

  7. Diffusion of N adatoms on the Fe(100) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M. Ø.; Österlund, L.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen;

    2000-01-01

    The diffusion of individual N adatoms on Fe(100) has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The measured diffusion barrier for isolated N adatoms is E-d = (0.92 +/- 0.04) eV, with a prefactor of nu(0) = 4.3 x 10(12) s(-1), whic...

  8. TESTING FOR VARYING DISPERSION OF LONGITUDINAL BINOMIAL DATA IN NONLINEAR LOGISTIC MODELS WITH RANDOM EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林金官; 韦博成

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, it is discussed that two tests for varying dispersion of binomial data in the framework of nonlinear logistic models with random effects, which are widely used in analyzing longitudinal binomial data. One is the individual test and power calculation for varying dispersion through testing the randomness of cluster effects, which is extensions of Dean(1992) and Commenges et al (1994). The second test is the composite test for varying dispersion through simultaneously testing the randomness of cluster effects and the equality of random-effect means. The score test statistics are constructed and expressed in simple, easy to use, matrix formulas. The authors illustrate their test methods using the insecticide data (Giltinan, Capizzi & Malani (1988)).

  9. Hyperbolic Mild Slope Equations with Inclusion of Amplitude Dispersion Effect: Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    New hyperbolic mild slope equations for random waves are developed with the inclusion of amplitude dispersion. The frequency perturbation around the peak frequency of random waves is adopted to extend the equations for regular waves to random waves. The nonlinear effect of amplitude dispersion is incorporated approximately into the model by only considering the nonlinear effect on the carrier waves of random waves, which is done by introducing a representative wave amplitude for the carrier waves. The computation time is greatly saved by the introduction of the representative wave amplitude. The extension of the present model to breaking waves is also considered in order to apply the new equations to surf zone. The model is validated for random waves propagate over a shoal and in surf zone against measurements.

  10. Dispersion-managed soliton interactions in fibers with randomly varying birefringence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Ju; (蔡炬); YANG; Xianglin; (杨祥林)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a soliton transmission model in high-speed dispersion-managed systems is advanced, and the equation of intrachannel soliton interactions in randomly varying birefringent fibers is acquired. The soliton interactions with the impact of PMD in uniform dispersion systems and DMS systems are also investigated numerically. We reveal the change in the collision length with PMD and map strength, and verify the robustness of DMS to PMD in soliton interactions.

  11. Effect of non-random dispersal strategies on spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2010-01-01

    1. Random dispersal leads to spatial coexistence via two mechanisms (emigration-mediated and source-sink), both of which involve the movement of organisms from areas of higher to lower fitness. What is not known is whether such coexistence would occur if organisms dispersed non-randomly, using cues such as density and habitat quality to gauge fitness differences between habitats. Here, I conduct a comparative analysis of random and non-random dispersal strategies in a foodweb with a basal resource, top predator, and two intermediate consumers that exhibit a trade-off between competitive ability and predator susceptibility. 2. I find a striking contrast between density- and habitat-dependent dispersal in their effects on spatial coexistence. Dispersal in response to competitor and predator density facilitates coexistence while dispersal in response to habitat quality (resource productivity and predator pressure) inhibits it. Moreover, density-dependent dispersal changes species' distribution patterns from interspecific segregation to interspecific aggregation, while habitat-dependent dispersal preserves the interspecific segregation observed in the absence of dispersal. Under density-dependent dispersal, widespread spatial coexistence results in an overall decline in the abundance of the inferior competitor that is less susceptible to predation and an overall increase in the abundance of the superior competitor that is more susceptible to predation. Under habitat-dependent dispersal, restricted spatial coexistence results in species' abundances being essentially unchanged from those observed in the absence of dispersal. 3. A key outcome is that when the superior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the inferior competitor does not, spatial coexistence is possible in both resource-poor and resource-rich habitats. However, when the inferior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the superior competitor does not, spatial

  12. Derivation of the Convective Dispersion Equation with Adsorption by Markov Random Ways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jing-Chun; QIN Sheng-Gao; WANG Yang

    2009-01-01

    The convective dispersion equation with adsorption is derived on the basis of the Chapman-Kolmogroff equation which expresses the statistical properties of the Markov transition probability. The acquired equation has the same expression as the one derived on the basis of the combination of both the mass balance equation and the particles retention kinetics equation. The probability variables that describe the random movement of solute particles have a definite physical significance associated with the parameters in the convective dispersion equation. The derivation confirms the validity of the Markov process to describe the particles movement in the process of convective dispersion.

  13. Switchable random laser from dye-doped polymer dispersed liquid crystal waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai; Wang, Feng; Liu, Liying; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Lei

    2007-01-01

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) film has been fabricated for random lasing action. In this PDLC film, the sizes of most liquid crystal (LC) droplets ranged from 200 to 500 nm. When the sample is optically pumped, ultrahigh Q (>10 000) lasing modes and a collimated laser beam can

  14. Information retrieval and cross-correlation function analysis of random noise radar signal through dispersive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejos, Ana Vazques; Dawood, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution we examine the propagation of an ultrawideband (UWB) random noise signal through dispersive media such as soil, vegetation, and water, using Fourier-based analysis. For such media, the propagated signal undergoes medium-specific impairments which degrade the received signal in a different way than the non-dispersive propagation media. Theoretically, larger penetration depths into a dispersive medium can be achieved by identifying and detecting the precursors, thereby offering significantly better signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced imaging. For a random noise signal, well defined precursors in term of peak-amplitude don't occur. The phenomenon must therefore be studied in terms of energy evolution. Additionally, the distortion undergone by the UWB random noise signal through a dispersive medium can introduce frequency-dependent uncertainty or noise in the received signal. This leads to larger degradation of the cross-correlation function (CCF), mainly in terms of sidelobe levels and main peak deformation, and consequently making the information retrieval difficult. We would further analyze one method to restore the shape and carrier frequency of the input UWB random noise signal, thereby, improving the CCF estimation.

  15. Random lasing and reversible photodegradation in disperse orange 11 dye-doped PMMA with dispersed ZrO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of intensity feedback random lasing at 645 nm in disperse orange 11 dye-doped PMMA (DO11/PMMA) with dispersed ZrO2 nanoparticles (NPs). The lasing threshold is found to increase with concentration, with the lasing threshold for 0.1 wt% being 75.8 ± 9.4 MW cm-2 and the lasing threshold for 0.5 wt% being 121.1 ± 2.1 MW cm-2, with the linewidth for both concentrations found to be ≈10 nm. We also consider the material’s photostability and find that it displays fully reversible photodegradation with the photostability and recovery rate being greater than previously observed for DO11/PMMA without NPs. This enhancement in photostability and recovery rate is found to be explicable by the modified correlated chromophore domain model, with the NPs resulting in the domain free energy advantage increasing from 0.29 eV to 0.41 eV. Additionally, the molecular decay and recovery rates are found to be in agreement with previous measurements of DO11/PMMA (Ramini et al 2013 Polym. Chem. 4 4938). These results present new avenues for the development of robust photodegradation-resistant organic dye-based optical devices.

  16. Random Lasing and Reversible Photodegradation in Disperse Orange 11 Dye-Doped PMMA with Dispersed ZrO$_2$ Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Benjamin R; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of intensity feedback random lasing at 645 nm in Disperse Orange 11 dye-doped PMMA (DO11/PMMA) with dispersed ZrO$_2$ nanoparticles (NPs). The lasing threshold is found to increase with concentration, with the lasing threshold for 0.1 wt\\% being $75.8 \\pm 9.4$ MW/cm$^2$ and the lasing threshold for 0.5 wt\\% being $121.1 \\pm 2.1$ MW/cm$^2$, with the linewidth for both concentrations found to be $\\approx 10$ nm. We also consider the material's photostability and find that it displays fully reversible photodegradation with the photostability and recovery rate being greater than previously observed for DO11/PMMA without NPs. This enhancement in photostability and recovery rate is found to be explicable by the modified correlated chromophore domain model, with the NPs resulting in the domain free energy advantage increasing from 0.29 eV to 0.41 eV. Additionally, the molecular decay and recovery rates are found to be in agreement with previous measurements of DO11/PMMA [Polymer Chemistry \\...

  17. Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  18. Random lasing in dye-doped polymer dispersed liquid crystal film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rina; Shi, Rui-xin; Wu, Xiaojiao; Wu, Jie; Dai, Qin

    2016-09-01

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film was designed and fabricated, and random lasing action was studied. A mixture of laser dye, nematic liquid crystal, chiral dopant, and PVA was used to prepare the dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film by means of microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that most liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix ranged from 30 μm to 40 μm, the size of the liquid crystal droplets was small. Under frequency doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical excitation, a plurality of discrete and sharp random laser radiation peaks could be measured in the range of 575-590 nm. The line-width of the lasing peak was 0.2 nm and the threshold of the random lasing was 9 mJ. Under heating, the emission peaks of random lasing disappeared. By detecting the emission light spot energy distribution, the mechanism of radiation was found to be random lasing. The random lasing radiation mechanism was then analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that the size of the liquid crystal droplets is the decisive factor that influences the lasing mechanism. The surface anchor role can be ignored when the size of the liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix is small, which is beneficial to form multiple scattering. The transmission path of photons is similar to that in a ring cavity, providing feedback to obtain random lasing output. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378042), the Colleges and Universities in Liaoning Province Outstanding Young Scholars Growth Plans, China (Grant No. LJQ2015093), and Shenyang Ligong University Laser and Optical Information of Liaoning Province Key Laboratory Open Funds, China.

  19. Surface diffusion of a carbon adatom on charged SWCNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion of a carbon adatom on SWCNT could be a mechanism for a CNT growth in a volume plasma, supplementing its growth from a transition metal catalyst nanoparticle. However, being embedded in plasma, the nanotube can charge by the plasma particles irradiation, in particular by electrons. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo methods we find (1) equilibrium sites, (2) adsorption energies, (3) potential barriers, (4) vibrational frequencies and (5) most probable pathways for diffusion of the adatom on external surfaces of SWCNTs of (5,5), (10,0) and (10,5) chirality, as function of its charge. The metal (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast diffusion of the carbon adatom, which is accelerated by the presence of the SWCNT negative charge. Reduced model of SWCNT growth is proposed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  20. Exploring molecular and spin interactions of Tellurium adatom in reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegaonkar, Ashwini [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India); Alegaonkar, Prashant [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advance Technology, Girinagar, Pune, 411 025, MS (India); Pardeshi, Satish, E-mail: skpar@chem.unipune.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India)

    2017-07-01

    The transport of spin information fundamentally requires favourable molecular architecture and tunable spin moments to make the medium pertinent for spintronic. We report on achieving coherent molecular-spin parameters for rGO due to Tellurium (Te) adatom. Initially, GO prepared using graphite, was modified into rGO by in situ incorporation of 1 (w/w)% of Te. Both the systems were subjected to ESCA, FTIR, Raman dispersion, ESR spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Analysis revealed that, Te substantially reacted with epoxides, carbonyl, and carboxylate groups that improved C-to-O ratio by twice. However, the spin splitting character, between Te and C, seems to be quenched. Moreover, Te altered the dynamical force constant between C-C and C=C that generated the mechanical stress within rGO network. The layer conjugation, nature of folding, symmetry, and electronic states of the edges were also affected by precipitation and entrapment of Te. The calculated dynamic molecular Raman and ESR spin parameters indicated that, Te acted as a bridging element for long range spin transport. This is particularly due to, the p-orbital moments of Te contributing, vectorially, to spin relaxation process operative at broken inversion symmetry sites. Our study suggests that, facile addition of Te in rGO is useful to achieve favourable spintronic properties. - Highlights: • Spin interactions and molecular dynamics modification due to Tellurium adatom in rGO. • Molecular level manipulation of Tellurium adatom for favourable spintronic properties. • Bychocov-Rashaba coupling are the operative channels in rGO. • Extrinsic coupling component get added vectorially by Tellurium. • Te-rGO is a viable medium for molecular spintronics.

  1. From random sphere packings to regular pillar arrays: analysis of transverse dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Khirevich, Siarhei; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2012-09-28

    We study the impact of microscopic order on transverse dispersion in the interstitial void space of bulk (unconfined) chromatographic beds by numerical simulations of incompressible fluid flow and mass transport of a passive tracer. Our study includes polydisperse random sphere packings (computer-generated with particle size distributions of modern core-shell and sub-2 μm particles), the macropore space morphology of a physically reconstructed silica monolith, and computer-generated regular pillar arrays. These bed morphologies are analyzed by their velocity probability density distributions, transient dispersion behavior, and the dependence of asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients on the mobile phase velocity. In our work, the spherical particles, the monolith skeleton, and the cylindrical pillars are all treated as impermeable solid phase (nonporous) and the tracer is unretained, to focus on the impact of microscopic order on flow and (particularly transverse) hydrodynamic dispersion in the interstitial void space. The microscopic order of the pillar arrays causes their velocity probability density distributions to start and end abruptly, their transient dispersion coefficients to oscillate, and the asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients to plateau out of initial power law behavior. The microscopically disordered beds, by contrast, follow power law behavior over the whole investigated velocity range, for which we present refined equations (i.e., Eq.(13) and the data in Table 2 for the polydisperse sphere packings; Eq.(17) for the silica monolith). The bulk bed morphologies and their intrinsic differences addressed in this work determine how efficient a bed can relax the transverse concentration gradients caused by wall effects, which exist in all confined separation media used in chromatographic practice. Whereas the effect of diffusion on transverse dispersion decreases and ultimately disappears at increasing velocity with the microscopically

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoscale surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Imran; Fayyaz Hussain; Muhammad Rashid; Muhammad Ismail; Hafeez Ullah; Yongqing Cai; M Arshad Javid; Ejaz Ahmad; S A Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation employing the embedded atom method potential is utilized to investigate nanoscale surface diffusion mechanisms of binary heterogeneous adatoms clusters at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. Surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters can be vital for the binary island growth on the surface and can be useful for the formation of alloy-based thin film surface through atomic exchange process. The results of the diffusion process show that at 300 K, the diffusion of small adatoms clusters shows hopping, sliding, and shear motion;whereas for large adatoms clusters (hexamer and above), the diffusion is negligible. At 500 K, small adatoms clusters, i.e., dimer, show almost all possible diffusion mechanisms including the atomic exchange process;however no such exchange is observed for adatoms clusters greater than dimer. At 700 K, the exchange mechanism dominates for all types of clusters, where Zr adatoms show maximum tendency and Ag adatoms show minimum or no tendency toward the exchange process. Separation and recombination of one or more adatoms are also observed at 500 K and 700 K. The Ag adatoms also occupy pop-up positions over the adatoms clusters for short intervals. At 700 K, the vacancies are also generated in the vicinity of the adatoms cluster, vacancy formation, filling, and shifting can be observed from the results.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoscale surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Imran; Fayyaz, Hussain; Muhammad, Rashid; Muhammad, Ismail; Hafeez, Ullah; Yongqing, Cai; M Arshad, Javid; Ejaz, Ahmad; S, A. Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation employing the embedded atom method potential is utilized to investigate nanoscale surface diffusion mechanisms of binary heterogeneous adatoms clusters at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. Surface diffusion of heterogeneous adatoms clusters can be vital for the binary island growth on the surface and can be useful for the formation of alloy-based thin film surface through atomic exchange process. The results of the diffusion process show that at 300 K, the diffusion of small adatoms clusters shows hopping, sliding, and shear motion; whereas for large adatoms clusters (hexamer and above), the diffusion is negligible. At 500 K, small adatoms clusters, i.e., dimer, show almost all possible diffusion mechanisms including the atomic exchange process; however no such exchange is observed for adatoms clusters greater than dimer. At 700 K, the exchange mechanism dominates for all types of clusters, where Zr adatoms show maximum tendency and Ag adatoms show minimum or no tendency toward the exchange process. Separation and recombination of one or more adatoms are also observed at 500 K and 700 K. The Ag adatoms also occupy pop-up positions over the adatoms clusters for short intervals. At 700 K, the vacancies are also generated in the vicinity of the adatoms cluster, vacancy formation, filling, and shifting can be observed from the results.

  4. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  5. Spin-spin correlations of magnetic adatoms on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güçlü, A. D.; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the interaction between two magnetic adatom impurities in graphene using the Anderson model. The two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian is solved numerically by using the quantum Monte Carlo technique. We find that the interimpurity spin susceptibility is strongly enhanced at low temperatures, significantly diverging from the well-known Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida result which decays as R-3.

  6. Dispersive and Covalent Interactions between Graphene and Metal Surfaces from the Random Phase Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the potential energy surfaces for graphene adsorbed on Cu(111), Ni(111), and Co(0001) using density functional theory and the random phase approximation (RPA). For these adsorption systems covalent and dispersive interactions are equally important and while commonly used approximations...... for exchange-correlation functionals give inadequate descriptions of either van der Waals or chemical bonds, RPA accounts accurately for both. It is found that the adsorption is a delicate competition between a weak chemisorption minimum close to the surface and a physisorption minimum further from the surface....

  7. Anisotropic surface-state-mediated RKKY interaction between adatoms on a hexagonal lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive an expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. Our analysis is based on a stationary phase approximation. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that, in general, the corresponding Fermi wave vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface-state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the projection of this kF (corresponding to vF) onto the direction of R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work. However, for metals with surface-state dispersions similar to Be(101¯0), we show that the RKKY interaction should have considerable anisotropy.

  8. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bruegger, Georges; Scheffold, Frank; Saenz, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with "optical tweezers" as well as to induce significant "optical binding" forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light induced interactions open a path towards...

  9. Effect of metal adatoms on hydrogen adsorption properties of phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Lei, Shuangying; Wan, Neng; Luan, Shan; Shen, Haiyun; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Based on first-principles density functional theory, we have investigated hydrogen storage on metal adatoms decorated phosphorene. Almost all metals including alkali, alkaline, 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals (TM) as well as post-TMs are considered to decorate phosphorene, and most metals exhibit an enhancement of H2 adsorption energy (E a), except for Zn, Cd, Hg, and all post-TMs. Nine metals show ideal Ea within the energy window 0.2-0.6 eV/H2 for practical application purposes. Among them, Li, Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, and La exhibit superior adsorption abilities of 3-5 H2 per adatom. Based on local density of states and Barder analyses, underlying mechanisms of interaction between phosphorene, metal, and H2 are also discussed.

  10. Zero-Point Spin-Fluctuations of Single Adatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez-Azpiroz, Julen; Dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2016-07-13

    Stabilizing the magnetic signal of single adatoms is a crucial step toward their successful usage in widespread technological applications such as high-density magnetic data storage devices. The quantum mechanical nature of these tiny objects, however, introduces intrinsic zero-point spin-fluctuations that tend to destabilize the local magnetic moment of interest by dwindling the magnetic anisotropy potential barrier even at absolute zero temperature. Here, we elucidate the origins and quantify the effect of the fundamental ingredients determining the magnitude of the fluctuations, namely, the (i) local magnetic moment, (ii) spin-orbit coupling, and (iii) electron-hole Stoner excitations. Based on a systematic first-principles study of 3d and 4d adatoms, we demonstrate that the transverse contribution of the fluctuations is comparable in size to the magnetic moment itself, leading to a remarkable ≳50% reduction of the magnetic anisotropy energy. Our analysis gives rise to a comprehensible diagram relating the fluctuation magnitude to characteristic features of adatoms, providing practical guidelines for designing magnetically stable nanomagnets with minimal quantum fluctuations.

  11. Floquet bound states around defects and adatoms in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovey, D. A.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have focused on laser-induced gaps in graphene which have been shown to have a topological origin, thereby hosting robust states at the sample edges. While the focus has remained mainly on these topological chiral edge states, the Floquet bound states around defects lack a detailed study. In this paper we present such a study covering large defects of different shape and also vacancy-like defects and adatoms at the dynamical gap at ℏ Ω /2 (ℏ Ω being the photon energy). Our results, based on analytical calculations as well as numerics for full tight-binding models, show that the bound states are chiral and appear in a number which grows with the defect size. Furthermore, while the bound states exist regardless of the type of the defect's edge termination (zigzag, armchair, mixed), the spectrum is strongly dependent on it. In the case of top adatoms, the bound state quasienergies depend on the adatoms energy. The appearance of such bound states might open the door to the presence of topological effects on the bulk transport properties of dirty graphene.

  12. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  13. Ab-initio calculations of interactions between Cu adatoms on Cu(1 1 0): Sensitivity of strong multi-site interactions to adatom relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-08-01

    We have parameterized the various interactions between Cu adatoms on Cu(1 1 0) using density-functional theory based ab-initio calculations. Our results indicate that in addition to pair interactions, 3-adatom and 4-adatom interactions of significant strengths are present in this system. This further stresses the importance of multi-site interactions in constructing a complete lattice-gas picture. Even though adding these multi-site interactions leads to good convergence in interaction energies, we find that some multi-site interactions are very sensitive to adatom relaxations. This makes the application of a simple lattice-gas picture inadequate for such surfaces. We also parameterize adatom interactions on this surface using the recently developed connector model. The connector model parameterization is as efficient as the parameterization using lattice-gas model. Further, we present diffusion barriers for nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) hops on this surface.

  14. Silicon adatom switching and manipulation on Si(111)- 7 x 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Fujita, Daisuke [Advanced Nanocharacterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Luce, Alexander, E-mail: SAGISAKA.Keisuke@nims.go.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-01-29

    We report on a multiple-state switching behavior in the tip height or tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy on the Si(111)- 7 x 7 surface. This switching is caused by displacement of silicon adatoms under the influence of energetic tunneling electrons. When the tip is fixed over a center adatom, five well-defined levels appear in the measured tip height and tunneling current. These levels are attributed to different electronic structures, depending on the configuration of the center adatoms in the unit cell. We also demonstrate manipulations of the center adatoms by controlling the sample bias.

  15. Dispersal and habitat connectivity in complex heterogeneous landscapes: an analysis with a GIS based random walk model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, P.; Verboom, J.; Knaapen, J.P.; Apeldoorn, van R.

    1996-01-01

    A grid-based random walk model has been developed to simulate animal dispersal, taking landscape heterogeneity and linear barriers such as roads and rivers into account. The model can be used to estimate connectivity and has been parameterized for thebadger in the central part of the Netherlands. Th

  16. Dispersal and habitat connectivity in complex heterogeneous landscapes: an analysis with a GIS based random walk model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, P.; Verboom, J.; Knaapen, J.P.; Apeldoorn, van R.

    1996-01-01

    A grid-based random walk model has been developed to simulate animal dispersal, taking landscape heterogeneity and linear barriers such as roads and rivers into account. The model can be used to estimate connectivity and has been parameterized for thebadger in the central part of the Netherlands.

  17. Rate Theory for Correlated Processes: Double Jumps in Adatom Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Sethna, J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the rate of activated motion over multiple barriers, in particular the correlated double jump of an adatom diffusing on a missing-row reconstructed platinum (110) surface. We develop a transition path theory, showing that the activation energy is given by the minimum-energy trajectory...... which succeeds in the double jump. We explicitly calculate this trajectory within an effective-medium molecular dynamics simulation. A cusp in the acceptance region leads to a root T prefactor for the activated rate of double jumps. Theory and numerical results agree....

  18. Approximation of the Lévy Feller advection dispersion process by random walk and finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Liu, F.; Turner, I.; Anh, V.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we present a random walk model for approximating a Lévy-Feller advection-dispersion process, governed by the Lévy-Feller advection-dispersion differential equation (LFADE). We show that the random walk model converges to LFADE by use of a properly scaled transition to vanishing space and time steps. We propose an explicit finite difference approximation (EFDA) for LFADE, resulting from the Grünwald-Letnikov discretization of fractional derivatives. As a result of the interpretation of the random walk model, the stability and convergence of EFDA for LFADE in a bounded domain are discussed. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to show the application of the present technique.

  19. Chiral magnetism of magnetic adatoms generated by Rashba electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Juba; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Ziane, Abdelhamid; Benakki, Mouloud; Blügel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2017-02-01

    We investigate long-range chiral magnetic interactions among adatoms mediated by surface states spin-splitted by spin–orbit coupling. Using the Rashba model, the tensor of exchange interactions is extracted wherein a thepseudo-dipolar interaction is found, in addition to the usual isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction. We find that, despite the latter interaction, collinear magnetic states can still be stabilized by the pseudo-dipolar interaction. The interadatom distance controls the strength of these terms, which we exploit to design chiral magnetism in Fe nanostructures deposited on a Au(111) surface. We demonstrate that these magnetic interactions are related to superpositions of the out-of-plane and in-plane components of the skyrmionic magnetic waves induced by the adatoms in the surrounding electron gas. We show that, even if the interatomic distance is large, the size and shape of the nanostructures dramatically impacts on the strength of the magnetic interactions, thereby affecting the magnetic ground state. We also derive an appealing connection between the isotropic exchange interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, which relates the latter to the first-order change of the former with respect to spin–orbit coupling. This implies that the chirality defined by the direction of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya vector is driven by the variation of the isotropic exchange interaction due to the spin–orbit interaction.

  20. Experiments on individual alumina-supported adatoms and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilius, N.; Cörper, A.; Bozdech, G.; Ernst, N.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-08-01

    To contribute to an understanding of growth conditions and electronic properties of metal clusters on technologically relevant oxides we have examined the mobility of individual, alumina-supported Pt-adatoms and the optical properties of single supported Ag-clusters. Using field-ion microscopy (FIM) we have prepared and imaged an individual Pt-adatom at approximately 40 K, both on the apex plane of a [1 1 0]-oriented NiAl tip and on a thin alumina film, grown on the same NiAl specimen by oxidation. On the alumina film, the onset temperature for Pt surface diffusion approaches 100 K being distinctively lower than the value 165 K measured on NiAl(1 1 0). Employing the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as a local electron source, photon emission from individual, alumina-supported Ag-clusters was spectroscopically analyzed. The occurrence of a distinct emission line is explained by the decay of a collective electron oscillation (Mie-plasmon resonance). For decreasing Ag-cluster diameter, the emission lines (i) shift to higher energies and (ii) their widths increase. To explain these observations, we discuss (i) the reduced screening of the plasmon oscillation due to the Ag 4d electrons and (ii) an enhanced electron surface scattering rate in small clusters.

  1. Tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Bjerngaard, M.; Paaske, J.

    In this communication, we address the question of how the presence of a magnetic impurity on a topological insulator (TI) surface manifests in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) when such a system is probed by a STM. For this purpose, we consider a single magnetic adatom with arbitrary spin, whose dynamics is governed by the local magnetic anisotropy. The spin is exchange-coupled to two-dimensional helical surface electrons, corresponding to the surface of a three-dimensional TI like Bi2Se3, with its characteristic hexagonally warped Dirac cone band structure. Employing an effective exchange-tunneling model, we calculate the non-linear differential conductance from a spin-polarized STM tip to the helical substrate, valid in the perturbative regime of weak exchange-tunneling and including the nonequilibrium pumping of the adatom spin states. The interplay between the magnetic anisotropy and the spin-momentum locked surface electrons is shown to give a number of specific imprints in the IETS, which could be investigated by spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. M. Misiorny, M. Bjerngaard and J. Paaske, manuscript in preparation Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  2. Theoretical study of optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Muhammad Aziz; Siregar, Syahril; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms. First, by introducing an alternating potential in a pure graphene, we demonstrate a gap formation in the density of states and the corresponding optical conductivity. We highlight the distinction between such a gap formation and the so-called Pauli blocking effect. Next, we apply this idea to graphene with adatoms by introducing magnetic interactions between the carrier spins and the spins of the adatoms. Exploring various possible ground-state spin configurations of the adatoms, we find that the antiferromagnetic configuration yields the lowest total electronic energy and is the only configuration that forms a gap. Furthermore, we analyze four different circumstances leading to similar gaplike structures and propose a means to interpret the magneticity and the possible orderings of the adatoms on graphene solely from the optical conductivity data. We apply this analysis to the recently reported experimental data of oxygenated graphene.

  3. The realization of half-metal and spin-semiconductor for metal adatoms on arsenene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Zhao, Yinchang; Zeng, Shuming; Ni, Jun

    2016-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of 15 different metal adatoms on silicenelike arsenene. The adsorption energies, geometries, density of states, dipole moments, work functions, net magnetic moments and Bader charges transferred from adatoms to arsenene sheet are calculated. All of the 15 metal adatoms on arsenene have binding energies larger than cohesive energies of the bulk metal, implying that stable adsorbates can be formed. As a result of the localized states originating from adatoms, the adsorption systems show a rich variety of electronic properties, such as metal, half-metal, semiconducting, and spin-semiconducting behaviors. The Co doped arsenene displays a half-metal property. The adsorption of Cu, Ag, and Au turns semiconducting arsenene into a narrow gap spin-semiconductor. These results indicate potential applications of functionalizations of silicenelike arsenene with metal adatoms, in particular for spintronics and dilute magnetic semiconductor materials.

  4. Electronic transport experiments on osmium-adatom-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Jamie; Henriksen, Erik

    Monolayer graphene is theoretically predicted to inherit a spin-orbit coupling from a dilute coating of certain transition metal adatoms. To explore these predictions we have constructed a cryogenic probe capable of in situ thermal annealing of graphene followed immediately by electronic transport measurements and controlled deposition of sub-monolayer coatings of most any metal. Previously a light coating of indium on graphene was investigated, and found to transfer electrons to graphene and reduce the mobility although no evidence of an induced spin-orbit coupling was seen. We are now depositing osmium and tungsten on graphene devices. Our initial results show an unexpected hole-doping and a sizable increase in resistance of the sample. We will report our progress on characterizing these samples by electronic transport measurements.

  5. Magnetic properties of iron adatoms and small iron clusters on Ag(1 0 0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, B.; Szunyogh, L.; Weinberger, P.

    2002-02-01

    A Green's function embedding technique based on the fully relativistic spin-polarized Screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method is used to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties of magnetic nanostructures. Strongly enhanced spin and orbital moments are obtained for an Fe adatom and for small clusters of Fe on a Ag(1 0 0) surface. As a consequence, for an Fe adatom a magnetic anisotropy energy is found that is about 10 times larger than for an Fe monolayer. Furthermore, the exchange coupling energy between two Fe adatoms is calculated in terms of the force theorem, showing a very rapid decay with increasing distance.

  6. Diffusion dynamics of vacancy on Re(0 0 0 1), compared with adatom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jianyu, E-mail: wuliyangjianyu@yahoo.com.c [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Hu Wangyu, E-mail: wangyuhu2001@yahoo.com.c [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Liu Yanhui [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China)

    2009-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations along with our recently constructed modified analytic embedded-atom method, the diffusion dynamics of single vacancy and adatom on Re(0 0 0 1) surface are studied. The diffusion coefficients of Re adatom and vacancy are calculated, and are found to present Arrhenius diagram. The diffusion migration energies (E{sub m}) and prefactors (D{sub 0}) are obtained from the Arrhenius relation. The calculated E{sub m} for adatom is in agreement with the recent low-temperature field ion microscope experimental data. The E{sub m} and D{sub 0} show that the vacancy has very low diffusive rate.

  7. Nonlinear acoustics in a dispersive continuum: Random waves, radiation pressure, and quantum noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, M. A.

    The nonlinear interaction of sound with sound is studied using dispersive hydrodynamics which derived from a variational principle and the assumption that the internal energy density depends on gradients of the mass density. The attenuation of sound due to nonlinear interaction with a background is calculated and is shown to be sensitive to both the nature of the dispersion and decay bandwidths. The theoretical results are compared to those of low temperature helium experiments. A kinetic equation which described the nonlinear self-inter action of a background is derived. When a Deybe-type cutoff is imposed, a white noise distribution is shown to be a stationary distribution of the kinetic equation. The attenuation and spectrum of decay of a sound wave due to nonlinear interaction with zero point motion is calculated. In one dimension, the dispersive hydrodynamic equations are used to calculate the Langevin and Rayleigh radiation pressures of wave packets and solitary waves.

  8. Approach for fast numerical propagation of uniformly polarized random electromagnetic fields in dispersive linearly birefringent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Piotr L; Domanski, Andrzej W

    2013-09-01

    An efficient simulation technique is proposed for computing propagation of uniformly polarized statistically stationary fields in linear nonimage-forming systems that includes dispersion of linear birefringence to all orders. The method is based on the discrete-time Fourier transformation of modified frequency profiles of the spectral Stokes parameters. It works under the condition that all (linearly) birefringent sections present in the system are described by the same phase birefringence dispersion curve, being a monotonic function of the optical frequency within the bandwidth of the light. We demonstrate the technique as a supplement for the Mueller-Stokes matrix formalism extended to any uniformly polarized polychromatic illumination. Accuracy of its numerical implementation has been verified by using parameters of a Lyot depolarizer made of a highly birefringent and dispersive monomode photonic crystal fiber.

  9. Estimating adhesive seed-dispersal distances : field experiments and correlated random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouissie, AM; Lengkeek, W; van Diggelen, R

    1. In this study we aimed to estimate distance distributions of adhesively dispersed seeds and the factors that determine them. 2. Seed attachment and detachment were studied using field experiments with a real sheep, a sheep dummy and a cattle dummy. Seed-retention data were used in correlated

  10. Nonlinear Acoustics in a Dispersive Continuum: Random Waves, Radiation Pressure, and Quantum Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    Karpman , Nonlinear Waves in Dispersive Media, Pergamon Press, New York, 1975, p. 76. 26. R. Beyers, Nonlinear Acoustics, U.S. Government Printing...20301 U. S. Army Research nffice 2 copies Box 12211 Research Triangle Park tlorth Carolina 27709 Defense Technical Information Center 12 copies Cameron

  11. Ethanol Diffusion on Rutile TiO2(110) Mediated by H Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huo, Peipei; Hansen, Jonas Ørbæk; Martinez, Umberto;

    2012-01-01

    and perpendicular to the rows of surface Ti atoms. The diffusion of ethanol molecules perpendicular to the rows of surface Ti atoms was found to be mediated by H adatoms in the rows of bridge-bonded O (Obr) atoms similarly to previous results obtained for water monomers. In contrast, the diffusion of H adatoms...... across the Ti rows, mediated by ethanol molecules, was observed only very rarely and exclusively on fully hydrogenated TiO2(110) surfaces. Possible reasons why the diffusion of H adatoms across the Ti rows mediated by ethanol molecules occurs less frequently than the cross-row diffusion of ethanol...... molecules mediated by H adatoms are discussed....

  12. Correlated adatom trimer on a metal surface: a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkin, V V; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Lichtenstein, A I

    2005-01-21

    The problem of three interacting Kondo impurities is solved within a numerically exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo scheme. A suppression of the Kondo resonance by interatomic exchange interactions for different cluster geometries is investigated. It is shown that a drastic difference between the Heisenberg and Ising cases appears for antiferromagnetically coupled adatoms. The effects of magnetic frustrations in the adatom trimer are investigated, and possible connections with available experimental data are discussed.

  13. ION-BEAM INDUCED GENERATION OF CU ADATOMS ON CU(100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BOERMA, DO

    1992-01-01

    Low-energy ion scattering was used to study on-beam induced adatom generation during irradiation of a Cu(100) surface with 6 keV Ne ions at a sample temperature of 60 K. It was found that the number of adatoms produced per incoming ion decreases from an average of 3.5 to a saturation level of 1.8 af

  14. Surface self-diffusion of adatom on Pt cluster with truncated octahedron structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jianyu, E-mail: wuliyangjianyu@yahoo.com.c [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Hu Wangyu, E-mail: wangyuhu2001@yahoo.com.c [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen Shuguang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2010-05-03

    Surface diffusion of single Pt adatom on Pt cluster with truncated octahedron structure is investigated through a combination of molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band method. Using an embedded atom method to describe the atomic interactions, the minimum energy paths are determined and the energy barriers for adatom diffusion across and along step are evaluated. The diffusion of adatom crossing step edge between {l_brace}111{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} facets has a surprisingly low barrier of 0.03 eV, which is 0.12 eV lower than the barrier for adatom diffusion from {l_brace}111{r_brace} to neighboring {l_brace}111{r_brace} facet. Owing to the small barrier of adatom diffusion across the step edge between {l_brace}111{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} facets, the diffusion of adatom along the step edge cannot occur. The molecular dynamics simulations at low temperatures also support these results. Our results show that mass transport will prefer step with {l_brace}100{r_brace} microfacet and the Pt clusters can have only {l_brace}111{r_brace} facets in epitaxial growth.

  15. A new formulation of the probability density function in random walk models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anne Katrine Vinther; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1997-01-01

    In this model for atmospheric dispersion particles are simulated by the Langevin Equation, which is a stochastic differential equation. It uses the probability density function (PDF) of the vertical velocity fluctuations as input. The PDF is constructed as an expansion after Hermite polynomials....... In several previous works where the PDF was expressed this way, further use was hampered by the fact that the PDF takes negative values for a range of velocities. This problem is overcome in the present formulation...

  16. Noble-metal intercalation process leading to a protected adatom in a graphene hollow site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan Nair, M.; Cranney, M.; Jiang, T.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Aubel, D.; Vonau, F.; Florentin, A.; Denys, E.; Bocquet, M.-L.; Simon, L.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that gold deposited on a monolayer (ML) of graphene on SiC(0001) is intercalated below the ML after an annealing procedure and affects the band structure of graphene. Here we prove experimentally and theoretically that some of the gold forms a dispersed phase composed of single adatoms, being intercalated between the ML and the buffer layer and in a hollow position with respect to C atoms of the ML on top. They are freestanding and negatively charged, due to the partial screening of the electron transfer between SiC and the ML, without changing the intrinsic n-type doping of the ML. As these single atoms decouple the ML from the buffer layer, the quasiparticles of graphene are less perturbed, thus increasing their Fermi velocity. Moreover, the hollow position of the intercalated single Au atoms might lead to spin-orbit coupling in the graphene layer covering IC domains. This effect of spin-orbit coupling has been recently observed experimentally in Au-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) [D. Marchenko, A. Varykhalov, J. Sánchez-Barriga, Th. Seyller, and O. Rader, Appl. Phys. Lett. 108, 172405 (2016), 10.1063/1.4947286] and has been theoretically predicted for heavy atoms, like thallium, in a hollow position on graphene [C. Weeks, J. Hu, J. Alicea, M. Franz, and R. Wu, Phys. Rev. X 1, 021001 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevX.1.021001; A. Cresti, D. V. Tuan, D. Soriano, A. W. Cummings, and S. Roche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246603 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246603].

  17. Mathematical model for the adsorption-induced nonlocal frequency shift in adatoms-nanobeam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouina, Hicham; Yahiaoui, Réda; Kerid, Rachid; Amine Benamar, Mohammed El; Brioua, Fathi

    2017-09-01

    This paper models and investigates the resonance frequency shift induced by the adsorption phenomena for an adatoms-nanobeam system including the small scale effect as well as rotary inertia and shear distortion effects. The Lennard-Jones (6-12) type potential is used to determine the adsorption-induced energy owing van der Waals (vdW) interaction mechanism between adatom-adatom and adatom-substrate. The small scale effect is introduced by using Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory while the explicit expressions of inertia moment and shear force are derived from the standard Timoshenko beam equations in which the residual stress effect is accounted as an additive axial load. Numerical results showed that the resonance frequency shift is depended on each of the adsorption density, mode number and small scale effects. Thus, numerical results are discussed in detail for a proper analysis of dynamic vibration behavior of adatoms-nanobeam systems which are of interest in the development of mass sensing devices.

  18. Efficient uncertainty quantification of a fully nonlinear and dispersive water wave model with random inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    of the evolution of waves. The model is analyzed using random sampling techniques and nonintrusive methods based on generalized polynomial chaos (PC). These methods allow us to accurately and efficiently estimate the probability distribution of the solution and require only the computation of the solution...... at different points in the parameter space, allowing for the reuse of existing simulation software. The choice of the applied methods is driven by the number of uncertain input parameters and by the fact that finding the solution of the considered model is computationally intensive. We revisit experimental...

  19. Study delay and dispersion effects in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI based on local density random walk distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfeng; Tian, Jie; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Dai, Jianping; Ai, Lin

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validation of the local density random walk (LDRW) function to correct the delayed and dispersed arterial input function (AIF) data derived from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI). Instead of using the gamma-variate function to smooth and extrapolate the AIF curves, we suggested a method which was based on diffusion with drift approach. Forty-seven AIF curves from ten patients were segmented to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results of the comparisons with the gamma-variate function showed that the LDRW distribution function may provide a new means for more accurate correction of AIF curves.

  20. Phenotypic evolution by distance in fluctuating environments: The contribution of dispersal, selection and random genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Steinar; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze how dispersal, genetic drift, and adaptation to the local environment affect the geographical differentiation of a quantitative character through natural selection using a spatial dynamic model for the evolution of the distribution of mean breeding values in space and time. The variation in optimal phenotype is described by local Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes with a given spatial autocorrelation. Selection and drift are assumed to be governed by phenotypic variation within areas with a given mean breeding value and constant additive genetic variance. Between such neighboring areas there will be white noise variation in mean breeding values, while the variation at larger distances has a spatial structure and a spatial scale that we investigate. The model is analyzed by solving balance equations for the stationary distribution of mean breeding values. We also present scaling results for the spatial autocovariance function for mean breeding values as well as that for the covariance between mean breeding value and the optimal phenotype expressing local adaption. Our results show in particular how these spatial scales depend on population density. For large densities the spatial scale of fluctuations in mean breeding values have similarities with corresponding results in population dynamics, where the effect of migration on spatial scales may be large if the local strength of density regulation is small. In our evolutionary model strength of density regulation corresponds to strength of local selection so that weak local selection may produce large spatial scales of autocovariances. Genetic drift and stochastic migration are shown to act through the population size within a characteristic area with much smaller variation in optimal phenotypes than in the whole population.

  1. Modelisation of London dispersion forces by random phase approximation: methodological developments

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, B

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis are shown developments in the random phase approximation (RPA) in the context of range-separated theories. We present advances in the formalism of the RPA in general, and particularly in the "dielectric matrix" formulation of RPA, which is explored in details. We show a summary of a work on the RPA equations with localised orbitals, especially developments of the virtual localized orbitals that are the "projected oscillatory orbitals" (POO). A program has been written to calculate functions such as the exchange hole, the response function, etc on real space grid (parallelepipedic or of the "DFT" type) ; some of those visualisations are shown here. In the real space, we offer an adaptation of the effective energy denominator approximation (EED), originally developped in the reciprocal space in solid physics. The analytical gradients of the RPA correlation energies in the context of range separation has been derived. The formalism developped here with a lagrangian allows an all-in-one derivation ...

  2. Structures of Adatom Clusters on Ag(111) Surface by Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-Hua; LIU Qing-Wei; LI Yu-Fen; ZHUANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the structures of Ag adatom clusters supported on the metal Ag(111) surface using the genetic algorithm (GA). The atomic interactions are modelled by the surface-embedded-atom method. The lowest-energy structures of adatom clusters with sizes n = 3-20 are obtained, in which n = 7, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19 are the magic numbers.Furthermore, we give a series of structures with energies close to the lowest energy (the lower-energy isomers), and the structure features are studied in detail. Except for some magic clusters and small clusters, every configuration of adatom clusters generally has two distinct adsorption ways, so the isomers always appear in pairs.

  3. Spin Hall Effect and Origins of Nonlocal Resistance in Adatom-Decorated Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuan, D; Marmolejo-Tejada, J M; Waintal, X; Nikolić, B K; Valenzuela, S O; Roche, S

    2016-10-21

    Recent experiments reporting an unexpectedly large spin Hall effect (SHE) in graphene decorated with adatoms have raised a fierce controversy. We apply numerically exact Kubo and Landauer-Büttiker formulas to realistic models of gold-decorated disordered graphene (including adatom clustering) to obtain the spin Hall conductivity and spin Hall angle, as well as the nonlocal resistance as a quantity accessible to experiments. Large spin Hall angles of ∼0.1 are obtained at zero temperature, but their dependence on adatom clustering differs from the predictions of semiclassical transport theories. Furthermore, we find multiple background contributions to the nonlocal resistance, some of which are unrelated to the SHE or any other spin-dependent origin, as well as a strong suppression of the SHE at room temperature. This motivates us to design a multiterminal graphene geometry which suppresses these background contributions and could, therefore, quantify the upper limit for spin-current generation in two-dimensional materials.

  4. Adatom-induced lateral inhomogeneity of quantum well states in metal multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2010-07-13

    The influence of Co adatoms on the quantum well states (QWSs) existing in Cu/Co(100) multilayers is investigated by means of ab initio calculations. The typical oscillations of the density of states at the Fermi level as a function of the number of Cu layers are found to be strongly perturbed by the presence of adatoms on the surface. In a lateral direction, the QWSs exhibit atomic-scale variations, which depend on the number of Cu layers. These results suggest that the phase accumulation model, which is often used for analyzing QWS, is not sufficient to interpret electronic features near adatoms and call for experimental real-space investigations of QWS.

  5. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  6. Adsorption and diffusion of Si adatom near single-layer steps on Si surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xiao-Yan; Huang Yan

    2005-01-01

    By use of the empirical tight-binding (ETB) method, the adsorption and diffusion behaviours of single silicon adatom on the reconstructed Si(100) surface with single-layer steps are simulated. The adsorption energies around the SA step, nonrebonded SB step, rebonded SB step, and rough SB step with a kink structure are specially mapped out in this paper, from which the favourable binding sites and several possible diffusion paths are achieved. Because of the rebonded and kink structures, the SB step is more suitable for the attachment of Si adatom than the SA step or defective surface.

  7. ELECTROOXIDATION OF METHANOL ON PT MODIFIED WITH ADATOMS (NI, CU, PB, CD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Khouchaf

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The electro oxidation of methanol has been studied in alkaline medium NaOH 0.1 M and acid medium H2SO4 0.5 M on a platinum electrode and a platinum modified by adatom adsorption (Ni, Cu, Pb, and Cd. The influence of different experimental variables (methanol concentration, and temperature is reported. Preliminary investigations by cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of platinum is still too low to be considered as a practical catalyst. Underpotential deposition of lead, nickel, cadmium, or copper adatoms at platinum allowed increasing significantly the current densities.

  8. Manipulating magnetism and conductance of an adatom-molecule junction on a metal surface: An ab initio study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Kun; Stepanyuk, V.S.; Bruno, P.

    2008-01-01

    and conductance in molecule-adatom junctions can be tailored by the STM tip. Varying the tip-substrate distance the magnetic moment of the Co adatom can be switched on/off. The interplay between spin-polarized electron transport through the junction and its magnetic properties is demonstrated. A spin...

  9. Using remote, spatial techniques to select a random household sample in a dispersed, semi-nomadic pastoral community: utility for a longitudinal health and demographic surveillance system

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Amber L; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Zwickle, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Obtaining a random household sample can be expensive and challenging. In a dispersed community of semi-nomadic households in rural Tanzania, this study aimed to test an alternative method utilizing freely available aerial imagery. Methods We pinned every single-standing structure or boma (compound) in Naitolia, Tanzania using a ‘placemark’ in Google Earth Pro (version 7.1.2.2041). Next, a local expert assisted in removing misclassified placemarks. A random sample was then selected ...

  10. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O, and F adatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gaoxue, E-mail: gaoxuew@mtu.edu, E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu, E-mail: shashi.p.karna.civ@mail.mil; Pandey, Ravindra, E-mail: gaoxuew@mtu.edu, E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu, E-mail: shashi.p.karna.civ@mail.mil [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Karna, Shashi P., E-mail: gaoxuew@mtu.edu, E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu, E-mail: shashi.p.karna.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ATTN: RDRL-WM, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005-5069 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O, and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp{sup 3} bonds of phosphorene and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp{sup 2} like bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O, and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N, and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N, and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene, yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunneling behavior is observed. Our results therefore offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of phosphorene by the adatom functionalization and provide the physical insights of the environmental sensitivity of phosphorene, which will be helpful to experimentalists in evaluating the performance and aging effects of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  11. Measuring the charge state of an adatom with noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, L.; Mohn, F.; Liljeroth, P.; Repp, J.; Meyer, G.; Giessibl, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Charge states of atoms can be investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy, but this method requires a conducting substrate. We investigated the charge-switching of individual adsorbed gold and silver atoms (adatoms) on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force micros

  12. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  13. Formation of Sr adatom chains on SrTiO3 (1 1 0) surface determined by strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Li, Fengmiao; Wang, Weihua; Yang, Hao; Guo, Jiandong

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of Sr adatoms on the SrTiO3 (1 1 0)-(4  ×  1) reconstructed surface with Ti2O3 vacancies distributed in a superstructure is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. With the adsorption amount increasing, all the Sr adatoms between adjacent Ti2O3 vacancies are closely packed along the quasi-1D stripes on the surface with a uniform separation from each other. The formation of such adatom chains is determined by the surface strain relief—the local lattice relaxations in response to Sr adatoms and Ti2O3 vacancies are incompatible, leading to the strong repulsive interaction between them. Consequently the distribution of Sr chains follows the long-range order of the growth template with their length tunable in a certain range by evaporation amount.

  14. Reversible Vertical Manipulations of Single Pt Adatom on Pt(111)Surface with a Triple-Apex Tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Qun; LIU Qing-Wei; ZHANG Peng; LI Yu-Fen; GAN Fu-Xi; ZHUANG Jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ With a triple-apex tip,we investigate theoretically the vertical manipulation of single Pt adatom on the Pt(111)surface.The adatom adsorbed on the fcc site of the flat Pt(111)surface can be transferred vertically to the tip by adjusting the tip height properly.Moreover,based on the strong vertical trapping ability and the relatively weak lateral trapping ability of the tip,we propose a simple method to realize a reversible vertical manipulation of the Pt adatom from the highly coordinated sites,the kink and the step sites,of the stepped Pt(111)surface.All the vertical manjpulations are completed using only the atomic force between the tip and the adatom,without the electric field.

  15. Effect of uniaxial strain on adatom diffusion across {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}-faceted step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jianyu, E-mail: wuliyangjianyu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Donghu Street, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Hu Wangyu, E-mail: Wangyuhu2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang Jianfeng [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion of Pt adatom across the strained {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}-faceted step is studied by embedded atom method along with nudged elastic band method. For adatom on the flat (1 1 1) surface, the anisotropic diffusion behavior is found as the uniaxial strain is imposed. For the strained {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}-faceted step, our results show that the maximum energy barrier for adatom crossing step edge remains approximately constant as the strain varied from -1.0% to 1.0%, and there is a rise as the larger uniaxial strain is applied. The calculated energy barrier for adatom diffusion along the step edge increases with increasing tensile strain, and the slope of the straight line is small.

  16. Csub>60sub> as an Atom Trap to Capture Co Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dongzhe; Repain, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    C60 molecules were used to trap Co adatoms and clusters on a Au(111) surface using atomic/molecular manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. Two manipulation pathways (successive integration of single Co atoms in one molecule or direct integration of a Co cluster) were found...... to efficiently allow the formation of complexes mixing a C60 molecule with Co atoms. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the robustness of the pi states of C60 that are preserved after Co trapping. Scanning tunneling microscopy images and density functional theory calculations reveal that dissociated Co...... clusters of up to nine atoms can be formed at the molecule-substrate interface. These results open new perspectives in the interactions between metal adatoms and molecules, for applications in metal-organic devices...

  17. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  18. Magnetic anisotropy of graphene quantum dots decorated with a ruthenium adatom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Beljakov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The creation of magnetic storage devices by decoration of a graphene sheet by magnetic transition-metal adatoms, utilizing the high in-plane versus out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE, has recently been proposed. This concept is extended in our density-functional-based modeling study by incorporating the influence of the graphene edge on the MAE. We consider triangular graphene flakes with both armchair and zigzag edges in which a single ruthenium adatom is placed at symmetrically inequivalent positions. Depending on the edge-type, the graphene edge was found to influence the MAE in opposite ways: for the armchair flake the MAE increases close to the edge, while the opposite is true for the zigzag edge. Additionally, in-plane pinning of the magnetization direction perpendicular to the edge itself is observed for the first time.

  19. CO adsorption on metal-oxide surfaces doped with transition-metal adatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, Janne; Lehman, Lauri; Salo, Petri [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2012-05-15

    Using first principles density functional theory calculations, we have studied the adsorption of carbon monoxide (CO) on clean, Ag and Pd doped MgO(001), TiO{sub 2}(110), and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surfaces. Our results show that adsorption of CO on the clean surfaces is generally weak. Ag doping improves the adsorption only weakly, except on the TiO{sub 2} surface. The presence of Pd, however, significantly improves adsorption on all the surfaces studied. On the doped surfaces, the best adsorption sites are always the sites on top of the transition metal adatom, and the interaction range is 3-4 Aa around an isolated adatom. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  1. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O and F Adatoms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gaoxue; Karna, Shashi P

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp3 bonds of phosphorene, and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp2 bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunnel...

  2. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  3. Electronic and vibrational properties of graphene monolayers with iron adatoms: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: dimakis@utpa.edu [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States); Navarro, Nestor E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States); Velazquez, Julian; Salgado, Andres [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Periodic density functional calculations were performed on graphene monolayers with and without an iron adatom. • Densities of states, charge transfers, and overlap populations were used to elucidate the effects of weak iron adsorption on graphene compared to CO adsorption on Pt. • Infrared intensities and normal mode analysis verify weak iron adsorption on graphene by studying the shift in prominent vibrational modes and changes in lattice dynamics. - Abstract: Periodic density functional calculations on graphene monolayers with and without an iron adatom have been used to elucidate iron-graphene adsorption and its effects on graphene electronic and vibrational properties. Density-of-states calculations and charge density contour plots reveal charge transfer from the iron s orbitals to the d orbitals, in agreement with past reports. Adsorbed iron atoms covalently bind to the graphene substrate, verified by the strong hybridization of iron d-states with the graphene bands in the energy region just below the Fermi level. This adsorption is weak and compared to the well-analyzed CO adsorption on Pt: It is indicated by its small adsorption energy and the minimal change of the substrate geometry due to the presence of the iron adatoms. Graphene vibrational spectra are analyzed though a systematic variation of the graphene supercell size. The shifts of graphene most prominent infrared active vibrational modes due to iron adsorption are explored using normal mode eigenvectors.

  4. Relaxed random walk model coupled with ecological niche modeling unravel the dispersal dynamics of a Neotropical savanna tree species in the deeper Quaternary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevatti, Rosane G; Terribile, Levi C; Rabelo, Suelen G; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dispersal routes of Neotropical savanna tree species is an essential step to unravel the effects of past climate change on genetic patterns, species distribution and population demography. Here we reconstruct the demographic history and dispersal dynamics of the Neotropical savanna tree species Tabebuia aurea to understand the effects of Quaternary climate change on its current spatial patterns of genetic diversity. We sampled 285 individuals from 21 populations throughout Brazilian savannas and sequenced all individuals for three chloroplast intergenic spacers and ITS nrDNA. We analyzed data using a multi-model inference framework by coupling the relaxed random walk model (RRW), ecological niche modeling (ENM) and statistical phylogeography. The most recent common ancestor of T. aurea lineages dated from ~4.0 ± 2.5 Ma. T. aurea lineages cyclically dispersed from the West toward the Central-West Brazil, and from the Southeast toward the East and Northeast Brazil, following the paleodistribution dynamics shown by the ENMs through the last glacial cycle. A historical refugium through time may have allowed dispersal of lineages among populations of Central Brazil, overlapping with population expansion during interglacial periods and the diversification of new lineages. Range and population expansion through the Quaternary were, respectively, the most frequent prediction from ENMs and the most likely demographic scenario from coalescent simulations. Consistent phylogeographic patterns among multiple modeling inferences indicate a promising approach, allowing us to understand how cyclical climate changes through the Quaternary drove complex population dynamics and the current patterns of species distribution and genetic diversity.

  5. Low-threshold and narrow linewidth diffusive random lasing in rhodamine 6G dye-doped polyurethane with dispersed ZrO_2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Eilers, Hergen

    2014-10-01

    We report on low-threshold and narrow linewidth intensity feedback random lasing in Rhodamine 6G dye-doped polyurethane with dispersed ZrO$_2$ nanoparticles. Depending on the dye/particle concentration, the lasing threshold is (6.8--15.4) MW/cm$^2$ and the linewidth is (4--6) nm. The lasing threshold as a function of nanoparticle concentration is found to follow a power law with an exponent of $-0.496 \\pm 0.010$, which is within uncertainty of Burin et al.'s theoretical prediction [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 215503 (2001)].

  6. Low-Threshold and Narrow Linewidth Diffusive Random Lasing in Rhodamine 6G Dye-Doped Polyurethane with Dispersed ZrO$_2$ Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Benjamin R; Eilers, Hergen

    2015-01-01

    We report on low-threshold and narrow linewidth intensity feedback random lasing in Rhodamine 6G dye-doped polyurethane with dispersed ZrO$_2$ nanoparticles. Depending on the dye/particle concentration, the lasing threshold is (6.8--15.4) MW/cm$^2$ and the linewidth is (4--6) nm. The lasing threshold as a function of nanoparticle concentration is found to follow a power law with an exponent of $-0.496 \\pm 0.010$, which is within uncertainty of Burin et al.'s theoretical prediction [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 215503 (2001)].

  7. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...... and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip...

  8. Self-Diffusion Mechanisms of Adatom on Al(001), (011)and (111) Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙煜杰; 李家明

    2003-01-01

    Using the first-principle molecular dynamical calculations, we have studied the adatom self-diffusion mechanisms on fcc Al (001), (011) and (111) surfaces. On each surface, there are several mechanisms, among which there is one favour mechanism with the minimum barrier energy. The atomic exchange mechanism along the [100]direction on the (001) surface, the long bridge hopping mechanism along the [110] direction on the (011) surface,and the bridge hopping mechanism along the [112] direction on the (111) surface are the favour mechanisms. The activation energy profiles for various self-diffusion mechanisms are studied in details.

  9. Oxidation mechanism of formic acid on the bismuth adatom-modified Pt(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Rondón, Juan Victor; Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Feliu, Juan M; Herrero, Enrique

    2014-09-24

    In order to improve catalytic processes, elucidation of reaction mechanisms is essential. Here, supported by a combination of experimental and computational results, the oxidation mechanism of formic acid on Pt(111) electrodes modified by the incorporation of bismuth adatoms is revealed. In the proposed model, formic acid is first physisorbed on bismuth and then deprotonated and chemisorbed in formate form, also on bismuth, from which configuration the C-H bond is cleaved, on a neighbor Pt site, yielding CO2. It was found computationally that the activation energy for the C-H bond cleavage step is negligible, which was also verified experimentally.

  10. Catalystlike behavior of Si adatoms in the growth of monolayer Al film on Si(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jing; Zhang, Lixin; Jiang, Ying; Guo, Jiandong; Guo, Qinlin; Wang, Enge; Ebert, Philipp; Sakurai, T; Wu, Kehui

    2010-07-07

    The formation mechanism of monolayer Al(111)1x1 film on the Si(111) radical3x radical3-Al substrate was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles calculations. We found that the Si adatoms on the radical3x radical3-Al substrate play important roles in the growth process. The growth of Al-1x1 islands is mediated by the formation and decomposition of SiAl(2) clusters. Based on experiments and theoretical simulations we propose a model where free Si atoms exhibit a catalystlike behavior by capturing and releasing Al atoms during the Al film growth.

  11. Nature of the Charge Localized Between Alkali Adatoms and Metal Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Wertheim, G. K.; Riffe, D. Mark; Citrin, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    Two previously unappreciated features in photoemission spectra from alkali atoms adsorbed on W(110), namely, the sign of the alkali-induced surface-atom core-level shift of the substrate at low coverage and the very large alkali shallow core-hole lifetime width at all coverages, show that the alkali-substrate interaction is not well described by a transfer of alkali charge. Instead, both features point to the formation of a charge cloud between the alkali adatom and substrate that is d...

  12. Heterodiffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    El koraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Ferrando, R.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The hetero-diffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces is studied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The atomic interactions are described by an Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. Static activation energies governing various diffusion processes (jumps and exchanges) are calculated by quenched MD, finding that activation energies for interlayer mobility at straight step edges are somewhat larger than those on the flat surface in the cross-channel [1 0 0]-direction, while interlayer barriers at kinks are considerably lower. Dynamic activation energies are calculated at high temperature from the Arrhenius plots of different diffusion mechanisms and compared to static barriers.

  13. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P., E-mail: murugan@cecri.res.in [CSIR Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India)

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  14. Tailoring the electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer SnO by B, C, N, O and F adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Junguang; Guan, Lixiu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, SnO has attracted more and more attention, because it is a bipolar electronic material holding great potential in the design of p-n junction. In this paper, we examine the effect of extrinsic point defects on modifying the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO using density functionals theory (DFT). The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. All adatoms are found energetically stable. B, C, N and F adatoms will modify the band gap and introduce band gap states. In addition, our calculations show that N, B and F can introduce stable local magnetic moment to the lattice. Our results, therefore, offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of SnO by surface functionalization, which will be helpful to experimentalists in improving the performance of SnO-based electronic devices and opening new avenue for its spintronics applications. PMID:28291244

  15. Steady- and transient-state analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel with randomly dispersed tristructural isotropic particles via two-temperature homogenized model-I: Theory and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Bum Hee; Cho, Nam Zin [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    As a type of accident-tolerant fuel, fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel was proposed after the Fukushima accident in Japan. The FCM fuel consists of tristructural isotropic particles randomly dispersed in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. For a fuel element with such high heterogeneity, we have proposed a two-temperature homogenized model using the particle transport Monte Carlo method for the heat conduction problem. This model distinguishes between fuel-kernel and SiC matrix temperatures. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those of other models. In Part I of the paper, homogenized parameters for the FCM fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure are obtained by (1) matching steady-state analytic solutions of the model with the results of particle transport Monte Carlo method for heat conduction problems, and (2) preserving total enthalpies in fuel kernels and SiC matrix. The homogenized parameters have two desirable properties: (1) they are insensitive to boundary conditions such as coolant bulk temperatures and thickness of cladding, and (2) they are independent of operating power density. By performing the Monte Carlo calculations with the temperature-dependent thermal properties of the constituent materials of the FCM fuel, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters are obtained.

  16. Theory of spin dynamics of magnetic adatoms traced by time-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schüler, Michael; Berakdar, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been shown recently (Loth et al. Science 329, 1628 (2010)) to be extendable as to access the nanosecond, spin-resolved dynamics of magnetic adatoms and molecules. Here we analyze theoretically this novel tool by considering the time-resolved spin dynamics of a single adsorbed Fe atom excited by a tunneling current pulse from a spin-polarized STM tip. The adatom spin-configuration can be controlled and probed by applying voltage pulses between the substrate and the spin-polarized STM tip. We demonstrate how, in a pump-probe manner, the relaxation dynamics of the sample spin is manifested in the spin-dependent tunneling current. Our model calculations are based on the scattering theory in a wave-packet formulation. The scheme is nonpertubative and hence, is valid for all voltages. The numerical results for the tunneling probability and the conductance are contrasted with the prediction of simple analytical models and compared with experiments.

  17. Engineering a Robust Quantum Spin Hall State in Graphene via Adatom Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Weeks

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 discovery of quantized conductance in HgTe quantum wells delivered the field of topological insulators (TIs its first experimental confirmation. While many three-dimensional TIs have since been identified, HgTe remains the only known two-dimensional system in this class. Difficulty fabricating HgTe quantum wells has, moreover, hampered their widespread use. With the goal of breaking this logjam, we provide a blueprint for stabilizing a robust TI state in a more readily available two-dimensional material—graphene. Using symmetry arguments, density functional theory, and tight-binding simulations, we predict that graphene endowed with certain heavy adatoms realizes a TI with substantial band gap. For indium and thallium, our most promising adatom candidates, a modest 6% coverage produces an estimated gap near 80 K and 240 K, respectively, which should be detectable in transport or spectroscopic measurements. Engineering such a robust topological phase in graphene could pave the way for a new generation of devices for spintronics, ultra-low-dissipation electronics, and quantum information processing.

  18. Symmetry-protected coherent transport for diluted vacancies and adatoms in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tijerina, David A.; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of a low concentration of adatoms or single vacancies in the linear-response transport properties of otherwise clean graphene. These impurities were treated as localized orbitals, and for each type two cases with distinct coupling symmetries were studied. For adatoms, we considered top- and hollow-site adsorbates (TOP and HS). For vacancies, we studied impurity formation by soft bond reconstruction (REC), as well as the more symmetric case of charge accumulation in unreconstructed vacancies (VAC). Our results indicate that the transport is determined by usual impurity scattering when the graphene-impurity coupling does not possess C3 v symmetry (TOP and REC). In contrast, VAC impurities decouple from the electronic states at the Dirac points, and yield no contribution to the resistivity for a sample in charge neutrality. Furthermore, the inversion-symmetry-conserving HS impurities also decouple from entire sets of momenta throughout the Brillouin zone, and do not contribute to the resistivity within a broad range of parameters. These behaviors are protected by C3 v and inversion symmetry, respectively, and persist for more general impurity models.

  19. Anisotropic Surface State Mediated RKKY Interaction Between Adatoms on a Hexagonal Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Theodore; Patrone, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive a far-field expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states on a (111) FCC surface, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that in general, the corresponding Fermi wave-vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the component of the aforementioned kF that is parallel to R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work.

  20. Zero energy modes in a superconductor with ferromagnetic adatom chains and quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čadež, Tilen; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2016-12-01

    We study Majorana zero energy modes (MZEM) that occur in an s-wave superconducting surface, at the ends of a ferromagnetic (FM) chain of adatoms, in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) considering both non self-consistent and self-consistent superconducting order. We find that in the self-consistent solution, the average superconducting gap function over the adatom sites has a discontinuous drop with increasing exchange interaction at the same critical value where the topological phase transition occurs. We also study the MZEM for both treatments of superconducting order and find that the decay length is a linear function of the exchange coupling strength, chemical potential and superconducting order. For wider FM chains the MZEM occur at smaller exchange couplings and the slope of the decay length as a function of exchange coupling grows with chain width. Thus we suggest experimental detection of different delocalization of MZEM in chains of varying widths. We discuss similarities and differences between the MZEM for the two treatments of the superconducting order.

  1. Chern insulators without band inversion in Mo S2 monolayers with 3 d adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinyuan; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Li, Yun; Yang, Zhongqin

    2017-02-01

    Electronic and topological properties of Mo S2 monolayers endowed with 3 d transition metal (TM) adatoms (V-Fe) are explored by using ab initio methods and k .p models. Without the consideration of the Hubbard U interaction, the V, Cr, and Fe adatoms tend to locate on the top of the Mo atoms, while the most stable site for the Mn atom is at the hollow position of the Mo-S hexagon. After the Hubbard U is applied, the most stable sites of all the systems become the top of the Mo atoms. Chern insulators without band inversion are achieved in these systems. The V and Fe adsorption systems are the best candidates to produce the topological states. The k .p model calculations indicate that these topological states are determined by the TM magnetism, the C3 v crystal field from the Mo S2 substrate, and the TM atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The special two-meron pseudospin texture is found to contribute to the topology. The apparent difference between the Berry curvatures for the V and Fe adsorption systems is also explored. Our results widen the understanding of the Chern insulators and are helpful for the applications of the Mo S2 monolayers in the future electronics and spintronics.

  2. Relaxed random walk model coupled with ecological niche modeling unravel the dispersal dynamics of a Neotropical savanna tree species in the deeper Quaternary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Garcia Collevatti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dispersal routes of Neotropical savanna tree species is an essential step to unravel the effects of past climate change on genetic patterns, species distribution and population demography. Here we reconstruct the demographic history and dispersal dynamics of the Neotropical savanna tree species Tabebuia aurea to understand the effects of Quaternary climate change on its current spatial patterns of genetic diversity. We sampled 285 individuals from 21 populations throughout Brazilian savannas and sequenced all individuals for three chloroplast intergenic spacers and ITS nrDNA. We analyzed data using a multi-model inference framework by coupling the relaxed random walk model, ecological niche modeling (ENM and statistical phylogeography. The most recent common ancestor of T. aurea lineages dated from ~4.0 ± 2.5 Ma. Tabebuia aurea lineages cyclically dispersed from the West towards the Central-West Brazil, and from the Southeast towards the East and Northeast Brazil, following the paleodistribution dynamics shown by the ENMs through the last glacial cycle. A historical refugium through time may have allowed dispersal of lineages among populations of Central Brazil, overlapping with population expansion during interglacial periods and the diversification of new lineages. Range and population expansion through the Quaternary were, respectively, the most frequent prediction from ENMs and the most likely demographic scenario from coalescent simulations. Consistent phylogeographic patterns among multiple modeling inferences indicate a promising approach, allowing us to understand how cyclical climate changes through the Quaternary drove complex population dynamics and the current patterns of species distribution and genetic diversity.

  3. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  4. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with enhanced orbital moments of Fe adatoms on a topological surface of Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Kuroda, Kenta; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Shirai, Kaito; Miyamoto, Koji; Arita, Masashi; Nakatake, Masashi; Okuda, Taichi; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kimura, Akio

    2013-06-12

    We have found a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of iron adatoms on a surface of the prototypical three-dimensional topological insulator Bi2Se3 by using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. The orbital magnetic moment of Fe is strongly enhanced at lower coverage, where angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows coexistence of non-trivial topological states at the surface.

  5. The Redox Behaviour of Randomly Dispersed Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes both in the Absence and in the Presence of Adsorbed Glucose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth P. Keeley

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of SWCNTs randomly dispersed on gold and glassy carbon electrode surfaces was characterised via cyclic voltammetry and complex impedance spectroscopy, using the ferri/ferrocyanide couple as a redox active test probe . In subsequent investigations glucose oxidase (GOx was adsorbed onto the SWCNT ensemble without apparent denaturation of the enzyme. Cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry were used to quantify and understand the process of electron transfer between the immobilised protein redox site and the working electrode. The effect of pH on the system was also investigated. In particular, we have shown that, for the calculation of electron transfer rate constants for surface-immobilised redox systems, chronoamperometry is preferable to voltammetry, which has been the technique of choice until now.

  6. Ancient DNA from hunter-gatherer and farmer groups from Northern Spain supports a random dispersion model for the Neolithic expansion into Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Hervella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phenomenon of Neolithisation refers to the transition of prehistoric populations from a hunter-gatherer to an agro-pastoralist lifestyle. Traditionally, the spread of an agro-pastoralist economy into Europe has been framed within a dichotomy based either on an acculturation phenomenon or on a demic diffusion. However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. In the present study, we have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA diversity in hunter-gatherers and first farmers from Northern Spain, in relation to the debate surrounding the phenomenon of Neolithisation in Europe. METHODOLOGY/SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis of mitochondrial DNA was carried out on 54 individuals from Upper Paleolithic and Early Neolithic, which were recovered from nine archaeological sites from Northern Spain (Basque Country, Navarre and Cantabria. In addition, to take all necessary precautions to avoid contamination, different authentication criteria were applied in this study, including: DNA quantification, cloning, duplication (51% of the samples and replication of the results (43% of the samples by two independent laboratories. Statistical and multivariate analyses of the mitochondrial variability suggest that the genetic influence of Neolithisation did not spread uniformly throughout Europe, producing heterogeneous genetic consequences in different geographical regions, rejecting the traditional models that explain the Neolithisation in Europe. CONCLUSION: The differences detected in the mitochondrial DNA lineages of Neolithic groups studied so far (including these ones of this study suggest different genetic impact of Neolithic in Central Europe, Mediterranean Europe and the Cantabrian fringe. The genetic data obtained in this study provide support for a random dispersion model for Neolithic farmers. This random dispersion had a different

  7. Nanostructured surfaces yield earlier: Molecular dynamics study of nanoindentation into adatom islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhain, Gerolf; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-04-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation we investigate nanoindentation into an fcc metal surface covered by an adatom island. Small islands are pushed into the solid and transported away by prismatic dislocation loops, and no defects remain under the indenter; thereafter indentation proceeds as for a flat surface. For large islands, the island boundaries do not influence indentation. Most interesting is the intermediate case, where the island size is comparable to the contact radius of the indenter at the onset of plasticity. Here plasticity starts immediately at the surface under the weakest step edges bounding the island. The dislocations are pinned to the step edges and dislocation activity remains localized under the island. For this intermediate case, the surface is weakest and yields earliest.

  8. Spin-sensitive shape asymmetry of adatoms on noncollinear magnetic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrate, D.; Yoshida, Y.; Moro-Lagares, M.; Kubetzka, A.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-03-01

    The spin-resolved density of states of Co atoms on a noncollinear magnetic support displays a distinct shape contrast, which is superimposed on the regular height contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. The apparent atom height follows the well-known cosine dependence on the angle formed by the tip and adatom local magnetization directions, whereas the shape contrast exhibits a sine dependence. We explain this effect in terms of a noncollinear spin density induced by the substrate, which in our case is the spin spiral of the Mn monolayer on W(110). The two independent contrast channels, apparent height and shape, are identified with the Co magnetization projections onto two orthogonal axes. As a result, all components of the overall atom magnetic moment vector can be determined with a single spin-sensitive tip in the absence of an external magnetic field. This result should be general for any atom deposited on noncollinear magnetic layers.

  9. Coherence and Decoherence of a Localized Excitation on a Surface Adatom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高世武; H.Petek; J.Aizpurua; P.Apell

    2002-01-01

    A theory of coherent excitation of a localized state on an adatom by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy(TR-2PPE) is presented within a microscopic model and the time-dependent formalism. Coherent oscillation and incoherent population decay of the excitation are obtained, and are shown to attain well-defined lifetime constants only in the long-delay limit. In addition, we have found a competing excitation channel via electron transfer. The theory is applied to Cs/Cu (111), which reproduces a few qualitative features observed in recent experiments. The effect of atomic motion on the 2PPE spectra, which manifests dominantly as a redshift in the spectrum, has been analysed.

  10. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111 surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadollah Naderi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111 A-type (Cd terminated and B-type (Te terminated surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as Aa site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from Aa (occupied to Aa (empty site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type. Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  11. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Ebadollah; Nanavati, Sachin; Majumder, Chiranjib; Ghaisas, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as Aa site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from Aa (occupied) to Aa (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  12. Diffusion of Cd and Te adatoms on CdTe(111) surfaces: A computational study using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naderi, Ebadollah, E-mail: enaderi42@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU), Pune-411007 (India); Nanavati, Sachin [Center for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), SPPU campus, Pune 411007 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Ghaisas, S. V. [Department of Electronic Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU), Pune-411007 (India); Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU), Pune-411007 (India)

    2015-01-15

    CdTe is one of the most promising semiconductor for thin-film based solar cells. Here we report a computational study of Cd and Te adatom diffusion on the CdTe (111) A-type (Cd terminated) and B-type (Te terminated) surfaces and their migration paths. The atomic and electronic structure calculations are performed under the DFT formalism and climbing Nudge Elastic Band (cNEB) method has been applied to evaluate the potential barrier of the Te and Cd diffusion. In general the minimum energy site on the surface is labeled as A{sub a} site. In case of Te and Cd on B-type surface, the sub-surface site (a site just below the top surface) is very close in energy to the A site. This is responsible for the subsurface accumulation of adatoms and therefore, expected to influence the defect formation during growth. The diffusion process of adatoms is considered from A{sub a} (occupied) to A{sub a} (empty) site at the nearest distance. We have explored three possible migration paths for the adatom diffusion. The adatom surface interaction is highly dependent on the type of the surface. Typically, Te interaction with both type (5.2 eV for A-type and 3.8 eV for B-type) is stronger than Cd interactions(2.4 eV for B-type and 0.39 eV for A-type). Cd interaction with the A-type surface is very weak. The distinct behavior of the A-type and B-type surfaces perceived in our study explain the need of maintaining the A-type surface during growth for smooth and stoichiometric growth.

  13. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: first-principles calculations and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, E; Hite, D A; McKay, K S; Pappas, D P; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H

    2016-01-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum gates due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we investigate the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by density functional theory, based on detailed scanning probe microscopy, how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape, and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. A simple model for the diffusion noise, which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, qualitatively reproduces the measured noise spectrum, and the estimate of the noise spectral density is in accord with measured values.

  14. Electric-field noise from carbon-adatom diffusion on a Au(110) surface: First-principles calculations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Hite, D. A.; McKay, K. S.; Pappas, D. P.; Weck, P. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The decoherence of trapped-ion quantum gates due to heating of their motional modes is a fundamental science and engineering problem. This heating is attributed to electric-field noise arising from the trap-electrode surfaces. In this work, we investigate the source of this noise by focusing on the diffusion of carbon-containing adsorbates on the surface of Au(110). We show by density functional theory, based on detailed scanning probe microscopy, how the carbon adatom diffusion on the gold surface changes the energy landscape and how the adatom dipole moment varies with the diffusive motion. A simple model for the diffusion noise, which varies quadratically with the variation of the dipole moment, predicts a noise spectrum, in accordance with the measured values.

  15. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., Rknockout ≈ Raccumulation). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  16. ADATOM, VACANCY AND SPUTTERING YIELDS OF ENERGETIC Pt ATOMS IMPACTING ON Pt(100) BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE ZI-YAN; ZHANG QING-YU

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the influence of incident atoms with low energy on the Pt(100) surface by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potential obtained by the embedded atom method (EAM) was used in the simulation. The incident energy changes from 0.leV to 200eV, and the target temperature ranges from 100 to 500 K. The target scales are 6×6×4 and 8×8×4 fcc cells for lower and higher incident energies, respectively. The adatom, sputtering, vacancy and backscattering yields are calculated. It was found that there is a sputtering threshold for the incident energy. When the incident energy is higher than the sputtering threshold, the sputtering yield increases with the increase of incident energy, and the sputtering shows a symmetrical pattern. We found that the adatom and vacancy yields increase as the incident energy increases. The vacancy yields are much higher than those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The dependence of the adatom and sputtering yields on the incident energy and the relative atomistic mechanisms are discussed.

  17. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion versus amphotericin B for treatment of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Raleigh; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi; White, Mary H; Li, Xin; Pietrelli, Larry; Gurwith, Marc; van Burik, Jo-Anne; Laverdiere, Michel; Safrin, Sharon; Wingard, John R

    2002-08-15

    We report a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial in which amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD [Amphotec]; 6 mg/kg/day) was compared with amphotericin B (AmB; 1.0-1.5 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in 174 patients. For evaluable patients in the ABCD and AmB treatment groups, respective rates of therapeutic response (52% vs. 51%; P=1.0), mortality (36% vs. 45%; P=.4), and death due to fungal infection (32% vs. 26%; P=.7) were similar. Renal toxicity was lower (25% vs. 49%; P=.002) and the median time to onset of nephrotoxicity was longer (301 vs. 22 days; P<.001) in patients treated with ABCD. Rates of drug-related toxicity in patients receiving ABCD and AmB, respectively, were 53% versus 30% (chills), 27% versus 16% (fever), 1% versus 4% (hypoxia) and 22% versus 24% (toxicity requiring study drug discontinuation). ABCD appears to have equivalent efficacy and superior renal safety, compared with AmB, in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis. However, infusion-related chills and fever occurred more frequently in patients receiving ABCD than in those receiving AmB.

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  19. Modelisation de la diffusion sur les surfaces metalliques: De l'adatome aux processus de croissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Ghyslain

    Cette these est consacree a l'etude des processus de diffusion en surface dans le but ultime de comprendre, et de modeliser, la croissance d'une couche mince. L'importance de bien mai triser la croissance est primordiale compte tenu de son role dans la miniaturisation des circuits electroniques. Nous etudions ici les surface des metaux nobles et de ceux de la fin de la serie de transition. Dans un premier temps, nous nous interessons a la diffusion d'un simple adatome sur une surface metallique. Nous avons, entre autres, mis en evidence l'apparition d'une correlation entre evenements successifs lorsque la temperature est comparable a la barriere de diffusion, i.e., la diffusion ne peut pas etre associee a une marche aleatoire. Nous proposons un modele phenomenologique simple qui reproduit bien les resultats des simulations. Ces calculs nous ont aussi permis de montrer que la diffusion obeit a la loi de Meyer-Neldel. Cette loi stipule que, pour un processus active, le prefacteur augmente exponentiellement avec la barriere. En plus, ce travail permet de clarifier l'origine physique de cette loi. En comparant les resultats dynamiques aux resultats statiques, on se rend compte que la barriere extraite des calculs dynamiques est essentiellement la meme que celle obtenue par une approche statique, beaucoup plus simple. On peut donc obtenir cette barriere a l'aide de methodes plus precises, i.e., ab initio, comme la theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite, qui sont aussi malheureusement beaucoup plus lourdes. C'est ce que nous avons fait pour plusieurs systemes metalliques. Nos resultats avec cette derniere approche se comparent tres bien aux resultats experimentaux. Nous nous sommes attardes plus longuement a la surface (111) du platine. Cette surface regorge de particularites interessantes, comme la forme d'equilibre non-hexagonale des i lots et deux sites d'adsorption differents pour l'adatome. De plus, des calculs ab initio precedents n'ont pas reussi a confirmer la

  20. A study on adatom transport through (√3 × √3)-R30°-CH3S self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) using first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulius, D; Torres, D; Illas, F; Archibald, W E

    2014-11-14

    Self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) have outstanding chemical, electrical, and optical properties, and Au adatoms seem to play a key role in these properties. Still, the fundamental understanding of adatom transport inside the self-assembled structure is very thin. In this paper we use first-principles calculations to reveal new details about the migration mechanism of Au adatoms in the presence of a CH3S self-assembled structure on Au(111). We study the inclusion of Au adatoms inside a well-packed (√3 × √3)-R30°-CH3S self-assembled lattice and present atomistic models supporting adatom migration by means of a hopping mechanism between pairs of CH3S species. Our calculations reveal that the transport of Au adatoms is slowed down inside the molecular network where the kinetic barrier for adatom migration is larger than on the clean Au surface. We attribute the hindered mobility of Au adatoms to the fact that adatom transport involves the breaking and making of Au-S bonds. Our results form a basis for further understanding the role played by defect transport in the properties of molecular assemblies.

  1. Steady- and Transient-State Analyses of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel with Randomly Dispersed Tristructural Isotropic Particles via Two-Temperature Homogenized Model—I: Theory and Method

    OpenAIRE

    Yoonhee Lee; Bumhee Cho; Nam Zin Cho

    2016-01-01

    As a type of accident-tolerant fuel, fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel was proposed after the Fukushima accident in Japan. The FCM fuel consists of tristructural isotropic particles randomly dispersed in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. For a fuel element with such high heterogeneity, we have proposed a two-temperature homogenized model using the particle transport Monte Carlo method for the heat conduction problem. This model distinguishes between fuel-kernel and SiC matrix temperatu...

  2. Adsorption of Te atoms on Au(1 1 1) and the emergence of an adatom-induced bound state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Koen; Debehets, Jolien; Muzychenko, Dmitry; Li, Zhe; Seo, Jin Won; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2017-03-01

    We report on the adsorption of Te adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are identified and investigated relying on scanning tunnelling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The Te adatoms lift the 23  ×  √3 surface reconstruction of the Au(1 1 1) support and their organization is similar to that of previously reported chalcogen adatoms on Au(1 1 1), which are also known to lift the herringbone reconstruction and can adopt a (√3  ×  √3)R30° structure. The adatoms show strong interaction with the Au(1 1 1) surface, resulting in scattering and confinement of the Au surface state (SS) electrons near the Fermi level. More remarkably, scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals the existence of an electronic resonance at high voltages well above the Fermi level. This resonance can be interpreted as a bound state that is split off from the bottom of the Au(1 1 1) bulk conduction band. A similar split-off state may exist for other types of adatoms on metallic surfaces that exhibit a surface band gap.

  3. Tracking the Effect of Adatom Electronegativity on Systematically Modified AlGaN/GaN Schottky Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Maria; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ostermaier, Clemens

    2015-10-21

    The influence of surface modifications on the Schottky barrier height for gallium nitride semiconductor devices is frequently underestimated or neglected in investigations thereof. We show that a strong dependency of Schottky barrier heights for nickel/aluminum-gallium nitride (0001) contacts on the surface terminations exists: a linear correlation of increasing barrier height with increasing electronegativity of superficial adatoms is observed. The negatively charged adatoms compete with the present nitrogen over the available gallium (or aluminum) orbital to form an electrically improved surface termination. The resulting modification of the surface dipoles and hence polarization of the surface termination causes observed band bending. Our findings suggest that the greatest Schottky barrier heights are achieved by increasing the concentration of the most polarized fluorine-gallium (-aluminum) bonds at the surface. An increase in barrier height from 0.7 to 1.1 eV after a 15% fluorine termination is obtained with ideality factors of 1.10 ± 0.05. The presence of surface dipoles that are changing the surface energy is proven by the sessile drop method as the electronegativity difference and polarization influences the contact angle. The extracted decrease in the Lifshitz-van-der-Waals component from 48.8 to 40.4 mJ/m(2) with increasing electronegativity and concentration of surface adatoms confirms the presence of increasing surface dipoles: as the polarizability of equally charged anions decreases with increasing electronegativity, the diiodomethane contact angles increase significantly from 14° up to 39° after the 15% fluorine termination. Therefore, a linear correlation between increasing anion electronegativity of the (Al)GaN termination and total surface energy within a 95% confidence interval is obtained. Furthermore, our results reveal a generally strong Lewis basicity of (Al)GaN surfaces explaining the high chemical inertness of the surfaces.

  4. Evolution of dispersal distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrett, Rick; Remenik, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The problem of how often to disperse in a randomly fluctuating environment has long been investigated, primarily using patch models with uniform dispersal. Here, we consider the problem of choice of seed size for plants in a stable environment when there is a trade off between survivability and dispersal range. Ezoe (J Theor Biol 190:287-293, 1998) and Levin and Muller-Landau (Evol Ecol Res 2:409-435, 2000) approached this problem using models that were essentially deterministic, and used calculus to find optimal dispersal parameters. Here we follow Hiebeler (Theor Pop Biol 66:205-218, 2004) and use a stochastic spatial model to study the competition of different dispersal strategies. Most work on such systems is done by simulation or nonrigorous methods such as pair approximation. Here, we use machinery developed by Cox et al. (Voter model perturbations and reaction diffusion equations 2011) to rigorously and explicitly compute evolutionarily stable strategies.

  5. Intrinsic life-time and external manipulation of Néel states in antiferromagnetic adatom spins on semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that antiferromagnetic Fe adatom spins on semiconductor Cu-N surfaces can be used to store information (Loth et al 2012 Science 335 196). Here, we investigate spin dynamics of such antiferromagnetic systems through Monte Carlo simulations. We find out the temperature and size laws of switching rates of Néel states and show that the Néel states can become stable enough for the information storage when the number of spins reaches one or two dozens of the Fe spins. We also explore promising methods for manipulating the Néel states. These could help realize information storage with such antiferromagnetic spin systems.

  6. A theoretical analysis of the spin dynamics of magnetic adatoms traced by time-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, M.; Pavlyukh, Y.; Berakdar, J.

    2012-04-01

    Inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has recently been shown (Loth et al 2010 Science 329 1628) to be extendable to access the nanosecond, spin-resolved dynamics of magnetic adatoms and molecules. Here we analyze this novel tool theoretically by considering the time-resolved spin dynamics of a single adsorbed Fe atom excited by a tunneling current pulse from a spin-polarized STM tip. The adatom spin configuration can be controlled and probed by applying voltage pulses between the substrate and the spin-polarized STM tip. We demonstrate how, in a pump-probe manner, the relaxation dynamics of the sample spin is manifested in the spin-dependent tunneling current. Our model calculations are based on the scattering theory in a wave-packet formulation. The scheme is non-perturbative and, hence, is valid for all voltages. The numerical results for the tunneling probability and the conductance are contrasted with the predictions of simple analytical models and compared with experiments.

  7. Intermixed adatom and surface-bound adsorbates in regular self-assembled monolayers of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Runhai; Yan, Jiawei; Jensen, Palle S; Ascic, Erhad; Gan, Shiyu; Tanner, David; Mao, Bingwei; Niu, Li; Zhang, Jingdong; Tang, Chunguang; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-04-07

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations reveal a complex structure for the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of racemic 2-butanethiol on Au(111) in aqueous solution. Six adsorbate molecules occupy a (10×√3)R30° cell organized as two RSAuSR adatom-bound motifs plus two RS species bound directly to face-centered-cubic and hexagonally close-packed sites. This is the first time that these competing head-group arrangements have been observed in the same ordered SAM. Such unusual packing is favored as it facilitates SAMs with anomalously high coverage (30%), much larger than that for enantiomerically resolved 2-butanethiol or secondary-branched butanethiol (25%) and near that for linear-chain 1-butanethiol (33%).

  8. Phononic dissipation during "hot" adatom motion: A QM/Me study of O2 dissociation at Pd surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukas, Vanessa J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    We augment ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with a quantitative account of phononic dissipation to study the non-equilibrium aftermath of the exothermic oxygen dissociation at low-index (111), (100), and (110) Pd surfaces. Comparing the hyperthermal diffusion arising from a non-instantaneous dissipation of the released chemical energy, we find a striking difference in the resulting "hot" adatom lifetime that is not overall reflected in experimentally recorded product end distances. We rationalize this finding through a detailed mode-specific phonon analysis and identify the dominant dissipation channels as qualitatively different groups of localized surface modes that ultimately lead to intrinsically different rates of dissipation to the Pd bulk. The thus obtained first-principles perspective on non-equilibrium adsorbate-phonon dynamics thereby underscores the sensitive dependence on details of the phononic fine structure, while questioning prevalent assumptions about energy sinks made in commonly used model bath Hamiltonians.

  9. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ashley E.; Santos-Carballal, David; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2016-05-01

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO2 crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO2 particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle.

  10. Steady- and Transient-State Analyses of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel with Randomly Dispersed Tristructural Isotropic Particles via Two-Temperature Homogenized Model—I: Theory and Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonhee Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a type of accident-tolerant fuel, fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM fuel was proposed after the Fukushima accident in Japan. The FCM fuel consists of tristructural isotropic particles randomly dispersed in a silicon carbide (SiC matrix. For a fuel element with such high heterogeneity, we have proposed a two-temperature homogenized model using the particle transport Monte Carlo method for the heat conduction problem. This model distinguishes between fuel-kernel and SiC matrix temperatures. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those of other models. In Part I of the paper, homogenized parameters for the FCM fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure are obtained by (1 matching steady-state analytic solutions of the model with the results of particle transport Monte Carlo method for heat conduction problems, and (2 preserving total enthalpies in fuel kernels and SiC matrix. The homogenized parameters have two desirable properties: (1 they are insensitive to boundary conditions such as coolant bulk temperatures and thickness of cladding, and (2 they are independent of operating power density. By performing the Monte Carlo calculations with the temperature-dependent thermal properties of the constituent materials of the FCM fuel, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters are obtained.

  11. Steady- and transient-state analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel with randomly dispersed tristructural isotropic particles via two-temperature homogenized model-II: Applications by coupling with COREDAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Bum Hee; Cho, Nam Zin [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In Part I of this paper, the two-temperature homogenized model for the fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel, in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in a fine lattice stochastic structure, was discussed. In this model, the fuel-kernel and silicon carbide matrix temperatures are distinguished. Moreover, the obtained temperature profiles are more realistic than those obtained using other models. Using the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of uranium nitride and the silicon carbide matrix, temperature-dependent homogenized parameters were obtained. In Part II of the paper, coupled with the COREDAX code, a reactor core loaded by fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel in which tristructural isotropic particles are randomly dispersed in the fine lattice stochastic structure is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized model at steady and transient states. The results are compared with those from harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models; i.e., we compare keff eigenvalues, power distributions, and temperature profiles in the hottest single channel at a steady state. At transient states, we compare total power, average energy deposition, and maximum temperatures in the hottest single channel obtained by the different thermal analysis models. The different thermal analysis models and the availability of fuel-kernel temperatures in the two-temperature homogenized model for Doppler temperature feedback lead to significant differences.

  12. Statistical Thermodynamics of Disperse Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    Principles of statistical physics are applied for the description of thermodynamic equilibrium in disperse systems. The cells of disperse systems are shown to possess a number of non-standard thermodynamic parameters. A random distribution of these parameters in the system is determined....... On the basis of this distribution, it is established that the disperse system has an additional degree of freedom called the macro-entropy. A large set of bounded ideal disperse systems allows exact evaluation of thermodynamic characteristics. The theory developed is applied to the description of equilibrium...

  13. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  14. Surface alloy formation of noble adatoms adsorbed on Si(111)-{radical}3x{radical}3-Pb surface: a first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chong; Wang Fei; Sun, Q; Jia Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2011-07-06

    The geometric structures, stability and electronic properties of initial stages of surface alloy formation for noble atoms adsorbed on Si(111)-{radical}3x{radical}3-Pb surfaces have been comparatively and extensively studied by using first-principles calculations within density functional theory. Our results revealed that an Au trimer rather than a tetramer adsorption induces a surface alloy by combining with Pb atoms in covalent bonds, exhibiting semiconducting characteristics due to the localization of surface states. The stability of the two-dimensional (2D) surface alloy obeys the Hume-Rothery rule. The electronic structures of the 2D surface alloy are sensitive to the number of Au adatoms and can be modulated by the quantity of Au adatoms. Unlike the Au atoms, our further calculations indicated that adsorption of Ag or Cu atoms on the surface cannot form a surface alloy with Pb atoms in the surface layer due to a weaker interaction or smaller radius.

  15. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dispersion Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  17. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  18. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  19. Seed dispersal of desert annuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, D Lawrence; Flores-Martinez, Arturo; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Barron-Gafford, Greg; Becerra, Judith X

    2008-08-01

    We quantified seed dispersal in a guild of Sonoran Desert winter desert annuals at a protected natural field site in Tucson, Arizona, USA. Seed production was suppressed under shrub canopies, in the open areas between shrubs, or both by applying an herbicide prior to seed set in large, randomly assigned removal plots (10-30 m diameter). Seedlings were censused along transects crossing the reproductive suppression borders shortly after germination. Dispersal kernels were estimated for Pectocarya recurvata and Schismus barbatus from the change in seedling densities with distance from these borders via inverse modeling. Estimated dispersal distances were short, with most seeds traveling less than a meter. The adhesive seeds of P. recurvata went farther than the small S. barbatus seeds, which have no obvious dispersal adaptation. Seeds dispersed farther downslope than upslope and farther when dispersing into open areas than when dispersing into shrubs. Dispersal distances were short relative to the pattern of spatial heterogeneity created by the shrub and open space mosaic. This suggests that dispersal could contribute to local population buildup, possibly facilitating species coexistence. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that escape in time via delayed germination is likely to be more important for desert annuals than escape in space.

  20. Incorporating patterns of disperser behaviour into models of seed dispersal and its effects on estimated dispersal curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, David A; Bentrupperbäumer, Joan; Bradford, Matt G; McKeown, Adam

    2005-11-01

    The processes determining where seeds fall relative to their parent plant influence the spatial structure and dynamics of plant populations and communities. For animal dispersed species the factors influencing seed shadows are poorly understood. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the daily temporal distribution of disperser behaviours, for example, foraging and movement, influences dispersal outcomes, in particular the shape and scale of dispersal curves. To do this, we describe frugivory and the dispersal curves produced by the southern cassowary, Casuarius casuarius, the only large-bodied disperser in Australia's rainforests. We found C. casuarius consumed fruits of 238 species and of all fleshy-fruit types. In feeding trials, seeds of 11 species were retained on average for 309 min (+/-256 SD). Sampling radio-telemetry data randomly, that is, assuming foraging occurs at random times during the day, gives an estimated average dispersal distance of 239 m (+/-207 SD) for seeds consumed by C. casuarius. Approximately 4% of seeds were dispersed further than 1,000 m. However, observation of wild birds indicated that foraging and movement occur more frequently early and late in the day. Seeds consumed early in the day were estimated to receive dispersal distances 1.4 times the 'random' average estimate, while afternoon consumed seeds received estimated mean dispersal distances of 0.46 times the 'random' estimate. Sampling movement data according to the daily distribution of C. casuarius foraging gives an estimated mean dispersal distance of 337 m (+/-194 SD). Most animals' behaviour has a non-random temporal distribution. Consequently such effects should be common and need to be incorporated into seed shadow estimation. Our results point to dispersal curves being an emergent property of the plant-disperser interaction rather than being a property of a plant or species.

  1. INVERSION SYMMETRY, ARCHITECTURE AND DISPERSITY, AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THERMODYNAMICS IN BULK AND CONFINED REGIONS: FROM RANDOMLY BRANCHED POLYMERS TO LINEAR CHAINS, STARS AND DENDRIMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D.Gujrati

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical evidence is presented in this review that architectural aspects can play an important role, not only in the bulk but also in confined geometries by using our recursive lattice theory, which is equally applicable to fixed architectures (regularly branched polymers, stars, dendrimers, brushes, linear chains, etc. and variable architectures, i.e. randomly branched structures. Linear chains possess an inversion symmetry (IS of a magnetic system (see text, whose presence or absence determines the bulk phase diagram. Fixed architectures possess the IS and yield a standard bulk phase diagram in which there exists a theta point at which two critical lines C and C' meet and the second virial coefficient A2 vanishes. The critical line C appears only for infinitely large polymers, and an order parameter is identified for this criticality. The critical line C' exists for polymers of all sizes and represents phase separation criticality. Variable architectures, which do not possess the IS, give rise to a topologically different phase diagram with no theta point in general. In confined regions next to surfaces, it is not the IS but branching and monodispersity, which becomes important in the surface regions. We show that branching plays no important role for polydisperse systems, but become important for monodisperse systems. Stars and linear chains behave differently near a surface.

  2. The Effects of Wenxin Keli on P-Wave Dispersion and Maintenance of Sinus Rhythm in Patients with Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, on P-wave dispersion (Pd and maintenance of sinus rhythm for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF. Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve randomized controlled trials (RCTs designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, for PAF, with Pd or maintenance rate of sinus rhythm as the main outcome measure. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0, and analysed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Fourteen RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The results of meta-analysis showed that WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, was more effective in Pd and the maintenance of sinus rhythm, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with PAF or PAF complicated by other diseases. Seven of the trials reported adverse events, indicating that the safety of WXKL is still uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, alone or combined with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving Pd as well as maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with PAF and its complications.

  3. Dispersed Indeterminacy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayngold, Moses

    2013-01-01

    A state of a single particle can be represented by a quantum blob in the corresponding phase space, or a patch (granule) in its 2-D subspace. Its area is frequently stated to be no less than, implying that such a granule is an indivisible quantum of the 2-D phase space. But this is generally not true, as is evident, for instance, from representation of some states in the basis of innately discrete observables like angular momentum. Here we consider some dispersed states involving the evanescent waves different from that in the total internal reflection. Such states are represented by a set of separated granules with individual areas, but with the total indeterminacy . An idealized model has a discrete Wigner function and is described by a superposition of eigenstates with eigenvalues and forming an infinite periodic array of dots on the phase plane. The question about the total indeterminacy in such state is discussed. We argue that the eigenstates corresponding to the considered EW cannot be singled out by a...

  4. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  5. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  6. The self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory study of carbon adatoms using tuned Hubbard U parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Wanrun; Yu, Tianrong; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory is a useful tool for realizing the electronic structures of large molecular complex systems. In this study, we analyze the electronic structure of C61, formed by fullerene C60 with a carbon adatom, using the fully localized limit and pseudo self-interaction correction methods of DFTB to adjust the Hubbard U parameter (DFTB+U). The results show that both the methods used to adjust U can significantly reduce the molecular orbital energy of occupied states localized on the defect carbon atom and improve the gap between highest occupied molecular orbital(HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital(LUMO) of C61. This work will provide a methodological reference point for future DFTB calculations of the electronic structures of carbon materials.

  7. Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindratsima, Onja H; Dunham, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal.

  8. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  9. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  10. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  11. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  12. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and redu

  13. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We ensured...... exogenous variation in -otherwise random- team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities (Raven test). Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  14. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... ensured exogenous variation in otherwise random team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities. Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub- teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  15. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances. We ensured exogenous...... variation in - otherwise random - team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities (Raven test). Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  16. Are introduced species better dispersers than native species? A global comparative study of seed dispersal distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Thomson, Fiona J; Warton, David I; Moles, Angela T

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first global test of the idea that introduced species have greater seed dispersal distances than do native species, using data for 51 introduced and 360 native species from the global literature. Counter to our expectations, there was no significant difference in mean or maximum dispersal distance between introduced and native species. Next, we asked whether differences in dispersal distance might have been obscured by differences in seed mass, plant height and dispersal syndrome, all traits that affect dispersal distance and which can differ between native and introduced species. When we included all three variables in the model, there was no clear difference in dispersal distance between introduced and native species. These results remained consistent when we performed analyses including a random effect for site. Analyses also showed that the lack of a significant difference in dispersal distance was not due to differences in biome, taxonomic composition, growth form, nitrogen fixation, our inclusion of non-invasive introduced species, or our exclusion of species with human-assisted dispersal. Thus, if introduced species do have higher spread rates, it seems likely that these are driven by differences in post-dispersal processes such as germination, seedling survival, and survival to reproduction.

  17. Dispersion management with metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-03-07

    An apparatus, system, and method to counteract group velocity dispersion in fibers, or any other propagation of electromagnetic signals at any wavelength (microwave, terahertz, optical, etc.) in any other medium. A dispersion compensation step or device based on dispersion-engineered metamaterials is included and avoids the need of a long section of specialty fiber or the need for Bragg gratings (which have insertion loss).

  18. Vowel dispersion in Truku

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Wen-yu; Chiang, Fang-mei

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the dispersion of vowel space in Truku, an endangered Austronesian language in Taiwan. Adaptive Dispersion (Liljencrants and Lindblom, 1972; Lindblom, 1986, 1990) proposes that the distinctive sounds of a language tend to be positioned in phonetic space in a way that maximizes perceptual contrast. For example, languages with large vowel inventories tend to expand the overall acoustic vowel space. Adaptive Dispersion predicts that the distance between the point vowels w...

  19. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  20. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  1. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  2. Perfect Dispersive Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shulabh

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion is at the heart of all ultrafast real-time signal processing systems across the entire electromagnetic spectrum ranging from radio-frequencies to optics. However, following Kramer-Kronig relations, these signal processing systems have been plagued with the parasitic amplitude distortions due to frequency dependent, and non-flat amplitude transmission of naturally dispersive media. This issue puts a serious limitation on the applicability and performance of these signal processing systems. To solve the above mentioned issue, a perfect dispersive medium is proposed in this work, which artificially violates the Kramer-Kronig relations, while satisfying all causality requirements. The proposed dispersive metamaterial is based on loss-gain metasurface pairs and exhibit a perfectly flat transmission response along with arbitrary dispersion in a broad bandwidth, thereby solving a seemingly unavoidable issue in all ultrafast signal processing systems. Such a metamaterial is further shown using sub-waveleng...

  3. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    overlay maps of effort to try and remove any induced artefacts in the data. Differences in timing or the route of migration has often been studies separately. Lokki and Saurola (Lokki & Saurola, 2004 develop an omnibus procedure to test if the migration timing and/or route differ among two populations of birds (e.g. males vs females. It uses a randomization test to calibrate the test statistic. However, it makes the key assumptions about equal recovery effort in time and space so that the method may be most applicable to comparison among species with similar migration timing and movement to keep differential sighting/recovery rates from affecting the result. Of course, it is in these cases where it is most difficulty to separate the groups which will require substantial samples to have good performance. Thorup and Rahbek (Thorup & Rahbek, 2004 provide a framework for accounting for unequal spatial recovery probability investigating the geometric influence of ocean and sea on observed migratory patterns. Taking the data set of Pied Flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca ringed as nestlings in Scandinavia and recovered en route on their initial migration and using a model based on the clock–and–compass innate navigation hypothesis they are showing that geometric constraints explain quite a bit of the variation in ring–recoveries. The model also shows that ring recovery patterns do reflect the migratory patterns, and that they are suitable for an analysis of the concentration of the migratory route which is important for the general use of ringing data in studies of migration. This is important for the general use of ringing data in studies of migration and dispersal. The new approach has also implications for understanding the migratory orientation program. The compiled papers highlight some novel ideas of how to analyse band recoveries to investigate migration routes and migration behaviour as well as dispersal patterns among birds and dolphins. Multistate modeling appears

  4. TESTING FOR VARYING DISPERSION IN DISCRETE EXPONENTIAL FAMILY NONLINEAR MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinJinguan; WeiBocheng; ZhangNansong

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to test for varying dispersion in generalized nonlinear models. Wei ,et al(1998) developed a likelihood ratio test,a score test and their adjustments to test for varying dispersion in continuous exponential family nonlinear models. This type of problem in the framework of general discrete exponential family nonlinear models is discussed. Two types of varying dispersion, which are random coefficients model and random effects model, are proposed,and corresponding score test statistics are constructed and expressed in simple ,easy to use ,matrix formulas.

  5. Rates of Gravel Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the three-dimensional dispersion of mixed size sediment. From a kinematics standpoint, few studies are available to inform on the streamwise and vertical rates of sediment dispersion in natural channels. This research uses a gravel tracing program to quantify dispersion rates over 19 flood seasons. Empirical observations come from Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. Frequent floods and the relatively limited armor layer facilitate streambed activity and relatively high bedload transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. Over 2500 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1989 and 1992 in four generations. To quantify gravel dispersion over distances up to 2.6 km, observations are taken from 11 recoveries. Over 280 floods capable of moving bedload occurred during this period, with five exceeding the estimated bankfull discharge. Streamwise dispersion is quantified by virtual velocity, while dispersion into the streambed is quantified by a vertical burial rate. The temporal trend in streamwise dispersion rates is described by a power function. Initial virtual velocities decline rapidly from around 1.4 m/hr to approach an asymptote value of about 0.2 m/hr. The rapid change corresponds to a significant increase in the proportion of buried tracers due to vertical mixing. Initial burial rates reflect the magnitude of the first flood after tracer deployment and range from 0.07 to 0.46 cm/hr depending on tracer generation. Burial rates converge to about 0.06 cm/hr after the fourth flood season and then gradually decline to about 0.01 cm/hr. Thus, the rate of streamwise dispersion exceeds that of vertical dispersion by three orders of magnitude when the movement of sediment routinely activated by floods is considered.

  6. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  7. The role of individual variation in marine larval dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Berend Nanninga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of individuals among patchy habitats plays a central role in spatial ecology and metapopulation dynamics. Dispersal (e.g. short vs. long is frequently observed to vary non-randomly within populations, indicating that variability among individuals may shape heterogeneity in patterns of connectivity. The concept of context- and condition-dependent dispersal describes the balance between the costs and benefits of dispersal that arises from the interaction of temporal and spatial landscape heterogeneity (the context with phenotypic variability among individuals (the condition. While this hypothesis is widely accepted terrestrial theory, it remains questionable to what extent the concept of adaptive dispersal strategies may apply to marine larval dispersal, a process that is largely determined by stochastic forces. Yet, larvae of many taxa exhibit strong navigational capabilities and there is mounting evidence of widespread intra-specific variability in biological traits that are potentially correlated with dispersal potential. While so far there are few known examples of real larval dispersal polymorphisms, intra-specifically variable dispersal strategies may be common in marine systems. Whether adaptive or not, it is becoming apparent that inter-individual heterogeneity in morphology, behaviour, condition, and life history traits may have critical effects on population-level heterogeneity in dispersal. Here, we explore the eco-evolutionary causes and consequences of intrinsic and extrinsic variability on larval dispersal by synthesizing the existing literature and drawing conceptual parallels from terrestrial theory. We emphasize the potential importance of larval dispersal polymorphisms in marine population dynamics.

  8. The role of individual variation in marine larval dispersal

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.

    2014-12-08

    The exchange of individuals among patchy habitats plays a central role in spatial ecology and metapopulation dynamics. Dispersal is frequently observed to vary non-randomly within populations (e.g., short vs. long), indicating that variability among individuals may shape heterogeneity in patterns of connectivity. The concept of context- and condition-dependent dispersal describes the balance between the costs and benefits of dispersal that arises from the interaction of temporal and spatial landscape heterogeneity (the context) with phenotypic variability among individuals (the condition). While this hypothesis is widely accepted in terrestrial theory, it remains questionable to what extent the concept of adaptive dispersal strategies may apply to marine larval dispersal, a process that is largely determined by stochastic forces. Yet, larvae of many taxa exhibit strong navigational capabilities and there is mounting evidence of widespread intra-specific variability in biological traits that are potentially correlated with dispersal potential. While so far there are few known examples of real larval dispersal polymorphisms, intra-specifically variable dispersal strategies may be common in marine systems. Whether adaptive or not, it is becoming apparent that inter-individual heterogeneity in morphology, behavior, condition, and life history traits may have critical effects on population-level heterogeneity in dispersal. Here, we explore the eco-evolutionary causes and consequences of intrinsic and extrinsic variability on larval dispersal by synthesizing the existing literature and drawing conceptual parallels from terrestrial theory. We emphasize the potential importance of larval dispersal polymorphisms in marine population dynamics.

  9. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  10. Dispersion forces in methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Coulon, P.; Luyckx, R.

    1977-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6 and R-7 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between two methane molecules and between methane and helium, neon and argon are calculated by a variation method.

  11. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  12. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...... dependent particle velocity into a position independent Gaussian velocity. Boundary conditions are obtained from Itos rule of stochastic differentiation. The model directly point at a canonical rule of reflection for the approximating random walk with finite time step. This reflection rule is different from...

  13. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  14. Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Christoffer; Nordstierna, Lars; Nordin, Matias; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed.

  15. The interaction of hydrazine with an Rh(1 1 1) surface as a model for adsorption to rhodium nanoparticles: A dispersion-corrected DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yan Bin [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Pharmaceutical Department, Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi 046000 (China); Jia, Jian Feng, E-mail: jiajf@dns.sxnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Wu, Hai Shun, E-mail: wuhs@mail.sxnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • We propose a model suitable for simulating the adsorption of hydrazine on rhodium nanoparticles. • We found that inclusion of dispersion correction results in significant enhancement for the adsorption to the Rh(1 1 1) surface. • Nanoparticles surface with lower-coordinated sites are more reactive than those with almost saturated surface sites. - Abstract: In recent years, metal nanoparticles were found to be excellent catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrazine for chemical hydrogen storage. In order to gain a better understanding of these catalytic systems, we have simulated the adsorption of hydrazine on rhodium nanoparticles surfaces by density functional theory (DFT) calculations with dispersion correction, DFT-D3 in the method of Grimme. The rhodium nanoparticles were modeled by the Rh(1 1 1) surface, in addition, the adsorptions at corners and edges sites of nanoparticles were considered by using rhodium adatoms on the surfaces. The calculations showed that hydrazine binds most strongly to the edge of nanoparticle with adsorption energy of −2.48 eV, where the hydrazine bridges adatoms of edge with the molecule twisted to avoid a cis structure; similar adsorption energy was found at the corner of nanoparticle, where the hydrazine bridges corner atom and surface atom with gauche configuration. However, we found that inclusion of the dispersion correction results in significant enhancement of molecule–substrate binding, thereby increasing the adsorption energy, especially the adsorption to the Rh(1 1 1) surface. The results demonstrate that the surface structure is a key factor to determine the thermodynamics of adsorption, with low coordinated atoms which providing sites of strong adsorption from the surface.

  16. Coping with power dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The last decades have witnessed a significant shift in policy competences away from central governments in Europe. The reallocation of competences spans over three dimensions: upwards; sideways; and downwards. This collection takes the dispersion of powers as a starting point and seeks to assess...... how the actors involved cope with the new configurations. In this introduction, we discuss the conceptualization of power dispersion and highlight the ways in which the contributions add to this research agenda. We then outline some general conclusions and end by indicating future avenues of research...

  17. Graphene random laser

    CERN Document Server

    Marini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating and controlling the optical energy flow inside random media is a research frontier of photonics and the basis of novel laser designs. In particular, light amplification in randomly dispersed active inclusions under external pumping has been extensively investigated, although it still lacks external tunability, reproducibility, and control over the beam spatial pattern, thus hindering its application in practical devices. Here we show that a graphene random metamaterial provides the means to overcome these limitations through its extraordinarily-low threshold for saturable absorption. The nonlinear properties of nano-graphene combined with an optically pumped gain medium allow us to controllably tune the system from chaotic to stable single-mode lasing. Our results hold great potential for the development of single-mode cavity-free lasers with engineered beam patterns in disordered media.

  18. Random duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO TieXin; CHEN XinXiang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a random duality theory for the further development of the theory of random conjugate spaces for random normed modules.First,the complicated stratification structure of a module over the algebra L(μ,K) frequently makes our investigations into random duality theory considerably different from the corresponding ones into classical duality theory,thus in this paper we have to first begin in overcoming several substantial obstacles to the study of stratification structure on random locally convex modules.Then,we give the representation theorem of weakly continuous canonical module homomorphisms,the theorem of existence of random Mackey structure,and the random bipolar theorem with respect to a regular random duality pair together with some important random compatible invariants.

  19. Random duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a random duality theory for the further development of the theory of random conjugate spaces for random normed modules. First, the complicated stratification structure of a module over the algebra L(μ, K) frequently makes our investigations into random duality theory considerably difierent from the corresponding ones into classical duality theory, thus in this paper we have to first begin in overcoming several substantial obstacles to the study of stratification structure on random locally convex modules. Then, we give the representation theorem of weakly continuous canonical module homomorphisms, the theorem of existence of random Mackey structure, and the random bipolar theorem with respect to a regular random duality pair together with some important random compatible invariants.

  20. Dispersion relation of excitation mode in strongly interacting fermions matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Ping; Chen Ji-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the excitation mode in non-relativistic interacting fermion matter.The polarization tensor is calculated with the random phase approximation in terms of finite temperature field theory.With the polarization tensor, the influences of temperature, particle number density and interaction strength on the dispersion relation are discussed in detail. It finds that the collective effects are qualitatively more important in the unitary fermions than those in the finite contact interaction matter.

  1. Performance Analysis of High-speed Optical Pulse Transmission in Dispersion-managed Nonlinear Birefringent Fiber Using Quantum Well Laser Diode Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Minhui; CHEN Jianping

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the high bit-rate optical pulse trasmission in single mode optical fiber with chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion (small random birefringence) and nonlinearity. Numerical method employed can precisely describe their interactive effect on transmission performance. Different dispersion maps and the related performance are analysed. Various simulation results and discussion are given. The results show that chromatic dispersion compensation should be carefully designed. Appropriate dispersion management can also alleviate the effect of polarization mode dispersion.

  2. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to aid...... personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector......, who have a work place away from a fixed or central location and have minimal management contact. Results suggest that the support employees receive from management, such as recognition, information sharing, training, and strategic awareness are all important for spatially dispersed front...

  3. Light dispersion in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  4. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  5. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  6. Validity condition of separating dispersion of PCFs into material dispersion and geometrical dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Lantian Hou; Zhaolun Liu; Guiyao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    When using normalized dispersion method for the dispersion design of photonic crystal fibers(PCFs),it is vital that the group velocity dispersion of PCF can be seen as the sum of geometrical dispersion and material dispersion.However,the error induced by this way of calculation will deteriorate the final results.Taking 5 ps/(km·nm)and 5% as absolute error and relative error limits,respectively,the structure parameter boundaries of PCFs about when separating total dispersion into geometrical and material components is valid are provided for wavelength shorter than 1700 nm.By using these two criteria together,it is adequate to evaluate the simulatcd dispersion of PCFs when normalized dispersion method is employed.

  7. Informed dispersal, heterogeneity in animal dispersal syndromes and the dynamics of spatially structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clobert, Jean; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Cote, Julien; Meylan, Sandrine; Massot, Manuel

    2009-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that individuals leave their natal area and select a breeding habitat non-randomly by relying upon information about their natal and future breeding environments. This variation in dispersal is not only based on external information (condition dependence) but also depends upon the internal state of individuals (phenotype dependence). As a consequence, not all dispersers are of the same quality or search for the same habitats. In addition, the individual's state is characterized by morphological, physiological or behavioural attributes that might themselves serve as a cue altering the habitat choice of conspecifics. These combined effects of internal and external information have the potential to generate complex movement patterns and could influence population dynamics and colonization processes. Here, we highlight three particular processes that link condition-dependent dispersal, phenotype-dependent dispersal and habitat choice strategies: (1) the relationship between the cause of departure and the dispersers' phenotype; (2) the relationship between the cause of departure and the settlement behaviour and (3) the concept of informed dispersal, where individuals gather and transfer information before and during their movements through the landscape. We review the empirical evidence for these processes with a special emphasis on vertebrate and arthropod model systems, and present case studies that have quantified the impacts of these processes on spatially structured population dynamics. We also discuss recent literature providing strong evidence that individual variation in dispersal has an important impact on both reinforcement and colonization success and therefore must be taken into account when predicting ecological responses to global warming and habitat fragmentation.

  8. INFLUENCE OF CHROMATIC DISPERSION, DISPERSION SLOPE, DISPERSION CURVATURE ON MICROWAVE GENERATION USING TWO CASCADE MODULATORS

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeep Singh; S.K. Raghuwanshi

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of harmonic generation of microwave signals after detection of a modulated optical carrier in cascaded two electro-optic modulators. Dispersion is one of the major limiting factors for microwave generation in microwave photonics. In this paper, we analyze influence of chromatic dispersion, dispersion slope, dispersion curvature on microwave generation using two cascaded MZMs and it has been found that output intensity of photodetector reduces when disper...

  9. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.

  10. Dispersion Interactions in Water Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidez, Emilie B; Gordon, Mark S

    2017-05-18

    The importance of dispersion forces in water clusters is examined using the effective fragment potential (EFP) method. Since the original EFP1 water potential does not include dispersion, a dispersion correction to the EFP1 potential (EFP1-D) was derived and implemented. The addition of dispersion to the EFP1 potential yields improved geometries for water clusters that contain 2-6 molecules. The importance of the odd E7 contribution to the dispersion energy is investigated. The E7 dispersion term is repulsive for all of the water clusters studied here and can have a magnitude that is as large as half of the E6 value. The E7 term therefore contributes to larger intermolecular distances for the optimized geometries. Inclusion of many-body effects and/or higher order terms may be necessary to further improve dispersion energies and optimized geometries.

  11. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-15

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  12. Imaging Through Random Discrete-Scatterer Dispersive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    trigonometric identities , and expressed in terms of the sine and cosine integrals. The individual partial-fraction terms have poles on the integration...of identical pulses emitted at linearly varying (chirped) time intervals. The wide-band nature of the pulses was facilitating their penetration...density, PSF, and AF structure. A. Definition of a chirped train of pulses We consider a signal F (t) composed of a sequence of identical pulses f(t

  13. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  14. Relevance of GaAs(001) surface electronic structure for high frequency dispersion on n-type accumulation capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, T. W.; Chen, W. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, Y. T.; Wei, G. J.; Lin, K. Y.; Cheng, C.-P.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the origin of long-puzzled high frequency dispersion on the accumulation region of capacitance-voltage characteristics in an n-type GaAs-based metal-oxide-semiconductor. Probed adatoms with a high Pauling electronegativity, Ag and Au, unexpectedly donate charge to the contacted As/Ga atoms of as-grown α2 GaAs(001)-2 × 4 surfaces. The GaAs surface atoms behave as charge acceptors, and if not properly passivated, they would trap those electrons accumulated at the oxide and semiconductor interface under a positive bias. The exemplified core-level spectra of the Al2O3/n-GaAs(001)-2 × 4 and the Al2O3/n-GaAs(001)-4 × 6 interfaces exhibit remnant of pristine surface As emission, thereby causing high frequency dispersion in the accumulation region. For the p-type GaAs, electrons under a negatively biased condition are expelled from the interface, thereby avoiding becoming trapped.

  15. Density Functional Theory with Modified Dispersion Correction for Metals Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers of Thiols on Au(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Andersson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using sound physical principles we modify the DFT-D2 atom pairwise semiempirical dispersion correction to density functional theory to work for metallic systems and in particular self-assembled monolayers of thiols on gold surfaces. We test our approximation for two functionals PBE-D and revPBE-D for lattice parameters and cohesive energies for Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au, adsorption energies of CO on (111 surfaces of Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au, and adsorption energy of benzene on Ag(111 and Au(111. Agreement with experimental data is substantially improved. We apply the method to self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au(111 and find reasonable agreement for PBE-D and revPBE-D for both physisorption of n-alkanethiols as well as dissociative chemisorption of dimethyl disulfide as an Au-adatom-dithiolate complex. By modifying the C6 coefficient for Au, we obtain quantitative agreement for physisorption and chemisorption for both PBE-D and revPBE-D using the same set of parameters. Our results confirm that inclusion of dispersion forces is crucial for any quantitative analysis of the thiol and thiolate bonds to the gold surface using quantum chemical calculations.

  16. Condition-dependent dispersal of a patchily distributed riparian ground beetle in response to disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Adam J; Sadler, Jon P; Fowles, Adrian P

    2006-11-01

    In common with many habitat elements of riverine landscapes, exposed riverine sediments (ERS) are highly disturbed, naturally patchy and regularly distributed, whose specialists are strongly adapted to flood disturbance and loss of habitat due to succession. Investigations of dispersal in ERS habitats therefore provide an important contrast to the unnaturally fragmented, stable systems usually studied. The present investigation analysed the three interdependent stages of dispersal: (1) emigration, (2) inter-patch movement and (3) immigration of a common ERS specialised beetle, Bembidion atrocaeruleum (Stephens 1828) (Coleoptera, Carabidae), in a relatively unmodified section of river, using mark-resight methods. Dispersal was correlated with estimates of local population size and density, water level and patch quality in order to test for condition-dependent dispersal cues. Flood inundation of habitat was found to increase strongly the overall rate of dispersal, and the rate of emigration was significantly higher from patches that were heavily trampled by cattle. Strongly declining numbers of dispersers with distance suggested low dispersal rates during periods of low water level. Dispersal in response to habitat degradation by cattle trampling would likely lead to a higher overall population fitness than a random dispersal strategy. Dispersal distances were probably adapted to the underlying habitat landscape distribution, high-flow dispersal cues and ready means of long-distance dispersal through hydrochory. Species whose dispersal is adapted to the natural habitat distribution of riverine landscapes are likely to be strongly negatively affected by reduced flood frequency and intensity and habitat fragmentation through flow regulation or channelisation.

  17. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-12-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (pdispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  19. Random Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanov, M A; Wettig, T

    2005-01-01

    We review elementary properties of random matrices and discuss widely used mathematical methods for both hermitian and nonhermitian random matrix ensembles. Applications to a wide range of physics problems are summarized. This paper originally appeared as an article in the Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

  20. Amplified Dispersive Optical Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2008-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be a powerful technique for studying tissue morphology in ophthalmology, cardiology, and endomicroscopy. Its performance is limited by the fundamental trade-off between the imaging sensitivity and acquisition speed -- a predicament common in virtually all imaging systems. In this paper, we circumvent this limit by using distributed Raman post-amplification of the reflection from the sample. We combine the amplification with simultaneously performed dispersive Fourier transformation, a process that maps the optical spectrum into an easily measured time-domain waveform. The Raman amplification enables measurement of weak signals which are otherwise buried in noise. It extends the depth range without sacrificing the acquisition speed or causing damage to the sample. As proof of concept, single-shot imaging with 15 dB improvement in sensitivity at an axial scan rate of 36.6 MHz is demonstrated.

  1. Natural dispersion revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Øistein; Reed, Mark; Bodsberg, Nils Rune

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new semi-empirical model for oil droplet size distributions generated by single breaking wave events. Empirical data was obtained from laboratory experiments with different crude oils at different stages of weathering. The paper starts with a review of the most commonly used model for natural dispersion, which is followed by a presentation of the laboratory study on oil droplet size distributions formed by breaking waves conducted by SINTEF on behalf of the NOAA/UNH Coastal Response Research Center. The next section presents the theoretical and empirical foundation for the new model. The model is based on dimensional analysis and contains two non-dimensional groups; the Weber and Reynolds number. The model was validated with data from a full scale experimental oil spill conducted in the Haltenbanken area offshore Norway in July 1982, as described in the last section of the paper.

  2. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  3. Progress in urban dispersion studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The present Study addresses recent achievements in better representation Of the urban area structure in meteorology and dispersion parameterisations. The setup and Main Outcome of several recent dispersion experiments in Urban areas and their use in model validation are discussed. The maximum...... BUBBLE Tracer Experiment) the horizontal spread of the plume corresponds to a Lagrangian time scale bigger than the value for ground Sources. Turbulence measurements LIP to 3-5 times the building height Lire needed for direct use in dispersion Calculations....

  4. INFLUENCE OF CHROMATIC DISPERSION, DISPERSION SLOPE, DISPERSION CURVATURE ON MICROWAVE GENERATION USING TWO CASCADE MODULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Singh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a theoretical study of harmonic generation of microwave signals after detection of a modulated optical carrier in cascaded two electro-optic modulators. Dispersion is one of the major limiting factors for microwave generation in microwave photonics. In this paper, we analyze influence of chromatic dispersion, dispersion slope, dispersion curvature on microwave generation using two cascaded MZMs and it has been found that output intensity of photodetector reduces when dispersion term up to fifth order are added. We have used the two cascaded Mach-Zehnder Modulators for our proposed model and tried to show the dispersion effect with the help of modulation depth factor of MZM, which have been not discussed earlier.

  5. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  6. The NET effect of dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops; Albertinka J. Murk

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  7. Fermion dispersion in axion medium

    OpenAIRE

    Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of a fermion with the dense axion medium is investigated for the purpose of finding an axion medium effect on the fermion dispersion. It is shown that axion medium influence on the fermion dispersion under astrophysical conditions is negligible small if the correct Lagrangian of the axion-fermion interaction is used.

  8. Large deviations in Taylor dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlen, Marcel; Engel, Andreas; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We establish a link between the phenomenon of Taylor dispersion and the theory of empirical distributions. Using this connection, we derive, upon applying the theory of large deviations, an alternative and much more precise description of the long-time regime for Taylor dispersion.

  9. Pigment dispersion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Sandhya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report of the rare occurrence of pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS with posterior subcapsular cataract in both eyes in a young male patient. The patient presented with complaints of progressive decrease in vision of one year duration. The patient also had high myopia with mild iridodonesis, phacodonesis and anterior insertion of zonules. Classical signs of PDS like Krukenberg's spindle on the posterior corneal surface were evident on slit lamp examination; transillumination defects in the iris could not be elicited by retroillumination as the iris was heavily pigmented. Gonioscopy revealed heavy and uniform pigmentation of trabecular meshwork. Evidence of a characteristic iris configuration on optical coherence tomography (OCT, namely, posterior bowing of iris in the mid periphery suggested the diagnosis of PDS. This case highlights the importance of OCT in identifying the iris configuration characteristically seen in PDS even in the absence of transillumination defects in the iris and reiterates the need to look for subtle signs like phacodonesis which are important when surgical intervention is planned.

  10. Dispersion in unit disks

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    We present two new approximation algorithms with (improved) constant ratios for selecting $n$ points in $n$ unit disks such that the minimum pairwise distance among the points is maximized. (I) A very simple $O(n \\log{n})$-time algorithm with ratio 0.5110 for disjoint unit disks. In combination with an algorithm of Cabello \\cite{Ca07}, it yields a $O(n^2)$-time algorithm with ratio of 0.4487 for dispersion in $n$ not necessarily disjoint unit disks. (II) A more sophisticated LP-based algorithm with ratio 0.6495 for disjoint unit disks that uses a linear number of variables and constraints, and runs in polynomial time. The algorithm introduces a novel technique which combines linear programming and projections for approximating distances. The previous best approximation ratio for disjoint unit disks was 1/2. Our results give a partial answer to an open question raised by Cabello \\cite{Ca07}, who asked whether 1/2 could be improved.

  11. Air Flow and Dispersion Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slinn, W. G.N.; Nicola, P. W.; Powell, D. C.; Davis, W. E.

    1976-03-01

    There are eight papers in this section. Some of the fundamentals of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants are examined with theoretical analyses as well as detailed experimental investigations. Emphasis has been placed on analyzing and summarizing previous experimental dispersion data with more realistic and fundamentally sound approaches to plume behavior. The goal is to finalize improved short-range dispersion models from existing data, removing inconsistencies and inadequacies in presently applied assessment models. Dispersion and transport efforts in the future should aim toward evaluating plume behavior on meso and regional scales. The complex features of flow and dispersion through storms, and in the vicinity of significant terrain characteristics influencing local to regional circulations must receive future emphasis. (auth)

  12. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices.

  13. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  14. Understanding the relative role of dispersion mechanisms across basin scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, M.; Zarlenga, A.; Volpi, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms are understood to represent the primary sources of the variance of travel time distribution in natural catchments. To quantify the fraction of variance introduced by each component, dispersion coefficients have been earlier defined in the framework of geomorphology-based rainfall-runoff models. In this paper we compare over a wide range of basin sizes and for a variety of runoff conditions the relative role of geomorphological dispersion, related to the heterogeneity of path lengths, and hillslope kinematic dispersion, generated by flow processes within the hillslopes. Unlike previous works, our approach does not focus on a specific study case; instead, we try to generalize results already obtained in previous literature stemming from the definition of a few significant parameters related to the metrics of the catchment and flow dynamics. We further extend this conceptual framework considering the effects of two additional variance-producing processes: the first covers the random variability of hillslope velocities (i.e. of travel times over hillslopes); the second deals with non-uniform production of runoff over the basin (specifically related to drainage density). Results are useful to clarify the role of hillslope kinematic dispersion and define under which conditions it counteracts or reinforces geomorphological dispersion. We show how its sign is ruled by the specific spatial distribution of hillslope lengths within the basin, as well as by flow conditions. Interestingly, while negative in a wide range of cases, kinematic dispersion is expected to become invariantly positive when the variability of hillslope velocity is large.

  15. Effects of habitat availability on dispersion of a stream cyprinid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mary C.; Grossman, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed temporal changes in the dispersion of the rosyside dace,Clinostomus funduloides, (family Cyprinidae) in a headwater stream, to assess the role of habitat availability in promoting fish aggregation. The dace foraged alone and in groups of up to about 25 individuals, and dispersion varied significantly among monthly censuses conducted from May through December. In two of three study pools, dace aggregated during July, October and/or December, but spread out during other months, especially during September when dispersion did not differ significantly from random. Dispersion was not significantly correlated with the total amount of suitable habitat available to foraging dace, but during summer, corresponded to the availability of depositional areas adjacent to rapid currents. Foragers aggregated in eddies or depositional areas during high stream discharge in July, and shifted out of depositional areas when current velocities declined from July to September. During late autumn, however, aggregations formed independently of changes in habitat conditions, and dace dispersion did not vary significantly among months in a third pool. The study suggests that dace dispersion cannot be predicted from the overall availability of suitable habitat as estimated from point measurements of depth and velocity; both the occurrence of a specific habitat feature (i.e., eddies adjacent to high velocity currents) and seasonal differences in behavior more strongly influenced the spatial distribution of foragers.

  16. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  17. Collision-induced timing jitter in dispersion-managed WDM soliton system with filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Du(杜建新); Qihong Lou(楼祺洪)

    2004-01-01

    Taking into account the randomicity of collision positions and the arbitrary encoding of data in channel,the influences of different dispersion management on collision-induced timing jitter in a filtered wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) soliton system are obtained statistically and numerically by applying a set of coupled ordinary differential equations which are derived through variational procedure. The optimal dispersion managements which can greatly reduce the collision-induced timing jitter are found. The multi-channel collision-induced timing jitters in a filtered WDM soliton system are given with an optimal dispersion management and constant dispersion.

  18. Brillouin precursor waveforms pertaining to UWB noise radar signals propagating through dispersive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, M.; Alejos, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating through causal, linear, and lossy dispersive media (soil, foliage, plasma, water, biological tissue, etc.), experience frequency-dependent attenuation and phase distortion. This has assumed significant importance for systems operating with ultrawideband (UWB) spectrum. This paper analyzes the dynamical evolution of UWB noise radar signals through dispersive media. The effects on the signal propagation due to the evolution of the Brillouin precursor through dispersive media are discussed. The evolving waveforms are then compared with the Brillouin precursor due to rectangular sine-modulated deterministic signals. The advantages of random noise waveforms through dispersive media are also discussed.

  19. Random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1990-01-01

    Since the publication of Random Matrices (Academic Press, 1967) so many new results have emerged both in theory and in applications, that this edition is almost completely revised to reflect the developments. For example, the theory of matrices with quaternion elements was developed to compute certain multiple integrals, and the inverse scattering theory was used to derive asymptotic results. The discovery of Selberg's 1944 paper on a multiple integral also gave rise to hundreds of recent publications. This book presents a coherent and detailed analytical treatment of random matrices, leading

  20. Dispersion scenarios over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Mikkelsen, T.; Moreno, J.

    1993-01-01

    A presentation of preliminary results from a real-time simulation of full-scale dispersion experiments carried out over complex terrain in Northern Spain is given. Actual wind and turbulence measurements as observed during the experiments were analysed and used as input data for a series of simul......A presentation of preliminary results from a real-time simulation of full-scale dispersion experiments carried out over complex terrain in Northern Spain is given. Actual wind and turbulence measurements as observed during the experiments were analysed and used as input data for a series...... are suitable for subsequent comparison with observed mean dispersion data when they become available....

  1. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  2. Randomized metarounding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARR,ROBERT D.; VEMPALA,SANTOSH

    2000-01-25

    The authors present a new technique for the design of approximation algorithms that can be viewed as a generalization of randomized rounding. They derive new or improved approximation guarantees for a class of generalized congestion problems such as multicast congestion, multiple TSP etc. Their main mathematical tool is a structural decomposition theorem related to the integrality gap of a relaxation.

  3. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graeme D. Ruxton; H. Martin Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    ...—dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied...

  4. Superradiant scattering of dispersive fields

    CERN Document Server

    Richartz, Maurício; Weinfurtner, Silke; Liberati, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by analogue models of classical and quantum field theory in curved spacetimes and their recent experimental realizations, we consider wave scattering processes of dispersive fields exhibiting two extra degrees of freedom. In particular, we investigate how standard superradiant scattering processes are affected by subluminal or superluminal modifications of the dispersion relation. We analyze simple 1-dimensional toy-models based on fourth-order corrections to the standard second order wave equation and show that low-frequency waves impinging on generic scattering potentials can be amplified during the process. In specific cases, by assuming a simple step potential, we determine quantitatively the deviations in the amplification spectrum that arise due to dispersion, and demonstrate that the amplification can be further enhanced due to the presence of extra degrees of freedom. We also consider dispersive scattering processes in which the medium where the scattering takes place is moving with respect ...

  5. Asphaltene dispersants as demulsification aids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manek, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Destabilization of petroleum asphaltenes may cause a multitude of problems in crude oil recovery and production. One major problem is their agglomeration at the water-oil interface of crude oil emulsions. Once agglomeration occurs, destabilized asphaltenes can form a thick pad in the dehydration equipment, which significantly reduces the demulsification rate. Certain polymeric dispersants increase asphaltene solubilization in hydrocarbon media, and when used in conjunction with emulsion breakers, facilitate the demulsification process. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how asphaltene dispersants can efficiently inhibit pad formation and help reduce demulsifier dosage. Criteria for dispersant application and selection are discussed, which include the application of a novel laboratory technique to assess asphaltene stabilization in the crude oil. The technique monitors asphaltene agglomeration while undergoing titration with an incompatible solvent (precipitant). The method was used to evaluate stabilization of asphaltenes in the crude oil and to screen asphaltene dispersants.

  6. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  7. Dispersion engineering for integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbésien, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book shows how dispersion engineering in two dimensional dielectric photonic crystals can provide new effects for the precise control of light propagation for integrated nanophotonics.Dispersion engineering in regular and graded photonic crystals to promote anomalous refraction effects is studied from the concepts to experimental demonstration via nanofabrication considerations. Self collimation, ultra and negative refraction, second harmonic generation, mirage and invisibility effects which lead to an unprecedented control of light propagation at the (sub-)wavelength scale for the

  8. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  9. LINEAR-DISPERSION DIVISION MULTIPLE-ACCESS FOR MIMO SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Dan; Lv Xingzai; Zhu Jinkang

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive study on novel Linear-Dispersion Division Multiple-Access (LDDMA) for multi-user uplink Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) systems is proposed. In the new multi- plexing scheme, each user's information symbol is dispersed by a User-Specific Matrix (USM) both in space and time domain and linearly combined at base-station side. And a simple random search al- gorithm, based on capacity maximization criteria, is developed to generate a bank of USMs. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the advantages of LDDMA. When the Bit Error Rate (BER) reaches 10, the performance gains are 3dB and 5dB, compared with Time-Division Linear Dispersion Codes (TD-LDC) and BLAST, respectively.

  10. Rheology and phase behavior of dense casein micelle dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoux, A.; Debbou, B.; Gésan-Guiziou, G.; Famelart, M.-H.; Doublier, J.-L.; Cabane, B.

    2009-10-01

    Casein micelle dispersions have been concentrated through osmotic stress and examined through rheological experiments. In conditions where the casein micelles are separated from each other, i.e., below random-close packing, the dispersions have exactly the flow and dynamic properties of the polydisperse hard-sphere fluid, demonstrating that the micelles interact only through excluded volume effects in this regime. These interactions cause the viscosity and the elastic modulus to increase by three orders of magnitude approaching the concentration of random-close packing estimated at Cmax≈178 g/l. Above Cmax, the dispersions progressively turn into "gels" (i.e., soft solids) as C increases, with elastic moduli G' that are nearly frequency independent. In this second regime, the micelles deform and/or deswell as C increases, and the resistance to deformation results from the formation of bonds between micelles combined with the intrinsic mechanical resistance of the micelles. The variation in G' with C is then very similar to that observed with concentrated emulsions where the resistance to deformation originates from a set of membranes that separate the droplets. As in the case of emulsions, the G' values at high frequency are also nearly identical to the osmotic pressures required to compress the casein dispersions. The rheology of sodium caseinate dispersions in which the caseins are not structured into micelles is also reported. Such dispersions have the behavior of associative polymer solutions at all the concentrations investigated, further confirming the importance of structure in determining the rheological properties of casein micelle systems.

  11. Fractional randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  12. Random-walk enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  13. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  15. Weight loss and P wave dispersion: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Anna Giulia; Grecchi, Ilaria; Muggia, Chiara; Tinelli, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if therapeutic weight loss reduces P wave dispersion. 20 obese patients (10 males and 10 females), part of a randomized clinical trial, were examined over a 6 month period. They were treated with a diet, aiming at 5% weight loss at the 6th month. After physical examination, they underwent laboratory tests, bioelectrical impedance analysis and a electrocardiogram (ECG). ECGs were transferred to a personal computer via a scanner and then magnified 400 times. We examined at baseline and at the 6th month, maximum and minimum P-wave duration, P-wave dispersion and heart rate. Comparing responders (patients who lost 5% of weight at t6) and not responders (who lost less than 5%), responders showed a significant reduction of P wave dispersion value (-0.38 [SD: 0.35] mm equal to -32.3 [SD: 11.3] % p=0.00001). All responders present a reduction of P wave dispersion, while for not-responders this is no longer evident. Finally, a good degree of correlation (r=0.54) between P wave dispersion difference and the decrease of weight was noticed. Females have a better response in P dispersion reduction strictly connected with their weight loss with a good correlation, (r=0.7, p=0.002), versus a moderate correlation evidenced in males (r=0.5, p=0.011). P wave duration and dispersion are significantly reduced in patients who lost more than 5% of weight and this decrease is highly related to the extent of weight loss. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dispersion properties of photonic Bandgap Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil; Søndergaard, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Dispersion properties of new low-index core photonic crystal fibres are presented. Both wideband nearzero despersion and very large dispersion is shown possible in the 1550 nm wavelength range.......Dispersion properties of new low-index core photonic crystal fibres are presented. Both wideband nearzero despersion and very large dispersion is shown possible in the 1550 nm wavelength range....

  17. Dispersion Management with Higher Order Mode Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddharth Ramachandran

    2003-01-01

    Dispersion compensation with few-mode fibers is emerging as a promising technique that can provide full dispersion and dispersion-slope compensation. The inherent modal path diversity of these fibers allows implementation of static as well as tunable dispersion management schemes. In addition, the low nonlinearityof this technology can improve system OSNR, leading to enhancements in transmission distances.

  18. Dispersion Management with Higher Order Mode Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddharth; Ramachandran

    2003-01-01

    Dispersion compensation with few-mode fibers is emerging as a promising technique that can provide full dispersion and dispersion-slope compensation. The inherent modal path diversity of these fibers allows implementation of static as well as tunable dispersion management schemes. In addition, the low non-linearity of this technology can improve system OSNR, leading to enhancements in transmission distances.

  19. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, J.S.; Wall, S.B.V.; Jenkins, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period.Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5–25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a

  20. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Jennifer S; Vander Wall, Stephen B; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2009-03-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period. Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5-25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a

  1. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  2. HYPERBRANCHED POLYMERIC DISPERSANTS AND NON-AQUEOUS PIGMENT DISPERSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ANDRE, XAVIER; Bernaerts, Katrien

    2011-01-01

    A polymeric dispersant having a hyperbranched polyurethane architecture obtained by reacting a polyisocyanate core with a mixture of a) 40 to 65 mol% of an anchor represented by Formula (I) and/or (II) wherein n represents an integer selected from 0 to 7; and X and Y each independently represent a p

  3. Hyperbranched polymeric dispersants and non-aqueous pigment dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ANDRE, XAVIER; Bernaerts, Katrien

    2012-01-01

    The invention discloses a polymeric dispersant having a hyperbranched polyurethane architecture obtained by reacting a polyisocyanate core with a mixture of a) 40 to 65 mol% of an anchor represented by Formula (I) and/or (II) wherein n represents an integer selected from 0 to 7; and X and Y each ind

  4. HYPERBRANCHED POLYMERIC DISPERSANTS AND NON-AQUEOUS PIGMENT DISPERSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ANCRE, XAVIER; BERNAERTS, KATRIEN; ANDRE, XAVIER

    2012-01-01

    A polymeric dispersant having a hyperbranched polyurethane architecture obtained by reacting a polyisocyanate core with a mixture of: a) 40 to 65 mol % of an anchor represented by Formula (I) and/or (II): wherein n represents an integer selected from 0 to 7; and X and Y each independently represent

  5. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  6. A generalized advection dispersion equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdon Atangana

    2014-02-01

    This paper examines a possible effect of uncertainties, variability or heterogeneity of any dynamic system when being included in its evolution rule; the notion is illustrated with the advection dispersion equation, which describes the groundwater pollution model. An uncertain derivative is defined; some properties of the operator are presented. The operator is used to generalize the advection dispersion equation. The generalized equation differs from the standard equation in four properties. The generalized equation is solved via the variational iteration technique. Some illustrative figures are presented.

  7. Dispersion scenarios over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Mikkelsen, T.; Moreno, J.

    1993-01-01

    A presentation of preliminary results from a real-time simulation of full-scale dispersion experiments carried out over complex terrain in Northern Spain is given. Actual wind and turbulence measurements as observed during the experiments were analysed and used as input data for a series of simul......A presentation of preliminary results from a real-time simulation of full-scale dispersion experiments carried out over complex terrain in Northern Spain is given. Actual wind and turbulence measurements as observed during the experiments were analysed and used as input data for a series...

  8. Modeling emerald ash borer dispersal using percolation theory: estimating the rate of range expansion in a fragmented landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin A. J. Taylor; Daniel A. Herms; Louis R. Iverson

    2008-01-01

    The dispersal of organisms is rarely random, although diffusion processes can be useful models for movement in approximately homogeneous environments. However, the environments through which all organisms disperse are far from uniform at all scales. The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is obligate on ash (Fraxinus spp...

  9. Experimental investigation of the impact of compound-specific dispersion and electrostatic interactions on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    breakthrough curves also at very high Péclet numbers. To quantitatively interpret the experimental results, we used four modeling approaches: classical advection-dispersion equation (ADE), continuous time random walk (CTRW), dual-domain mass transfer model (DDMT), and a multicomponent ionic dispersion model...

  10. Erbium doped random fiber laser and fiber mixing effect

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Can; Thévenaz, Luc; Brès, Camille Sophie

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate an active random fiber laser by directly pumping a 100 m erbium-doped fiber at 980 nm wavelength, with a fiber loop mirror forming a half-open cavity. Random lasing with competing spectral modes in the range from 1535 nm to 1560 nm is achieved, with the maximum lasing slope efficiency around 10%. We also study the effect of combining a dispersion compensated fiber with the erbium-doped fiber. The kilometers long dispersion compensated fiber reduces the random lasing threshold a...

  11. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  12. On Dispersion in Visual Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Barneveld, H.H. van

    1975-01-01

    An idealized visual pigment absorbance spectrum is used together with a Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation to calculate the contribution of the visual pigment to the refractive index of the fly photoreceptor. It appears that an absorption coefficient of 0.010 µm-1 results in a refractive index varia

  13. Magnetic exciton dispersion in praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainford, B. D.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the dispersion of magnetic excitons have been made in a single crystal of praseodymium metal using inelastic neutron scattering. A preliminary analysis of the data yields the first detailed information about the exchange interactions and the crystal field splittings in the light...

  14. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  15. DIMO, a plant dispersal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Jochem, R.; Greft, van der J.G.M.; Franke, J.; Malinowska, A.H.; Geertsema, W.; Prins, A.H.; Ozinga, W.A.; Hoek, van der D.C.J.; Grashof-Bokdam, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to human activities many natural habitats have become isolated. As a result the dispersal of many plant species is hampered. Isolated populations may become extinct and have a lower probability to become reestablished in a natural way. Moreover, plant species may be forced to migrate to new area

  16. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  17. Wireless Communication over Dispersive Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, K.

    2010-01-01

    Broadband wireless communication systems require high transmission rates, where the bandwidth of the transmitted signal is larger than the channel coherence bandwidth. This gives rise to time dispersion of the transmitted symbols or frequency-selectivity with different frequency components exhibitin

  18. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Mehak [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutics; McKenna, Gregory B. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Suryanarayanan, Raj [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutics

    2016-05-27

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF$-$PV P>NIF$-$HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  19. Dispersion-enhanced laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two level and multilevel) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the sideband frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an undercoupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  20. Seed dispersal: Size does matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Many small seed-eating rodents bury their food in an erratic manner called scatter-hoarding because they are unable to defend one large hoard. This process has a complicated influence on seed dispersal,as shown in the work by ZHANG Zhibin at the CAS Institute of Zoology and hisco-workers.

  1. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  2. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  3. Dispersive mudslide-induced tsunamis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rubino

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear nested model for mudslide-induced tsunamis is proposed in which three phases of the life of the wave, i.e. the generation, far-field propagation and costal run-up are described by means of different mathematical models, that are coupled through appropriate matching procedures. The generation and run-up dynamics are simulated through a nonlinear shallow-water model with movable lateral boundaries: in the generation region two active layers are present, the lower one describing the slide descending on a sloping topography. For the intermediate phase, representing wave propagation far from the generation region, the hydrostatic assumption is not assumed as appropriate in general and, therefore, a nonlinear model allowing for weak phase dispersion, namely a Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, is used. This choice is made in order to assess the relevance of dispersive features such as solitary waves and dispersive tails. It is shown that in some realistic circumstances dispersive mudslide-induced tsunami waves can be produced over relatively short, distances. In such cases the use of a hydrostatic model throughout the whole tsunami history turns out to give erroneous results. In particular, when solitary waves are generated during the tsunami propagation in the open sea, the resulting run-up process yields peculiar wave forms leading to amplified coastal inundations with respect to a mere hydrostatic context.

  4. Strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows; Ecoulements diphasiques disperses fortement couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zun, I.; Lance, M.; Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L.; Petrosyan, A.; Lecoq, N.; Anthore, R.; Bostel, F.; Feuillebois, F.; Nott, P.; Zenit, R.; Hunt, M.L.; Brennen, C.E.; Campbell, C.S.; Tong, P.; Lei, X.; Ackerson, B.J.; Asmolov, E.S.; Abade, G.; da Cunha, F.R.; Lhuillier, D.; Cartellier, A.; Ruzicka, M.C.; Drahos, J.; Thomas, N.H.; Talini, L.; Leblond, J.; Leshansky, A.M.; Lavrenteva, O.M.; Nir, A.; Teshukov, V.; Risso, F.; Ellinsen, K.; Crispel, S.; Dahlkild, A.; Vynnycky, M.; Davila, J.; Matas, J.P.; Guazelli, L.; Morris, J.; Ooms, G.; Poelma, C.; van Wijngaarden, L.; de Vries, A.; Elghobashi, S.; Huilier, D.; Peirano, E.; Minier, J.P.; Gavrilyuk, S.; Saurel, R.; Kashinsky, O.; Randin, V.; Colin, C.; Larue de Tournemine, A.; Roig, V.; Suzanne, C.; Bounhoure, C.; Brunet, Y.; Tanaka, A.T.; Noma, K.; Tsuji, Y.; Pascal-Ribot, S.; Le Gall, F.; Aliseda, A.; Hainaux, F.; Lasheras, J.; Didwania, A.; Costa, A.; Vallerin, W.; Mudde, R.F.; Van Den Akker, H.E.A.; Jaumouillie, P.; Larrarte, F.; Burgisser, A.; Bergantz, G.; Necker, F.; Hartel, C.; Kleiser, L.; Meiburg, E.; Michallet, H.; Mory, M.; Hutter, M.; Markov, A.A.; Dumoulin, F.X.; Suard, S.; Borghi, R.; Hong, M.; Hopfinger, E.; Laforgia, A.; Lawrence, C.J.; Hewitt, G.F.; Osiptsov, A.N.; Tsirkunov, Yu. M.; Volkov, A.N.

    2003-07-01

    -phase flow, current distribution and mass transfer along a vertical gas evolving electrode; a two-way coupled model for dilute multiphase flows. Topic 3: turbulence modulation by particles, droplets or bubbles in dense systems: influence of particles on the transition to turbulence in pipe flow; comparison between a point particle model and a finite-diameter-model for the particle turbulence interaction in a suspension; the effect on turbulence by bubbles rising through it under buoyancy; the physical mechanisms of modifying the structure of turbulent homogeneous shear flows by dispersed particles; influence of hydrodynamic interactions between particles on the turbulent flow in a suspension; review of relationships between Lagrangian and Eulerian scales; a two-point PDF for modelling turbulent dispersed two-phase flows and derivation of a two field model; mathematical and numerical modeling of two-phase compressible flows with micro-inertia. Topic 4: collective effects in dispersed two-phase flows clustering and phase distribution: hydrodynamic structure of downward bubbly flow; influence of gravity on the dynamics of a turbulent bubbly pipe flow; experimental study of two-phase flows; particle clusters formed in dispersed gas-solid flows: simulations and experiments; experimental study of the turbulence in bubbly flows at high void fraction; first step in the study of the correlation between air/water flow fluctuations and random buffering forces; clustering and settling velocity of micro-droplets in a grid turbulence. Topic 5: large scale instabilities and gravity driven dispersed flows: new 'non-isothermal' linear instability modes in fluidized beds and bubbly flows; large scale instability in a confined buoyant shear layer; convective instability in uniform dispersed layers; structures in gravity driven bubbly flows; effects of concentration profiles on velocity profiles in sewer; pyroclastic density currents viewed as mammoth scale two-phase flows; mixing and

  5. Interdependence of waveguide and material dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuse, D

    1979-09-01

    Theoretical work on dispersion in single-mode fibers sometimes uses the assumption that waveguide dispersion D(w) and material dispersion D(m) are separate effects that contribute additively to the total amount of dispersion D(m+w). Using Gloge's LP-mode approximation we compute the dispersion of the LP(0l) (HE(11)) mode by solving the eigenvalue equation taking dispersion of core and cladding materials into account. The dispersion of the LP(01) mode is computed by numerical differentiation of the solution of the eigenvalue equation. The difference D(m+w) - D(w) is compared to waveguide dispersion D(w), which is computed by ignoring the dispersive properties of the core and cladding materials. We find large percentage deviations between D(m+w) - D(m) and D(w). The assumption of additivity of material and waveguide dispersion is thus not quite correct. However, because of the small contribution of waveguide dispersion to the total dispersion of the LP(01) mode, even a large percentage error in the waveguide dispersion has little influence on the over-all dispersion of the LP(01) mode.

  6. Analysis of Wave Nonlinear Dispersion Relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-jie; TAO Jian-fu

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dispersion relations and modified relations proposed by Kirby and Hedges have the limitation of intermediate minimum value. To overcome the shortcoming, a new nonlinear dispersion relation is proposed. Based on the summarization and comparison of existing nonlinear dispersion relations, it can be found that the new nonlinear dispersion relation not only keeps the advantages of other nonlinear dispersion relations, but also significantly reduces the relative errors of the nonlinear dispersion relations for a range of the relative water depth of 1<kh<1.5 and has sufficient accuracy for practical purposes.

  7. Dispersion compensation based on prism compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongying; Lan, Tian; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    A prism compressor can compensate dispersion of femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. An accurate expression of the group delay dispersion (GDD) of a prism compressor at arbitrary incident angle and at arbitrary incident point is obtained, which is of benefit to finely compensating dispersion of femtosecond pulses. Influences of several parameters on group delay dispersion are analyzed for the active compensation of dispersion of femtosecond pulses. These expressions are convenient to applications of intra- and extra-cavity dispersion compensation of ultra-short laser pulses, as well as fine compensation of satellite laser ranging and laser altimetry.

  8. Seed dispersal distances: a typology based on dispersal modes and plant traits

    OpenAIRE

    Vittoz, P.; Engler, R.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of plants to disperse seeds may be critical for their survival under the current constraints of landscape fragmentation and climate change. Seed dispersal distance would therefore be an important variable to include in species distribution models. Unfortunately, data on dispersal distances are scarce, and seed dispersion models only exist for some species with particular dispersal modes. To overcome this lack of knowledge, we propose a simple approach to estimate seed dispersal di...

  9. Nanocomposites from Stable Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymeric Matrices Using Dispersion Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymeric matrices include CNTs dispersed in a host polymer or copolymer whose monomers have delocalized electron orbitals, so that a dispersion interaction results between the host polymer or copolymer and the CNTs dispersed therein. Nanocomposite products, which are presented in bulk, or when fabricated as a film, fiber, foam, coating, adhesive, paste, or molding, are prepared by standard means from the present stable dispersions of CNTs in polymeric matrices, employing dispersion interactions, as presented hereinabove.

  10. Functional redundancy and complementarities of seed dispersal by the last neotropical megafrugivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael S Bueno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional redundancy has been debated largely in ecology and conservation, yet we lack detailed empirical studies on the roles of functionally similar species in ecosystem function. Large bodied frugivores may disperse similar plant species and have strong impact on plant recruitment in tropical forests. The two largest frugivores in the neotropics, tapirs (Tapirus terrestris and muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides are potential candidates for functional redundancy on seed dispersal effectiveness. Here we provide a comparison of the quantitative, qualitative and spatial effects on seed dispersal by these megafrugivores in a continuous Brazilian Atlantic forest. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found a low overlap of plant species dispersed by both muriquis and tapirs. A group of 35 muriquis occupied an area of 850 ha and dispersed 5 times more plant species, and 13 times more seeds than 22 tapirs living in the same area. Muriquis dispersed 2.4 times more seeds in any random position than tapirs. This can be explained mainly because seed deposition by muriquis leaves less empty space than tapirs. However, tapirs are able to disperse larger seeds than muriquis and move them into sites not reached by primates, such as large forest gaps, open areas and fragments nearby. Based on published information we found 302 plant species that are dispersed by at least one of these megafrugivores in the Brazilian Atlantic forest. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study showed that both megafrugivores play complementary rather than redundant roles as seed dispersers. Although tapirs disperse fewer seeds and species than muriquis, they disperse larger-seeded species and in places not used by primates. The selective extinction of these megafrugivores will change the spatial seed rain they generate and may have negative effects on the recruitment of several plant species, particularly those with large seeds that have muriquis and tapirs as the last living

  11. Functional Redundancy and Complementarities of Seed Dispersal by the Last Neotropical Megafrugivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Rafael S.; Guevara, Roger; Ribeiro, Milton C.; Culot, Laurence; Bufalo, Felipe S.; Galetti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional redundancy has been debated largely in ecology and conservation, yet we lack detailed empirical studies on the roles of functionally similar species in ecosystem function. Large bodied frugivores may disperse similar plant species and have strong impact on plant recruitment in tropical forests. The two largest frugivores in the neotropics, tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) and muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) are potential candidates for functional redundancy on seed dispersal effectiveness. Here we provide a comparison of the quantitative, qualitative and spatial effects on seed dispersal by these megafrugivores in a continuous Brazilian Atlantic forest. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a low overlap of plant species dispersed by both muriquis and tapirs. A group of 35 muriquis occupied an area of 850 ha and dispersed 5 times more plant species, and 13 times more seeds than 22 tapirs living in the same area. Muriquis dispersed 2.4 times more seeds in any random position than tapirs. This can be explained mainly because seed deposition by muriquis leaves less empty space than tapirs. However, tapirs are able to disperse larger seeds than muriquis and move them into sites not reached by primates, such as large forest gaps, open areas and fragments nearby. Based on published information we found 302 plant species that are dispersed by at least one of these megafrugivores in the Brazilian Atlantic forest. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that both megafrugivores play complementary rather than redundant roles as seed dispersers. Although tapirs disperse fewer seeds and species than muriquis, they disperse larger-seeded species and in places not used by primates. The selective extinction of these megafrugivores will change the spatial seed rain they generate and may have negative effects on the recruitment of several plant species, particularly those with large seeds that have muriquis and tapirs as the last living seed dispersers. PMID

  12. Incorporating density dependence into the directed-dispersal hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Orr; Nathan, Ran

    2010-05-01

    The directed-dispersal (DrD) hypothesis, one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of seed dispersal, asserts that enhanced (nonrandom) arrival to favorable establishment sites is advantageous for plant fitness. However, as anticipated by the ideal free distribution theory, enhanced seed deposition may impair site suitability by increasing density-dependent mortality, thus negating the advantage postulated by the DrD hypothesis. Although the role of density effects is thoroughly discussed in the seed-dispersal literature, this DrD paradox remains largely overlooked. The paradox, however, may be particularly pronounced in animal-mediated dispersal systems, in which DrD is relatively common, because animals tend to generate local seed aggregations due to their nonrandom movements. To investigate possible solutions to the DrD paradox, we first introduce a simple analytical model that calculates the optimal DrD level at which seed arrival to favorable establishment sites yields maximal fitness gain in comparison to a null model of random arrival. This model predicts intermediate optimal DrD levels that correspond to various attributes of the plants, the dispersers, and the habitat. We then use a simulation model to explore the temporal dynamics of the invasion process of the DrD strategy in a randomly dispersed population, and the resistance of a DrD population against invasion of other dispersal strategies. This model demonstrates that some properties of the invasion process (e.g., mutant persistence ratio in the population and generations until initial establishment) are facilitated by high DrD levels, and not by intermediate levels as expected from the analytical model. These results highlight the need to revise the DrD hypothesis to include the countering effects of density-dependent mortality inherently imposed by enhanced arrival of seeds to specific sites. We illustrate how the revised hypothesis can elucidate previous results from empirical studies

  13. Hawking Radiation in Dispersive Media

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Scott James

    2011-01-01

    Hawking radiation, despite its presence in theoretical physics for over thirty years, remains elusive and undetected. It also suffers, in its original context of gravitational black holes, from conceptual difficulties. Of particular note is the trans-Planckian problem, which is concerned with the apparent origin of the radiation in absurdly high frequencies. In order to gain better theoretical understanding and, it is hoped, experimental verification of Hawking radiation, much study is being devoted to systems which model the spacetime geometry of black holes, and which, by analogy, are also thought to emit Hawking radiation. These analogue systems typically exhibit dispersion, which regularizes the wave behaviour at the horizon but does not lend itself well to analytic treatment, thus rendering Hawking's prediction less secure. A general analytic method for dealing with Hawking radiation in dispersive systems has proved difficult to find. This thesis presents new numerical and analytic results for Hawking em...

  14. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Saleh-Moghaddam; M E Zomorrodian

    2013-11-01

    The average of the moments for event shapes in + - → hadrons within the context of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are $\\langle 1 - T \\rangle, \\langle ρ \\rangle, \\langle B_{T} \\rangle$ and $\\langle B_{W} \\rangle$. We extract , the coupling constant in perturbative theory and α0 in the non-perturbative theory using the dispersive model. By fitting the experimental data, the values of $(M_{Z^{°}})$ = 0.1171 ± 0.00229 and 0 ($_{I} = 2{\\text{GeV}}$) = 0.5068 ± 0.0440 are found. Our results are consistent with the above model. Our results are also consistent with those obtained from other experiments at different energies. All these features are explained in this paper.

  15. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, J. J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke, and fumes in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of turbulence at large Reynolds number as described by Kolmogorov. The model consists of Langevin and diffusion equations in which the damping and diffusivity are expressed by expansions in powers of the reciprocal Kolmogorov constant C0. We derive solutions of O(C00) and O(C0-1). We truncate at O(C0-2) which is shown to result in an error of a few percentages in predicted dispersion statistics for representative cases of turbulent flow. We reveal analogies and remarkable differences between the solutions of classical statistical mechanics and those of statistical turbulence.

  16. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  17. Dispersion engineering of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Isroel M; Bendoym, Igor; Jung, Young U; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2013-12-30

    In this work, it is shown how the shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be engineered by manipulating the distribution of the electromagnetic fields in multilayer structures, which themselves are controlled by the free electron density in metal-like materials, such as doped semiconductors in the THz spectral range. By having a nonuniform free electron density profile, reduced relative to that in typical bulk metals, the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmons are distributed in different metallic materials that have different complex dielectric permittivities. As the in-plane component of surface plasmon's wave-vector increases, they become more confined to a particular layer of the multilayer structure and have energies that are predictable by considering the permittivity of the layer in which the fields are most concentrated. Unusual and arbitrary shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be designed, including stair steps and dovetails shapes.

  18. Tachyonic Dispersion in Coherent Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, Y D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a technique to realize a tachyonic band structure in a coherent network, such as an array of coupled ring resonators. This is achieved by adding "PT symmetric" spatially-balanced gain and loss to each node of the network. In a square-lattice network, the quasi-energy bandstructure exhibits a tachyonic dispersion relation, centered at either the center or corner of the Brillouin zone. There is one tachyonic hyperboloid in each gap, unlike in PT-symmetric tight-binding honeycomb lattices where the hyperboloids occur in pairs. The dispersion relation can be probed by measuring the peaks in transmission across a finite network as the gain/loss parameter is varied.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Random fixed points and random differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos S. Papageorgiou

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we study random best approximations to random sets, using fixed point techniques, obtaining this way stochastic analogues of earlier deterministic results by Browder-Petryshyn, KyFan and Reich. Then we prove two fixed point theorems for random multifunctions with stochastic domain that satisfy certain tangential conditions. Finally we consider a random differential inclusion with upper semicontinuous orientor field and establish the existence of random solutions.

  1. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  2. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  3. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  4. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  5. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  6. Meso-Scale Radioactive Dispersion Modelling using GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarko; Suud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Method (LPDM) is applied to model atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material in a meso-scale of a few tens of kilometers for site study purpose. Empirical relationships are used to determine the dispersion coefficient for various atmospheric stabilities. Diagnostic 3-D wind field is created based on data from a meteorological station using mass-conservation principle. Particles imitating radioactive pollutant are dispersed in the wind-field as a point source. Time-integrated air concentration is calculated using kernel density estimator (KDE) in the lowest layer of the atmosphere. Parallel code is developed for GTX-660Ti GPU with a total of 1344 scalar processors using CUDA programming. Significant speedup of about 20 times is achieved compared to the serial version of the code while accuracy is kept at reasonable level. Only small differences in particle positions and grid doses are observed when using the same sets of random number and meteorological data in both CPU and GPU versions of the code.

  7. The dispersal of protoplanetary discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercolano Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protoplanetary discs are a natural consequence of the star formation process and as such are ubiquitous around low-mass stars. They are fundamental to planet formation as they hold the reservoir of material from which planets form. Their evolution and final dispersal and the timescales that regulate these process are therefore of particular interest. In this contribution I will review the observational evidence for the dispersal of discs being dominated by two timescales and for the final dispersal to occur quickly and from the inside out. I will discuss the current theoretical models, including X-ray photoevaporation, showing that the latter provides a natural explanation to the observed behaviour and review supporting and contrasting evidence. I will finally introduce a new mechanism based on the interaction between planet formation and photoevaporation that may explain a particular class of transition discs with large inner holes and high accretion rates that are problematic for photoevaporation models and planet formation models alone.

  8. Chromatic Dispersion Estimation in Digital Coherent Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Ruben Andres; Hauske, Fabian N.; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Polarization-diverse coherent demodulation allows to compensate large values of accumulated linear distortion by digital signal processing. In particular, in uncompensated links without optical dispersion compensation, the parameter of the residual chromatic dispersion (CD) is vital to set...

  9. Conductivity of graphene affected by metal adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Jing-Tian; Meng, Jian-Wei; Jiang, An-Quan; Zhuang, Jun; Ning, Xi-Jing

    2017-03-01

    It has been a mystery how metal atoms adsorbed on perfect graphene impact the conductivity. We deposited Al, Cu, or Ag atoms onto graphene sheet on SiO2 substrate at room temperature or 573 K by pulsed laser ablation and measured the zero-gate resistance in-situ, showing that the resistance increased suddenly just after each of the deposition pulse and then decayed slowly to an elevated plateau, forming a sequential jagged peaks. Based on the fact that most areas of the graphene sheet are of perfect lattice structure, our calculations via first principles suggest that the resistance peaks result directly from the contribution of metal atoms landed on the perfect regions, and decaying of the peaks corresponds to the clustering process of the metal atoms.

  10. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  11. Optical angular momentum in dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2012-01-01

    The angular momentum density and flux of light in a dispersive, rotationally symmetric medium are derived from Noether's theorem. Optical angular momentum in a dispersive medium has no simple relation to optical linear momentum, even if the medium is homogeneous. A circularly polarized monochromatic beam in a homogeneous, dispersive medium carries a spin angular momentum per unit energy of $\\pm\\omega^{-1}$, as in vacuum. This result demonstrates the non-trivial interplay of dispersive contributions to optical angular momentum and energy.

  12. Dispersion climatology in a coastal zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1986-01-01

    system should be used to describe the dispersion. This dispersion classification scheme is used to organize 3 years of data from two meteorological masts, one placed directly at a shoreline and the other roughly 1 km inland. Differences in the dispersion climatology over land and water are studied...

  13. Dispersion properties of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Dridi, Kim;

    1998-01-01

    Approximate dispersion and bending properties of all-silica two-dimensional photonic crystal fibres are characterised by the combination of an effective-index model and classical analysis tools for optical fibres. We believe for the first time to have predicted the dispersion properties of photonic...... crystal fibres. The results strongly indicate that these fibres have potential applications as dispersion managing components...

  14. Pictures of blockscale transport: Effective versus ensemble dispersion and its uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Solute transport models tend to use coarse numerical grid blocks to alleviate computational costs. Aside from computational issues, the subsurface environment is usually characterized over a coarse measurement network where only large scale fluctuations of the flow field are captured. Neglecting the subscale velocity fluctuations in transport simulators can lead to erroneous predictions with consequences in risk analysis and remediation. For such reasons, upscaled dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the subscale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this work, we examine the low order statistical properties of the blockscale dispersion tensor. The blockscale is defined as the scale upon which the spatially variable flow field is homogenized (e.g. the numerical grid block). Using a Lagrangian framework, we discuss different conceptualizations of the blockscale dispersion tensor. We distinguish effective and ensemble blockscale dispersion, which measure the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute dispersion. Ensemble dispersion quantifies subscale velocity fluctuations between realizations, which overestimates the actual velocity variability. Effective dispersion on the other hand quantifies the actual blockscale velocity variability and thus reflects the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on mixing and spreading. Based on these concepts, we quantify the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute particle spreading and determine the governing equations for the coarse-grained concentration distributions. We develop analytical and semi-analytical expressions for the average and variance of the blockscale dispersion tensor in 3D flow fields as a function of the structural parameters characterizing the subsurface. Our results illustrate the relevance of the blockscale

  15. Going against the flow: a case for upstream dispersal and detection of uncommon dispersal events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, E.R.J.; Fraaije, Rob G.A.; Groot, de G.A.; Erkens, R.H.J.; Garsen, Annemarie G.; Kleyheeg, Erik; Raven, Bart M.; Soons, Merel B.

    2016-01-01

    1.Dispersal and colonisation are key processes determining species survival, and their importance is increasing as a consequence of ongoing habitat fragmentation, land-use change and climate change. Identification of long-distance dispersal events, including upstream dispersal, and of the dispersal

  16. Going against the flow: a case for upstream dispersal and detection of uncommon dispersal events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, E. R. Jasper; Fraaije, Rob G. A.; de Groot, G. Arjen; Erkens, Roy H. J.; Garssen, Annemarie G.; Kleyheeg, Erik; Raven, Bart M.; Soons, Merel B.

    2016-01-01

    * Dispersal and colonisation are key processes determining species survival, and their importance is increasing as a consequence of ongoing habitat fragmentation, land-use change and climate change. Identification of long-distance dispersal events, including upstream dispersal, and of the dispersal

  17. Broadband dispersion compensation using microstructure fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhang; Xiaomin Ren; Yongzhao Xu; Zinan Wang; Yongqing Huang; Xue Chen

    2007-01-01

    Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876Dispersion and dispersion slope compensation of 10-Gb/s pulses using microstructure fibers (MFs) is demonstrated experimentally. A 26-m MF is used to compensate the dispersion of 2-km standard singe mode fiber in a 20-nm range in C band. The experimental results show that a significant improvement can be achieved in the quality of the observed pulses with the dispersion compensation. Moreover, the further research shows that the MF can compensate the anomalous dispersion of a single mode fiber within ±0.27 ps/(nm·km) over a 50-nm wavelength range from 1520 to 1570 nm.

  18. Normal-dispersion microresonator Kerr frequency combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb generation has developed into a hot research area in the past decade. Microresonator combs are promising for portable applications due to their potential for chip-level integration and low power consumption. According to the group velocity dispersion of the microresonator employed, research in this field may be classified into two categories: the anomalous dispersion regime and the normal dispersion regime. In this paper, we discuss the physics of Kerr comb generation in the normal dispersion regime and review recent experimental advances. The potential advantages and future directions of normal dispersion combs are also discussed.

  19. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; De Rossi, Sylvain Combrié Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a CROW made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the fact that the cavity mode profile itself is dispersive, i.e., the mode wave function depends on the driving frequency, not the eigenfrequency. This occurs because the photonic crystal cavity resonances do not form a complete set. By taking into account the dispersive mode profile, we formulate a mode coupling model that accurately describes the asymmetric dispersion without introducing any new free parameters.

  20. Bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides with four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuhao; Jafari, Zeinab; Agarwal, Anu M; Kimerling, Lionel C; Li, Guifang; Michel, Jurgen; Zhang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new type of bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides that have four zero-dispersion wavelengths. Low and flat dispersion can be achieved by using two different material combinations, with a much smaller index contrast as compared to the previously proposed slot-assisted dispersion-flattened waveguides. Without using a nano-slot, dispersion becomes less sensitive to waveguide dimensions, which is highly desirable for high-yield device fabrication. Ultra-low dispersion, high nonlinearity, and fabrication-friendly design would make it promising for practical implementation of nonlinear photonic functions. The proposed waveguide configuration deepens our understanding of the dispersion flattening principle.

  1. Minimal dispersion refractive index profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feit, M D

    1979-09-01

    The analogy between optics and quantum mechanics is exploited by considering a 2-D quantum system whose Schroedinger equation is closely related to the wave equation for light propagation in an optical fiber. From this viewpoint, Marcatili's condition for minimal-dispersion-refractive-index profiles, and the Olshansky- Keck formula for rms pulse spreading in an alpha-profile fiber may be derived without recourse to the WKB approximation. Besides affording physical insight into these results, the present approach points out a possible limitation in their application to real fibers.

  2. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  3. Dispersal and individual quality in a long lived species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The idea of differences in individual quality has been put forward in numerous long-term studies in long-lived species to explain differences in lifetime production among individuals. Despite the important role of individual heterogeneity in vital rates in demography, population dynamics and life history theory, the idea of 'individual quality' is elusive. It is sometimes assumed to be a static or dynamic individual characteristic. When considered as a dynamic trait, it is sometimes assumed to vary deterministically or stochastically, or to be confounded with the characteristics of the habitat. We addressed heterogeneity in reproductive performance among individuals established in higher-quality habitat in a long-lived seabird species. We used approaches to statistical inference based on individual random effects permitting quantification of heterogeneity in populations and assessment of individual variation from the population mean. We found evidence of heterogeneity in breeding probability, not success probability. We assessed the influence of dispersal on individual reproductive potential. Dispersal is likely to be destabilizing in species with high site and mate fidelity. We detected heterogeneity after dispersal, not before. Individuals may perform well regardless of quality before destabilization, including those that recruited in higher-quality habitat by chance, but only higher-quality individuals may be able to overcome the consequences of dispersal. Importantly, results differed when accounting for individual heterogeneity (an increase in mean breeding probability when individuals dispersed), or not (a decrease in mean breeding probability). In the latter case, the decrease in mean breeding probability may result from a substantial decrease in breeding probability in a few individuals and a slight increase in others. In other words, the pattern observed at the population mean level may not reflect what happens in the majority of individuals.

  4. Nonlinear Dispersion Effect on Wave Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ruijie; Dong-Young LEE

    2000-01-01

    A new nonlinear dispersion relation is given in this paper, which can overcome the limitation of the intermediate minimum value in the dispersion relation proposed by Kirby and Dalrymple (1986), and which has a better approximation to Hedges' empirical relation than the modilied relations by Hedges (1987). Kirby and Dahymple (1987) for shallow waters. The new dispersion relation is simple in form. thus it can be used easily in practice. Meanwhile. a general explicil approximalion to the new dispersion rela tion and olher nonlinear dispersion relations is given. By use of the explicit approximation to the new dispersion relation along with the mild slope equation taking inlo account weakly nonlinear effect, a mathematical model is obtained, and it is applied to laboratory data. The results show that the model developed vith the new dispersion relation predicts wave translornation over complicated topography quite well.

  5. The Spread of a Noise Field in a Dispersive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Leon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the production of induced noise by a pulse and the propagation of the noise in a dispersive medium. We present a simple model where the noise is the sum of pulses and where the mean of each pulse is random. We obtain explicit expressions for the standard deviation of the spatial noise as a function of time. We also formulate the problem in terms of a time-frequency phase space approach and in particular we use the Wigner distribution to define the spatial/spatial-frequency distribution.

  6. The remarkable activity and stability of a highly dispersive beta-brass Cu-Zn catalyst for the production of ethylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Zheng, Jianwei; Qu, Jin; Liao, Fenglin; Raine, Elizabeth; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Su, Shei Sia; Po, Pang; Yuan, Youzhu; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-01

    Incorporation of Zn atoms into a nanosize Cu lattice is known to alter the electronic properties of Cu, improving catalytic performance in a number of industrially important reactions. However the structural influence of Zn on the Cu phase is not well studied. Here, we show that Cu nano-clusters modified with increasing concentration of Zn, derived from ZnO support doped with Ga3+, can dramatically enhance their stability against metal sintering. As a result, the hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO) to ethylene glycol, an important reaction well known for deactivation from copper nanoparticle sintering, can show greatly enhanced activity and stability with the CuZn alloy catalysts due to no noticeable sintering. HRTEM, nano-diffraction and EXAFS characterization reveal the presence of a small beta-brass CuZn alloy phase (body-centred cubic, bcc) which appears to greatly stabilise Cu atoms from aggregation in accelerated deactivation tests. DFT calculations also indicate that the small bcc CuZn phase is more stable against Cu adatom migration than the fcc CuZn phase with the ability to maintain a higher Cu dispersion on its surface.

  7. Effective Block-Scale Dispersion and Its Self-Averaging Behavior in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Felipe; Dentz, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Upscaled (effective) dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the sub-scale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this study, we use the framework developed in de Barros and Rubin (2011) [de Barros F.P.J. and Rubin Y., Modelling of block-scale macrodispersion as a random function. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 676 (2011): 514-545] to develop novel semi-analytical expressions for the first two statistical moments of the block-effective dispersion coefficients in three-dimensional spatially random flow fields as a function of the key characteristic length scales defining the transport problem. The derived expressions are based on perturbation theory and limited to weak-to-mild heterogeneity and uniform-in-the-mean steady state flow fields. The semi-analytical solutions provide physical insights of the main controlling factors influencing the temporal scaling of the dispersion coefficient of the solute body and its self-averaging dispersion behavior. Our results illustrate the relevance of the joint influence of the block-scale and local-scale dispersion in diminishing the macrodispersion variance under non-ergodic conditions. The impact of the statistical anisotropy ratio in the block-effective macrodispersion self-averaging behavior is also investigated. The analysis performed in this work has implications in numerical modeling and grid design.

  8. Introduction to nonlinear dispersive equations

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    This textbook introduces the well-posedness theory for initial-value problems of nonlinear, dispersive partial differential equations, with special focus on two key models, the Korteweg–de Vries equation and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. A concise and self-contained treatment of background material (the Fourier transform, interpolation theory, Sobolev spaces, and the linear Schrödinger equation) prepares the reader to understand the main topics covered: the initial-value problem for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the generalized Korteweg–de Vries equation, properties of their solutions, and a survey of general classes of nonlinear dispersive equations of physical and mathematical significance. Each chapter ends with an expert account of recent developments and open problems, as well as exercises. The final chapter gives a detailed exposition of local well-posedness for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, taking the reader to the forefront of recent research. The second edition of Introdu...

  9. QT dispersion in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unubol, Mustafa; Eryilmaz, Ufuk; Guney, Engin; Ture, Mevlut; Akgullu, Cagdas

    2013-04-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition caused by a pituitary adenoma that secretes growth hormone. The mortality rate is 72 % higher in patients with acromegaly than in the general population according to meta-analyses. Mortality analysis has shown as many as 60 % of acromegalic patients die due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden cardiac death may occur in patients with acromegaly and malignant ventricular arrhythmia may play an important role in this fatal complication; however, the precise mechanism is not fully known. QT dispersion (dQT) is an electrophysiological factor known to be associated with a tendency for ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. This study aimed to evaluate dQT as an early predictor of ventricular tachyarrhythmia, as sudden cardiac death commonly occurs in acromegalic patients. This cross-sectional case-control study enrolled 20 patients (10 female and 10 male) with acromegaly and 20 healthy controls (11 female and 9 male) after exclusion criteria were applied. Each participant underwent 12-lead electrocardiography, including ≥3 QRS complexes, at a speed of 25 mm/s after a 15-min rest. In each participant, the QT interval (beginning of the Q wave to the end of the T wave) was corrected (QTc) for heart rate using Bazett's formula [Formula: see text] QTc dispersion (dQTc) (QTc max - QTc min) was also calculated. There was no significant difference in median dQTc between the acromegalic patients (0.79 s) and the controls (0.45 s) (p > 0.05). Active acromegalic patients (n = 14) were estimated to have a median dQTc of 0.82 s, after excluding from the analysis six patients that were under full biochemical control, and that had randomly obtained growth hormone levels acromegaly might have an elevated risk for ventricular arrhythmia. We think that a non-invasive, simple and inexpensive marker-measurement of dQT-as part of cardiac monitoring could be valuable for screening complications in acromegalic patients.

  10. Modeling the dispersion in electromechanically coupled myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Thomas S. E.; Prassl, Anton J.; Plank, Gernot; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We present an approach to model the dispersion of fiber and sheet orientations in the myocardium. By utilizing structure parameters, an existing orthotropic and invariant-based constitutive model developed to describe the passive behavior of the myocardium is augmented. Two dispersion parameters are fitted to experimentally observed angular dispersion data of the myocardial tissue. Computations are performed on a unit myocardium tissue cube and on a slice of the left ventricle indicating that the dispersion parameter has an effect on the myocardial deformation and stress development. The use of fiber dispersions relating to a pathological myocardium had a rather big effect. The final example represents an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle indicating the influence of fiber and sheet dispersions upon contraction over a cardiac cycle. Although only a minor shift in the pressure–volume (PV) loops between the cases with no dispersions and with fiber and sheet dispersions for a healthy myocardium was observed, a remarkably different behavior is obtained with a fiber dispersion relating to a diseased myocardium. In future simulations, this dispersion model for myocardial tissue may advantageously be used together with models of, for example, growth and remodeling of various cardiac diseases. PMID:23868817

  11. Modeling the dispersion in electromechanically coupled myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Thomas S E; Prassl, Anton J; Plank, Gernot; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    We present an approach to model the dispersion of fiber and sheet orientations in the myocardium. By utilizing structure parameters, an existing orthotropic and invariant-based constitutive model developed to describe the passive behavior of the myocardium is augmented. Two dispersion parameters are fitted to experimentally observed angular dispersion data of the myocardial tissue. Computations are performed on a unit myocardium tissue cube and on a slice of the left ventricle indicating that the dispersion parameter has an effect on the myocardial deformation and stress development. The use of fiber dispersions relating to a pathological myocardium had a rather big effect. The final example represents an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle indicating the influence of fiber and sheet dispersions upon contraction over a cardiac cycle. Although only a minor shift in the pressure-volume (PV) loops between the cases with no dispersions and with fiber and sheet dispersions for a healthy myocardium was observed, a remarkably different behavior is obtained with a fiber dispersion relating to a diseased myocardium. In future simulations, this dispersion model for myocardial tissue may advantageously be used together with models of, for example, growth and remodeling of various cardiac diseases.

  12. Research progress in avian dispersal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LIU; Zhengwang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Dispersal, defined as a linear spreading move-ment of individuals away from others of the population is a fundamental characteristic of organisms in nature. Dispersal is a central concept in ecological, behavioral and evolutionary studies, driven by different forces such as avoidance of inbreeding depression, density-dependent competition and the need to change breeding locations. By effective dispersal, organisms can enlarge their geo-graphic range and adjust the dynamic, sex ratio and gen-etic compositions of a population. Birds are one of the groups that are studied intensively by human beings. Due to their diurnal habits, diverse life history strategies and complex movement, birds are also ideal models for the study of dispersal behaviors. Certain topics of avian dispersal including sex-biased, asymmetric dispersal caused by differences in body conditions, dispersal pro-cesses, habitat selection and long distance dispersal are discussed here. Bird-ringing or marking, radio-telemetry and genetic markers are useful tools widely applied in dispersal studies. There are three major challenges regard-ing theoretical study and methodology research of dis-persal: (1) improvement in research methodology is needed, (2) more in-depth theoretical research is neces-sary, and (3) application of theoretical research into the conservation efforts for threatened birds and the manage-ment of their habitats should be carried out immediately.

  13. Distinguishing the importance between habitat specialization and dispersal limitation on species turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixiong; Wang, Xiaoan; Guo, Hua; Fan, Weiyi; Lv, Haiying; Duan, Renyan

    2013-09-01

    Understanding what governs community assembly and the maintenance of biodiversity is a central issue in ecology, but has been a continuing debate. A key question is the relative importance of habitat specialization (niche assembly) and dispersal limitation (dispersal assembly). In the middle of the Loess Plateau, northwestern China, we examined how species turnover in Liaodong oak (Quercus wutaishanica) forests differed between observed and randomized assemblies, and how this difference was affected by habitat specialization and dispersal limitation using variation partitioning. Results showed that expected species turnover based on individual randomization was significantly lower than the observed value (P turnover deviation significantly depended on the environmental and geographical distances (P species composition variation at all the three layers (P species traits into account would strengthen our confidence in the inferred assembly mechanisms.

  14. Longitudinal dispersion of heavy particles in an oscillating tunnel and application to wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V. S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Steffensen, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    against experimental data in the literature. Then, the random-walk dispersion model is run for different oscillatory flow cases and for a number of steady flow cases for comparison. The primary sediment grains of concern are fine sediments (with low fall velocity), which would stay in suspension for most...

  15. Remote Sensing, Sampling and Simulation Applications in Analyses of Insect Dispersion and Abundance in Cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L. Willers; J. M. McKinion; J. N. Jenkins

    2006-01-01

    Simulation was employed to create stratified simple random samples of different sample unit sizes to represent tarnished plant bug abundance at different densities within various habitats of simulated cotton fields. These samples were used to investigate dispersion patterns of this cotton insect. It was found that the assessment of spatial pattern varied as a function...

  16. Soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fiber with two zero dispersive wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibin; Yang, Hua; Tang, Pinghua; Zhao, Chujun; Gao, Jing

    2013-05-06

    Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we present a numerical study of trapping of dispersive waves by solitons during supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers pumped with femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region. Numerical simulation results show that the generated supercontinuum is bounded by two branches of dispersive waves, namely blue-shifted dispersive waves (B-DWs) and red-shifted dispersive waves (R-DWs). We find a novel phenomenon that not only B-DWs but also R-DWs can be trapped by solitons across the zero-dispersion wavelength when the group-velocity matching between the soliton and the dispersive wave is satisfied, which may led to the generation of new spectral components via mixing of solitons and dispersive waves. Mixing of solitons with dispersive waves has been shown to play an important role in shaping not only the edge of the supercontinuum, but also its central part around the higher zero-dispersion wavelength. Further, we show that the phenomenon of soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths has a very close relationship with pumping power and the interval between two zero-dispersion wavelengths. In order to clearly display the evolution of soliton trapping of dispersive waves, the spectrogram of output pulses is observed using cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating technique (XFROG).

  17. Geographic consistency in the seed dispersal patterns of Taxus baccata L. in the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Lavabre

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Seed dispersal is a crucial process in tree population dynamics. In the case of yew, Taxus baccata L., seeds are dispersed by birds and mammals in a non-random, microhabitat-dependent way, a pattern constraining population renewal and expansion. While skewed dispersal has been frequently found, we lack knowledge on how consistent are spatial restrictions across time and yew’s geographical range. This sort of information is required for the development of trans-regional management tools for this species. Area of study: Three Taxus baccata stands across Spain, namely Cantabrian Range, Sierra de Gredos and Sierra de Cazorla.Material and methods: During two consecutive years, we have been studying the contribution of frugivorous animals to the seed dispersal patterns of Taxus baccata L., in three ecologically contrasted localities of the Iberian Peninsula. Main results: The spatial distribution of the seeds in the landscape was very heterogeneous, with the majority of the seeds consistently dispersed into forested microhabitats and almost none outside the forest. The main seed dispersers were always frugivorous birds, particularly thrushes (Turdus merula, T. viscivorus, T. philomelos and T. iliacus. Research highlights: The results highlighted the large-scale consistency of the seed dispersal system of Taxus baccata. We suggest that the generalized spatially-restricted dispersal contributes to the lack of regeneration and absence of population expansion of the species all over its range. As a trans-regional conservation strategy, we recommend measures aimed at maintaining as much as diverse assemblage of frugivores in order to provide complementary seed dispersal and therefore enhance population regeneration and expansion.Keywords: English Yew; frugivory; seed rain; microhabitats; Turdus spp.; carnivorous mammals; spatially-restricted dispersal

  18. Simplified numerical model for clarifying scaling behavior in the intermediate dispersion regime in homogeneous porous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Milligen, B Ph

    2014-01-01

    The dispersion of solute in porous media shows a non-linear increase in the transition from diffusion to advection dominated dispersion as the flow velocity is raised. In the past, the behavior in this intermediate regime has been explained with a variety of models. {We present and use a simplified numerical model which does not contain any turbulence, Taylor dispersion, or fractality. With it, we show that the non-linearity in the intermediate regime nevertheless occurs. Furthermore,} we show that that the intermediate regime can be regarded as a phase transition between random, diffusive transport at low flow velocity and ordered transport controlled by the geometry of the pore space at high flow velocities. This phase transition explains the first-order behavior in the intermediate regime. A new quantifier, the ratio of the amount of solute in dominantly advective versus dominantly diffusive pore channels, plays the role of `order parameter' of this phase transition. Taylor dispersion, often invoked to exp...

  19. Dispersed publication of editorial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There seems to be no dedicated journals available for publication of editorial research in the biomedical sciences; that is research into editorial or publication process issues involving the scientific approach to writing, reviewing, editing and publishing. It is unknown where papers...... concerning these issues are typically published. We therefore set out to study the distribution of such papers in the biomedical literature. METHODS: In this pilot study, we conducted a MEDLINE search for papers on editorial research published in the year 2012. RESULTS: We found 445 articles published in 311...... journals with a median of one article per journal (range: 1-17). CONCLUSION: The publication of papers on editorial research seems to be dispersed. In order to increase the visibility of this research field, it may be reasonable to establish well-defined platforms such as dedicated journals or journal...

  20. Dispersion based beam tilt correction

    CERN Document Server

    Guetg, Marc W; Prat, Eduard; Reiche, Sven

    2013-01-01

    In Free Electron Lasers (FEL), a transverse centroid misalignment of longitudinal slices in an electron bunch reduces the effective overlap between radiation field and electron bunch and therefore the FEL performance. The dominant sources of slice misalignments for FELs are the incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation within bunch compressors as well as transverse wake fields in the accelerating cavities. This is of particular importance for over-compression which is required for one of the key operation modes for the SwissFEL planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The centroid shift is corrected using corrector magnets in dispersive sections, e.g. the bunch compressors. First and second order corrections are achieved by pairs of sextupole and quadrupole magnets in the horizontal plane while skew quadrupoles correct to first order in the vertical plane. Simulations and measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility are done to investigate the proposed correction scheme for SwissFEL. This paper pres...

  1. Post-crash fuel dispersal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    This paper is a brief overview of work over the last several decades in understanding what occurs to jet fuel stored in aircraft fuel tanks on impact with the ground. Fuel dispersal is discussed in terms of the overall crash dynamics process and impact regimes are identified. In a generic sense, the types of flow regimes which can occur are identified and general descriptions of the processes are given. Examples of engineering level tools, both computational and experimental, which have applicability to analyzing the complex environments are presented. Finally, risk based decision is discussed as a quick means of identifying requirements for development of preventative or mitigation strategies, such as further work on the development of an anti-misting agent.

  2. Dispersion relations for unphysical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Generalized dispersion relations are discussed for unphysical particles, e.g. confined degrees of freedom that are not present in the physical spectra but can give rise to observable bound states. While in general the propagator of the unphysical particles can have complex poles and cannot be reconstructed from the knowledge of the imaginary part, under reasonable assumptions the missing piece of information is shown to be in the rational function that contains the poles and must be added to the integral representation. For pure Yang-Mills theory, the rational part and the spectral term are identified in the explicit analytical expressions provided by the massive expansion of the gluon propagator. The multi particle spectral term turns out to be very small and the simple rational part provides, from first principles, an approximate propagator that is equivalent to the tree-level result of simple phenomenological models like the refined Gribov-Zwanziger model.

  3. Dispersion and suburbanisation. New ethnoscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Serra del Pozo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many deviations from the simple scheme of ethnic enclaves or ethnic centralities today, even in contemporary Little Havana in Miami. This scheme tends to be diluted by three processes: 1 the decentralization of some immigrant residents towards the suburbs or urban periphery; these suburban immigrants may be more settled or affluent than recent immigrants living in inner-city communities; 2 the dispersal of entrepreneurs of a particular ethnic minority in a large metropolitan area; and 3 the emergence and coexistence of multiple ethnic groups in the same zone or area. The three processes gradually cause the loss of the unity of the residententrepreneur coethnic tandem in the same neighbourhood.

  4. Dispersed publication of editorial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There seems to be no dedicated journals available for publication of editorial research in the biomedical sciences; that is research into editorial or publication process issues involving the scientific approach to writing, reviewing, editing and publishing. It is unknown where papers...... concerning these issues are typically published. We therefore set out to study the distribution of such papers in the biomedical literature. METHODS: In this pilot study, we conducted a MEDLINE search for papers on editorial research published in the year 2012. RESULTS: We found 445 articles published in 311...... journals with a median of one article per journal (range: 1-17). CONCLUSION: The publication of papers on editorial research seems to be dispersed. In order to increase the visibility of this research field, it may be reasonable to establish well-defined platforms such as dedicated journals or journal...

  5. Dispersion Properties of TIRPCF under Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; YU Ding-chen

    2006-01-01

    The dispersion properties in the short wavelength region of total internal reflective photonic crystal fiber(TIRPCF) in Compton scattering have been studied by using the model of the equivalent twin waveguide soliton coupling,dispersion management solitons and effective refractive index. It is shown that the positive dispersion of the cladding waveguide of TIRPCF and the negative dispersion of its core waveguide are quickly increased by the square of the collision non-elastic composition between the electron and photons,and they are lessened by the increase of the electron absorption photon number. Under the one-photon nonlinear Compton scattering,the method of the compensated probing laser diffraction by the phase hole induced by the stationary pumping laser in the cladding waveguide enables the average dispersion value of TIRPCF to be close to zero,and the zero dispersion point quickly shifts to the short wavelength region.

  6. Renormalized dispersion relations of β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shi-xiao W.; Lu, Hai-hao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-09-01

    We study the nonlinear dispersive characteristics in β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) chains in both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady state. By applying a multiple scale analysis to the FPU chain, we analyze the contribution of the trivial and nontrivial resonance to the renormalization of the dispersion relation. Our results show that the contribution of the nontrivial resonance remains significant to the renormalization, in particular, in strongly nonlinear regimes. We contrast our results with the dispersion relations obtained from the Zwanzig-Mori formalism and random phase approximation to further illustrate the role of resonances. Surprisingly, these theoretical dispersion relations can be generalized to describe dispersive characteristics well at the nonequilibrium steady state of the FPU chain with driving-damping in real space. Through numerical simulation, we confirm that the theoretical renormalized dispersion relations are valid for a wide range of nonlinearities in thermal equilibrium as well as in nonequilibrium steady state. We further show that the dispersive characteristics persist in nonequilibrium steady state driven-damped in Fourier space.

  7. Renormalized dispersion relations of β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shi-xiao W; Lu, Hai-hao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-09-01

    We study the nonlinear dispersive characteristics in β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) chains in both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady state. By applying a multiple scale analysis to the FPU chain, we analyze the contribution of the trivial and nontrivial resonance to the renormalization of the dispersion relation. Our results show that the contribution of the nontrivial resonance remains significant to the renormalization, in particular, in strongly nonlinear regimes. We contrast our results with the dispersion relations obtained from the Zwanzig-Mori formalism and random phase approximation to further illustrate the role of resonances. Surprisingly, these theoretical dispersion relations can be generalized to describe dispersive characteristics well at the nonequilibrium steady state of the FPU chain with driving-damping in real space. Through numerical simulation, we confirm that the theoretical renormalized dispersion relations are valid for a wide range of nonlinearities in thermal equilibrium as well as in nonequilibrium steady state. We further show that the dispersive characteristics persist in nonequilibrium steady state driven-damped in Fourier space.

  8. Axial Dispersion in Segmented Gas-Liquid Flow: Effects of the Channel Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, Metin

    2009-11-01

    The effects of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows have been studied computationally in a two-dimensional setting using a front-tracking/finite-volume method. Passive tracer particles are used to visualize and quantify the axial dispersion. The molecular diffusion is modeled by random walk of tracer particles. It is found that there is significant axial dispersion in serpentine channels even in the absence of molecular diffusion and dispersion increases with channel curvature. It is known that there is no dispersion in straight channels since a lubricating thin liquid layer persists on the wall. However this lubricating liquid layer is periodically broken in the curved channel case leading to enhanced axial dispersion. It is found that the dispersion increases as the Peclet number (Pe) decreases both in straight and curved channels. Difference between the straight and curved channel decreases continuously as the Peclet number decreases and virtually disappears at low Peclet numbers, i.e., Pestudy. A model is proposed based on the difference between the liquid film thicknesses on the inner and outer side of the bend in the limit as Pe->∞. Good agreement is found between the computational results and the model when the liquid slug is well mixed by the chaotic advection.

  9. Operational mesoscale atmospheric dispersion prediction using a parallel computing cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C V Srinivas; R Venkatesan; N V Muralidharan; Someshwar Das; Hari Dass; P Eswara Kumar

    2006-06-01

    An operational atmospheric dispersion prediction system is implemented on a cluster supercomputer for Online Emergency Response at the Kalpakkam nuclear site.This numerical system constitutes a parallel version of a nested grid meso-scale meteorological model MM5 coupled to a random walk particle dispersion model FLEXPART.The system provides 48-hour forecast of the local weather and radioactive plume dispersion due to hypothetical airborne releases in a range of 100 km around the site.The parallel code was implemented on different cluster con figurations like distributed and shared memory systems.A 16-node dual Xeon distributed memory gigabit ethernet cluster has been found sufficient for operational applications.The runtime of a triple nested domain MM5 is about 4 h for a 24 h forecast.The system had been operated continuously for a few months and results were ported on the IMSc home page. Initial and periodic boundary condition data for MM5 are provided by NCMRWF,New Delhi. An alternative source is found to be NCEP,USA.These two sources provide the input data to the operational models at different spatial and temporal resolutions using different assimilation methods.A comparative study on the results of forecast is presented using these two data sources for present operational use.Improvement is noticed in rainfall forecasts that used NCEP data, probably because of its high spatial and temporal resolution.

  10. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  11. Formulation of disperse systems science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensively the science and technology behind the formulation of disperse systems like emulsions, suspensions, foams and others. Starting with a general introduction, the book covers a broad range of topics like the role of different classes of surfactants, stability of disperse systems, formulation of different dispersions, evaluation of formulations and many more. Many examples are included, too. Written by the experienced author and editor Tharwart Tadros, this book is indispensable for every scientist working in the field.

  12. Electrostatic Stabilization of Graphene in Organic Dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Andrew N J; Velicky, Matej; Dryfe, Robert A.W.

    2015-01-01

    The exfoliation of graphite to give graphene dispersions in nonaqueous solvents is an important area with regards to scalable production of graphene in bulk quantities and its ultimate application in devices. Understanding the mechanisms governing the stability of these dispersions is therefore of both scientific interest and technological importance. Herein, we have used addition of an indifferent electrolyte to perturb few-layer graphene dispersions in a nonaqueous solvent (1,2-dichloroetha...

  13. Phonon dispersion and heat capacity in polyfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Parvej; Srivastava, Seema; Ali Khan, Irfan; Gupta, V. D.; Ansari, Saif-ul-Islam

    A study of the normal modes of vibration and their dispersion in polyfuran (Pfu) based on the Urey-Bradley force field is reported. It provides a detailed interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Characteristic features of dispersion curves such as regions of high density-of-states, repulsion and character mixing of dispersive modes are discussed. Predictive values of heat capacity as a function of temperature are calculated.

  14. Signal velocity for anomalous dispersive waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1983-03-11

    The concept of signal velocity for dispersive waves is usually identified with that of group velocity. When the dispersion is anomalous, this interpretation is not correct since the group velocity can assume nonphysical values. In this note, by using the steepest descent method first introduced by Brillouin, the phase velocity is shown to be the signal velocity when the dispersion is anomalous in the full range of frequencies.

  15. Bed-Load Dispersion: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    However, the work of Phillips et al. (2013) suggested that the asymptotic limit of bed-load dispersion is super- dispersive. Fischer et al. (1979...Olinde and Johnson 2015, Phillips et al. 2013, Martin et al. 2012 and 2014). Campagnol et al. (2015) showed that if the particles are exhibiting...vertical dispersion. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 119(9): 1818–1832. Phillips , C. B., R. L. Martin, and D. J. Jerolmack. 2013

  16. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2012-06-19

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed-dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology.

  17. Black Brant X third stage dispersion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Maksimovic, V. M.; Lindahl, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The successful development of the Black Brant X (BBX) launch vehicle resulted from the application of a gyroscopically stabilized, unguided third stage motor configuration. Design analyses indicated sufficient gyroscopic stability and acceptable impact dispersion could be realized by optimizing second/third stage separation time. By flying an unguided third stage motor, significant program cost savings were realized. One flight test and two operational missions demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing gyroscopic stability to achieve satisfactory trajectory dispersion on a high performance rocket. A detailed assessment of the major dispersion contributors identified for the first three BBX missions is presented, offering important insight into the dispersion sensitivity of unguided, spin-stabilized flight.

  18. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF EPOXY RESIN WATERBORNE DISPERSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-zhong Yang; Yuan-ze Xu; De-lu Zhao

    2001-01-01

    The waterborne dispersions of epoxy resin were prepared by the phase inversion emulsification technique.Rheological behavior and its relationship with the structural change of the systems were studied. It was shown that the concentrated dispersions were highly viscoelastic and pseudoplastic, which was attributed to the formation of a physical network among the waterborne particles via hydrogen bond. The dilute dispersions were Newtonian fluids. The discrete clusters composed of small waterborne particles were found in diluted dispersions. With increasing solid content, there existed a structural transition via percolation through a cluster-cluster aggregation mode to form the physical network, which was qualitatively evidenced by the TEM morphologies.``

  19. Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskill, Peter; Carvalho, Danilo O; Capurro, Margareth L; Alphey, Luke; Donnelly, Christl A; McKemey, Andrew R

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed. The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8 m (95% CI: 49.9 m, 56.8 m) and Malaysia: 58.0 m (95% CI: 51.1 m, 71.0 m). Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

  20. Selection of Dispersivity in Groundwater Risk Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓峰; 唐杰

    2004-01-01

    The Domenico model is used in combination with ASTM E 1739 in a Tier 2 risk assessment of chlorinated organic solvents contaminated groundwater sites to predict potential contaminant concentration in groundwater down-gradient from the point of exposure (POE). A knowledge of the dispersivity parameters is necessary for carrying out this calculation. A constant longitudinal dispersivity of 10 m is often used in analytical and numerical calculation. However, because of the scale effect of dispersion, two other main approaches are currently often used. From the viewpoint of conservative principle in risk assessment, it is necessary to determine which dispersivity data will give a higher predicted concentration, corresponding to a more conservative risk calculation. Generally, it is considered that a smaller dispersivity leads to a higher predicted concentration. This assumption is correct when dispersion is the only natural attenuation factor. However, degradation of commonly encountered chlorinated organic solvents in environment under natural condition has been widely reported. Calculations given in this paper of several representative cases show that a general consideration of the influence of dispersivity on concentration prediction is not always correct when a degradation term is included in the calculation. To give a conservative risk calculation, the scale effect of dispersion is considered. Calculations also show that the dispersivity parameters need to be determined by considering the POE distance from the source, the groundwater velocity, and the degradation rate of the contaminant.

  1. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2012-01-01

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed–dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology. PMID:22566677

  2. Discrete dispersion models and their Tweedie asymptotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bent; Kokonendji, Célestin C.

    2016-01-01

    in this approach, whereas several overdispersed discrete distributions, such as the Neyman Type A, Pólya-Aeppli, negative binomial and Poisson-inverse Gaussian, turn out to be Poisson-Tweedie factorial dispersion models with power dispersion functions, analogous to ordinary Tweedie exponential dispersion models...... with power variance functions. Using the factorial cumulant generating function as tool, we introduce a dilation operation as a discrete analogue of scaling, generalizing binomial thinning. The Poisson-Tweedie factorial dispersion models are closed under dilation, which in turn leads to a Poisson...

  3. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elsasser, Robert [UNIV OF PADERBORN; Friedrich, Tobias [ICSI/BERKELEY; Sauerwald, Tomas [ICSI/BERKELEY

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  4. Completely random signed measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar

    Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases.......Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases....

  5. An Anderson-localized random nanolaser

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jin; Ek, Sara; Gregersen, Niels; Suhr, Troels; Schubert, Martin; Mørk, Jesper; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Precision is a virtue throughout science in general and in optics in particular where carefully fabricated nanometer-scale devices hold great promise for both classical and quantum photonics [1-6]. In such nanostructures, unavoidable imperfections often impose severe performance limits but, in certain cases, disorder may enable new functionalities [7]. Here we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder in a semiconductor photonic-crystal waveguide, leading to Anderson localization of light [8]. This enables highly e?cient and broadband tunable lasers with very small mode volumes. We observe an intriguing interplay between gain, dispersion-controlled slow light, and disorder, which determines the cross-over from ballistic transport to Anderson localization. Such a behavior is a unique feature of non-conservative random media that enables the demonstration of all-optical control of random lasing. Our statistical analysis shows a way towards ultimate thr...

  6. Dispersal-mediated trophic interactions can generate apparent patterns of dispersal limitation in aquatic metacommunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreydt, D.; De Meester, L.; Decaestecker, E.; Villena, M.J.; Van der Gucht, K.; Vannormelingen, P.; Vyverman, W.; Declerck, S.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal is a major organising force in metacommunities, which may facilitate compositional responses of local communities to environmental change and affect ecosystem function. Organism groups differ widely in their dispersal abilities and their communities are therefore expected to have different

  7. Who dispersed the seeds? The use of DNA barcoding in frugivory and seed dispersal studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    González‐Varo, Juan P; Arroyo, Juan M; Jordano, Pedro; Gilbert, M

    2014-01-01

    ... ‘which species dispersed the seeds’. This is essential for assessing how multiple frugivore species contribute distinctly to critical dispersal events such as seed delivery to safe sites, long...

  8. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  9. Comparative Study on Atmospheric Dispersion Module of Level 3 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Dahye; Jang, Misuk; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seoung Rae [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Some regulation documents such as Regulatory Guides and NUREG publications from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have influences on domestic radiation environmental analyses. As renewal versions of NUREG-0800 and NUREG-1555 have issued lately, the assessment for Severe Accident (SA) with Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) should be added to Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Radiation Environmental Report (RER). Because these reports are the required documents for obtaining the construction permit and operating license, it is important to understand the PSA methodology and it needs to improve the site-specific input data of L3PSA codes for SA. First, our review focuses on the atmospheric dispersion and deposition related input data of L3PSA code in this paper. Then we will continue to review the improvements of other input data. Two atmospheric dispersion models, which are PAVAN developed for design basis accident and ATMOS of MACCS2 code developed for SA, were reviewed in this paper. L3PSA deals with the effects of severe accidents and basically includes the evaluation of both short- and long-term effects. Therefore, both the deposition effects and nuclide information(type, amount, and chemical characteristics of released radionuclide) would be considered as the input parameters of atmospheric dispersion model for L3PSA. Additionally, the meteorological data would be sampled randomly to meet the purpose of probabilistic method. However, the sampling method would be selected according to analysis purpose. After review, ATMOS module and its input data are suitably developed for the atmospheric dispersion analysis of L3PSA. However, ATMOS module was developed using the site-specific terrain and environment characteristics. For the domestic application, it needs to study the input data reflecting the Korean terrain and environment characteristics. It would be also continuously improved in response to the time- and site-specific changes of weather

  10. Who dispersed the seeds? The use of DNA barcoding in frugivory and seed dispersal studies

    OpenAIRE

    González-Varo, Juan P.; J.M. Arroyo; Jordano, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Assessing dispersal events in plants faces important challenges and limitations. A methodological issue that limits advances in our understanding of seed dissemination by frugivorous animals is identifying 'which species dispersed the seeds'. This is essential for assessing how multiple frugivore species contribute distinctly to critical dispersal events such as seed delivery to safe sites, long-distance dispersal and the colonization of non-occupied habitats. Here, we describe DNA-barcoding ...

  11. Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Tymen, Blaise; Sih, Andrew; Brodin, Tomas

    2013-12-22

    Dispersal is a fundamental life-history trait for many ecological processes. Recent studies suggest that dispersers, in comparison to residents, display various phenotypic specializations increasing their dispersal inclination or success. Among them, dispersers are believed to be consistently more bold, exploratory, asocial or aggressive than residents. These links between behavioural types and dispersal should vary with the cause of dispersal. However, with the exception of one study, personality-dependent dispersal has not been studied in contrasting environments. Here, we used mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to test whether personality-dependent dispersal varies with predation risk, a factor that should induce boldness or sociability-dependent dispersal. Corroborating previous studies, we found that dispersing mosquitofish are less social than non-dispersing fish when there was no predation risk. However, personality-dependent dispersal is negated under predation risk, dispersers having similar personality types to residents. Our results suggest that adaptive dispersal decisions could commonly depend on interactions between phenotypes and ecological contexts.

  12. Does an ant-dispersed plant, Viola reichenbachiana, suffer from reduced seed dispersal under inundation disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzing, A.; Dauber, J.; Hammer, E.; Hammouti, N.; Bohning-Gaese, K.

    2008-01-01

    Many plant species use ants as seed dispersers. This dispersal mode is considered to be susceptible to disturbances, but the effect of natural, small-scale disturbances is still unknown. We investigated how small-scale disturbances due to inundation affect seed dispersal in Viola reichenbachiana, a

  13. Dispersion-induced nonlinearities in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Mecozzi, A.

    2002-01-01

    A dispersive and saturable medium is shown, under very general conditions, to possess ultrafast dynamic behaviour due to non-adiabatic polarisation dynamics. Simple analytical expressions relating the effect to the refractive index dispersion of a semiconductor ire derived and the magnitude...... of the equivalent Kerr coefficient is shown to be in qualitative agreement with measurements on active semiconductor waveguides....

  14. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...

  15. Van der Waals forces and spatial dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A version of the Green's functions theory of the Van der Waals forces which can be conveniently used in the presence of spatial dispersion is presented. The theory is based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and is valid for interacting bodies, separated by vacuum. Objections against theories acounting for the spatial dispersion are discussed.

  16. Are western juniper seeds dispersed through diplochory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed dispersal of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) appears to be convergent on a strategy utilized by fruit-bearing trees in that this conifer produces fleshy female cones (a.k.a., juniper “berries”) that are consumed by frugivorous birds, which then disperse the seeds through endozoochory b...

  17. Dispersive and erodible soils - fundamental differences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive, erodible and slaking soils are prevalent over wide areas of South Africa. Each of these materials increases the cost of construction, but dispersive soils are likely to lead to far more serious problems, particularly in dam construction...

  18. Phonon dispersion relation of liquid metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P B Thakor; P N Gajjar; A R Jani

    2009-06-01

    The phonon dispersion curves of some liquid metals, viz. Na ( = 1), Mg ( = 2), Al ( = 3) and Pb ( = 4), have been computed using our model potential. The charged hard sphere (CHS) reference system is applied to describe the structural information. Our model potential along with CHS reference system is capable of explaining the phonon dispersion relation for monovalent, divalent, trivalent and tetravalent liquid metals.

  19. Membranes as separators of dispersed emulsion phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefferts, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reuse or discharge of industrial waste waters, containing small fractions of dispersed oil, requires a purification treatment for which membranes can be used. If only little oil is present, removal of the dispersed phase might be preferable to the more commonly applied removal of the

  20. Hominoid dispersal patterns and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Andreas; Borries, Carola

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in DNA and isotope analyses have allowed tentative reconstructions of dispersal strategies of Plio-Pleistocene hominins.(1,2) Comparing their findings to dispersal patterns of some extant apes and humans suggested groups of related males and unrelated females in Neandertals indicating patrilocality(2) and Pan-like male philopatry in australopiths.(1) Here we review the demographic, ethnographic, and genetic evidence of dispersal patterns in extant apes and humans and compare the results to the suggestions for Plio-Pleistocene hominins. We find that alternative dispersal patterns, for example among gorillas or gibbons, could explain the findings of related or natal males in a confined geographic area. Based on sexual size dimorphism, we speculate that gorillas might currently be the best model for reconstructing dispersal in robust australopiths. Given that the sexual size dimorphism in other australopiths is still hotly debated, the question of which hominoid model best matches their dispersal pattern must remain unanswered. Neandertal dispersal patterns have been compared to patrilocality of modern humans. However, the latter is related to the advent of food production. Consequently, hunter-gatherers exhibiting primarily multilocality appear to be the better comparison for Neandertals. Overall, human-like patrilocality and Pan-like male philopatry appear to be poor models for the reconstruction of dispersal patterns in Plio-Pleistocene hominins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Eugene W; Jordano, Pedro; Gómez, José María

    2010-10-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effectiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an overview of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representation of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with elevational contours representing isoclines of SDE. We discuss the structure of disperser assemblages on such landscapes. Following this we discuss recent advances and ideas in seed dispersal in the context of their impacts on SDE. Finally, we highlight a number of emerging issues that provide insight into SDE. Overall, the SDE framework successfully captures the complexities of seed dispersal. We advocate an expanded use of the term dispersal encompassing the multiple recruitment stages from fruit to adult. While this entails difficulties in estimating SDE, it is a necessary expansion if we are to understand the central relevance of seed dispersal in plant ecology and evolution.

  2. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact... not to exceed 0.45 percent by weight of the pigment. The pigmented articles may contact all...

  4. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of app...

  5. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...

  6. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, W.M.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three level

  7. Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes Presenter: Dr. Fatma Kaplan Dispersal is an important behavior for many organisms. It can easily be observed when infectious juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) leave a consumed insect host. Dauer larvae of ...

  8. Intermolecular forces: a solution to dispersion interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ken D

    2013-12-01

    London dispersion forces have been cited as an important factor in protein folding, drug–receptor interactions, and catalyst selectivities. However, careful analysis of a model system finds that the dispersion interactions are only minor contributors to the formation of complexes in solution.

  9. Chromatic Dispersion Estimation in Digital Coherent Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Ruben Andres; Hauske, Fabian N.; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil;

    2011-01-01

    Polarization-diverse coherent demodulation allows to compensate large values of accumulated linear distortion by digital signal processing. In particular, in uncompensated links without optical dispersion compensation, the parameter of the residual chromatic dispersion (CD) is vital to set the ac...

  10. Dispersed and decentralised settlement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Černe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of reintegration of the urban system new settlements are emerging on theurban rim, transitional zones are reurbanised, derelict areas within the cities are being developedand degraded urban areas of derelict industrial complexes are being renaturalised. Inthe periphery combined research and production parks are being set up, in the open landscapeintegrated business, trade and recreational centres are springing up. Decentralisationand recentralisation of focal points of development accompany the contemporary processesof reurbanisation and suburbanisation – they are simultaneous and move in two-direction i.e. to and from the city. We understand them as manifestation of a dynamic balance amongcontradiction existing between the centre and the rim. Deindustrialisation and relocation ofproduction and distribution from the centres of gravity to the periphery generate extensivedegraded urban areas within cities and between the city and suburbs. The periphery is beingurbanised with the creation of new, dispersed and nonhierachical poles of development, andthe city and inner city is undergoing reurbanization. The general environmental conditionsin the city and in the countryside are being equalised, the potentials of development arebeing sought in the comparative advantages of local conditions: be it attractive urban districts,be it suburban entities or countryside areas.

  11. Dispersive internal long wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Holm, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, C.D.; Lvov, Y. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work is a joint analytical and numerical study of internal dispersive water wave propagation in a stratified two-layer fluid, a problem that has important geophysical fluid dynamics applications. Two-layer models can capture the main density-dependent effects because they can support, unlike homogeneous fluid models, the observed large amplitude internal wave motion at the interface between layers. The authors have derived new model equations using multiscale asymptotics in combination with the method they have developed for vertically averaging velocity and vorticity fields across fluid layers within the original Euler equations. The authors have found new exact conservation laws for layer-mean vorticity that have exact counterparts in the models. With this approach, they have derived a class of equations that retain the full nonlinearity of the original Euler equations while preserving the simplicity of known weakly nonlinear models, thus providing the theoretical foundation for experimental results so far unexplained.

  12. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  13. Databases of surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Boschi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of seismic surface waves provide the most important constraint on the elastic properties of the Earth’s lithosphere and upper mantle. Two databases of fundamental mode surface wave dispersion were recently compiled and published by groups at Harvard (Ekström et al., 1997 and Utrecht/Oxford (Trampert and Woodhouse, 1995, 2001, and later employed in 3-d global tomographic studies. Although based on similar sets of seismic records, the two databases show some significant discrepancies. We derive phase velocity maps from both, and compare them to quantify the discrepancies and assess the relative quality of the data; in this endeavour, we take careful account of the effects of regularization and parametrization. At short periods, where Love waves are mostly sensitive to crustal structure and thickness, we refer our comparison to a map of the Earth’s crust derived from independent data. On the assumption that second-order effects like seismic anisotropy and scattering can be neglected, we find the measurements of Ekström et al. (1997 of better quality; those of Trampert and Woodhouse (2001 result in phase velocity maps of much higher spatial frequency and, accordingly, more difficult to explain and justify geophysically. The discrepancy is partly explained by the more conservative a priori selection of data implemented by Ekström et al. (1997. Nevertheless, it becomes more significant with decreasing period, which indicates that it could also be traced to the different measurement techniques employed by the authors.

  14. Excitations in a Two-Dimensional Random Antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R. J.; Walker, L. R.; Guggenheim, H. J.;

    1975-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering studies of the magnetic excitations in the planar Heisenberg random antiferromagnet Rb2Mn0.5Ni0.5F4 at 7K are reported. Two well-defined bands of excitations are observed. A simple mean crystal model is found to predict accurately the measured dispersion relations using...

  15. Plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The dispersion curves of the plasmonic waves of a semi-infinite random metal-dielectric nanocomposite, consisting of bulk metal embedded with dielectric inclusions, are presented. Two branches of p-polarized surface plasmon-polariton modes are found to exist. The possibility of experimentally observing the surface waves by attenuated total reflection is demonstrated.

  16. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a "team......". This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly...... contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than...

  17. High-dispersive mirrors for femtosecond lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervak, V; Teisset, C; Sugita, A; Naumov, S; Krausz, F; Apolonski, A

    2008-07-07

    We report on the development of highly dispersive mirrors for chirped-pulse oscillators (CPO) and amplifiers (CPA). In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate the usability of highly dispersive multilayer mirrors for high-energy femtosecond oscillators, namely for i) a chirped-pulse Ti:Sa oscillator and ii) an Yb:YAG disk oscillator. In both cases a group delay dispersion (GDD) of the order of 2x10(4) fs(2) was introduced, accompanied with an overall transmission loss as low as approximately 2 per cent. This unprecedented combination of high dispersion and low loss over a sizeable bandwidth with multilayer structures opens the prospects for femtosecond CPA systems equipped with a compact, alignment-insensitive all-mirror compressors providing compensation of GDD as well as higher-order dispersion.

  18. Rheological behaviour of heated potato starch dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, L.; Witczak, M.; Ziêba, T.; Fortuna, T.

    2012-10-01

    The study was designed to investigate the rheological properties of heated potato starch dispersions. Water suspensions of starch were heated at 65, 80 or 95°C for 5, 15, 30 or 60 min. The dispersions obtained were examined for granule size distribution and rheology. It was found that the starch dispersions significantly differed in both respects. The mean diameters of starch granules were largest for the dispersion heated at 65°C and smallest for that heated at 95°C. As the heating temperature was raised, the yield stresses and consistency coefficients decreased, while the flow behaviour indexes and Casson plastic viscosities increased. There were also differences in the viscoelastic properties of the dispersions: for those heated at 65°C the storage and loss moduli increased with heating time whereas for those heated at 80°C both moduli decreased.

  19. Shock waves in dispersive Eulerian fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Hoefer, M A

    2013-01-01

    The long time behavior of an initial step resulting in a dispersive shock wave (DSW) for the one-dimensional isentropic Euler equations regularized by generic, third order dispersion is considered by use of Whitham averaging. Under modest assumptions, the jump conditions (DSW locus and speeds) for admissible, weak DSWs are characterized and found to depend only upon the sign of dispersion (convex or concave) and a general pressure law. Two mechanisms leading to the breakdown of this simple wave DSW theory for sufficiently large jumps are identified: a change in the sign of dispersion, leading to gradient catastrophe in the modulation equations, and the loss of genuine nonlinearity in the modulation equations. Large amplitude DSWs are constructed for several particular dispersive fluids with differing pressure laws modeled by the generalized nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. These include superfluids (Bose-Einstein condensates and ultracold Fermions) and "optical fluids". Estimates of breaking times for smoo...

  20. Flow properties of acetylated chickpea protein dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li H; Hung, Tran V

    2010-06-01

    Chickpea protein concentrate was acetylated with acetic anhydride at 5 levels. Acetylated chickpea protein (ACP) dispersions at 3 levels (6%, 45%, and 49%) were chosen for this flow property study. Effects of protein concentration, temperature, concentrations of salt addition and particularly, degree of acetylation on these properties were examined. Compared with native chickpea proteins, the ACP dispersions exhibited a strong shear thinning behavior. Within measured temperature range (15 to 55 degrees C), the apparent viscosities of native chickpea protein dispersions were temperature independent; those of ACP dispersions were thermally affected. The flow index (n), consistency coefficient (m), apparent yield stress, and apparent viscosities of ACP dispersions increased progressively up to 45% acetylation but decreased at 49% acetylation level. Conformational studies by gel filtration suggested that chickpea proteins were associated or polymerized at up to 45% acetylation but the associated subunits gradually dissociated to smaller units at higher levels (49%) of acetylation.

  1. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a "team......". This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly...... contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than...

  2. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  3. Laboratory effectiveness testing of oil spill dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.A.; Wang, Z.; Handfield, D.; Ianuzzi, D.; Ackerman, F. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-06-01

    Dispersant effectiveness tests are reviewed. Studies have been conducted of the variances among several standard regulatory tests. Three main causes of differences have been identified, oil-to-water ratio, settling time and energy. Energy can be partially compensated for in high energy tests by correcting for natural dispersion. With this correction and with high oil-to-water ratios and a settling time of at least 10 minutes, five apparatuses yield very similar results for a variety of oils and dispersants. Recent studies into the energy variation of dispersant tests show that the energy level varies in many apparatuses. The repeatability of energy levels in apparatus is largely responsible for the variation in dispersant effectiveness values in certain apparatus. Studies of analytical procedures show that traditional extraction and analysis methods cause a bias to results. Methods to overcome these difficulties are presented.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of Inertial Particle Preferential Dispersion in a Turbulent Flow over a Backward-Facing Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulation of inertial particle dispersion in a turbulent flow over a backward-facing step was performed. The numerical results of both instantaneous particle dispersion and two-phase velocity statistics were in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The analysis of preferential dispersion of inertial particles was then presented by a wavelets analysis method for decomposing the two-phase turbulence signal obtained by numerical simulations, showing that the inertial particle concentration is separation from the Gaussian random distribution with very strong intermittencies. The statistical PDF of vorticity seen by particles shows that the inertial particles tend to accumulate in low vorticity regions where ∇u: ∇u is larger than zero. The concentration distribution of particle preferential dispersion preserves the historical effects. The research conclusions are useful for further understanding the two-phase turbulence physics and establishing accurate engineering prediction models of particle dispersion.

  5. Matricially free random variables

    CERN Document Server

    Lenczewski, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    We show that the operatorial framework developed by Voiculescu for free random variables can be extended to arrays of random variables whose multiplication imitates matricial multiplication. The associated notion of independence, called matricial freeness, can be viewed as a generalization of both freeness and monotone independence. At the same time, the sums of matricially free random variables, called random pseudomatrices, are closely related to Gaussian random matrices. The main results presented in this paper concern the standard and tracial central limit theorems for random pseudomatrices and the corresponding limit distributions which can be viewed as matricial generalizations of semicirle laws.

  6. Modulation instability in the weak dispersion regime of a dispersion modulated passive fiber-ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Trillo, Stefano; Mussot, Arnaud

    2017-05-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the modulation instability process in a dispersion oscillating passive fiber-ring resonator in the low dispersion region. Generally, the modulation of the dispersion along the cavity length is responsible for the emergence of a regime characterised by multiple parametric resonances (or Faraday instabilities). We show that, under weak dispersion conditions, a huge number of Faraday sidebands can grow under the influence of fourth order dispersion. We specifically designed a piecewise uniform fiber-ring cavity and report on experiments that confirm our theoretical predictions. We recorded the dynamics of this system revealing strong interactions between the different sidebands in agreement with numerical simulations.

  7. Seed dispersal by pulp consumers, not "legitimate" seed dispersers, increases Guettarda viburnoides population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loayza, Andrea P; Knight, Tiffany

    2010-09-01

    We examined the effect of seed dispersal by Purplish Jays (Cyanocorax cyanomelas; pulp consumers) and the Chestnut-eared Araçari (Pteroglossus castanotis; "legitimate" seed dispersers) on population growth of the small tree Guettarda viburnoides (Rubiaceae) in northeastern Bolivian savannas. Because each bird species differs with respect to feeding and post-feeding behavior, we hypothesized that seed dispersal by each species will contribute differently to the rate of increase of G. viburnoides, but that seed dispersal by either species will increase population growth when compared to a scenario with no seed dispersal. To examine the effects of individual dispersers on the future population size of G. viburnoides, we projected population growth rate using demographic models for G. viburnoides that explicitly incorporate data on quantitative and qualitative aspects of seed dispersal by each frugivore species. Our model suggests that seed dispersal by C. cyanomelas leads to positive population growth of G. viburnoides, whereas seed dispersal by P. castanotis has a detrimental effect on the population growth of this species. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report negative effects of a "legitimate" seed disperser on the population dynamics of the plant it consumes. Our results stress the importance of incorporating frugivore effects into population projection matrices, to allow a comprehensive analysis of the effectiveness of different dispersers for plant population dynamics.

  8. The Danish Dispersal Policy on Refugee Immigrants 1986-1998: A Natural Experiment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    This paper investigates whether the Danish Dispersal Policy on new refugee immigrants carried out from 1986 to 1998 can be regarded as a natural experiment. Were refugees randomly assigned to a location? The main findings are as follows. First, around 90% of new refugees were assigned to a location....... Second, the dispersal policy successfully distributed new refugees equally across locations relative to the number of inhabitants in a location. Third, the actual settlement may have been influenced by six refugee characteristics. I conclude that the initial location of new refugees 1986-1998 may...

  9. 离散型指数族非线性模型的变离差检验%TESTING FOR VARYING DISPERSION IN DISCRETE EXPONENTIAL FAMILY NONLNEAR MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林金官; 韦博成; 张南松

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to test for varying dispersion in generalized nonlinear models. Wei,et al (1998) developed a likelihood ratio test,a score test and their adjustments to test for varying dispersion in continuous exponential family nonlinear models. This type of problem in the framework of general discrete exponential family nonlinear models is discussed. Two types of varying dispersion, which are random coefficients model and random effects model, are proposed ,and corresponding score test statistics are constructed and expressed in simple ,easy to use ,matrix formulas.

  10. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  11. On Gaussian random supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C. [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Physical Sciences Building 428, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-04-08

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with |F|≪M{sub susy} or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log (P)∝−N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  12. On Gaussian random supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-04-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with | F| ≪ M susy or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log( P ) ∝ - N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  13. On Gaussian Random Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bachlechner, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kahler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with |F|<< M_{susy} or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log(P)\\propto -N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics...

  14. Temporally variable dispersal and demography can accelerate the spread of invading species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Stephen P; Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze how temporal variability in local demography and dispersal combine to affect the rate of spread of an invading species. Our model combines state-structured local demography (specified by an integral or matrix projection model) with general dispersal distributions that may depend on the state of the individual or its parent. It allows very general patterns of stationary temporal variation in both local demography and in the frequency and distribution of dispersal distances. We show that expressions for the asymptotic spread rate and its sensitivity to parameters, which have been derived previously for less general models, continue to hold. Using these results we show that random temporal variability in dispersal can accelerate population spread. Demographic variability can further accelerate spread if it is positively correlated with dispersal variability, for example if high-fecundity years are also years in which juveniles tend to settle further away from their parents. A simple model for the growth and spread of patches of an invasive plant (perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium) illustrates these effects and shows that they can have substantial impacts on the predicted speed of an invasion wave. Temporal variability in dispersal has received very little attention in both the theoretical and empirical literature on invasive species spread. Our results suggest that this needs to change.

  15. Shear Flow Dispersion Under Wave and Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal dispersion of solute in open channel flow with short period progressive waves is investigated. The waves induce second order drift velocity in the direction of propagation and enhance the mixing process in concurrent direction. The 1-D wave-period-averaged dispersion equation is derived and an expression for the wave-current induced longitudinal dispersion coefficient (WCLDC) is proposed based on Fischer's expression (1979) for dispersion in unidirectional flow. The result shows that the effect of waves on dispersion is mainly due to the cross-sectional variation of the drift velocity. Furthermore, to obtain a more practical expression of the WCLDC, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient due to Seo and Cheong (1998) is modified to incluee the effect of drift velocity. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to verify the proposed expression. The experimental results, together with dimensional analysis, show that the wave effect can be reflected by the ratio between the wave amplitude and wave period. A comparative study between the cases with and without waves demonstrates that the magnitude of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient is increased under the presence of waves.

  16. Acorn dispersal estimated by radio-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Josep; Pausas, Juli G

    2007-10-01

    Bird-dispersed seeds are difficult to track, especially in the case of long-distance dispersal events. To estimate the oak dispersal distance and the seed shadow generated by the European jay (Garrulus glandarius), we inserted radio-transmitters in 239 acorns, placed them in bird-feeders and then located them by radio-tracking. Using this methodology we located the exact caching site of 94 Quercus ilex and 54 Q. suber acorns and determined the caching habitat characteristics (vegetation type, distance, spatial distribution). The results show that: (1) there is no differences in the dispersal distance distribution between the different acorn species or sizes, (2) dispersal distances range from approximately 3 m up to approximately 550 m (mean = 68.6 m; median = 49.2 m), (3) recently abandoned fields and forest tracks were the sites preferred by jays to cache acorns, whereas fields and shrublands were avoided and (4) seed shadows showed acorn aggregation zones (i.e. clusters of caches) close to the feeder as well as isolated caches at longer distances. The results also suggest that radio-transmitters are a cheap and reliable way to determine seed shadows and quantify both seed dispersal and post-dispersal seed predation for medium to large seeds.

  17. On Gaussian random supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial K\\"ahler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a nume...

  18. Quantum Random Number Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. We discuss the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multipl...

  19. Stationary one-dimensional dispersive shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2011-01-01

    We address shock waves generated upon the interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defect in defocusing media with linear gain and two-photon absorption. We found that in contrast to conservative media where one-dimensional dispersive shock waves usually exist only as nonstationary objects expanding away from defect or generating beam, the competition between gain and two-photon absorption in dissipative medium results in the formation of localized stationary dispersive shock waves, whose transverse extent may considerably exceed that of the refractive index defect. One-dimensional dispersive shock waves are stable if the defect strength does not exceed certain critical value.

  20. DISPERSION OF CYLINDRICAL PARTICLES IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhen-yu; LIN Jian-zhong

    2004-01-01

    With consideration of the Stokes drag and virtual mass force, the equations for mean and fluctuating velocities in rotation and translation were given for rigid cylindrical particles moving in a turbulent flow. Then the rotational and translational dispersion coefficients of particle were derived. The relationships between the dispersion coefficients and flow length scale as well as particle characteristic parameters were analyzed. The resulting dispersion coefficients were proved to decrease as the particle length increases. The conclusions are helpful for the further research on the motion of cylindrical particles in turbulent flows.

  1. Inverse scattering of dispersive stratified structures

    CERN Document Server

    Skaar, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    We consider the inverse scattering problem of retrieving the structural parameters of a stratified medium consisting of dispersive materials, given knowledge of the complex reflection coefficient in a finite frequency range. It is shown that the inverse scattering problem does not have a unique solution in general. When the dispersion is sufficiently small, such that the time-domain Fresnel reflections have durations less than the round-trip time in the layers, the solution is unique and can be found by layer peeling. Numerical examples with dispersive and lossy media are given, demonstrating the usefulness of the method for e.g. THz technology.

  2. Dispersion and fall out of heavier particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Poul

    2016-01-01

    they may like gasses and aerosols be transported more or less far by the wind. The present paper focuses on the growth of plumes of such particles larger and heavier than aerosols and transported by the wind. Implementation in existing decision support puff dispersion programs requires a parameterization...... of this growth, and two reasonable describing parameterizations have been found, one in the literature, one proposed here, and both are compared to experimental work found in the literature. The parameterization from the literature has been implemented in the dispersion program RIMPUFF, which has subsequently...... shown that the effect on fall out to a large extent overrules the effect on the dispersion of such particles....

  3. Plasma Dispersion Function for the Kappa Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma dispersion function is computed for a homogeneous isotropic plasma in which the particle velocities are distributed according to a Kappa distribution. An ordinary differential equation is derived for the plasma dispersion function and it is shown that the solution can be written in terms of Gauss' hypergeometric function. Using the extensive theory of the hypergeometric function, various mathematical properties of the plasma dispersion function are derived including symmetry relations, series expansions, integral representations, and closed form expressions for integer and half-integer values of K.

  4. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review

    OpenAIRE

    Schupp, Eugene W.; JORDANO, Pedro; Gómez Reyes, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effec- tiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an over- view of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representa- tion of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with ele...

  5. Dispersion Method Using Focused Ultrasonic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyel; Chu, Minchul

    2010-07-01

    The dispersion of powders into liquids has become one of the most important techniques in high-tech industries and it is a common process in the formulation of various products, such as paint, ink, shampoo, beverages, and polishing media. In this study, an ultrasonic system with a cylindrical transducer is newly introduced for pure nanoparticle dispersion. The acoustics pressure field and the characteristics of the shock pulse caused by cavitation are investigated. The frequency spectrum of the pulse from the collapse of air bubbles in the cavitation is analyzed theoretically. It was confirmed that a TiO2 water suspension can be dispersed effectively using the suggested system.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Aerial Dispersion on Piston Dispersal Mechanism%Modeling and Simulation of Aerial Dispersion on Piston Dispersal Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶如意; 王浩; 黄蓓

    2011-01-01

    For the aerial dispersing interior ballistic process and submunition exterior ballistic initial conditions of cluster munition with piston maximum travel limit, a novel model is established, and the numerical simulation is performed. The piston maximum travel limit and the effect of reaction force on carrier body are researched using the internal ballistic model. Guide tube, cluster munition rotating and submunition assembly are analyzed using the submunition initial external ballistic model. The computational results are consistent with the practical process and the experimental data, and prove the rationality of this model. The theoretical methods are presented for the construction design and dispersion analysis of piston dispersal mechanism.

  7. High-Multipolar Effects on Dispersive Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Noguez, C; Esquivel-Sirvent, R; Villarreal, C; Noguez, Cecilia; Roman-Velazquez, Carlos E.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the dispersive force between a spherical nanoparticle (with a radius $\\le$ 100 nm) and a substrate is enhanced by several orders of magnitude when the sphere is near to the substrate. We calculate exactly the dispersive force in the non-retarded limit by incorporating the contributions to the interaction from of all the multipolar electromagnetic modes. We show that as the sphere approaches the substrate, the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, induced by the vacuum and the presence of the substrate, the dispersive force is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We discuss this effect as a function of the size of the sphere.

  8. Flow, transport and diffusion in random geometries II: applications

    KAUST Repository

    Asinari, Pietro

    2015-01-07

    Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) is an efficient and flexible solution for the propagation of uncertainties in complex models, where an explicit parametrization of the input randomness is not available or too expensive. We present several applications of our MLMC algorithm for flow, transport and diffusion in random heterogeneous materials. The absolute permeability and effective diffusivity (or formation factor) of micro-scale porous media samples are computed and the uncertainty related to the sampling procedures is studied. The algorithm is then extended to the transport problems and multiphase flows for the estimation of dispersion and relative permeability curves. The impact of water drops on random stuctured surfaces, with microfluidics applications to self-cleaning materials, is also studied and simulated. Finally the estimation of new drag correlation laws for poly-dispersed dilute and dense suspensions is presented.

  9. Distorted-distance models for directional dispersal: a general framework with application to a wind-dispersed tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van B.; Visser, M.D.; Muller-Landau, H.C.; Jansen, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Seed and pollen dispersal is often directionally biased, because of the inherent directionality of wind and many other dispersal vectors. Nevertheless, the vast majority of studies of seed and pollen dispersal fit isotropic dispersal kernels to data, implicitly assuming that dispersal is equally

  10. Distorted-distance models for directional dispersal: a general framework with application to a wind-dispersed tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van B.; Visser, M.D.; Muller-Landau, H.C.; Jansen, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Seed and pollen dispersal is often directionally biased, because of the inherent directionality of wind and many other dispersal vectors. Nevertheless, the vast majority of studies of seed and pollen dispersal fit isotropic dispersal kernels to data, implicitly assuming that dispersal is equally

  11. Optimisation of dispersion parameters of Gaussian plume model for CO₂ dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Lu, Cheng; Michal, Guillaume; Venton, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects entail the possibility of accidental release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. To quantify the spread of CO2 following such release, the 'Gaussian' dispersion model is often used to estimate the resulting CO2 concentration levels in the surroundings. The Gaussian model enables quick estimates of the concentration levels. However, the traditionally recommended values of the 'dispersion parameters' in the Gaussian model may not be directly applicable to CO2 dispersion. This paper presents an optimisation technique to obtain the dispersion parameters in order to achieve a quick estimation of CO2 concentration levels in the atmosphere following CO2 blowouts. The optimised dispersion parameters enable the Gaussian model to produce quick estimates of CO2 concentration levels, precluding the necessity to set up and run much more complicated models. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were employed to produce reference CO2 dispersion profiles in various atmospheric stability classes (ASC), different 'source strengths' and degrees of ground roughness. The performance of the CFD models was validated against the 'Kit Fox' field measurements, involving dispersion over a flat horizontal terrain, both with low and high roughness regions. An optimisation model employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the best dispersion parameters in the Gaussian plume model was set up. Optimum values of the dispersion parameters for different ASCs that can be used in the Gaussian plume model for predicting CO2 dispersion were obtained.

  12. Dispersal Timing: Emigration of Insects Living in Patchy Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Lakovic

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a life-history trait affecting dynamics and persistence of populations; it evolves under various known selective pressures. Theoretical studies on dispersal typically assume 'natal dispersal', where individuals emigrate right after birth. But emigration may also occur during a later moment within a reproductive season ('breeding dispersal'. For example, some female butterflies first deposit eggs in their natal patch before migrating to other site(s to continue egg-laying there. How breeding compared to natal dispersal influences the evolution of dispersal has not been explored. To close this gap we used an individual-based simulation approach to analyze (i the evolution of timing of breeding dispersal in annual organisms, (ii its influence on dispersal (compared to natal dispersal. Furthermore, we tested (iii its performance in direct evolutionary contest with individuals following a natal dispersal strategy. Our results show that evolution should typically result in lower dispersal under breeding dispersal, especially when costs of dispersal are low and population size is small. By distributing offspring evenly across two patches, breeding dispersal allows reducing direct sibling competition in the next generation whereas natal dispersal can only reduce trans-generational kin competition by producing highly dispersive offspring in each generation. The added benefit of breeding dispersal is most prominent in patches with small population sizes. Finally, the evolutionary contests show that a breeding dispersal strategy would universally out-compete natal dispersal.

  13. Quantum random number generator

    CERN Document Server

    Stipcevic, M

    2006-01-01

    We report upon a novel principle for realization of a fast nondeterministic random number generator whose randomness relies on intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical processes of photonic emission in semiconductors and subsequent detection by the photoelectric effect. Timing information of detected photons is used to generate binary random digits-bits. The bit extraction method based on restartable clock theoretically eliminates both bias and autocorrelation while reaching efficiency of almost 0.5 bits per random event. A prototype has been built and statistically tested.

  14. Misuse of randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Kjaergard, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The quality of randomization of Chinese randomized trials on herbal medicines for hepatitis B was assessed. Search strategy and inclusion criteria were based on the published protocol. One hundred and seventy-six randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving 20,452 patients with chronic hepatitis B....../150) of the studies were imbalanced at the 0.05 level of probability for the two treatments and 13.3% (20/150) imbalanced at the 0.01 level in the randomization. It is suggested that there may exist misunderstanding of the concept and the misuse of randomization based on the review....

  15. Differential Contribution of Frugivores to Complex Seed Dispersal Patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. Jordano; C. Garcia; J. A. Godoy; J. L. Garcia-Castaño

    2007-01-01

    .... However, data are lacking on species-specific variation in two central aspects of seed dispersal, distance of dispersal and probability of dispersal among populations through long-distance transport...

  16. The Flying Sunflower: A Seed Dispersal Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buege, Douglas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an open-ended activity in which students build a "plant" that launches its seeds as far as possible to study the dispersal strategies of various plants. Recommends extension activities for elementary- and secondary-level students. (WRM)

  17. Training for Internationalization through Domestic Geographical Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santangelo, Grazia D.; Stucchi, Tamara

    organizational learning, we seek to solve this puzzle in relation to the internationalization of Indian BGs. In particular, we argue that in heterogeneous domestic emerging markets BG’s geographical dispersion across sub-national states provides training for internationalization. To internationalize successfully......, BGs need to develop the capability of managing geographically dispersed units in institutional heterogeneous contexts. Domestic geographical dispersion would indeed help the BG dealing with different regulations, customers and infrastructures. However, there is less scope for such training as BGs...... become more internationally experienced, and the benefits of domestic geographical dispersions are limited by the degree of urbanization of sub-national states. We test our argument on a sample of 693 Indian BGs over the period 2001-2010....

  18. A dispersive approach to Sudakov resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, Einan

    2007-01-01

    We present a general all-order formulation of Sudakov resummation in QCD in terms of dispersion integrals. We show that the Sudakov exponent can be written as a dispersion integral over spectral density functions, weighted by characteristic functions that encode information on power corrections. The characteristic functions are defined and computed analytically in the large-beta_0 limit. The spectral density functions encapsulate the non-Abelian nature of the interaction. They are defined by the time-like discontinuity of specific effective charges (couplings) that are directly related to the familiar Sudakov anomalous dimensions and can be computed order-by-order in perturbation theory. The dispersive approach provides a realization of Dressed Gluon Exponentiation, where Sudakov resummation is enhanced by an internal resummation of running-coupling corrections. We establish all-order relations between the scheme-invariant Borel formulation and the dispersive one, and address the difference in the treatment o...

  19. Sex-biased dispersal of human ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru

    2017-07-01

    Some anthropologists and primatologists have argued that, judging by extant chimpanzees and humans, which are female-biased dispersers, the common ancestors of humans and chimpanzees were also female-biased dispersers. It has been thought that sex-biased dispersal patterns have been genetically transmitted for millions of years. However, this character has changed many times with changes in environment and life-form during human evolution and historical times. I examined life-form and social organization of nonhuman primates, among them gatherers (foragers), hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, industrialists, and modern and extant humans. I conclude that dispersal patterns changed in response to environmental conditions during primate and human evolution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Revised state diagram of Laponite dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongondry, Philippe; Tassin, Jean François; Nicolai, Taco

    2005-03-15

    We propose a state diagram of charged disk-like mineral particle (Laponite) dispersions as a function of the Laponite concentration (C) and the concentration of added salt (C(s)), based on simple observation and light-scattering measurements. At low C or high C(s) the dispersions separate into two domains due to sedimentation of Laponite aggregates, while at high C and low C(s) they form homogeneous gels that do not flow upon tube reversal. The aggregation rate and the structure factor of the Laponite dispersions is determined with light scattering as a function of C and C(s). We discuss in detail the controversy on the origin of gelation of Laponite dispersions in the absence of added salt. We argue that aggregation rather than glass formation causes gelation.

  1. Theoretical Considerations in Developing Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Surwase, Sachin;

    2014-01-01

    Before pursuing the laborious route of amorphous solid dispersion formulation and development, which is the topic of many of the subsequent chapters in this book, the formulation scientist would benefit from a priori knowledge whether the amorphous route is a viable one for a given drug and how...... to their glass-forming ability and glass stability. In the main parts of this chapter, we review theoretical approaches to determine amorphous drug polymer miscibility and crystalline drug polymer solubility, as a prerequisite to develop amorphous solid dispersions (glass solutions)....... much solubility improvement, and hence increase in bioavailability, can be expected, and what forms of solid dispersion have been developed in the past. In this chapter, we therefore initially define the various forms of solid dispersions, and then go on to discuss properties of pure drugs with respect...

  2. Experimental measurement of dispersion coefficients for gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Delgado, E. [National University at Comahue (Brazil); Da Franca Correa, A.C. [State Univ. of Campinas (Brazil)

    2001-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on dispersion, a phenomenon by which molecules of two miscible fluids diffuse into one another when they come into contact with each other. Both longitudinal and transverse diffusion is a result of forced flow. Longitudinal dispersion occurs in the direction of flow, while transverse dispersion occurs perpendicular to the direction of flow. This study focused on measuring longitudinal dispersion coefficients on natural gas displaced by an inert gas (nitrogen) at very low pressure. The experiments were carried out at two different pressure ranges on unconsolidated porous media at a Gas Plant Laboratory near Neuquen, Argentina. Two different types of porous media were used, a plastic hose and a metallic slim tube. They were each filled twice with both natural and synthetic sand grains. The study provided a better understanding of how gases behave at low pressures. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  3. Pulse dispersion in hollow optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Waynant, Ronald W.; Gannot, Israel

    2005-09-01

    A study of laser (near- and mid-infrared) pulse dispersion in hollow waveguides is presented. We developed an analytical model to describe the pulse dispersion in hollow waveguides and compared our theoretical calculations with measurements done by us and also by two other groups. The pulse dispersion was experimentally measured for a short Q-switched Er:YAG laser in the nanosecond range and for femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses transmitted by hollow optical waveguides. For analytical calculation of the pulse dispersion in these waveguides, a refined ray tracing program was developed. This approach took into account roughness of the internal reflecting and refracting inner layers. A comparison analysis between the measurements and calculations conducted at identical parameters demonstrates good correlation between theoretical and experimental results.

  4. Transport and dispersion on offshore banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannah, C. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2000-07-01

    Basic principles of developing a model of benthic boundary layer transport of the vertical distribution of sediments to generate estimates of drift and dispersion are described. The application of local benthic boundary layer transport to the Hibernia, Cohasset and Georges Bank fields show inter-regional variations associated with water depth and current strength. At Cohasset no significant impact of drift or dispersion was observed during five days of simulation. At Georges Bank modelled currents and local benthic boundary layer transport predicted impacts from drilling waste disposal as a function of settling velocity and location on the Bank. Dispersion due to horizontal shear in the currents on the northern flank was clearly evident in the sheared distribution of the particles. The dispersion produced increased diffusivity compared with a local benthic boundary layer transport application. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Dispersion forces between noble gas atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Luyckx, R.; Coulon, P.

    1978-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6, R -8, and R-10 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between helium, neon, and argon at distance R are calculated using an elementary variation method.

  6. Dispersive shock waves with nonlocal nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Barsi, Christopher; Sun, Can; Fleischer, Jason W

    2007-01-01

    We consider dispersive optical shock waves in nonlocal nonlinear media. Experiments are performed using spatial beams in a thermal liquid cell, and results agree with a hydrodynamic theory of propagation.

  7. Dispersive shock waves with nonlocal nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie; Sun, Can; Fleischer, Jason W

    2007-10-15

    We consider dispersive optical shock waves in nonlocal nonlinear media. Experiments are performed using spatial beams in a thermal liquid cell, and results agree with a hydrodynamic theory of propagation.

  8. SCIPUFF - a generalized hazard dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, R.I.; Henn, D.S.; Parker, S.F.; Gabruk, R.S. [Titan Research and Technology, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One of the more popular techniques for efficiently representing the dispersion process is the Gaussian puff model, which uses a collection of Lagrangian puffs with Gaussian concentration profiles. SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated Puff) is an advanced Gaussian puff model. SCIPUFF which uses second-order turbulence closure techniques to relate the dispersion rates to measurable turbulent velocity statistics, providing a wide range of applicability. In addition, the closure model provides a prediction of the statistical variance in the concentration field which can be used to estimate the uncertainty in the dispersion prediction resulting from the inherent uncertainty in the wind field. SCIPUFF has been greatly extended from a power plant plume model to describe more general source characteristics, material properties, and longer range dispersion. In addition, a Graphical User Interface has been developed to provide interactive problem definition and output display. This presentation describes the major features of the model, and presents several example calculations.

  9. Nonlinear Dispersion Relation in Wave Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞杰; 严以新; 曹宏生

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear dispersion relation is presented to model the nonlinear dispersion of waves over the whole range of possible water depths. It reduces the phase speed over-prediction of both Hedges′ modified relation and Kirby and Dalrymple′s modified relation in the region of 1<kh<1.5 for small wave steepness and maintains the monotonicity in phase speed variation for large wave steepness. And it has a simple form. By use of the new nonlinear dispersion relation along with the mild slope equation taking into account weak nonlinearity, a mathematical model of wave transformation is developed and applied to laboratory data. The results show that the model with the new dispersion relation can predict wave transformation over complicated bathymetry satisfactorily.

  10. Bird deterrent and dispersal systems: Research update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a research update on bird deterrent and dispersal systems by the Petroleum Association for Conservation of the Canadian Environment. The purpose of...

  11. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  12. Chirped mirrors with low dispersion ripple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervak, V; Naumov, S; Krausz, F; Apolonski, A

    2007-10-17

    We demonstrate a chirped dielectric multilayer mirror (CM) with controlled reflectivity and dispersion in the wavelength range 760-840 nm. It exhibits a reflectivity of >99.9% and a mean group delay dispersion (GDD) of about -30 fs(2) with a theoretical GDD ripple of less than 0.5 fs(2) in the working spectral range. Deviations of the measured GDD from the calculated one are restricted to less than +/- 3 fs(2), limited by our measurement system. Simulations reveal that a dispersive delay line composed of 120 bounces off these mirrors introduces negligible distortion to a femtosecond pulse and largely preserves its contrast. The mirrors constitute an ideal tool for precision intracavity or extracavity dispersion control in the range of several thousand fs(2), particularly if pulses with high contrast are to be generated.

  13. Seed Dispersal Potential of Asian Elephants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harich, Franziska K.; Treydte, Anna Christina; Ogutu, Joseph Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    Elephants, the largest terrestrial mega-herbivores, play an important ecological role in maintaining forest ecosystem diversity. While several plant species strongly rely on African elephants (Loxodonta africana; L. cyclotis) as seed dispersers, little is known about the dispersal potential...... of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). We examined the effects of elephant fruit consumption on potential seed dispersal using the example of a tree species with mega-faunal characteristics, Dillenia indica L., in Thailand. We conducted feeding trials with Asian elephants to quantify seed survival and gut...... with the longest GPT displayed the highest germination success over time. Unexpectedly, seeds planted with dung had longer germination times than those planted without. We conclude that D. indica does not solely depend on but benefits from dispersal by elephants. The declining numbers of these mega-faunal seed...

  14. Modeling electrical dispersion phenomena in Earth materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is illustrated that IP phenomena in rocks can be described using conductivity dispersion models deduced as solutions to a 2nd-order linear differential equation describing the motion of a charged particle immersed in an external electrical field. Five dispersion laws are discussed, namely: the non-resonant positive IP model, which leads to the classical Debye-type dispersion law and by extension to the Cole-Cole model, largely used in current practice; the non-resonant negative IP model, which allows negative chargeability values, known in metals at high frequencies, to be explained as an intrinsic physical property of earth materials in specific field cases; the resonant flat, positive or negative IP models, which can explain the presence of peak effects at specific frequencies superimposed on flat, positive or negative dispersion spectra.

  15. Frictionless dispersive hydrodynamics of Stokes flows

    CERN Document Server

    Maiden, Michelle D; Anderson, Dalton V; Schubert, Marika E; Hoefer, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Effectively frictionless, dispersive flow characterizes superfluids, nonlinear optical diffraction, and geophysical fluid interfaces. Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) and solitons are fundamental nonlinear excitations in these media, but DSW studies to date have been severely constrained by a loss of coherence. Here we report on a novel dispersive hydrodynamics testbed: the effectively frictionless flow of interfacial waves between two high contrast, low Reynolds' number Stokes fluids. This system enables high fidelity observations of large amplitude DSWs, found to agree quantitatively with a nonlinear wave averaging theory. We then report on observations of highly coherent phenomena including DSW backflow, the refraction or absorption of solitons by DSWs, and multi-phase DSW-DSW merger. The complex, coherent, nonlinear mixing of DSWs and solitons observed here are universal features of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamic flows.

  16. Adsorption of an anionic dispersant on lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    Since coal is not a homogeneous substance but a mixture of carbonaceous materials and mineral matter, it has a variety of surface properties. Therefore, it is not easy to control the properties of coal suspensions by simply adjusting variables, such as pH and/or electrolyte. A chemical agent needs to be added to control the properties of the coal suspensions. The adsorption behavior of an anionic dispersant in the presence of a wetting agent using some Turkish lignite samples was investigated. The effects of dispersant concentration, temperature and pH on the dispersant adsorption were studied systematically, and the experimental results are presented. Pellupur B69 as a dispersant, commercial mixture of formaldehyde condensate sodium salt of naphthalene sulphonic acid, and Texapon N{sub 2}5 as a wetting agent, a sodium lauryl ether sulfate, have been used.

  17. Quantum random number generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  18. Dispersion of Human Capital and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jungsoo Park

    2004-01-01

    Based on a theoretical consideration of human capital production technology, this study empirically investigates the growth implication of dispersion of population distribution in terms of educational attainment levels. Based on a pooled 5-year interval time-series data set of 94 developed and developing countries for 1960 to 1995, the study finds that dispersion index as well as average index of human capital positively influences productivity growth. Given limited social resources for human...

  19. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses....... Knowledge of material dispersion is critical in delivering step-index fibres including with high numerical aperture for mid-infrared supercontinuum generation....

  20. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  1. Study of LPG Release & Dispersion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Shanjun; Peng Xiangwei

    2003-01-01

    The current applicable release & dispersion models are reviewed. A typical model is developed on the basis of LPG storage conditions in China and the authors' research. The study is focused on the relationship between LPG composition and release rate, and on the influence of buildings or structures located in the surrounding area on the dispersion of gas plume. The established model is compared with existing models by the use of published field test data.

  2. Dispersive Approach to the Trace Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Kawka, N.; Teryaev, O. V.; Veretin, O.L.

    1997-01-01

    In the scalar $\\phi^4$ field model the dispersive approach to the trace anomaly is proposed. It is shown that it is impossible to get dispersion representation for all formfactors so that preserve both the translation and dilatation Ward identities. Subtractions which preserve energy-momentum conservation violate the classical trace Ward--Takahashi identity and give rise to an anomalous contribution to the matrix element of stress tensor $\\theta_\\mu^\

  3. Casein Micelle Dispersions under Osmotic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchoux, Antoine; Cayemitte, Pierre-Emerson; Jardin, Julien; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève; Cabane, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Casein micelles dispersions have been concentrated and equilibrated at different osmotic pressures using equilibrium dialysis. This technique measured an equation of state of the dispersions over a wide range of pressures and concentrations and at different ionic strengths. Three regimes were found. i), A dilute regime in which the osmotic pressure is proportional to the casein concentration. In this regime, the casein micelles are well separated and rarely interact, whereas the osmotic press...

  4. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2 of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJs of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN, e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9. A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9 and C. elegans (ascr#2 dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes.

  5. Non-Perturbative Theory of Dispersion Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, M; Persson, C; Parsons, D F; Buhmann, S Y; Brevik, I; Sernelius, Bo E

    2015-01-01

    Some open questions exist with fluctuation-induced forces between extended dipoles. Conventional intuition derives from large-separation perturbative approximations to dispersion force theory. Here we present a full non-perturbative theory. In addition we discuss how one can take into account finite dipole size corrections. It is of fundamental value to investigate the limits of validity of the perturbative dispersion force theory.

  6. Dispersive radiation induced by shock waves in passive resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguti, Stefania; Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We show that passive Kerr resonators pumped close to zero dispersion wavelengths on the normal dispersion side can develop the resonant generation of linear waves driven by cavity (mixed dispersive-dissipative) shock waves. The resonance mechanism can be successfully described in the framework of the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation with higher-order dispersive terms. Substantial differences with radiation from cavity solitons and purely dispersive shock waves dispersion are highlighted.

  7. Beyond dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Mei-I; Fuh, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-28

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other dispersion liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) methods have been developed since the first DLLME method was reported in 2006. DLLME is simple, rapid, and affords high enrichment factor, this is due to the large contact surface area of the extraction solvent. DLLME is a method suitable for the extraction in many different water samples, but it requires using chlorinated solvents. In recent years, interest in DLLME or dispersion LPME has been focused on the use of low-toxicity solvents and more conveniently practical procedures. This review examines some of the most interesting developments in the past few years. In the first section, DLLME methods are separated in two categories: DLLME with low-density extraction solvent and DLLME with high-density extraction solvent. Besides these methods, many novel special devices for collecting low-density extraction solvent are also mentioned. In addition, various dispersion techniques with LPME, including manual shaking, air-assisted LPME (aspirating and injecting the extraction mixture by syringe), ultrasound-assisted emulsification, vortex-assisted emulsification, surfactant-assisted emulsification, and microwave-assisted emulsification are described. Besides the above methods, combinations of DLLME with other extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion and supercritical fluid extraction) are introduced. The combination of nanotechnique with DLLME is also introduced. Furthermore, this review illustrates the application of DLLME or dispersion LPME methods to separate and preconcentrate various organic analytes, inorganic analytes, and samples.

  8. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of applications. For example, such models can be useful for evaluating the mitigation potential of roadside barriers in reducing near-road exposures and their associated adverse health effects. Two databases, a tracer field study and a wind tunnel study, provide measurements used in the development and/or validation of algorithms to simulate dispersion in the presence of noise barriers. The tracer field study was performed in Idaho Falls, ID, USA with a 6-m noise barrier and a finite line source in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The second study was performed in the meteorological wind tunnel at the US EPA and simulated line sources at different distances from a model noise barrier to capture the effect on emissions from individual lanes of traffic. In both cases, velocity and concentration measurements characterized the effect of the barrier on dispersion.This paper presents comparisons with the two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s ADMS model (ADMS-Urban). In R-LINE the physical features reveal

  9. TSUNAMI DISPERSION SENSITIVITY TO SEISMIC SOURCE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Igorevich Gusev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the sensitivity of frequency dispersion effects to the form of initial surface elevation of seismic tsunami source. We vary such parameters of the source as rupture depth, dip-angle and rake-angle. Some variations in magnitude and strike angle are considered. The fully nonlinear dispersive model on a rotating sphere is used for wave propagation simulations. The main feature of the algorithm is the splitting of initial system on two subproblems of elliptic and hyperbolic type, which allows implementation of well-suitable numerical methods for them. The dispersive effects are estimated through differences between computations with the dispersive and nondispersive models. We consider an idealized test with a constant depth, a model basin for near-field tsunami simulations and a realistic scenario. Our computations show that the dispersion effects are strongly sensitive to the rupture depth and the dip-angle variations. Waves generated by sources with lager magnitude may be even more affected by dispersion.

  10. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Wolf M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three levels of complexity: (1) an event-based binomial model that considers only the occurrence of mortality or arrival, (2) a temporally explicit exponential model that employs mortality and arrival rates, and (3) a spatially explicit grid-walk model that simulates the movement of animals through an artificial landscape. Each model was fitted to the same set of field data. A first objective of the paper is to illustrate how the maximum-likelihood method can be used in all three cases to estimate the means and confidence limits for the relevant model parameters, given a particular set of data on dispersal survival. Using this framework we show that the structure of the uncertainty for all three models is strikingly similar. In fact, the results of our unified approach imply that spatially explicit dispersal models, which take advantage of information on landscape details, suffer less from uncertainly than do simpler models. Moreover, we show that the proposed strategy of model development safeguards one from error propagation in these more complex models. Finally, our approach shows that all models related to animal dispersal, ranging from simple to complex, can be related in a hierarchical fashion, so that the various approaches to modeling such dispersal can be viewed from a unified perspective.

  11. Dispersive shock waves and modulation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    There is growing physical and mathematical interest in the hydrodynamics of dissipationless/dispersive media. Since G.B. Whitham's seminal publication fifty years ago that ushered in the mathematical study of dispersive hydrodynamics, there has been a significant body of work in this area. However, there has been no comprehensive survey of the field of dispersive hydrodynamics. Utilizing Whitham's averaging theory as the primary mathematical tool, we review the rich mathematical developments over the past fifty years with an emphasis on physical applications. The fundamental, large scale, coherent excitation in dispersive hydrodynamic systems is an expanding, oscillatory dispersive shock wave or DSW. Both the macroscopic and microscopic properties of DSWs are analyzed in detail within the context of the universal, integrable, and foundational models for uni-directional (Korteweg-de Vries equation) and bi-directional (Nonlinear Schrödinger equation) dispersive hydrodynamics. A DSW fitting procedure that does not rely upon integrable structure yet reveals important macroscopic DSW properties is described. DSW theory is then applied to a number of physical applications: superfluids, nonlinear optics, geophysics, and fluid dynamics. Finally, we survey some of the more recent developments including non-classical DSWs, DSW interactions, DSWs in perturbed and inhomogeneous environments, and two-dimensional, oblique DSWs.

  12. Interspecific Variation in Primary Seed Dispersal in a Tropical Forest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helene C. Muller-Landau; S. Joseph Wright; Osvaldo Calderón; Richard Condit; Stephen P. Hubbell

    2008-01-01

    1. We investigated the relationships of seed size, dispersal mode and other species characteristics to interspecific variation in mean primary seed dispersal distances, mean annual seed production per...

  13. Measurement of small dispersion values in optical components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Liu, Fenghai; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    1999-01-01

    It is reported that small dispersion values in optical components can be measured using the RF modulation method originally restricted to large dispersions. Using a constant dispersion offset, arbitrarily small dispersion values can be measured with a resolution as good as 1.2 ps/nm.......It is reported that small dispersion values in optical components can be measured using the RF modulation method originally restricted to large dispersions. Using a constant dispersion offset, arbitrarily small dispersion values can be measured with a resolution as good as 1.2 ps/nm....

  14. Growth and dispersal with inertia: Hyperbolic reaction-transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Campos, Daniel; Horsthemke, Werner

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the behavior of five hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations most commonly employed to describe systems of interacting organisms or reacting particles where dispersal displays inertia. We first discuss the macroscopic or mesoscopic foundation, or lack thereof, of these reaction-transport equations. This is followed by an analysis of the temporal evolution of spatially uniform states. In particular, we determine the uniform steady states of the reaction-transport systems and their stability properties. We then address the spatiotemporal behavior of pure death processes. We end with a unified treatment of the front speed for hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations with Kolmogorov-Petrosvskii-Piskunov kinetics. In particular, we obtain an exact expression for the front speed of a general class of reaction correlated random walk systems. Our results establish that three out of the five hyperbolic reaction-transport equations provide physically acceptable models of biological and chemical systems.

  15. Determining The Dispersibility Of South Louisiana Crude Oil By Eight Oil Dispersant Products Listed On The NCP Product Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently conducted a laboratory study to measure the dispersion effectiveness of eight dispersants currently listed on the National Contingency Plan Product Schedule. Results are useful in determining how many commercial dispersant products would have been effective for use o...

  16. Instabilities of dispersion-managed solitons in the normal dispersion regime

    OpenAIRE

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    2000-01-01

    Dispersion-managed solitons are reviewed within a Gaussian variational approximation and an integral evolution model. In the normal regime of the dispersion map (when the averaged path dispersion is negative), there are two solitons of different pulse duration and energy at a fixed propagation constant. We show that the short soliton with a larger energy is linearly (exponentially) unstable. The other (long) soliton with a smaller energy is linearly stable but hits a resonance with excitation...

  17. Dispersion modeling of thermal power plant emissions on stochastic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorle, J. M. R.; Sambana, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to couple a deterministic atmospheric dispersion solver based on Gaussian model with a nonintrusive stochastic model to quantify the propagation of multiple uncertainties. The nonintrusive model is based on probabilistic collocation framework. The advantage of nonintrusive nature is to retain the existing deterministic plume dispersion model without missing the accuracy in extracting the statistics of stochastic solution. The developed model is applied to analyze the SO2 emission released from coal firing unit in the second stage of the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) in Dadri, India using "urban" conditions. The entire application is split into two cases, depending on the source of uncertainty. In case 1, the uncertainties in stack gas exit conditions are used to construct the stochastic space while in case 2, meteorological conditions are considered as the sources of uncertainty. Both cases develop 2D uncertain random space in which the uncertainty propagation is quantified in terms of plume rise and pollutant concentration distribution under slightly unstable atmospheric stability conditions. Starting with deterministic Gaussian plume model demonstration and its application, development of stochastic collocation model, convergence study, error analysis, and uncertainty quantification are presented in this paper.

  18. Effects of Reynolds Number on Mixing and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method was used to estimate the effects of Reynolds number (Re), and sidewall boundaries, on dispersion of gases in fractured and porous media. The systems studied ranged from idealized channels with parallel grooves and honeycomb structures, to casts of natural fractures and aggregates of sedimented, quasi-spherical particles. For specific configurations of rough, intersecting fractures, Re variation from 0 to 100 causes only a factor ~2 variation in the mixing ratio C2/(C1+C2), where C1 and C2 are the concentrations of solute in the outlet legs of the fracture intersection. However, slight changes in the intersection alignment yield up to factor 5 range in the mixing ratio, for the geometries studied. For both individual fractures and fracture intersections, sidewall boundary effects tend to be overwhelmed by velocity variations within the fracture planes. LB simulations for porous aggregates give good agreement with experimental studies. However, in random aggregates at high Re, it becomes impractical to obtain dispersion coefficients by LB and the method of moments. Alternative LB methods are discussed.

  19. Re-Thinking the Two-Body Problem: The Segregation of Women into Geographically-Dispersed Occupations

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research on the family cites the tendency for couples to relocate for husbands’ careers as evidence against the gender-neutrality of household economic decisions. For these studies, occupational segregation is a concern because occupations are not random by sex and mobility is not random by occupation. I find the tendency for households to relocate for husbands’ careers is better-explained by the segregation of women into geographically-dispersed occupations rather than by the direc...

  20. Solid dispersions in pharmaceutical technology. Part I. Classification and methods to obtain solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolewicz, Bozena; Górniak, Agata; Probst, Sandra; Owczarek, Artur; Pluta, Janusz; Zurawska-Płaksej, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    There are many methods to increase solubility of a substance. These include, inter alia, preparation of solid dispersions, i.e. eutectic mixtures, solid solutions, glassy solutions and suspensions. When compared to the individual constituents prior to dispersion formation solid dispersion components are better soluble in water. Therefore, solid solutions became one of the most promising ways to modify solubility, ensuring improved bioavailability and consequently therapeutic efficacy of a substance. In this part of the publication solid dispersions were classified and described in regard to their properties and preparation methods, i.e. melting method, melt evaporation and melt extrusion methods, lyophilisation technique, melt agglomeration process as well as SCF technology and electrospinning.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Aqueous Dispersion Poly[urethane-(disperse blue 14)-urethane] Dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Hai HU; Xing Yuan ZHANG; Jia Bing DAI; Ge Wen XU

    2004-01-01

    A novel polymeric dye of aqueous dispersion poly[urethane-(disperse blue 14)-urethane] was synthesized based on poly(propylene glycol) (PPG), 2, 4-tolylene diisocyanate (TDI), dimethylol propionic acid (DMPA), disperse blue 14 and triethylamine (TEA) depending on a modified acetone process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify the structure of the polymeric dye, indicating an obvious carbonyl stretching absorption in disperse blue 14. The polymer was also characterized by the analysis of DSC, TGA, WAXD and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  2. Predation of cassowary dispersed seeds: is the cassowary an effective disperser?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Matt G; Westcott, David A

    2011-09-01

    Post-dispersal predation is a potentially significant modifier of the distribution of recruiting plants and an often unmeasured determinant of the effectiveness of a frugivore's dispersal service. In the wet tropical forests of Australia and New Guinea, the cassowary provides a large volume, long distance dispersal service incorporating beneficial gut processing; however, the resultant clumped deposition might expose seeds to elevated mortality. We examined the contribution of post-dispersal seed predation to cassowary dispersal effectiveness by monitoring the fate of 11 species in southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii Linnaeus) droppings over a period of 1 year. Across all species, the rate of predation and removal was relatively slow. After 1 month, 70% of seeds remained intact and outwardly viable, while the number fell to 38% after 1 year. The proportion of seeds remaining intact in droppings varied considerably between species: soft-seeded and large-seeded species were more likely to escape removal and predation. Importantly, across all species, seeds in droppings were no more likely to be predated than those left undispersed under the parent tree. We speculate that seed predating and scatter-hoarding rodents are responsible for the vast majority of predation and removal from droppings and that the few seeds which undergo secondary dispersal survive to germination. Our findings reinforce the conclusion that the cassowary is an important seed disperser; however, dispersal effectiveness for particular plant species can be reduced by massive post-dispersal seed mortality. © 2011 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  3. Effective band structure of random alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-06-11

    Random substitutional A(x)B(1-x) alloys lack formal translational symmetry and thus cannot be described by the language of band-structure dispersion E(k(→)). Yet, many alloy experiments are interpreted phenomenologically precisely by constructs derived from wave vector k(→), e.g., effective masses or van Hove singularities. Here we use large supercells with randomly distributed A and B atoms, whereby many different local environments are allowed to coexist, and transform the eigenstates into an effective band structure (EBS) in the primitive cell using a spectral decomposition. The resulting EBS reveals the extent to which band characteristics are preserved or lost at different compositions, band indices, and k(→) points, showing in (In,Ga)N the rapid disintegration of the valence band Bloch character and in Ga(N,P) the appearance of a pinned impurity band.

  4. Random walks, random fields, and disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Černý, Jiří; Kotecký, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the mathematics that lies at the intersection of probability theory, statistical physics, combinatorics and computer science, this volume collects together lecture notes on recent developments in the area. The common ground of these subjects is perhaps best described by the three terms in the title: Random Walks, Random Fields and Disordered Systems. The specific topics covered include a study of Branching Brownian Motion from the perspective of disordered (spin-glass) systems, a detailed analysis of weakly self-avoiding random walks in four spatial dimensions via methods of field theory and the renormalization group, a study of phase transitions in disordered discrete structures using a rigorous version of the cavity method, a survey of recent work on interacting polymers in the ballisticity regime and, finally, a treatise on two-dimensional loop-soup models and their connection to conformally invariant systems and the Gaussian Free Field. The notes are aimed at early graduate students with a mod...

  5. Mixed random walks with a trap in scale-free networks including nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Sheng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    Random walks including non-nearest-neighbor jumps appear in many real situations such as the diffusion of adatoms and have found numerous applications including PageRank search algorithm, however, related theoretical results are much less for this dynamical process. In this paper, we present a study of mixed random walks in a family of fractal scale-free networks, where both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps are included. We focus on trapping problem in the network family, which is a particular case of random walks with a perfect trap fixed at the central high-degree node. We derive analytical expressions for the average trapping time (ATT), a quantitative indicator measuring the efficiency of the trapping process, by using two different methods, the results of which are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we analytically determine all the eigenvalues and their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix characterizing the dynamical process. Our results show that although next-nearest-neighb...

  6. Modeling impacts of subscale heterogeneities on dispersive solute transport in subsurface systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal, Vikrant; Leung, Juliana Y

    2015-11-01

    Previous works in the literature demonstrated that dispersion increases with heterogeneities and travel distance in heterogeneous reservoirs. However, it remains challenging to quantify the effects of subscale heterogeneities on dispersion. Scale-up of input dispersivity and other reservoir attributes to the transport modeling scale should account for subscale heterogeneity and its variability. A method is proposed to quantify the uncertainties in reservoir attributes and dispersivity introduced by scale-up. A random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method, which is not prone to numerical dispersion, is used for transport modeling. First, to scale-up rock properties including porosity and permeability, volume variance at the transport modeling scale is computed corresponding to a given spatial correlation model; numerous sets of "conditioning data" are sampled from probability distributions whose mean is the block average of the actual measure values and the variance is the variance of block mean. Stochastic simulations are subsequently performed to generate multiple realizations at the transport modeling scale. Next, multiple sub-grid geostatistical realizations depicting detailed fine-scale heterogeneities and of the same physical sizes as the transport modeling grid block are subjected to RWPT simulation. Effective longitudinal and transverse (horizontal) dispersivities in two-dimensional models are determined simultaneously by matching the corresponding breakthrough concentration history for each realization with an equivalent medium consisting of averaged homogeneous rock properties. Aggregating results derived with all realizations, we generate probability distributions of scaled-up dispersivities conditional to particular averaged rock properties, from which values representative of the transport modeling scale are randomly drawn. The method is applied to model a tracer injection process. Results obtained from coarse-scale models, where reservoir properties and

  7. The fundamental solution and numerical solution of the Riesz fractional advection-dispersion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S.; Liu, F.; Anh, V.; Turner, I.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a Riesz fractional advection-dispersion equation (RFADE), which is derived from the kinetics of chaotic dynamics. The RFADE is obtained from the standard advection-dispersion equation by replacing the first-order and second-order space derivatives by the Riesz fractional derivatives of order{alpha} [isin] (0, 1) and {beta} [isin] (1, 2], respectively. We derive the fundamental solution for the Riesz fractional advection-dispersion equation with an initial condition (RFADE-IC). We investigate a discrete random walk model based on an explicit finite-difference approximation for the RFADE-IC and prove that the random walk model belongs to the domain of attraction of the corresponding stable distribution. We also present explicit and implicit difference approximations for the Riesz fractional advection-dispersion equation with initial and boundary conditions (RFADE-IBC) in a finite domain. Stability and convergence of these numerical methods for the RFADE-IBC are discussed. Some numerical examples are given to show that the numerical results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  8. Quantum random number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  9. Randomness and Differentiability

    CERN Document Server

    Brattka, Vasco; Nies, André

    2011-01-01

    We characterize some major algorithmic randomness notions via differentiability of effective functions. (1) We show that a real number z in [0,1] is computably random if and only if every nondecreasing computable function [0,1]->R is differentiable at z. (2) A real number z in [0,1] is weakly 2-random if and only if every almost everywhere differentiable computable function [0,1]->R is differentiable at z. (3) Recasting results of the constructivist Demuth (1975) in classical language, we show that a real z is ML random if and only if every computable function of bounded variation is differentiable at z, and similarly for absolutely continuous functions. We also use the analytic methods to show that computable randomness of a real is base invariant, and to derive preservation results for randomness notions.

  10. Invitation to Random Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    This article is preface to the SIGMA special issue ''Tensor Models, Formalism and Applications'', http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/Tensor_Models.html. The issue is a collection of eight excellent, up to date reviews on random tensor models. The reviews combine pedagogical introductions meant for a general audience with presentations of the most recent developments in the field. This preface aims to give a condensed panoramic overview of random tensors as the natural generalization of random matrices to higher dimensions.

  11. Applications of KinetiSol dispersing for the production of plasticizer free amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-06-14

    Thermal manufacturing methods for the production of solid dispersions frequently require the addition of a plasticizer in order to achieve requisite molten material flow properties when processed by unit operations such as hot melt extrusion. KinetiSol Dispersing, a rapid high energy thermal manufacturing process, was investigated for the ability to produce amorphous solid dispersions without the aid of a plasticizer. For this study itraconazole was used as a model active ingredient, while Eudragit L100-55 and Carbomer 974P were used as model solid dispersion carriers. Triethyl citrate (TEC) was used as necessary as a model plasticizer. Compositions prepared by KinetiSol Dispersing and hot melt extrusion were evaluated for solid state properties, supersaturated in vitro dissolution behavior under pH change conditions and accelerated stability performance. Results showed that both manufacturing processes were capable of producing amorphous solid dispersions, however compositions produced by hot melt extrusion required the presence of TEC and yielded a glass transition temperature (T(g)) of approximately 54 degrees C. Plasticized and unplasticized compositions were successfully produced by KinetiSol Dispersing, with plasticizer free solid dispersions exhibiting a T(g) of approximately 101 degrees C. Supersaturated in vitro dissolution testing revealed a significantly higher dissolution rate of plasticized material which was attributed to the pore forming behavior of TEC during the acidic phase of testing. A further contribution to release may also have been provided by the greater diffusivity in the plasticized polymer. X-ray diffraction testing revealed that under accelerated stability conditions, plasticized compositions exhibited partial recrystallization, while plasticizer free materials remained amorphous throughout the 6-month testing period. These results demonstrated that KinetiSol Dispersing could be used for the production of amorphous solid dispersions

  12. On Random Rough Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhi Wu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,the concept of a random rough set which includes the mechanisms of numeric and non-numeric aspects of uncertain knowledge is introduced. It is proved that for any belief structure and its inducing belief and plausibility measures there exists a random approximation space such that the associated lower and upper probabilities are respectively the given belief and plausibility measures, and vice versa. And for a random approximation space generated from a totally random set, its inducing lower and upper probabilities are respectively a pair of necessity and possibility measures.

  13. NEXT Ion Thruster Performance Dispersion Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT ion thruster is a low specific mass, high performance thruster with a nominal throttling range of 0.5 to 7 kW. Numerous engineering model and one prototype model thrusters have been manufactured and tested. Of significant importance to propulsion system performance is thruster-to-thruster performance dispersions. This type of information can provide a bandwidth of expected performance variations both on a thruster and a component level. Knowledge of these dispersions can be used to more conservatively predict thruster service life capability and thruster performance for mission planning, facilitate future thruster performance comparisons, and verify power processor capabilities are compatible with the thruster design. This study compiles the test results of five engineering model thrusters and one flight-like thruster to determine unit-to-unit dispersions in thruster performance. Component level performance dispersion analyses will include discharge chamber voltages, currents, and losses; accelerator currents, electron backstreaming limits, and perveance limits; and neutralizer keeper and coupling voltages and the spot-to-plume mode transition flow rates. Thruster level performance dispersion analyses will include thrust efficiency.

  14. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomáscolo, Silvia B; Levey, Douglas J; Kimball, Rebecca T; Bolker, Benjamin M; Alborn, Hans T

    2010-08-17

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant-animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous animals. Even though plant reproduction depends largely on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurring traits in fruits with differences in behavior, physiology, and morphology of fruit-eating vertebrates. Hence, the origin and maintenance of fruit diversity remains largely unexplained. Using a multivariate phylogenetic comparative test with unbiased estimates of odor and color in figs, we demonstrate that fruit traits evolve in concert and as predicted by differences in the behavior, physiology (perceptive ability) and morphology of their frugivorous seed dispersers. The correlated evolution of traits results in the convergence of general appearance of fruits in species that share disperser types. Observations at fruiting trees independently confirmed that differences in fig traits predict differences in dispersers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that differences among frugivores have shaped the evolution of fruit traits. More broadly, our results underscore the importance of mutualisms in both generating and maintaining biodiversity.

  15. Porosity, Dispersivity, and Contaminant Transport in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOIWO Juana P.

    2001-01-01

    Porosity (n) and Dispersivity (D) were modeled in relation to Solute Transport Time (t) in a saturated, homogeneous, isotropic, unconfined aquifer using the MOC model. It was noted that n and D have an important influence on solute transport time t in groundwater, with a consistently strong and direct relationship between n, D, and t. In the case of porosity, the relationship was found to be directly related to t when other aquifer properties remained unchanged. This was also mathematically argued using a form of the flow equation put forward by Henry Darcy (1856). Dispersivity on the other hand had somehow the same relationship with solute transport time t as porosity, but with much less effect. That is, higher dispersions lead to longer solute transport time within the aquifer system. This was because as the individual solute particles set off from the average seepage velocity, they traversed through longer distances due to tortuosity, mechanical mixing, diffusion, and microscopic heterogeneity latent in the porous media. Also when n and D were co- treated over t, n was noted to be dominant over D with regard t. This follows that the effect of porosity on solute transport time far out shadowed that of dispersivity. Stated in other words, the dispersivity of a substance in any porous medium is to a large extent a function of the porosity of that medium.

  16. On evolutionary stability of carrying capacity driven dispersal in competition with regularly diffusing populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, L; Braverman, E

    2014-11-01

    Two competing populations in spatially heterogeneous but temporarily constant environment are investigated: one is subject to regular movements to lower density areas (random diffusion) while the dispersal of the other is in the direction of the highest per capita available resources (carrying capacity driven diffusion). The growth of both species is subject to the same general growth law which involves Gilpin-Ayala, Gompertz and some other equations as particular cases. The growth rate, carrying capacity and dispersal rate are the same for both population types, the only difference is the dispersal strategy. The main result of the paper is that the two species cannot coexist (unless the environment is spatially homogeneous), and the carrying capacity driven diffusion strategy is evolutionarily stable in the sense that the species adopting this strategy cannot be invaded by randomly diffusing population. Moreover, once the invasive species inhabits some open nonempty domain, it would spread over any available area bringing the native species diffusing randomly to extinction. One of the important technical results used in the proofs can be interpreted in the form that the limit solution of the equation with a regular diffusion leads to lower total population fitness than the ideal free distribution.

  17. Langevin equation model of dispersion in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasstrom, J S

    1998-08-01

    This dissertation presents the development and evaluation of a Lagrangian stochastic model of vertical dispersion of trace material in the convective boundary layer (CBL). This model is based on a Langevin equation of motion for a fluid particle, and assumes the fluid vertical velocity probability distribution is skewed and spatially homogeneous. This approach can account for the effect of large-scale, long-lived turbulent structures and skewed vertical velocity distributions found in the CBL. The form of the Langevin equation used has a linear (in velocity) deterministic acceleration and a skewed randomacceleration. For the case of homogeneous fluid velocity statistics, this ""linear-skewed" Langevin equation can be integrated explicitly, resulting in a relatively efficient numerical simulation method. It is shown that this approach is more efficient than an alternative using a "nonlinear-Gaussian" Langevin equation (with a nonlinear deterministic acceleration and a Gaussian random acceleration) assuming homogeneous turbulence, and much more efficient than alternative approaches using Langevin equation models assuming inhomogeneous turbulence. "Reflection" boundary conditions for selecting a new velocity for a particle that encounters a boundary at the top or bottom of the CBL were investigated. These include one method using the standard assumption that the magnitudes of the particle incident and reflected velocities are positively correlated, and two alternatives in which the magnitudes of these velocities are negatively correlated and uncorrelated. The constraint that spatial and velocity distributions of a well-mixed tracer must be the same as those of the fluid, was used to develop the Langevin equation models and the reflection boundary conditions. The two Langevin equation models and three reflection methods were successfully tested using cases for which exact, analytic statistical properties of particle velocity and position are known, including well

  18. Dispersion of T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in crude oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph J; Hürlimann, Martin; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Freed, Denise; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-09-15

    Crude oils, which are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, can be characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation methods to yield physical properties and chemical compositions. In particular, the field dependence, or dispersion, of T1 relaxation can be used to investigate the presence and dynamics of asphaltenes, the large molecules primarily responsible for the high viscosity in heavy crudes. However, the T2 relaxation dispersion of crude oils, which provides additional insight when measured alongside T1, has yet to be investigated systematically. Here we present the field dependence of T1-T2 correlations of several crude oils with disparate densities. While asphaltene and resin-containing crude oils exhibit significant T1 dispersion, minimal T2 dispersion is seen in all oils. This contrasting behavior between T1 and T2 cannot result from random molecular motions, and thus, we attribute our dispersion results to highly correlated molecular dynamics in asphaltene-containing crude oils. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, Metin

    2010-12-01

    The effects of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows are studied computationally in a two-dimensional setting using a finite-volume/front-tracking method. Passive tracer particles are used to visualize and quantify the axial dispersion. The molecular diffusion is modeled by random walk of tracer particles. It is found that there is significant axial dispersion in serpentine channels even in the absence of molecular diffusion. The lubricating thin liquid layer that persists on the wall of a straight channel is periodically broken in the serpentine channel leading to enhanced axial dispersion. It is also found that the axial dispersion is always larger in the serpentine channel than that in the straight channel but the effects of channel curvature are more pronounced at high Peclet numbers, i.e., Pe>104. A model is proposed based on the difference between the liquid film thicknesses on the inner and outer side of the bend in the limit as Pe→∞. Good agreement is found between the computational results and the model when the liquid slug is well mixed by the chaotic advection.

  20. Characterizing dispersivity and stagnation in porous media using NMR flow propagators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, P. M.; Mitchell, J.; Fordham, E. J.

    2016-09-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) displacement probability distributions (flow propagators) are presented for water flowing through heterogeneous porous materials. Four sedimentary rocks have been chosen as example systems: Dolostone, Bentheimer sandstone, Berea sandstone, and Indiana limestone (in order of decreasing permeability). The fluid displacement is characterized by pre-asymptotic Stokes' flow and so the probability distributions are bimodal, with peaks corresponding to stagnant fluid in dead-end pores and flowing fluid in the connected porosity. Cut-off Gaussian functions are used to fit the flowing and stagnant peaks independently. An effective dispersivity length scale Lv (also known as the mixing length scale) is estimated by fitting the portion of the probability distribution corresponding to the flowing fluid. For the relatively homogeneous Bentheimer sandstone, the ratio of effective dispersivity length scale to effective transport diameter dt is Lv /dt ≈ 16 , which is an order of magnitude larger than for randomly packed glass beads where Lv /dt ≈ 1.8 . We compare these dispersivity parameters to similar values extracted from a cumulant analysis of the entire propagator. Fitting a cut-off Gaussian avoids the usual complications of analyzing dispersion in the presence of the ubiquitous stagnant fluid, and results in a clear demonstration of the influence of long-range heterogeneities on the dispersivity for flow in real sedimentary rocks.

  1. Characterizing dispersivity and stagnation in porous media using NMR flow propagators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, P M; Mitchell, J; Fordham, E J

    2016-09-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) displacement probability distributions (flow propagators) are presented for water flowing through heterogeneous porous materials. Four sedimentary rocks have been chosen as example systems: Dolostone, Bentheimer sandstone, Berea sandstone, and Indiana limestone (in order of decreasing permeability). The fluid displacement is characterized by pre-asymptotic Stokes' flow and so the probability distributions are bimodal, with peaks corresponding to stagnant fluid in dead-end pores and flowing fluid in the connected porosity. Cut-off Gaussian functions are used to fit the flowing and stagnant peaks independently. An effective dispersivity length scale Lv (also known as the mixing length scale) is estimated by fitting the portion of the probability distribution corresponding to the flowing fluid. For the relatively homogeneous Bentheimer sandstone, the ratio of effective dispersivity length scale to effective transport diameter dt is Lv/dt≈16, which is an order of magnitude larger than for randomly packed glass beads where Lv/dt≈1.8. We compare these dispersivity parameters to similar values extracted from a cumulant analysis of the entire propagator. Fitting a cut-off Gaussian avoids the usual complications of analyzing dispersion in the presence of the ubiquitous stagnant fluid, and results in a clear demonstration of the influence of long-range heterogeneities on the dispersivity for flow in real sedimentary rocks.

  2. Co-evolution between sociality and dispersal: the role of synergistic cooperative benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jessica; Brelsford, Alan; Avilés, Leticia

    2012-11-07

    Explaining the evolution of sociality is challenging because social individuals face disadvantages that must be balanced by intrinsic benefits of living in a group. One potential route towards the evolution of sociality may emerge from the avoidance of dispersal, which can be risky in some environments. Although early studies found that local competition may cancel the benefits of cooperation in viscous populations, subsequent studies have identified conditions, such as the presence of kin recognition or specific demographic conditions, under which altruism will still spread. Most of these studies assume that the costs of cooperating outweigh the direct benefits (strong altruism). In nature, however, many organisms gain synergistic benefits from group living, which may counterbalance even costly altruistic behaviours. Here, we use an individual based model to investigate how dispersal and social behaviour co-evolve when social behaviours result in synergistic benefits that counterbalance the relative cost of altruism to a greater extent than assumed in previous models. When the cost of cooperation is high, selection for sociality responds strongly to the cost of dispersal. In particular, cooperation can begin to spread in a population when higher cooperation levels become correlated with lower dispersal tendencies within individuals. In contrast, less costly social behaviours are less sensitive to the cost of dispersal. In line with previous studies, we find that mechanisms of global population control also affect this relationship: when whole patches (groups) go extinct each generation, selection favours a relatively high dispersal propensity, and social behaviours evolve only when they are not very costly. If random individuals within groups experience mortality each generation to maintain a global carrying capacity, on the other hand, social behaviours spread and dispersal is reduced, even when the latter is not costly.

  3. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and tr

  4. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  5. Surface Polaritons in a Wire Medium with Spatial Dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    The dispersion relations of the surface polariton in a semi-infinite wire medium with spatial dispersion are analysed.In comparison with the traditional spatial dispersive medium there only exists one branch instead of multibranch for the dispersion curve.The possibility of the experimentally observing the surface polaritons by attenuated total reflection is simulated numerically.

  6. Natal dispersal and personalities in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemanse, N.J.; Both, C.; Van Noordwijk, A.J.; Rutten, A.L.; Drent, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Dispersal is a major determinant of the dynamics and genetic structure of populations, and its consequences depend not only on average dispersal rates and distances, but also on the characteristics of dispersing and philopatric individuals. We investigated whether natal dispersal correlated with a p

  7. Natal dispersal and personalities in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemanse, N.J.; Both, C.; Noordwijk, van A.J.; Rutten, A.L.; Drent, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Dispersal is a major determinant of the dynamics and genetic structure of populations, and its consequences depend not only on average dispersal rates and distances, but also on the characteristics of dispersing and philopatric individuals. We investigated whether natal dispersal correlated with a

  8. A photonic crystal fiber with zero dispersion at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Andreas

    2002-01-01

    We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm......We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm...

  9. Dispersive and diffusive-dispersive shock waves for nonconvex conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    El, G A; Shearer, M

    2015-01-01

    We compare the structure of solutions of Riemann problems for a conservation law with nonconvex (specifically, cubic) flux, regularized by two different mechanisms: 1) dispersion (in the modified Korteweg--de Vries (mKdV) equation); and 2) a combination of diffusion and dispersion (in the mKdV-Burgers equation). In the first case, the possible dynamics involve two qualitatively different types of expanding dispersive shock waves (DSWs), rarefaction waves (RWs) and kinks (smooth fronts). In the second case, in addition to RWs, there are travelling wave solutions approximating both classical (Lax) and nonclassical (undercompressive) shock waves. Despite the singular nature of the zero-diffusion limit and rather differing analytical approaches employed in the descriptions of dispersive and diffusive-dispersive regularization, the resulting comparison of the two cases reveals a number of striking parallels. In particular the mKdV kink solution is identified as an undercompressive DSW. Other prominent features, su...

  10. Preparation and Application of Microencapsulated Disperse Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗艳; 陈水林

    2001-01-01

    Microcapsules containing disperse dyes were prepared by means of in-situ polymerization. Polyester fabrics were multiple-transfer printed and color-mix printed using those microencapsulated dyes under different process conditions. By color measurement instrument, it can be seen that the times of multiple-transfer printing are up to ten while under appropriate conditions, especially when the transfer printing time is 50 seconds and the transfer printing temperature is 180°C. On the other hand, the K/S value of each transfer printing can keep almost constant. Meanwhile, the visual effect of color- mix printing with microencapsulated disperse dyes is special in the varicolored exhibiting if compared with conventional disperse dyes.

  11. Hamiltonian description of composite fermions: Magnetoexciton dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    1999-11-01

    A microscopic Hamiltonian theory of the FQHE, developed by Shankar and myself based on the fermionic Chern-Simons approach, has recently been quite successful in calculating gaps in fractional quantum hall states, and in predicting approximate scaling relations between the gaps of different fractions. I now apply this formalism towards computing magnetoexciton dispersions (including spin-flip dispersions) in the ν=13, 25, and 37 gapped fractions, and find approximate agreement with numerical results. I also analyze the evolution of these dispersions with increasing sample thickness, modelled by a potential soft at high momenta. New results are obtained for instabilities as a function of thickness for 25 and 37, and it is shown that the spin-polarized 25 state, in contrast to the spin-polarized 13 state, cannot be described as a simple quantum ferromagnet.

  12. Training for Internationalization through Domestic Geographical Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santangelo, Grazia D.; Stucchi, Tamara

    Traditionally created to deal with the unfriendly domestic environment, business groups (BGs) are increasingly internationalizing. However, how BGs can reconcile their strictly domestic orientation with an international dimension still remains an open question. Drawing on arguments from...... organizational learning, we seek to solve this puzzle in relation to the internationalization of Indian BGs. In particular, we argue that in heterogeneous domestic emerging markets BG’s geographical dispersion across sub-national states provides training for internationalization. To internationalize successfully......, BGs need to develop the capability of managing geographically dispersed units in institutional heterogeneous contexts. Domestic geographical dispersion would indeed help the BG dealing with different regulations, customers and infrastructures. However, there is less scope for such training as BGs...

  13. Wage Dispersion and Decentralization of Wage Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Le Maire, Christian Daniel; Munch, Jakob Roland

    This paper studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use a detailed panel data set covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides exogenous variation in the indi......This paper studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use a detailed panel data set covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides exogenous variation...... in the individual worker's wage-setting system that facilitates identification of the effects of decentralization. Consistent with predictions we find that wages are more dispersed under firm-level bargaining compared to more centralized wage-setting systems. However, the differences across wage-setting systems...

  14. EMAT enhanced dispersion of particles in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger A.; Rios, Orlando; Melin, Alexander M.; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz; Wilgen, John B.

    2016-11-29

    Particulate matter is dispersed in a fluid material. A sample including a first material in a fluid state and second material comprising particulate matter are placed into a chamber. The second material is spatially dispersed in the first material utilizing EMAT force. The dispersion process continues until spatial distribution of the second material enables the sample to meet a specified criterion. The chamber and/or the sample is electrically conductive. The EMAT force is generated by placing the chamber coaxially within an induction coil driven by an applied alternating current and placing the chamber and induction coil coaxially within a high field magnetic. The EMAT force is coupled to the sample without physical contact to the sample or to the chamber, by another physical object. Batch and continuous processing are utilized. The chamber may be folded within the bore of the magnet. Acoustic force frequency and/or temperature may be controlled.

  15. Employment effects of spatial dispersal of refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refugees subjected to a spatial dispersal tend to be assigned to a location outside the immigrant-dense cities. We argue that such locations are associated with low place utility. Our partial equilibrium search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts that the reservat......Refugees subjected to a spatial dispersal tend to be assigned to a location outside the immigrant-dense cities. We argue that such locations are associated with low place utility. Our partial equilibrium search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts...... that the reservation wage for local jobs decreases with place utility. We test the theoretical prediction by estimating the effects of characteristics of the location of assignment on the transition rate into the first job. Our sample is male refugees aged 30-59 who were subjected to the Danish spatial dispersal...

  16. Bacteria dispersal by hitchhiking on zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Leunert, Franziska;

    2010-01-01

    and nonpathogenic bacteria has shown that direct association with zooplankton has significant influences on the bacteria's physiology and ecology. We used stratified migration columns to study vertical dispersal of hitchhiking bacteria through migrating zooplankton across a density gradient that was otherwise...... impenetrable for bacteria in both upward and downward directions (conveyor-belt hypothesis). The strength of our experiments is to permit quantitative estimation of transport and release of associated bacteria: vertical migration of Daphnia magna yielded an average dispersal rate of 1.3 x 10(5) x cells x...... Daphnia(-1) x migration cycle(-1) for the lake bacterium Brevundimonas sp. Bidirectional vertical dispersal by migrating D. magna was also shown for two other bacterial species, albeit at lower rates. The prediction that diurnally migrating zooplankton acquire different attached bacterial communities from...

  17. EMAT enhanced dispersion of particles in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A.; Rios, Orlando; Melin, Alexander M.; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz; Wilgen, John B.

    2016-11-29

    Particulate matter is dispersed in a fluid material. A sample including a first material in a fluid state and second material comprising particulate matter are placed into a chamber. The second material is spatially dispersed in the first material utilizing EMAT force. The dispersion process continues until spatial distribution of the second material enables the sample to meet a specified criterion. The chamber and/or the sample is electrically conductive. The EMAT force is generated by placing the chamber coaxially within an induction coil driven by an applied alternating current and placing the chamber and induction coil coaxially within a high field magnetic. The EMAT force is coupled to the sample without physical contact to the sample or to the chamber, by another physical object. Batch and continuous processing are utilized. The chamber may be folded within the bore of the magnet. Acoustic force frequency and/or temperature may be controlled.

  18. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  19. Hydrodynamic dispersion broadening of a sedimentation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Salin, D.

    1994-10-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is responsible for the spreading of the sedimentation front even in a noncolloidal monodisperse suspension. Measurements of the broadening of the top front observed during sedimentation have been used in determining the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient. Hindered settling has an opposed effect and leads to the self-sharpening of the front. Both effects have to be taken into account simultaneously. This Letter provides a simple, but complete determination of the space and time concentration profile and shows that the final front should consist of a steady-shape profile propagating at constant velocity. With such a solution, the data of Davis et al. [AIChE J. 34, 123 (1988); J. Fluid Mech. 196, 107 (1988)] give hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient five times larger than their former analysis, in agreement with Lee et al. [Phys. Fluids A 4, 2601 (1992)].

  20. Modelling and Simulation of Crude Oil Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai JIMOH

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out to develop a model equation for the dispersion of crude oil in water. Seven different crude oils (Bonny Light, Antan Terminal, Bonny Medium, Qua Iboe Light, Brass Light Mbede, Forcados Blend and Heavy H were used as the subject crude oils. The developed model equation in this project which is given as...It was developed starting from the equation for the oil dispersion rate in water which is given as...The developed equation was then simulated with the aid of MathCAD 2000 Professional software. The experimental and model results obtained from the simulation of the model equation were plotted on the same axis against time of dispersion. The model results revealed close fittings between the experimental and the model results because the correlation coefficients and the r-square values calculated using Spreadsheet Program were both found to be unity (1.00.