WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomly deployed sensor

  1. Performance Evaluation of AODV, DSDV & DSR for Quasi Random Deployment of Sensor Nodes in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkarni, Nandkumar P.; Prasad, Ramjee; Cornean, Horia

    2011-01-01

    Sensor deployment is one of the key topics addressed in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). This paper proposes a new deployment technique of sensor nodes for WSN called as Quasi Random Deployment (QRD). The novel approach to deploy sensor nodes in QRD fashion is to improve the energy efficiency...... of the WSN in order to increase the network life time and coverage. The QRD produces highly uniform coordinates and it systematically fills the specified area. Along with Random Deployment (RD) pattern of wireless sensor node QRD is analysed in this study. The network is simulated using NS-2 simulator...... energy consumption, coverage area. The simulation results show that the conventional routing protocols like DSR have a best performance for both RD and QRD of the sensor nodes when there is no mobility of the sensor nodes as compared to AODV and DSDV. Among AODV and DSDV, AODV performs better as compared...

  2. Design of Randomly Deployed Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks by Algorithms Based on Swarm Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Joon-Woo Lee; Won Kim

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design of a randomly deployed heterogeneous wireless sensor network (HWSN) with two types of nodes: a powerful node and an ordinary node. Powerful nodes, such as Cluster Heads (CHs), communicate directly to the data sink of the network, and ordinary nodes sense the desired information and transmit the processed data to powerful nodes. The heterogeneity of HWSNs improves the networks lifetime and coverage. This paper focuses on the design of a random network among HWSNs....

  3. Coverage-Guaranteed Sensor Node Deployment Strategies for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Sha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Deployment quality and cost are two conflicting aspects in wireless sensor networks. Random deployment, where the monitored field is covered by randomly and uniformly deployed sensor nodes, is an appropriate approach for large-scale network applications. However, their successful applications depend considerably on the deployment quality that uses the minimum number of sensors to achieve a desired coverage. Currently, the number of sensors required to meet the desired coverage is based on asymptotic analysis, which cannot meet deployment quality due to coverage overestimation in real applications. In this paper, we first investigate the coverage overestimation and address the challenge of designing coverage-guaranteed deployment strategies. To overcome this problem, we propose two deployment strategies, namely, the Expected-area Coverage Deployment (ECD and BOundary Assistant Deployment (BOAD. The deployment quality of the two strategies is analyzed mathematically. Under the analysis, a lower bound on the number of deployed sensor nodes is given to satisfy the desired deployment quality. We justify the correctness of our analysis through rigorous proof, and validate the effectiveness of the two strategies through extensive simulation experiments. The simulation results show that both strategies alleviate the coverage overestimation significantly. In addition, we also evaluate two proposed strategies in the context of target detection application. The comparison results demonstrate that if the target appears at the boundary of monitored region in a given random deployment, the average intrusion distance of BOAD is considerably shorter than that of ECD with the same desired deployment quality. In contrast, ECD has better performance in terms of the average intrusion distance when the invasion of intruder is from the inside of monitored region.

  4. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  5. Mobility Assisted Sensor Node Self-Deployment for Maximizing the Coverage of Wireless Sensor Networks using A Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VV Juli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks extend the capability to monitor and control far-flung environments. However, sensor nodes must be deployed appropriately to reach an adequate coverage level for the successful acquisition of data. Modern sensing devices are able to move from one place to another for different purposes and constitute the mobile sensor network. This mobile sensor capability could be used to enhance the coverage of the sensor network. Since mobile sensor nodes have limited capabilities and power constraints, the algorithms which drive the sensors to optimal locations should extend the coverage. It should also reduce the power needed to move the sensors efficiently. In this paper, a genetic algorithm- (GA based sensor deployment scheme is proposed to maximize network coverage, and the performance was studied with the random deployment using a Matlab simulation.

  6. A Novel Deployment Scheme Based on Three-Dimensional Coverage Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Ruchuan; Sun, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Coverage pattern and deployment strategy are directly related to the optimum allocation of limited resources for wireless sensor networks, such as energy of nodes, communication bandwidth, and computing power, and quality improvement is largely determined by these for wireless sensor networks. A three-dimensional coverage pattern and deployment scheme are proposed in this paper. Firstly, by analyzing the regular polyhedron models in three-dimensional scene, a coverage pattern based on cuboids is proposed, and then relationship between coverage and sensor nodes' radius is deduced; also the minimum number of sensor nodes to maintain network area's full coverage is calculated. At last, sensor nodes are deployed according to the coverage pattern after the monitor area is subdivided into finite 3D grid. Experimental results show that, compared with traditional random method, sensor nodes number is reduced effectively while coverage rate of monitor area is ensured using our coverage pattern and deterministic deployment scheme. PMID:25045747

  7. Analysis of the Deployment Quality for Intrusion Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Assad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrusion detection application in a homogeneous wireless sensor network is defined as a mechanism to detect unauthorized intrusions or anomalous moving attackers in a field of interest. The quality of deterministic sensor nodes deployment can be determined sufficiently by a rigorous analysis before the deployment. However, when random deployment is required, determining the deployment quality becomes challenging. An area may require that multiple nodes monitor each point from the sensing area; this constraint is known as k-coverage where k is the number of nodes. The deployment quality of sensor nodes depends directly on node density and sensing range; mainly a random sensor nodes deployment is required. The major question is centred around the problem of network coverage, how can we guarantee that each point of the sensing area is covered by the required number of sensor nodes and what a sufficient condition to guarantee the network coverage? To deal with this, probabilistic intrusion detection models are adopted, called single/multi-sensing detection, and the deployment quality issue is surveyed and analysed in terms of coverage. We evaluate the capability of our probabilistic model in homogeneous wireless sensor network, in terms of sensing range, node density, and intrusion distance.

  8. An efficient genetic algorithm for maximum coverage deployment in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yourim; Kim, Yong-Hyuk

    2013-10-01

    Sensor networks have a lot of applications such as battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and industrial diagnostics. Coverage is one of the most important performance metrics for sensor networks since it reflects how well a sensor field is monitored. In this paper, we introduce the maximum coverage deployment problem in wireless sensor networks and analyze the properties of the problem and its solution space. Random deployment is the simplest way to deploy sensor nodes but may cause unbalanced deployment and therefore, we need a more intelligent way for sensor deployment. We found that the phenotype space of the problem is a quotient space of the genotype space in a mathematical view. Based on this property, we propose an efficient genetic algorithm using a novel normalization method. A Monte Carlo method is adopted to design an efficient evaluation function, and its computation time is decreased without loss of solution quality using a method that starts from a small number of random samples and gradually increases the number for subsequent generations. The proposed genetic algorithms could be further improved by combining with a well-designed local search. The performance of the proposed genetic algorithm is shown by a comparative experimental study. When compared with random deployment and existing methods, our genetic algorithm was not only about twice faster, but also showed significant performance improvement in quality.

  9. A Deployment Strategy for Multiple Types of Requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuxun

    2015-10-01

    Node deployment is one of the most crucial issues in wireless sensor networks, and it is of realistic significance to complete the deployment task with multiple types of application requirements. In this paper, we propose a deployment strategy for multiple types of requirements to solve the problem of deterministic and grid-based deployment. This deployment strategy consists of three deployment algorithms, which are for different deployment objectives. First, instead of general random search, we put forward a deterministic search mechanism and the related cost-based deployment algorithm, in which nodes are assigned to different groups which are connected by near-shortest paths, and realize significant reduction of path length and deployment cost. Second, rather than ordinary nondirection deployment, we present a notion of counterflow and the related delay-based deployment algorithm, in which the profit of deployment cost and loss of transmission delay are evaluated, and achieve much diminishing of transmission path length and transmission delay. Third, instead of conventional uneven deployment based on the distances to the sink, we propose a concept of node load level and the related lifetime-based deployment algorithm, in which node distribution is determined by the actual load levels and extra nodes are deployed only where really necessary. This contributes to great improvement of network lifetime. Last, extensive simulations are used to test and verify the effectiveness and superiority of our findings.

  10. Context-Aware Local Optimization of Sensor Network Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Argany

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are increasingly used for tracking and monitoring dynamic phenomena in urban and natural areas. Spatial coverage is an important issue in sensor networks in order to fulfill the needs of sensing applications. Optimization methods are widely used to efficiently distribute sensor nodes in the network to achieve a desired level of coverage. Most of the existing algorithms do not consider the characteristics of the real environment in the optimization process. In this paper, we propose the integration of contextual information in optimization algorithms to improve sensor network coverage. First, we investigate the implication of contextual information in sensor networks. Then, a conceptual framework for local context-aware sensor network deployment optimization method is introduced and related algorithms are presented in detail. Finally, several experiments are carried out to evaluate the validity of the proposed method. The results obtained from these experiments show the effectiveness of our approach in different contextual situations.

  11. Intent-based resource deployment in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Geeth; Pham, Tien; Sullivan, Paul; Grueneberg, Keith; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Norman, Tim

    2012-06-01

    Information derived from sensor networks plays a crucial role in the success of many critical tasks such as surveillance, and border monitoring. In order to derive the correct information at the right time, sensor data must be captured at desired locations with respect to the operational tasks in concern. Therefore, it is important that at the planning stage of a mission, sensing resources are best placed in the field to capture the required data. For example, consider a mission goal identify snipers, in an operational area before troops are deployed - two acoustic arrays and a day-night video camera are needed to successfully achieve this goal. This is because, if the resources are placed in correct locations, two acoustic arrays could provide direction of the shooter and a possible location by triangulating acoustic data whereas the day-night camera could produce an affirmative image of the perpetrators. In order to deploy the sensing resources intelligently to support the user decisions, in this paper we propose a Semantic Web based knowledge layer to identify the required resources in a sensor network and deploy the needed resources through a sensor infrastructure. The knowledge layer captures crucial information such as resources configurations, their intended use (e.g., two acoustic arrays deployed in a particular formation with day-night camera are needed to identify perpetrators in a possible sniper attack). The underlying sensor infrastructure will assists the process by exposing the information about deployed resources, resources in theatre, and location information about tasks, resources and so on.

  12. Deployment-based lifetime optimization model for homogeneous Wireless Sensor Network under retransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiying; Liu, Xiaoxi; Xie, Wei; Huang, Ning

    2014-12-10

    Sensor-deployment-based lifetime optimization is one of the most effective methods used to prolong the lifetime of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) by reducing the distance-sensitive energy consumption. In this paper, data retransmission, a major consumption factor that is usually neglected in the previous work, is considered. For a homogeneous WSN, monitoring a circular target area with a centered base station, a sensor deployment model based on regular hexagonal grids is analyzed. To maximize the WSN lifetime, optimization models for both uniform and non-uniform deployment schemes are proposed by constraining on coverage, connectivity and success transmission rate. Based on the data transmission analysis in a data gathering cycle, the WSN lifetime in the model can be obtained through quantifying the energy consumption at each sensor location. The results of case studies show that it is meaningful to consider data retransmission in the lifetime optimization. In particular, our investigations indicate that, with the same lifetime requirement, the number of sensors needed in a non-uniform topology is much less than that in a uniform one. Finally, compared with a random scheme, simulation results further verify the advantage of our deployment model.

  13. 2D wireless sensor network deployment based on Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliodromitis, Athanasios; Pantazis, George; Vescoukis, Vasileios

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have rapidly evolved and now comprise a powerful tool in monitoring and observation of the natural environment, among other fields. The use of WSNs is critical in early warning systems, which are of high importance today. In fact, WSNs are adopted more and more in various applications, e.g. for fire or deformation detection. The optimum deployment of sensors is a multi-dimensional problem, which has two main components; network and positioning approach. Although lots of work has dealt with the issue, most of it emphasizes on mere network approach (communication, energy consumption) and not on the topography (positioning) of the sensors in achieving ideal geometry. In some cases, it is hard or even impossible to achieve perfect geometry in nodes' deployment. The ideal and desirable scenario of nodes arranged in square or hexagonal grid would raise extremely the cost of the network, especially in unfriendly or hostile environments. In such environments the positions of the sensors have to be chosen among a list of possible points, which in most cases are randomly distributed. This constraint has to be taken under consideration during the WSN planning. Full geographical coverage is in some applications of the same, if not of greater, importance than the network coverage. Cost is a crucial factor at network planning and given that resources are often limited, what matters, is to cover the whole area with the minimum number of sensors. This paper suggests a deployment method for nodes, in large scale and high density WSNs, based on Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT). It approximates the solution through the geometry of the random points and proposes a deployment plan, for the given characteristics of the study area, in order to achieve a deployment as near as possible to the ideal one.

  14. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source, is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data......-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility...

  15. Novel Visual Sensor Coverage and Deployment in Time Aware PTZ Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence G. H. Yap

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the visual sensor deployment algorithm in Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ Wireless Visual Sensor Networks (WVSNs. With PTZ capability, a sensor’s visual coverage can be extended to reduce the number of visual sensors that need to be deployed. The coverage zone of a visual sensor in PTZ WVSN is composed of two regions, a Direct Coverage Region (DCR and a PTZ Coverage Region (PTZCR. In the PTZCR, a visual sensor needs a mechanical pan-tilt-zoom operation to cover an object. This mechanical operation can take seconds, so the sensor might not be able to adjust the camera in time to capture the visual data. In this paper, for the first time, we study this PTZ time-aware PTZ WVSN deployment problem. We formulate this PTZ time-aware PTZ WVSN deployment problem as an optimization problem where the objective is to minimize the total visual sensor deployment cost so that each area is either covered in the DCR or in the PTZCR while considering the PTZ time constraint. The proposed Time Aware Coverage Zone (TACZ model successfully captures the PTZ visual sensor coverage in terms of camera focal range, angle span zone coverage and camera PTZ time. Then a novel heuristic, called Time Aware Deployment with PTZ camera (TADPTZ algorithm, is proposed to solve the problem. From our computational experiments, we found out that TACZ model outperforms the existing M coverage model under all network scenarios. In addition, as compared to the optimal solutions, the TACZ model is scalable and adaptable to the different PTZ time requirements when deploying large PTZ WVSNs.

  16. Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Crop Storages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Pilegaard; Green, Ole; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2015-01-01

    of a wireless sensor network based system that provides continuous, automatic, and up-to-date information on a crop storage, while presenting the data in an easily accessible manner, is also described. The design decisions, challenges, and practical experiences from real-world large scale deployment...... of the system are also discussed. It is concluded that the network works well for the intended application and that the intended users also see a value in the provided service....

  17. Software as a service approach to sensor simulation software deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Steven; Miller, Gordon; Mayott, Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Traditionally, military simulation has been problem domain specific. Executing an exercise currently requires multiple simulation software providers to specialize, deploy, and configure their respective implementations, integrate the collection of software to achieve a specific system behavior, and then execute for the purpose at hand. This approach leads to rigid system integrations which require simulation expertise for each deployment due to changes in location, hardware, and software. Our alternative is Software as a Service (SaaS) predicated on the virtualization of Night Vision Electronic Sensors (NVESD) sensor simulations as an exemplary case. Management middleware elements layer self provisioning, configuration, and integration services onto the virtualized sensors to present a system of services at run time. Given an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) environment, enabled and managed system of simulations yields a durable SaaS delivery without requiring user simulation expertise. Persistent SaaS simulations would provide on demand availability to connected users, decrease integration costs and timelines, and benefit the domain community from immediate deployment of lessons learned.

  18. Wireless Sensor Network Deployment for Monitoring Wildlife Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Vicente López-Bao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are being deployed in very diverse application scenarios, including rural and forest environments. In these particular contexts, specimen protection and conservation is a challenge, especially in natural reserves, dangerous locations or hot spots of these reserves (i.e., roads, railways, and other civil infrastructures. This paper proposes and studies a WSN based system for generic target (animal tracking in the surrounding area of wildlife passages built to establish safe ways for animals to cross transportation infrastructures. In addition, it allows target identification through the use of video sensors connected to strategically deployed nodes. This deployment is designed on the basis of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, but it increases the lifetime of the nodes through an appropriate scheduling. The system has been evaluated for the particular scenario of wildlife monitoring in passages across roads. For this purpose, different schemes have been simulated in order to find the most appropriate network operational parameters. Moreover, a novel prototype, provided with motion detector sensors, has also been developed and its design feasibility demonstrated. Original software modules providing new functionalities have been implemented and included in this prototype. Finally, main performance evaluation results of the whole system are presented and discussed in depth.

  19. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Yndal Sørensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV. The system, available in open-source , is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake.

  20. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-14

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source , is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons) on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake.

  1. Low Cost and Flexible UAV Deployment of Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Yndal; Jacobsen, Lars Toft; Hansen, John Paulin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a platform for airborne sensor applications using low-cost, open-source components carried by an easy-to-fly unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV). The system, available in open-source , is designed for researchers, students and makers for a broad range of exploration and data-collection needs. The main contribution is the extensible architecture for modularized airborne sensor deployment and real-time data visualisation. Our open-source Android application provides data collection, flight path definition and map tools. Total cost of the system is below 800 dollars. The flexibility of the system is illustrated by mapping the location of Bluetooth beacons (iBeacons) on a ground field and by measuring water temperature in a lake. PMID:28098819

  2. Deployment of distributed applications in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Virginia; Atzori, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The increase in computation and sensing capabilities as well as in battery duration of commercially available Wireless Sensors Network (WSN) nodes are making the paradigm of an horizontal ambient intelligence infrastructure feasible. Accordingly, the sensing, computing and communicating infrastructure is set with a programmable middleware that allows for quickly deploying different applications running on top of it so as to follow the changing ambient needs. In this scenario, we face the problem of setting up the desired application in complex scenarios with hundreds of nodes, which consists of identifying which actions should be performed by each of the nodes so as to satisfy the ambient needs while minimizing the application impact on the infrastructure battery lifetime. Accordingly, we approach the problem by considering every possible decomposition of the application's sensing and computing operations into tasks to be assigned to each infrastructure component. The contribution of energy consumption due to the performance of each task is then considered to compute a cost function, allowing us to evaluate the viability of each deployment solution. Simulation results show that our framework results in considerable energy conservation with respect to sink-oriented or cluster-oriented deployment approaches, particularly for networks with high node densities, non-uniform energy consumption and initial energy, and complex actions.

  3. The effect on wireless sensor communication when deployed in biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jakob Juul; Green, Ole; Nadimi, Esmaeil S; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been studied in a variety of scenarios over recent years, but work has almost exclusively been done using air as the transmission media. In this article some of the challenges of deploying a WSN in a heterogeneous biomass, in this case silage, is handled. The dielectric constant of silage is measured using an open-ended coaxial probe. Results were successfully obtained in the frequency range from 400 MHz to 4 GHz, but large variations suggested that a larger probe should be used for more stable results. Furthermore, the detuning of helix and loop antennas and the transmission loss of the two types of antennas embedded in silage was measured. It was found that the loop antenna suffered less from detuning but was worse when transmitting. Lastly, it is suggested that taking the dielectric properties of silage into account during hardware development could result in much better achievable communication range.

  4. ZERO: Probabilistic Routing for Deploy and Forget Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Pacho

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available As Wireless Sensor Networks are being adopted by industry and agriculture for large-scale and unattended deployments, the need for reliable and energy-conservative protocols become critical. Physical and Link layer efforts for energy conservation are not mostly considered by routing protocols that put their efforts on maintaining reliability and throughput. Gradient-based routing protocols route data through most reliable links aiming to ensure 99% packet delivery. However, they suffer from the so-called ”hot spot” problem. Most reliable routes waste their energy fast, thus partitioning the network and reducing the area monitored. To cope with this ”hot spot” problem we propose ZERO a combined approach at Network and Link layers to increase network lifespan while conserving reliability levels by means of probabilistic load balancing techniques.

  5. Node deployment algorithm based on viscous fluid model for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiguang; Qian, Huanyan

    2014-01-01

    With the scale expands, traditional deployment algorithms are becoming increasingly complicated than before, which are no longer fit for sensor networks. In order to reduce the complexity, we propose a node deployment algorithm based on viscous fluid model. In wireless sensor networks, sensor nodes are abstracted as fluid particles. Similar to the diffusion and self-propagation behavior of fluid particles, sensor nodes realize deployment in unknown region following the motion rules of fluid. Simulation results show that our algorithm archives good coverage rate and homogeneity in large-scale sensor networks.

  6. Sensor Node Deployment Approach in Wireless Sensor Network Based on Multi-objective Flower Pollination Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Hajjej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is one of the most dominant technology trends in the upcoming decades. Due to the lack of communication infrastructure, designing a WSN has posed a real challenge to the designers. WSNs should capture information from the environment, acquired, receive and retransmit them while having enough lifetime to reach many decades without external intervention. Thus, optimizing some objective functions, like energy consumption and coverage at the levels of nodes deployment is required to enhance the performances. In this work, deployment issue has been modeled as a constrained multi-objective optimization (MOO problem. The aim of this work was to find the optimal sensor nodes positions in the area of interest in terms of coverage, energy consumption and network connectivity. A new multi-objective optimization approach based on Flower Pollination Algorithm (FPA was introduced. The simulation results show that the proposed approach improve both coverage and energy consumption compared with other multi objective approaches.

  7. A Multiobjective Fuzzy Inference System based Deployment Strategy for a Distributed Mobile Sensor Network

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    Amol P. Bhondekar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor deployment scheme highly governs the effectiveness of distributed wireless sensor network. Issues such as energy conservation and clustering make the deployment problem much more complex. A multiobjective Fuzzy Inference System based strategy for mobile sensor deployment is presented in this paper. This strategy gives a synergistic combination of energy capacity, clustering and peer-to-peer deployment. Performance of our strategy is evaluated in terms of coverage, uniformity, speed and clustering. Our algorithm is compared against a modified distributed self-spreading algorithm to exhibit better performance.

  8. On Efficient Deployment of Wireless Sensors for Coverage and Connectivity in Constrained 3D Space

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    Chase Q. Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensor networks have been used in a rapidly increasing number of applications in many fields. This work generalizes a sensor deployment problem to place a minimum set of wireless sensors at candidate locations in constrained 3D space to k-cover a given set of target objects. By exhausting the combinations of discreteness/continuousness constraints on either sensor locations or target objects, we formulate four classes of sensor deployment problems in 3D space: deploy sensors at Discrete/Continuous Locations (D/CL to cover Discrete/Continuous Targets (D/CT. We begin with the design of an approximate algorithm for DLDT and then reduce DLCT, CLDT, and CLCT to DLDT by discretizing continuous sensor locations or target objects into a set of divisions without sacrificing sensing precision. Furthermore, we consider a connected version of each problem where the deployed sensors must form a connected network, and design an approximation algorithm to minimize the number of deployed sensors with connectivity guarantee. For performance comparison, we design and implement an optimal solution and a genetic algorithm (GA-based approach. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed deployment algorithms consistently outperform the GA-based heuristic and achieve a close-to-optimal performance in small-scale problem instances and a significantly superior overall performance than the theoretical upper bound.

  9. Innovative energy resourceful merged layer technique (MLT of node deployment to enhance the lifetime of wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Susila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network (WSN is consisting of anthology of large number of small sensor nodes which are deployed in a defined area to observe the surroundings parameters. Since, energy consumption is significant challenge in WSN. As sensor nodes are equipped with battery which has limited energy. Energy efficient information processing is most importance for many routing protocols were proposed to increase the lifetime of WSN. In order to improve the lifetime of WSN, the proposed MLT routing protocol has implemented where the sensor nodes are randomly deployed in the field. The merged layer node deployment pattern of the sensor nodes system operation maximizes the working time of full coverage in a given WSN. MLT provides energy-balancing while selecting cluster head (CH for each round. The cluster head selection mechanism is essential and has same procedure like Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH in MLT protocol. The main idea of this paper is combine two layers of sensor nodes which are belonging to the same set but in different group to improve the lifetime of WSN. MATLAB simulations are performed to analyze and compare the performance of MLT with LEACH protocol. The obtained simulation output has enhanced results and superfluous lifetime compared to other protocols.

  10. A Power Balance Aware Wireless Charger Deployment Method for Complete Coverage in Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks

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    Tu-Liang Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional sensor nodes are usually battery powered, and the limited battery power constrains the overall lifespan of the sensors. Recently, wireless power transmission technology has been applied in wireless sensor networks (WSNs to transmit wireless power from the chargers to the sensor nodes and solve the limited battery power problem. The combination of wireless sensors and wireless chargers forms a new type of network called wireless rechargeable sensor networks (WRSNs. In this research, we focus on how to effectively deploy chargers to maximize the lifespan of a network. In WSNs, the sensor nodes near the sink consume more power than nodes far away from the sink because of frequent data forwarding. This important power unbalanced factor has not been considered, however, in previous charger deployment research. In this research, a power balance aware deployment (PBAD method is proposed to address the power unbalance in WRSNs and to design the charger deployment with maximum charging efficiency. The proposed deployment method is effectively aware of the existence of the sink node that would cause unbalanced power consumption in WRSNs. The simulation results show that the proposed PBAD algorithm performs better than other deployment methods, and fewer chargers are deployed as a result.

  11. Probabilistic dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks by artificial bee colony algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Celal; Karaboga, Dervis; Gorkemli, Beyza

    2011-01-01

    As the usage and development of wireless sensor networks are increasing, the problems related to these networks are being realized. Dynamic deployment is one of the main topics that directly affect the performance of the wireless sensor networks. In this paper, the artificial bee colony algorithm is applied to the dynamic deployment of stationary and mobile sensor networks to achieve better performance by trying to increase the coverage area of the network. A probabilistic detection model is considered to obtain more realistic results while computing the effectively covered area. Performance of the algorithm is compared with that of the particle swarm optimization algorithm, which is also a swarm based optimization technique and formerly used in wireless sensor network deployment. Results show artificial bee colony algorithm can be preferable in the dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks.

  12. Probabilistic Dynamic Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks by Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dervis Karaboga

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As the usage and development of wireless sensor networks are increasing, the problems related to these networks are being realized. Dynamic deployment is one of the main topics that directly affect the performance of the wireless sensor networks. In this paper, the artificial bee colony algorithm is applied to the dynamic deployment of stationary and mobile sensor networks to achieve better performance by trying to increase the coverage area of the network. A probabilistic detection model is considered to obtain more realistic results while computing the effectively covered area. Performance of the algorithm is compared with that of the particle swarm optimization algorithm, which is also a swarm based optimization technique and formerly used in wireless sensor network deployment. Results show artificial bee colony algorithm can be preferable in the dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks.

  13. A polygon model for wireless sensor network deployment with directional sensing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Chung, Yeh-Ching

    2009-01-01

    The modeling of the sensing area of a sensor node is essential for the deployment algorithm of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In this paper, a polygon model is proposed for the sensor node with directional sensing area. In addition, a WSN deployment algorithm is presented with topology control and scoring mechanisms to maintain network connectivity and improve sensing coverage rate. To evaluate the proposed polygon model and WSN deployment algorithm, a simulation is conducted. The simulation results show that the proposed polygon model outperforms the existed disk model and circular sector model in terms of the maximum sensing coverage rate.

  14. Optimized Node Deployment Algorithm and Parameter Investigation in a Mobile Sensor Network for Robotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongxin Tang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile sensor networks are an important part of modern robotics systems and are widely used in robotics applications. Therefore, sensor deployment is a key issue in current robotics systems research. Since it is one of the most popular deployment methods, in recent years the virtual force algorithm has been studied in detail by many scientists. In this paper, we focus on the virtual force algorithm and present a corresponding parameter investigation for mobile sensor deployment. We introduce an optimized virtual force algorithm based on the exchange force, in which a new shielding rule grounded in Delaunay triangulation is adopted. The algorithm employs a new performance metric called ‘pair-correlation diversion', designed to evaluate the uniformity and topology of the sensor distribution. We also discuss the implementation of the algorithm's computation and analyse the influence of experimental parameters on the algorithm. Our results indicate that the area ratio, φs, and the exchange force constant, G, influence the final performance of the sensor deployment in terms of the coverage rate, the convergence time and topology uniformity. Using simulations, we were able to verify the effectiveness of our algorithm and we obtained an optimal region for the (φs, G-parameter space which, in the future, could be utilized as an aid for experiments in robotic sensor deployment.

  15. Extending the lifetime of wireless sensor network with partial SDN deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tomovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency is one of the key requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs. In order to optimize energy usage at sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new network architecture that relies on concepts of Software Defined Networking (SDN. Since SDN is a relatively new technology, originally envisioned for wired networks, it cannot be expected to get immediately and completely adopted in WSN domain, regardless of potential benefits. For this reason, we consider incremental SDN deployment where SDN nodes coexist with traditional sensor nodes, and propose a new routing algorithm for SDN controller that prolongs the WSN lifetime even when a small percentage of SDN nodes is deployed.

  16. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, Selects the right sensors for process conditions Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur

  17. Optimum wireless sensor deployment scheme for structural health monitoring: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengyin; Fang, Kun; Teng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    With the rapid advancements in smart sensing technology and wireless communication technology, the wireless sensor network (WSN) offers an alternative solution to structural health monitoring (SHM). In WSNs, dense deployment of wireless nodes aids the identification of structural dynamic characteristics, while data transmission is a significant issue since wireless channels typically have a lower bandwidth and a limited power supply. This paper provides a wireless sensor deployment optimization scheme for SHM, in terms of both energy consumption and modal identification accuracy. A spherical energy model is established to formulate the energy consumption within a WSN. The optimal number of sensors and their locations are obtained through solving a multi-objective function with weighting factors on energy consumption and modal identification accuracy using a genetic algorithm (GA). Simulation and comparison results with traditional sensor deployment methods demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed optimization scheme.

  18. A Deployment Method Based on Spring Force in Wireless Robot Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Yu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robotic sensor deployment is fundamental for the effectiveness of wireless robot sensor networks-a good deployment algorithm leads to good coverage and connectivity with low energy consumption for the whole network. Virtual force-based algorithms (VFAs is one of the most popular approaches to this problem. In VFA, sensors are treated as points subject to repulsive and attractive forces exerted among them-sensors can move according to imaginary force generated in algorithms. In this paper, a virtual spring force-based algorithm with proper damping is proposed for the deployment of sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network (WSN. A new metric called Pair Correlation Diversion (PCD is introduced to evaluate the uniformity of the sensor distribution. Numerical simulations showed that damping can affect the network coverage, energy consumption, convergence time and general topology in the deployment. Moreover, it was found that damping effect (imaginary friction force has significant influence on algorithm outcomes. In addition, when working under approximate critical-damping condition, the proposed approach has the advantage of a higher coverage rate, better configurational uniformity and less energy consumption.

  19. Optimal sensor placement for deployable antenna module health monitoring in SSPS using genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Xuepan; Huang, Xiaoqi; Cheng, ZhengAi; Zhang, Xinghua; Hou, Xinbin

    2017-11-01

    The concept of space solar power satellite (SSPS) is an advanced system for collecting solar energy in space and transmitting it wirelessly to earth. However, due to the long service life, in-orbit damage may occur in the structural system of SSPS. Therefore, sensor placement layouts for structural health monitoring should be firstly considered in this concept. In this paper, based on genetic algorithm, an optimal sensor placement method for deployable antenna module health monitoring in SSPS is proposed. According to the characteristics of the deployable antenna module, the designs of sensor placement are listed. Furthermore, based on effective independence method and effective interval index, a combined fitness function is defined to maximize linear independence in targeted modes while simultaneously avoiding redundant information at nearby positions. In addition, by considering the reliability of sensors located at deployable mechanisms, another fitness function is constituted. Moreover, the solution process of optimal sensor placement by using genetic algorithm is clearly demonstrated. At last, a numerical example about the sensor placement layout in a deployable antenna module of SSPS is presented, which by synthetically considering all the above mentioned performances. All results can illustrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed sensor placement method in SSPS.

  20. Pure random search for ambient sensor distribution optimisation in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P; Nugent, Chris D; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are living spaces facilitated with technology to allow individuals to remain in their own homes for longer, rather than be institutionalised. Sensors are the fundamental physical layer with any smart home, as the data they generate is used to inform decision support systems, facilitating appropriate actuator actions. Positioning of sensors is therefore a fundamental characteristic of a smart home. Contemporary smart home sensor distribution is aligned to either a) a total coverage approach; b) a human assessment approach. These methods for sensor arrangement are not data driven strategies, are unempirical and frequently irrational. This Study hypothesised that sensor deployment directed by an optimisation method that utilises inhabitants' spatial frequency data as the search space, would produce more optimal sensor distributions vs. the current method of sensor deployment by engineers. Seven human engineers were tasked to create sensor distributions based on perceived utility for 9 deployment scenarios. A Pure Random Search (PRS) algorithm was then tasked to create matched sensor distributions. The PRS method produced superior distributions in 98.4% of test cases (n=64) against human engineer instructed deployments when the engineers had no access to the spatial frequency data, and in 92.0% of test cases (n=64) when engineers had full access to these data. These results thus confirmed the hypothesis.

  1. An Improved Co-evolutionary Particle Swarm Optimization for Wireless Sensor Networks with Dynamic Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Ma

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of wireless sensor networks (WSNs depends on the coverage and target detection probability provided by dynamic deployment, which is usually supported by the virtual force (VF algorithm. However, in the VF algorithm, the virtual force exerted by stationary sensor nodes will hinder the movement of mobile sensor nodes. Particle swarm optimization (PSO is introduced as another dynamic deployment algorithm, but in this case the computation time required is the big bottleneck. This paper proposes a dynamic deployment algorithm which is named “virtual force directed co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization” (VFCPSO, since this algorithm combines the co-evolutionary particle swarm optimization (CPSO with the VF algorithm, whereby the CPSO uses multiple swarms to optimize different components of the solution vectors for dynamic deployment cooperatively and the velocity of each particle is updated according to not only the historical local and global optimal solutions, but also the virtual forces of sensor nodes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed VFCPSO is competent for dynamic deployment in WSNs and has better performance with respect to computation time and effectiveness than the VF, PSO and VFPSO algorithms.

  2. Lessons learned on solar powered wireless sensor network deployments in urban, desert environments

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Ahmad H.

    2015-05-01

    The successful deployment of a large scale solar powered wireless sensor network in an urban, desert environment is a very complex task. Specific cities of such environments cause a variety of operational problems, ranging from hardware faults to operational challenges, for instance due to the high variability of solar energy availability. Even a seemingly functional sensor network created in the lab does not guarantee reliable long term operation, which is absolutely necessary given the cost and difficulty of accessing sensor nodes in urban environments. As part of a larger traffic flow wireless sensor network project, we conducted several deployments in the last two years to evaluate the long-term performance of solar-powered urban wireless sensor networks in a desert area. In this article, we share our experiences in all domains of sensor network operations, from the conception of hardware to post-deployment analysis, including operational constraints that directly impact the software that can be run. We illustrate these experiences using numerous experimental results, and present multiple unexpected operational problems as well as some possible solutions to address them. We also show that current technology is far from meeting all operational constraints for these demanding applications, in which sensor networks are to operate for years to become economically appealing.

  3. Dynamic deployment of applications in wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Pilloni, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, the progress inWirelss Sensor Network (WSN) technology, both in terms of processing capability and energy consumption reduction, has evolved WSNs into complex systems that can gather information about the monitored environment and make prompt and intelligent decisions. In the beginning, military applications drove the research and development of WSNs, with large-scale acoustic systems for underwater surveillance, radar systems for the collection of data on air target...

  4. Micro-unattended mobility system for grenade-launcher-deployed sensors (MUMS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sword, Lee F.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a robotic system that will provide limited mobility capability to ballistically deployed sensors for acquisition of intelligence from building interiors. The future of warfare is expected to shift from large-scale battles to smaller conflicts in increasingly urban environments. Success in such situations can be improved by providing the war fighter detailed information about the location, activities, and capabilities of the opponents. A limited mobility capability adds to the usefulness of grenade launcher deployed sensors in two important ways. First, it relaxes the targeting accuracy requirement allowing a higher probability of successful placement even at greater ranges. Second, it increases the covertness of the sensor by allowing precise placement in an unobtrusive location. Underlying technologies required to implement this approach include a method of attaching the sensor package to the wall and shock tolerant electronics.

  5. Extending the lifetime of wireless sensor network with partial SDN deployment

    OpenAIRE

    S. Tomovic; I. Radusinovic

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency is one of the key requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). In order to optimize energy usage at sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new network architecture that relies on concepts of Software Defined Networking (SDN). Since SDN is a relatively new technology, originally envisioned for wired networks, it cannot be expected to get immediately and completely adopted in WSN domain, regardless of potential benefits. For this reason, we consider incremental SDN deployment...

  6. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, Cristina; Aguilera, Francisco; González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Sandoval, Francisco

    2016-07-07

    In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN), nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i) to achieve good coverage; and (ii) to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  7. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Urdiales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN, nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i to achieve good coverage; and (ii to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  8. Optimal Deployment of Sensor Nodes Based on Performance Surface of Underwater Acoustic Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Jee Woong

    2017-10-20

    The underwater acoustic sensor network (UWASN) is a system that exchanges data between numerous sensor nodes deployed in the sea. The UWASN uses an underwater acoustic communication technique to exchange data. Therefore, it is important to design a robust system that will function even in severely fluctuating underwater communication conditions, along with variations in the ocean environment. In this paper, a new algorithm to find the optimal deployment positions of underwater sensor nodes is proposed. The algorithm uses the communication performance surface, which is a map showing the underwater acoustic communication performance of a targeted area. A virtual force-particle swarm optimization algorithm is then used as an optimization technique to find the optimal deployment positions of the sensor nodes, using the performance surface information to estimate the communication radii of the sensor nodes in each generation. The algorithm is evaluated by comparing simulation results between two different seasons (summer and winter) for an area located off the eastern coast of Korea as the selected targeted area.

  9. Optimal Deployment of Sensor Nodes Based on Performance Surface of Underwater Acoustic Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhyo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The underwater acoustic sensor network (UWASN is a system that exchanges data between numerous sensor nodes deployed in the sea. The UWASN uses an underwater acoustic communication technique to exchange data. Therefore, it is important to design a robust system that will function even in severely fluctuating underwater communication conditions, along with variations in the ocean environment. In this paper, a new algorithm to find the optimal deployment positions of underwater sensor nodes is proposed. The algorithm uses the communication performance surface, which is a map showing the underwater acoustic communication performance of a targeted area. A virtual force-particle swarm optimization algorithm is then used as an optimization technique to find the optimal deployment positions of the sensor nodes, using the performance surface information to estimate the communication radii of the sensor nodes in each generation. The algorithm is evaluated by comparing simulation results between two different seasons (summer and winter for an area located off the eastern coast of Korea as the selected targeted area.

  10. Cross Deployment Networking and Systematic Performance Analysis of Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengxian; Song, Min; Yin, Guisheng; Wang, Hongbin; Ma, Xuefei; Song, Houbing

    2017-07-12

    Underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) have become a new hot research area. However, due to the work dynamics and harsh ocean environment, how to obtain an UWSN with the best systematic performance while deploying as few sensor nodes as possible and setting up self-adaptive networking is an urgent problem that needs to be solved. Consequently, sensor deployment, networking, and performance calculation of UWSNs are challenging issues, hence the study in this paper centers on this topic and three relevant methods and models are put forward. Firstly, the normal body-centered cubic lattice to cross body-centered cubic lattice (CBCL) has been improved, and a deployment process and topology generation method are built. Then most importantly, a cross deployment networking method (CDNM) for UWSNs suitable for the underwater environment is proposed. Furthermore, a systematic quar-performance calculation model (SQPCM) is proposed from an integrated perspective, in which the systematic performance of a UWSN includes coverage, connectivity, durability and rapid-reactivity. Besides, measurement models are established based on the relationship between systematic performance and influencing parameters. Finally, the influencing parameters are divided into three types, namely, constraint parameters, device performance and networking parameters. Based on these, a networking parameters adjustment method (NPAM) for optimized systematic performance of UWSNs has been presented. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper is feasible and efficient in networking and performance calculation of UWSNs.

  11. Multi-Sensor Network for Landslides Simulation and Hazard Monitoring - Design and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Qiao, G.; Lu, P.; Feng, T.; Tian, Y.; Fan, H.; Liu, S.; Liu, C.; Tong, X.; Wang, W.; Shen, Y.; Guan, Z.; Li, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes a newly developed multi-sensor network system for landslide and hazard monitoring. Landslide hazard is one of the most destructive natural disasters, which has severely affected human safety, properties and infrastructures. We report the results of designing and deploying the multi-sensor network, based on the simulated landslide model, to monitor typical landslide areas and with a goal to predict landslide hazard and mitigate damages. The integration and deployment of the prototype sensor network were carried out in an experiment area at Tongji University in Shanghai. In order to simulate a real landslide, a contractible landslide body is constructed in the experiment area by 7m*1.5m. Then, some different kind of sensors, such as camera, GPS, crackmeter, accelerometer, laser scanning system, inclinometer, etc., are installed near or in the landslide body. After the sensors are powered, continuous sampling data will be generated. With the help of communication method, such as GPRS, and certain transport devices, such as iMesh and 3G router, all the sensor data will be transported to the server and stored in Oracle. These are the current results of an ongoing project of the center. Further research results will be updated and presented in the near future.

  12. MULTI-SENSOR NETWORK FOR LANDSLIDES SIMULATION AND HAZARD MONITORING - DESIGN AND DEPLOYMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a newly developed multi-sensor network system for landslide and hazard monitoring. Landslide hazard is one of the most destructive natural disasters, which has severely affected human safety, properties and infrastructures. We report the results of designing and deploying the multi-sensor network, based on the simulated landslide model, to monitor typical landslide areas and with a goal to predict landslide hazard and mitigate damages. The integration and deployment of the prototype sensor network were carried out in an experiment area at Tongji University in Shanghai. In order to simulate a real landslide, a contractible landslide body is constructed in the experiment area by 7m*1.5m. Then, some different kind of sensors, such as camera, GPS, crackmeter, accelerometer, laser scanning system, inclinometer, etc., are installed near or in the landslide body. After the sensors are powered, continuous sampling data will be generated. With the help of communication method, such as GPRS, and certain transport devices, such as iMesh and 3G router, all the sensor data will be transported to the server and stored in Oracle. These are the current results of an ongoing project of the center. Further research results will be updated and presented in the near future.

  13. Dynamic sensor deployment for the monitoring of chemical releases in urban environments (DYCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.; Robins, Alan; Rudd, Alison; Wilks, Ashley

    2011-05-01

    We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders to provide a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne chemical threat agents following their release into the environment. We describe the development and experimental results for a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

  14. Design and deployment of low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors for gas monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassini, Sabrina; Ishtaiwi, Maen; Parvis, Marco; Vallan, Alberto

    2014-12-30

    This paper describes an approach to develop and deploy low-cost plastic optical fiber sensors suitable for measuring low concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere. The sensors are designed by depositing onto the exposed core of a plastic fiber thin films of sensitive compounds via either plasma sputtering or via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The interaction between the deposited layer and the gas alters the fiber's capability to transmit the light, so that the sensor can simply be realized with a few centimeters of fiber, an LED and a photodiode. Sensors arranged in this way exhibit several advantages in comparison to electrochemical and optical conventional sensors; in particular, they have an extremely low cost and can be easily designed to have an integral, i.e., cumulative, response. The paper describes the sensor design, the preparation procedure and two examples of sensor prototypes that exploit a cumulative response. One sensor is designed for monitoring indoor atmospheres for cultural heritage applications and the other for detecting the presence of particular gas species inside the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon detector of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN in Geneva.

  15. A Wireless Sensor Network for Hospital Security: From User Requirements to Pilot Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaseva Ville

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing amount of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN applications require low network delays. However, current research on WSNs has mainly concentrated on optimizing energy-efficiency omitting low network delays. This paper presents a novel WSN design targeted at applications requiring low data transfer delays and high reliability. We present the whole design flow from user requirements to an actual pilot deployment in a real hospital unit. The WSN includes multihop low-delay data transfer and energy-efficient mobile nodes reaching lifetime of years with small batteries. The nodes communicate using a low-cost low-power 2.4 GHz radio. The network is used in a security application with which personnel can send alarms in threatening situations. Also, a multitude of sensor measurements and actuator control is possible with the WSN. A full-scale pilot deployment is extensively experimented for performance results. Currently, the pilot network is in use at the hospital.

  16. A New Node Deployment and Location Dispatch Algorithm for Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that deployment strategies for underwater sensor networks should contribute to fully connecting the networks, a Guaranteed Full Connectivity Node Deployment (GFCND algorithm is proposed in this study. The GFCND algorithm attempts to deploy the coverage nodes according to the greedy iterative strategy, after which the connectivity nodes are used to improve network connectivity and fully connect the whole network. Furthermore, a Location Dispatch Based on Command Nodes (LDBCN algorithm is proposed, which accomplishes the location adjustment of the common nodes with the help of the SINK node and the command nodes. The command nodes then dispatch the common nodes. Simulation results show that the GFCND algorithm achieves a comparatively large coverage percentage and a fully connected network; furthermore, the LDBCN algorithm helps the common nodes preserve more total energy when they reach their destination locations.

  17. Characterizing the Path Coverage of Random Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Noori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in security monitoring applications to sense and report specific activities in a field. In path coverage, for example, the network is in charge of monitoring a path and discovering any intruder trying to cross it. In this paper, we investigate the path coverage properties of a randomly deployed wireless sensor network when the number of sensors and also the length of the path are finite. As a consequence, Boolean model, which has been widely used previously, is not applicable. Using results from geometric probability, we determine the probability of full path coverage, distribution of the number of uncovered gaps over the path, and the probability of having no uncovered gaps larger than a specific size. We also find the cumulative distribution function (cdf of the covered part of the path. Based on our results on the probability of full path coverage, we derive a tight upper bound for the number of nodes guaranteeing the full path coverage with a desired reliability. Through computer simulations, it is verified that for networks with nonasymptotic size, our analysis is accurate where the Boolean model can be inaccurate.

  18. Energy balanced strategies for maximizing the lifetime of sparsely deployed underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guo, Zhongwen; Wu, Kaishun; Hong, Feng; Feng, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWA-SNs) are envisioned to perform monitoring tasks over the large portion of the world covered by oceans. Due to economics and the large area of the ocean, UWA-SNs are mainly sparsely deployed networks nowadays. The limited battery resources is a big challenge for the deployment of such long-term sensor networks. Unbalanced battery energy consumption will lead to early energy depletion of nodes, which partitions the whole networks and impairs the integrity of the monitoring datasets or even results in the collapse of the entire networks. On the contrary, balanced energy dissipation of nodes can prolong the lifetime of such networks. In this paper, we focus on the energy balance dissipation problem of two types of sparsely deployed UWA-SNs: underwater moored monitoring systems and sparsely deployed two-dimensional UWA-SNs. We first analyze the reasons of unbalanced energy consumption in such networks, then we propose two energy balanced strategies to maximize the lifetime of networks both in shallow and deep water. Finally, we evaluate our methods by simulations and the results show that the two strategies can achieve balanced energy consumption per node while at the same time prolong the networks lifetime.

  19. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Azpilicueta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network.

  20. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpilicueta, Leyre; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Martínez, Carlos; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-07-22

    With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network.

  1. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpilicueta, Leyre; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Martínez, Carlos; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network. PMID:27455270

  2. Wireless sensor network deployment for monitoring soil moisture dynamics at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Filippi, E.; Ioriatti, L.; Martinelli, M.; Massa, A.; Toller, G.

    2009-12-01

    We describe a recent deployment of soil moisture and temperature sensors in an apple tree orchard aimed at exploring the interaction between soil moisture dynamics and plant physiology. The field is divided into three parcels with different constant irrigation rates. The deployment includes dendrometers which monitor the variations of the trunk diameter. The idea is to monitor continuously and at small time steps soil moisture dynamics, soil temperature and a parameter reflecting plant stress at the parcel scale, in order to better investigate the interaction between plant physiology and soil moisture dynamics. Other sensors monitoring plant physiology can be easily accommodated within the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). The experimental site is an apple orchard of 5000 m2 located at Cles, province of Trento, Italy, at the elevation of 640 m.a.s.l. In this site about 1200 apple trees are cultivated (cultivar Golden Delicious). The trees have been planted in 2004 in north-south rows 3.5 m apart. The deployment consists of 27 locations connected by a multi hop WSN, each one equipped with 5 soil moisture sensors (capacitance sensors EC-5, decagon Service) at the depths of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 80 cm, and a temperature sensor at the depth of 20 cm, for a total of 135 soil moisture and 27 temperature sensors. The proposed monitoring system is based on totally autonomous sensor nodes which allow both real time and historic data management. The data gathered are then organized in a database on a public web site. The node sensors are connected through an input/output interface to a WSN platform. The power supply consists of a solar panel able to provide 250 mA at 7 V and a 3V DC/DC converter based on a dual frequency high efficient switching regulator. The typical meteorological data are monitored with a weather station located at a distance of approximately 100 m from the experimental site. Great care has been posed to calibration of the capacitance sensors both in the

  3. A Movement-Assisted Deployment of Collaborating Autonomous Sensors for Indoor and Outdoor Environment Monitoring

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    Ewa Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Using mobile robots or unmanned vehicles to assist optimal wireless sensors deployment in a working space can significantly enhance the capability to investigate unknown environments. This paper addresses the issues of the application of numerical optimization and computer simulation techniques to on-line calculation of a wireless sensor network topology for monitoring and tracking purposes. We focus on the design of a self-organizing and collaborative mobile network that enables a continuous data transmission to the data sink (base station and automatically adapts its behavior to changes in the environment to achieve a common goal. The pre-defined and self-configuring approaches to the mobile-based deployment of sensors are compared and discussed. A family of novel algorithms for the optimal placement of mobile wireless devices for permanent monitoring of indoor and outdoor dynamic environments is described. They employ a network connectivity-maintaining mobility model utilizing the concept of the virtual potential function for calculating the motion trajectories of platforms carrying sensors. Their quality and utility have been justified through simulation experiments and are discussed in the final part of the paper.

  4. A Movement-Assisted Deployment of Collaborating Autonomous Sensors for Indoor and Outdoor Environment Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Sikora, Andrzej; Marks, Michał

    2016-09-14

    Using mobile robots or unmanned vehicles to assist optimal wireless sensors deployment in a working space can significantly enhance the capability to investigate unknown environments. This paper addresses the issues of the application of numerical optimization and computer simulation techniques to on-line calculation of a wireless sensor network topology for monitoring and tracking purposes. We focus on the design of a self-organizing and collaborative mobile network that enables a continuous data transmission to the data sink (base station) and automatically adapts its behavior to changes in the environment to achieve a common goal. The pre-defined and self-configuring approaches to the mobile-based deployment of sensors are compared and discussed. A family of novel algorithms for the optimal placement of mobile wireless devices for permanent monitoring of indoor and outdoor dynamic environments is described. They employ a network connectivity-maintaining mobility model utilizing the concept of the virtual potential function for calculating the motion trajectories of platforms carrying sensors. Their quality and utility have been justified through simulation experiments and are discussed in the final part of the paper.

  5. Energy-Efficient Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Deployment with Multiple Objectives for Structural Health Monitoring

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    Chengyin Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous wireless sensor networks (HWSNs are widely adopted in structural health monitoring systems due to their potential for implementing sophisticated algorithms by integrating a diverse set of devices and improving a network’s sensing performance. However, deploying such a HWSN is still in a challenge due to the heterogeneous nature of the data and the energy constraints of the network. To respond to these challenges, an optimal deployment framework in terms of both modal information quality and energy consumption is proposed in this study. This framework generates a multi-objective function aimed at maximizing the quality of the modal information identified from heterogeneous data while minimizing the consumption of energy within the network at the same time. Particle swarm optimization algorithm is then implemented to seek solutions to the function effectively. After laying out the proposed sensor-optimization framework, a methodology is present to determine the clustering of the sensors to further conserve energy. Finally, a numerical verification is performed on a four-span pre-stressed reinforced concrete box-girder bridge. Results show that a set of strategically positioned heterogeneous sensors can maintain a balanced trade-off between the modal information accuracy and energy consumption. It is also observed that an appropriate cluster-tree network topology can further achieve energy saving in HWSNs.

  6. Energy-Efficient Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Deployment with Multiple Objectives for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengyin; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Wang, Fei; Chen, Hui

    2016-11-06

    Heterogeneous wireless sensor networks (HWSNs) are widely adopted in structural health monitoring systems due to their potential for implementing sophisticated algorithms by integrating a diverse set of devices and improving a network's sensing performance. However, deploying such a HWSN is still in a challenge due to the heterogeneous nature of the data and the energy constraints of the network. To respond to these challenges, an optimal deployment framework in terms of both modal information quality and energy consumption is proposed in this study. This framework generates a multi-objective function aimed at maximizing the quality of the modal information identified from heterogeneous data while minimizing the consumption of energy within the network at the same time. Particle swarm optimization algorithm is then implemented to seek solutions to the function effectively. After laying out the proposed sensor-optimization framework, a methodology is present to determine the clustering of the sensors to further conserve energy. Finally, a numerical verification is performed on a four-span pre-stressed reinforced concrete box-girder bridge. Results show that a set of strategically positioned heterogeneous sensors can maintain a balanced trade-off between the modal information accuracy and energy consumption. It is also observed that an appropriate cluster-tree network topology can further achieve energy saving in HWSNs.

  7. Process of 3D wireless decentralized sensor deployment using parsing crossover scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H.R. Ko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN usually consists of numerous wireless devices deployed in a region of interest, each able to collect and process environmental information and communicate with neighboring devices. It can thus be regarded as a Multi-Agent System for territorial security, where individual agents cooperate with each other to avoid duplication of effort and to exploit other agent’s capacities. The problem of sensor deployment becomes non-trivial when we consider environmental factors, such as terrain elevations. Due to the fact that all sensors are homogeneous, the chromosomes that encode sensor positions are actually interchangeable, and conventional crossover schemes such as uniform crossover would cause some redundancy as well as over-concentration in certain specific geographical area. We propose a Parsing Crossover Scheme that intends to reduce redundancy and ease geographical concentration pattern in an effort to facilitate the search. The proposed parsing crossover method demonstrates better performances than those of uniform crossover under different terrain irregularities.

  8. A Deployment of Fine-Grained Sensor Network and Empirical Analysis of Urban Temperature

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    Yoshito Tobe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature in an urban area exhibits a complicated pattern due to complexity of infrastructure. Despite geographical proximity, structures of a group of buildings and streets affect changes in temperature. To investigate the pattern of fine-grained distribution of temperature, we installed a densely distributed sensor network called UScan. In this paper, we describe the system architecture of UScan as well as experience learned from installing 200 sensors in downtown Tokyo. The field experiment of UScan system operated for two months to collect long-term urban temperature data. To analyze the collected data in an efficient manner, we propose a lightweight clustering methodology to study the correlation between the pattern of temperature and various environmental factors including the amount of sunshine, the width of streets, and the existence of trees. The analysis reveals meaningful results and asserts the necessity of fine-grained deployment of sensors in an urban area.

  9. Network-based Parallel Retrieval Onboard Computing Environment for Sensor Systems Deployed on NASA Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Remote Sensing Solutions proposes to develop the Network-based Parallel Retrieval Onboard Computing Environment for Sensor Systems (nPROCESS) for deployment on...

  10. Design and deployment of a new wireless sensor node platform for building environmental monitoring and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essa Jafer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly agreed that a 15–40% reduction of building energy consumption is achievable by efficiently operated buildings when compared with typical practice. Existing research has identified that the level of information available to Building Managers with existing Building Management Systems and Environmental Monitoring Systems is insufficient to perform the required performance-based building assessment. The majority of today’s buildings are insufficiently sensored to obtain an unambiguous understanding of performance. The cost of installing additional sensors and meters is extremely high, primarily due to the estimated cost of wiring and the needed labour. From these perspectives wireless sensors technology proves to have a greater cost-efficiency while maintaining high levels of functionality and reliability. In this paper, a wireless sensor network mote hardware design and implementation are introduced particularly for building deployment application. The core of the mote design is based on the 8-bit AVR microcontroller, Atmega1281 and 2.4 GHz wireless communication chip, CC2420. The sensors were selected carefully to meet both the building monitoring and design requirements. Beside the sensing capability, actuation and interfacing to external meters/sensors are provided to perform different management control and data recording tasks.

  11. The Node Deployment of Intelligent Sensor Networks Based on the Spatial Difference of Farmland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Naisen; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Jingchao; Pang, Fangrong; Ni, Jun

    2015-11-11

    Considering that agricultural production is characterized by vast areas, scattered fields and long crop growth cycles, intelligent wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are suitable for monitoring crop growth information. Cost and coverage are the most key indexes for WSN applications. The differences in crop conditions are influenced by the spatial distribution of soil nutrients. If the nutrients are distributed evenly, the crop conditions are expected to be approximately uniform with little difference; on the contrary, there will be great differences in crop conditions. In accordance with the differences in the spatial distribution of soil information in farmland, fuzzy c-means clustering was applied to divide the farmland into several areas, where the soil fertility of each area is nearly uniform. Then the crop growth information in the area could be monitored with complete coverage by deploying a sensor node there, which could greatly decrease the deployed sensor nodes. Moreover, in order to accurately judge the optimal cluster number of fuzzy c-means clustering, a discriminant function for Normalized Intra-Cluster Coefficient of Variation (NICCV) was established. The sensitivity analysis indicates that NICCV is insensitive to the fuzzy weighting exponent, but it shows a strong sensitivity to the number of clusters.

  12. Deploying four optical UAV-based sensors over grassland: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bueren, S. K.; Burkart, A.; Hueni, A.; Rascher, U.; Tuohy, M. P.; Yule, I. J.

    2015-01-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with lightweight spectral sensors facilitate non-destructive, near-real-time vegetation analysis. In order to guarantee robust scientific analysis, data acquisition protocols and processing methodologies need to be developed and new sensors must be compared with state-of-the-art instruments. Four different types of optical UAV-based sensors (RGB camera, converted near-infrared camera, six-band multispectral camera and high spectral resolution spectrometer) were deployed and compared in order to evaluate their applicability for vegetation monitoring with a focus on precision agricultural applications. Data were collected in New Zealand over ryegrass pastures of various conditions and compared to ground spectral measurements. The UAV STS spectrometer and the multispectral camera MCA6 (Multiple Camera Array) were found to deliver spectral data that can match the spectral measurements of an ASD at ground level when compared over all waypoints (UAV STS: R2=0.98; MCA6: R2=0.92). Variability was highest in the near-infrared bands for both sensors while the band multispectral camera also overestimated the green peak reflectance. Reflectance factors derived from the RGB (R2=0.63) and converted near-infrared (R2=0.65) cameras resulted in lower accordance with reference measurements. The UAV spectrometer system is capable of providing narrow-band information for crop and pasture management. The six-band multispectral camera has the potential to be deployed to target specific broad wavebands if shortcomings in radiometric limitations can be addressed. Large-scale imaging of pasture variability can be achieved by either using a true colour or a modified near-infrared camera. Data quality from UAV-based sensors can only be assured, if field protocols are followed and environmental conditions allow for stable platform behaviour and illumination.

  13. Distributed Detection of Randomly Located Targets in Mobility-Assisted Sensor Networks with Node Mobility Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaweera SudharmanK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance gain achieved by adding mobile nodes to a stationary sensor network for target detection depends on factors such as the number of mobile nodes deployed, mobility patterns, speed and energy constraints of mobile nodes, and the nature of the target locations (deterministic or random. In this paper, we address the problem of distributed detection of a randomly located target by a hybrid sensor network. Specifically, we develop two decision-fusion architectures for detection where in the first one, impact of node mobility is taken into account for decisions updating at the fusion center, while in the second model the impact of node mobility is taken at the node level decision updating. The cost of deploying mobile nodes is analyzed in terms of the minimum fraction of mobile nodes required to achieve the desired performance level within a desired delay constraint. Moreover, we consider managing node mobility under given constraints.

  14. Deployment of dual-sensor ALIS for humanitarian demining in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-06-01

    We are in the process of developing a high-resolution landmine scanning system "ALIS" which produces horizontal slices of the shallow subsurface for visualization of buried explosives and inert clutter. As many AP mines contain minimum amounts of metal, metal detectors need to be combined with a complimentary subsurface imaging sensor. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is widely accepted for subsurface sensing in the fields of geology, archaeology and utility detection. The demining application requires real-time imaging results with centimetre resolution in a highly portable package. The key requirement for sharp images of the subsurface is the precise tracking of the geophysical sensor(s) during data collection. We should also notice that GPR system is a very wide band radar system, and equivalent to UWB radar, which has recently been developed for short-range high-accuracy radar. We are testing simplified but effective signal processing for imaging mines. We are currently testing a dual sensor ALIS which is a realtime sensor tracking system based on a CCD camera and image processing. In this paper we introduce the GPR systems which we have developed for detection of buried antipersonnel mines and small size explosives. ALIS has been deployed in Cambodia since 2009 and detected more than 70 mines in mine fields, and returned more than 13ha cleaned fields to local farmers. We also report the current status of ALIS in Cambodia.

  15. Node Deployment with k-Connectivity in Sensor Networks for Crop Information Full Coverage Monitoring

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    Naisen Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are suitable for the continuous monitoring of crop information in large-scale farmland. The information obtained is great for regulation of crop growth and achieving high yields in precision agriculture (PA. In order to realize full coverage and k-connectivity WSN deployment for monitoring crop growth information of farmland on a large scale and to ensure the accuracy of the monitored data, a new WSN deployment method using a genetic algorithm (GA is here proposed. The fitness function of GA was constructed based on the following WSN deployment criteria: (1 nodes must be located in the corresponding plots; (2 WSN must have k-connectivity; (3 WSN must have no communication silos; (4 the minimum distance between node and plot boundary must be greater than a specific value to prevent each node from being affected by the farmland edge effect. The deployment experiments were performed on natural farmland and on irregular farmland divided based on spatial differences of soil nutrients. Results showed that both WSNs gave full coverage, there were no communication silos, and the minimum connectivity of nodes was equal to k. The deployment was tested for different values of k and transmission distance (d to the node. The results showed that, when d was set to 200 m, as k increased from 2 to 4 the minimum connectivity of nodes increases and is equal to k. When k was set to 2, the average connectivity of all nodes increased in a linear manner with the increase of d from 140 m to 250 m, and the minimum connectivity does not change.

  16. Node Deployment with k-Connectivity in Sensor Networks for Crop Information Full Coverage Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Naisen; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Jingchao; Pang, Fangrong; Ni, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are suitable for the continuous monitoring of crop information in large-scale farmland. The information obtained is great for regulation of crop growth and achieving high yields in precision agriculture (PA). In order to realize full coverage and k-connectivity WSN deployment for monitoring crop growth information of farmland on a large scale and to ensure the accuracy of the monitored data, a new WSN deployment method using a genetic algorithm (GA) is here proposed. The fitness function of GA was constructed based on the following WSN deployment criteria: (1) nodes must be located in the corresponding plots; (2) WSN must have k-connectivity; (3) WSN must have no communication silos; (4) the minimum distance between node and plot boundary must be greater than a specific value to prevent each node from being affected by the farmland edge effect. The deployment experiments were performed on natural farmland and on irregular farmland divided based on spatial differences of soil nutrients. Results showed that both WSNs gave full coverage, there were no communication silos, and the minimum connectivity of nodes was equal to k. The deployment was tested for different values of k and transmission distance (d) to the node. The results showed that, when d was set to 200 m, as k increased from 2 to 4 the minimum connectivity of nodes increases and is equal to k. When k was set to 2, the average connectivity of all nodes increased in a linear manner with the increase of d from 140 m to 250 m, and the minimum connectivity does not change. PMID:27941704

  17. Deployment Algorithms of Wireless Sensor Networks for Near-surface Underground Oil and Gas Pipeline Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Ping YU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas pipelines are the infrastructure of national economic development. Deployment problem of wireless underground sensor networks (WUSN for oil and gas pipeline systems is a fundamental problem. This paper firstly analyzed the wireless channel characteristics and energy consumption model in near-surface underground soil, and then studied the spatial structure of oil and gas pipelines and introduced the three-layer system structure of WUSN for oil and gas pipelines monitoring. Secondly, the optimal deployment strategy in XY plane and XZ plane which were projected from three-dimensional oil and gas pipeline structure was analyzed. Thirdly, the technical framework of using kinetic energy of the fluid in pipelines to recharge sensor nodes and partition strategy for energy consumption balance based on the wireless communication technology of magnetic induction waveguide were proposed, which can effectively improve the energy performance and connectivity of the network, and provide theoretical guidance and practical basis for the monitoring of long oil and gas pipeline network, the city tap water pipe network and sewage pipe network.

  18. A Multiscale Approach to the Smart Deployment of Micro-Sensors over Lightweight Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capellari, Giovanni; Caimmi, Francesco; Bruggi, Matteo; Mariani, Stefano

    2017-07-15

    A topology optimization approach has been recently proposed to maximize the sensitivity to damage of measurements, collected through a network of sensors to be deployed over thin plates for structural health monitoring purposes. Within such a frame, damage is meant as a change in the structural health characterized by a reduction of relevant stiffness and load-carrying properties. The sensitivity to a damage of unknown amplitude and location is computed by comparing the response to the external actions of the healthy structure and of a set of auxiliary damaged structures, each one featuring reduced mechanical properties in a small region only. The topology optimization scheme has been devised to properly account for the information coming from all of the sensors to be placed on the structure and for damage depending on its location. In this work, we extend the approach within a multiscale frame to account for three different length scales: a macroscopic one, linked to the dimensions of the whole structure to be monitored; a mesoscopic one, linked to the characteristic size of the damaged region; a microscopic one, linked to the size of inertial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to be used within a marginally-invasive health monitoring system. Results are provided for a square plate and for a section of fuselage with stiffeners, to show how the micro-sensors have to be deployed to maximize the capability to detect a damage, to assess the sensitivity of the results to the measurement noise and to also discuss the speedup in designing the network topology against a standard single-scale approach.

  19. Path to Impact for Autonomous Field Deployable Chemical Sensors: A Case Study of in Situ Nitrite Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenbeck, Tim M; Smith, Matthew C

    2017-05-02

    Natural freshwater systems have been severely affected by excess loading of macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus) from fertilizers, fossil fuels, and human and livestock waste. In the USA, impacts to drinking water quality, biogeochemical cycles, and aquatic ecosystems are estimated to cost US$210 billion annually. Field-deployable nutrient sensors (FDS) offer potential to support research and resource management efforts by acquiring higher resolution data than are currently supported by expensive conventional sampling methods. Following nearly 40 years of research and development, FDS instruments are now starting to penetrate commercial markets. However, instrument uncertainty factors (high cost, reliability, accuracy, and precision) are key drivers impeding the uptake of FDS by the majority of users. Using nitrite sensors as a case study, we review the trends, opportunities, and challenges in producing and implementing FDS from a perspective of innovation and impact. We characterize the user community and consumer needs, identify trends in research approaches, tabulate state-of-the-art examples and specifications, and discuss data life cycle considerations. With further development of FDS through prototyping and testing in real-world applications, these tools can deliver information for protecting and restoring natural waters, enhancing process control for industrial operations and water treatment, and providing novel research insights.

  20. Wireless Sensor Network Operating System Design Rules Based on Real-World Deployment Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Selavo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs have been a widely researched field since the beginning of the 21st century. The field is already maturing, and TinyOS has established itself as the de facto standard WSN Operating System (OS. However, the WSN researcher community is still active in building more flexible, efficient and user-friendly WSN operating systems. Often, WSN OS design is based either on practical requirements of a particular research project or research group's needs or on theoretical assumptions spread in the WSN community. The goal of this paper is to propose WSN OS design rules that are based on a thorough survey of 40 WSN deployments. The survey unveils trends of WSN applications and provides empirical substantiation to support widely usable and flexible WSN operating system design.

  1. Node Deployment Algorithm Based on Connected Tree for Underwater Sensor Networks

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    Peng Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Designing an efficient deployment method to guarantee optimal monitoring quality is one of the key topics in underwater sensor networks. At present, a realistic approach of deployment involves adjusting the depths of nodes in water. One of the typical algorithms used in such process is the self-deployment depth adjustment algorithm (SDDA. This algorithm mainly focuses on maximizing network coverage by constantly adjusting node depths to reduce coverage overlaps between two neighboring nodes, and thus, achieves good performance. However, the connectivity performance of SDDA is irresolute. In this paper, we propose a depth adjustment algorithm based on connected tree (CTDA. In CTDA, the sink node is used as the first root node to start building a connected tree. Finally, the network can be organized as a forest to maintain network connectivity. Coverage overlaps between the parent node and the child node are then reduced within each sub-tree to optimize coverage. The hierarchical strategy is used to adjust the distance between the parent node and the child node to reduce node movement. Furthermore, the silent mode is adopted to reduce communication cost. Simulations show that compared with SDDA, CTDA can achieve high connectivity with various communication ranges and different numbers of nodes. Moreover, it can realize coverage as high as that of SDDA with various sensing ranges and numbers of nodes but with less energy consumption. Simulations under sparse environments show that the connectivity and energy consumption performances of CTDA are considerably better than those of SDDA. Meanwhile, the connectivity and coverage performances of CTDA are close to those depth adjustment algorithms base on connected dominating set (CDA, which is an algorithm similar to CTDA. However, the energy consumption of CTDA is less than that of CDA, particularly in sparse underwater environments.

  2. Recent advances of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors: principles and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Wojtas, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of compact interband cascade lasers(ICLs) and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based trace gas sensors will permit the targeting of strong fundamental rotational-vibrational transitions in the mid-infrared which are one to two orders of magnitude more intense than transitions in the overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared. This has led to the design and fabrication of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors for use in the petrochemical industry, environmental monitoring and atmospheric chemistry. Specifically, the spectroscopic detection and monitoring of four molecular species, methane (CH4) [1], ethane (C2H6), formaldehyde (H2CO) [2] and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [3] will be described. CH4, C2H6 and H2CO can be detected using two detection techniques: mid-infrared tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a compact multi-pass gas cell and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Both techniques utilize state-of-the-art mid-IR, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) ICLs and QCLs. TDLAS was performed with an ultra-compact 54.6m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass gas cell capable of 435 passes between two concave mirrors separated by 12.5 cm. QEPAS used a small robust absorption detection module (ADM) which consists of a quartz tuning fork (QTF), two optical windows, gas inlet/outlet ports and a low noise frequency pre-amplifier. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection were employed for spectral data processing. TDLAS and QEPAS can achieve minimum detectable absorption losses in the range from 10-8 to 10-11cm-1/Hz1/2. Several recent examples of real world applications of field deployable gas sensors will be described. For example, an ICL based TDLAS sensor system is capable of detecting CH4 and C2H6 concentration levels of 1 ppb in a 1 sec. sampling time, using an ultra-compact, robust sensor architecture. H2S detection was realized with a THz QEPAS sensor

  3. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-Based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Efficient self-organizing virtual clusterheads that supervise data collection based on their wireless connectivity, risk, and overhead costs, are an important element of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). This function is especially critical during deployment when system resources are allocated to a subsequent application. In the presented research,…

  4. A Prospective Cluster-Randomized Trial of Telehealth Coaching to Promote Bone Health and Nutrition in Deployed Soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S. McCarthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Findings from previous studies suggest that inadequate consumption of calcium and vitamin D and a decrease in exercise while deployed can be detrimental to bone health. This study enrolled 234 soldiers randomized to receive one-time nutrition and exercise education pre-deployment (n = 149, or telehealth coaching (n = 85, throughout the deployment cycle. Results suggest that online educational efforts may enhance sports activity, bone turnover, and vitamin D status. Improving vitamin D status and remaining active while deployed appears to sustain healthy bone density in young soldiers. Early and aggressive educational outreach to young adults may prevent chronic musculoskeletal conditions and disabling osteoporosis later in life.

  5. A Formal Methodology to Design and Deploy Dependable Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Testa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are being increasingly adopted in critical applications, where verifying the correct operation of sensor nodes is a major concern. Undesired events may undermine the mission of the WSNs. Hence, their effects need to be properly assessed before deployment, to obtain a good level of expected performance; and during the operation, in order to avoid dangerous unexpected results. In this paper, we propose a methodology that aims at assessing and improving the dependability level of WSNs by means of an event-based formal verification technique. The methodology includes a process to guide designers towards the realization of a dependable WSN and a tool (“ADVISES” to simplify its adoption. The tool is applicable to homogeneous WSNs with static routing topologies. It allows the automatic generation of formal specifications used to check correctness properties and evaluate dependability metrics at design time and at runtime for WSNs where an acceptable percentage of faults can be defined. During the runtime, we can check the behavior of the WSN accordingly to the results obtained at design time and we can detect sudden and unexpected failures, in order to trigger recovery procedures. The effectiveness of the methodology is shown in the context of two case studies, as proof-of-concept, aiming to illustrate how the tool is helpful to drive design choices and to check the correctness properties of the WSN at runtime. Although the method scales up to very large WSNs, the applicability of the methodology may be compromised by the state space explosion of the reasoning model, which must be faced by partitioning large topologies into sub-topologies.

  6. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-06-16

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011-2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1-1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring.

  7. A Formal Methodology to Design and Deploy Dependable Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Alessandro; Cinque, Marcello; Coronato, Antonio; Augusto, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-23

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are being increasingly adopted in critical applications, where verifying the correct operation of sensor nodes is a major concern. Undesired events may undermine the mission of the WSNs. Hence, their effects need to be properly assessed before deployment, to obtain a good level of expected performance; and during the operation, in order to avoid dangerous unexpected results. In this paper, we propose a methodology that aims at assessing and improving the dependability level of WSNs by means of an event-based formal verification technique. The methodology includes a process to guide designers towards the realization of a dependable WSN and a tool ("ADVISES") to simplify its adoption. The tool is applicable to homogeneous WSNs with static routing topologies. It allows the automatic generation of formal specifications used to check correctness properties and evaluate dependability metrics at design time and at runtime for WSNs where an acceptable percentage of faults can be defined. During the runtime, we can check the behavior of the WSN accordingly to the results obtained at design time and we can detect sudden and unexpected failures, in order to trigger recovery procedures. The effectiveness of the methodology is shown in the context of two case studies, as proof-of-concept, aiming to illustrate how the tool is helpful to drive design choices and to check the correctness properties of the WSN at runtime. Although the method scales up to very large WSNs, the applicability of the methodology may be compromised by the state space explosion of the reasoning model, which must be faced by partitioning large topologies into sub-topologies.

  8. Towards a cross-platform software framework to support end-to-end hydrometeorological sensor network deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celicourt, P.; Sam, R.; Piasecki, M.

    2016-12-01

    Global phenomena such as climate change and large scale environmental degradation require the collection of accurate environmental data at detailed spatial and temporal scales from which knowledge and actionable insights can be derived using data science methods. Despite significant advances in sensor network technologies, sensors and sensor network deployment remains a labor-intensive, time consuming, cumbersome and expensive task. These factors demonstrate why environmental data collection remains a challenge especially in developing countries where technical infrastructure, expertise and pecuniary resources are scarce. In addition, they also demonstrate the reason why dense and long-term environmental data collection has been historically quite difficult. Moreover, hydrometeorological data collection efforts usually overlook the (critically important) inclusion of a standards-based system for storing, managing, organizing, indexing, documenting and sharing sensor data. We are developing a cross-platform software framework using the Python programming language that will allow us to develop a low cost end-to-end (from sensor to publication) system for hydrometeorological conditions monitoring. The software framework contains provision for sensor, sensor platforms, calibration and network protocols description, sensor programming, data storage, data publication and visualization and more importantly data retrieval in a desired unit system. It is being tested on the Raspberry Pi microcomputer as end node and a laptop PC as the base station in a wireless setting.

  9. Analysis of wireless sensor network topology and estimation of optimal network deployment by deterministic radio channel characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-02-05

    One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption.

  10. How well could existing sensors detect the deployment of a solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering effort?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, Alan J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-29

    While the stated reason for asking this question is “to understand better our ability to warn policy makers in the unlikely event of an unanticipated SRM geoengineering deployment or large-scale field experiment”, my colleagues and I felt that motives would be important context because the scale of any meaningful SRM deployment would be so large that covert deployment seems impossible. However, several motives emerged that suggest a less-than-global effort might be important.

  11. Method for Optimal Sensor Deployment on 3D Terrains Utilizing a Steady State Genetic Algorithm with a Guided Walk Mutation Operator Based on the Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unaldi, Numan; Temel, Samil; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the deployment of a limited number of sensors in order to achieve maximum coverage on a terrain. The optimal sensor deployment which enables one to minimize the consumed energy, communication time and manpower for the maintenance of the network has attracted interest with the increased number of studies conducted on the subject in the last decade. Most of the studies in the literature today are proposed for two dimensional (2D) surfaces; however, real world sensor deployments often arise on three dimensional (3D) environments. In this paper, a guided wavelet transform (WT) based deployment strategy (WTDS) for 3D terrains, in which the sensor movements are carried out within the mutation phase of the genetic algorithms (GAs) is proposed. The proposed algorithm aims to maximize the Quality of Coverage (QoC) of a WSN via deploying a limited number of sensors on a 3D surface by utilizing a probabilistic sensing model and the Bresenham's line of sight (LOS) algorithm. In addition, the method followed in this paper is novel to the literature and the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) method as well as a standard genetic algorithm based method and the results reveal that the proposed method is a more powerful and more successful method for sensor deployment on 3D terrains. PMID:22666078

  12. A novel solid state non-dispersive infrared CO2 gas sensor compatible with wireless and portable deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Desmond; MacGregor, Calum

    2013-05-29

    This paper describes development of a novel mid-infrared light emitting diode (LED) and photodiode (PD) light source/detector combination and use within a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide gas sensor. The LED/PD based NDIR sensor provides fast stabilisation time (time required to turn on the sensor from cold, warm up, take and report a measurement, and power down again ≈1 second), longevity (>15 years), low power consumption and low cost. Described performance is compatible with "fit and forget" wireless deployed sensors in applications such as indoor air quality monitoring/control & energy conservation in buildings, transport systems, horticultural greenhouses and portable deployment for safety, industrial and medical applications. Fast stabilisation time, low intrinsic power consumption and cycled operation offer typical energy consumption per measurement of mJ's, providing extended operation using battery and/or energy harvesting strategies (measurement interval of ≈ 2 minutes provides >10 years operation from one AA battery). Specific performance data is provided in relation to measurement accuracy and noise, temperature performance, cross sensitivity, measurement range (two pathlength variants are described covering ambient through to 100% gas concentration), comparison with NDIR utilizing thermal source/pyroelectric light source/detector combination and compatibility with energy harvesting. Semiconductor based LED/PD processing together with injection moulded reflective optics and simple assembly provide a route to low cost high volume manufacturing.

  13. A Novel Solid State Non-Dispersive Infrared CO2 Gas Sensor Compatible with Wireless and Portable Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Gibson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes development of a novel mid-infrared light emitting diode (LED and photodiode (PD light source/detector combination and use within a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR carbon dioxide gas sensor. The LED/PD based NDIR sensor provides fast stabilisation time (time required to turn on the sensor from cold, warm up, take and report a measurement, and power down again ≈1 second, longevity (>15 years, low power consumption and low cost. Described performance is compatible with “fit and forget” wireless deployed sensors in applications such as indoor air quality monitoring/control & energy conservation in buildings, transport systems, horticultural greenhouses and portable deployment for safety, industrial and medical applications. Fast stabilisation time, low intrinsic power consumption and cycled operation offer typical energy consumption per measurement of mJ’s, providing extended operation using battery and/or energy harvesting strategies (measurement interval of ≈ 2 minutes provides >10 years operation from one AA battery. Specific performance data is provided in relation to measurement accuracy and noise, temperature performance, cross sensitivity, measurement range (two pathlength variants are described covering ambient through to 100% gas concentration, comparison with NDIR utilizing thermal source/pyroelectric light source/detector combination and compatibility with energy harvesting. Semiconductor based LED/PD processing together with injection moulded reflective optics and simple assembly provide a route to low cost high volume manufacturing.

  14. Enhanced Deployment Strategy for Role-based Hierarchical Application Agents in Wireless Sensor Networks with Established Clusterheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Audrey

    Efficient self-organizing virtual clusterheads that supervise data collection based on their wireless connectivity, risk, and overhead costs, are an important element of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). This function is especially critical during deployment when system resources are allocated to a subsequent application. In the presented research, a model used to deploy intrusion detection capability on a Local Area Network (LAN), in the literature, was extended to develop a role-based hierarchical agent deployment algorithm for a WSN. The resulting model took into consideration the monitoring capability, risk, deployment distribution cost, and monitoring cost associated with each node. Changing the original LAN methodology approach to model a cluster-based sensor network depended on the ability to duplicate a specific parameter that represented the monitoring capability. Furthermore, other parameters derived from a LAN can elevate costs and risk of deployment, as well as jeopardize the success of an application on a WSN. A key component of the approach presented in this research was to reduce the costs when established clusterheads in the network were found to be capable of hosting additional detection agents. In addition, another cost savings component of the study addressed the reduction of vulnerabilities associated with deployment of agents to high volume nodes. The effectiveness of the presented method was validated by comparing it against a type of a power-based scheme that used each node's remaining energy as the deployment value. While available energy is directly related to the model used in the presented method, the study deliberately sought out nodes that were identified with having superior monitoring capability, cost less to create and sustain, and are at low-risk of an attack. This work investigated improving the efficiency of an intrusion detection system (IDS) by using the proposed model to deploy monitoring agents after a temperature sensing

  15. Summer Activity Sensor Data from Collars Deployed on Female Polar Bears in the Chukchi Sea 1989 to 1995 and Southern Beaufort Sea 1989 to 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These are data collected from two types of activity sensors housed within collars deployed on female polar bears in the Chukchi and southern Beaufort Seas during the...

  16. Evaluation of the Impact of Furniture on Communications Performance for Ubiquitous Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. Gómez Skarmeta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensions of the environment with the integration of sensing systems in any space, in conjunction with ubiquitous computing are enabling the so-called Smart Space Sensor Networks. This new generation of networks are offering full connectivity with any object, through the Internet of Things (IoT and/or the Web, i.e., the Web of Things. These connectivity capabilities are making it feasible to sense the behaviours of people at home and act accordingly. These sensing systems must be integrated within typical elements found at home such as furniture. For that reason, this work considers furniture as an interesting element for the transparent location of sensors. Furniture is a ubiquitous object, i.e., it can be found everywhere at home or the office, and it can integrate and hide the sensors of a network. This work addresses the lack of an exhaustive study of the effect of furniture on signal losses. In addition an easy-to-use tool for estimating the robustness of the communication channel among the sensor nodes and gateways is proposed. Specifically, the losses in a sensor network signal due to the materials found within the communication link are evaluated. Then, this work proposes a software tool that gathers the obtained results and is capable of evaluating the impact of a given set of materials on the communications. This tool also provides a mechanism to optimize the sensor network deployments during the definition of smart spaces. Specifically, it provides information such as: maximum distances between sensor nodes, most suitable type of furniture to integrate sensors, or battery life of sensor nodes. This tool has been validated empirically in the lab, and it is currently being used by several enterprise partners of the Technological Centre of Furniture and Wood in the southeast of Spain.

  17. Evaluation of the impact of furniture on communications performance for ubiquitous deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleda, Andrés L; Jara, Antonio J; Maestre, Rafael; Santa, Guadalupe; Gómez Skarmeta, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    The extensions of the environment with the integration of sensing systems in any space, in conjunction with ubiquitous computing are enabling the so-called Smart Space Sensor Networks. This new generation of networks are offering full connectivity with any object, through the Internet of Things (IoT) and/or the Web, i.e., the Web of Things. These connectivity capabilities are making it feasible to sense the behaviours of people at home and act accordingly. These sensing systems must be integrated within typical elements found at home such as furniture. For that reason, this work considers furniture as an interesting element for the transparent location of sensors. Furniture is a ubiquitous object, i.e., it can be found everywhere at home or the office, and it can integrate and hide the sensors of a network. This work addresses the lack of an exhaustive study of the effect of furniture on signal losses. In addition an easy-to-use tool for estimating the robustness of the communication channel among the sensor nodes and gateways is proposed. Specifically, the losses in a sensor network signal due to the materials found within the communication link are evaluated. Then, this work proposes a software tool that gathers the obtained results and is capable of evaluating the impact of a given set of materials on the communications. This tool also provides a mechanism to optimize the sensor network deployments during the definition of smart spaces. Specifically, it provides information such as: maximum distances between sensor nodes, most suitable type of furniture to integrate sensors, or battery life of sensor nodes. This tool has been validated empirically in the lab, and it is currently being used by several enterprise partners of the Technological Centre of Furniture and Wood in the southeast of Spain.

  18. Evaluation of the Impact of Furniture on Communications Performance for Ubiquitous Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Smart Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleda, Andrés L.; Jara, Antonio J.; Maestre, Rafael; Santa, Guadalupe; Gómez Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2012-01-01

    The extensions of the environment with the integration of sensing systems in any space, in conjunction with ubiquitous computing are enabling the so-called Smart Space Sensor Networks. This new generation of networks are offering full connectivity with any object, through the Internet of Things (IoT) and/or the Web, i.e., the Web of Things. These connectivity capabilities are making it feasible to sense the behaviours of people at home and act accordingly. These sensing systems must be integrated within typical elements found at home such as furniture. For that reason, this work considers furniture as an interesting element for the transparent location of sensors. Furniture is a ubiquitous object, i.e., it can be found everywhere at home or the office, and it can integrate and hide the sensors of a network. This work addresses the lack of an exhaustive study of the effect of furniture on signal losses. In addition an easy-to-use tool for estimating the robustness of the communication channel among the sensor nodes and gateways is proposed. Specifically, the losses in a sensor network signal due to the materials found within the communication link are evaluated. Then, this work proposes a software tool that gathers the obtained results and is capable of evaluating the impact of a given set of materials on the communications. This tool also provides a mechanism to optimize the sensor network deployments during the definition of smart spaces. Specifically, it provides information such as: maximum distances between sensor nodes, most suitable type of furniture to integrate sensors, or battery life of sensor nodes. This tool has been validated empirically in the lab, and it is currently being used by several enterprise partners of the Technological Centre of Furniture and Wood in the southeast of Spain. PMID:22778653

  19. Extending the lifetime of wireless sensor network with partial SDN deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomovic, Slavica; Radusinovic, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency is one of the key requirements in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). In order to optimize energy usage at sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new network architecture that relies on concepts of Software Defined Networking...

  20. An Energy-Efficient Secure Routing and Key Management Scheme for Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Deployment Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xuan Hung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For many sensor network applications such as military or homeland security, it is essential for users (sinks to access the sensor network while they are moving. Sink mobility brings new challenges to secure routing in large-scale sensor networks. Previous studies on sink mobility have mainly focused on efficiency and effectiveness of data dissemination without security consideration. Also, studies and experiences have shown that considering security during design time is the best way to provide security for sensor network routing. This paper presents an energy-efficient secure routing and key management for mobile sinks in sensor networks, called SCODEplus. It is a significant extension of our previous study in five aspects: (1 Key management scheme and routing protocol are considered during design time to increase security and efficiency; (2 The network topology is organized in a hexagonal plane which supports more efficiency than previous square-grid topology; (3 The key management scheme can eliminate the impacts of node compromise attacks on links between non-compromised nodes; (4 Sensor node deployment is based on Gaussian distribution which is more realistic than uniform distribution; (5 No GPS or like is required to provide sensor node location information. Our security analysis demonstrates that the proposed scheme can defend against common attacks in sensor networks including node compromise attacks, replay attacks, selective forwarding attacks, sinkhole and wormhole, Sybil attacks, HELLO flood attacks. Both mathematical and simulation-based performance evaluation show that the SCODEplus significantly reduces the communication overhead, energy consumption, packet delivery latency while it always delivers more than 97 percent of packets successfully.

  1. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva González-Parada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  2. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Aguilera, Francisco; Sandoval, Francisco; Urdiales, Cristina

    2017-01-09

    Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN) allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i) to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii) to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Wearable Sensor Systems: A Case Study in Moderate-Scale Deployment in Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Ge, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wong, Wai-Choong

    2015-09-25

    A wearable sensor system enables continuous and remote health monitoring and is widely considered as the next generation of healthcare technology. The performance, the packet error rate (PER) in particular, of a wearable sensor system may deteriorate due to a number of factors, particularly the interference from the other wearable sensor systems in the vicinity. We systematically evaluate the performance of the wearable sensor system in terms of PER in the presence of such interference in this paper. The factors that affect the performance of the wearable sensor system, such as density, traffic load, and transmission power in a realistic moderate-scale deployment case in hospital are all considered. Simulation results show that with 20% duty cycle, only 68.5% of data transmission can achieve the targeted reliability requirement (PER is less than 0.05) even in the off-peak period in hospital. We then suggest some interference mitigation schemes based on the performance evaluation results in the case study.

  4. All-Direction Random Routing for Source-Location Privacy Protecting against Parasitic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Zeng, Jiwen

    2017-03-17

    Wireless sensor networks are deployed to monitor the surrounding physical environments and they also act as the physical environments of parasitic sensor networks, whose purpose is analyzing the contextual privacy and obtaining valuable information from the original wireless sensor networks. Recently, contextual privacy issues associated with wireless communication in open spaces have not been thoroughly addressed and one of the most important challenges is protecting the source locations of the valuable packages. In this paper, we design an all-direction random routing algorithm (ARR) for source-location protecting against parasitic sensor networks. For each package, the routing process of ARR is divided into three stages, i.e., selecting a proper agent node, delivering the package to the agent node from the source node, and sending it to the final destination from the agent node. In ARR, the agent nodes are randomly chosen in all directions by the source nodes using only local decisions, rather than knowing the whole topology of the networks. ARR can control the distributions of the routing paths in a very flexible way and it can guarantee that the routing paths with the same source and destination are totally different from each other. Therefore, it is extremely difficult for the parasitic sensor nodes to trace the packages back to the source nodes. Simulation results illustrate that ARR perfectly confuses the parasitic nodes and obviously outperforms traditional routing-based schemes in protecting source-location privacy, with a marginal increase in the communication overhead and energy consumption. In addition, ARR also requires much less energy than the cloud-based source-location privacy protection schemes.

  5. On the Deployment of a Connected Sensor Network for Confident Information Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huping Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Coverage and connectivity are two important performance metrics in wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we study the sensor placement problem to achieve both coverage and connectivity. Instead of using the simplistic disk coverage model, we use our recently proposed confident information coverage model as the sensor coverage model. The grid approach is applied to discretize the sensing field, and our objective is to place the minimum number of sensors to form a connected network and to provide confident information coverage for all of the grid points. We first formulate the sensor placement problem as a constrained optimization problem. Then, two heuristic algorithms, namely the connected cover formation (CCF algorithm and the cover formation and relay placement with redundancy removal (CFRP-RR algorithm, are proposed to find the approximate solutions for the sensor placement problem. The simulation results validate their effectiveness, and the CCF algorithm performs slightly better than the CFRP-RR algorithm.

  6. Building rooftop classification using random forests for large-scale PV deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Dan; Mohajeri, Nahid; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis

    2017-10-01

    Large scale solar Photovoltaic (PV) deployment on existing building rooftops has proven to be one of the most efficient and viable sources of renewable energy in urban areas. As it usually requires a potential analysis over the area of interest, a crucial step is to estimate the geometric characteristics of the building rooftops. In this paper, we introduce a multi-layer machine learning methodology to classify 6 roof types, 9 aspect (azimuth) classes and 5 slope (tilt) classes for all building rooftops in Switzerland, using GIS processing. We train Random Forests (RF), an ensemble learning algorithm, to build the classifiers. We use (2 × 2) [m2 ] LiDAR data (considering buildings and vegetation) to extract several rooftop features, and a generalised footprint polygon data to localize buildings. The roof classifier is trained and tested with 1252 labeled roofs from three different urban areas, namely Baden, Luzern, and Winterthur. The results for roof type classification show an average accuracy of 67%. The aspect and slope classifiers are trained and tested with 11449 labeled roofs in the Zurich periphery area. The results for aspect and slope classification show different accuracies depending on the classes: while some classes are well identified, other under-represented classes remain challenging to detect.

  7. MOFs for the Sensitive Detection of Ammonia: Deployment of fcu-MOF Thin Films as Effective Chemical Capacitive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assen, Ayalew H; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Salama, Khaled N

    2017-09-22

    This work reports on the fabrication and deployment of a select metal-organic framework (MOF) thin film as an advanced chemical capacitive sensor for the sensing/detection of ammonia (NH 3 ) at room temperature. Namely, the MOF thin film sensing layer consists of a rare-earth (RE) MOF (RE-fcu-MOF) deposited on a capacitive interdigitated electrode (IDE). Purposely, the chemically stable naphthalene-based RE-fcu-MOF (NDC-Y-fcu-MOF) was elected and prepared/arranged as a thin film on a prefunctionalized capacitive IDE via the solvothermal growth method. Unlike earlier realizations, the fabricated MOF-based sensor showed a notable detection sensitivity for NH 3 at concentrations down to 1 ppm, with a detection limit appraised to be around 100 ppb (at room temperature) even in the presence of humidity and/or CO 2 . Distinctly, the NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited the required stability to NH 3 , in contrast to other reported MOFs, and a remarkable detection selectivity toward NH 3 vs CH 4 , NO 2 , H 2 , and C 7 H 8 . The NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited excellent performance for sensing ammonia for simulated breathing system in the presence of the mixture of carbon dioxide and/or humidity (water vapor), with no major alteration in the detection signal.

  8. MOFs for the Sensitive Detection of Ammonia: Deployment of fcu-MOF Thin-Films as Effective Chemical Capacitive Sensors.

    KAUST Repository

    Assen, Ayalew Hussen Assen

    2017-08-15

    This work reports on the fabrication and deployment of a select metal-organic framework (MOF) thin film as an advanced chemical capacitive sensor for the sensing/detection of ammonia (NH3) at room temperature. Namely, the MOF thin film sensing layer consists of a rare-earth (RE) MOF (RE-fcu-MOF) deposited on a capacitive interdigitated electrode (IDE). Purposely, the chemically stable naphthalene-based RE-fcu-MOF (NDC-Y-fcu-MOF) was elected and prepared/arranged as a thin film on a pre-functionalized capacitive IDE via the solvothermal growth method. Unlike earlier realizations, the fabricated MOF-based sensor showed a notable detection sensitivity for NH3 at concentrations down to 1 ppm, with a detection limit appraised to be around 100 ppb (at room temperature) even in the presence of humidity and/or CO2. Distinctly, the NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited the required stability to NH3, in contract to other reported MOFs, and a remarkable detection selectivity towards NH3 vs. CH4, NO2, H2 and C7H8. The NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited excellent performance for sensing ammonia for simulated breathing system in the presence of the mixture of carbon dioxide and/or humidity (water vapor), with no major alteration in the detection signal.

  9. Analysis of Wireless Sensor Network Topology and Estimation of Optimal Network Deployment by Deterministic Radio Channel Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Aguirre

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption.

  10. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus...

  11. Miniaturized Sensors for Monitoring of Atmospheric Trace Gases using Multiple Deployment Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Daylight Solutions proposes a miniaturized sensor package based on ECqcLTM and QEPAS technology that were independently developed by Daylight Solutions (San Diego,...

  12. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  13. Remote interrogation of WDM fiber-optic intensity sensors deploying delay lines in the virtual domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, David Sánchez; Vázquez, Carmen

    2013-05-07

    In this work a radio-frequency self-referencing WDM intensity-based fiber-optic sensor operating in reflective configuration and using virtual instrumentation is presented. The use of virtual delay lines at the reception stage, along with novel flexible self-referencing techniques, and using a single frequency, avoids all-optical or electrical-based delay lines approaches. This solution preserves the self-referencing and performance characteristics of the proposed WDM-based optical sensing topology, and leads to a more compact solution with higher flexibility for the multiple interrogation of remote sensing points in a sensor network. Results are presented for a displacement sensor demonstrating the concept feasibility.

  14. Remote Interrogation of WDM Fiber-Optic Intensity Sensors Deploying Delay Lines in the Virtual Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vázquez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work a radio-frequency self-referencing WDM intensity-based fiber-optic sensor operating in reflective configuration and using virtual instrumentation is presented. The use of virtual delay lines at the reception stage, along with novel flexible self-referencing techniques, and using a single frequency, avoids all-optical or electrical-based delay lines approaches. This solution preserves the self-referencing and performance characteristics of the proposed WDM-based optical sensing topology, and leads to a more compact solution with higher flexibility for the multiple interrogation of remote sensing points in a sensor network. Results are presented for a displacement sensor demonstrating the concept feasibility.

  15. Towards a Software Framework to Support Deployment of Low Cost End-to-End Hydroclimatological Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celicourt, P.; Piasecki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Deployment of environmental sensors assemblies based on cheap platforms such as Raspberry Pi and Arduino have gained much attention over the past few years. While they are more attractive due to their ability to be controlled with a few programming language choices, the configuration task can become quite complex due to the need of having to learn several different proprietary data formats and protocols which constitute a bottleneck for the expansion of sensor network. In response to this rising complexity the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has sponsored the development of the IEEE 1451 standard in an attempt to introduce a common standard. The most innovative concept of the standard is the Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS) which enables transducers to self-identify, self-describe, self-calibrate, to exhibit plug-and-play functionality, etc. We used Python to develop an IEEE 1451.0 platform-independent graphical user interface to generate and provide sufficient information about almost ANY sensor and sensor platforms for sensor programming purposes, automatic calibration of sensors data, incorporation of back-end demands on data management in TEDS for automatic standard-based data storage, search and discovery purposes. These features are paramount to make data management much less onerous in large scale sensor network. Along with the TEDS Creator, we developed a tool namely HydroUnits for three specific purposes: encoding of physical units in the TEDS, dimensional analysis, and on-the-fly conversion of time series allowing users to retrieve data in a desired equivalent unit while accommodating unforeseen and user-defined units. In addition, our back-end data management comprises the Python/Django equivalent of the CUAHSI Observations Data Model (ODM) namely DjangODM that will be hosted by a MongoDB Database Server which offers more convenience for our application. We are also developing a data which will be paired with the data

  16. Deployment of Low-Cost, Carbon Dioxide Sensors throughout the Washington Metropolitan Area - The Capital Climate Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Kristen M.; Bailey, D. Michelle; Houston Miller, J.

    2016-04-01

    According to the IPCC from 1995 to 2005, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations increased by 19 ppm, the highest average growth rate recorded for any decade since measurements began in the 1950s. Due to its ability to influence global climate change, it is imperative to continually monitor carbon dioxide emission levels, particularly in urban areas where some estimate in excess of 75% of total greenhouse gas emissions occur. Although high-precision sensors are commercially available, these are not cost effective for mapping a large spatial area. A goal of this research is to build out a network of sensors that are accurate and precise enough to provide a valuable data tool for accessing carbon emissions from a large, urban area. This publically available greenhouse gas dataset can be used in numerous environmental assessments and as validation for remote sensing products. It will also be a valuable teaching tool for classes at our university and will promote further engagement of K-12 students and their teachers through education and outreach activities. Each of our sensors (referred to as "PiOxides") utilizes a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) sensor for the detection of carbon dioxide along with a combination pressure/temperature/humidity sensor. The collection of pressure and temperature increases the accuracy and precision of the CO2 measurement. The sensors communicate using a serial interfaces with a Raspberry Pi microcontroller. Each PiOxide is connected to a website that leverages recent developments in open source GIS tools. In this way, data from individual sensors can be followed individually or aggregated to provide real-time, spatially-resolved data of CO2 trends across a broad area. Our goal for the network is to expand across the entire DC/Maryland/Virginia Region through partnerships with private and public schools. We are also designing GHG Bluetooth beacons that may be accessed by mobile phone users in their vicinity. In two additional

  17. A wireless sensor network deployment for rural and forest fire detection and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Garcia, Miguel; Bri, Diana; Sendra, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Forest and rural fires are one of the main causes of environmental degradation in Mediterranean countries. Existing fire detection systems only focus on detection, but not on the verification of the fire. However, almost all of them are just simulations, and very few implementations can be found. Besides, the systems in the literature lack scalability. In this paper we show all the steps followed to perform the design, research and development of a wireless multisensor network which mixes sensors with IP cameras in a wireless network in order to detect and verify fire in rural and forest areas of Spain. We have studied how many cameras, sensors and access points are needed to cover a rural or forest area, and the scalability of the system. We have developed a multisensor and when it detects a fire, it sends a sensor alarm through the wireless network to a central server. The central server selects the closest wireless cameras to the multisensor, based on a software application, which are rotated to the sensor that raised the alarm, and sends them a message in order to receive real-time images from the zone. The camera lets the fire fighters corroborate the existence of a fire and avoid false alarms. In this paper, we show the test performance given by a test bench formed by four wireless IP cameras in several situations and the energy consumed when they are transmitting. Moreover, we study the energy consumed by each device when the system is set up. The wireless sensor network could be connected to Internet through a gateway and the images of the cameras could be seen from any part of the world.

  18. Deploying 5G-technologies in smart city and smart home wireless sensor networks with interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2015-01-01

    interconnected infrastructure elements, to handle big-data from the smart homes, and to be compatible with existing infrastructures. The considered cognitive radio technology is based on pre-coded OFDM which offers the needed flexibility to deal with the key challenges found in the smart home networks. Thus......Deploying 5G technologies in a combination of smart homes and smart city opens for a new ecosystem with big potentials. The potentials lie in the creation of an advanced ICT infrastructure with support for connected and entangled services possibilities including technologies for efficient...

  19. Foam Sensor Structures Would be Self-Deployable and Survive Hard Landings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Baumgartmer, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A document proposes systems of sensors encased in cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures for exploring remote planets. Lightweight structures that can be compressed for storage and later expanded, then rigidified for use are made from foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs). According to the instant proposal, a CHEM sensor structure would be fabricated at full size from SMP foam at a temperature below its glass-transition temperature (Tg). It would then be heated above Tg and compacted to a small volume, then cooled below Tg and kept below Tg during launch, flight, and landing. At landing, the inelastic yielding of the rigid compacted foam would absorb impact energy, thereby enabling the structure to survive the landing. The structure would then be solar heated above Tg, causing it to revert to its original size and shape. Finally, the structure would be rigidified by cooling it below Tg by the cold planetary or space environment. Besides surviving hard landing, this sensor system will provide a soft, stick-at-the-impact-site landing to access scientifically and commercially interesting sites, including difficult and hard-to-reach areas.

  20. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trček, Denis

    2016-01-02

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other) also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  1. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Trček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  2. Development and deployment of fiber optic highway and bridge monitoring sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, John M.; Udd, Eric; Schulz, Whitten L.; MacMahon, Robert; Soltesz, Steven M.; Laylor, Harold M.

    2000-06-01

    Fiber grating strain sensors offer a means to monitor the health of highways and bridges as well as a means to monitor vehicular traffic patterns and critical data such as speed, weight, and classification of vehicle types. This paper overviews recent results associated with employing very high speed demodulation systems with capabilities in excess of 10 kHz and strain sensitivities on the order of one microstrain. It is clearly shown that this type of system can be used as an effective traffic monitoring tool as well as for health monitoring purposes.

  3. Application of Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks to Achieve Intelligent Microgrids: A Promising Approach towards a Global Smart Grid Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Llaria

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids (SGs constitute the evolution of the traditional electrical grid towards a new paradigm, which should increase the reliability, the security and, at the same time, reduce the costs of energy generation, distribution and consumption. Electrical microgrids (MGs can be considered the first stage of this evolution of the grid, because of the intelligent management techniques that must be applied to assure their correct operation. To accomplish this task, sensors and actuators will be necessary, along with wireless communication technologies to transmit the measured data and the command messages. Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks (WSANs are therefore a promising solution to achieve an intelligent management of MGs and, by extension, the SG. In this frame, this paper surveys several aspects concerning the application of WSANs to manage MGs and the electrical grid, as well as the communication protocols that could be applied. The main concerns regarding the SG deployment are also presented, including future scenarios where the interoperability of different generation technologies must be assured.

  4. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  5. Random Access Performance of Distributed Sensors Attacked by Unknown Jammers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dae-Kyo; Wui, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Dongwoo

    2017-11-18

    In this paper, we model and investigate the random access (RA) performance of sensor nodes (SN) in a wireless sensor network (WSN). In the WSN, a central head sensor (HS) collects the information from distributed SNs, and jammers disturb the information transmission primarily by generating interference. In this paper, two jamming attacks are considered: power and code jamming. Power jammers (if they are friendly jammers) generate noises and, as a result, degrade the quality of the signal from SNs. Power jamming is equally harmful to all the SNs that are accessing HS and simply induces denial of service (DoS) without any need to hack HS or SNs. On the other hand, code jammers mimic legitimate SNs by sending fake signals and thus need to know certain system parameters that are used by the legitimate SNs. As a result of code jamming, HS falsely allocates radio resources to SNs. The code jamming hence increases the failure probability in sending the information messages, as well as misleads the usage of radio resources. In this paper, we present the probabilities of successful preamble transmission with power ramping according to the jammer types and provide the resulting throughput and delay of information transmission by SNs, respectively. The effect of two jamming attacks on the RA performances is compared with numerical investigation. The results show that, compared to RA without jammers, power and code jamming degrade the throughput by up to 30.3% and 40.5%, respectively, while the delay performance by up to 40.1% and 65.6%, respectively.

  6. Random Access Performance of Distributed Sensors Attacked by Unknown Jammers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kyo Jeong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we model and investigate the random access (RA performance of sensor nodes (SN in a wireless sensor network (WSN. In the WSN, a central head sensor (HS collects the information from distributed SNs, and jammers disturb the information transmission primarily by generating interference. In this paper, two jamming attacks are considered: power and code jamming. Power jammers (if they are friendly jammers generate noises and, as a result, degrade the quality of the signal from SNs. Power jamming is equally harmful to all the SNs that are accessing HS and simply induces denial of service (DoS without any need to hack HS or SNs. On the other hand, code jammers mimic legitimate SNs by sending fake signals and thus need to know certain system parameters that are used by the legitimate SNs. As a result of code jamming, HS falsely allocates radio resources to SNs. The code jamming hence increases the failure probability in sending the information messages, as well as misleads the usage of radio resources. In this paper, we present the probabilities of successful preamble transmission with power ramping according to the jammer types and provide the resulting throughput and delay of information transmission by SNs, respectively. The effect of two jamming attacks on the RA performances is compared with numerical investigation. The results show that, compared to RA without jammers, power and code jamming degrade the throughput by up to 30.3% and 40.5%, respectively, while the delay performance by up to 40.1% and 65.6%, respectively.

  7. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF INEXPENSIVE THERMAL SENSORS AND SMALL UAS DEPLOYMENT FOR LIVING HUMAN DETECTION IN RESCUE MISSIONS APPLICATION SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Levin

    2016-06-01

    use SUAVs and small thermal sensors for the human detection scenarios described above. Differences in temperatures were collected by deployed imaging acquisition platform are interpretable on FLIR images visually. Moreover, we applied ENVI image processing functions for calibration and numerical estimations of such a temperature differences. There are more potential system functionalities such as voice messages from rescue teams and even distant medication delivery for the victims of described emergencies. This paper describes experiments, processing results, and future research in more details.

  8. Sensor Nodes Deployment Strategy for Monitoring Roadside Biomass Carbon Stocks of Tourism Destination: A Case of Wulong World Natural Heritage, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1978s, China has experienced one of the highest tourism growth rates in the world, which in turn has driven extensive land-use and land-cover change. The aim of this research is to develop a sensor nodes positioning strategy for detecting land use related dynamics of vegetation carbon stocks of Wulong world natural heritage. Based on the assessment of road networks’ influences on biomass carbon stocks, roadside biomass carbon stocks risk index was proposed as a sensor deployment strategy to identify the optimal positions of the sensors to detect the changes in vegetation carbon stocks. Forest and cropland around the lower levels of roads should be the most important region of sensor nodes deployment strategy. The results generated from this study have the ability to achieve optimal solution of spatial positioning problem with minimum number of sensors in biomass carbon monitoring sensor networks. This analysis appears to have great potential for a wide range of practical applications in tourism industry in China.

  9. A Depth-Adjustment Deployment Algorithm Based on Two-Dimensional Convex Hull and Spanning Tree for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Jun; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Le

    2016-07-14

    Most of the existing node depth-adjustment deployment algorithms for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) just consider how to optimize network coverage and connectivity rate. However, these literatures don't discuss full network connectivity, while optimization of network energy efficiency and network reliability are vital topics for UWSN deployment. Therefore, in this study, a depth-adjustment deployment algorithm based on two-dimensional (2D) convex hull and spanning tree (NDACS) for UWSNs is proposed. First, the proposed algorithm uses the geometric characteristics of a 2D convex hull and empty circle to find the optimal location of a sleep node and activate it, minimizes the network coverage overlaps of the 2D plane, and then increases the coverage rate until the first layer coverage threshold is reached. Second, the sink node acts as a root node of all active nodes on the 2D convex hull and then forms a small spanning tree gradually. Finally, the depth-adjustment strategy based on time marker is used to achieve the three-dimensional overall network deployment. Compared with existing depth-adjustment deployment algorithms, the simulation results show that the NDACS algorithm can maintain full network connectivity with high network coverage rate, as well as improved network average node degree, thus increasing network reliability.

  10. A Depth-Adjustment Deployment Algorithm Based on Two-Dimensional Convex Hull and Spanning Tree for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing node depth-adjustment deployment algorithms for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs just consider how to optimize network coverage and connectivity rate. However, these literatures don’t discuss full network connectivity, while optimization of network energy efficiency and network reliability are vital topics for UWSN deployment. Therefore, in this study, a depth-adjustment deployment algorithm based on two-dimensional (2D convex hull and spanning tree (NDACS for UWSNs is proposed. First, the proposed algorithm uses the geometric characteristics of a 2D convex hull and empty circle to find the optimal location of a sleep node and activate it, minimizes the network coverage overlaps of the 2D plane, and then increases the coverage rate until the first layer coverage threshold is reached. Second, the sink node acts as a root node of all active nodes on the 2D convex hull and then forms a small spanning tree gradually. Finally, the depth-adjustment strategy based on time marker is used to achieve the three-dimensional overall network deployment. Compared with existing depth-adjustment deployment algorithms, the simulation results show that the NDACS algorithm can maintain full network connectivity with high network coverage rate, as well as improved network average node degree, thus increasing network reliability.

  11. Impact of high power interference sources in planning and deployment of wireless sensor networks and devices in the 2.4 GHz frequency band in heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-11-12

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  12. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Falcone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  13. Moored ADCP current data from deployment 2 of the Multi-disciplinary Ocean Sensors for Environmental Analyses and Networks (MOSEAN) project north of Hawaii 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0116094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ADCP data were collected by sensors from seven deployments within 2004-2007 on the HALE-ALOHA mooring, a location about 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. The...

  14. Efficient Graph-Based Resource Allocation Scheme Using Maximal Independent Set for Randomly- Deployed Small Star Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Qingfeng

    2017-11-06

    In future scenarios of heterogeneous and dense networks, randomly-deployed small star networks (SSNs) become a key paradigm, whose system performance is restricted to inter-SSN interference and requires an efficient resource allocation scheme for interference coordination. Traditional resource allocation schemes do not specifically focus on this paradigm and are usually too time consuming in dense networks. In this article, a very efficient graph-based scheme is proposed, which applies the maximal independent set (MIS) concept in graph theory to help divide SSNs into almost interference-free groups. We first construct an interference graph for the system based on a derived distance threshold indicating for any pair of SSNs whether there is intolerable inter-SSN interference or not. Then, SSNs are divided into MISs, and the same resource can be repetitively used by all the SSNs in each MIS. Empirical parameters and equations are set in the scheme to guarantee high performance. Finally, extensive scenarios both dense and nondense are randomly generated and simulated to demonstrate the performance of our scheme, indicating that it outperforms the classical max K-cut-based scheme in terms of system capacity, utility and especially time cost. Its achieved system capacity, utility and fairness can be close to the near-optimal strategy obtained by a time-consuming simulated annealing search.

  15. Sensor and Location data from Ear Tag PTTs Deployed on Polar Bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea 2009 to 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These are data collected from Wildlife Computers ear tag platform transmitter terminals (PTT) deployed on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea during the months...

  16. Numerical Demultiplexing of Color Image Sensor Measurements via Non-linear Random Forest Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Jason; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Cho, Daniel; Clausi, David A; Wong, Alexander

    2016-06-27

    The simultaneous capture of imaging data at multiple wavelengths across the electromagnetic spectrum is highly challenging, requiring complex and costly multispectral image devices. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of simultaneous multispectral imaging using conventional image sensors with color filter arrays via a novel comprehensive framework for numerical demultiplexing of the color image sensor measurements. A numerical forward model characterizing the formation of sensor measurements from light spectra hitting the sensor is constructed based on a comprehensive spectral characterization of the sensor. A numerical demultiplexer is then learned via non-linear random forest modeling based on the forward model. Given the learned numerical demultiplexer, one can then demultiplex simultaneously-acquired measurements made by the color image sensor into reflectance intensities at discrete selectable wavelengths, resulting in a higher resolution reflectance spectrum. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of such a method for the purpose of simultaneous multispectral imaging.

  17. Numerical Demultiplexing of Color Image Sensor Measurements via Non-linear Random Forest Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Jason; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Cho, Daniel; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The simultaneous capture of imaging data at multiple wavelengths across the electromagnetic spectrum is highly challenging, requiring complex and costly multispectral image devices. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of simultaneous multispectral imaging using conventional image sensors with color filter arrays via a novel comprehensive framework for numerical demultiplexing of the color image sensor measurements. A numerical forward model characterizing the formation of sensor measurements from light spectra hitting the sensor is constructed based on a comprehensive spectral characterization of the sensor. A numerical demultiplexer is then learned via non-linear random forest modeling based on the forward model. Given the learned numerical demultiplexer, one can then demultiplex simultaneously-acquired measurements made by the color image sensor into reflectance intensities at discrete selectable wavelengths, resulting in a higher resolution reflectance spectrum. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of such a method for the purpose of simultaneous multispectral imaging.

  18. A machine learning calibration model using random forests to improve sensor performance for lower-cost air quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Presto, Albert A.; Kumar, Sriniwasa P. N.; Gu, Jason; Hauryliuk, Aliaksei; Robinson, Ellis S.; Robinson, Allen L.; Subramanian, R.

    2018-01-01

    Low-cost sensing strategies hold the promise of denser air quality monitoring networks, which could significantly improve our understanding of personal air pollution exposure. Additionally, low-cost air quality sensors could be deployed to areas where limited monitoring exists. However, low-cost sensors are frequently sensitive to environmental conditions and pollutant cross-sensitivities, which have historically been poorly addressed by laboratory calibrations, limiting their utility for monitoring. In this study, we investigated different calibration models for the Real-time Affordable Multi-Pollutant (RAMP) sensor package, which measures CO, NO2, O3, and CO2. We explored three methods: (1) laboratory univariate linear regression, (2) empirical multiple linear regression, and (3) machine-learning-based calibration models using random forests (RF). Calibration models were developed for 16-19 RAMP monitors (varied by pollutant) using training and testing windows spanning August 2016 through February 2017 in Pittsburgh, PA, US. The random forest models matched (CO) or significantly outperformed (NO2, CO2, O3) the other calibration models, and their accuracy and precision were robust over time for testing windows of up to 16 weeks. Following calibration, average mean absolute error on the testing data set from the random forest models was 38 ppb for CO (14 % relative error), 10 ppm for CO2 (2 % relative error), 3.5 ppb for NO2 (29 % relative error), and 3.4 ppb for O3 (15 % relative error), and Pearson r versus the reference monitors exceeded 0.8 for most units. Model performance is explored in detail, including a quantification of model variable importance, accuracy across different concentration ranges, and performance in a range of monitoring contexts including the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and the US EPA Air Sensors Guidebook recommendations of minimum data quality for personal exposure measurement. A key strength of the RF approach is that

  19. Deployment and evaluation of a dual-sensor autofocusing method for on-machine measurement of patterns of small holes on freeform surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Longstaff, Andrew; Fletcher, Simon; Myers, Alan

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents and evaluates an active dual-sensor autofocusing system that combines an optical vision sensor and a tactile probe for autofocusing on arrays of small holes on freeform surfaces. The system has been tested on a two-axis test rig and then integrated onto a three-axis computer numerical control (CNC) milling machine, where the aim is to rapidly and controllably measure the hole position errors while the part is still on the machine. The principle of operation is for the tactile probe to locate the nominal positions of holes, and the optical vision sensor follows to focus and capture the images of the holes. The images are then processed to provide hole position measurement. In this paper, the autofocusing deviations are analyzed. First, the deviations caused by the geometric errors of the axes on which the dual-sensor unit is deployed are estimated to be 11 μm when deployed on a test rig and 7 μm on the CNC machine tool. Subsequently, the autofocusing deviations caused by the interaction of the tactile probe, surface, and small hole are mathematically analyzed and evaluated. The deviations are a result of the tactile probe radius, the curvatures at the positions where small holes are drilled on the freeform surface, and the effect of the position error of the hole on focusing. An example case study is provided for the measurement of a pattern of small holes on an elliptical cylinder on the two machines. The absolute sum of the autofocusing deviations is 118 μm on the test rig and 144 μm on the machine tool. This is much less than the 500 μm depth of field of the optical microscope. Therefore, the method is capable of capturing a group of clear images of the small holes on this workpiece for either implementation.

  20. Rich: Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head Selection and Node Deployment Strategy in Concentric-based WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment, sensor nodes are scattered randomly in the sensing field. Hence, the coverage can not be guaranteed. In contrast, the coverage of uniformly deployment is in general larger than the random deployment. However, uniformly deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. In this situation, larger load may be imposed to CHs (cluster heads around the sink. Therefore, CHs close to the sink use up their energy earlier than those farther away from the sink. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel node deployment strategy in the concentric model, namely, Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head selection and node deployment strategy (called Rich. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed Rich scheme. The simulation results show that the proposed Rich alleviates the unbalanced traffic pattern significantly, prolongs network lifetime and achieves satisfactory coverage ratio.

  1. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  2. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusheng Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI. In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG, forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI and a congestion game with capacity (CGC. For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE. Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  3. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  4. Global Positioning System surveys of storm-surge sensors deployed during Hurricane Ike, Seadrift, Texas, to Lake Charles, Louisiana, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jason; Woodward, Brenda K.; Storm, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey installed a network of pressure sensors at 65 sites along the Gulf Coast from Seadrift, Texas, northeast to Lake Charles, Louisiana, to record the timing, areal extent, and magnitude of inland storm surge and coastal flooding caused by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. A Global Positioning System was used to obtain elevations of reference marks near each sensor. A combination of real-time kinematic (RTK) and static Global Positioning System surveys were done to obtain elevations of reference marks. Leveling relative to reference marks was done to obtain elevations of sensor orifices above the reference marks. This report summarizes the Global Positioning System data collected and processed to obtain reference mark and storm-sensor-orifice elevations for 59 storm-surge sensors recovered from the original 65 installed as a necessary prelude to computation of storm-surge elevations. National Geodetic Survey benchmarks were used for RTK surveying. Where National Geodetic Survey benchmarks were not within 12 kilometers of a sensor site, static surveying was done. Additional control points for static surveying were in the form of newly established benchmarks or reestablished existing benchmarks. RTK surveying was used to obtain positions and elevations of reference marks for 29 sensor sites. Static surveying was used to obtain positions and elevations of reference marks for 34 sensor sites; four sites were surveyed using both methods. Multiple quality checks on the RTK-survey and static-survey data were applied. The results of all quality checks indicate that the desired elevation accuracy for the surveys of this report, less than 0.1-meter error, was achieved.

  5. Node Self-Deployment Algorithm Based on an Uneven Cluster with Radius Adjusting for Underwater Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Xu, Yiming; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-14

    Existing move-restricted node self-deployment algorithms are based on a fixed node communication radius, evaluate the performance based on network coverage or the connectivity rate and do not consider the number of nodes near the sink node and the energy consumption distribution of the network topology, thereby degrading network reliability and the energy consumption balance. Therefore, we propose a distributed underwater node self-deployment algorithm. First, each node begins the uneven clustering based on the distance on the water surface. Each cluster head node selects its next-hop node to synchronously construct a connected path to the sink node. Second, the cluster head node adjusts its depth while maintaining the layout formed by the uneven clustering and then adjusts the positions of in-cluster nodes. The algorithm originally considers the network reliability and energy consumption balance during node deployment and considers the coverage redundancy rate of all positions that a node may reach during the node position adjustment. Simulation results show, compared to the connected dominating set (CDS) based depth computation algorithm, that the proposed algorithm can increase the number of the nodes near the sink node and improve network reliability while guaranteeing the network connectivity rate. Moreover, it can balance energy consumption during network operation, further improve network coverage rate and reduce energy consumption.

  6. Node Self-Deployment Algorithm Based on an Uneven Cluster with Radius Adjusting for Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing move-restricted node self-deployment algorithms are based on a fixed node communication radius, evaluate the performance based on network coverage or the connectivity rate and do not consider the number of nodes near the sink node and the energy consumption distribution of the network topology, thereby degrading network reliability and the energy consumption balance. Therefore, we propose a distributed underwater node self-deployment algorithm. First, each node begins the uneven clustering based on the distance on the water surface. Each cluster head node selects its next-hop node to synchronously construct a connected path to the sink node. Second, the cluster head node adjusts its depth while maintaining the layout formed by the uneven clustering and then adjusts the positions of in-cluster nodes. The algorithm originally considers the network reliability and energy consumption balance during node deployment and considers the coverage redundancy rate of all positions that a node may reach during the node position adjustment. Simulation results show, compared to the connected dominating set (CDS based depth computation algorithm, that the proposed algorithm can increase the number of the nodes near the sink node and improve network reliability while guaranteeing the network connectivity rate. Moreover, it can balance energy consumption during network operation, further improve network coverage rate and reduce energy consumption.

  7. Clustering algorithm in initialization of multi-hop wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Peng; Tao, Jiang; Zhang, Kui; Chen, Hsiao-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    In most application scenarios of wireless sensor networks (WSN), sensor nodes are usually deployed randomly and do not have any knowledge about the network environment or even their ID's at the initial stage of their operations. In this paper, we address the clustering problems with a newly deployed

  8. Spouse READI (Resilience Education and Deployment Information): Randomized Clinical Trial Formerly Reintegration: The Role of Spouse Telephone BATTLEMIND Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    health (Green, Nurius & Lester, 2013). Deployment effects on the military spouse include increased loneliness , anxiety, depression, sleep disorders...families. Military Behavioral Health, 1(1), 31-40. MacDermid Wadsworth, SM. Family risk and resilience in the context of war and terrorism. (2010...Hazle et al., 2012). Deployment effects on the military spouse include increased loneliness , anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, adjustment

  9. Fully-distributed randomized cooperation in wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2015-01-07

    When marrying randomized distributed space-time coding (RDSTC) to geographical routing, new performance horizons can be created. In order to reach those horizons however, routing protocols must evolve to operate in a fully distributed fashion. In this letter, we expose a technique to construct a fully distributed geographical routing scheme in conjunction with RDSTC. We then demonstrate the performance gains of this novel scheme by comparing it to one of the prominent classical schemes.

  10. A Model for Field Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) within the Domain of Microclimate Habitat Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) represent a class of miniaturized information systems designed to monitor physical environments. These smart monitoring systems form collaborative networks utilizing autonomous sensing, data-collection, and processing to provide real-time analytics of observed environments. As a fundamental research area in…

  11. Selecting Optimal Parameters of Random Linear Network Coding for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Zhang, Qi; Fitzek, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This work studies how to select optimal code parameters of Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). With Rateless Deluge [1] the authors proposed to apply Network Coding (NC) for Over-the-Air Programming (OAP) in WSNs, and demonstrated that with NC a significant...

  12. Kalman Filtering for Discrete Stochastic Systems with Multiplicative Noises and Random Two-Step Sensor Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the optimal Kalman filtering problem for a class of discrete stochastic systems with multiplicative noises and random two-step sensor delays. Three Bernoulli distributed random variables with known conditional probabilities are introduced to characterize the phenomena of the random two-step sensor delays which may happen during the data transmission. By using the state augmentation approach and innovation analysis technique, an optimal Kalman filter is constructed for the augmented system in the sense of the minimum mean square error (MMSE. Subsequently, the optimal Kalman filtering is derived for corresponding augmented system in initial instants. Finally, a simulation example is provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed filtering method.

  13. Performance of wireless sensor networks under random node failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Pan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-28

    Networks are essential to the function of a modern society and the consequence of damages to a network can be large. Assessing network performance of a damaged network is an important step in network recovery and network design. Connectivity, distance between nodes, and alternative routes are some of the key indicators to network performance. In this paper, random geometric graph (RGG) is used with two types of node failure, uniform failure and localized failure. Since the network performance are multi-facet and assessment can be time constrained, we introduce four measures, which can be computed in polynomial time, to estimate performance of damaged RGG. Simulation experiments are conducted to investigate the deterioration of networks through a period of time. With the empirical results, the performance measures are analyzed and compared to provide understanding of different failure scenarios in a RGG.

  14. Distributed parallel cooperative coevolutionary multi-objective large-scale immune algorithm for deployment of wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bin; Zhao, Jianwei; Yang, Po

    2018-01-01

    -objective evolutionary algorithms the Cooperative Coevolutionary Generalized Differential Evolution 3, the Cooperative Multi-objective Differential Evolution and the Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm III, the proposed algorithm addresses the deployment optimization problem efficiently and effectively.......Using immune algorithms is generally a time-intensive process especially for problems with a large number of variables. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel cooperative coevolutionary multi-objective large-scale immune algorithm that is implemented using the message passing interface...... (MPI). The proposed algorithm is composed of three layers: objective, group and individual layers. First, for each objective in the multi-objective problem to be addressed, a subpopulation is used for optimization, and an archive population is used to optimize all the objectives. Second, the large...

  15. Deployable antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  16. Posthole Sensor Performance in the USArray Transportable Array - Results from Testing and Initial Deployments in Alaska and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, A.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Sauter, A.; Woodward, R.

    2014-12-01

    To prepare for the deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and adjacent Canada over the next several years, IRIS has evaluated different strategies for emplacing posthole seismometers. The goal of this work has been to maintain or enhance a TA station's noise performance while reducing the weight and logistical considerations required for its installation. Motivating this research are developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in this region, where many potential sites are located on frost-fractured outcrops or underlain by permafrost, in either case only accessible by helicopter. Current emplacement methods use a portable rig to auger or hammer-drill a hole 2.5-5 meters deep, in unconsolidated materials and permafrost, or by diamond bit coring 1-3 meters into rock. These emplacements are used at new TA installations and upgrades to existing AK network stations, and we compare their performance to the lower-48 TA vault installations. Through July 2014 there are eight TA and six upgraded AK stations operating under USArray; including five since at least October 2012, providing a detailed record of seasonal and/or site-specific behavior. We also discuss testing of different downhole configurations for 13 stations deployed at Piñon Flat Observatory in California since April 2014. Station performance is presented and compared using probability density functions summed from hourly power spectral density calculations. These are computed for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded on each seismic channel. Our results show that the noise performance of seismometers in Alaska with cased- or core- hole installations sometimes exceeds that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly for the horizontal channels at long periods. We analyze and discuss the performance of example stations, comparing to other nearby seismometers. We also examine the performance of AK

  17. Validation of a portable, deployable system for continuous vital sign monitoring using a multiparametric wearable sensor and personalised analytics in an Ebola treatment centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhubl, Steven R; Feye, Dawit; Levine, Adam C; Conkright, Chad; Wegerich, Stephan W; Conkright, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The recent Ebola epidemic in West Africa strained existing healthcare systems well beyond their capacities due to the extreme volume and severity of illness of the patients. The implementation of innovative digital technologies within available care centres could potentially improve patient care as well as healthcare worker safety and effectiveness. We developed a Modular Wireless Patient Monitoring System (MWPMS) and conducted a proof of concept study in an Ebola treatment centre (ETC) in Makeni, Sierra Leone. The system was built around a wireless, multiparametric 'band-aid' patch sensor for continuous vital sign monitoring and transmission, plus sophisticated data analytics. Results were used to develop personalised analytics to support automated alerting of early changes in patient status. During the 3-week study period, all eligible patients (n=26) admitted to the ETC were enrolled in the study, generating a total of 1838 hours of continuous vital sign data (mean of 67.8 hours/patient), including heart rate, heart rate variability, activity, respiratory rate, pulse transit time (inversely related to blood pressure), uncalibrated skin temperature and posture. All patients tolerated the patch sensor without problems. Manually determined and automated vital signs were well correlated. Algorithm-generated Multivariate Change Index, pulse transit time and arrhythmia burden demonstrated encouraging preliminary findings of important physiological changes, as did ECG waveform changes. In this proof of concept study, we were able to demonstrate that a portable, deployable system for continuous vital sign monitoring via a wireless, wearable sensor supported by a sophisticated, personalised analytics platform can provide high-acuity monitoring with a continuous, objective measure of physiological status of all patients that is achievable in virtually any healthcare setting, anywhere in the world.

  18. Feasibility of Deploying Inhaler Sensors to Identify the Impacts of Environmental Triggers and Built Environment Factors on Asthma Short-Acting Bronchodilator Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jason G; Barrett, Meredith A; Henderson, Kelly; Humblet, Olivier; Smith, Ted; Sublett, James W; Nesbitt, LaQuandra; Hogg, Chris; Van Sickle, David; Sublett, James L

    2017-02-01

    Epidemiological asthma research has relied upon self-reported symptoms or healthcare utilization data, and used the residential address as the primary location for exposure. These data sources can be temporally limited, spatially aggregated, subjective, and burdensome for the patient to collect. First, we aimed to test the feasibility of collecting rescue inhaler use data in space-time using electronic sensors. Second, we aimed to evaluate whether these data have the potential to identify environmental triggers and built environment factors associated with rescue inhaler use and to determine whether these findings would be consistent with the existing literature. We utilized zero-truncated negative binomial models to identify triggers associated with inhaler use, and implemented three sensitivity analyses to validate our findings. Electronic sensors fitted on metered dose inhalers tracked 5,660 rescue inhaler use events in space and time for 140 participants from 13 June 2012 to 28 February 2014. We found that the inhaler sensors were feasible in passively collecting objective rescue inhaler use data. We identified several environmental triggers with a positive and significant association with inhaler use, including: AQI, PM10, weed pollen, and mold. Conversely, the spatial distribution of tree cover demonstrated a negative and significant association with inhaler use. Utilizing a sensor to capture the signal of rescue inhaler use in space-time offered a passive and objective signal of asthma activity. This approach enabled detailed analyses to identify environmental triggers and built environment factors that are associated with asthma symptoms beyond the residential address. The application of these new technologies has the potential to improve our surveillance and understanding of asthma. Citation: Su JG, Barrett MA, Henderson K, Humblet O, Smith T, Sublett JW, Nesbitt L, Hogg C, Van Sickle D, Sublett JL. 2017. Feasibility of deploying inhaler sensors to

  19. No Effect of Insecticide Treated Curtain Deployment on Aedes Infestation in a Cluster Randomized Trial in a Setting of Low Dengue Transmission in Guantanamo, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Isora; Montada, Domingo; Baly, Alberto; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Methodology The current study evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Insecticide Treated Curtain (ITC) deployment for reducing dengue vector infestation levels in the Cuban context with intensive routine control activities. A cluster randomized controlled trial took place in Guantanamo city, east Cuba. Twelve neighborhoods (about 500 households each) were selected among the ones with the highest Aedes infestation levels in the previous two years, and were randomly allocated to the intervention and control arms. Long lasting ITC (PermaNet) were distributed in the intervention clusters in March 2009. Routine control activities were continued in the whole study area. In both study arms, we monitored monthly pre- and post-intervention House Index (HI, number of houses with at least 1 container with Aedes immature stages/100 houses inspected), during 12 and 18 months respectively. We evaluated the effect of ITC deployment on HI by fitting a generalized linear regression model with a negative binomial link function to these data. Principal Findings At distribution, the ITC coverage (% of households using ≥1 ITC) reached 98.4%, with a median of 3 ITC distributed/household. After 18 months, the coverage remained 97.4%. The local Aedes species was susceptible to deltamethrin (mosquito mortality rate of 99.7%) and the residual deltamethrin activity in the ITC was within acceptable levels (mosquito mortality rate of 73.1%) after one year of curtain use. Over the 18 month observation period after ITC distribution, the adjusted HI rate ratio, intervention versus control clusters, was 1.15 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.34). The annualized cost per household of ITC implementation was 3.8 USD, against 16.8 USD for all routine ACP activities. Conclusion Deployment of ITC in a setting with already intensive routine Aedes control actions does not lead to reductions in Aedes infestation levels. PMID:25794192

  20. A random walk evolution model of wireless sensor networks and virus spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, considering both cluster heads and sensor nodes, we propose a novel evolving a network model based on a random walk to study the fault tolerance decrease of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) due to node failure, and discuss the spreading dynamic behavior of viruses in the evolution model. A theoretical analysis shows that the WSN generated by such an evolution model not only has a strong fault tolerance, but also can dynamically balance the energy loss of the entire network. It is also found that although the increase of the density of cluster heads in the network reduces the network efficiency, it can effectively inhibit the spread of viruses. In addition, the heterogeneity of the network improves the network efficiency and enhances the virus prevalence. We confirm all the theoretical results with sufficient numerical simulations.

  1. Dark Current Random Telegraph Signals in Solid-State Image Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Virmontois, Cédric; Goiffon, Vincent; Mark S Robbins; Tauziède, Laurie; Geoffray, Hervé; Raine, Mélanie; Girard, Sylvain; Gilard, Olivier; Magnan, Pierre; Bardoux, Alain

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Dark Current-Random Telegraph Signal (DC-RTS) in solid-state image sensors. The DCRTS is investigated in several bulk materials, for different surface interfaces and for different trench isolation interfaces. The main parameter used to characterize the DC-RTS is the transition maximum amplitude which seems to be the most appropriate for studying the phenomenon and identifying its origin. Proton, neutron and Co-60 Gamma-ray irradiations are used to study DC-RTS induce...

  2. Throughput Analysis of Fading Sensor Networks with Regular and Random Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaowen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present closed-form expressions of the average link throughput for sensor networks with a slotted ALOHA MAC protocol in Rayleigh fading channels. We compare networks with three regular topologies in terms of throughput, transmit efficiency, and transport capacity. In particular, for square lattice networks, we present a sensitivity analysis of the maximum throughput and the optimum transmit probability with respect to the signal-to-interference ratio threshold. For random networks with nodes distributed according to a two-dimensional Poisson point process, the average throughput is analytically characterized and numerically evaluated. It turns out that although regular networks have an only slightly higher average link throughput than random networks for the same link distance, regular topologies have a significant benefit when the end-to-end throughput in multihop connections is considered.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance Temperature Sensor Based on Photonic Crystal Fibers Randomly Filled with Silver Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Luan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a temperature sensor design based on surface plasmon resonances (SPRs supported by filling the holes of a six-hole photonic crystal fiber (PCF with a silver nanowire. A liquid mixture (ethanol and chloroform with a large thermo-optic coefficient is filled into the PCF holes as sensing medium. The filled silver nanowires can support resonance peaks and the peak will shift when temperature variations induce changes in the refractive indices of the mixture. By measuring the peak shift, the temperature change can be detected. The resonance peak is extremely sensitive to temperature because the refractive index of the filled mixture is close to that of the PCF material. Our numerical results indicate that a temperature sensitivity as high as 4 nm/K can be achieved and that the most sensitive range of the sensor can be tuned by changing the volume ratios of ethanol and chloroform. Moreover, the maximal sensitivity is relatively stable with random filled nanowires, which will be very convenient for the sensor fabrication.

  4. Harvesting Entropy for Random Number Generation for Internet of Things Constrained Devices Using On-Board Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Marcin Piotr; Jara, Antonio; Ogorzalek, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Entropy in computer security is associated with the unpredictability of a source of randomness. The random source with high entropy tends to achieve a uniform distribution of random values. Random number generators are one of the most important building blocks of cryptosystems. In constrained devices of the Internet of Things ecosystem, high entropy random number generators are hard to achieve due to hardware limitations. For the purpose of the random number generation in constrained devices, this work proposes a solution based on the least-significant bits concatenation entropy harvesting method. As a potential source of entropy, on-board integrated sensors (i.e., temperature, humidity and two different light sensors) have been analyzed. Additionally, the costs (i.e., time and memory consumption) of the presented approach have been measured. The results obtained from the proposed method with statistical fine tuning achieved a Shannon entropy of around 7.9 bits per byte of data for temperature and humidity sensors. The results showed that sensor-based random number generators are a valuable source of entropy with very small RAM and Flash memory requirements for constrained devices of the Internet of Things. PMID:26506357

  5. Harvesting entropy for random number generation for internet of things constrained devices using on-board sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Marcin Piotr; Jara, Antonio; Ogorzalek, Maciej

    2015-10-22

    Entropy in computer security is associated with the unpredictability of a source of randomness. The random source with high entropy tends to achieve a uniform distribution of random values. Random number generators are one of the most important building blocks of cryptosystems. In constrained devices of the Internet of Things ecosystem, high entropy random number generators are hard to achieve due to hardware limitations. For the purpose of the random number generation in constrained devices, this work proposes a solution based on the least-significant bits concatenation entropy harvesting method. As a potential source of entropy, on-board integrated sensors (i.e., temperature, humidity and two different light sensors) have been analyzed. Additionally, the costs (i.e., time and memory consumption) of the presented approach have been measured. The results obtained from the proposed method with statistical fine tuning achieved a Shannon entropy of around 7.9 bits per byte of data for temperature and humidity sensors. The results showed that sensor-based random number generators are a valuable source of entropy with very small RAM and Flash memory requirements for constrained devices of the Internet of Things.

  6. Harvesting Entropy for Random Number Generation for Internet of Things Constrained Devices Using On-Board Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Piotr Pawlowski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Entropy in computer security is associated with the unpredictability of a source of randomness. The random source with high entropy tends to achieve a uniform distribution of random values. Random number generators are one of the most important building blocks of cryptosystems. In constrained devices of the Internet of Things ecosystem, high entropy random number generators are hard to achieve due to hardware limitations. For the purpose of the random number generation in constrained devices, this work proposes a solution based on the least-significant bits concatenation entropy harvesting method. As a potential source of entropy, on-board integrated sensors (i.e., temperature, humidity and two different light sensors have been analyzed. Additionally, the costs (i.e., time and memory consumption of the presented approach have been measured. The results obtained from the proposed method with statistical fine tuning achieved a Shannon entropy of around 7.9 bits per byte of data for temperature and humidity sensors. The results showed that sensor-based random number generators are a valuable source of entropy with very small RAM and Flash memory requirements for constrained devices of the Internet of Things.

  7. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  8. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  9. Near-surface temperature and salinity stratification as observed with dual-sensor Lagrangian drifters deployed during SPURS-2 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Denis; Dong, Shenfu; Goni, Gustavo; Lumpkin, Rick; Foltz, Greg

    2017-04-01

    Despite the importance of sea surface salinity (SSS) as an indicator of the hydrological cycle, many details of air-sea interaction responsible for freshwater fluxes and processes determining the near-surface salinity stratification and its variability are still poorly understood. This is primarily due to the lack of dedicated observations. The advent of satellites capable of monitoring SSS, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), Aquarius, and Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) missions, has greatly advanced our knowledge of SSS distribution and variability. However, the spatial resolution of satellite retrievals is too coarse to study the upper-ocean salinity changes due to patchy and transient rain events. Furthermore, the satellites measure salinity within the upper 1 cm skin layer, which can significantly differ from in situ SSS measured at 5 m depth by most Argo floats. Differences between the Aquarius and Argo SSS can be as large as ±0.5 psu. In order to study the near-surface salinity structure in great detail and to link the satellite observations of SSS with all the oceanic and atmospheric processes that control its variability, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has initiated two field campaigns within the framework of Salinity Processes in the Upper-Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) project (http://spurs.jpl.nasa.gov/). The first campaign, SPURS-1, took place in the evaporation-dominated subtropical North Atlantic Ocean in 2012-2013. The second campaign, SPURS-2, focused on a 3×3° domain in the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the eastern equatorial Pacific (123.5-126.5°W and 8.5-11.5°N), where the near-surface salinity is strongly dominated by precipitation. The first SPURS-2 cruise took place in Aug-Sep 2016 on board the R/V Roger Revelle, during which a complex multi-instrument oceanographic survey was conducted. As part of this field campaign, we deployed 6 dual-sensor Lagrangian drifters, specifically designed

  10. Sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjea, Supriyo; Thurston, J.; Kininmonth, S.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the details of a sensor network that is currently being deployed at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The sensor network allows scientists to retrieve sensor data that has a high spatial and temporal resolution. We give an overview of the energy-efficient data aggregation

  11. PUFKEY: A High-Security and High-Throughput Hardware True Random Number Generator for Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfang Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Random number generators (RNG play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks.

  12. PUFKEY: a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator for sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongfang; Lu, Zhaojun; Zou, Xuecheng; Liu, Zhenglin

    2015-10-16

    Random number generators (RNG) play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF) elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST) randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks.

  13. Sign language recognition with the Kinect sensor based on conditional random fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Deok

    2014-12-24

    Sign language is a visual language used by deaf people. One difficulty of sign language recognition is that sign instances of vary in both motion and shape in three-dimensional (3D) space. In this research, we use 3D depth information from hand motions, generated from Microsoft's Kinect sensor and apply a hierarchical conditional random field (CRF) that recognizes hand signs from the hand motions. The proposed method uses a hierarchical CRF to detect candidate segments of signs using hand motions, and then a BoostMap embedding method to verify the hand shapes of the segmented signs. Experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could recognize signs from signed sentence data at a rate of 90.4%.

  14. Sign Language Recognition with the Kinect Sensor Based on Conditional Random Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Deok Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sign language is a visual language used by deaf people. One difficulty of sign language recognition is that sign instances of vary in both motion and shape in three-dimensional (3D space. In this research, we use 3D depth information from hand motions, generated from Microsoft’s Kinect sensor and apply a hierarchical conditional random field (CRF that recognizes hand signs from the hand motions. The proposed method uses a hierarchical CRF to detect candidate segments of signs using hand motions, and then a BoostMap embedding method to verify the hand shapes of the segmented signs. Experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could recognize signs from signed sentence data at a rate of 90.4%.

  15. Deployment psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abel

    breaking fashion, brings into a single compendium the growing body of literatures, since Yerkes's work, which point to the ... [they] reflect on how they have changed”.3 From the outset of this text, there is a very real and palpable sense .... embedded and enmeshed. At times, Deployment psychology appears to ignore the.

  16. Denning Behavior Classifications Using Temperature Sensor Data on Collars Deployed on Polar Bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea, 1986-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data include two spreadsheets. The first is average daily temperatures received via satellite transmitting collars deployed on polar bears in the southern...

  17. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    environment. Zero shift errors  Part replacement after testing  Material damage, including damage to composite fibers and plastic deformation in...of motors or deployment drivers  Loss or redistribution of lubrication Hysteresis errors  Material creep due to time in storage and time in the...measurements can be made with fixed references within the room. The first solution is self -explanatory. The second solution requires regular reference

  18. AWARE: Platform for Autonomous self-deploying and operation of Wireless sensor-actuator networks cooperating with unmanned AeRial vehiclEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollero, Anibal; Bernard, Markus; La Civita, Marco; van Hoesel, L.F.W.; Marron, Pedro J.; Lepley, Jason; de Andres, Eduardo

    This paper presents the AWARE platform that seeks to enable the cooperation of autonomous aerial vehicles with ground wireless sensor-actuator networks comprising both static and mobile nodes carried by vehicles or people. Particularly, the paper presents the middleware, the wireless sensor network,

  19. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  20. A Robust on-Demand Path-Key Establishment Framework via Random Key Predistribution for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Weili

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secure communication is a necessity for some wireless sensor network (WSN applications. However, the resource constraints of a sensor render existing cryptographic systems for traditional network systems impractical for a WSN. Random key predistribution scheme has been proposed to overcome these limits. In this scheme, a ring of keys is randomly drawn from a large key pool and assigned to a sensor. Nodes sharing common keys can communicate securely using a shared key, while a path-key is established for those nodes that do not share any common keys. This scheme requires moderate memory and processing power, thus it is considered suitable for WSN applications. However, since the shared key is not exclusively owned by the two end entities, the established path-key may be revealed to other nodes just by eavesdropping. Based on the random-key predistribution scheme, we present a framework that utilizes multiple proxies to secure the path-key establishment. Our scheme is resilient against node capture, collusive attack, and random dropping, while only incurring a small amount of overhead. Furthermore, the scheme ensures that, with high probability, all path-keys are exclusively known by the two end nodes involved in the communication along the path.

  1. Performance of a class of multi-robot deploy and search strategies based on centroidal voronoi configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, K. R.; Ghose, Debasish

    2013-04-01

    This article considers a class of deploy and search strategies for multi-robot systems and evaluates their performance. The application framework used is deployment of a system of autonomous mobile robots equipped with required sensors in a search space to gather information. The lack of information about the search space is modelled as an uncertainty density distribution. The agents are deployed to maximise single-step search effectiveness. The centroidal Voronoi configuration, which achieves a locally optimal deployment, forms the basis for sequential deploy and search (SDS) and combined deploy and search (CDS) strategies. Completeness results are provided for both search strategies. The deployment strategy is analysed in the presence of constraints on robot speed and limit on sensor range for the convergence of trajectories with corresponding control laws responsible for the motion of robots. SDS and CDS strategies are compared with standard greedy and random search strategies on the basis of time taken to achieve reduction in the uncertainty density below a desired level. The simulation experiments reveal several important issues related to the dependence of the relative performances of the search strategies on parameters such as the number of robots, speed of robots and their sensor range limits.

  2. Numerical Demultiplexing of Color Image Sensor Measurements via Non-linear Random Forest Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Deglint; Farnoud Kazemzadeh; Daniel Cho; Clausi, David A.; Alexander Wong

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous capture of imaging data at multiple wavelengths across the electromagnetic spectrum is highly challenging, requiring complex and costly multispectral image devices. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of simultaneous multispectral imaging using conventional image sensors with color filter arrays via a novel comprehensive framework for numerical demultiplexing of the color image sensor measurements. A numerical forward model characterizing the formation of sensor mea...

  3. SENSE IT: Teaching STEM Principles to Middle and High School Students through the Design, Construction and Deployment of Water Quality Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, Liesl; Lowes, Susan; Stolkin, Rustam; Lin, Peiyi; Bonner, James; Kirkey, William; Ojo, Temitope

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and impact of an NSF-funded ITEST project designed to enrich science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education using educational modules that teach students to construct, program, and test a series of sensors used to monitor water quality. During the two years of the SENSE IT project, over 30…

  4. Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks with Probabilistic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao

    2016-01-01

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has attracted considerable attention. Conventional research on this topic focuses on the 0/1 coverage model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we study the target coverage problem, where the objective is to find the least number of sensor nodes in randomly-deployed WSNs based on the probabilistic sensing model. We analyze the joint detection probability of target with multiple sensors. Based on the theoretical analysis of the detection probability, we formulate the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem. We prove that the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem is NP-hard and present an approximation algorithm called the Probabilistic Sensor Coverage Algorithm (PSCA) with provable approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of PSCA theoretically and also perform extensive simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27618902

  5. A Survey of Sensor Network Security

    OpenAIRE

    Vaseashta, A.; S. VASEASHTA

    2008-01-01

    Sensor networks deploy sensor nodes to detect and monitor environmental events and interactions. Existing sensor networks focus on communication within the bounds of resource restrained sensor nodes at the expense of security. In this paper, a review of sensor network components, architectures, algorithms and protocols aims to increase awareness of sensor network limitations and resulting strategies to ensure information security within wireless sensor networks. Because sensor networks deploy...

  6. Bioinspired evolutionary algorithm based for improving network coverage in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mohammadjavad; Bin Abd Latiff, Muhammad Shafie; Chizari, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) include sensor nodes in which each node is able to monitor the physical area and send collected information to the base station for further analysis. The important key of WSNs is detection and coverage of target area which is provided by random deployment. This paper reviews and addresses various area detection and coverage problems in sensor network. This paper organizes many scenarios for applying sensor node movement for improving network coverage based on bioinspired evolutionary algorithm and explains the concern and objective of controlling sensor node coverage. We discuss area coverage and target detection model by evolutionary algorithm.

  7. HIGH: A Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping Approach in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy, sensor nodes are scattered randomly or uniformly in the sensing field, respectively. Hence, the coverage ratio cannot be guaranteed. The coverage ratio of uniform deployment, in general, is larger than that of the random deployment strategy. However, a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Therefore, cluster heads (CHs around the sink have larger loads than those farther away from the sink. That is, CHs close to the sink exhaust their energy earlier. In order to overcome the above problem, we propose a Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping approacH in WSNs (called HIGH. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed HIGH scheme. The simulation results validate our theoretical analysis and show that the proposed HIGH scheme achieves a satisfactory coverage ratio, balances the energy consumption among sensor nodes, and extends network lifetime significantly.

  8. Random Matrix Theoretic Approaches to Sensor Fusion for Sensing and Surveillance in Highly Cluttered Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Squared Error (MSE) tracking performance for direction of arrival estimation in the presence of noise and missing data; see Fig. 5. 6) We have...scatter in random directions, thereby hindering its passage. As the thickness of a slab of highly scattering random medium increases, this effect

  9. Random Forest-Based Recognition of Isolated Sign Language Subwords Using Data from Accelerometers and Surface Electromyographic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruiliang; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-14

    Sign language recognition (SLR) has been widely used for communication amongst the hearing-impaired and non-verbal community. This paper proposes an accurate and robust SLR framework using an improved decision tree as the base classifier of random forests. This framework was used to recognize Chinese sign language subwords using recordings from a pair of portable devices worn on both arms consisting of accelerometers (ACC) and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors. The experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed random forest-based method for recognition of Chinese sign language (CSL) subwords. With the proposed method, 98.25% average accuracy was obtained for the classification of a list of 121 frequently used CSL subwords. Moreover, the random forests method demonstrated a superior performance in resisting the impact of bad training samples. When the proportion of bad samples in the training set reached 50%, the recognition error rate of the random forest-based method was only 10.67%, while that of a single decision tree adopted in our previous work was almost 27.5%. Our study offers a practical way of realizing a robust and wearable EMG-ACC-based SLR systems.

  10. Random Forest Classification of Wetland Landcovers from Multi-Sensor Data in the Arid Region of Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohong Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The wetland classification from remotely sensed data is usually difficult due to the extensive seasonal vegetation dynamics and hydrological fluctuation. This study presents a random forest classification approach for the retrieval of the wetland landcover in the arid regions by fusing the Pléiade-1B data with multi-date Landsat-8 data. The segmentation of the Pléiade-1B multispectral image data was performed based on an object-oriented approach, and the geometric and spectral features were extracted for the segmented image objects. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI series data were also calculated from the multi-date Landsat-8 data, reflecting vegetation phenological changes in its growth cycle. The feature set extracted from the two sensors data was optimized and employed to create the random forest model for the classification of the wetland landcovers in the Ertix River in northern Xinjiang, China. Comparison with other classification methods such as support vector machine and artificial neural network classifiers indicates that the random forest classifier can achieve accurate classification with an overall accuracy of 93% and the Kappa coefficient of 0.92. The classification accuracy of the farming lands and water bodies that have distinct boundaries with the surrounding land covers was improved 5%–10% by making use of the property of geometric shapes. To remove the difficulty in the classification that was caused by the similar spectral features of the vegetation covers, the phenological difference and the textural information of co-occurrence gray matrix were incorporated into the classification, and the main wetland vegetation covers in the study area were derived from the two sensors data. The inclusion of phenological information in the classification enables the classification errors being reduced down, and the overall accuracy was improved approximately 10%. The results show that the proposed random forest

  11. Random Walker Coverage Analysis for Information Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Skiadopoulos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing technological progress in electronics provides network nodes with new and enhanced capabilities that allow the revisit of the traditional information dissemination (and collection problem. The probabilistic nature of information dissemination using random walkers is exploited here to deal with challenges imposed by unconventional modern environments. In such systems, node operation is not deterministic (e.g., does not depend only on network nodes’ battery, but it rather depends on the particulars of the ambient environment (e.g., in the case of energy harvesting: sunshine, wind. The mechanism of information dissemination using one random walker is studied and analyzed in this paper under a different and novel perspective. In particular, it takes into account the stochastic nature of random walks, enabling further understanding of network coverage. A novel and original analysis is presented, which reveals the evolution network coverage by a random walker with respect to time. The derived analytical results reveal certain additional interesting aspects regarding network coverage, thus shedding more light on the random walker mechanism. Further analytical results, regarding the walker’s spatial movement and its associated neighborhood, are also confirmed through experimentation. Finally, simulation results considering random geometric graph topologies, which are suitable for modeling mobile environments, support and confirm the analytical findings.

  12. Optimization of the Coverage and Accuracy of an Indoor Positioning System with a Variable Number of Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Perez, Francisco; Lazaro-Galilea, Jose Luis; Bravo, Ignacio; Gardel, Alfredo; Rodriguez, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on optimal sensor deployment for indoor localization with a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Our goal is to obtain an algorithm to deploy sensors taking the number of sensors, accuracy and coverage into account. Contrary to most works in the literature, we consider the presence of obstacles in the region of interest (ROI) that can cause occlusions between the target and some sensors. In addition, we aim to obtain all of the Pareto optimal solutions regarding the number of sensors, coverage and accuracy. To deal with a variable number of sensors, we add speciation and structural mutations to the well-known non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). Speciation allows one to keep the evolution of sensor sets under control and to apply genetic operators to them so that they compete with other sets of the same size. We show some case studies of the sensor placement of an infrared range-difference indoor positioning system with a fairly complex model of the error of the measurements. The results obtained by our algorithm are compared to sensor placement patterns obtained with random deployment to highlight the relevance of using such a deployment algorithm. PMID:27338414

  13. Optimization of the Coverage and Accuracy of an Indoor Positioning System with a Variable Number of Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Perez, Francisco; Lazaro-Galilea, Jose Luis; Bravo, Ignacio; Gardel, Alfredo; Rodriguez, David

    2016-06-22

    This paper focuses on optimal sensor deployment for indoor localization with a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Our goal is to obtain an algorithm to deploy sensors taking the number of sensors, accuracy and coverage into account. Contrary to most works in the literature, we consider the presence of obstacles in the region of interest (ROI) that can cause occlusions between the target and some sensors. In addition, we aim to obtain all of the Pareto optimal solutions regarding the number of sensors, coverage and accuracy. To deal with a variable number of sensors, we add speciation and structural mutations to the well-known non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). Speciation allows one to keep the evolution of sensor sets under control and to apply genetic operators to them so that they compete with other sets of the same size. We show some case studies of the sensor placement of an infrared range-difference indoor positioning system with a fairly complex model of the error of the measurements. The results obtained by our algorithm are compared to sensor placement patterns obtained with random deployment to highlight the relevance of using such a deployment algorithm.

  14. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  15. Big Deployables in Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Bruce; Francis, William; Goff, Jonathan; Cross, Michael; Copel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The concept of utilizing small satellites to perform big mission objectives has grown from a distant idea to a demonstrated reality. One of the challenges in using small-satellite platforms for high-value missions is the packaging of long and large surface-area devices such as antennae, solar arrays and sensor positioning booms. One possible enabling technology is the slit-tube, or a deployable “tape-measure” boom which can be flattened and rolled into a coil achieving a high volumetric packa...

  16. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Nørgaard, K.; Bruttomesso, D.; Mathieu, C.; Frid, A.; Dayan, C. M.; Diem, P.; Fermon, C.; Wentholt, I. M. E.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes. In this investigator-initiated multi-centre trial (the Eurythmics Trial) in eight outpatient centres in Europe, we randomized 83 patients with

  17. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  18. NOC Liverpool Unit 117 Glider deployment report for the DEFRA MAREMAP Project, April - May 2012 deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document summarises the extended deployment of a 200 metre depth rated Slocum Electric glider by the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, UK from the 2nd April to 17th May 2012. The deployment was aimed as a pilot study for the use of gliders by environment agencies to monitor marine conservation zones. Lithium expendable batteries were used inside the glider to provide an extended endurance. The glider had a series of science sensors installed to measure physical oceanographic and b...

  19. Novel Heat Flow Probe Design and Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel method for deploying heat flow sensors/heaters in a hole and also a novel approach to subsurface access using a percussive method. The...

  20. Clinical Efficacy of Two Different Methods to Initiate Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pumps: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Moreno-Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze clinical effect of a novel approach to initiate sensor-augmented insulin pumps in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM patients through early real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM initiation. Methods. A 26-week pilot study with T1DM subjects randomized (1 : 1 to start RT-CGM three weeks before continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM pre-CSII or adding RT-CGM three weeks after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM post-CSII. Results. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a mean age of 36.6 yr. (range 19–59 yr. and T1DM duration of 16.8±10.6 yr. Higher adherence in CGM pre-CSII patients was confirmed at study end (84.6±11.1% versus 64.0±25.4%; P=0.01. The two intervention groups had similar HbA1c reduction at study end of −0.6% (P=0.9. Hypoglycemic event frequency reduction was observed from baseline to study end only in CGM pre-CSII group (mean difference in change, −6.3%; 95% confidence interval, −12.0 to −0.5; P=0.04. Moreover, no severe hypoglycemia was detected among CGM pre-CSII subjects during the study follow-up (0.0±0.0 events versus 0.63±1.0 events; P=0.03. CGM pre-CSII patients showed better satisfaction than CGM post-CSII patients at the end of the study (27.3±9.3 versus 32.9±7.2; P=0.04. Conclusions. CGM pre-CSII is a novel approach to improve glycemic control and satisfaction in type 1 diabetes sensor-augmented pump treated patients.

  1. Localization with a Mobile Beacon in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB. The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node’s location and then the node’s location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  2. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  3. Adaptive reconfigurable distributed sensor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akey, Mark L.

    1997-07-01

    The infancy of unattended ground based sensors is quickly coming to an end with the arrival of on-board GPS, networking, and multiple sensing capabilities. Unfortunately, their use is only first-order at best: GPS assists with sensor report registration; networks push sensor reports back to the warfighter and forwards control information to the sensors; multispectral sensing is a preset, pre-deployment consideration; and the scalability of large sensor networks is questionable. Current architectures provide little synergy among or within the sensors either before or after deployment, and do not map well to the tactical user's organizational structures and constraints. A new distributed sensor architecture is defined which moves well beyond single sensor, single task architectures. Advantages include: (1) automatic mapping of tactical direction to multiple sensors' tasks; (2) decentralized, distributed management of sensor resources and tasks; (3) software reconfiguration of deployed sensors; (4) network scalability and flexibility to meet the constraints of tactical deployments, and traditional combat organizations and hierarchies; and (5) adaptability to new battlefield communication paradigms such as BADD (Battlefield Analysis and Data Dissemination). The architecture is supported in two areas: a recursive, structural definition of resource configuration and management via loose associations; and a hybridization of intelligent software agents with tele- programming capabilities. The distributed sensor architecture is examined within the context of air-deployed ground sensors with acoustic, communication direction finding, and infra-red capabilities. Advantages and disadvantages of the architecture are examined. Consideration is given to extended sensor life (up to 6 months), post-deployment sensor reconfiguration, limited on- board sensor resources (processor and memory), and bandwidth. It is shown that technical tasking of the sensor suite can be automatically

  4. Deployment Strategies and Clustering Protocols Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chérif Diallo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks face significant design challenges due to limited computing and storage capacities and, most importantly, dependence on limited battery power. Energy is a critical resource and is often an important issue to the deployment of sensor applications that claim to be omnipresent in the world of future. Thus optimizing the deployment of sensors becomes a major constraint in the design and implementation of a WSN in order to ensure better network operations. In wireless networking, clustering techniques add scalability, reduce the computation complexity of routing protocols, allow data aggregation and then enhance the network performance. The well-known MaxMin clustering algorithm was previously generalized, corrected and validated. Then, in a previous work we have improved MaxMin by proposing a Single- node Cluster Reduction (SNCR mechanism which eliminates single-node clusters and then improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we show that MaxMin, because of its original pathological case, does not support the grid deployment topology, which is frequently used in WSN architectures. The unreliability feature of the wireless links could have negative impacts on Link Quality Indicator (LQI based clustering protocols. So, in the second part of this paper we show how our distributed Link Quality based d- Clustering Protocol (LQI-DCP has good performance in both stable and high unreliable link environments. Finally, performance evaluation results also show that LQI-DCP fully supports the grid deployment topology and is more energy efficient than MaxMin.

  5. Glidersonde, a Meteorological Optical Profiling Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "Glidersonde"is a UAV-deployed environmental sensor suite that is air-deployed and glides into denied or hazardous areas including volcanoes or nuclear...

  6. Deployment and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deployed parent returns, individual counseling and/or family counseling may help. Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org: Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Helping Children Adjust to a Move A Message to ...

  7. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  8. Treadmill training with tilt sensor functional electrical stimulation for improving balance, gait, and muscle architecture of tibialis anterior of survivors with chronic stroke: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dal-Yeon; Lee, Hwang-Jae; Lee, Gyu-Chang; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-01-01

    Gait training is important for stroke rehabilitation, such as using the treadmill training with functional electrical stimulation (FES). This study was to investigate the effects of the treadmill training with tilt sensor FES on the balance, gait, and muscle architecture of the tibialis anterior in stroke survivors. The study was a randomized controlled trial. Thirty-four stroke survivors were recruited and screened eligibility criteria. Thirty-two participants were randomly allocated to two groups using random allocation software: Treadmill training with Tilt Sensor FES (TTSF) group (n= 16) and Treadmill training with Placebo Tilt Sensor FES (TPTSF) group (n= 16). TTSF group performed gait training on treadmill with tilt sensor FES, and TPTSF group performed gait training on treadmill with placebo tilt sensor FES. Two participants were dropped during this study, and 30 participants were included at post-test. Balance and gait were measured using the timed up and go (TUG) test, berg balance scale (BBS), and 10 m walk test (10 mWT). Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the muscle architecture of the tibialis anterior. After intervention, there were significant improvements in the TUG, BBS, and 10 mWT compared to baseline in both groups (p< 0.05). At follow-up, the TUG, BBS, 10 mWT, and muscle architecture of tibialis anterior on the paretic side showed significant improvements in the TTSF group compared to TPTSF group (p< 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that TTSF can be an effective intervention for improving balance, gait ability, and muscle architecture of tibialis anterior of stroke survivors.

  9. Selectivity of Chemoresistive Sensors Made of Chemically Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Random Networks for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Feller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different grades of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT have been processed by spraying layer-by-layer (sLbL to obtain an array of chemoresistive transducers for volatile organic compound (VOC detection. The sLbL process led to random networks of CNT less conductive, but more sensitive to vapors than filtration under vacuum (bucky papers. Shorter CNT were also found to be more sensitive due to the less entangled and more easily disconnectable conducting networks they are making. Chemical functionalization of the CNT’ surface is changing their selectivity towards VOC, which makes it possible to easily discriminate methanol, chloroform and tetrahydrofuran (THF from toluene vapors after the assembly of CNT transducers into an array to make an e-nose. Interestingly, the amplitude of the CNT transducers’ responses can be enhanced by a factor of five (methanol to 100 (chloroform by dispersing them into a polymer matrix, such as poly(styrene (PS, poly(carbonate (PC or poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. COOH functionalization of CNT was found to penalize their dispersion in polymers and to decrease the sensors’ sensitivity. The resulting conductive polymer nanocomposites (CPCs not only allow for a more easy tuning of the sensors’ selectivity by changing the chemical nature of the matrix, but they also allow them to adjust their sensitivity by changing the average gap between CNT (acting on quantum tunneling in the CNT network. Quantum resistive sensors (QRSs appear promising for environmental monitoring and anticipated disease diagnostics that are both based on VOC analysis.

  10. Minimizing the Energy Consumption in ‎Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Saad Talib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy in Wireless Sensor networks (WSNs represents an essential factor in designing, controlling and operating the sensor networks. Minimizing the consumed energy in WSNs application is a crucial issue for the network effectiveness and efficiency in terms of lifetime, cost and operation. Number of algorithms and protocols were proposed and implemented to decrease the energy consumption. WSNs operate with battery powered sensors. Sensors batteries have not easily rechargeable even though having restricted power. Frequently the network failure occurs due to the sensors energy insufficiency. MAC protocols in WSNs achieved low duty-cycle by employing periodic sleep and wakeup. Predictive Wakeup MAC (PW-MAC protocol was made use of the asynchronous duty cycling. It reduces the consumption of the node energy by allowing the senders to predict the receiver′s wakeup times. The WSN must be applied in an efficient manner to utilize the sensor nodes and their energy to ensure efficient network throughput. Prediction of the WSN lifetime previously to its installation represents a significant concern. To ensure energy efficiency the sensors duty cycles must be adjusted appropriately to meet the network traffic demands. The energy consumed in each node due to its switching between the active and the idle states were also estimated. The sensors are assumed to be randomly deployed. This paper aims to improve the randomly deployed network lifetime by scheduling the effects of transmission, reception and sleep states on the sensor node energy consumption. Results for these states with many performance metrics were also studied and discussed

  11. Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil is a proposed technology that will be designed and tested to provide a greatly superior parachute precision delivery system...

  12. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  13. Inflatable Wing Deployment Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight experiment conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Wing deployment time is typically on the order of a third of a second, almost faster than the human eye can see. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  14. An analytic Study of the Key Factors In uencing the Design and Routing Techniques of a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Bahuguna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network contains various nodes having certain sensing, processing and communication capabilities. Actually they are multifunctional battery operated nodes called motes. These motes are small in size and battery constrained. They are operated by a power source. A wireless sensor network consists of a huge number of tiny sensor nodes which are deployed either randomly or according to some predefined distribution. The sensors nodes in a sensor network are cooperative among themselves having self-organizing ability. This ensures that a wireless network serves a wide variety of applications. Few of them are weather monitoring, health, security and military etc. As their applications are wide, this requires that sensors in a sensor network must play their role very efficiently. But, as discussed above, the sensor nodes have energy limitation. This limitation leads failure of nodes after certain round of communication. So, a sensor network suffers with sensors having energy limitations. Beside this, sensor nodes in a sensor network must fulfill connectivity and coverage requirements. In this paper, we have discussed various issues affecting the design of a wireless sensor network. This provides the readers various research issues in designing a wireless sensor network.

  15. A Two-Phase Coverage-Enhancing Algorithm for Hybrid Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing field coverage is a key task in many sensor network applications. In certain scenarios, the sensor field may have coverage holes due to random initial deployment of sensors; thus, the desired level of coverage cannot be achieved. A hybrid wireless sensor network is a cost-effective solution to this problem, which is achieved by repositioning a portion of the mobile sensors in the network to meet the network coverage requirement. This paper investigates how to redeploy mobile sensor nodes to improve network coverage in hybrid wireless sensor networks. We propose a two-phase coverage-enhancing algorithm for hybrid wireless sensor networks. In phase one, we use a differential evolution algorithm to compute the candidate’s target positions in the mobile sensor nodes that could potentially improve coverage. In the second phase, we use an optimization scheme on the candidate’s target positions calculated from phase one to reduce the accumulated potential moving distance of mobile sensors, such that the exact mobile sensor nodes that need to be moved as well as their final target positions can be determined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm provided significant improvement in terms of area coverage rate, average moving distance, area coverage–distance rate and the number of moved mobile sensors, when compare with other approaches.

  16. A Two-Phase Coverage-Enhancing Algorithm for Hybrid Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingguo; Fok, Mable P

    2017-01-09

    Providing field coverage is a key task in many sensor network applications. In certain scenarios, the sensor field may have coverage holes due to random initial deployment of sensors; thus, the desired level of coverage cannot be achieved. A hybrid wireless sensor network is a cost-effective solution to this problem, which is achieved by repositioning a portion of the mobile sensors in the network to meet the network coverage requirement. This paper investigates how to redeploy mobile sensor nodes to improve network coverage in hybrid wireless sensor networks. We propose a two-phase coverage-enhancing algorithm for hybrid wireless sensor networks. In phase one, we use a differential evolution algorithm to compute the candidate's target positions in the mobile sensor nodes that could potentially improve coverage. In the second phase, we use an optimization scheme on the candidate's target positions calculated from phase one to reduce the accumulated potential moving distance of mobile sensors, such that the exact mobile sensor nodes that need to be moved as well as their final target positions can be determined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm provided significant improvement in terms of area coverage rate, average moving distance, area coverage-distance rate and the number of moved mobile sensors, when compare with other approaches.

  17. The Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationships the psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family members child and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic) military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions). This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. PMID:28845345

  18. A Sensor Management Tool for Use with NASA World Wind Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The number of sensors that are deployed continues to increase for scientific, commercial and intelligence related applications. Quantities of sensor data are...

  19. A Sensor Management Tool for Use with NASA World Wind Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Information about the world and its local environments is becoming increasingly available due to the development and deployment of sensors. Deployed sensors include...

  20. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  1. Deploying OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Pepple, Ken

    2011-01-01

    OpenStack was created with the audacious goal of being the ubiquitous software choice for building public and private cloud infrastructures. In just over a year, it's become the most talked-about project in open source. This concise book introduces OpenStack's general design and primary software components in detail, and shows you how to start using it to build cloud infrastructures. If you're a developer, technologist, or system administrator familiar with cloud offerings such as Rackspace Cloud or Amazon Web Services, Deploying OpenStack shows you how to obtain and deploy OpenStack softwar

  2. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  3. Wireless Sensor Technologies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in the design and applications of wirelessly networked and embedded sensors. Wireless sensor nodes are typically low-cost, low-power, small devices equipped with limited sensing, data processing and wireless communication capabilities, as well as power supplies. They leverage the concept of wireless sensor networks (WSNs, in which a large (possibly huge number of collaborative sensor nodes could be deployed. As an outcome of the convergence of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology, wireless communications, and digital electronics, WSNs represent a significant improvement over traditional sensors. In fact, the rapid evolution of WSN technology has accelerated the development and deployment of various novel types of wireless sensors, e.g., multimedia sensors. Fulfilling Moore’s law, wireless sensors are becoming smaller and cheaper, and at the same time more powerful and ubiquitous. [...

  4. NOC turbulence glider deployment report for the OSMOSIS Project

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.; McLaughlin, D.

    2011-01-01

    This document summarises the three deployments of the NOC Liverpool Teledyne Webb Research Slocum glider fitted with an external Rockland Scientific International micro-Rider turbulence probe during September 2011. The general aim of these glider deployments was to generate underwater turbulence and glider based CTD measurements for comparison with other sensor systems. This information will be used for evaluation of the performance of other measurement systems that are required for the Ocean...

  5. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Rifaximin for the Prevention of Travelers’ Diarrhea in US Military Personnel Deployed to lncirlik Air Base, lncirlik, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    military personnel on deployment for prevention of TD with supportive future studies that consider deployment length, settings, and operational situations...populations, management of dysentery, persistent and chronic diarrhea, and other diar- rhea issues will be addressed in future articles. If the above...management-from poorly focused empiricism to fluid therapy and modem pharmacotherapy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2007; 25: 759~9. 38. Tribble DR, Baqar S

  6. Deployed Analyst Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    request ............................93 Figure 34. CAA Operations Analysis Division SharePoint Site...................................................98...organization assistance—maintains a SharePoint site (focused on current operations) on Non-secure Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET) to...facilitate deployed ORSA operations and analytical reachback support. Vision. The CAA OA Division Current Operations Team SharePoint site identifies

  7. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  8. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  9. Three-Dimensional Sensor Common Operating Picture (3-D Sensor COP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Picture (3-D Sensor COP). To test the 3-D Sensor COP, we took advantage of a sensor network that had been deployed for the Enterprise Challenge 2016 at... app .............9 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Fusion3D is a software application for...took advantage of a sensor network that had been deployed for the Enterprise Challenge 2016 (EC16) at Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The

  10. Deployment Pulmonary Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    respiratory pathogens. 114-117 Due to the use of improvised explosive devices and mines in OEF/OIF, Service members are also at risk for blast...121. Litz BT, Keane TM, Fisher L, Marx B, Monacol V. Physical health complaints in combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: A preliminary report... devices (e.g., thermo luminescent dosimeter) as required by occupational specialty of personnel. X X Draw pre-deployment serum specimens. X

  11. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Deployable tensegrity towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  13. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  14. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  15. ALIS deployment in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motoyuki; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    Dual sensor is one of the most promising sensors for humanitarian demining operations. Conventional landmine detection depends on highly trained and focused human operators manually sweeping 1m2 plots with a metal detector and listening for characteristic audio signals indicating the presence of AP (Anti-personnel) landmines. In order to reduce the time of plodding detected objects, metal detectors need to be combined with a complimentary subsurface imaging sensor. i.e., GPR(Ground Penetrating Radar). The demining application requires real-time imaging results with centimetre resolution in a highly portable package. We are currently testing a dual sensor ALIS which is a real-time sensor tracking system based on a CCD camera and image processing. In this paper we introduce ALIS systems which we have developed for detection of buried antipersonnel mines and small size explosives. The performance of ALIS has been tested in Cambodia since 2009. More than 80 anti-personnel mines have been detected and removed from local agricultural area. ALIS has cleared more than 70,000 m2 area and returned it to local farmers.

  16. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    PhD program in Clinical Psychology . 6.2-6.4: Nothing to Report 7. PARTICIPANTS & OTHER COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS Personnel Role Person...randomized clinical trial with a sample of 150 Active Duty families who are within 6 months of deployment. Families will be randomized to receive the...develop Strong Parents Self-Care manual (for comparison arm), (4) obtain regulatory approvals for randomized clinical trial, (5) launch randomized

  17. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  18. Unmasking the Effect of Analgesics on Endodontic Diagnosis Using a Novel Bite Force Sensor Device: A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishnani, Sushil; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Bhardwaj, Anuj; Dubey, Sandeep; Saha, Mainak; Kala, Shubham; Jain, Sohini; Narwani, Shweta

    2016-10-01

    A definitive diagnosis is of primary importance before initiating any endodontic treatment; yet, there are occasions when the dental professional is unable to accurately reproduce the patient's chief complaint, as it can pose a dilemma and may require consideration of multiple variables in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. So to overcome this problem, a methodical approach in providing endodontic treatment should be implemented which includes diagnosis, definitive dental treatment and adjunctive drug therapy, known as the "3D" strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible "masking" effect of these analgesics on endodontic diagnosis using a novel bite force sensor device. A total of 90 patients with endodontic pain were selected and they were given either a placebo or 400 mg ibuprofen (brufen) or 50mg diclofenac sodium (voveron). Both patients and operators were completely blinded to the drugs administered. Bite force tolerance values were noted before and one hour after administration of medication using the self designed bite force sensor. The pre- and post-bite force tolerance values were tabulated for both contralateral and affected tooth. For the affected tooth, there was statistically significant difference between pre- and post-bite force tolerance values in Group I (i.e., ibuprofen) and Group II (i.e., diclofenac sodium) (p<0.05) with no significant difference observed in Group III (placebo). The easily available over the counter self administered analgesics in addition to providing symptomatic relief to patients suffering from symptomatic apical periodontitis may also cloud the definitive diagnosis of the clinician, thus jeopardising the treatment plan. The self designed bite force sensor was effective in arriving at a definitive diagnosis in teeth with chronic irreversible pulpitis with symptomatic apical periodontitis, where the allodynia has been camouflaged by the use of analgesics like ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium.

  19. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  20. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  1. Multi-Sensor Approach for the Monitoring of Halitosis Treatment via Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)-Containing Lozenges--A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Tecco, Simona; Santonico, Marco; Vernile, Chiara; Ciciarelli, Daniele; Tarantino, Ester; Marzo, Giuseppe; Pennazza, Giorgio

    2015-08-10

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate whether a recently described multi-sensor approach called BIONOTE(®) is accurate enough to verify the efficacy of treatment of patients with halitosis. A treatment with Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)-containing lozenges, compared with placebo was tested. The BIONOTE(®) was compared with traditional techniques used to detect halitosis: OralChroma™ and two calibrated odor judges enrolled for the organoleptic assessments. Twenty patients (10 treated and 10 placebo), suffering from active phase halitosis were included in the study. Treatment consisted of Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)-containing lozenges or placebo, 4 tablets/day for 14 days. t0 was before the beginning of the study; t1 was day 7 and t2 was day 14. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed through: (1) Rosenberg score; (2) Winkel tongue coating index (WTCI) anterior and posterior; (2) OralChroma™; (3) the new developed multi-sensor approach, called BIONOTE(®) (test technique). Only the WTCI anterior revealed statistically significant changes between t0 and t2 data (p = 0.014) in the treated group. Except for the WTCI anterior, all diagnostic methods revealed the lack of effectiveness for halitosis of a 14-days treatment with Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)-containing lozenges. The BIONOTE(®) multisensor system seems accurate in addition to OralChroma™ to assess the initial condition of halitosis and its mitigation during treatment.

  2. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  3. Optimal Control of a Surge-Mode WEC in Random Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertok, Allan [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Ceberio, Olivier [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Staby, Bill [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Previsic, Mirko [Re Vision Consulting, Sacramento, CA (United States); Scruggs, Jeffrey [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Van de Ven, James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The objective of this project was to develop one or more real-time feedback and feed-forward (MPC) control algorithms for an Oscillating Surge Wave Converter (OSWC) developed by RME called SurgeWEC™ that leverages recent innovations in wave energy converter (WEC) control theory to maximize power production in random wave environments. The control algorithms synthesized innovations in dynamic programming and nonlinear wave dynamics using anticipatory wave sensors and localized sensor measurements; e.g. position and velocity of the WEC Power Take Off (PTO), with predictive wave forecasting data. The result was an advanced control system that uses feedback or feed-forward data from an array of sensor channels comprised of both localized and deployed sensors fused into a single decision process that optimally compensates for uncertainties in the system dynamics, wave forecasts, and sensor measurement errors.

  4. Improving Temporal Coverage of an Energy-Efficient Data Extraction Algorithm for Environmental Monitoring Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo Chatterjea

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Collecting raw data from a wireless sensor network for environmental monitoring applications can be a difficult task due to the high energy consumption involved. This is especially difficult when the application requires specialized sensors that have very high energy consumption, e.g. hydrological sensors for monitoring marine environments. This paper introduces a technique for reducing energy consumption by minimizing sensor sampling operations. In addition, we illustrate how a randomized algorithm can be used to improve temporal coverage such that the time between the occurrence of an event and its detection can be minimized. We evaluate our approach using real data collected from a sensor network deployment on the Great Barrier Reef.

  5. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  6. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  7. Hole Detection for Quantifying Connectivity in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Antil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to random deployment, environmental factors, dynamic topology, and external attacks, emergence of holes in wireless sensor networks is inescapable. Hole is an area in sensor network around which sensors cease to sense or communicate due to drainage of battery or any fault, either temporary or permanent. Holes impair sensing and communication functions of network; thus their identification is a major concern. This paper discusses different types of holes and significance of hole detection in wireless sensor networks. Coverage hole detection schemes have been classified into three categories based on the type of information used by algorithms, computation model, and network dynamics for better understanding. Then, relative strengths and shortcomings of some of the existing coverage hole detection algorithms are discussed. The paper is concluded by highlighting various future research directions.

  8. Efficiency Evaluation of Strategies for Dynamic Management of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Verônica González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and evaluates dynamic management strategies to improve efficiency in event-triggered wireless sensor networks. We are considering mobility, where nodes move themselves to maximize the coverage, and load balancing state-of-the-art techniques, by which the number of nodes sensing the same area is reduced. To explore mobility, we present a simple method by which nodes can dynamically reorganize themselves based on the force fields approach of mobile robotics. Firstly, the strategies are evaluated separately through experiments with different network configurations and, afterwards, a joint evaluation has been conducted to observe the impact of mobility on the efficiency of load balancing techniques. We show that mobile nodes significantly contribute to keeping the coverage as nodes die in mesh and powerfully improving it in random deployments. Load balancing techniques achieve important results, increasing lifetime and the number of sensed events. However, in random deployments, these techniques lose efficiency and become unsuitable strategies. Combining these strategies with mobility, we observe that PS-based technique keeps its contribution in mesh and random deployments, as well as improving its performance for not so dense networks. Ant-based technique when combined with mobile nodes loses performance significantly in mesh and keeps its good performance in random deployed and less dense networks.

  9. A Realistic Coverage Model with Backup Set Computation for Wireless Video Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay S Ukani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Video Sensor Network (WVSN are gaining increasing popularity due availability of low cost CMOS camera and miniaturization of hardware. For many applications it is difficult to have pre-engineered deployment of video camera sensors which leads to redundancy. Due to sectored coverage and random deployment, it becomes challenging to model video sensor coverage to identify redundancy and suppress redundant video transmission. Several efforts have been made to model coverage redundancy considering 2-dimensional coverage. Field of View (FoV of the camera sensor is in 3-dimensions, thus it is very difficult to model the coverage and identify overlap area for realistic camera. 3-dimensional coverage is largely an unexplored problem. In this paper, a realistic 3-dimensional pyramid camera coverage is assumed and backup set of nodes are computed. Backup set of a node is a set of video sensor nodes which collectively covers coverage area of the node under consideration. The approach presented in the paper identifies minimal sized set of backup nodes which can be used to adaptively duty cycle the video capture and transmission. The result shows that number of nodes required to remain active to cover the sensor field is reduced and in turn average energy consumption of the network also reduces.

  10. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  11. Urban Code/ Urban Code Deploy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — COTS databases to support the automation of application deployments through different environments. It keeps track of software deliverables at various stages of SDLC...

  12. 2-Sensor Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Segal

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ad-hoc networks of sensor nodes are in general semi-permanently deployed. However, the topology of such networks continuously changes over time, due to the power of some sensors wearing out to new sensors being inserted into the network, or even due to designers moving sensors around during a network re-design phase (for example, in response to a change in the requirements of the network. In this paper, we address the problem of covering a given path by a limited number of sensors — in our case to two, and show its relation to the well-studied matrix multiplication problem.

  13. Sleep Deprivation Attack Detection in Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattasali, Tapalina; Chaki, Rituparna; Sanyal, Sugata

    2012-02-01

    Deployment of sensor network in hostile environment makes it mainly vulnerable to battery drainage attacks because it is impossible to recharge or replace the battery power of sensor nodes. Among different types of security threats, low power sensor nodes are immensely affected by the attacks which cause random drainage of the energy level of sensors, leading to death of the nodes. The most dangerous type of attack in this category is sleep deprivation, where target of the intruder is to maximize the power consumption of sensor nodes, so that their lifetime is minimized. Most of the existing works on sleep deprivation attack detection involve a lot of overhead, leading to poor throughput. The need of the day is to design a model for detecting intrusions accurately in an energy efficient manner. This paper proposes a hierarchical framework based on distributed collaborative mechanism for detecting sleep deprivation torture in wireless sensor network efficiently. Proposed model uses anomaly detection technique in two steps to reduce the probability of false intrusion.

  14. Embedded sensor systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dharma Prakash

    2017-01-01

    This inspiring textbook provides an introduction to wireless technologies for sensors, explores potential use of sensors for numerous applications, and utilizes probability theory and mathematical methods as a means of embedding sensors in system design. It discusses the need for synchronization and underlying limitations, inter-relation between given coverage and connectivity to number of sensors needed, and the use of geometrical distance to determine location of the base station for data collection and explore use of anchor nodes for relative position determination of sensors. The book explores energy conservation, communication using TCP, the need for clustering and data aggregation, and residual energy determination and energy harvesting. It covers key topics of sensor communication like mobile base stations and relay nodes, delay-tolerant sensor networks, and remote sensing and possible applications. The book defines routing methods and do performance evaluation for random and regular sensor topology an...

  15. After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools: 1-Year Outcomes of an Evidence-Based Parenting Program for Military Families Following Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Zamir, Osnat

    2017-09-15

    Despite significant stressors facing military families over the past 15 years of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, no parenting programs adapted or developed for military families with school-aged children have been rigorously tested. We present outcome data from the first randomized controlled trial of a behavioral parent training program for families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. In the present study, 336 primarily National Guard and Reserve families with 4-12-year-old children were recruited from a Midwestern state. At least one parent in each family had deployed to the recent conflicts: Operations Iraqi or Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND). Families were randomized to a group-based parenting program (After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT)) or web and print resources-as-usual. Using a social interaction learning framework, we hypothesized an indirect effects model: that the intervention would improve parenting, which, in turn, would be associated with improvements in child outcomes. Applying intent-to-treat analyses, we examined the program's effect on observed parenting, and children's adjustment at 12-months post baseline. Controlling for demographic (marital status, length, child gender), deployment variables (number of deployments), and baseline values, families randomized to the ADAPT intervention showed significantly improved observed parenting compared to those in the comparison group. Observed parenting, in turn, was associated with significant improvements in child adjustment. These findings present the first evidence for the effectiveness of a parenting program for deployed military families with school-aged children.

  16. Deploying the Mental Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing and an “illumination direction” (for the shading. Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

  17. Mechanisms for Prolonging Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinying

    2010-01-01

    Sensors are used to monitor and control the physical environment. A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is composed of a large number of sensor nodes that are densely deployed either inside the phenomenon or very close to it [18][5]. Sensor nodes measure various parameters of the environment and transmit data collected to one or more sinks, using…

  18. Underwater Sensor Nodes and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lloret

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensor technology has matured enough to be used in any type of environment. The appearance of new physical sensors has increased the range of environmental parameters for gathering data. Because of the huge amount of unexploited resources in the ocean environment, there is a need of new research in the field of sensors and sensor networks. This special issue is focused on collecting recent advances on underwater sensors and underwater sensor networks in order to measure, monitor, surveillance of and control of underwater environments. On the one hand, from the sensor node perspective, we will see works related with the deployment of physical sensors, development of sensor nodes and transceivers for sensor nodes, sensor measurement analysis and several issues such as layer 1 and 2 protocols for underwater communication and sensor localization and positioning systems. On the other hand, from the sensor network perspective, we will see several architectures and protocols for underwater environments and analysis concerning sensor network measurements. Both sides will provide us a complete view of last scientific advances in this research field.

  19. Underwater sensor nodes and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime

    2013-09-05

    Sensor technology has matured enough to be used in any type of environment. The appearance of new physical sensors has increased the range of environmental parameters for gathering data. Because of the huge amount of unexploited resources in the ocean environment, there is a need of new research in the field of sensors and sensor networks. This special issue is focused on collecting recent advances on underwater sensors and underwater sensor networks in order to measure, monitor, surveillance of and control of underwater environments. On the one hand, from the sensor node perspective, we will see works related with the deployment of physical sensors, development of sensor nodes and transceivers for sensor nodes, sensor measurement analysis and several issues such as layer 1 and 2 protocols for underwater communication and sensor localization and positioning systems. On the other hand, from the sensor network perspective, we will see several architectures and protocols for underwater environments and analysis concerning sensor network measurements. Both sides will provide us a complete view of last scientific advances in this research field.

  20. Fiber optical sensors for aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechstedt, Ralf D.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper selected fiber optical point sensors that are of potential interest for deployment in aircraft are discussed. The operating principles together with recent measurement results are described. Examples include a high-temperature combined pressure and temperature sensor for engine health, hydraulics and landing gear monitoring, an ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor for oil, pneumatic and fluid aero systems applications and a combined acceleration and temperature sensor for condition monitoring of rotating components.

  1. Security Techniques for Sensor Systems and the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Sensor systems are becoming pervasive in many domains, and are recently being generalized by the Internet of Things (IoT). This wide deployment, however, presents significant security issues. We develop security techniques for sensor systems and IoT, addressing all security management phases. Prior to deployment, the nodes need to be hardened. We…

  2. Effectiveness of sensor monitoring in an occupational therapy rehabilitation program for older individuals after hip fracture, the SO-HIP trial: study protocol of a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Margriet C; Ter Riet, Gerben; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Kröse, Ben; de Rooij, Sophia E; Buurman, Bianca M

    2017-01-03

    The performance of activities of daily living (ADL) at home is important for the recovery of older individuals after hip fracture. However, 20-90% of these individuals lose ADL function and never fully recover. It is currently unknown to what extent occupational therapy (OT) with coaching based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) improves recovery. The same holds for sensor monitoring-based coaching in addition to OT. Here, we describe the design of a study investigating the effect of sensor monitoring embedded in an OT rehabilitation program on the recovery of ADL among older individuals after hip fracture. Six nursing homes will be randomized in a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial. All nursing homes will initially provide standard care. At designated time points, nursing homes, successively and in random order, will cross over to the provision of OT and at the next time point, to sensor monitoring-enhanced OT. A total of 288 older individuals, previously living alone in the community, who after a hip fracture were admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation ward for a short-term rehabilitation, will be enrolled. Individuals in the first intervention group (OTc) will participate in an OT rehabilitation program with coaching based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles. In the sensor monitoring group, sensor monitoring is added to the OT intervention (OTcsm). Participants will receive a sensor monitoring system consisting of (i) an activity monitor during nursing home stay, (ii) a sensor monitoring system at home and a (iii) a web-based feedback application. These components will be embedded in the OT. The OT consists of a weekly session with an occupational therapist during the nursing home stay followed by four home visits and four telephone consultations. The primary outcome is patient-perceived daily functioning at 6 months, assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). As far as we know, this study is the first

  3. Wireless Sensor Networks TestBed: ASNTbed

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dludla, AG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have been used in different types of applications and deployed within various environments. Simulation tools are essential for studying WSNs, especially for exploring large-scale networks. However, WSN testbeds...

  4. Distributed estimation for adaptive sensor selection in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Hassan Hamid, Matasm M.

    2014-05-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are usually deployed for monitoring systems with the distributed detection and estimation of sensors. Sensor selection in WSNs is considered for target tracking. A distributed estimation scenario is considered based on the extended information filter. A cost function using the geometrical dilution of precision measure is derived for active sensor selection. A consensus-based estimation method is proposed in this paper for heterogeneous WSNs with two types of sensors. The convergence properties of the proposed estimators are analyzed under time-varying inputs. Accordingly, a new adaptive sensor selection (ASS) algorithm is presented in which the number of active sensors is adaptively determined based on the absolute local innovations vector. Simulation results show that the tracking accuracy of the ASS is comparable to that of the other algorithms.

  5. An Efficient Distributed Coverage Hole Detection Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan Kumar Sahoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, certain areas of the monitoring region may have coverage holes and serious coverage overlapping due to the random deployment of sensors. The failure of electronic components, software bugs and destructive agents could lead to the random death of the nodes. Sensors may be dead due to exhaustion of battery power, which may cause the network to be uncovered and disconnected. Based on the deployment nature of the nodes in remote or hostile environments, such as a battlefield or desert, it is impossible to recharge or replace the battery. However, the data gathered by the sensors are highly essential for the analysis, and therefore, the collaborative detection of coverage holes has strategic importance in WSNs. In this paper, distributed coverage hole detection algorithms are designed, where nodes can collaborate to detect the coverage holes autonomously. The performance evaluation of our protocols suggests that our protocols outperform in terms of hole detection time, limited power consumption and control packet overhead to detect holes as compared to other similar protocols.

  6. Deployable Structural Booms for Large Deployable Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a new generation of large, high power deployable solar arrays has been identified as the most significant challenge facing the development of...

  7. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Stasch

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement.

  8. Safety Pilot Model Deployment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data were collected during the Safety Pilot Model Deployment (SPMD). The data sets that these entities will provide include basic safety messages (BSM), vehicle...

  9. Deployable Entry-system Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Deployable Entry-system ProjecT (ADEPT) will develop requirements for the ADEPT flight test.  Prior entry systems used high mass thermal protection...

  10. The parenting cycle of deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R; Ross, Abigail

    2012-02-01

    Parents of dependent children comprise approximately 42% of Active Duty and National Guard/Reserve military members serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recent estimates indicate that more than two million children have experienced parental deployment since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This article seeks to characterize the impact of the deployment life cycle on parenting roles among service members and at-home partners/caregivers of dependent children. Specifically, a new conceptual framework is presented for considering the ways in which parenting and co-parenting processes are affected by the demands and transitions inherent in contemporary deployment to a war zone. Although the phase-based emotional cycle of deployment continues to offer an instructive description of the broad challenges faced by military couples, a parenting cycle of deployment model shifts the perspective to the critical and largely ignored processes of parenting in the context of deployment and war, and to the realities faced by parents serving in the U.S. military. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research related to military families are addressed.

  11. Wireless Power Transfer for Distributed Estimation in Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Vien V.; Shin, Won-Yong; Ishibashi, Koji

    2017-04-01

    This paper studies power allocation for distributed estimation of an unknown scalar random source in sensor networks with a multiple-antenna fusion center (FC), where wireless sensors are equipped with radio-frequency based energy harvesting technology. The sensors' observation is locally processed by using an uncoded amplify-and-forward scheme. The processed signals are then sent to the FC, and are coherently combined at the FC, at which the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) is adopted for reliable estimation. We aim to solve the following two power allocation problems: 1) minimizing distortion under various power constraints; and 2) minimizing total transmit power under distortion constraints, where the distortion is measured in terms of mean-squared error of the BLUE. Two iterative algorithms are developed to solve the non-convex problems, which converge at least to a local optimum. In particular, the above algorithms are designed to jointly optimize the amplification coefficients, energy beamforming, and receive filtering. For each problem, a suboptimal design, a single-antenna FC scenario, and a common harvester deployment for colocated sensors, are also studied. Using the powerful semidefinite relaxation framework, our result is shown to be valid for any number of sensors, each with different noise power, and for an arbitrarily number of antennas at the FC.

  12. Introduction to wireless sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Forster, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Explores real-world wireless sensor network development, deployment, and applications. The book begins with an introduction to wireless sensor networks and their fundamental concepts. Hardware components, operating systems, protocols, and algorithms that make up the anatomy of a sensor node are described in chapter two. Properties of wireless communications, medium access protocols, wireless links, and link estimation protocols are described in chapter three and chapter four. Routing basics and metrics, clustering techniques, time synchronization and localization protocols, as well as sensing techniques are introduced in chapter five to nine. The concluding chapter summarizes the learnt methods and shows how to use them to deploy real-world sensor networks in a structured way.

  13. Military to Civilian RCT of an Intervention to Promote Post-Deployment Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Promote Post-Deployment Reintegration W81XWH-08-2-0045 2 September 2011-1 September 2012AnnualOctober 2012 Minnesota Veterans Research Institute...strategies. Research Study, Randomized Controlled Trial, Expressive Writing, Internet-based Intervention, OEF/OIF Veterans , Post-deployment Reintegration 15...OEF veterans with post-deployment reintegration problems that can be used throughout VA for very little expense. Task 18: Code participant essays

  14. Connectivity, Coverage and Placement in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Heng Foh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wireless communication between sensors allows the formation of flexible sensor networks, which can be deployed rapidly over wide or inaccessible areas. However, the need to gather data from all sensors in the network imposes constraints on the distances between sensors. This survey describes the state of the art in techniques for determining the minimum density and optimal locations of relay nodes and ordinary sensors to ensure connectivity, subject to various degrees of uncertainty in the locations of the nodes.

  15. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanides, J; Nørgaard, K; Bruttomesso, D

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes.......To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes....

  16. Data Dissemination in Mobile Phone Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Le, Viet Duc; Le Viet Duc, L Duc

    Deploying sensors over large areas is costly in terms of configuration, hardware, and maintenance. Using onboard sensors of today mobile phones can significantly reduce the expenses in monitoring areas and disseminating events or data. Via the available short-range Bluetooth and/or WiFi interfaces,

  17. Thresholded Range Aggregation in Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Lin, Zhifeng; Mamoulis, Nikos

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in wireless sensor technologies (e.g., Mica, Telos motes) enable the economic deployment of lightweight sensors for capturing data from their surrounding environment, serving various monitoring tasks, like forest wildfire alarming and volcano activity. We propose a novel query...

  18. Significant Storage on Sensor Storage Space, Energy Consumption and Better Security Based on Routing in Hybrid Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    K.Nageswara rao; D. Rajya Lakshmi; T. Venkateswara rao

    2011-01-01

    WSNs are characterized by limited resources in term s of communication, computation and energy supply. A critical constraint on sensors networks is that s ensor nodes employ batteries. A second constraint i s that sensors will be deployed unattended and in large nu mbers, so that it will be difficult to change or re charge batteries in the sensors .The Energy Consumption in wireless sensor networks varies greatly based on t he protocols the sensors use...

  19. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  20. An energy-efficient and secure hybrid algorithm for wireless sensor networks using a mobile data collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Karanam Ravichandran; Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new hybrid algorithm for security, which incorporates both distributed and hierarchal approaches. It uses a mobile data collector (MDC) to collect information in order to save energy of sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network (WSN) as, in most networks, these sensor nodes have limited energy. Wireless sensor networks are prone to security problems because, among other things, it is possible to use a rogue sensor node to eavesdrop on or alter the information being transmitted. To prevent this, this paper introduces a security algorithm for MDC-based WSNs. A key use of this algorithm is to protect the confidentiality of the information sent by the sensor nodes. The sensor nodes are deployed in a random fashion and form group structures called clusters. Each cluster has a cluster head. The cluster head collects data from the other nodes using the time-division multiple access protocol. The sensor nodes send their data to the cluster head for transmission to the base station node for further processing. The MDC acts as an intermediate node between the cluster head and base station. The MDC, using its dynamic acyclic graph path, collects the data from the cluster head and sends it to base station. This approach is useful for applications including warfighting, intelligent building and medicine. To assess the proposed system, the paper presents a comparison of its performance with other approaches and algorithms that can be used for similar purposes.

  1. Availability Issues in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel G.; Silva, Ivanovitch; Guedes, Luiz Affonso; Vasques, Francisco; Portugal, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Wireless visual sensor networks have been considered for a large set of monitoring applications related with surveillance, tracking and multipurpose visual monitoring. When sensors are deployed over a monitored field, permanent faults may happen during the network lifetime, reducing the monitoring quality or rendering parts or the entire network unavailable. In a different way from scalar sensor networks, camera-enabled sensors collect information following a directional sensing model, which changes the notions of vicinity and redundancy. Moreover, visual source nodes may have different relevancies for the applications, according to the monitoring requirements and cameras' poses. In this paper we discuss the most relevant availability issues related to wireless visual sensor networks, addressing availability evaluation and enhancement. Such discussions are valuable when designing, deploying and managing wireless visual sensor networks, bringing significant contributions to these networks. PMID:24526301

  2. Using GStreamer for acoustic signal processing in deployable sensor nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otnes, R.; Eastwood, J.; Colin, M.E.G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract—In the framework of a bilateral Netherlands- Norway defense research cooperation (2014-2017) between The Netherlands Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO NL) and Forsvarets forskningsinstitutt (FFI NO), it has been shown that a compact general-purpose processor board developed for smartphones

  3. Analysis and Algorithms for Imperfect Sensor Deployment and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources ...Programming; Optimization; Computation; Game Theory; Analytics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 20 19a...NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON J. Cole Smith a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) 864-656-4716 Standard

  4. A Method To Determine Validity And Reliability Of Activity Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, Simone Theresa; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerometry-based activity sensors are nowadays widely deployed in ambulatory monitoring of physical activity. Field experiments are characterized by very little control over usage of the sensor [1]. A malfunctioning sensor, giving output within the range of normal physical activity, will not be

  5. Distributed Service Discovery for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Perianu, Raluca; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Service discovery in heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks is a challenging research objective, due to the inherent limitations of sensor nodes and their extensive and dense deployment. The protocols proposed for ad hoc networks are too heavy for sensor environments. This paper presents a

  6. Prototyping an Operational System with Multiple Sensors for Pasture Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Wark

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Combining multiple proximal sensors within a wireless sensor network (WSN enhances our capacity to monitor vegetation, compared to using a single sensor or non-networked setup. Data from sensors with different spatial and temporal characteristics can provide complementary information. For example, point-based sensors such as multispectral sensors which monitor at high temporal frequency but, at a single point, can be complemented by array-based sensors such as digital cameras which have greater spatial resolution but may only gather data at infrequent intervals. In this article we describe the successful deployment of a prototype system for using multiple proximal sensors (multispectral sensors and digital cameras for monitoring pastures. We show that there are many technical issues involved in such a deployment, and we share insights relevant for other researchers who may consider using WSNs for an operational deployment for pasture monitoring under often difficult environmental conditions. Although the sensors and infrastructure are important, we found that other issues arise and that an end-to-end workflow is an essential part of effectively capturing, processing and managing the data from a WSN. Our deployment highlights the importance of testing and ongoing monitoring of the entire workflow to ensure the quality of data captured. We demonstrate that the combination of different sensors enhances our ability to identify sensor problems necessary to collect accurate data for pasture monitoring.

  7. Functional Testing of Wireless Sensor Node Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    test approach can enable their conformance to design and deployment specifications. We discuss off-line, hierarchical, functional testing of complete wireless sensor nodes containing configurable logic through a combination of FPGA-based board test and Software-Based Self-Test (SBST) techniques....... The proposed functional test methodology has been applied to a COTS-based sensor node development platform and can be applied, in general, for testing all types of wireless sensor node designs....

  8. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Post-deployment family violence among UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jamie; Jones, Margaret; Somaini, Greta; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-12-19

    Research into violence among military personnel has not differentiated between stranger- and family-directed violence. While military factors (combat exposure and post-deployment mental health problems) are risk factors for general violence, there has been limited research on their impact on violence within the family environment. This study aims to compare the prevalence of family-directed and stranger-directed violence among a deployed sample of UK military personnel and to explore risk factors associated with both family- and stranger-directed violence. This study utilised data from a large cohort study which collected information by questionnaire from a representative sample of randomly selected deployed UK military personnel (n = 6711). The prevalence of family violence immediately following return from deployment was 3.6% and 7.8% for stranger violence. Family violence was significantly associated with having left service, while stranger violence was associated with younger age, male gender, being single, having a history of antisocial behaviour as well as having left service. Deployment in a combat role was significantly associated with both family and stranger violence after adjustment for confounders [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.92 (1.25-2.94), p = 0.003 and aOR = 1.77 (1.31-2.40), p military personnel. Further research using a validated measurement tool for family violence would improve comparability with other research.

  10. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  11. Wake Sensor Evaluation Program and Results of JFK-1 Wake Vortex Sensor Intercomparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Burnham, David C.; Rudis, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    The overall approach should be to: (1) Seek simplest, sufficiently robust, integrated ground based sensor systems (wakes and weather) for AVOSS; (2) Expand all sensor performance cross-comparisons and data mergings in on-going field deployments; and (3) Achieve maximal cost effectiveness through hardware/info sharing. An effective team is in place to accomplish the above tasks.

  12. The Efficacy of Epidemic Algorithms on Detecting Node Replicas in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimha Shashidhar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A node replication attack against a wireless sensor network involves surreptitious efforts by an adversary to insert duplicate sensor nodes into the network while avoiding detection. Due to the lack of tamper-resistant hardware and the low cost of sensor nodes, launching replication attacks takes little effort to carry out. Naturally, detecting these replica nodes is a very important task and has been studied extensively. In this paper, we propose a novel distributed, randomized sensor duplicate detection algorithm called Discard to detect node replicas in group-deployed wireless sensor networks. Our protocol is an epidemic, self-organizing duplicate detection scheme, which exhibits emergent properties. Epidemic schemes have found diverse applications in distributed computing: load balancing, topology management, audio and video streaming, computing aggregate functions, failure detection, network and resource monitoring, to name a few. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm is the first attempt at exploring the potential of this paradigm to detect replicas in a wireless sensor network. Through analysis and simulation, we show that our scheme achieves robust replica detection with substantially lower communication, computational and storage requirements than prior schemes in the literature.

  13. Self-organizing cooperative sensor network for remote surveillance: current results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burne, Richard A.; Buczak, Anna L.; Jin, Yaochu; Jamalabad, Vikram R.; Kadar, Ivan; Eadan, Eitan R.

    1999-07-01

    The capabilities of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) have steadily improved and have been shown to be of value in various military missions. Today's UGS are multi-functional, integrated sensor platforms that can detect and locate a wide variety of ground-based and airborne targets. The rather large size (> 1 cubic foot) and relatively expensive cost of these integrated platforms are two main drawbacks for remote surveillance applications that support rapidly deployable, small unit operations. As an alternative, remote surveillance may be possible with smaller, less costly sensors that work cooperatively together as a network. The objective of this study was to develop algorithms that can optimally organized and adaptively control a network of UGSs in order to achieve a surveillance mission. In the present study, the sensor network, a random distribution of acoustic sensors over a surveillance area, is tasked to detect and track any targets entering into the surveillance area. In addition, the sensor network is required to maximize its tracking accuracy and minimize its power utilization.

  14. Advancing profiling sensors with a wireless approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Alex; Russomanno, David J

    2012-11-22

    The notion of a profiling sensor was first realized by a Near-Infrared (N-IR) retro-reflective prototype consisting of a vertical column of wired sparse detectors. This paper extends that prior work and presents a wireless version of a profiling sensor as a collection of sensor nodes. The sensor incorporates wireless sensing elements, a distributed data collection and aggregation scheme, and an enhanced classification technique. In this novel approach, a base station pre-processes the data collected from the sensor nodes and performs data re-alignment. A back-propagation neural network was also developed for the wireless version of the N-IR profiling sensor that classifies objects into the broad categories of human, animal or vehicle with an accuracy of approximately 94%. These enhancements improve deployment options as compared with the first generation of wired profiling sensors, possibly increasing the application scenarios for such sensors, including intelligent fence applications.

  15. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  16. Its deployment and transportation policies

    OpenAIRE

    YGNACE, JL; UNO, N

    2004-01-01

    Technology has driven the mobility needs of people and has been critical in the movement of goods. The newest wave of transportation technologies is the development and deployment of intelligent transportation systems. For the last 15 years, these systems have been promoted by the private industry and the public sector, mainly departments of transportation. The academia has also been involved as a developers and evaluators of technologies. However, the progress of its implementation has been ...

  17. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    researchers have found that spouses were more likely to seek care for their mental health problems and were less concerned with the stigma of mental...Few Guard members had anticipated the degree of adjustments that would be required: When you have been in a foreign country, coming back is a...Changes in the children while the deployed member is gone can spur conflict, particularly when children make the transition from childhood to adolescence

  18. How Deployments Affect Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Interestingly, some service members welcomed the longer working days as a way to keep themselves busy and distracted from homesickness or thoughts of...want more-frequent communica- tion home. Some members with whom we spoke felt that talking to family while on deploy- ment only increased homesickness ...debt, to save for college , or to buy such items as cars. In this way, the rewards of a hard de- ployment can have long-term effects for military

  19. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  20. A Risk Based Approach to Limit the Effects of Covert Channels for Internet Sensor Data Aggregators for Sensor Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecco, Camilo H.; Camp, L. Jean

    Effective defense against Internet threats requires data on global real time network status. Internet sensor networks provide such real time network data. However, an organization that participates in a sensor network risks providing a covert channel to attackers if that organization’s sensor can be identified. While there is benefit for every party when any individual participates in such sensor deployments, there are perverse incentives against individual participation. As a result, Internet sensor networks currently provide limited data. Ensuring anonymity of individual sensors can decrease the risk of participating in a sensor network without limiting data provision.

  1. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.

  2. Novel Framework for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Flying Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Prateek; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel framework for data collection from a sensor network using flying sensor nodes. Efficient data communication within the network is a necessity as sensor nodes are usually energy constrained. The proposed framework utilizes the various entities forming the network...... for a different utility compared to their usual role in sensor networks. Use of flying sensor nodes is usually considered for conventional purpose of sensing and monitoring. Flying sensing nodes are usually utilized collectively in the form of an aerial sensor network, they are not expected to function as a data...... intensive multi-hop inter-cluster communication to relay information to the BS. The flying sensor node is referred as sensor fly. The limitations of a conventional sensor network deployed on ground surface, in respect to the near ground path loss, and communication hindrance due to undulating terrain...

  3. An advanced temporal credential-based security scheme with mutual authentication and key agreement for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2013-07-24

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs). Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.'s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users' attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.'s authentication scheme are left unchanged.

  4. An Advanced Temporal Credential-Based Security Scheme with Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ta Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs. Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.’s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users’ attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.’s authentication scheme are left unchanged.

  5. Artist concept of Drogue Chute Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the drogue chute deployment as the Apollo Command Module returns to earth from a mission to the moon. The droge chutes serve to orient the Command Module properly for main chute deployment.

  6. Hierarchical Orbital Observatory Deployable Shroud (HOODS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large deployable telescopes such as NASA's 9.2m and 16.8m segmented ATLAST systems require commensurately large deployable sunshades for thermal control and to...

  7. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Page Content ... Deployment and Children Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Helping Children Adjust to a Move A ...

  8. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  9. Large space deployable antenna systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The design technology is described for manufacturing a 20 m or larger space erectable antenna with high thermal stability, high dynamic stiffness, and minimum stowed size. The selected approach includes a wrap rib design with a cantilever beam basic element and graphite-epoxy composite lenticular cross section ribs. The rib configuration and powered type operated deploying mechanism are described and illustrated. Other features of the parabolic reflector discussed include weight and stowed diameter characteristics, structural dynamics characteristics, orbit thermal aperture limitations, and equivalent element and secondary (on axis) patterns. A block diagram of the multiple beam pattern is also presented.

  10. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  11. The Long Tail Issue in Large Scale Deployment of Personal Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuttone, Andrea; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    We describe the challenges and the open questions arising during the design and deployment of SensibleJournal, a mobile personal informatics system with interactive visualizations of mobility and social interactions based on data acquired from embedded smartphone sensors. The SensibleJournal system...

  12. Mathematical theories of distributed sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iyengar, Sitharama S; Balakrishnan, N

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Distributed Sensor Networks demonstrates how mathematical theories can be used to provide distributed sensor modeling and to solve important problems such as coverage hole detection and repair. The book introduces the mathematical and computational structure by discussing what they are, their applications and how they differ from traditional systems. The text also explains how mathematics are utilized to provide efficient techniques implementing effective coverage, deployment, transmission, data processing, signal processing, and data protection within distributed sensor networks. Finally, the authors discuss some important challenges facing mathematics to get more incite to the multidisciplinary area of distributed sensor networks.

  13. “And Then, the Weekend Started”: Story of a WSN Deployment on a Construction Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Fernández-Steeger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are versatile monitoring systems that can provide a large amount of real-time data in scenarios where wired infrastructures are inapplicable or expensive. This technology is expected to be handled by domain experts, who perceive a WSN as a (promised to be easy to deploy black box. This work presents the deployment experience of a WSN, as conducted by domain experts, in a ground improvement area. Building upon off-the-shelf solutions, a fuel cell powered gateway and 21 sensor devices measuring acceleration, inclination, temperature and barometric pressure were installed to monitor ground subsidence. We report about how poor GSM service, malfunctioning hardware, unknown communication patterns and obscure proprietary software required in-field ad-hoc solutions. Through the lessons learned, we look forward to investigating how to make the deployment of these systems an easier task.

  14. Satellite Sensornet Gateway Technology Infusion Through Rapid Deployments for Environmental Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzel, T.; Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Ye, W.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Satellite Sensornet Gateway (SSG) is an ongoing ESTO Advanced Information Systems Technology project, at the University of Southern California. The major goal of SSG is to develop a turnkey solution for building environmental observation systems based on sensor networks. Our system has been developed through an iterative series of deployment-driven design, build, test, and revise which maximizes technology infusion to the earth scientist. We have designed a robust and flexible sensor network called Sensor Processing and Acquisition Network (SPAN). Our SPAN architecture emphasizes a modular and extensible design, such that core building blocks can be reused to develop different scientific observation systems. To support rapid deployment at remote locations, we employ satellite communications as the backhaul to relay in-situ sensor data to a central database. To easily support various science applications, we have developed a unified sensor integration framework that allows streamlined integration of different sensors to the system. Our system supports heterogeneous sets of sensors, from industry-grade products to research- specific prototypes. To ensure robust operation in harsh environments, we have developed mechanisms to monitor system status and recover from potential failures along with additional remote configuration and QA/QC functions. Here we briefly describe the deployments, the key science missions of the deployments and the role that the SSG technology played in each mission. We first deployed our SSG technology at the James Reserve in February 2007. In a joint deployment with the NEON project, SDSC, and UC Riverside, we set up a meteorological station, using a diverse set of sensors, with the objective of validating our basic technology components in the field. This system is still operational and streaming live sensor data. At Stunt Ranch, a UC Reserve near Malibu, CA, we partnered with UCLA biologist Phillip Rundel in order to study the drought

  15. Image-based environmental monitoring sensor application using an embedded wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Jeongyeup; Hicks, John; Coe, Sharon; Govindan, Ramesh

    2014-08-28

    This article discusses the experiences from the development and deployment of two image-based environmental monitoring sensor applications using an embedded wireless sensor network. Our system uses low-power image sensors and the Tenet general purpose sensing system for tiered embedded wireless sensor networks. It leverages Tenet's built-in support for reliable delivery of high rate sensing data, scalability and its flexible scripting language, which enables mote-side image compression and the ease of deployment. Our first deployment of a pitfall trap monitoring application at the James San Cannot Mountain Reserve provided us with insights and lessons learned into the deployment of and compression schemes for these embedded wireless imaging systems. Our three month-long deployment of a bird nest monitoring application resulted in over 100,000 images collected from a 19-camera node network deployed over an area of 0.05 square miles, despite highly variable environmental conditions. Our biologists found the on-line, near-real-time access to images to be useful for obtaining data on answering their biological questions.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of the Shinyei PPD42NS Low-Cost Particulate Matter Sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Austin

    Full Text Available Finely resolved PM2.5 exposure measurements at the level of individual participants or over a targeted geographic area can be challenging due to the cost, size and weight of the monitoring equipment. We propose re-purposing the low-cost, portable and lightweight Shinyei PPD42NS particle counter as a particle counting device. Previous field deployment of this sensor suggests that it captures trends in ambient PM2.5 concentrations, but important characteristics of the sensor response have yet to be determined. Laboratory testing was undertaken in order to characterize performance.The Shinyei sensors, in-line with a TSI Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS model 3321, tracked particle decay within an aerosol exposure chamber. Test atmospheres were composed of monodisperse polystyrene spheres with diameters of 0.75, 1, 2 3 and 6 um as well as a polydisperse atmosphere of ASHRAE test dust #1.Two-minute block averages of the sensor response provide a measurement with low random error, within sensor, for particles in the 0.75-6μm range with a limit of detection of 1 μg/m3. The response slope of the sensors is idiomatic, and each sensor requires a unique response curve. A linear model captures the sensor response for concentrations below 50 μg/m3 and for concentrations above 50 μg/m3 a non-linear function captures the response and saturates at 800 μg/m3. The Limit of Detection (LOD is 1 μg/m3. The response time is on the order of minutes, making it appropriate for tracking short-term changes in concentration.When paired with prior evaluation, these sensors are appropriate for use as ambient particle counters for low and medium concentrations of respirable particles (< 100 ug/m3. Multiple sensors deployed over a spatial grid would provide valuable spatio-temporal variability in PM2.5 and could be used to validate exposure models. When paired with GPS tracking, these devices have the potential to provide time and space resolved exposure measurements for a

  17. Laboratory Evaluation of the Shinyei PPD42NS Low-Cost Particulate Matter Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Elena; Novosselov, Igor; Seto, Edmund; Yost, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Finely resolved PM2.5 exposure measurements at the level of individual participants or over a targeted geographic area can be challenging due to the cost, size and weight of the monitoring equipment. We propose re-purposing the low-cost, portable and lightweight Shinyei PPD42NS particle counter as a particle counting device. Previous field deployment of this sensor suggests that it captures trends in ambient PM2.5 concentrations, but important characteristics of the sensor response have yet to be determined. Laboratory testing was undertaken in order to characterize performance. The Shinyei sensors, in-line with a TSI Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS) model 3321, tracked particle decay within an aerosol exposure chamber. Test atmospheres were composed of monodisperse polystyrene spheres with diameters of 0.75, 1, 2 3 and 6 um as well as a polydisperse atmosphere of ASHRAE test dust #1. Two-minute block averages of the sensor response provide a measurement with low random error, within sensor, for particles in the 0.75-6μm range with a limit of detection of 1 μg/m3. The response slope of the sensors is idiomatic, and each sensor requires a unique response curve. A linear model captures the sensor response for concentrations below 50 μg/m3 and for concentrations above 50 μg/m3 a non-linear function captures the response and saturates at 800 μg/m3. The Limit of Detection (LOD) is 1 μg/m3. The response time is on the order of minutes, making it appropriate for tracking short-term changes in concentration. When paired with prior evaluation, these sensors are appropriate for use as ambient particle counters for low and medium concentrations of respirable particles (sensors deployed over a spatial grid would provide valuable spatio-temporal variability in PM2.5 and could be used to validate exposure models. When paired with GPS tracking, these devices have the potential to provide time and space resolved exposure measurements for a large number of participants, thus

  18. The Effect of OEF/OIF Deployment Intensity on the Rate of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Active Duty Population

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Arkes, Jeremy; Kwan, Boon Wah; Tan, Lai Yee; Thomas V. Williams

    2009-01-01

    This study estimates the effect of deployment location and length on the risk of developing PTSD, relative to what it would normally be from the normal military operations. We use a random sample of activity-duty enlisted personnel serving between 2001 and 2006. We identify PTSF cases from TRICARE medical records and link deployment information from Contingency Tracking System. Comparing to those in other duties around the world, deployment to Iraq/Afghanistan increases the odds of develop...

  19. Detection of Intelligent Intruders in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing research works on the intrusion detection problem in a wireless sensor network (WSN assume linear or random mobility patterns in abstracting intruders’ models in traversing the WSN field. However, in real-life WSN applications, an intruder is usually an intelligent mobile robot with environment learning and detection avoidance capability (i.e., the capability to avoid surrounding sensors. Due to this, the literature results based on the linear or random mobility models may not be applied to the real-life WSN design and deployment for efficient and effective intrusion detection in practice. This motivates us to investigate the impact of intruder’s intelligence on the intrusion detection problem in a WSN for various applications. To be specific, we propose two intrusion algorithms, the pinball and flood-fill algorithms, to mimic the intelligent motion and behaviors of a mobile intruder in detecting and circumventing nearby sensors for detection avoidance while heading for its destination. The two proposed algorithms are integrated into a WSN framework for intrusion detection analysis in various circumstances. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted, and the results indicate that: (1 the performance of a WSN drastically changes as a result of the intruder’s intelligence in avoiding sensor detections and intrusion algorithms; (2 network parameters, including node density, sensing range and communication range, play a crucial part in the effectiveness of the intruder’s intrusion algorithms; and (3 it is imperative to integrate intruder’s intelligence in the WSN research for intruder detection problems under various application circumstances.

  20. Demonstration of UAV deployment and control of mobile wireless sensing networks for modal analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Hirose, Mitsuhito; Greenwood, William; Xiao, Yong; Lynch, Jerome; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Kamat, Vineet

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can serve as a powerful mobile sensing platform for assessing the health of civil infrastructure systems. To date, the majority of their uses have been dedicated to vision and laser-based spatial imaging using on-board cameras and LiDAR units, respectively. Comparatively less work has focused on integration of other sensing modalities relevant to structural monitoring applications. The overarching goal of this study is to explore the ability for UAVs to deploy a network of wireless sensors on structures for controlled vibration testing. The study develops a UAV platform with an integrated robotic gripper that can be used to install wireless sensors in structures, drop a heavy weight for the introduction of impact loads, and to uninstall wireless sensors for reinstallation elsewhere. A pose estimation algorithm is embedded in the UAV to estimate the location of the UAV during sensor placement and impact load introduction. The Martlet wireless sensor network architecture is integrated with the UAV to provide the UAV a mobile sensing capability. The UAV is programmed to command field deployed Martlets, aggregate and temporarily store data from the wireless sensor network, and to communicate data to a fixed base station on site. This study demonstrates the integrated UAV system using a simply supported beam in the lab with Martlet wireless sensors placed by the UAV and impact load testing performed. The study verifies the feasibility of the integrated UAV-wireless monitoring system architecture with accurate modal characteristics of the beam estimated by modal analysis.

  1. A Hybrid Optimized Weighted Minimum Spanning Tree for the Shortest Intrapath Selection in Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheswaran Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network (WSN consists of sensor nodes that need energy efficient routing techniques as they have limited battery power, computing, and storage resources. WSN routing protocols should enable reliable multihop communication with energy constraints. Clustering is an effective way to reduce overheads and when this is aided by effective resource allocation, it results in reduced energy consumption. In this work, a novel hybrid evolutionary algorithm called Bee Algorithm-Simulated Annealing Weighted Minimal Spanning Tree (BASA-WMST routing is proposed in which randomly deployed sensor nodes are split into the best possible number of independent clusters with cluster head and optimal route. The former gathers data from sensors belonging to the cluster, forwarding them to the sink. The shortest intrapath selection for the cluster is selected using Weighted Minimum Spanning Tree (WMST. The proposed algorithm computes the distance-based Minimum Spanning Tree (MST of the weighted graph for the multihop network. The weights are dynamically changed based on the energy level of each sensor during route selection and optimized using the proposed bee algorithm simulated annealing algorithm.

  2. Enabling Wireless Power Transfer in Cellular Networks: Architecture, Modeling and Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kaibin; Lau, Vincent K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave power transfer (MPT) delivers energy wirelessly from stations called power beacons (PBs) to mobile devices by microwave radiation. This provides mobiles practically infinite battery lives and eliminates the need of power cords and chargers. To enable MPT for mobile charging, this paper proposes a new network architecture that overlays an uplink cellular network with randomly deployed PBs for powering mobiles, called a hybrid network. The deployment of the hybrid network under an out...

  3. Cognitive networks applications and deployments

    CERN Document Server

    Lloret Mauri, Jaime; Rawat, Danda B; Perez, Javier Manuel Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONEfficient Spectrum Management: Challenges and Solutions; Tarek M. Salem, Sherine M. Abdel-Kader, Salah M. Abdel-MaGeid, and Mohamed ZakiA Survey on Joint Routing and Dynamic spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks; Xianzhong Xie, Helin Yang, and Athanasios V. VasilakosNeighbor Discovery for Cognitive Radio Networks; Athar Ali Khan, Mubashir Husain Rehmani, and Yasir SaleemSPECTRUM SENSINGTime-Domain Cognitive Sensor Networking; Stefano Busanelli, Gianluigi Ferrari, Alessandro Colazzo, and Jean-Michel DricotSpectrum Sensing in Cognitive Wireless Networks; Danda B. Rawat and Chan

  4. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the C...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  5. Deployable Debris Shields For Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Crews, Jeanne

    1993-01-01

    Multilayer shields made of lightweight sheet materials deployed from proposed Space Station Freedom for additional protection against orbiting debris. Deployment mechanism attached at each location on exterior where extra protection needed. Equipment withdraws layer of material from storage in manner similar to unfurling sail or extending window shade. Number of layers deployed depends on required degree of protection, and could be as large as five.

  6. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  7. Soil moisture sensors based on metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kitić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper novel miniature metamaterial-based soil moisture sensors are presented. The sensors are based on resonant-type metamaterials and employ split-ring resonators (SRR, spiral resonators and fractal SRRs to achieve small dimensions, high sensitivity, and compatibility with standard planar fabrication technologies. All these features make the proposedsensors suitable for deployment in agriculture for precise mapping of soil humidity.

  8. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  9. Self-Deploying Gossamer Support Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results demonstrated the feasibility of using shape memory polymer composites to deploy, tension and support gossamer antennas. Cornerstone Research Group,...

  10. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  11. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  12. The health of UK military personnel who deployed to the 2003 Iraq war: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotopf, Matthew; Hull, Lisa; Fear, Nicola T; Browne, Tess; Horn, Oded; Iversen, Amy; Jones, Margaret; Murphy, Dominic; Bland, Duncan; Earnshaw, Mark; Greenberg, Neil; Hughes, Jamie Hacker; Tate, A Rosemary; Dandeker, Christopher; Rona, Roberto; Wessely, Simon

    2006-05-27

    Concerns have been raised about the mental and physical health of UK military personnel who deployed to the 2003 war in Iraq and subsequent tours of duty in the country. We compared health outcomes in a random sample of UK armed forces personnel who were deployed to the 2003 Iraq war with those in personnel who were not deployed. Participants completed a questionnaire covering the nature of the deployment and health outcomes, which included symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, common mental disorders, general wellbeing, alcohol consumption, physical symptoms, and fatigue. The participation rate was 62.3% (n=4722) in the deployed sample, and 56.3% (n=5550) in the non-deployed sample. Differences in health outcomes between groups were slight. There was a modest increase in the number of individuals with multiple physical symptoms (odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI 1.15-1.54). No other differences between groups were noted. The effect of deployment was different for reservists compared with regulars. In regulars, only presence of multiple physical symptoms was weakly associated with deployment (1.32; 1.14-1.53), whereas for reservists deployment was associated with common mental disorders (2.47, 1.35-4.52) and fatigue (1.78; 1.09-2.91). There was no evidence that later deployments, which were associated with escalating insurgency and UK casualties, were associated with poorer mental health outcomes. For regular personnel in the UK armed forces, deployment to the Iraq war has not, so far, been associated with significantly worse health outcomes, apart from a modest effect on multiple physical symptoms. There is evidence of a clinically and statistically significant effect on health in reservists.

  13. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built

  14. Towards Interoperable IoT Deployments inSmart Cities - How project VITAL enables smart, secure and cost- effective cities

    OpenAIRE

    Schiele, Gregor; Soldatos, John; Mitton, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    International audience; IoT-based deployments in smart cities raise several challenges, especially in terms of interoperability. In this paper, we illustrate semantic interoperability solutions for IoT systems. Based on these solutions, we describe how the FP7 VITAL project aims to bridge numerous silo IoT deployments in smart cities through repurposing and reusing sensors and data streams across multiple applications without carelessly compromising citizens’ security and privacy. This approa...

  15. Plant stress analysis technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring vegetation is an active area of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI) research. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) is assisting in the transfer of the LIFI technology to the agricultural private sector through a market survey. The market survey will help identify the key eco-agricultural issues of the nations that could benefit from the use of sensor technologies developed by the Office of Science and Technology (OST). The principal region of interest is the Western Hemisphere, particularly, the rapidly growing countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The analysis of needs will assure that the focus of present and future research will center on economically important issues facing both hemispheres. The application of the technology will be useful to the agriculture industry for airborne crop analysis as well as in the detection and characterization of contaminated sites by monitoring vegetation. LIFI airborne and close-proximity systems will be evaluated as stand-alone technologies and additions to existing sensor technologies that have been used to monitor crops in the field and in storage.

  16. Multi-Sensor Approach for the Monitoring of Halitosis Treatment via Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)—Containing Lozenges—A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Tecco, Simona; Santonico, Marco; Vernile, Chiara; Ciciarelli, Daniele; Tarantino, Ester; Marzo, Giuseppe; Pennazza, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate whether a recently described multi-sensor approach called BIONOTE® is accurate enough to verify the efficacy of treatment of patients with halitosis. A treatment with Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)–containing lozenges, compared with placebo was tested. The BIONOTE® was compared with traditional techniques used to detect halitosis: OralChroma™ and two calibrated odor judges enrolled for the organoleptic assessments. Twenty patients (10 treated and 10 placebo), suffering from active phase halitosis were included in the study. Treatment consisted of Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)—containing lozenges or placebo, 4 tablets/day for 14 days. t0 was before the beginning of the study; t1 was day 7 and t2 was day 14. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed through: (1) Rosenberg score; (2) Winkel tongue coating index (WTCI) anterior and posterior; (2) OralChroma™; (3) the new developed multi-sensor approach, called BIONOTE® (test technique). Only the WTCI anterior revealed statistically significant changes between t0 and t2 data (p = 0.014) in the treated group. Except for the WTCI anterior, all diagnostic methods revealed the lack of effectiveness for halitosis of a 14-days treatment with Lactobacillus brevis (CD2)–containing lozenges. The BIONOTE® multisensor system seems accurate in addition to OralChroma™ to assess the initial condition of halitosis and its mitigation during treatment. PMID:26266414

  17. Evaluation of Methods for In-Situ Calibration of Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Current field-deployable microphone phased arrays for aeroacoustic flight testing require the placement of hundreds of individual sensors over a large area. Depending on the duration of the test campaign, the microphones may be required to stay deployed at the testing site for weeks or even months. This presents a challenge in regards to tracking the response (i.e., sensitivity) of the individual sensors as a function of time in order to evaluate the health of the array. To address this challenge, two different methods for in-situ tracking of microphone responses are described. The first relies on the use of an aerial sound source attached as a payload on a hovering small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) vehicle. The second relies on the use of individually excited ground-based sound sources strategically placed throughout the array pattern. Testing of the two methods was performed in microphone array deployments conducted at Fort A.P. Hill in 2015 and at Edwards Air Force Base in 2016. The results indicate that the drift in individual sensor responses can be tracked reasonably well using both methods. Thus, in-situ response tracking methods are useful as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the health of a phased array during long duration deployments.

  18. Interoperability developments for next generation multifunctional ocean sensor systems in nexos

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Daniel Mihai; Río Fernandez, Joaquín del; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Moreno Lupiáñez, Manuel; Bröring, Arne; Pearlman, Jay; Delory, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Sensor technology is rapidly advancing, enabling smaller and less expensive instruments to monitor Earth’s environment. It is expected that many more kinds and quantities of networked environmental sensors will be deployed in coming years. This work presents an approach for the smart configuration and integration of marine sensors into an interoperable Sensor Web infrastructure such that the overall life cycle cost of sensors and observing systems is reduced and data h...

  19. IBE-Lite: a lightweight identity-based cryptography for body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chiu C; Wang, Haodong; Zhong, Sheng; Li, Qun

    2009-11-01

    A body sensor network (BSN) is a network of sensors deployed on a person's body for health care monitoring. Since the sensors collect personal medical data, security and privacy are important components in a BSN. In this paper, we developed IBE-Lite, a lightweight identity-based encryption suitable for sensors in a BSN. We present protocols based on IBE-Lite that balance security and privacy with accessibility and perform evaluation using experiments conducted on commercially available sensors.

  20. Panoramic imaging perimeter sensor design and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the conceptual design and preliminary performance modeling of a 360-degree imaging sensor. This sensor combines automatic perimeter intrusion detection with immediate visual assessment and is intended to be used for fast deployment around fixed or temporary high-value assets. The sensor requirements, compiled from various government agencies, are summarized. The conceptual design includes longwave infrared and visible linear array technology. An auxiliary millimeter-wave sensing technology is also considered for use during periods of infrared and visible obscuration. The infrared detectors proposed for the sensor design are similar to the Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly Types Three A and B (SADA-IIIA/B). An overview of the sensor and processor is highlighted. The infrared performance of this sensor design has been predicted using existing thermal imaging system models and is described in the paper. Future plans for developing a prototype are also presented.

  1. A trust-based probabilistic coverage algorithm for wireless sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghikhaki, Zahra; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental issue for many applications in wireless sensor networks. Due to sensors resource limitations, inherent uncertainties associated with their measurements, and the harsh and dynamic environment in which they are deployed, having a QoS-aware coverage scheme is a must.

  2. Network lifetime-aware data collection in Underwater Sensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of energy-efficient data collection and routing schemes for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) is a challenging issue due to the peculiarities of the underlying physical layer technology. Since the recharging or replacement of sensor nodes is almost impossible after deployment, the critical issue of ...

  3. Reconfiguration of sustainable thermoelectric generation using wireless sensor network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2014-01-01

    wireless sensor networks (WSNs), where remotely deployed temperature and voltage sensors as well as latching relays can be organized as a whole to intelligently identify and execute the optimal interconnection of TEM strings. A reconfigurable TEM array with a WSN controller and a maximum power point...

  4. Energy Efficient Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks based on Ant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN's) have become an important and challenging research area in recent years. Wireless Sensor Networks consisting of nodes with limited power are deployed to gather useful information from the field. In WSNs it is critical to collect the information in an energy efficient manner. Ant Colony ...

  5. Performance analysis of data retrieval in wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitici, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are currently revolutionizing the way we live, work, and interact with the surrounding environment. Due to their ease of deployment, cost effectiveness and versatile functionality, sensors are employed in a wide range of areas such as environmental monitoring, surveillance

  6. CoCMA: Energy-Efficient Coverage Control in Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Networks Using a Memetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chung Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSNs has drawn much attention in recent years. Given the limited energy for sensor nodes, it is critical to implement WSNs with energy efficiency designs. Sensing coverage in networks, on the other hand, may degrade gradually over time after WSNs are activated. For mission-critical applications, therefore, energy-efficient coverage control should be taken into consideration to support the quality of service (QoS of WSNs. Usually, coverage-controlling strategies present some challenging problems: (1 resolving the conflicts while determining which nodes should be turned off to conserve energy; (2 designing an optimal wake-up scheme that avoids awakening more nodes than necessary. In this paper, we implement an energy-efficient coverage control in cluster-based WSNs using a Memetic Algorithm (MA-based approach, entitled CoCMA, to resolve the challenging problems. The CoCMA contains two optimization strategies: a MA-based schedule for sensor nodes and a wake-up scheme, which are responsible to prolong the network lifetime while maintaining coverage preservation. The MA-based schedule is applied to a given WSN to avoid unnecessary energy consumption caused by the redundant nodes. During the network operation, the wake-up scheme awakens sleeping sensor nodes to recover coverage hole caused by dead nodes. The performance evaluation of the proposed CoCMA was conducted on a cluster-based WSN (CWSN under either a random or a uniform deployment of sensor nodes. Simulation results show that the performance yielded by the combination of MA and wake-up scheme is better than that in some existing approaches. Furthermore, CoCMA is able to activate fewer sensor nodes to monitor the required sensing area.

  7. CoCMA: Energy-Efficient Coverage Control in Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Networks Using a Memetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Joe-Air; Chen, Chia-Pang; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Lin, Tzu-Shiang; Tseng, Chwan-Lu; Yang, En-Cheng; Wang, Yung-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has drawn much attention in recent years. Given the limited energy for sensor nodes, it is critical to implement WSNs with energy efficiency designs. Sensing coverage in networks, on the other hand, may degrade gradually over time after WSNs are activated. For mission-critical applications, therefore, energy-efficient coverage control should be taken into consideration to support the quality of service (QoS) of WSNs. Usually, coverage-controlling strategies present some challenging problems: (1) resolving the conflicts while determining which nodes should be turned off to conserve energy; (2) designing an optimal wake-up scheme that avoids awakening more nodes than necessary. In this paper, we implement an energy-efficient coverage control in cluster-based WSNs using a Memetic Algorithm (MA)-based approach, entitled CoCMA, to resolve the challenging problems. The CoCMA contains two optimization strategies: a MA-based schedule for sensor nodes and a wake-up scheme, which are responsible to prolong the network lifetime while maintaining coverage preservation. The MA-based schedule is applied to a given WSN to avoid unnecessary energy consumption caused by the redundant nodes. During the network operation, the wake-up scheme awakens sleeping sensor nodes to recover coverage hole caused by dead nodes. The performance evaluation of the proposed CoCMA was conducted on a cluster-based WSN (CWSN) under either a random or a uniform deployment of sensor nodes. Simulation results show that the performance yielded by the combination of MA and wake-up scheme is better than that in some existing approaches. Furthermore, CoCMA is able to activate fewer sensor nodes to monitor the required sensing area.

  8. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  9. Deployable System for Crash-Load Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    An externally deployable honeycomb structure is investigated with respect to crash energy management for light aircraft. The new concept utilizes an expandable honeycomb-like structure to absorb impact energy by crushing. Distinguished by flexible hinges between cell wall junctions that enable effortless deployment, the new energy absorber offers most of the desirable features of an external airbag system without the limitations of poor shear stability, system complexity, and timing sensitivity. Like conventional honeycomb, once expanded, the energy absorber is transformed into a crush efficient and stable cellular structure. Other advantages, afforded by the flexible hinge feature, include a variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid deployment methods. Radial deployment is utilized when omnidirectional cushioning is required. Linear deployment offers better efficiency, which is preferred when the impact orientation is known in advance. Several energy absorbers utilizing different deployment modes could also be combined to optimize overall performance and/or improve system reliability as outlined in the paper. Results from a series of component and full scale demonstration tests are presented as well as typical deployment techniques and mechanisms. LS-DYNA analytical simulations of selected tests are also presented.

  10. The purely functional software deployment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolstra, E.

    2006-01-01

    Software deployment is the set of activities related to getting software components to work on the machines of end users. It includes activities such as installation, upgrading, uninstallation, and so on. Many tools have been developed to support deployment, but they all have serious

  11. Conceptual design of EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hongtao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); He, Kaihui, E-mail: hekh@iterchina.cn [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Beijing 100862 (China); Cheng, Yong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); Song, Yuntao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); Yang, Yang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China); Villedieu, Eric [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shi, Shanshuang; Yang, Songzhu [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Rd, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A redundant 11-DOF articulated robot for EAST in-vessel maintenance is presented. • A new modular joint developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for the robot is described. • A 3-DOF gripper integrated with cameras and torque sensor is developed. - Abstract: EAST multi-purpose maintenance deployer (EMMD) system, being collaboratively developed by ASIPP and CEA-IRFM, is built as upgrades for EAMA. Updated kinematics parameters such as DOF distribution and joint angle for EMMD robot are performed and verified in a simulation platform. A new modular joint has been developed to optimize the yaw joint actuator for easy assembly and flexibility reduction. A 3-DOF gripper with cameras and torque sensor has been designed to provide inspection and dexterous handling of small fragments inside the EAST chamber. A conceptual upgrade for EAMA-CASK has been developed for the purpose of protecting the end-effector's sensors which do not have temperature-resistant qualification. The high temperature and vacuum compatible solutions and validation experiments have been presented in this paper.

  12. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  13. A Fault Tolerance Mechanism for On-Road Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Feng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available On-Road Sensor Networks (ORSNs play an important role in capturing traffic flow data for predicting short-term traffic patterns, driving assistance and self-driving vehicles. However, this kind of network is prone to large-scale communication failure if a few sensors physically fail. In this paper, to ensure that the network works normally, an effective fault-tolerance mechanism for ORSNs which mainly consists of backup on-road sensor deployment, redundant cluster head deployment and an adaptive failure detection and recovery method is proposed. Firstly, based on the N − x principle and the sensors’ failure rate, this paper formulates the backup sensor deployment problem in the form of a two-objective optimization, which explains the trade-off between the cost and fault resumption. In consideration of improving the network resilience further, this paper introduces a redundant cluster head deployment model according to the coverage constraint. Then a common solving method combining integer-continuing and sequential quadratic programming is explored to determine the optimal location of these two deployment problems. Moreover, an Adaptive Detection and Resume (ADR protocol is deigned to recover the system communication through route and cluster adjustment if there is a backup on-road sensor mismatch. The final experiments show that our proposed mechanism can achieve an average 90% recovery rate and reduce the average number of failed sensors at most by 35.7%.

  14. Concept of Operations for Nuclear Warhead Embedded Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockett, P D; Koncher, T R

    2012-05-16

    Embedded arms-control-sensors provide a powerful new paradigm for managing compliance with future nuclear weapons treaties, where deployed warhead numbers will be reduced to 1000 or less. The CONOPS (Concept of Operations) for use with these sensors is a practical tool with which one may help define design parameters, including size, power, resolution, communications, and physical structure. How frequently must data be acquired and must a human be present? Will such data be acquired for only stored weapons or will it be required of deployed weapons as well? Will tactical weapons be subject to such monitoring or will only strategic weapons apply? Which data will be most crucial? Will OSI's be a component of embedded sensor data management or will these sensors stand alone in their data extraction processes? The problem space is massive, but can be constrained by extrapolating to a reasonable future treaty regime and examining the bounded options this scenario poses. Arms control verification sensors, embedded within the warhead case or aeroshell, must provide sufficient but not excessively detailed data, confirming that the item is a nuclear warhead and that it is a particular warhead without revealing sensitive information. Geolocation will be provided by an intermediate transceiver used to acquire the data and to forward the data to a central processing location. Past Chain-of-Custody projects have included such devices and will be primarily responsible for adding such indicators in the future. For the purposes of a treaty regime a TLI will be verified as a nuclear warhead by knowledge of (a) the presence and mass of SNM, (b) the presence of HE, and (c) the reporting of a unique tag ID. All of these parameters can be obtained via neutron correlation measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and fiber optic grating fabrication, respectively. Data from these sensors will be pushed out monthly and acquired nearly daily, providing one of several verification layers in

  15. Smart sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  16. Statistical Analysis of the Random Telegraph Noise in a 1.1 μm Pixel, 8.3 MP CMOS Image Sensor Using On-Chip Time Constant Extraction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Calvin Yi-Ping; Tu, Honyih; Wu, Thomas Meng-Hsiu; Chou, Kuo-Yu; Yeh, Shang-Fu; Yin, Chin; Lee, Chih-Lin

    2017-11-23

    A study of the random telegraph noise (RTN) of a 1.1 μm pitch, 8.3 Mpixel CMOS image sensor (CIS) fabricated in a 45 nm backside-illumination (BSI) technology is presented in this paper. A noise decomposition scheme is used to pinpoint the noise source. The long tail of the random noise (RN) distribution is directly linked to the RTN from the pixel source follower (SF). The full 8.3 Mpixels are classified into four categories according to the observed RTN histogram peaks. A theoretical formula describing the RTN as a function of the time difference between the two phases of the correlated double sampling (CDS) is derived and validated by measured data. An on-chip time constant extraction method is developed and applied to the RTN analysis. The effects of readout circuit bandwidth on the settling ratios of the RTN histograms are investigated and successfully accounted for in a simulation using a RTN behavior model.

  17. Service and device discovery of nodes in a wireless sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Östmark, Å.; Lindgren, P.; van Halteren, Aart; Meppelink, L.

    2006-01-01

    Emerging wireless communication standards and more capable sensors and actuators have pushed further development of wireless sensor networks. Deploying a large number of sensor nodes requires a high-level framework enabling the devices to present themselves and the resources they hold. The device

  18. Industrial wireless sensor networks applications, protocols, and standards

    CERN Document Server

    Güngör, V Çagri

    2013-01-01

    The collaborative nature of industrial wireless sensor networks (IWSNs) brings several advantages over traditional wired industrial monitoring and control systems, including self-organization, rapid deployment, flexibility, and inherent intelligent processing. In this regard, IWSNs play a vital role in creating more reliable, efficient, and productive industrial systems, thus improving companies' competitiveness in the marketplace. Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards examines the current state of the art in industrial wireless sensor networks and outline

  19. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  20. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  1. Deployable wing model considering structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness for deployment system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Keisuke; Wang, Yinan; Makihara, Kanjuro

    2017-11-01

    In future, wings will be deployed in the span direction during flight. The deployment system improves flight ability and saves storage space in the airplane. For the safe design of the wing, the deployment motion needs to be simulated. In the simulation, the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness should be considered because they may lead to undesirable phenomena such as a residual vibration after the deployment or a flutter during the deployment. In this study, the deployment motion is simulated in the time domain by using a nonlinear folding wing model based on multibody dynamics, absolute nodal coordinate formulation, and two-dimensional aerodynamics with strip theory. We investigate the effect of the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness on the time-domain deployment simulation.

  2. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  3. Sensor Placement Optimization using Chama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geotechnology and Engineering Dept.; Nicholson, Bethany L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Discrete Math and Optimization Dept.; Laird, Carl Damon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Discrete Math and Optimization Dept.

    2017-10-01

    Continuous or regularly scheduled monitoring has the potential to quickly identify changes in the environment. However, even with low - cost sensors, only a limited number of sensors can be deployed. The physical placement of these sensors, along with the sensor technology and operating conditions, can have a large impact on the performance of a monitoring strategy. Chama is an open source Python package which includes mixed - integer, stochastic programming formulations to determine sensor locations and technology that maximize monitoring effectiveness. The methods in Chama are general and can be applied to a wide range of applications. Chama is currently being used to design sensor networks to monitor airborne pollutants and to monitor water quality in water distribution systems. The following documentation includes installation instructions and examples, description of software features, and software license. The software is intended to be used by regulatory agencies, industry, and the research community. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the Python Programming Language. References are included for addit ional background on software components. Online documentation, hosted at http://chama.readthedocs.io/, will be updated as new features are added. The online version includes API documentation .

  4. Downhole Applications of Magnetic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Li, Bodong; Moellendick, Timothy E

    2017-10-19

    In this paper we present a review of the application of two types of magnetic sensors-fluxgate magnetometers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors-in the oil/gas industry. These magnetic sensors play a critical role in drilling wells safely, accurately and efficiently into a target reservoir zone by providing directional data of the well and acquiring information about the surrounding geological formations. Research into magnetic sensors for oil/gas drilling has not been explored by researchers to the same extent as other applications, such as biomedical, magnetic storage and automotive/aerospace applications. Therefore, this paper aims to serve as an opportunity for researchers to truly understand how magnetic sensors can be used in a downhole environment and to provide fertile ground for research and development in this area. A look ahead, discussing other magnetic sensor technologies that can potentially be used in the oil/gas industry is presented, and what is still needed in order deploy them in the field is also addressed.

  5. Energy-Efficient Implementation of ECDH Key Exchange for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Christian; Mader, Roland; Koschuch, Manuel; Großschädl, Johann; Szekely, Alexander; Tillich, Stefan

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are playing a vital role in an ever-growing number of applications ranging from environmental surveillance over medical monitoring to home automation. Since WSNs are often deployed in unattended or even hostile environments, they can be subject to various malicious attacks, including the manipulation and capture of nodes. The establishment of a shared secret key between two or more individual nodes is one of the most important security services needed to guarantee the proper functioning of a sensor network. Despite some recent advances in this field, the efficient implementation of cryptographic key establishment for WSNs remains a challenge due to the resource constraints of small sensor nodes such as the MICAz mote. In this paper we present a lightweight implementation of the elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman (ECDH) key exchange for ZigBee-compliant sensor nodes equipped with an ATmega128 processor running the TinyOS operating system. Our implementation uses a 192-bit prime field specified by the NIST as underlying algebraic structure and requires only 5.20 ·106 clock cycles to compute a scalar multiplication if the base point is fixed and known a priori. A scalar multiplication using a random base point takes about 12.33 ·106 cycles. Our results show that a full ECDH key exchange between two MICAz motes consumes an energy of 57.33 mJ (including radio communication), which is significantly better than most previously reported ECDH implementations on comparable platforms.

  6. A Secure Localization Approach Using Mutual Authentication and Insider Node Validation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Localization is a concerning issue in the applications of wireless sensor networks. Along with the accuracy of the location estimation of the sensor nodes, the security of the estimation is another priority. Wireless sensor networks often face various attacks where the attackers try to manipulate the estimated location or try to provide false beacons. In this paper, we have proposed a methodology that will address this problem of security aspects in localization of the sensor nodes. Moreover, we have considered the network environment with random node deployment and mobility as these two conditions are less addressed in previous research works. Further, our proposed algorithm provides low overhead due to the usage of less control messages in a limited transmission range. In addition, we have also proposed an algorithm to detect the malicious anchor nodes inside the network. The simulated results show that our proposed algorithm is efficient in terms of time consumption, localization accuracy, and localization ratio in the presence of malicious nodes.

  7. Modeling network technology deployment rates with different network models

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Yoo

    2011-01-01

    To understand the factors that encourage the deployment of a new networking technology, we must be able to model how such technology gets deployed. We investigate how network structure influences deployment with a simple deployment model and different network models through computer simulations. The results indicate that a realistic model of networking technology deployment should take network structure into account.

  8. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Bagula

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1 slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2 master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3 repeater sensor nodes, also called “anchor” nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by

  9. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagula, Antoine; Castelli, Lorenzo; Zennaro, Marco

    2015-06-30

    Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1) slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2) master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3) repeater sensor nodes, also called "anchor" nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by simulation results

  10. Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Kelly, Victoria; Hall, Mark; Palecki, Michael A.; Temimi, Marouane

    2016-10-01

    Soil observations networks at the national scale play an integral role in hydrologic modeling, drought assessment, agricultural decision support, and our ability to understand climate change. Understanding soil moisture variability is necessary to apply these measurements to model calibration, business and consumer applications, or even human health issues. The installation of soil moisture sensors as sparse, national networks is necessitated by limited financial resources. However, this results in the incomplete sampling of the local heterogeneity of soil type, vegetation cover, topography, and the fine spatial distribution of precipitation events. To this end, temporary networks can be installed in the areas surrounding a permanent installation within a sparse network. The temporary networks deployed in this study provide a more representative average at the 3 km and 9 km scales, localized about the permanent gauge. The value of such temporary networks is demonstrated at test sites in Millbrook, New York and Crossville, Tennessee. The capacity of a single U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) sensor set to approximate the average of a temporary network at the 3 km and 9 km scales using a simple linear scaling function is tested. The capacity of a temporary network to provide reliable estimates with diminishing numbers of sensors, the temporal stability of those networks, and ultimately, the relationship of the variability of those networks to soil moisture conditions at the permanent sensor are investigated. In this manner, this work demonstrates the single-season installation of a temporary network as a mechanism to characterize the soil moisture variability at a permanent gauge within a sparse network.

  11. Sustainable coastal sensor networks: technologies and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Butman, Jerry; Babb, Ivar; Bucklin, Ann

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed sensor network for a coastal maritime security system. This concept incorporates a network of small passive and active multi-phenomenological unattended sensors and shore based optical sensors to detect, classify, and track submerged threat objects approaching high value coastal assets, such as ports, harbors, residential, commercial, and military facilities and areas. The network of unattended, in-water sensors perform the initial detection, classification, and coarse tracking and then queues shore based optical laser radar sensors. These shore-based sensors perform a queued sector search to develop a refined track on the submerged threat objects that were initially detected by the unattended sensor network. Potential threat objects include swimmers, small unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV's), small submarines, and submerged barges. All of these threats have the potential to transport threat objects such as explosives, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear materials. Reliable systems with low false alarm rates (FAR) are proposed. Tens to hundreds of low cost passive sensors are proposed to be deployed conjunctively with several active acoustic and optical sensors in threat and facility dependant patterns to maximize the detection, tracking and classification of submerged threat objects. The integrated command and control system and novel microbial fuel cells to power these sensor networks are also described.

  12. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INTERNET OF THINGS FOR SMART CITY DEPLOYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGE SUCIU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Computing represents the new method of delivering hardware and software resources to the users, Internet of Things (IoT is currently one of the most popular ICT paradigms. Both concepts can have a major impact on how we build smart or/and smarter cities. Cloud computing represents the delivery of hardware and software resources on-demand over the Internet as a Service. At the same time, the IoT concept envisions a new generation of devices (sensors, both virtual and physical that are connected to the Internet and provide different services for value-added applications. In this paper we present our view on how to deploy Cloud computing and IoT for smart or/and smarter cities. We demonstrate that data gathered from heterogeneous and distributed IoT devices can be automatically managed, handled and reused with decentralized cloud services.

  13. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  14. Temperature and salinity data from moored seacat sensors of the Multi-disciplinary Ocean Sensors for Environmental Analyses and Networks (MOSEAN) project 2004-2007 (NODC Accession 0115703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected by seacat sensors from seven deployments within 2004-2007 on the HALE-ALOHA mooring, a location about 100 km north of...

  15. Radio link design framework for WSN deployment and performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponara, Sergio; Giannetti, Filippo

    2017-05-01

    For an easy implementation of wireless sensor and actuator networks (WSAN), the state-of-the-art is offering single-chip solutions embedding in the same device a microcontroller core with a wireless transceiver. These internet-on-chip devices support different protocols (Bluetooth, ZigBee, Bluetooth Low Energy, sub- GHz links), from about 300 MHz to 6 GHz, with max. sustained bit-rates from 250 kb/s (sub-GHz links) to 4 Mb/s (Wi-Fi), and different trade-offs between RX sensitivity (from -74 to -100 dBm), RX noise figure (few dB to 10 dB), maximum TX power (from 0 to 22 dBm), link distances, power consumption levels (from few mW to several hundreds of mW). One limit for their successful application is the missing of an easy-to-use modeling and simulation environment to plan their deployment. The need is to predict, before installing a network, at which distances the sensors can be deployed, the real achievable bit-rate, communication latency, outage probability, power consumption, battery duration. To this aim, this paper presents the H2AWKS (Harsh environment and Hardware Aware Wireless linK Simulator) simulator, which allows the planning of a WSAN taking into account environment constraints and hardware parameters. Applications of H2AWKS to real WSAN case studies prove that it is an easy to use simulation environment, which allows design exploration of the system performance of a WSAN as a function of the operating environment and of the hardware parameters of the used devices.

  16. Network performance of a wireless sensor network for temperature monitoring in vineyards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liscano, Ramiro; Jacoub, John Khalil; Dersingh, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are an emerging technology which can be used for outdoor environmental monitoring. This paper presents challenges that arose from the development and deployment of a WSN for environmental monitoring as well as network performance analysis of this network. Different...... components in our sensor network architecture are presented like the physical nodes, the sensor node code, and two messaging protocols; one for collecting sensor and network values and the other for sensor node commands. An information model for sensor nodes to support plug-and-play capabilities in sensor...

  17. Secure Wireless Sensor Networks: Problems and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Hu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available As sensor networks edge closer towards wide-spread deployment, security issues become a central concern. So far, the main research focus has been on making sensor networks feasible and useful, and less emphasis was placed on security. This paper analyzes security challenges in wireless sensor networks and summarizes key issues that should be solved for achieving the ad hoc security. It gives an overview of the current state of solutions on such key issues as secure routing, prevention of denial-of-service and key management service. We also present some secure methods to achieve security in wireless sensor networks. Finally we present our integrated approach to securing sensor networks.

  18. RadNet Air Quality (Deployable) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet Deployable Monitoring is designed to collect radiological and meteorological information and data asset needed to establish the impact of radiation levels on...

  19. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  20. Field guide to quick deployment thermocouples

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Instructions for quick deployment of thermocouples to measure fire intensity at Kulm Wetland Management District as part of the Fire Intensity Monitoring survey....

  1. Maintenance decision support system deployment guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This is a guide for transportation professionals on why and how to deploy winter Maintenance Decision Support Systems (MDSS). Adverse winter weather can cause traffic delays and crashes. Treating the effects of winter weather can also have impacts on...

  2. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. These...

  3. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's Veritex(TM) materials. These...

  4. Office of Civilian Response Deployment Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The purpose of OCR DTS is to establish, manage and track relevant Civilian Response Corps teams for deployment by sector experience, training, education etc.

  5. Optimizing the Deployment of Public Access Defibrillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Timothy C.Y.; Demirtas, Derya; Kwon, Roy H.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a significant public health issue, and treatment, namely, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, is very time sensitive. Public access defibrillation programs, which deploy automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for bystander use in an emergency, reduce

  6. Extreme Environment Sampling System Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Venus or Comet mission architectures may feature robotic sampling systems comprised of a Sampling Tool and Deployment Mechanism. Since 2005, Honeybee has been...

  7. High Efficiency, Deployable Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrathin, lightweight, flexible, and easily deployable solar cell (SC) capable of specific power greater than 1kW/kg are at an early stage of development for...

  8. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  9. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  10. Aptamer Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Marrazza, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    In the last years, great progress has been accomplished in the development of aptamer sensors with different transducers. In order to improve the sensitivity of these biosensors, several methodologies have been employed. In this Special Issue, the state of art and the future trends in the field of aptamer sensors have been explored.

  11. Sap flow sensors: construction, quality control and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tyler W; Kuo, Chen-Min; Liang, Xu; Yu, Pao-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a design for two types of sensors, based on the thermal dissipation and heat ratio methods of sap flow calculation, for moderate to large scale deployments for the purpose of monitoring tree transpiration. These designs include a procedure for making these sensors, a quality control method for the final products, and a complete list of components with vendors and pricing information. Both sensor designs were field tested alongside a commercial sap flow sensor to assess their performance and show the importance for quality controlling the sensor outputs. Results show that for roughly 2% of the cost of commercial sensors, self-made sap flow sensors can provide acceptable estimates of the sap flow measurements compared to the commercial sensors.

  12. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    frequented by military families and by emailing announcements to military family life administrators located in all 50 states. Military couples were...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0131 TITLE: Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Knobloch...Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0131 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  13. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  14. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Deployed Military Members 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-10-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N10-P20 Wilson...training literature of new recruits or accessions, the rate of ID and IDA was a significant health risk to these military members . It was surmised...study inform nurses and health care professionals that are involved in the deployment preparation of military members . They should target assessing

  15. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  16. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  17. Soldier sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossives, Dean P.

    2010-04-01

    A new sensor system, whose functionality is not reliant on mass spectrometric or ionization methods, is combined with a substrate technology which allows for separately optimized control circuits and standardized advanced sensors in a simple packaging methodology to foster an entirely new generation of modular optical sensors. These sensors will be based on biologic and chromic compounds. The compounds will utilize reversible reaction chemistry to enable self cleaning. The detector's operation is based on simple changes in absorbance, reflectance, color, or other optical properties. The time to saturation of the sensor will determine the relative concentration in the air. A detection scheme based on these properties will function in high background levels and also be able to pick up low level concentrations as well.

  18. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  19. Fiber-Optic Sensing System: Overview, Development and Deployment in Flight at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the research and technological development of the fiber-optic sensing system (FOSS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (NASA AFRC) is presented. Theory behind fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, as well as interrogation technique based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) is discussed. Assessment and validation of FOSS as an accurate measurement tool for structural health monitoring is realized in the laboratory environment as well as large-scale flight deployment.

  20. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  1. A gendered perspective on military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Nilsson, Johanna; Berkel, Laverne

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment, especially in combat or dangerous areas, can have a strong influence on subsequent mental health. This effect may be intensified as a result of the potential stigma that admission of mental health problems indicates weakness. Additional mental health issues exist for female soldiers from the National Guard who are pulled from non-military environments to work under dangerous conditions far from home and traditional social support. Minimal documentation is available about the day-to-day, gendered experiences of deployment for this group of female soldiers. To provide background for appropriate training and support, the aim of this study was to understand better the experiences of military deployment for women in the National Guard. We used content analysis to analyze individual, semi-structured interviews with a sample of 42 women from 7 U.S. National Guard units who were deployed in combat areas. Four general themes emerged about deployment experience: the general environment of stress, heterogeneous job responsibilities, home comes with you, and gendered stress. Military efforts are needed to address gender-specific issues associated with deployment and to develop resilience training that will optimize the mental health of female soldiers.

  2. FUZZY LOGIC BASED ENERGY EFFICIENT PROTOCOL IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Wei Siew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs have been vastly developed due to the advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS using WSN to study and monitor the environments towards climates changes. In environmental monitoring, sensors are randomly deployed over the interest area to periodically sense the physical environments for a few months or even a year. Therefore, to prolong the network lifetime with limited battery capacity becomes a challenging issue. Low energy adaptive cluster hierarchical (LEACH is the common clustering protocol that aim to reduce the energy consumption by rotating the heavy workload cluster heads (CHs. The CHs election in LEACH is based on probability model which will lead to inefficient in energy consumption due to least desired CHs location in the network. In WSNs, the CHs location can directly influence the network energy consumption and further affect the network lifetime. In this paper, factors which will affect the network lifetime will be presented and the demonstration of fuzzy logic based CH selection conducted in base station (BS will also be carried out. To select suitable CHs that will prolong the network first node dies (FND round and consistent throughput to the BS, energy level and distance to the BS are selected as fuzzy inputs.

  3. A Female Urinary Diversion Device for Military Women in the Deployed Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    environment, and 2) determine if there are differences in self-reported urinary symptoms between an intervention group and control group of deployed... Freedom (OEF) were recruited from an SRC. They were randomly assigned to the IG (n = 61) or CG (n = 33). Of the 61 military women randomized to...provided support for the FUDD’s utility in austere environments. Clinically significant differences in urinary symptoms between groups were determined

  4. A Coaching Intervention to Promote Nutrition and Bone Health in Deployed Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-13

    remainder influenced by hormonal status, diet, environmental factors, and exercise . The most important modifiable risk factors associated with bone density ...dietary and exercise contributions to bone health assessed before and after a 9-month deployment. Design/Methods: Prospective, longitudinal, cluster...randomized, controlled trial. Outcomes included anthropometrics, bone density , bone turnover, dietary intake, and frequency/ intensity of work, sport, and

  5. Spectrum Load Balancing for Flexible Spectrum Usage in Local Area Deployment Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Wang, Yuanye; Marchetti, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a non-contention based mechanism for allocation of the spectral resources by several interfering Home e-NodeBs (HeNBs) deployed by the same or different operators, potentially in random manner in a given geographical area. The proposed mechanism facilitates allocation of ...

  6. BLIG: A New Approach for Sensor Identification, Grouping,and Authorisation in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    BLIG (Blinking Led Indicated Grouping) for easy deployment of BSNs on patients in critical situations, including mechanisms for uniquely identifying and grouping sensor nodes belonging to a patient in a secure and trusted way. This approach has been designed in close cooperation with users, and easy...

  7. Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E E

    1997-10-01

    cause lateral distribution of the water. The large tank that accommodates the sand bed and the necessary plumbing to simulate various well configurations was received. The monitoring equipment and the sensors are currently being installed. The experimental procedures for Phase II experiments are under further investigation and will be initiated upon installation of CATC and assembly of the monitoring system. Due to insufficient operating funds, the large scale experiments will not be done this year. Task No. 1.3: Technical Support - Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for In Situ Formed Barriers (B. Overbey & D. Locke, BDM Federal): The Operating Permit Renewal Request for bench scale operations in the FETC B-17 building was submitted to the FETC Lab Safety Committee for approval on 8/14/97. A review of the revised NEPA documents prepared last year indicates that these documents are still applicable for the current work. The initial design and specifications for the CATC vessel were prepared. Construction of the CATC was initiated in early July, the vessel was received August 15, 1997, and on-site work was completed this quarter.

  8. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  9. Electrochemical sensor monitoring of volcanic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Freshwater, Ray; Oppenheimer, Clive; Saffell, John; Jones, Rod; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Mead, Iqbal

    2010-05-01

    Advances in instrumentation have fuelled a recent growth of interest in using portable sensor systems for environmental monitoring of pollution. Developments in wireless technology are enabling such systems to operate remotely and autonomously, generating a wealth of environmental data. We report here on the application of miniature Alphasense electrochemical sensors to the detection and characterisation of gases in volcanic plumes. A highly portable sensor system was developed to operate an array of 6 low cost electrochemical sensors to detect CO, H2, HCl, SO2, H2S and NO2 at 1 Hz. A miniature pump draws air over all sensors simultaneously (i.e. sensors arranged in parallel). The sensor output in these campaigns was logged on PDAs for real-time viewing, and later download (with a view to future data-streaming). The instrument was deployed at a number of volcanoes and was subject to extremely harsh conditions including highly acidic environments, low (Antarctic) temperatures, and transport over rough terrain. Analysis methods are demonstrated that consider calibration, cross-sensitivities of the sensors to multiple gases, differing sensor response times, temperature dependence, and background sensor drift with time. The analysis is applied to a range of plume field-measurements to extract gas concentrations ranging from 100's ppmv to sub-ppmv and to characterise the individual volcano emissions. Applications of similar sensor systems for real-time long-term monitoring of volcanic emissions (which may indicate and ultimately predict eruptive behavior), and UAV and balloon-borne plume sampling are now already being realised. This work focused on demonstrating the application of electrochemical sensors to monitoring of environmental pollution from volcanoes. Other applications for similar sensors include the near-source monitoring of industrial emissions, and of pollutant levels enhanced by traffic emissions in the urban environment.

  10. Bio-Inspired Cyber Security for Smart Grid Deployments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, Archibald D.; Thompson, Seth R.; Doroshchuk, Ruslan A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2013-05-01

    mart grid technologies are transforming the electric power grid into a grid with bi-directional flows of both power and information. Operating millions of new smart meters and smart appliances will significantly impact electric distribution systems resulting in greater efficiency. However, the scale of the grid and the new types of information transmitted will potentially introduce several security risks that cannot be addressed by traditional, centralized security techniques. We propose a new bio-inspired cyber security approach. Social insects, such as ants and bees, have developed complex-adaptive systems that emerge from the collective application of simple, light-weight behaviors. The Digital Ants framework is a bio-inspired framework that uses mobile light-weight agents. Sensors within the framework use digital pheromones to communicate with each other and to alert each other of possible cyber security issues. All communication and coordination is both localized and decentralized thereby allowing the framework to scale across the large numbers of devices that will exist in the smart grid. Furthermore, the sensors are light-weight and therefore suitable for implementation on devices with limited computational resources. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Digital Ants framework and then present results from test bed-based demonstrations that show that Digital Ants can identify a cyber attack scenario against smart meter deployments.

  11. Review Of Prevention Techniques For Denial Of Service DOS Attacks In Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Rolla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks comprised of several tiny sensor nodes which are densely deployed over the region to monitor the environmental conditions. These sensor nodes have certain design issues out of which security is the main predominant factor as it effects the whole lifetime of network. DDoS Distributed denial of service attack floods unnecessary packets in the sensor network. A review on DDoS attacks and their prevention techniques have been done in this paper.

  12. Review Of Prevention Techniques For Denial Of Service DOS Attacks In Wireless Sensor Network

    OpenAIRE

    Poonam Rolla; Manpreet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks comprised of several tiny sensor nodes which are densely deployed over the region to monitor the environmental conditions. These sensor nodes have certain design issues out of which security is the main predominant factor as it effects the whole lifetime of network. DDoS Distributed denial of service attack floods unnecessary packets in the sensor network. A review on DDoS attacks and their prevention techniques have been done in this paper.

  13. A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

    2011-09-12

    This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we

  14. Lightweight, Self-Deploying Foam Antenna Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Levin, Steven; Rand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight, deployable antennas for a variety of outer-space and terrestrial applications would be designed and fabricated according to the concept of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures, according to a proposal. Mechanically deployable antennas now in use are heavy, complex, and unreliable, and they utilize packaging volume inefficiently. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would be simple and would deploy themselves without need for any mechanisms and, therefore, would be more reliable. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would also weigh less, could be packaged in smaller volumes, and would cost less, relative to mechanically deployable antennas. The CHEM concept was described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56; and "Solar Heating for Deployment of Foam Structures" (NPO-20961), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 36. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The CHEM concept is one of utilizing opencell foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to make lightweight, reliable, simple, and inexpensive structures that can be alternately (1) compressed and stowed compactly or (2) expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM structure is fabricated at full size from a block of SMP foam in its glassy state [at a temperature below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP]. The structure is heated to the rubbery state of the SMP (that is, to a temperature above Tg) and compacted to a small volume. After compaction, the structure is cooled to the glassy state of the SMP. The compacting force can then be released and the structure remains compact as long as the temperature is kept below Tg. Upon subsequent heating of the structure above Tg, the simultaneous elastic recovery of the foam and its shape-memory effect cause the structure to expand to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the structure can be rigidified by

  15. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments...

  16. 5th International Workshop on Real-World Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Wen; Ferrari, Federico; Zimmerling, Marco; Mottola, Luca

    2014-01-01

    This edited book presents the results of the 5th Workshop on Real-world Wireless Sensor Networks (REALWSN). The purpose of this workshop  was to bring together researchers and practitioners working in the area of sensor networks, with focus on real-world experiments or deployments of wireless sensor networks. Included were, nonetheless, emerging forms of sensing such as those that leverage smart phones, Internet of Things, RFIDs, and robots. Indeed, when working with real-world experiments or deployments, many new or unforeseen issues may arise: the network environment may be composed of a variety of different technologies, leading to very heterogeneous network structures; software development for large scale networks poses new types of problems; the performance of prototype networks may differ significantly from the deployed system; whereas actual sensor network deployments may need a complex combination of autonomous and manual configuration. Furthermore, results obtained through simulation are typically n...

  17. Guidesonde: Targeting meteorological dropsonde with optical and in-situ sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exists a programmatic need across several government agencies for both UAV and manned aircraft to be able to deploy in-situ observation sensors within areas of...

  18. Campaign monitoring of railroad bridges in high-speed rail shared corridors using wireless smart sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This research project used wireless smart sensors to develop a cost-effective and practical portable structural health monitoring : system for railroad bridges in North America. The system is designed for periodic deployment rather than as a permanen...

  19. Engineered spacecraft deployables influenced by nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, David; Wolpert, W. D.

    2009-08-01

    Northrop Grumman has been a leader in the space industry for over 50 years, and in fact was the first in the industry to produce a contractor-built spacecraft. Since the dawn of the Space Age and that Pioneer-1 spacecraft, every sub-system that makes up a spacecraft has grown in capability. One of the most visible changes to a spacecraft that enables these enhanced capabilities is the variety of appendages called deployable systems. These systems include solar arrays, antenna reflectors, telescopes and a current design for a tennis court sized sunshield. While the end product may look very different and perform different functions, all deployable systems share certain common attributes. Among these are: a latch mechanism for the deployable restraining it to the spacecraft for launch, an unlatching or release mechanism once orbit is achieved, an energy storage device or driving mechanism for deployment and a re-latching, or sometimes a repositioning device for orientation of the system during the mission. This paper describes these space-based systems and draws some comparisons with various natural analogs. While it may not be the case that the aerospace engineer is attempting to duplicate natural systems, it is almost certain that spacecraft deployable systems have been influenced by nature.

  20. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  1. Articulated Deployment System for Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, M.; Borst, G.; Grimminck, M.; Robroek, M.; Geuskens, F.

    2015-09-01

    An articulated deployment system is developed for the deployment and pointing of antenna reflectors with a larger diameter and extended focal length. The articulated boom can be folded in several configurations to stow on the spacecraft sidewall. The boom, made of carbon fibre that is configured for a low CTE of better than ±0.3μm/m-K, deploys by means of spring-driven hinges interconnected via synchronisation cables and is controlled by an actuator. When fully deployed the hinges are latched, providing a stiff structure essential for disturbance-free pointing of the antenna. For pointing, the existing ADTM Mk2 gimbal by Airbus Defence and Space UK is used. The arm is mounted (repeatably) to the spacecraft with an adjustable range of ±7mm in all axes for coarse adjustment and mounted (repeatably) to the reflector with fine adjustment range of ±2mm and ±1.5°.The reflector boom has a modular design, which allows a wide range of mission configurations by tuning only a few design parameters such as limb length, deployment angles, and the number of articulations required to stow the boom.

  2. Persistent Identifiers for Field Deployments: A Missing Link in the Provenance Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R. A.; Ji, P.; Fils, D.; Shepherd, A.; Chandler, C. L.; Lehnert, K.

    2016-12-01

    Research in the geosciences is characterized by a wide range of complex and costly field deployments including oceanographic cruises, submersible dives, drilling expeditions, seismic networks, geodetic campaigns, moored arrays, aircraft flights, and satellite missions. Each deployment typically produces a mix of sensor and sample data, spanning a period from hours to decades, that ultimately yields a long tail of post-field products and publications. Publishing persistent, citable identifiers for field deployments will facilitate 1) preservation and reuse of the original field data, 2) reproducibility of the resulting publications, and 3) recognition for both the facilities that operate the platforms and the investigators who secure funding for the experiments. In the ocean domain, sharing unique identifiers for field deployments is a familiar practice. For example, the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) routinely links datasets to cruise identifiers published by the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program. In recent years, facilities have started to publish formal/persistent identifiers, typically Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), for field deployments including seismic networks, oceanographic cruises, and moored arrays. For example, the EarthChem Library (ECL) publishes a DOI for each dataset which, if it derived from an oceanographic research cruise on a US vessel, is linked to a DOI for the cruise published by R2R. Work is underway to create similar links for the IODP JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) and the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO). We present results and lessons learned including a draft schema for publishing field deployments as DataCite DOI records; current practice for linking these DOIs with related identifiers such as Open Researcher and Contributor IDs (ORCIDs), Open Funder Registry (OFR) codes, and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs); and consideration of other

  3. Vibrissa Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Docket No. 300119 1 of 11 VIBRISSA SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention provides a...vibrissa in two dimensions. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION [0010] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a sensor capable of

  4. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    behavioral problems in children , a higher risk of divorce , and higher rates of suicide. Not surprisingly, service members and spouses regularly name...applied only to children younger than 11, not to teenagers. Neither teens’ parents nor the youths themselves reported behavioral difficulties. But... preparing for deployment (developing an emergency financial plan or buying life insurance), the higher their parenting satisfaction after deployment

  5. Research on lightweight passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror in the deployable space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peifeng; Li, Chuang; Jing, Nan; Chong, Yaqin; Ren, Guorui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of lightweight passive deployment mechanism based on the tape spring and the shape memory alloy is presented for the secondary mirror of a deployable space telescope. In this passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror, the high elastic potential energy of the folded tape springs is used as driving force when the support structure is extended, and the high stiffness characteristics of the circular arc cross section of the tape spring can be used to achieve structure self-locking after deployment. Then a deployable space telescope combined with lightweight passive deployable mechanism for the secondary mirror is designed for applying to nanosatellite imaging. Furthermore, a lock-release device is designed to achieve the function of locking the folded structure and releasing on orbit by taking advantage of the phase transformation characteristics of shape memory alloy with temperature changing. Finally, the correction method for the deployment error of secondary mirror is discussed. The temperature of the tape springs is controlled respectively to make a required length change. This can achieve the purpose of adjusting the position of the secondary mirror and improve the deployment accuracy.

  6. Simulation of Locking Space Truss Deployments for a Large Deployable Sparse Aperture Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...6 Martin Marietta Box Truss Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Able Deployable Articulated Mast (ADAM...8 3. Martin Marietta Deployable Box Truss Design [2]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4

  7. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  8. Applying Sensor Web Technology to Marine Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirka, Simon; del Rio, Joaquin; Mihai Toma, Daniel; Nüst, Daniel; Stasch, Christoph; Delory, Eric

    2015-04-01

    SWE specifications that provide stricter guidance how these standards shall be applied to marine data (e.g. SensorML 2.0 profiles stating which metadata elements are mandatory building upon the ESONET Sensor Registry developments, etc.). Within the NeXOS project the presented architecture is implemented as a set of open source components. These implementations can be re-used by all interested scientists and data providers needing tools for publishing or consuming oceanographic sensor data. In further projects such as the European project FixO3 (Fixed-point Open Ocean Observatories), these software development activities are complemented with additional efforts to provide guidance how Sensor Web technology can be applied in an efficient manner. This way, not only software components are made available but also documentation and information resources that help to understand which types of Sensor Web deployments are best suited to fulfil different types of user requirements.

  9. A new energy-efficient MAC protocol with noise-based transmitted-reference modulation for wireless sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morshed, S.; Heijenk, Geert; Meijerink, Arjan; Ye, D.; van der Zee, Ronan A.R.; Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2013-01-01

    Energy-constrained behavior of sensor nodes is one of the most important criteria for successful deployment of wireless sensor networks. The medium access control (MAC) protocol determines to a large extent the time a sensor node transceiver spends listening or transmitting, and hence the energy

  10. Enviro-Net: From Networks of Ground-Based Sensor Systems to a Web Platform for Sensor Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems monitoring is essential to properly understand their development and the effects of events, both climatological and anthropological in nature. The amount of data used in these assessments is increasing at very high rates. This is due to increasing availability of sensing systems and the development of new techniques to analyze sensor data. The Enviro-Net Project encompasses several of such sensor system deployments across five countries in the Americas. These deployments use a few different ground-based sensor systems, installed at different heights monitoring the conditions in tropical dry forests over long periods of time. This paper presents our experience in deploying and maintaining these systems, retrieving and pre-processing the data, and describes the Web portal developed to help with data management, visualization and analysis.

  11. Decentralized Sensor Fusion for Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; Barbosa, Marco; Bowden, Richard; Capitán, Jesús; Corominas, Andreu; Gilbert, Andrew; Illingworth, John; Merino, Luis; Mirats, Josep M.; Moreno, Plínio; Ollero, Aníbal; Sequeira, João; Spaan, Matthijs T.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we explain the architecture for the environment and sensors that has been built for the European project URUS (Ubiquitous Networking Robotics in Urban Sites), a project whose objective is to develop an adaptable network robot architecture for cooperation between network robots and human beings and/or the environment in urban areas. The project goal is to deploy a team of robots in an urban area to give a set of services to a user community. This paper addresses the sensor architecture devised for URUS and the type of robots and sensors used, including environment sensors and sensors onboard the robots. Furthermore, we also explain how sensor fusion takes place to achieve urban outdoor execution of robotic services. Finally some results of the project related to the sensor network are highlighted. PMID:22294927

  12. Assessment of dynamic analyses for deploying space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, D.; Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A selected list of references on the analysis of the deployment concepts for large space truss structures are reviewed. The stability of the deployment process is discussed, and stable methods of deployment mentioned. Analytical and experimental needs to assess feasibility and performance of proposed deployment concepts are outlined.

  13. Development of Norms for the Post-deployment Reintegration Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    perspective. Recognizing the importance of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers...of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers developed the Army Post- Deployment... successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, and attempting to address the gaps and limitations of existing

  14. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges......More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  15. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  16. Techno-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Halldor Matthias

    2007-01-01

    og kombinerer en solid teknisk viden om telenet og tjenester med økonomisk teori og teori for regulering af telekommunikation. På grundlag heraf opstilles en tekno-økonomisk omkostningsmodel, der simulerer kapitaludgifter og ydelser. Som et særligt element i modellen benyttes spilteori til......-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment. It investigates the current market situation of broadband services, where the electricity companies challenge the incumbent telecom operators by extensive deployment of optical fibres to the end users. Very often the old telecom operators have a well-developed infrastructure...

  17. Industrial deployment of system engineering methods

    CERN Document Server

    Romanovsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A formal method is not the main engine of a development process, its contribution is to improve system dependability by motivating formalisation where useful. This book summarizes the results of the DEPLOY research project on engineering methods for dependable systems through the industrial deployment of formal methods in software development. The applications considered were in automotive, aerospace, railway, and enterprise information systems, and microprocessor design.  The project introduced a formal method, Event-B, into several industrial organisations and built on the lessons learned to

  18. Sensor emplacement testing at Poker Flat, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Anderson, K. E.; Azevedo, S.; Carothers, L.; Love, M.; Miller, P. E.; Parker, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Slad, G.; Thomas, D.; Aderhold, K.

    2013-12-01

    PASSCAL provides equipment and support for temporary seismic projects. Speed and efficiency of deployments are essential. A revised emplacement technique of putting broadband sensors directly into soil (aka direct burial) is being tested. The first phase (fall 2011 to spring 2013) comparing data quality and sensor stability between the direct burial and the traditional 1 m deep temporary PASSCAL-style vault in a wet and noisy site near San Antonio, NM is complete. Results suggest there is little or no difference in sensor performance in the relatively high-noise environment of this initial test. The second phase was started in November 2012 with the goal of making the same comparison, but at Poker Flat, Alaska, in a low-noise, high-signal, cold and wet environment, alongside a Transportable Array (TA) deployment to be used as a performance control. This location is in an accessible and secure area with very low site noise. In addition to benefiting future worldwide PASSCAL deployments, the Poker Flat experiment serves a secondary purpose of testing modifications necessary to successfully deploy and recover broadband stations in a cold environment with the limited logistics anticipated for remote Flexible Array (FA) and PASSCAL Program deployments in Alaska. Developing emplacement techniques that maintain high data quality and data return while minimizing logistics is critical to enable principle investigators to effectively and efficiently co-locate within the future TA Alaska footprint. Three Nanometrics sensors were installed in November 2012 in power-augered holes 76 cm in depth: a Trillium Compact Posthole (PH) and two Trillium 120PH units (one standard PH and one enhanced PHQ). The installations took less than 8 hours in -30°C conditions with 4 hours of usable daylight. The Compact PH and the 120PHQ are delivering data in realtime, while the 120PH is testing standalone power and data collection systems. Preliminary results compare favorably to each other as

  19. Sensor trustworthiness in uncertain time varying stochastic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay; Fernandes, Ronald; Vadakkeveedu, Kalyan

    2011-06-01

    Persistent surveillance applications require unattended sensors deployed in remote regions to track and monitor some physical stimulant of interest that can be modeled as output of time varying stochastic process. However, the accuracy or the trustworthiness of the information received through a remote and unattended sensor and sensor network cannot be readily assumed, since sensors may get disabled, corrupted, or even compromised, resulting in unreliable information. The aim of this paper is to develop information theory based metric to determine sensor trustworthiness from the sensor data in an uncertain and time varying stochastic environment. In this paper we show an information theory based determination of sensor data trustworthiness using an adaptive stochastic reference sensor model that tracks the sensor performance for the time varying physical feature, and provides a baseline model that is used to compare and analyze the observed sensor output. We present an approach in which relative entropy is used for reference model adaptation and determination of divergence of the sensor signal from the estimated reference baseline. We show that that KL-divergence is a useful metric that can be successfully used in determination of sensor failures or sensor malice of various types.

  20. Networked unattented ground sensors assesment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguereau, Julien; Gattefin, Christian; Dupuy, Gilles

    2003-09-01

    Within the framework of the NATO AC 323 / RTO TG 25 group, relating to advanced concepts of acoustic and seismic technology for military applications, Technical Establishment of Bourges welcomed and organized a joint campaign of experiment intending to demonstrate the interest of a networked unattented ground sensors for vehicles detection and tracking in an area defense context. Having reminded the principle of vehicles tracking, this paper describes the progress of the test campaign and details particularly sensors and participants deployment, the solution of interoperability chosen by the group and the instrumentation used to acquire, network, process and publish in real-time data available during the test: meteorological data, trajectography data and targets detection reports data. Finally, some results of the campaign are presented.

  1. Proximity sensor system development. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pigoski, T.M. [Merrit Systems, Inc. (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMERC) and Merritt Systems, Inc. (MSI) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for the development and demonstration of a compact, modular proximity sensing system suitable for application to a wide class of manipulator systems operated in support of environmental restoration and waste management activities. In teleoperated modes, proximity sensing provides the manipulator operator continuous information regarding the proximity of the manipulator to objects in the workspace. In teleoperated and robotic modes, proximity sensing provides added safety through the implementation of active whole arm collision avoidance capabilities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by LMERC for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design for the electronics required to support a modular whole arm proximity sensing system based on the use of capacitive sensors developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The use of ASIC technology greatly reduces the size of the electronics required to support the selected sensor types allowing deployment of many small sensor nodes over a large area of the manipulator surface to provide maximum sensor coverage. The ASIC design also provides a communication interface to support sensor commands from and sensor data transmission to a distributed processing system which allows modular implementation and operation of the sensor system. MSI is a commercial small business specializing in proximity sensing systems based upon infrared and acoustic sensors.

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE: Sensors for automotive telematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J. D.; Austin, L.

    2000-02-01

    This article reviews the current practice in sensors and sensor applications for automotive and traffic-control systems. Sensors to control engine fuelling, ignition and transmission (known as the powertrain) are reviewed and the likely course of future development is discussed in the light of regulatory and market requirements as well as trends in sensor design and manufacture. Sensor needs for suspension, braking and control of traction are also reviewed and the likely introduction of wheel and tyre sensors to enhance driving safety is discussed. The recent trend towards vehicle-mounted devices to sense the vehicle's environment (such as radar, optical, ultrasound, capacitive and image-based systems) and the implications of the introduction of safety-critical automotive systems such as adaptive cruise control are discussed. Sensors for initiating the deployment of safety systems such as airbags, together with transducers for disconnecting fuel pumps and vehicle batteries in the event of a crash, are reviewed. The paper includes a brief discussion of highway-based sensors for measuring vehicle speed and presence and concludes with a discussion of the likely future developments in the field.

  3. Intruder Activity Analysis under Unreliable Sensor Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of counting intruder activities within a monitored domain by a sensor network. The deployed sensors are unreliable. We characterize imperfect sensors with misdetection and false-alarm probabilities. We model intruder activities with Markov Chains. A set of Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models the imperfect sensors and intruder activities to be monitored. A novel sequential change detection/isolation algorithm is developed to detect and isolate a change from an HMM representing no intruder activity to another HMM representing some intruder activities. Procedures for estimating the entry time and the trace of intruder activities are developed. A domain monitoring example is given to illustrate the presented concepts and computational procedures.

  4. Assessing the quality of humidity measurements from operational radiosonde sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, I.; Arkin, P. A.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The quality of humidity measurements from global operational radiosonde sensors in upper, middle, and lower troposphere for the period 2000-2011 were investigated using satellite observations from three microwave water vapor channels. We first simulated the satellite brightness temperatures using radiosonde profiles and a radiative transfer model then carefully collocated simulated and observed satellite brightness temperatures. We partitioned the data into daytime and nighttime to evaluate the daytime radiation bias then separately evaluated the statistics for each sensor type. The error characteristics among different radiosondes vary significantly, which largely reflects the differences in sensor type. These differences are more evident in the mid-upper troposphere than in the lower troposphere, mainly because some of the sensors stop responding to tropospheric humidity somewhere in the upper or even in the middle troposphere. In the upper troposphere, most sensors have a dry bias but Russian sensors and a few other sensors including GZZ2, VZB2, and RS80H have a wet bias. In middle troposphere, Russian sensors still have a wet bias but all other sensors have a dry bias. All sensors, including Russian sensors, have a dry bias in lower troposphere. The systematic and random errors generally decrease from upper to lower troposphere. Sensors from China, India, Russia, and the U.S. have a large random error in upper troposphere, which indicates that these sensors are not suitable for upper tropospheric studies as they fail to respond to humidity changes in the upper and even middle troposphere. Overall, Vaisala sensors perform better than other sensors throughout the troposphere exhibiting the smallest systematic and random errors. Because of the large differences between different radiosonde humidity sensors, it is important for long-term trend studies to only use data measured using a single type of sensor at any given station. If multiple sensor types are used

  5. Link-quality measurement and reporting in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehri, Abdellah; Jeon, Gwanggil; Choi, Byoungjo

    2013-03-04

    Wireless Sensor networks (WSNs) are created by small hardware devices that possess the necessary functionalities to measure and exchange a variety of environmental data in their deployment setting. In this paper, we discuss the experiments in deploying a testbed as a first step towards creating a fully functional heterogeneous wireless network-based underground monitoring system. The system is mainly composed of mobile and static ZigBee nodes, which are deployed on the underground mine galleries for measuring ambient temperature. In addition, we describe the measured results of link characteristics such as received signal strength, latency and throughput for different scenarios.

  6. Link-Quality Measurement and Reporting in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungjo Choi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor networks (WSNs are created by small hardware devices that possess the necessary functionalities to measure and exchange a variety of environmental data in their deployment setting. In this paper, we discuss the experiments in deploying a testbed as a first step towards creating a fully functional heterogeneous wireless network-based underground monitoring system. The system is mainly composed of mobile and static ZigBee nodes, which are deployed on the underground mine galleries for measuring ambient temperature. In addition, we describe the measured results of link characteristics such as received signal strength, latency and throughput for different scenarios.

  7. Lifetime optimization of wireless sensor network by a better nodes positioning and energy distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J. M.; Murad, N. M.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a method of energy distribution on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). Nodes are randomly positioned and the sink is placed at the centre of the surface. Simulations show that relay nodes around the sink are too much requested to convey data, which substantially reduces their lifetime. So, several algorithmic solutions are presented to optimize the energy distribution on each node, compared to the classical uniform energy distribution. Their performance is discussed in terms of failure rate of data transmission and network lifetime. Moreover, the total energy distributed on all nodes before the deployment is invariable and some non-uniform energy distributions are created. Finally, simulations show that every energy distributions greatly improve the WSN lifetime and decrease the failure rate of data transmission.

  8. Data retrieval time for energy harvesting wireless sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitici, M.A.; Goseling, Jasper; de Graaf, Maurits; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of retrieving a reliable estimate of an attribute monitored by a wireless sensor network, where the sensors harvest energy from the environment independently, at random. Each sensor stores the harvested energy in batteries of limited capacity. Moreover, provided they have

  9. Using URIs to effectively transmit sensor data and metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Buck, Justin; Darroch, Louise; Gardner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Autonomous ocean observation is massively increasing the number of sensors in the ocean. Accordingly, the continuing increase in datasets produced, makes selecting sensors that are fit for purpose a growing challenge. Decision making on selecting quality sensor data, is based on the sensor's metadata, i.e. manufacturer specifications, history of calibrations etc. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has developed the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards to facilitate integration and interoperability of sensor data and metadata. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Semantic Web technologies enable machine comprehensibility promoting sophisticated linking and processing of data published on the web. Linking the sensor's data and metadata according to the above-mentioned standards can yield practical difficulties, because of internal hardware bandwidth restrictions and a requirement to constrain data transmission costs. Our approach addresses these practical difficulties by uniquely identifying sensor and platform models and instances through URIs, which resolve via content negotiation to either OGC's sensor meta language, sensorML or W3C's Linked Data. Data transmitted by a sensor incorporate the sensor's unique URI to refer to its metadata. Sensor and platform model URIs and descriptions are created and hosted by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) linked systems service. The sensor owner creates the sensor and platform instance URIs prior and during sensor deployment, through an updatable web form, the Sensor Instance Form (SIF). SIF enables model and instance URI association but also platform and sensor linking. The use of URIs, which are dynamically generated through the SIF, offers both practical and economical benefits to the implementation of SWE and Linked Data standards in near real time systems. Data can be linked to metadata dynamically in-situ while saving on the costs associated to the transmission of long metadata descriptions. The transmission

  10. Future wind deployment scenarios for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, Jarrad G

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available expansion planning exercise is undertaken. The results of this show that a considerable deployment of wind into the future should be expected where in least-cost scenarios ˜15-25 GW of installed wind capacity by 2030 (˜10-20% of the energy mix), ˜40-60 GW...

  11. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager advanced deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Coupland, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    If you are an experienced Configuration Manager administrator looking to advance your career or get more from your current environment, then this book is ideal for you. Prior experience of deploying and managing a Configuration Manager site would be helpful in following the examples throughout this book.

  12. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development: A Novel Approach. ... Therefore the software engineer has enormous task in engineering functional software that can work and be delivered on time..This paper focuses on how customers' voice can be heard in order to reduce development and ...

  13. Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to Intercept Small Arms and Ammunition ... The present practice of stop and search fails to capture most vehicles conveying sensitive and dangerous security exhibits such as ..... transmitter and responder. Simply put, transponder is an electric device used to.

  14. Design, Implementation and Deployment of PAIRwise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Allan; Almeroth, Kevin; Bimber, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Increased access to the Internet has dramatically increased the sources from which students can deliberately or accidentally copy information. This article discusses our motivation to design, implement, and deploy an Internet based plagiarism detection system, called PAIRwise, to address this growing problem. We give details as to how we detect…

  15. Deploying Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development efforts that ignore IK would end up wasting enormous amounts of resources and might not achieve expected results. The need to deploy IK for sustainable development can be conceptualised when one observes the dynamics and total shift of Africans away from their culture towards western knowledge.

  16. Supporting Children and Families throughout Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    A military deployment is a challenging time for all family members. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they often do not have skills to handle all of the change and uncertainty and are still learning to manage their emotions and behaviors. They do not have a wealth of past experiences to rely on as adults do. They also do not have…

  17. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... product design, development, and manufacture. Traditionally, the house of quality has been used in the automobile industry and other factory environments, but the same challenge of managing design complexity that Quality Function. Deployment tackles in the product industry also plagues the software ...

  18. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  19. ELFms deployment in- and outside CERN CC

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, G

    2004-01-01

    ELFms (http://cern.ch/elfms) stands for Extremely Large Fabric management system, and comprises tools for fabric configuration and installation (Quattor), monitoring (Lemon), and hardware/state management (LEAF). In this talk, I will describe the ELFms modules and overall architecture, as well as the integration/deployment status at CERN-CC and other sites/projects.

  20. Region-Based Collision Avoidance Beaconless Geographic Routing Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JeongCheol; Park, HoSung; Kang, SeokYoon; Kim, Ki-Il

    2015-06-05

    Due to the lack of dependency on beacon messages for location exchange, the beaconless geographic routing protocol has attracted considerable attention from the research community. However, existing beaconless geographic routing protocols are likely to generate duplicated data packets when multiple winners in the greedy area are selected. Furthermore, these protocols are designed for a uniform sensor field, so they cannot be directly applied to practical irregular sensor fields with partial voids. To prevent the failure of finding a forwarding node and to remove unnecessary duplication, in this paper, we propose a region-based collision avoidance beaconless geographic routing protocol to increase forwarding opportunities for randomly-deployed sensor networks. By employing different contention priorities into the mutually-communicable nodes and the rest of the nodes in the greedy area, every neighbor node in the greedy area can be used for data forwarding without any packet duplication. Moreover, simulation results are given to demonstrate the increased packet delivery ratio and shorten end-to-end delay, rather than well-referred comparative protocols.

  1. High Resolution Robust GPS-free Localization for Wireless Sensor Networks and its Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mirza, Mohammed

    2011-12-12

    In this thesis we investigate the problem of robustness and scalability w.r.t. estimating the position of randomly deployed motes/nodes of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) without the help of Global Positioning System (GPS) devices. We propose a few applications of range independent localization algorithms that allow the sensors to actively determine their location with high resolution without increasing the complexity of the hardware or any additional device setup. In our first application we try to present a localized and centralized cooperative spectrum sensing using RF sensor networks. This scheme collaboratively sense the spectrum and localize the whole network efficiently and with less difficulty. In second application we try to focus on how efficiently we can localize the nodes, to detect underwater threats, without the use of beacons. In third application we try to focus on 3-Dimensional localization for LTE systems. Our performance evaluation shows that these schemes lead to a significant improvement in localization accuracy compared to the state-of-art range independent localization schemes, without requiring GPS support.

  2. UAV-Assisted Dynamic Clustering of Wireless Sensor Networks for Crop Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Ammad; Mansour, Ali; Jeune, Denis Le; Ayaz, Mohammad; Aggoune, El-Hadi M

    2018-02-11

    In this study, a crop health monitoring system is developed by using state of the art technologies including wireless sensors and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Conventionally data is collected from sensor nodes either by fixed base stations or mobile sinks. Mobile sinks are considered a better choice nowadays due to their improved network coverage and energy utilization. Usually, the mobile sink is used in two ways: either it goes for random walk to find the scattered nodes and collect data, or follows a pre-defined path established by the ground network/clusters. Neither of these options is suitable in our scenario due to the factors like dynamic data collection, the strict targeted area required to be scanned, unavailability of a large number of nodes, dynamic path of the UAV, and most importantly, none of these are known in advance. The contribution of this paper is the formation of dynamic runtime clusters of field sensors by considering the above mentioned factors. Furthermore a mechanism (Bayesian classifier) is defined to select best node as cluster head. The proposed system is validated through simulation results, lab and infield experiments using concept devices. The obtained results are encouraging, especially in terms of deployment time, energy, efficiency, throughput and ease of use.

  3. Scalable Coverage Maintenance for Dense Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Owing to numerous potential applications, wireless sensor networks have been attracting significant research effort recently. The critical challenge that wireless sensor networks often face is to sustain long-term operation on limited battery energy. Coverage maintenance schemes can effectively prolong network lifetime by selecting and employing a subset of sensors in the network to provide sufficient sensing coverage over a target region. We envision future wireless sensor networks composed of a vast number of miniaturized sensors in exceedingly high density. Therefore, the key issue of coverage maintenance for future sensor networks is the scalability to sensor deployment density. In this paper, we propose a novel coverage maintenance scheme, scalable coverage maintenance (SCOM, which is scalable to sensor deployment density in terms of communication overhead (i.e., number of transmitted and received beacons and computational complexity (i.e., time and space complexity. In addition, SCOM achieves high energy efficiency and load balancing over different sensors. We have validated our claims through both analysis and simulations.

  4. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  5. SensorKit: An End-to-End Solution for Environmental Sensor Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F.; Graham, E.; Deschon, A.; Lam, Y.; Goldman, J.; Wroclawski, J.; Kaiser, W.; Benzel, T.

    2008-12-01

    and transmission, using a custody transfer mechanism that ensures data is retained until successful delivery to the scientist can be confirmed. The ability for the scientist to communicate in real-time with the sensor network in the field enables remote sensor reconfiguration and system health and status monitoring. We use a spiral approach of design, test, deploy and revise, and, by going to the field frequently and getting feedback from field scientists, we have been able to include additional functionality that is useful to the scientist while ensuring SensorKit remains intuitive to operate. Users can configure, control, and monitor SensorKit using a number of tools we have developed. An intuitive user interface running on a desktop or laptop allows scientists to setup the system, add and configure sensors, and specify when and how the data will be collected. We also have a mobile version of our interface that runs on a PDA and lets scientists calibrate sensors and "tune" the system while in the field, allowing for data validation before leaving the field and returning to the research lab. SensorKit also features SensorBase, an intuitive user interface built on top of a standard SQL database, which allows scientists to store and share their data with other researchers. SensorKit has been used for diverse scientific applications and deployed throughout the world: from studying mercury cycling in rice paddies in China, to ecological research in the neotropical rainforests of Costa Rica, to monitoring the contamination of salt lakes in Argentina.

  6. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: Validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, Jose L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, Sergio [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Essa, Mohamed Ali Abd El Aziz [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, Santos [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have simulated bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling a Lagrangian model to an Eulerian one, and to a 3D random walk model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of experiments in a vertical column with isothermal co-current two phase flow have been performed and used to validate the previous model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the influence of the turbulence induced by the bubbles on the results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of experimental and computed results has been performed for different boundary conditions. - Abstract: A set of two phase flow experiments for different conditions ranging from bubbly flow to cap/slug flow have been performed under isothermal concurrent upward air-water flow conditions in a vertical column of 3 m height. Special attention in these experiments was devoted to the transition from bubbly to cap/slug flow. The interfacial velocity of the bubbles and the void fraction distribution was obtained using 2 and 4 sensors conductivity probes. Numerical simulations of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code with an Eulerian one. The first one tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates (r, {phi}, z) inside the fluid field under the action of the following forces: buoyancy, drag, lift, wall lubrication. Also we have incorporated a 3D stochastic differential equation model to account for the random motion of the individual bubbles in the turbulent velocity field of the carrier liquid. Also we have considered the deformations undergone by the bubbles when they touch the walls of the pipe and are compressed until they rebound. The velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS). The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate {epsilon} transport equations

  7. Research Challenges for Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melodia, Tommaso; Akyildiz, Ian F.

    This chapter discusses the state of the art and the major research challenges in architectures, algorithms, and protocols, for wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSNs). These are networks of wirelessly interconnected smart devices designed and deployed to retrieve video and audio streams, still images, and scalar sensor data. First, applications and key factors influencing the design of WMSNs are discussed. Then, the existing solutions at the application, transport, network, link, and physical layers of the communication protocol stack are investigated. Finally, fundamental open research issues are discussed and future research trends in this area are outlined.

  8. Querying moving objects detected by sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bestehorn, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Declarative query interfaces to Sensor Networks (SN) have become a commodity. These interfaces allow access to SN deployed for collecting data using relational queries. However, SN are not confined to data collection, but may track object movement, e.g., wildlife observation or traffic monitoring. While rational approaches are well suited for data collection, research on ""Moving Object Databases"" (MOD) has shown that relational operators are unsuitable to express information needs on object movement, i.e., spatio-temporal queries. ""Querying Moving Objects Detected by Sensor Networks"" studi

  9. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  10. Downhole Applications of Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka P. Gooneratne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a review of the application of two types of magnetic sensors—fluxgate magnetometers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors—in the oil/gas industry. These magnetic sensors play a critical role in drilling wells safely, accurately and efficiently into a target reservoir zone by providing directional data of the well and acquiring information about the surrounding geological formations. Research into magnetic sensors for oil/gas drilling has not been explored by researchers to the same extent as other applications, such as biomedical, magnetic storage and automotive/aerospace applications. Therefore, this paper aims to serve as an opportunity for researchers to truly understand how magnetic sensors can be used in a downhole environment and to provide fertile ground for research and development in this area. A look ahead, discussing other magnetic sensor technologies that can potentially be used in the oil/gas industry is presented, and what is still needed in order deploy them in the field is also addressed.

  11. Energy Efficient Data Gathering Schemes in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Ant Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal K.Naskar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor nodes are highly energy constrainedand hence formulating energy-efficient protocols in order toenhance network lifetime and performance are of utmostimportance in wireless sensor networks. A few solutions exist tothe problem, LEACH and PEGASIS protocols being the mostelegant ones. Both schemes try to achieve a solution byminimizing the overall energy dissipation by the nodes in thenetwork. While randomizing cluster heads for achieving equalenergy dissipation has been done in the LEACH protocol, thePEGASIS protocol forms a chain of all the nodes in thenetwork, each node taking rounds in transmitting to the basestation. In this paper we propose energy efficient protocolswhich enhance the performance of LEACH, PEGASIS. Theindividual nodes being deployed randomly in the play field thebase station is located at variable distances from them. Hence itis clear that the nodes would actually dissipate a differentamount of energy during their turn of transmission to the basestation. The inter-nodal distance also being variable it too playsa role in unequal energy dissipation of the nodes. This energydifference between the various nodes keeps on increasingresulting in poorer network performance. In our schemes we tryto nullify the differences occurring due to these abovementioned causes and thus increase the network performanceby balancing the energy dissipation by the nodes. We alsoemploy the Ant Colony Optimization algorithm (ACO for chainconstruction instead of the greedy algorithm to enhance thenetwork performance. Extensive simulations have been carriedout which show significant improvement over PEGASIS whichin turn implies substantial increment over LEACH.

  12. Public Auditing with Privacy Protection in a Multi-User Model of Cloud-Assisted Body Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Cui, Jie; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Lu

    2017-05-05

    Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs) are gaining importance in the era of the Internet of Things (IoT). The modern medical system is a particular area where the WBSN techniques are being increasingly adopted for various fundamental operations. Despite such increasing deployments of WBSNs, issues such as the infancy in the size, capabilities and limited data processing capacities of the sensor devices restrain their adoption in resource-demanding applications. Though providing computing and storage supplements from cloud servers can potentially enrich the capabilities of the WBSNs devices, data security is one of the prevailing issues that affects the reliability of cloud-assisted services. Sensitive applications such as modern medical systems demand assurance of the privacy of the users' medical records stored in distant cloud servers. Since it is economically impossible to set up private cloud servers for every client, auditing data security managed in the remote servers has necessarily become an integral requirement of WBSNs' applications relying on public cloud servers. To this end, this paper proposes a novel certificateless public auditing scheme with integrated privacy protection. The multi-user model in our scheme supports groups of users to store and share data, thus exhibiting the potential for WBSNs' deployments within community environments. Furthermore, our scheme enriches user experiences by offering public verifiability, forward security mechanisms and revocation of illegal group members. Experimental evaluations demonstrate the security effectiveness of our proposed scheme under the Random Oracle Model (ROM) by outperforming existing cloud-assisted WBSN models.

  13. Public Auditing with Privacy Protection in a Multi-User Model of Cloud-Assisted Body Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Cui, Jie; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs) are gaining importance in the era of the Internet of Things (IoT). The modern medical system is a particular area where the WBSN techniques are being increasingly adopted for various fundamental operations. Despite such increasing deployments of WBSNs, issues such as the infancy in the size, capabilities and limited data processing capacities of the sensor devices restrain their adoption in resource-demanding applications. Though providing computing and storage supplements from cloud servers can potentially enrich the capabilities of the WBSNs devices, data security is one of the prevailing issues that affects the reliability of cloud-assisted services. Sensitive applications such as modern medical systems demand assurance of the privacy of the users’ medical records stored in distant cloud servers. Since it is economically impossible to set up private cloud servers for every client, auditing data security managed in the remote servers has necessarily become an integral requirement of WBSNs’ applications relying on public cloud servers. To this end, this paper proposes a novel certificateless public auditing scheme with integrated privacy protection. The multi-user model in our scheme supports groups of users to store and share data, thus exhibiting the potential for WBSNs’ deployments within community environments. Furthermore, our scheme enriches user experiences by offering public verifiability, forward security mechanisms and revocation of illegal group members. Experimental evaluations demonstrate the security effectiveness of our proposed scheme under the Random Oracle Model (ROM) by outperforming existing cloud-assisted WBSN models. PMID:28475110

  14. An End-to-End System to Enable Quick, Easy and Inexpensive Deployment of Hydrometeorological Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celicourt, P.; Piasecki, M.

    2014-12-01

    The high cost of hydro-meteorological data acquisition, communication and publication systems along with limited qualified human resources is considered as the main reason why hydro-meteorological data collection remains a challenge especially in developing countries. Despite significant advances in sensor network technologies which gave birth to open hardware and software, low-cost (less than $50) and low-power (in the order of a few miliWatts) sensor platforms in the last two decades, sensors and sensor network deployment remains a labor-intensive, time consuming, cumbersome, and thus expensive task. These factors give rise for the need to develop a affordable, simple to deploy, scalable and self-organizing end-to-end (from sensor to publication) system suitable for deployment in such countries. The design of the envisioned system will consist of a few Sensed-And-Programmed Arduino-based sensor nodes with low-cost sensors measuring parameters relevant to hydrological processes and a Raspberry Pi micro-computer hosting the in-the-field back-end data management. This latter comprises the Python/Django model of the CUAHSI Observations Data Model (ODM) namely DjangODM backed by a PostgreSQL Database Server. We are also developing a Python-based data processing script which will be paired with the data autoloading capability of Django to populate the DjangODM database with the incoming data. To publish the data, the WOFpy (WaterOneFlow Web Services in Python) developed by the Texas Water Development Board for 'Water Data for Texas' which can produce WaterML web services from a variety of back-end database installations such as SQLite, MySQL, and PostgreSQL will be used. A step further would be the development of an appealing online visualization tool using Python statistics and analytics tools (Scipy, Numpy, Pandas) showing the spatial distribution of variables across an entire watershed as a time variant layer on top of a basemap.

  15. Optimum distributed detection of weak signals in dependent sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Rick S.; Kassam, Saleem A.

    1992-05-01

    The extension of classical locally optimum (LO) detection results to the case of distributed detection with dependent sensors is considered. The necessary conditions are presented for the LO distributed sensor detector designs and fusion rule for an N sensor parallel distributed detection system with dependent sensor observations. Specific solutions are obtained for a random signal in additive noise detection problem with two sensors. Letting f be the noise probability density function (pdf), these solutions indicate that the LO sensor detector nonlinearities, in general, contain a term proportional to f-prime/f. The importance of this term varies with the additive noise pdf and the false alarm probability. LO solutions are presented for finite sample sizes, and the LO solutions are discussed in the asymptotic case. The results are extended to yield the form of the solutions for the N sensor LO random signal distribution problem, which yields expected generalizations of the two sensor results.

  16. A rapidly deployable chemical sensing network for the real-time monitoring of toxic airborne contaminant releases in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.

    2010-04-01

    We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders in providing a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne contaminants following their malicious or accidental release into a rural, urban or industrial environment. We describe the development of a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

  17. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study to study military family readiness. This article presents analyses on marital relationships, family environment, psychological and behavioral health, child well-being, and military integration.

  18. Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  19. Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings fully deployed during flight following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Californiaornia. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  20. Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings continue deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  1. In search for a robust design of environmental sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Setia; Susanto, Ferry; de Souza, Paulo; Timms, Greg; Malhotra, Vishv; Turner, Paul

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an approach to the design of environmental sensor networks (ESN) which aims at providing a robust, fit-for-purpose network with minimum redundancy. A set of near optimum ESN designs is sought using an evolutionary algorithm, which incorporates redundancy and robustness as fitness functions. This work can assist the decision-making process when determining the number of sensor nodes and how the nodes are going to be deployed in the region of interest.

  2. Monitoring water distribution systems: understanding and managing sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ediriweera, D. D.; Marshall, I. W.

    2010-01-01

    Sensor networks are currently being trialed by the water distribution industry for monitoring complex distribution infrastructure. The paper presents an investigation in to the architecture and performance of a sensor system deployed for monitoring such a distribution network. The study reveals lapses in systems design and management, resulting in a fifth of the data being either missing or erroneous. Findings identify the importance of undertaking in-depth consideration of all aspects of a l...

  3. Intrusion Detection Systems in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nabil Ali Alrajeh; Khan, S.; Bilal Shams

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of sensor nodes deployed in a manner to collect information about surrounding environment. Their distributed nature, multihop data forwarding, and open wireless medium are the factors that make WSNs highly vulnerable to security attacks at various levels. Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) can play an important role in detecting and preventing security attacks. This paper presents current Intrusion Detection Systems and some open research problems relat...

  4. PIGS - A New Wavefront Sensor Concept for ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, S.; Ragazzoni, R.; Gässler, W.; Diolaiti, E.; Farinato, J.; Adriciaco, C.; Meyers, R.; Morris, T.; Ghedina, A.

    Adaptive Optics Systems for Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) will need new wavefront sensing concepts to deploy their full capabilities. In this paper we exemplify the necessity of new wavefront sensing ideas by discussing briefly some major problems and present as a possible solution the pseudo infinite guide star sensor (PIGS). A prototype of a PIGS sensor was already built in the laboratory, which could demonstrate its feasibility.

  5. Next generation sensing platforms for extended deployments in large-scale, multidisciplinary, adaptive sampling and observational networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. N.; Meinig, C.; Mordy, C. W.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Cokelet, E. D.; Jenkins, R.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    New autonomous sensors have dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of oceanographic data collection, enabling rapid sampling over extremely fine scales. Innovative new autonomous platofrms like floats, gliders, drones, and crawling moorings leverage the full potential of these new sensors by extending spatiotemporal reach across varied environments. During 2015 and 2016, The Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory tested several new types of fully autonomous platforms with increased speed, durability, and power and payload capacity designed to deliver cutting-edge ecosystem assessment sensors to remote or inaccessible environments. The Expendable Ice-Tracking (EXIT) gloat developed by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is moored near bottom during the ice-free season and released on an autonomous timer beneath the ice during the following winter. The float collects a rapid profile during ascent, and continues to collect critical, poorly-accessible under-ice data until melt, when data is transmitted via satellite. The autonomous Oculus sub-surface glider developed by the University of Washington and PMEL has a large power and payload capacity and an enhanced buoyancy engine. This 'coastal truck' is designed for the rapid water column ascent required by optical imaging systems. The Saildrone is a solar and wind powered ocean unmanned surface vessel (USV) developed by Saildrone, Inc. in partnership with PMEL. This large-payload (200 lbs), fast (1-7 kts), durable (46 kts winds) platform was equipped with 15 sensors designed for ecosystem assessment during 2016, including passive and active acoustic systems specially redesigned for autonomous vehicle deployments. The senors deployed on these platforms achieved rigorous accuracy and precision standards. These innovative platforms provide new sampling capabilities and cost efficiencies in high-resolution sensor deployment

  6. EDITORIAL: Sensors and sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Richard; Tian, Gui Yun

    2008-02-01

    Sensors are very important for measurement science and technology. They serve as a vital component in new measurement techniques and instrumentation systems. Key qualities of a good sensor system are high resolution, high reliability, low cost, appropriate output for a given input (good sensitivity), rapid response time, small random error in results, and small systematic error. Linearity is also useful, but with the advent of lookup tables and software, it is not as important as it used to be. In the last several years, considerable effort around the world has been devoted to a wide range of sensors from nanoscale sensors to sensor networks. Collectively, these vast and multidisciplinary efforts are developing important technological roadmaps to futuristic sensors with new modalities, significantly enhanced effectiveness and integrated functionality (data processing, computation, decision making and communications). When properly organized, they will have important relevance to life science and security applications, e.g. the sensing and monitoring of chemical, biological, radiological and explosive threats. A special feature in this issue takes a snapshot of some recent developments that were first presented at an international conference, the 2007 IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control (ICNSC). The conference discussed recent developments, from which a few papers have since been brought together in this special feature. Gas sensing for environmental monitoring remains a topical subject, and two papers deal with this issue. One is concerned with the exploitation of nanostructured Au-doped cobalt oxyhydroxide-based carbon monoxide sensors for fire detection at its earlier stages (Zhuiykov and Dowling), whilst another examines the role of oxygen in high temperature hydrogen sulfide detection using MISiC sensors (Weng et al). Again for environmental monitoring, another paper deals with accurate sound source localization in a reverberant

  7. Optical fibre microwire sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.; Belal, Mohammad; Jung, Y.; Song, Z.; Xu, F.; Newson, T.P.; Richardson, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews sensing applications of optical fibre microwires and nanowires. In addition to the usual benefits of sensors based on optical fibres, these sensors are extremely compact and have fast response speeds. In this review sensors will be grouped in three categories according to their morphology: linear sensors, resonant sensors and tip sensors. While linear and resonant sensors mainly exploit the fraction of power propagating outside the microwire physical boundary, tip sensors t...

  8. Violent behaviour in U.K. military personnel returning home after deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmanus, D; Dean, K; Al Bakir, M; Iversen, A C; Hull, L; Fahy, T; Wessely, S; Fear, N T

    2012-08-01

    There is growing concern about an alleged rise in violent behaviour amongst military personnel returning from deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of violence in a sample of U.K. military personnel following homecoming from deployment in Iraq and to examine the impact of deployment-related experiences, such as combat trauma, on violence, and the role of sociodemographics and pre-enlistment antisocial behaviour. This study used baseline data from a cohort study of a large randomly selected sample of U.K. Armed Forces personnel in service at the time of the Iraq war (2003). Regular personnel (n=4928) who had been deployed to Iraq were included. Data, collected by questionnaire, included information on deployment experiences, sociodemographic and military characteristics, pre-enlistment antisocial behaviour, post-deployment health outcomes and a self-report measure of physical violence in the weeks following return from deployment. Prevalence of violence was 12.6%. This was strongly associated with pre-enlistment antisocial behaviour [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9-4.4]. After controlling for pre-enlistment antisocial behaviour, sociodemographics and military factors, violence was still strongly associated with holding a combat role (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6-2.5) and having experienced multiple traumatic events on deployment (aOR for four or more traumatic events 3.7, 95% CI 2.5-5.5). Violence on homecoming was also associated with mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder (aOR 4.8, 95% CI 3.2-7.2) and alcohol misuse (aOR 3.1, 95% CI 2.5-3.9). Experiences of combat and trauma during deployment were significantly associated with violent behaviour following homecoming in U.K. military personnel. Post-deployment mental health problems and alcohol misuse are also associated with increased violence.

  9. A USB Interfaced Motion Capture Sensor, Using Tri-Axis Magnetic/Inertial Sensors For Use In Kinematic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Foody, J.; Mathews, F.; Kumar, D.; Markham, C.; Ward, T.; Caulfield, B.

    2005-01-01

    An unobtrusive tri-axis magnetic and gravitational field transducer for use in kinematic tracking is presented. Outlined is a novel approach for using such a sensor i.e. providing a Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface, allowing the direct utilization of the logical topology of the standard, making scalable deployment possible. Furthermore design considerations; construction and performance of the sensor are analysed and discussed in detail.

  10. Evaluation of a Multimedia Intervention for Children and Families Facing Multiple Military Deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flittner O'Grady, Allison; Thomaseo Burton, E; Chawla, Neelu; Topp, David; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Repeated military deployments have been a common experience for many military families in the past 15 years. While there has been an increase in research and intervention focused on the effects on families of military deployments, much of this work has not focused specifically on the particular needs of young children. Talk, Listen, Connect: Multiple Deployments (TLC-II MD), a multimedia kit designed for home use, is among the first interventions directed toward young children. Created by Sesame Workshop and using popular Sesame Street characters, TLC-II MD was designed to support and equip families with young children with skills to address challenges associated with multiple deployments. This study utilized a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of TLC-II MD relative to a control condition using a Sesame Workshop multimedia kit not tailored to military families. Parents in both groups reported that children enjoyed the video overall and watched it repeatedly. Also in both groups, caregivers' depressive symptoms and children's aggressive behaviors declined significantly over time. Caregivers in the test group reported significantly larger increases in comfort discussing the deployment with their child and stronger perceptions that the DVD helped children to cope. Thus, the resilience-oriented materials were helpful to both groups, but those tailored to military families were significantly more likely to be perceived as helpful. Findings offer evidence regarding the ability of multimedia self-administered interventions to assist military families.

  11. Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: after deployment, adaptive parenting tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; Pinna, Keri L M; Hanson, Sheila K; Brockberg, Dustin

    2014-02-01

    The high operational tempo of the current conflicts and the unprecedented reliance on National Guard and Reserve forces highlights the need for services to promote reintegration efforts for those transitioning back to civilian family life. Despite evidence that parenting has significant influence on children's functioning, and that parenting may be impaired during stressful family transitions, there is a dearth of empirically supported psychological interventions tailored for military families reintegrating after deployment. This article reports on the modification of an empirically supported parenting intervention for families in which a parent has deployed to war. A theoretical rationale for addressing parenting during reintegration after deployment is discussed. We describe the intervention, After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), and report early feasibility and acceptability data from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of ADAPT, a 14-week group-based, Web-enhanced parenting training program. Among the first 42 families assigned to the intervention group, participation rates were high, and equal among mothers and fathers. Satisfaction was high across all 14 sessions. Implications for psychological services to military families dealing with the deployment process are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Mental health of Dutch peacekeeping veterans 10-25 years after deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassens, Ellen R; van Veen, Tineke; Weerts, Jos M P; Zitman, Frans G

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the mental health of Dutch peacekeeping veterans, 10--25 years after deployment, and its association with deployment-related traumatic events. We randomly selected a group of 1046 peacekeeping veterans, who participated in military missions in Lebanon, former Yugoslavia, and various other missions between 1979 and 1997. We sent a questionnaire assessing current levels of psychological distress (Brief Symptom Inventory--BSI), and a questionnaire assessing trauma related to deployment. Psychological data were available for 729 veterans. In 83% of the veterans, no significant psychological distress was found, whereas 17% scored above the BSI cut-off for psychopathology. Interestingly, this percentage was equal to that in a non-patient norm group. From this finding we concluded that 10--25 years post-deployment, Dutch peacekeeping veterans do not show more psychological distress than the general Dutch population. In addition, we did not find a significant association between trauma exposure 10--25 years ago and current BSI scores. Moreover, trauma-exposure explained only 9% of the variance in psychological distress. Thus, although military peacekeeping operations may have a strong impact on the lives of soldiers, in this group of veterans they do not seem to have caused severe psychological distress10--25 years after deployment.

  13. Optimization of equipment deployment on fire trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowicki Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the problem of deploying firemen’ equipment is discussed in order to achieve the best value of ergonomic indicators for fireman during anti-fire action. The equipment can be deployed on the fore truck in a different ways. We are looking for the best way to do it from the point of view of ergonomics. The multi-criterial optimization problem of equipment location on the vehicle has been formulated. It is linear integer programming problem with three criteria functions. It is able to solve that problem using formal method after some modifications. It is possible to receive several solutions from multi-criterial optimization problem and then evaluate them in a virtual simulation environment. It can then be taken into account a number of additional factors that are important for fireman and ergonomics.

  14. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    of Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 (N = 743), we assessed community reintegration difficulties 2.5 years after home coming (study sample: N = 454). Furthermore, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed before, during, and after deployment. Trajectories of PTSD symptoms...... from a previously published latent growth mixture modeling analysis were used to address whether community reintegration difficulties differ as a result of course and level of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: Between 3.6 and 18.0 % reported to have some, a lot, or extreme difficulties in reintegration domains...... such as interpersonal functioning, productivity, community involvement, and self-care. Mean level of reintegration difficulties differed significantly across six PTSD symptom trajectories (range 6.35-36.00); with more symptomatic trajectories experiencing greater community reintegration difficulties. CONCLUSIONS...

  15. PEP Deployment and Bandwidth Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younghusband, Charles; Slade, Peter; Weaver, Jeff

    This paper will discuss current deployment scenarios for Performance Enhancement Proxies (PEP) technologies in broadband satellite access systems from the perspective of one PEP technology provider. Recent improvements such as DVB-S2 can provide substantial gains at the link layer. In order to achieve further efficiency gains, the satellite industry is now forced to look elsewhere - namely other layers in the data communications network stack. Satellite terminal manufacturers are now moving beyond basic TCP acceleration techniques to more comprehensive optimization techniques that incorporate advances in data compression and flexibility for more deployment scenarios. Some of the advances for PEP technology are in part due to CPU and memory technology advances, resulting in increasingly affordable access to computing power, allowing PEP manufacturers deliver substantial performance and bandwidth savings gains.

  16. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  17. Changing Family Roles - Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    on the impact of technology-based communication during deployment on later psychological distress and role functioning. PROGRESS TO DATE...higher levels of warmth and lower levels of agonism also reported lower levels of externalizing behavior in their children. When at-home partners...reported their children’s relationship changed over the course of the study, so did their reports of externalizing behavior in their children. 15. SUBJECT

  18. Coverage Improvement for Wireless Sensor Networks using Grid Quorum based Node Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Prateek; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2012-01-01

    Coverage of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is an important quality of service (QoS) metric and often the desired coverage is not attainable at the initial deployment, but node mobility can be used to improve the coverage by relocating sensor nodes. Unconstrained node mobility is considered infea...

  19. Optical sensors for accelerator diagnostics. Final report for the period September 15, 1998 - September 14, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher P.

    2002-04-08

    DARHT utilizes a long pulse electron beam having a duration in excess of 2 microseconds. An electro-optic voltage sensor technology has been developed and commissioned to address this unique diagnostic environment. Over 200 sensors have demonstrated 0.25% accuracy. Deployment is expected in 2002.

  20. Data fusion in multi sensor platforms for wide-area perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polychronopoulos, A.; Floudas, N.; Amditis, A.; Bank, D.; Broek, S.P. van den

    2006-01-01

    there is a strong belief that the improvement of preventive safety applications and the extension of their operative range will be achieved by the deployment of multiple sensors with wide fields of view (FOV). The paper contributes to the solution of the problem and introduces distributed sensor