WorldWideScience

Sample records for randomized trial patients

  1. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; da Costa, Hanna C.; Merbis, Merijn A. E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; van Dam, Frits S. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT

  2. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; da Costa, Hanna C; Merbis, Merijn A E; Fortuin, Andries A; Muller, Martin J; van Dam, Frits S A M

    2005-02-01

    To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect.

  3. Acupuncture in Patients with Allergic Asthma: A Randomized Pragmatic Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhaus, Benno; Roll, Stephanie; Jena, Susanne; Icke, Katja; Adam, Daniela; Binting, Sylvia; Lotz, Fabian; Willich, Stefan N; Witt, Claudia M

    2017-04-01

    Although the available evidence is insufficient, acupuncture is used in patients suffering from chronic asthma. The aim of this pragmatic study was to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with allergic asthma compared to treatment with routine care alone. Patients with allergic asthma were included in a randomized controlled trial and randomized to receive up to 15 acupuncture sessions over 3 months or to a control group receiving routine care alone. Patients who did not consent to randomization received acupuncture treatment for the first 3 months and were followed as a cohort. All trial patients were allowed to receive routine care in addition to study treatment. The primary endpoint was the asthma quality of life questionnaire (AQLQ, range: 1-7) at 3 months. Secondary endpoints included general health related to quality of life (Short-Form-36, SF-36, range 0-100). Outcome parameters were assessed at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. A total of 1,445 patients (mean age 43.8 [SD 13.5] years, 58.7% female) were randomized and included in the analysis (184 patients randomized to acupuncture and 173 to control, and 1,088 in the nonrandomized acupuncture group). In the randomized part, acupuncture was associated with an improvement in the AQLQ score compared to the control group (difference acupuncture vs. control group 0.7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-1.0]) as well as in the physical component scale and the mental component scale of the SF-36 (physical: 2.5 [1.0-4.0]; mental 4.0 [2.1-6.0]) after 3 months. Treatment success was maintained throughout 6 months. Patients not consenting to randomization showed similar improvements as the randomized acupuncture group. In patients with allergic asthma, additional acupuncture treatment to routine care was associated with increased disease-specific and health-related quality of life compared to treatment with routine care alone.

  4. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  5. Exercise in Patients on Dialysis: A Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Fabio; Mallamaci, Francesca; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Baggetta, Rossella; Bolignano, Davide; Torino, Claudia; Lamberti, Nicola; Bertoli, Silvio; Ciurlino, Daniele; Rocca-Rey, Lisa; Barillà, Antonio; Battaglia, Yuri; Rapanà, Renato Mario; Zuccalà, Alessandro; Bonanno, Graziella; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Rapisarda, Francesco; Rastelli, Stefania; Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio; De Paola, Luciano; Lombardi, Luigi; Cupisti, Adamasco; Fuiano, Giorgio; Lucisano, Gaetano; Summaria, Chiara; Felisatti, Michele; Pozzato, Enrico; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Castellino, Pietro; Aucella, Filippo; Abd ElHafeez, Samar; Provenzano, Pasquale Fabio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Catizone, Luigi; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested the benefits of physical exercise for patients on dialysis. We conducted the Exercise Introduction to Enhance Performance in Dialysis trial, a 6-month randomized, multicenter trial to test whether a simple, personalized walking exercise program at home, managed by dialysis staff, improves functional status in adult patients on dialysis. The main study outcomes included change in physical performance at 6 months, assessed by the 6-minute walking test and the five times sit-to-stand test, and in quality of life, assessed by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire. We randomized 296 patients to normal physical activity (control; n=145) or walking exercise (n=151); 227 patients (exercise n=104; control n=123) repeated the 6-month evaluations. The distance covered during the 6-minute walking test improved in the exercise group (mean distance±SD: baseline, 328±96 m; 6 months, 367±113 m) but not in the control group (baseline, 321±107 m; 6 months, 324±116 m; Pquality of social interaction score (P=0.01) in the kidney disease component of the KDQOL-SF improved significantly in the exercise arm compared with the control arm. Hence, a simple, personalized, home-based, low-intensity exercise program managed by dialysis staff may improve physical performance and quality of life in patients on dialysis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Prospectively screening for eligible patients was inaccurate in predicting patient recruitment of orthopedic randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Bauke W; Dijkman, Bernadette G; Guyatt, Gordon H; Sprague, Sheila; Tornetta, Paul; Bhandari, Mohit

    2011-05-01

    To compare the accuracy of estimates of potential recruitment from a prospective 8-week screening study compared with a retrospective chart review across sites participating in two fracture management trials. During the planning phase of two large, multicenter, randomized controlled fracture management trials, 74 clinical sites provided estimates of the annual recruitment rate both retrospectively (based on chart reviews) and prospectively. The prospective estimate was generated by screening, for 8 weeks, all incoming patients for eligibility in the concerning trial, without actually enrolling any patient. We compared these prospective and retrospective estimates with one another (for 74 sites in the two trials) and with actual 1-year recruitment rates in the definitive trial (for nine sites in one trial). There was a median difference of four patients (interquartile range: -14 to 18 patients; P=0.89) between a center's prospective estimate and its retrospective estimate. Both predictions were overestimations of recruitment in the definitive trial; only 31% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 28, 35) of retrospectively estimated patients, and 31% (95% CI: 27, 35) of prospectively estimated patients were recruited in the definitive trials. Compared with relatively simple chart reviews, prospectively screening for eligible patients at clinical sites, which is associated with substantial costs, did not result in more accurate predictions of accrual in large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness : A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, E.C.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; van Dam, A.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Mulder, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness. Methods: Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968).

  8. The morbidity of treatment for patients with stage I endometrial cancer : Results from a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creutzberg, CL; van Putten, WLJ; Koper, PC; Lybeert, MLM; Jobsen, JJ; Warlam-Rodenhuis, CC; De Winter, KAJ; Lutgens, LCHW; van den Bergh, ACM; van der Steen-Banasik, E; Beerman, H; van Lent, M

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment complications for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer treated with surgery and pelvic radiotherapy (RT) or surgery alone in a multicenter randomized trial. Methods and Materials: The Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma (PORTEC) trial

  9. Sleep disorders in patients with depression or schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial using acupuncture treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Yeo, S.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this preliminary clinical trial was to investigate whether acupuncture has a positive influence on sleep and symptomatology in patients with schizophrenia or depression. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was used. One hundred participants were recruited: 40

  10. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  11. Vascular care in patients with Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular lesions-a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Kuiper, Roy; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether vascular care slows dementia progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular lesions on neuroimaging. DESIGN: Multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial with 2-year follow-up. SETTING: Neurological and geriatric outpatient clinics in 10

  12. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,Giovanni E.; Barreto,Rodrigo G. P.; Caroline C. Robinson; Rodrigo D. M. Plentz; Silva, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Ri...

  13. Patient agenda setting in respiratory outpatients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Frances; Everden, Angharad Jt; O'Brien, Cathy M; Fagan, Petrea L; Fuld, Jonathan P

    2015-11-01

    Soliciting a patient's agenda (the reason for their visit, concerns and expectations) is fundamental to health care but if not done effectively outcomes can be adversely affected. Forms to help patients consider important issues prior to a consultation have been tested with mixed results. We hypothesized that using an agenda form would impact the extent to which patients felt their doctor discussed the issues that were important to them. Patients were randomized to receive an agenda form to complete whilst waiting or usual care. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients agreeing with the statement 'My doctor discussed the issues that were important to me' rated on a four-point scale. Secondary outcomes included other experience and satisfaction measures, consultation duration and patient confidence. There was no significant effect of agenda form use on primary or secondary outcomes. Post hoc exploratory analyses suggested possible differential effects for new compared to follow-up patients. There was no overall benefit from the form and a risk of detrimental impact on patient experience for some patients. There is a need for greater understanding of what works for whom in supporting patients to get the most from their consultation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Cognitive Stimulation in Patients with Dementia: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mapelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study explores the effective outcomes of a structured cognitive stimulation treatment to improve cognition and behavioral symptoms in people with dementia (PWDs, using a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: Thirty PWDs were divided into three groups: experimental (treated with cognitive stimulation, placebo (treated with occupational therapy, and control (continuing with the usual activities of the nursing home. Assessment, at baseline and after a period of 8 weeks, was performed using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, Esame Neuropsicologico Breve 2, Geriatric Depression Scale and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Results: Only the experimental group improved its performance in cognitive tests (p Conclusions: The results suggest that a cognitive stimulation treatment for PWDs would improve not only their cognition, but also behavioral symptoms.

  15. Patient Empowerment Improved Perioperative Quality of Care in Cancer Patients Aged ≥ 65 Years - A Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Maren; Eckardt, Rahel; Scholtz, Kathrin; Neuner, Bruno; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Sehouli, Jalid; Stief, Christian G; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled, clinical prospective interventional trial was aimed at exploring the effect of patient empowerment on short- and long-term outcomes after major oncologic surgery in elderly cancer patients...

  16. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Jochems (Eline); C.M. van der Feltz-Cornelis (Christina); A. van Dam (Arno); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness.Methods: Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968).

  17. Systematic review: The relation between nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia: randomized trials in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Deborah; De Jonghe, Bernard; Heyland, Daren

    1997-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of enteral nutrition on nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients as summarized in randomized clinical trials. Study identification and selection Studies were identified through MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, bibliographies of primary and review articles, and personal files. Through duplicate independent review, we selected randomized trials evaluating approaches to nutrition and their relation to nosocomial pneumonia. Data abstraction I...

  18. Shared Care in Monitoring Stable Glaucoma Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer-Goor, Kim M.; van Vliet, Ellen J.; van Sprundel, Esther; Plochg, Thomas; Koopmanschap, Marc A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Lemij, Hans G.

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the quality of care provided by a hospital-based shared care glaucoma follow-up unit with care as usual. This randomized controlled trial included stable glaucoma patients and patients at risk for developing glaucoma. Patients in the Usual Care group (n=410) were seen by glaucoma

  19. Randomized clinical trial of nutritional counseling for malnourished hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, C; García-Agua-Soler, N; Vázquez-Sánchez, M Á; Requena-Toro, M V; Padilla-Romero, L; Casals-Sánchez, J L

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity, longer hospital stays and general loss of quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of dietary counseling for malnourished hospital patients. Prospective, randomized, open-label study of 106 hospital patients with malnutrition (54 in the control group and 52 in the intervention group). The intervention group received dietary counseling, and the control group underwent standard treatment. We determined the patients' nutritional state (body mass index, laboratory parameters, malnutrition universal screening tool), degree of dependence (Barthel index), quality of life (SF-12), degree of satisfaction (CSQ-8), the number and length of readmissions and mortality. The patients who underwent the "intervention" increased their weight at 6 months, while the controls lost weight (difference in body mass index, 2.14kg/m(2); p<.001). The intervention group had better results when compared with the control group in the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool scores (difference, -1.29; p<.001), Barthel index (difference, 7.49; p=.025), SF-12 (difference, 13.72; p<.001) and CSQ-8 (difference, 4.34, p<.001) and required fewer readmissions (difference, -0.37; p=.04) and shorter stays for readmissions (difference, -6.75; p=.035). Mortality and laboratory parameters were similar for the 2 groups. Nutritional counseling improved the patients' nutritional state, quality of life and degree of dependence and decreased the number of hospital readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative Intravenous Acetaminophen for Craniotomy Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steven; Murphy, Glenn S; Avram, Michael J; Shear, Torin; Benson, Jessica; Parikh, Kruti N; Patel, Aashka; Newmark, Rebecca; Patel, Vimal; Bailes, Julian; Szokol, Joseph W

    2017-10-16

    To determine whether opioids during the first 24 postoperative hours were significantly altered when receiving intravenous (IV) acetaminophen during that time compared with those receiving placebo (normal saline). One hundred forty patients undergoing any type of craniotomy were randomly assigned to receive either 1 g of IV acetaminophen or placebo upon surgical closure, and every 6 hours thereafter, up to 18 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements for the first 24 postoperative hours were recorded. Time to rescue medications in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU)/intensive care unit (ICU), amount of rescue medication, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, number of successful neurological examinations, sedation, delirium, satisfaction, and visual analog scale pain scores were also recorded. Compared with the placebo group, more patients in the IV acetaminophen group (10/66 [15.2%] vs. 4/65 [6.2%] in the placebo group) did not require opioids within the first 24 postoperative hours, but this did not reach significance (odds ratio, -9.0%, 95% confidence interval -20.5% to 1.8%; P = 0.166). Both groups had similar times to rescue medications, amounts of rescue medications, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, numbers of successful neurological examinations, sedation, delirium, satisfaction scores, visual analog scale pain scores, and temperatures within the first 24 postoperative hours. The opioid requirements within the first 24 postoperative hours were similar in the placebo and acetaminophen groups. This study is informative for the design and planning of future studies investigating the management of postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. OPPORTUNITY: a randomized clinical trial of growth hormone on outcome in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopple, J.D.; Cheung, A.K.; Christiansen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    , uncontrolled hypertension, chronic use of high-dose glucocorticoids, or immunosuppressive agents and pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The OPPORTUNITY Trial is the first large-scale randomized clinical trial in adult MHD patients evaluating the response to GH of such clinical endpoints as mortality, morbidity, markers...... human GH injections, compared with placebo, improve survival in hypoalbuminemic MHD patients. Secondary hypotheses are that GH improves morbidity and health, including number of hospitalized days, time to cardiovascular events, LBM, serum protein and inflammatory marker levels, exercise capacity...

  2. Audio-recorded information to patients considering participation in cancer clinical trials - a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenmar, Mia; Johansson, Hemming; Wilking, Nils; Hatschek, Thomas; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2014-09-01

    Patient information in cancer clinical trial is challenging. The value of audio-recording interventions for patients considering participating in clinical trials is unclear. The primary aim of this randomized study was to investigate effects of audio-recorded information on knowledge and understanding in patients considering participation in a clinical trial. Patients scheduled for information about a phases 2 or 3 trial by one of the 13 participating oncologists at the Department of Oncology during the study period (2008-2013) were eligible. The intervention consisted of an audio-recording on compact disc (CD) of the information at the medical consultation in which the patients were informed about a trial. Knowledge and understanding was measured by the questionnaire, Quality of Informed Consent. A total of 130 patients were randomized, 70% of the calculated sample size (n = 186). Sixty-seven patients were randomized to the intervention. In total, 101 patients (78%) completed questionnaires. No statistical significant differences were found between the groups with respect to knowledge and understanding. The level of knowledge was relatively high, with the exceptions of the risks associated with, and the unproven nature of, the trial. Overall, patients who declined participation scored statistically significant lower on knowledge. The present study was underpowered and the results should therefore be interpreted with caution. Still, 130 patients were included with a response rate of 78%. A CD including the oral information about a clinical trial did not show any effects on knowledge or understanding. However, the levels of knowledge were high, possible due to the high levels of education in the study group. Information on risks associated with the trial is still an area for improvement.

  3. Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Fecal Transplantation for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, Noortje G.; Fuentes, Susana; van der Spek, Mirjam J.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Hartman, Jorn H. A.; Duflou, Ann; Löwenberg, Mark; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; de Vos, Willem M.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; D'Haens, Geert R.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Several case series have reported the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for ulcerative colitis (UC). We assessed the efficacy and safety of FMT for patients with UC in a double-blind randomized trial. Patients with mild to moderately active UC (n = 50) were assigned to groups that

  4. Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial of Fecal Transplantation for Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, N.G.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Spek, van der M.J.; Tijssen, J.; Hartman, J.H.A.; Duflou, A.; Löwenberg, M.; Brink, van den G.R.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Haens, D' G.R.; Ponsioen, C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: & Aims: Several case series have reported the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for ulcerative colitis (UC). We assessed the efficacy and safety of FMT for patients with UC in a double-blind randomized trial. METHODS: Patients with mild to moderately active UC (n=50)

  5. Timing of tracheotomy in ICU patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, Koji; Nishimura, Masaji; Egi, Moritoki; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The optimal timing of tracheotomy in critically ill patients remains a topic of debate. We performed a systematic review to clarify the potential benefits of early versus late tracheotomy. Methods We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials that compared outcomes in patients managed with early and late tracheotomy. A random-effects meta-analysis, combining data from three a priori-defined categories of timing of tracheotomy (within 4 versus after 10?days, with...

  6. Herbal Medicine for Xerostomia in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongki; Noh, Hyeonseok; Choi, Dong-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Xerostomia (dry mouth) causes many clinical problems, including oral infections, speech difficulties, and impaired chewing and swallowing of food. Many cancer patients have complained of xerostomia induced by cancer therapy. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy of herbal medicine for the treatment of xerostomia in cancer patients. Randomized controlled trials investigating the use of herbal medicines to treat xerostomia in cancer patients were included. We searched the following 12 databases without restrictions on time or language. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Twenty-five randomized controlled trials involving 1586 patients met the inclusion criteria. A total of 24 formulas were examined in the included trials. Most of the included trials were insufficiently reported in the methodology section. Five formulas were shown to significantly improve the salivary flow rate compared to comparators. Regarding the grade of xerostomia, all formulas with the exception of a Dark Plum gargle solution with normal saline were significantly effective in reducing the severity of dry mouth. Adverse events were reported in 4 trials, and adverse effects of herbal medicine were reported in 3 trials. We found herbal medicines had potential benefits for improving salivary function and reducing the severity of dry mouth in cancer patients. However, methodological limitations and a relatively small sample size reduced the strength of the evidence. More high-quality trials reporting sufficient methodological data are warranted to enforce the strength of evidence regarding the effectiveness of herbal medicines.

  7. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. Methods A randomized controlled prospective clinical tr...

  8. Randomized controlled trial of an intervention to change cardiac misconceptions in myocardial infarction patients

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiras, Maria João; Maroco, João; Monteiro,Rita; Caeiro, Raúl; Neto, David Dias

    2016-01-01

    There is converging evidence that changing beliefs about an illness leads to positive recovery outcomes. However, cardiac misconceptions interventions have been investigated mainly in Angina or Coronary Heart Disease patients, and less in patients following Myocardial Infarction (MI). In these patients, cardiac misconceptions may play a role in the adjustment or lifestyle changes. This article reports a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to reduce the strength of misconce...

  9. Lessons Learned from EVOLVE for Planning of Future Randomized Trials in Patients on Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfrey, Patrick S; Block, Geoffrey A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Drüeke, Tilman B; Floege, Jürgen; Herzog, Charles A; London, Gerard M; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Moe, Sharon M; Wheeler, David C; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-03-07

    The effect of the calcimimetic cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in patients undergoing hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism was assessed in the Evaluation of Cinacalcet Hydrochloride Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events trial. This was the largest (in size) and longest (in duration) randomized controlled clinical trial undertaken in this population. During planning, execution, analysis, and reporting of the trial, many lessons were learned, including those related to the use of a composite cardiovascular primary endpoint, definition of endpoints (particularly heart failure and severe unremitting hyperparathyroidism), importance of age for optimal stratification at randomization, use of unadjusted and adjusted intention-to-treat analysis for the primary outcome, how to respond to a lower-than-predicted event rate during the trial, development of a prespecified analytic plan that accounted for nonadherence and for cointerventions that diminished the power of the trial to observe a treatment effect, determination of the credibility of a subgroup effect, use of adverse effects database to investigate rare diseases, collection of blood for biomarker measurement not designated before trial initiation, and interpretation of the benefits-to-harms ratio for individual patients. It is likely that many of these issues will arise in the planning of future trials in CKD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stegenga Boudewijn; Dommerholt Jan; de Gast Arthur; Bron Carel; Wensing Michel; Oostendorp Rob AB

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group receiv...

  11. Patient Engagement in Randomized Controlled Tai Chi Clinical Trials among the Chronically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongsheng; Kong, Weihong; Jiang, Joanna J

    2017-01-01

    Physicians encounter various symptom-based complaints each day. While physicians strive to support patients with chronic illnesses, evidence indicates that patients who are actively involved in their health care have better health outcomes and sometimes lowers costs. This article is to analyze how patient engagement is described when complex interventions such as Tai Chi were delivered in Randomized Controlled clinical Trials (RCTs). It reviews the dynamic patient- physician relationship in chronic illness management and to illustrate the patient engagement process, using Tai Chi as an example intervention. RCTs are considered the gold standard in clinical research. This study is a qualitative analysis of RCTs using Tai Chi as an intervention. A systematic literature search was performed to identify quality randomized controlled clinical trials that investigated the effects of Tai Chi. Selected clinical trials were classified according to research design, intervention style, patient engagement, and outcomes. Patient engagement was classified based on levels of patient participation, compliance, and selfmanagement. The chronic health conditions included in this paper are Parkinson's disease, polyneuropathy, hypertension, stroke, chronic insomnia, chronic heart failure, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, central obesity, depression, deconditioning in the elderly, or being pre-clinically disabled. We found that patient engagement, as a concept, was not well defined in literature. It covers a wide range of related terms, such as patient involvement, participation, shared decision- making, patient activation, adherence, compliance, and self-management. Tai Chi, as a very complex practice system, is to balance all aspects of a patient's life; however, the level of patient engagement is difficult to describe using conventional clinical trial design. To accurately illustrate the effect of a complex intervention, novel research design must explore ways to measure patient

  12. Study Protocol: A randomized controlled trial of patient navigation-activation to reduce cancer health disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau Sally

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer health disparities affecting low-income and minority patients are well documented. Root-causes are multifactorial, including diagnostic and treatment delays, social and financial barriers, and poor communication. Patient navigation and communication coaching (activation are potential interventions to address disparities in cancer treatment. The purpose of this clinical trial is to test the effectiveness of an intervention combining patient navigation and activation to improve cancer treatment. Methods/Design The Rochester Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP is a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, patient-level randomized trial (RCT of patient navigation and activation, targeting newly-diagnosed breast and colorectal cancer patients in Rochester, NY. The goal of the program is to decrease cancer health disparities by addressing barriers to receipt of cancer care and promoting patient self-efficacy. The intervention uses trained, paraprofessional patient navigators recruited from the target community, and a detailed training and supervisory program. Recruited patients are randomly assigned to receive either usual care (except for baseline and follow-up questionnaires and interviews or intervention. The intervention patients receive tailored assistance from their patient navigators, including phone calls, in-person meetings, and behind-the-scenes coordination of care. A total of 344 patients have been recruited. Outcomes measured at three month intervals include timeliness of care, patient adherence, patient satisfaction, quality of life, self-efficacy, health literacy, and cancer knowledge. Discussion This unique intervention combining patient navigation and patient activation is designed to address the multifactorial problem of cancer health disparities. If successful, this study will affect the design and implementation of patient navigation programs. Trials Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT

  13. Transition rates from schizotypal disorder to psychotic disorder for first-contact patients included in the OPUS trial. A randomized clinical trial of integrated treatment and standard treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    Only a few randomized clinical trials have tested the effect on transition rates of intervention programs for patients with sub-threshold psychosis-like symptoms.......Only a few randomized clinical trials have tested the effect on transition rates of intervention programs for patients with sub-threshold psychosis-like symptoms....

  14. Therapeutic Effect of Virtual Reality on Post-Stroke Patients: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira da Fonseca, Erika; Ribeiro da Silva, Nildo Manoel; Pinto, Elen Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to check the therapeutic effect of virtual reality associated with conventional physiotherapy on gait balance and the occurrence of falls after a stroke. This was a randomized, blinded clinical trial conducted with post-stroke patients, randomized into two groups-treatment group and control group-and subjected to balance assessments by the Dynamic Gait Index and investigation of falls before and after 20 intervention sessions. Statistically significant difference was considered at P rehabilitation in post-stroke patients, with repercussions on the reduction of falls. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inversion therapy in patients with pure single level lumbar discogenic disease: a pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K S Manjunath; Gregson, Barbara A; Hargreaves, Gerard; Byrnes, Tiernan; Winburn, Philip; Mendelow, A David

    2012-01-01

    Backache and sciatica due to protuberant disc disease is a major cause of lost working days and health expenditure. Surgery is a well-established option in the management flowchart. There is no strong evidence proving that traction for sciatica is effective. We report a pilot prospective randomized controlled trial comparing inversion traction and physiotherapy with standard physiotherapy alone in patients awaiting lumbar disc surgery. This study sought to study the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of inversion therapy in patients with single level lumbar discogenic disease, who had been listed for surgery. This was a single centre prospective randomized controlled trial undertaken at the Regional Neurosciences Centre, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. It was a prospective randomized controlled trial where patients awaiting surgery for pure lumbar discogenic disease within the ambit of the prestated inclusion/exclusion criteria were allocated to either physiotherapy or physiotherapy and intermittent traction with an inversion device. Post-treatment assessment made by blinded observers at 6 weeks for various outcome measures included the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) Score, Short Form 36 (SF 36), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analogue Pain Score (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and the need for surgery. Avoidance of surgery was considered a treatment success. Twenty-six patients were enrolled and 24 were randomized [13 to inversion + physiotherapy and 11 to physiotherapy alone (control)]. Surgery was avoided in 10 patients (76.9%) in the inversion group, whereas it was averted in only two patients (22.2%) in the control group. Cancellation of the proposed operation was a clinical decision based on the same criteria by which the patient was listed for surgery initially. There were no significant differences in the RMDQ, SF 36, ODI, VAS or MRI results between the two groups. Intermittent traction with an

  16. [Controlled randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    It is generally agreed that the first comparative clinical trial in history was done by James Lind in 1747, in the treatment of scurvy. The general bases of modern experimental medicine were published by Claude Bernard in 1865. However, it is the development of new drugs and the evolution of methodological concepts that led to the first randomized controlled clinical trial, in 1948, which showed that the effects of streptomycin on pulmonary tuberculosis were significantly different from those of a placebo. Today, "evidence-based" medicine aims to rationalize the medical decision-making process by taking into account, first and foremost, the results of controlled randomized clinical trials, which provide the highest level of evidence. In the second half of the 20th century it became clear that different kinds of clinical trials might not provide the same level of evidence. Practitioners' intimate convictions must be challenged by the results of controlled clinical trials. Take the CAST trial for example, which, in 1989, tested antiarrhythmic drugs versus placebo in patients with myocardial infarction. It was well known that ventricular arrhythmias were a factor of poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, and it was therefore considered self-evident that drug suppression of these ventricular arrhythmias would reduce the mortality rate. In the event, the CAST trial showed the exact opposite, with an almost 3-fold increase in total mortality among patients with coronary heart disease who were treated with antiarrhythmic drugs. These results had a profound impact on the use of antiarrythmic drugs, which became contraindicated after myocardial infarction. A clinical trial has to fulfill certain methodological standards to be accepted as evidence-based medicine. First, a working hypothesis has to be formulated, and then the primary outcome measure must be chosen before beginning the study. An appropriate major endpoint for efficacy must be selected, in keeping with the

  17. Why cancer patients enter randomized clinical trials: exploring the factors that influence their decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Whelan, Timothy J; Schiff, Susan; Dubois, Sacha; Crooks, Dauna; Haines, Patricia T; DeRosa, Diane; Roberts, Robin S; Gafni, Amiram; Pritchard, Kathleen; Levine, Mark N

    2004-11-01

    Few interventions have been designed and tested to improve recruitment to clinical trials in oncology. The multiple factors influencing patients' decisions have made the prioritization of specific interventions challenging. The present study was undertaken to identify the independent predictors of a cancer patient's decision to enter a randomized clinical trial. A list of factors from the medical literature was augmented with a series of focus groups involving cancer patients, physicians, and clinical research associates (CRAs). A series of questionnaires was developed with items based on these factors and were administered concurrently to 189 cancer patients, their physicians, and CRAs following the patient's decision regarding trial entry. Forward logistic regression modeling was performed using the items significantly correlated (by univariate analysis) with the decision to enter a clinical trial. A number of items were significantly correlated with the patient's decision. In the multivariate logistic regression model, the patient's perception of personal benefit was the most important, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.08 (P decision-making process were also important. These included whether the CRA helped with the decision (OR = 1.71; P decision was hard for the patient to make (OR = 0.52; P decision-making process while respecting the need for information and patient autonomy may also lead to meaningful improvements in accrual.

  18. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Barreto, Rodrigo G P; Robinson, Caroline C; Plentz, Rodrigo D M; Silva, Marcelo F

    2016-04-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions.

  19. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni E. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Results Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. Conclusion GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions.

  20. Effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality in cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibagheri, Ali; Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    Sleep disorders are common among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit (CCU). This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCU. In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa damascene aromatherapy for three subsequent nights. In the both groups the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. After the study, the mean scores of five domains of Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index as well as the mean of total score of the index in the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group. Rosa damascene aromatherapy can significantly improve the sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurodynamic treatment for patients with nerve-related leg pain: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Stieven, Fábio F; Araújo, Francisco X; Wiebusch, Matheus; Rosa, Carolina G; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Méa; Silva, Marcelo F

    2016-10-01

    To investigate if neurodynamic treatment is more effective than advice to remain active in patients with nerve-related leg pain. Parallel-group randomized controlled trial blinded to the outcome assessor conducted in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Sixty patients recruited from the community and private practices. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive four sessions of neurodynamic treatment over two weeks comprising passive lumbar foramen opening and neurodynamic sliders plus home exercises or advice to remain active. Leg pain intensity, disability, low back pain intensity, functional ability, symptoms distribution and global impression of recovery will be assessed at two and four weeks after randomization. A linear mixed model will be employed for each outcome following intention to treat principles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo John

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome measures that were used in the trials – the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA Scale, and two itch measures, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF itch measure. Methods Subjects aged 18 to 70 years with moderate to severe psoriasis for at least 6 months were recruited into the two clinical trials (n = 1095. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated for all patient reported outcomes at baseline and at 12 weeks. Construct validity was evaluated by relations among the different patient reported outcomes and between the patient reported outcomes and the clinical assessments (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; Overall Lesion Severity Scale; Physician's Global Assessment of Change assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks, as was the change over the course of the 12 week portion of the trial. Results Internal consistency reliability ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 for the patient reported outcome measures. The patient reported outcome measures were all shown to have significant construct validity with respect to each other and with respect to the clinical assessments. The four measures also demonstrated significant responsiveness to change in underlying clinical status of the patients over the course of the trial, as measured by the independently assessed clinical outcomes. Conclusions The DLQI, the PSA, VAS, and the NPF are considered useful tools for the measurement of dermatology

  3. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    starting enrolment before 2010 to 63.2% after 2010 (24/38, P clinical trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov. CONCLUSION: Many published randomized controlled trials from Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica were not adequately registered but the requirement of trial registration has...... the proportion of correctly registered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in Acta from 2009 to 2014. METHODS: We manually searched all Acta issues from 2009 to 2014 for RCTs. Information about timing of data collection and registration in trial registries was extracted. We classified RCTs as correctly...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  4. Mobile applications for handheld devices to screen and randomize acute stroke patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ai; Connelly, B; Abbott, Ei; Maland, E; Kim, J; Blake, J

    2012-08-01

    The availability of internet connectivity and mobile application software used by low-power handheld devices makes smart phones of unique value in time-sensitive clinical trials. Trial-specific applications can be downloaded by investigators from various mobile software distribution platforms or web applications delivered over HTTP. The Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) II investigators in collaboration with MentorMate released the ATACH-II Patient Recruitment mobile application available on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry in 2011. The mobile application provides tools for pre-screening, assessment of eligibility, and randomization of patients. Since the release of ATACH-II mobile application, the CLEAR-IVH (Clot Lysis Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage) trial investigators have also adopted such a mobile application. The video-conferencing capabilities of the most recent mobile devices open up additional opportunities to involve central coordinating centers in the recruitment process in real time.

  5. Psychiatric treatment following participation in the CapOpus randomized trial for patients with comorbid cannabis use disorder and psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten Rygaard; Orlovska, Sonja; Fohlmann, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Randomized trials targeting cannabis use disorders in patients with psychosis have generally been unsuccessful. One of the largest such trials was the CapOpus trial, which had an impact on the number of monthly joints used, but not on the number of days with cannabis use or positive or negative...

  6. [Some factors affecting treatment outcome in a randomized clinical trial of borderline patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jill C; Yeomans, Frank; Stone, Michael H; Haran, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    At the Personality Disorders Institute we have been investigating the efficacy of Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP), a twice weekly manualized psychodynamic psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder compared to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Supportive Psychotherapy (SP) in a randomized clinical trial of 90 borderline patients. We will first present some developmental foundations of BPD, followed by a discussion of the theoretical foundations of TFP. We will then discuss patient characteristics that have an impact on outcome. We will present both clinical and empirical data in a discussion of individual cases that were representative of a sample of borderline patients treated in Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP).

  7. Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer: a randomized controlled trial of 635 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dorthe; Løssl, Kristine; Nyboe Andersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, controlled and double-blinded trial studied whether acupuncture in relation to embryo transfer could increase the ongoing pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy. A total of 635 patients undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic...... sperm injection (ICSI) were included. In 314 patients, embryo transfer was accompanied by acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. In the control group, 321 patients received placebo acupuncture using a validated placebo needle. In the acupuncture group and the placebo...

  8. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  10. Effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Bock, Silke; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Baecker, Marcus; Bachmann, Jürgen; Langhorst, Jost; Musial, Frauke; Dobos, Gustav J

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of cupping, a traditional method of treating musculoskeletal pain, in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in an open randomized trial. n = 52 outpatients (58.5 +/- 8.0 years) with neurologically confirmed CTS were randomly assigned to either a verum (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Verum patients were treated with a single application of wet cupping, and control patients with a single local application of heat within the region overlying the trapezius muscle. Patients were followed up on day 7 after treatment. The primary outcome, severity of CTS symptoms (VAS), was reduced from 61.5 +/- 20.5 to 24.6 +/- 22.7 mm at day 7 in the cupping group and from 67.1 +/- 20.2 to 51.7 +/- 23.9 mm in the control group [group difference -24.5mm (95%CI -36.1; -2.9, P cupping therapy may be effective in relieving the pain and other symptoms related to CTS. The efficacy of cupping in the long-term management of CTS and related mechanisms remains to be clarified. The results of a randomized trial on the clinical effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are presented. Cupping of segmentally related shoulder zones appears to alleviate the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise--Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL)--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarden, Mary; Møller, Tom; Kjeldsen, Lars; Birgens, Henrik; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Bang Christensen, Karl; Diderichsen, Finn; Hendriksen, Carsten; Adamsen, Lis

    2013-10-02

    Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured and supervised counseling and exercise program. This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise--Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours + 30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70-80%) on an ergometer cycle, strength exercises using hand weights and relaxation exercise. Individual health counseling sessions include a self directed home walk program with a step counter. The primary endpoint is functional performance/exercise capacity (6 minute walk distance). The secondary endpoints are submaximal VO₂ max test, sit to stand and bicep curl test, physical activity levels, patient reported outcomes (quality of life, anxiety and depression, symptom prevalence, intensity and interference). Evaluation of clinical outcomes will be explored including incidence of infection, hospitalization days, body mass index, time to recurrence and survival. Qualitative exploration of patients' health behavior and experiences. PACE-AL will provide evidence of the effect of exercise and health promotion counseling on

  12. Erythromycin for Gastric Emptying in Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia for Emergency Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnetzki, Christoph; Elia, Nadia; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Giostra, Emiliano; Spahr, Laurent; Waeber, Jean-Luc; Pavlovic, Gordana; Lysakowski, Christopher; Tramèr, Martin R

    2015-08-01

    Patients undergoing emergency procedures under general anesthesia have impaired gastric emptying and are at high risk for aspiration of gastric contents. Erythromycin has strong gastric prokinetic properties. To evaluate the efficacy of erythromycin lactobionate in gastric emptying in patients undergoing emergency surgery. The Erythro-Emerge trial was a single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients undergoing emergency surgery under general anesthesia at Geneva University Hospitals. We included 132 patients from March 25, 2009, through April 10, 2013, and all patients completed the study. Randomization was stratified for trauma and nontrauma procedures. The randomization code was opened on April 23, 2013, and analyses were performed through July 26, 2013. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis. Patients were randomized to intravenous erythromycin lactobionate, 3 mg/kg, or placebo 15 minutes before tracheal intubation. Patients were followed up for 24 hours. The primary outcome was a clear stomach, defined as less than 40 mL of liquids and no solids and identified through endoscopy immediately after intubation. The secondary outcome was the pH level of residual gastric content. A clear stomach was diagnosed in 42 of 66 patients (64%) receiving placebo compared with 53 of 66 patients (80%) receiving erythromycin (risk ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.01-1.57]). In the population undergoing surgery for nontrauma, the association between receipt of erythromycin and having a clear stomach (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]) was statistically significant (13.4 [1.49-120]; P = .02); in the population undergoing surgery for trauma, it was not (1.81 [0.64-5.16]; P = .26). Median (interquartile range) pH of the residual gastric liquid was 2 (1-4) in 36 patients receiving placebo and 6 (3-7) in 16 receiving erythromycin (P = .002). Patients receiving erythromycin had nausea (20 [30%] vs 4 [6%]) and stomach cramps (15 [23%] vs 2 [3

  13. Colloid solutions for fluid resuscitation in patients with sepsis: systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing-Zi; Wei, Dan; Pan, Hong-Fei; Chen, Yu-Jun; Liang, Xiu-An; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Tang, Hua-Bo

    2013-10-01

    Colloids are widely used for fluid resuscitation in patients with sepsis. But the optimal type of fluid remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the effects on mortality and safety of different colloid solutions in patients with sepsis requiring volume replacement by examining direct comparisons of colloid solutions. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, China Biological Medicine Database, VIP Chinese Journals Database, and CNKI China National Knowledge Infrastructure Whole Article Database. Randomized clinical trials comparing different colloids in septic patients needing fluid resuscitation were selected. Seventeen randomized clinical trials with a total 1281 participants met the inclusion criteria. Mortality was obtained in all trials. For intervention of albumin vs. hydroxyethyl starch solution (HES), the relative risk (RR) of death was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-1.30). For intervention of albumin vs. gelatin, the RR of death was 2.4 (95% CI 0.31-18.35). For intervention of gelatin vs. HES, the RR of death was 1.02 (95% CI 0.79-1.32). For the intervention of HES vs. dextran, the RR of death was 1.38 (95% CI 0.28-6.78). For the intervention of gelatin vs. dextran, RR of death was not estimable. For albumin vs. dextran, no trial was included. Four trials of intervention of albumin vs. HES recorded the change of severity score. There is no evidence that one colloid solution is more effective and safer than another for fluid resuscitation in sepsis. The severity score is improved in HES, but the confidence intervals are wide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  15. Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing the Feasibility of Shortened Fasts in Intubated ICU Patients Undergoing Tracheotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, Nathan; Tassler, Andrew; Ow, Thomas J; Smith, Richard V; Shuaib, Stefan; Cohen, Hillel W; Sarta, Catherine; Schiff, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    American Society of Anesthesiology guidelines recommend preoperative fasts of 6 hours after light snacks and 8 hours after large meals. These guidelines were designed for healthy patients undergoing elective procedures but are often applied to intubated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ICU patients undergoing routine procedures may be subjected to unnecessary prolonged fasts. This study tests whether shorter fasts allow for better nutrition delivery and patient outcomes without increasing the risk. Randomized blinded controlled trial. Tertiary academic medical center. ICU patients undergoing bedside tracheotomy. Intubated ICU patients who were receiving enteral feeding and for whom bedside tracheotomy was indicated were enrolled prospectively and randomly allocated to 2 parallel preoperative fasting regimens: a 6-hour fast (control) and a 45-minute fast (intervention). Patients were assessed for aspiration, caloric delivery, metabolic markers, and infectious and noninfectious complications. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and randomized. There were no complications related to the procedure. There were no cases of intraoperative aspiration identified. There was a single postoperative pneumonia in the control group. Median (interquartile range) length of fast and caloric delivery were significantly different between the control group and the shortened fast group: 22 hours (18, 34) vs 14 hours (5, 25; P < .001) and 429 kcal (57, 1125) vs 1050 kcal (825, 1410; P = .01), respectively. Shortening preoperative fasts in intubated ICU patients allowed for better caloric delivery in the preoperative period. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Music preferences of mechanically ventilated patients participating in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheit, Annie; Breckenridge, Stephanie J; Chlan, Linda L; Savik, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving measure and supportive modality utilized to treat patients experiencing respiratory failure. Patients experience pain, discomfort, and anxiety as a result of being mechanically ventilated. Music listening is a non-pharmacological intervention used to manage these psychophysiological symptoms associated with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine music preferences of 107 MV patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial that implemented a patient-directed music listening protocol to help manage the psychophysiological symptom of anxiety. Music data presented includes the music genres and instrumentation patients identified as their preferred music. Genres preferred include: classical, jazz, rock, country, and oldies. Instrumentation preferred include: piano, voice, guitar, music with nature sounds, and orchestral music. Analysis of three patients' preferred music received throughout the course of the study is illustrated to demonstrate the complexity of assessing MV patients and the need for an ongoing assessment process.

  17. Disease knowledge after an educational program in patients with GERD – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Hermod

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient education has proved beneficial in several but not all chronic disease. Inconsistent findings may rely on varying educational effects of various programs and differential effects on subgroups of patients. Patients' increase in disease knowledge may serve as a feedback to the educator on how well the education program works – but may not be associated to relevant clinical outcomes like quality of life (QoL. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a group based education program for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD on disease knowledge and the association between knowledge and QoL. Methods Patients with GERD were randomly allocated to education (102 patients or control (109 patients. The education program was designed as a structured dialogue conveying information about pathophysiology, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of GERD, patients' rights and use of healthcare. Outcomes were a 24 item knowledge test on GERD (score 0 – 24 2 and 12 months after the educational program and disease specific and general QoL (Digestive symptoms and disease impact, DSIQ, and General Health Questionnaire, GHQ. Results Patients allocated to education achieved higher knowledge test scores than controls at 2 months (17.0 vs. 13.1, p Conclusion A group based education program for patients with GERD designed as a structured dialogue increased patients' disease knowledge, which was retained after 1 year. Changes in GERD-knowledge were not associated with change in QoL. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT0061850

  18. Is customized vestibular rehabilitation effective in patients with multiple sclerosis? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Gulnur; Karapolat, Hale; Akkoc, Yesim; Yuceyar, Nur

    2016-08-01

    Balance disorders are among the most common problems encountered by patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to investigate the effects of customized vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on balance, functional capacity, quality of life, and depression in patients with MS. This study was designed as a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The study was carried out in a single tertiary referral center. Forty consecutive patients referred with a diagnosis of MS were randomized into two groups: an exercise group (N.=20) and a control group (N.=20). The experimental group underwent customized VR and the wait-listed control group received the usual medical care. All of the patients were assessed with objective balance tests (Romberg Test, Tandem Romberg Test, Foam Romberg Test, Static Posturography, Six-Meter Walk Test, Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go Test, Functional Gait Assessment, and Dynamic Gait Index), subjective balance parameters (Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale and Dizziness Handicap Inventory), and functional capacity (Six-Minute Walking Test), quality of life (Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory) scales. At the end of the trial, the exercise group exhibited significant changes in most of the evaluated parameters compared to the control group [except the Tandem Romberg with eyes closed and the Foam Romberg, standing with eyes open (P0.05). The intergroup comparisons of differences indicated significant recoveries in favor of the exercise group in all of the evaluated parameters (P<0.05). This study confirms the effects of customized VR programs on balance, quality of life, and functional capacity in patients with MS. Customized VR is an effective method for treating balance disorders in patients with MS.

  19. Sertraline Versus Placebo in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedli, Karin; Guirguis, Ayman; Almond, Michael; Day, Clara; Chilcot, Joseph; Da Silva-Gane, Maria; Davenport, Andrew; Fineberg, Naomi A; Spencer, Benjamin; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2017-02-07

    Depression is common in patients on hemodialysis, but data on the benefits and risks of antidepressants in this setting are limited. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sertraline over 6 months in patients on hemodialysis with depression to determine study feasibility, safety, and effectiveness. Patients on hemodialysis at five United Kingdom renal centers completed the Beck Depression Inventory II. Those scoring ≥16 and not already on treatment for depression were invited to undergo diagnostic interview to confirm major depressive disorder. Eligible patients with major depressive disorder were randomized to receive the study medication-either sertraline or placebo. Outcomes included recruitment and dropout rates, change in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Beck Depression Inventory II, and qualitative information to guide design of a large-scale trial. In total, 709 patients were screened and enrolled between April of 2013 and October of 2014; 231 (32.6%) had Beck Depression Inventory II scores ≥16, and 68 (29%) of these were already receiving treatment for depression. Sixty-three underwent diagnostic interview, 37 were diagnosed with major depressive disorder, and 30 were randomized; 21 completed the trial: eight of 15 on sertraline and 13 of 15 on placebo (P=0.05). Dropouts due to adverse and serious adverse events were greater in the sertraline group. All occurred in the first 3 months. Over 6 months, depression scores improved in both groups. Beck Depression Inventory II score fell from 29.1±8.4 to 17.3±12.4 (PDepression Rating Scale score fell from 24.5±4.1 to 10.3±5.8 (Pdepressed patients already taking antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Randomized controlled trial of a patient decision-making aid for orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kate; Cunningham, Susan J; Petrie, Aviva; Ryan, Fiona S

    2017-08-01

    Patient decision-making aids (PDAs) are instruments that facilitate shared decision making and enable patients to reach informed, individual decisions regarding health care. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of a PDA compared with traditional information provision for adolescent patients considering fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. Before treatment, orthodontic patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the intervention group received the PDA and standard information regarding fixed appliances, and the control group received the standard information only. Decisional conflict was measured using the Decisional Conflict Scale, and the levels of decisional conflict were compared between the 2 groups. Seventy-two patients were recruited and randomized in a ratio of 1:1 to the PDA and control groups. Seventy-one patients completed the trial (control group, 36; PDA group, 35); this satisfied the sample size calculation. The median total Decisional Conflict Scale score in the PDA group was lower than in the control group (15.63 and 19.53, respectively). However, this difference was not statistically significant (difference between groups, 3.90; 95% confidence interval of the difference, -4.30 to 12.11). Sex, ethnicity, age, and the time point at which patients were recruited did not have significant effects on Decisional Conflict Scale scores. No harm was observed or reported for any participant in the study. The results of this study showed that the provision of a PDA to adolescents before they consented for fixed appliances did not significantly reduce decisional conflict. There may be a benefit in providing a PDA for some patients, but it is not yet possible to say how these patients could be identified. This trial was registered with the Harrow National Research Ethics Committee (reference 12/LO/0279). The protocol was not published before trial commencement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Desmopressin after cardiac surgery in bleeding patients. A multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, E; Cattaneo, M; Crescenzi, G; Ranucci, M; Guarracino, F; Cariello, C; Baldassarri, R; Isgrò, G; Baryshnikova, E; Fano, G; Franco, A; Gerli, C; Crivellari, M; Zangrillo, A; Landoni, G

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that desmopressin decreases post-operative blood loss in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. These studies were small and never studied the effect of desmopressin in patients with active bleeding. Objective of the study was to determine whether desmopressin reduces red blood cells transfusion requirements in patients with active bleeding after cardiac surgery who had been pre-treated with tranexamic acid. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study randomized elective patients with bleeding after cardiac surgery despite pre-treatment with tranexamic acid, to receive placebo (saline solution) or a single administration of desmopressin (0.3 μg/kg in saline solution). The primary endpoint was the number of patients requiring red blood cells transfusion after randomization and during hospital stay. Secondary end points were: blood loss from chest tubes during the first 24 h after study drug administration, hours of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, and in-hospital mortality. The study was interrupted after inclusion of 67% of the planned patients for futility. The number of patients requiring red blood cells transfusion after randomization was 37/68 (54%) in desmopressin group and 33/67 (49%) in placebo group (P = 0.34) with no difference in blood loss: 575 (interquartile 422-770) ml in desmopressin group and 590 (476-1013) ml in placebo group (P = 0.42), mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay or mortality. This multicenter randomized trial demonstrated that, in patients pre-treated with tranexamic acid, desmopressin should not be expected to improve treatment of patients who experience bleeding after cardiac surgery. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Music preferences of mechanically ventilated patients participating in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheit, Annie; Breckenridge, Stephanie J.; Chlan, Linda L.; Savik, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving measure and supportive modality utilized to treat patients experiencing respiratory failure. Patients experience pain, discomfort, and anxiety as a result of being mechanically ventilated. Music listening is a non-pharmacological intervention used to manage these psychophysiological symptoms associated with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine music preferences of 107 MV patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial that implemented a patient-directed music listening protocol to help manage the psychophysiological symptom of anxiety. Music data presented includes the music genres and instrumentation patients identified as their preferred music. Genres preferred include: classical, jazz, rock, country, and oldies. Instrumentation preferred include: piano, voice, guitar, music with nature sounds, and orchestral music. Analysis of three patients’ preferred music received throughout the course of the study is illustrated to demonstrate the complexity of assessing MV patients and the need for an ongoing assessment process. PMID:25574992

  3. Systematic evaluation of the methodology of randomized controlled trials of anticoagulation in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Gabriel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that are inappropriately designed or executed may provide biased findings and mislead clinical practice. In view of recent interest in the treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications in cancer patients we evaluated the characteristics, risk of bias and their time trends in RCTs of anticoagulation in patients with cancer. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search, including a search of four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI the Web of Science, and CENTRAL up to February 2010. We included RCTs in which the intervention and/or comparison consisted of: vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin (UFH, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, direct thrombin inhibitors or fondaparinux. We performed descriptive analyses and assessed the association between the variables of interest and the year of publication. Results We included 67 RCTs with 24,071 participants. In twenty one trials (31% DVT diagnosis was triggered by clinical suspicion; the remaining trials either screened for DVT or were unclear about their approach. 41 (61%, 22 (33%, and 11 (16% trials respectively reported on major bleeding, minor bleeding, and thrombocytopenia. The percentages of trials satisfying risk of bias criteria were: adequate sequence generation (85%, adequate allocation concealment (61%, participants’ blinding (39%, data collectors’ blinding (44%, providers’ blinding (41%, outcome assessors’ blinding (75%, data analysts’ blinding (15%, intention to treat analysis (57%, no selective outcome reporting (12%, no stopping early for benefit (97%. The mean follow-up rate was 96%. Adequate allocation concealment and the reporting of intention to treat analysis were the only two quality criteria that improved over time. Conclusions Many RCTs of anticoagulation in patients with cancer appear to use insufficiently rigorous outcome assessment methods and to have deficiencies in key methodological

  4. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-11-25

    The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. A randomized controlled prospective clinical trial including 97 people, from them 71 patients with various AS manifestations. Patients were divided in 2 subgroups for non-drug weight loss program, and conventional drug therapy. The weight loss program included calorie restriction with 100-150 kcal/day, fat-free vegetables, salt diet, and optimum physical activity. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows version 17.0. The weight loss subgroup lost ranging between 7-20% from an initial weight (P = 0.016). Weight loss was achieved due to fatty mass reduction only (P = 0.005). Hemoglobin levels (P bone mineral density (P water (P = 0.006) and muscle masses (P = 0.0038) were increased in weight loss subgroup. Ejection fraction (P body fat. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01700075. State registration is # 0109RK000079, code is O.0475 at the National Center for Scientific and Technical Information of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  5. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research.

  6. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochems EC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eline C Jochems,1,2 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis,1–3 Arno van Dam,3,4 Hugo J Duivenvoorden,5 Cornelis L Mulder1,6 1Department of Psychiatry, Epidemiological and Social Psychiatric Research Institute, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2GGz Breburg, Top Clinical Center for Body, Mind and Health, Tilburg, the Netherlands; 3Tilburg University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tranzo Department, Tilburg, the Netherlands; 4GGZ Westelijk Noord Brabant, Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands; 5Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 6BavoEuropoort, Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness.Methods: Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968. Participants: adult outpatients with a primary diagnosis of a psychotic disorder or a personality disorder and their clinicians, treated in 12 community mental health teams (the clusters of two mental health institutions in the Netherlands. Interventions: monthly motivation feedback (MF generated by clinicians additional to treatment as usual (TAU and TAU by the community mental health teams. Primary outcome: treatment engagement at patient level, assessed at 12 months by clinicians. Randomization: teams were allocated to MF or TAU by a computerized randomization program that randomized each team to a single treatment by blocks of varying size. All participants within these teams received similar treatment. Clinicians and patients were not blind to treatment allocation at the 12-month assessment.Results: The 294 randomized patients (148 MF, 146 TAU and 57 clinicians (29 MF, 28 TAU of 12 teams (6 MF, 6 TAU were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. No statistically significant differences

  7. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.J.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Lee, J. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

  8. Radial Access Reduces Mortality in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes: Results From an Updated Trial Sequential Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andò, Giuseppe; Capodanno, Davide

    2016-04-11

    The authors sought to investigate whether the cumulative evidence coming from randomized studies has reached the necessary power to consider radial access as a bleeding avoidance strategy that reduces mortality and ischemic endpoints in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Studies in ACS patients have reached conflicting conclusions about the impact of radial access in improving ischemic outcomes in addition to the established bleeding benefit. English-language publications and abstracts of major cardiovascular meetings until October 2015 were scrutinized. Study quality, patient characteristics, procedural data, and outcomes were extracted. Data were pooled in random effects meta-analyses with classic and trial sequential techniques. Trial sequential analysis combines the a priori information size calculation needed to allow for clinically meaningful statistical inference with the adjustment of thresholds for which results are considered significant. Seventeen studies, encompassing data from 19,328 patients, were pooled. Radial access was found to reduce mortality (relative risk [RR]: 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60 to 0.88; p = 0.001), major adverse cardiovascular events (RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.77 to 0.95; p = 0.005), and major bleeding (RR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.76; p < 0.001). Multiple sensitivity analyses showed consistent results, and trial sequential analysis suggested firm evidence for a meaningful reduction in mortality with radial access. Radial access reduces mortality compared with femoral access in ACS patients undergoing invasive management. This benefit is paralleled by consistent reductions in major adverse cardiovascular events and major bleeding, supporting radial access as the default strategy for cardiac catheterization in patients with ACS. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Randomized, single blind, controlled trial of inhaled glutathione vs placebo in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, C; Tosco, A; Abete, P; Carnovale, V; Basile, C; Magliocca, A; Quattrucci, S; De Sanctis, S; Alatri, F; Mazzarella, G; De Pietro, L; Turino, C; Melillo, E; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Raia, V

    2015-03-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) the defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein may be responsible for the impaired transport of glutathione (GSH), the first line defense of the lung against oxidative stress. The aim of this single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effect of inhaled GSH in patients with CF. 54 adult and 51 pediatric patients were randomized to receive inhaled GSH or placebo twice daily for 12 months. Twelve month treatment with inhaled GSH did not achieve our predetermined primary outcome measure of 15% improvement in FEV1%. Only in patients with moderate lung disease, 3, 6 and 9 months therapy with GSH resulted in a statistically significant increase of FEV1 values from the baseline. Moreover GSH therapy improved 6-minute walking test in pediatric population. GSH was well tolerated by all patients. Inhaled GSH has slight positive effects in CF patients with moderate lung disease warranting further study. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01450267; URL: www.clinicaltrialsgov. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Patient Education on Influenza Vaccine Uptake among Community-Dwelling Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Chun; Mui, Carlo; Chiu, Wing Yan; Ng, Yuk Yiu; Chen, Matthew H. Y.; Ho, Pui Hung; Kwok, Chun Pong; Lam, Suki S. M.; Wong, Chun Yip; Wong, Kit Yee; Pang, Herbert H.

    2017-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to test the effectiveness of brief face-to-face patient education in increasing influenza vaccination rate among elderly in the community. Recruitment and intervention were conducted at two general outpatient clinics in Hong Kong. 529 eligible patients were randomly assigned to intervention or control group…

  11. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. Methods/Design In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse. The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. Discussion This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2137

  12. Linaclotide in Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients with Moderate to Severe Abdominal Bloating: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E Lacy

    Full Text Available Abdominal bloating is a common and bothersome symptom of chronic idiopathic constipation. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation and concomitant moderate-to-severe abdominal bloating.This Phase 3b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial randomized patients to oral linaclotide (145 or 290 μg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Eligible patients met Rome II criteria for chronic constipation upon entry with an average abdominal bloating score ≥5 (self-assessment: 0 10-point numerical rating scale during the 14-day baseline period. Patients reported abdominal symptoms (including bloating and bowel symptoms daily; adverse events were monitored. The primary responder endpoint required patients to have ≥3 complete spontaneous bowel movements/week with an increase of ≥1 from baseline, for ≥9 of 12 weeks. The primary endpoint compared linaclotide 145 μg vs. placebo.The intent-to-treat population included 483 patients (mean age=47.3 years, female=91.5%, white=67.7%. The primary endpoint was met by 15.7% of linaclotide 145 μg patients vs. 7.6% of placebo patients (P<0.05. Both linaclotide doses significantly improved abdominal bloating vs. placebo (P<0.05 for all secondary endpoints, controlling for multiplicity. Approximately one-third of linaclotide patients (each group had ≥50% mean decrease from baseline in abdominal bloating vs. 18% of placebo patients (P<0.01. Diarrhea was reported in 6% and 17% of linaclotide 145 and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 2% of placebo patients. AEs resulted in premature discontinuation of 5% and 9% of linaclotide 145 μg and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 6% of placebo patients.Once-daily linaclotide (145 and 290 μg significantly improved bowel and abdominal symptoms in chronic idiopathic constipation patients with moderate-to-severe baseline abdominal bloating; in particular

  13. Cluster randomized, controlled trial on patient safety improvement in general practice: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background An open, constructive safety culture is key in healthcare since it is seen as a main condition for patient safety. Studies have examined culture improvement strategies in hospitals. In primary care, however, not much is known about effective strategies to improve the safety culture yet. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of two patient safety culture interventions: a patient safety culture questionnaire solely, the SCOPE, or the SCOPE questionnaire combined with a patient safety workshop. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale and design of this trial. Methods/design The SCOPE Intervention Study is a cluster randomized, three-armed controlled trial, that will be conducted in 30 general practices in the Netherlands. Ten practices in the first intervention arm will complete the SCOPE questionnaire and are expected to draw and implement their own improvement initiatives based on a computerised feedback report. In the second intervention arm, staff of the ten practices also will be asked to complete the SCOPE questionnaire and in addition will be given a complementary workshop. This workshop is theoretical and interactive, educating staff and facilitating discussion, leading to a practice specific action plan for patient safety improvement. The results of the SCOPE questionnaire are incorporated in the workshop. The ten practices in the control arm continue care as usual. Baseline and follow-up measurements will be conducted with an implementation period of one year. The primary outcome will include the number of incidents reported and secondary several quality and safety indicators and the patient safety culture. Moreover, interviews will be conducted at follow-up to evaluate the implementation process of the intervention. Discussion Results of this study will give insight in the effect of administering a culture questionnaire or the questionnaire with a complementary workshop. This knowledge will aid implementation of

  14. Anxiety Treatment of Opioid Dependent Patients with Buprenorphine: A Randomized, Double-blind, Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Jahromi, Mina Sefidfard

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the impact of vary doses of buprenorphine on anxiety symptoms in opioid-dependent inpatients over a 7 days period, using a randomized controlled trial design. Patients were randomized to three groups. Fourteen men who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria for both opioid use disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and were seeking for treatment. Patients obtain dosages of 32 mg or 64 mg or 96 mg of buprenorphine as a single dose only and were treated in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Of 14 subjects; 5 (35.7%) obtained 32 mg, 4 (28.6%) obtained 64 mg, and 5 (35.7%) obtained 96 mg of buprenorphine. Administering daily Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and interview. All the patients ended the 7-day treatment time. The results showed a significant reduction in anxiety symptoms within each of the three groups (P = 0.00), but no difference in outcome between the groups (P = 0.605). The outcome suggests a single high dose of buprenorphine can supply a speedy, safe, simple, and suitable means of anxiety treatment. The single high dose of buprenorphine could be a novel mechanism medication that provides a rapid and sustained improvement for generalized anxiety disorder in opioid dependent patients. Placebo-controlled trials of longer duration are needed to evaluate ability, safety, and psychological and physiological influence of extended exposure to this medication.

  15. Physiotherapy in patients with clinical signs of shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Thilo O; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H G

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the effect of individualized manual physiotherapy and exercises compared with individualized exercises alone in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Randomized controlled trial. Patients with shoulder impingement of more than 4 weeks' duration. Patients in the intervention group were treated with individually adapted exercises and examination-based physiotherapy. Controls were treated with individually adapted exercises only. Both groups had 10 treatment sessions over a period of 5 weeks and subsequently continued their exercises at home for another 7 weeks. Results were analysed at 5 and 12 weeks after the start of the study. Primary outcome measures were: Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and Patient's Global Impression of Change. Secondary outcome measures were: mean weekly pain score; Generic Patient-Specific Scale; and Patients' Satisfaction with Treatment. A total of 46 patients were randomized to the intervention group and 44 to the control group. Although both groups showed significant improvements, there was no difference between groups for the primary and secondary outcomes at any time. Only the results for mean pain differed at 5 weeks in favour of the intervention group. Individually adapted exercises were effective in the treatment of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Individualized manual physiotherapy contributed only a minor amount to the improvement in pain intensity. However, further research is necessary to confirm these results before definite recommendations can be made.

  16. Role of 3D animation in periodontal patient education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Gertjan; Quirynen, Marc; Ozcelik, Onur; Teughels, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled parallel trial investigates the effect of 3D animation on the increase and recall of knowledge on periodontitis by patients with periodontitis. The effects of a 3D animation (3D animation group) were compared with narration and drawing (control group) for periodontal patient education. A total of 68 periodontitis patients were stratified according to educational level and then randomly allocated to control or 3D animation groups. All patients received: (1) a pre-test (baseline knowledge), (2) a patient education video (3D animation or control video), (3) a post-test (knowledge immediately after looking at the video), and (4) a follow-up test (knowledge recall after 2 weeks). Each test contained 10 multiple-choice questions. There was no significant difference in baseline knowledge. Patients receiving the 3D animations had significantly higher scores for both the post-test and the follow-up test, when compared with patients receiving sketch animations. 3D animations are more effective than real-time drawings for periodontal patient education in terms of knowledge recall. 3D animations may be a powerful tool for assisting in the information process. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Randomized clinical trial of Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score-based management of patients with suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M; Kolodziej, B; Andersson, R E

    2017-10-01

    The role of imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis is controversial. This prospective interventional study and nested randomized trial analysed the impact of implementing a risk stratification algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score, and compared routine imaging with selective imaging after clinical reassessment. Patients presenting with suspicion of appendicitis between September 2009 and January 2012 from age 10 years were included at 21 emergency surgical centres and from age 5 years at three university paediatric centres. Registration of clinical characteristics, treatments and outcomes started during the baseline period. The AIR score-based algorithm was implemented during the intervention period. Intermediate-risk patients were randomized to routine imaging or selective imaging after clinical reassessment. The baseline period included 1152 patients, and the intervention period 2639, of whom 1068 intermediate-risk patients were randomized. In low-risk patients, use of the AIR score-based algorithm resulted in less imaging (19·2 versus 34·5 per cent; P appendicitis (6·8 versus 9·7 per cent; P = 0·034). Intermediate-risk patients randomized to the imaging and observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendicectomies (6·4 versus 6·7 per cent respectively; P = 0·884), number of admissions, number of perforations and length of hospital stay, but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (53·4 versus 46·3 per cent; P = 0·020). AIR score-based risk classification can safely reduce the use of diagnostic imaging and hospital admissions in patients with suspicion of appendicitis. Registration number: NCT00971438 ( http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of Adding a Pictorial Display to Enhance Recall of Cancer Patient Histories: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolch, Gary; Ghosh, Sunita; Boyington, Curtiss; Watanabe, Sharon M; Fainsinger, Robin; Burton-Macleod, Sarah; Thai, Vincent; Thai, JoAnn; Fassbender, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Current health care delivery models have increased the need for safe and concise patient handover. Handover interventions in the literature have focused on the use of structured tools but have not evaluated their ability to facilitate retention of patient information. In this study, mock pictorial displays were generated in an attempt to create a snapshot of each patient's medical and social circumstances. These pictorial displays contained the patient's photograph and other disease- and treatment-related images. The objective of this randomized trial was to assess the ability of these snapshots to enhance delayed information recall by care providers. Participating physicians were given four advanced cancer patient histories to review, two at a time over two weeks. Pictorial image displays, referred to as the Electronic Whiteboard (EWB) were added, in a randomized manner to half of the textual histories. The impact of the EWB on information recall was tested in immediate and delayed time frames. Overall, patient information recall declined significantly over time, with or without the EWB. Still, this trial demonstrates significantly higher test scores after 24 hours with the addition of pictures to textual patient information, compared with textual information alone (P = 0.0002). A more modest improvement was seen with the addition of the EWB for questionnaires administered immediately after history review (P = 0.008). Most participants agreed that the EWB was a useful enhancement and that seeing a patient's photograph improved their ability to retain information. Most studies examining the institution of handover protocols in the health care setting have failed to harness the power of pictures and other representative images. This study demonstrates the ability of pictorial displays to improve both immediate and delayed recall of patient histories without increasing review time. These types of displays may be amenable to generation by software programs and

  19. Bias due to lack of patient blinding in clinical trials. A systematic review of trials randomizing patients to blind and nonblind sub-studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Emanuelsson, Frida; Skou Thomsen, Ann Sofia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blinding patients in clinical trials is a key methodological procedure, but the expected degree of bias due to nonblinded patients on estimated treatment effects is unknown. METHODS: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials with one sub-study (i.e. experimental vs control....... There was a larger effect size difference in 10 acupuncture trials [-0.63 (-0.77 to -0.49)], than in the two non-acupuncture trials [-0.17 (-0.41 to 0.07)]. Lack of patient blinding also increased attrition and use of co-interventions: ratio of control group attrition risk 1.79 (1.18 to 2.70), and ratio of control...

  20. Selecting the appropriate pacing mode for patients with sick sinus syndrome: evidence from randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, A E; Nielsen, J C

    2003-12-01

    Several observational studies have indicated that selection of pacing mode may be important for the clinical outcome in patients with symptomatic bradycardia, affecting the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), thromboembolism, congestive heart failure, mortality and quality of life. In this paper we present and discuss the most recent data from six randomized trials on mode selection in patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS). In pacing mode selection, VVI(R) pacing is the least attractive solution, increasing the incidence of AF and-as compared with AAI(R) pacing, also the incidence of heart failure, thromboembolism and death. VVI(R) pacing should not be used as the primary pacing mode in patients with SSS, who haven't chronic AF. AAIR pacing is superior to DDDR pacing, reducing AF and preserving left ventricular function. Single site right ventricular pacing-VVI(R) or DDD(R) mode-causes an abnormal ventricular activation and contraction (called ventricular desynchronization), which results in a reduced left ventricular function. Despite the risk of AV block, we consider AAIR pacing to be the optimal pacing mode for isolated SSS today and an algorithm to select patients for AAIR pacing is suggested. Trials on new pacemaker algorithms minimizing right ventricular pacing as well as trials testing alternative pacing sites and multisite pacing to reduce ventricular desynchronization can be expected within the next years.

  1. Central or peripheral catheters for initial venous access of ICU patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jean-Damien; Salomon, Laurence; Boyer, Alexandre; Thiery, Guillaume; Meybeck, Agnes; Roy, Carine; Pasquet, Blandine; Le Mière, Eric; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2013-09-01

    The vast majority of ICU patients require some form of venous access. There are no evidenced-based guidelines concerning the use of either central or peripheral venous catheters, despite very different complications. It remains unknown which to insert in ICU patients. We investigated the rate of catheter-related insertion or maintenance complications in two strategies: one favoring the central venous catheters and the other peripheral venous catheters. Multicenter, controlled, parallel-group, open-label randomized trial. Three French ICUs. Adult ICU patients with equal central or peripheral venous access requirement. Patients were randomized to receive central venous catheters or peripheral venous catheters as initial venous access. The primary endpoint was the rate of major catheter-related complications within 28 days. Secondary endpoints were the rate of minor catheter-related complications and a composite score-assessing staff utilization and time spent to manage catheter insertions. Analysis was intention to treat. We randomly assigned 135 patients to receive a central venous catheter and 128 patients to receive a peripheral venous catheter. Major catheter-related complications were greater in the peripheral venous catheter than in the central venous catheter group (133 vs 87, respectively, p=0.02) although none of those was life threatening. Minor catheter-related complications were 201 with central venous catheters and 248 with peripheral venous catheters (p=0.06). 46% (60/128) patients were managed throughout their ICU stay with peripheral venous catheters only. There were significantly more peripheral venous catheter-related complications per patient in patients managed solely with peripheral venous catheter than in patients that received peripheral venous catheter and at least one central venous catheter: 1.92 (121/63) versus 1.13 (226/200), pcentral venous catheter-related complications per patient between patients initially randomized to peripheral

  2. Effects of acupuncture on patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Rey Koldo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a multidimensional disorder for which treatment as yet remains unsatisfactory. Studies of an acupuncture-based approach, despite its broad acceptance among patients and healthcare staff, have not produced sufficient evidence of its effectiveness in treating this syndrome. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture for patients with fibromyalgia, with respect to reducing their pain and level of incapacity, and improving their quality of life. Methods/design Randomized controlled multicentre study, with 156 outpatients, aged over 17 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, either alone or associated with severe depression, according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. The participants will be randomly assigned to receive either "True acupuncture" or "Sham acupuncture". They will be evaluated using a specific measurement system, constituted of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Hamilton rating scale for depression. Also taken into consideration will be the clinical and subjective pain intensity, the patient's family structure and relationships, psychological aspects, quality of life, the duration of previous temporary disability, the consumption of antidepressant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory medication, and the potential effect of factors considered to be predictors of a poor prognosis. All these aspects will be examined by questionnaires and other suitably-validated instruments. The results obtained will be analysed at 10 weeks, and 6 and 12 months from the start of treatment. Discussion This trial will utilize high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. It may provide evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for fibromyalgia either alone or associated with severe depression. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number

  3. Internet Treatment Addressing either Insomnia or Depression, for Patients with both Diagnoses: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Kerstin; Jernelöv, Susanna; Kraepelien, Martin; Bergdahl, Malin Olséni; Jungmarker, Kristina; Ankartjärn, Linda; Lindefors, Nils; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare treatment effects when patients with insomnia and depression receive treatment for either insomnia or depression. Design: A 9-w randomized controlled trial with 6- and 12-mo follow-up. Setting: Internet Psychiatry Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants: Forty-three adults in whom comorbid insomnia and depression were diagnosed, recruited via media and assessed by psychiatrists. Interventions: Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for either insomnia or depression. Measurements and Results: Primary outcome measures were symptom self-rating scales (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI] and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS-S]), assessed before and after treatment with follow-up after 6 and 12 mo. The participants' use of sleep medication and need for further treatment after completion of ICBT was also investigated. The insomnia treatment was more effective than the depression treatment in reducing insomnia severity during treatment (P = 0.05), and equally effective in reducing depression severity. Group differences in insomnia severity were maintained during the 12-mo follow-up period. Post treatment, participants receiving treatment for insomnia had significantly less self-rated need for further insomnia treatment (P Internet-delivered treatment with cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for insomnia was more effective than ICBT for depression for patients with both diagnoses. This indicates, in line with previous research, that insomnia when comorbid with depression is not merely a symptom of depression, but needs specific treatment. Trial Registration: The trial was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, registration ID: NCT01256099. Citation: Blom K, Jernelöv S, Kraepelien M, Bergdahl MO, Jungmarker K, Ankartjärn L, Lindefors N, Kaldo V. Internet treatment addressing either insomnia or depression, for patients with both diagnoses: a randomized trial. SLEEP 2015;38(2):267–277. PMID:25337948

  4. A randomized, controlled trial of physician postures when breaking bad news to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, Eduardo; Palmer, J Lynn; Pace, Ellen; Zhang, Karen; Willey, Jie; Strasser, Florian; Bennett, Michael I

    2007-09-01

    Medical training teaches physicians to sit when breaking bad news, though there have been no controlled studies to support this advice. We aimed to establish cancer patients' preference for physician posture when physicians break bad news using a randomized controlled crossover trial in a department of palliative care at a large US cancer center. Referred patients were blind to the hypothesis and watched video sequences of a sitting or standing physician breaking bad news to a cancer patient and 168 of 173 participants (88 female) completed the study. Sitting physicians were preferred and viewed as significantly more compassionate than standing physicians (P posture. In summary, cancer patients, especially females, prefer physicians to sit when breaking bad news and rate physicians who adopt this posture as more compassionate. However, sitting posture alone is unlikely to compensate for poor communication skills and lack of other respectful gestures during a consultation.

  5. Method for evaluating prediction models that apply the results of randomized trials to individual patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattan Michael W

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The clinical significance of a treatment effect demonstrated in a randomized trial is typically assessed by reference to differences in event rates at the group level. An alternative is to make individualized predictions for each patient based on a prediction model. This approach is growing in popularity, particularly for cancer. Despite its intuitive advantages, it remains plausible that some prediction models may do more harm than good. Here we present a novel method for determining whether predictions from a model should be used to apply the results of a randomized trial to individual patients, as opposed to using group level results. Methods We propose applying the prediction model to a data set from a randomized trial and examining the results of patients for whom the treatment arm recommended by a prediction model is congruent with allocation. These results are compared with the strategy of treating all patients through use of a net benefit function that incorporates both the number of patients treated and the outcome. We examined models developed using data sets regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer and Dutasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy. Results For adjuvant chemotherapy, we found that patients who would opt for chemotherapy even for small risk reductions, and, conversely, those who would require a very large risk reduction, would on average be harmed by using a prediction model; those with intermediate preferences would on average benefit by allowing such information to help their decision making. Use of prediction could, at worst, lead to the equivalent of an additional death or recurrence per 143 patients; at best it could lead to the equivalent of a reduction in the number of treatments of 25% without an increase in event rates. In the Dutasteride case, where the average benefit of treatment is more modest, there is a small benefit of prediction modelling, equivalent to a reduction of

  6. The Effectiveness of Exergames in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Ali Yavuz; Tok, Fatih; Yildirim, Pelin; Ordahan, Banu; Turkoglu, Gozde; Sahin, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    Exergames are a well-known type of game based on a virtual avatar's body movements. This hightech approach promotes an active lifestyle. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of exergames on pain, disease activity, functional capacity and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study involved 60 patients, who were randomized into either the exergame group (EG) or the control group (CG). The EG patients engaged in exergaming, and CG patients did not engage in any exercises. The exergaming sessions were performed five times a week for eight weeks (40 sessions in total). The patients were assessed before and after the eight-week program on a visual analog scale (VAS), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) questionnaire. A statistically significant improvement was observed in VAS, BASFI, BASDAI and ASQoL scores in the EG group after completion of the exercise program (p < 0.05). This study is a first step in investigating the possibilities of using an exergame platform to help patients with spondyloarthropathies to adopt a more physically active lifestyle. The results of this study suggest that exergames increase physical activity and decrease the pain scores in AS patients and also could, therefore, be feasible and safe.

  7. Pharmaceutical care of elderly patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyun-Hong; Ou, Huang-Tz; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Kao, Yea-Huei Yang

    2016-02-01

    Care of the elderly with diabetes is more complicated than that for other age groups. The elderly and/or those with multiple comorbidities are often excluded from randomized controlled trials of treatments for diabetes. The heterogeneity of health status of the elderly also increases the difficulty in diabetes care; therefore, diabetes care for the elderly should be individualized. Motivated patients educated about diabetes benefit the most from collaborating with a multidisciplinary patient-care team. A pharmacist is an important team member by serving as an educator, coach, healthcare manager, and pharmaceutical care provider. To evaluate the effects of pharmaceutical care on glycemic control of ambulatory elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. A 421-bed district hospital in Nantou City, Taiwan. We conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial involving 100 patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control (HbA1c levels of ≥9.0 %) aged ≥65 years over 6 months. Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-care (control, n = 50) or pharmaceutical-care (intervention, n = 50) group. Pharmaceutical care was provided by a certified diabetes-educator pharmacist who identified and resolved drug-related problems and established a procedure for consultations pertaining to medication. The Mann–Whitney test was used to evaluate nonparametric quantitative data. Statistical significance was defined as P Medical expenses between groups did not significantly differ (−624.06 vs. −418.7, P = 0.767). There was no significant difference in hospitalization rates between groups. The pharmacist intervention program provided pharmaceutical services that improved long-term, safe control of blood sugar levels for ambulatory elderly patients with diabetes and did not increase medical expenses.

  8. HYPERTENSION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT (HIP): RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT FOR PHYSICIANS AND LIFESTYLE MODIFICATION FOR PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetkey, Laura P.; Pollak, Kathryn I.; Yancy, William S.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Batch, Bryan C.; Samsa, Greg; Matchar, David B.; Lin, Pao-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Despite widely publicized hypertension treatment guidelines for physicians and lifestyle recommendations for patients, blood pressure control rates remain low. In community-based primary care clinics, we performed a nested, 2×2 randomized, controlled trial of physician intervention vs. control and/or patient intervention vs. control. Physician Intervention included internet-based training, self-monitoring, and quarterly feedback reports. Patient Intervention included 20 weekly group sessions followed by 12 monthly phone counseling contacts, and focused on weight loss, DASH dietary pattern, exercise, and reduced sodium intake. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 6 months. Eight primary care practices (32 physicians) were randomized to Physician Intervention or Control. Within those practices, 574 patients were randomized to Patient Intervention or Control. Patients’ mean age was 60 years, 61% female, 37% African American. BP data were available for 91% of patients at 6 months. The main effect of Physician Intervention on systolic blood pressure at 6 months, adjusted for baseline pressure, was 0.3 mmHg (95% CI −1.5 to 2.2; p = 0.72). The main effect of the Patient Intervention was −2.6 mmHg (95% CI −4.4, −0.7; p = 0.01). The interaction of the 2 interventions was significant (p = 0.03); the largest impact was observed with the combination of Physician and Patient Intervention (−9.7 ± 12.7 mmHg). Differences between treatment groups did not persist at 18 months. Combined physician and patient intervention lowers blood pressure; future research should focus on enhancing effectiveness and sustainability of these interventions. PMID:19920081

  9. Efficacy of a carrageenan nasal spray in patients with common cold: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Martin; Enzenhofer, Elisabeth; Schneider, Sven; Rauch, Margit; Bodenteich, Angelika; Neumann, Kurt; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Grassauer, Andreas; Lion, Thomas; Mueller, Christian A

    2013-11-13

    The common cold is the most widespread viral infection in humans. Iota-carrageenan has previously shown antiviral effectiveness against cold viruses in clinical trials. This study investigated the efficacy of a carrageenan-containing nasal spray on the duration of the common cold and nasal fluid viral load in adult patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 211 patients suffering from early symptoms of the common cold were treated for seven days. Application was performed three times daily with either a carrageenan-supplemented nasal spray or saline solution as placebo with an overall observation period of 21 days. The primary endpoint was the duration of disease defined as the time until the last day with symptoms followed by all other days in the study period without symptoms. During the study, but prior unblinding, the definition of disease duration was adapted from the original protocol that defines disease duration as the time period of symptoms followed by 48 hours without symptoms. In patients showing a laboratory-confirmed cold virus infection and adherence to the protocol, alleviation of symptoms was 2.1 days faster in the carrageenan group in comparison to placebo (p = 0.037). The primary endpoint that had been prespecified but was changed before unblinding was not met. Viral titers in nasal fluids showed a significantly greater decrease in carrageenan patients in the intention-to-treat population (p = 0.024) and in the per protocol population (p = 0.018) between days 1 and 3/4. In adults with common cold virus infections, direct local administration of carrageenan with nasal sprays reduced the duration of cold symptoms. A significant reduction of viral load in the nasal wash fluids of patients confirmed similar findings from earlier trials in children and adults. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80148028.

  10. Taping patients with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knol Dirk L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder problems are a common complaint of the musculoskeletal system. Physical therapists treat these patients with different modalities such as exercise, massage, and shoulder taping. Although different techniques have been described, the effectiveness of taping has not yet been established. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual physical therapy care in combination with a particular tape technique for subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder compared to usual physical therapy care without this tape technique in a primary healthcare setting. Methods and design An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS as assessed by physical therapists will be recruited. Eligible patients will be randomized to either the intervention group (usual care in combination with the particular tape technique or the control group (usual care without this tape technique. In both groups, usual care will consist of individualized physical therapy care. The primary outcomes will be shoulder-specific function (the Simple Shoulder Test and pain severity (11-point numerical rating scale. The economic evaluation will be performed using a societal perspective. All relevant costs will be registered using cost diaries. Utilities (Quality Adjusted Life Years will be measured using the EuroQol. The data will be collected at baseline, and 4, 12, and 26 weeks follow-up. Discussion This pragmatic study will provide information about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of taping in patients presenting with clinical signs of SAIS. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2575

  11. Effects of exercise on sleep problems in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorf, Karen; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Schmidt, Martina E

    2017-04-01

    Sleep problems frequently affect breast cancer patients during and after treatment and reduce their quality of life. Treatment strategies are mostly unknown. Thus, we assessed within a randomized controlled trial whether a 12-week exercise program starting with the radiotherapy influences sleep trajectories. Sleep quality and problems were assessed via self-report in 160 breast cancer patients before, during, and 2, 6, and 12 months after participation in a trial investigating resistance exercise versus a relaxation control group concomitant with radiotherapy. As additional comparison group, 25 age-matched healthy women exercised and followed identical study procedures. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used. The exercise intervention significantly decreased sleep problems compared to the relaxation control group (scale: 0-100, with between-group mean differences of -10.2 (p = 0.03) from baseline to the end of radiotherapy and -10.9 (p = 0.005) to the end of the intervention), with sleep problems decreasing in the exercise group and increasing in the control group. At 12 months, differences were still observed but statistically non-significant (mean difference = -5.9, p = 0.20). Further adjustment for potential confounders did not change the results. Several determinants of sleep problems at baseline were identified, e.g., previous chemotherapy and higher body mass index. Our randomized exercise intervention trial confirmed results from earlier but mostly smaller studies that radiotherapy aggravates sleep problems in breast cancer patients and that exercise can ameliorate these effects. Considering that sleep quality can be a major predictor of quality of life, our findings are of substantial importance to many breast cancer patients.

  12. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeboom, Thomas J; Stukstette, Mirelle J P M; de Bie, Rob A; Cornelissen, Jessica; den Broeder, Alfons A; van den Ende, Cornelia H M

    2010-07-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT) is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA). The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse). The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Dutch Trial Register NTR2137.

  13. Using Press Ganey Provider Feedback to Improve Patient Satisfaction: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Craig D; Fu, Rongwei; Heilman, James; Tanski, Mary; John Ma, O; Lines, Alan; Keith French, L

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility, logistics, and potential effect of monthly provider funnel plot feedback reports from Press Ganey data and semiannual face-to-face coaching sessions to improve patient satisfaction scores. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial of 25 emergency medicine faculty providers in one urban academic emergency department. We enrolled full-time clinical faculty with at least 12 months of baseline Press Ganey data, who anticipated working in the ED for at least 12 additional months. Providers were randomized into intervention or control groups in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group had an initial 20-minute meeting to introduce the funnel plot feedback tool and standardized feedback based on their baseline Press Ganey scores and then received a monthly e-mail with their individualized funnel plot depicting cumulative Press Ganey scores (compared to their baseline score and the mean score of all providers) for 12 months. The primary outcome was the difference in Press Ganey "doctor-overall" scores between treatment groups at 12 months. We used a weighted analysis of covariance model to analyze the study groups, accounting for variation in the number of surveys by provider and baseline scores. Of 36 eligible faculty, we enrolled 25 providers, 13 of whom were randomized to the intervention group and 12 to the control group. During the study period, there were 815 Press Ganey surveys returned, ranging from four to 71 surveys per provider. For the standardized overall doctor score over 12 months (primary outcome), there was no difference between the intervention and control groups (difference = 1.3 points, 95% confidence interval = -2.4 to 5.9, p = 0.47). Similarly, there was no difference between groups when evaluating the four categories of doctor-specific patient satisfaction scores from the Press Ganey survey (all p > 0.05). In this pilot trial of monthly provider funnel plot

  14. Clinical review: Strict or loose glycemic control in critically ill patients - implementing best available evidence from randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M.J.; Harmsen, R.E.; Spronk, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Glycemic control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as 'strict glycemic control' (SGC), decreased mortality and morbidity of adult critically ill patients in two randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five successive RCTs, however, failed to show benefit of SGC with one trial even

  15. Early Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Biliopancreatic Mass Lesions, a Prospective, Randomized Intervention Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Krüger

    Full Text Available Patients with biliopancreatic tumors frequently suffer from weight loss and cachexia. The in-hospital work-up to differentiate between benign and malignant biliopancreatic lesions requires repeated pre-interventional fasting periods that can aggravate this problem. We conducted a randomized intervention study to test whether routine in-hospital peripheral intravenous nutrition on fasting days (1000 ml/24 h, 700 kcal has a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition.168 patients were screened and 100 enrolled in the trial, all undergoing in-hospital work-up for biliopancreatic mass lesions and randomized to either intravenous nutrition or control. Primary endpoint was weight loss at time of hospital discharge; secondary endpoints were parameters determined by bioelectric impedance analysis and quality of life recorded by the EORTC questionnaire.Within three months prior to hospital admission patients had a median self-reported loss of 4.0 kg (25*th: -10.0 kg and 75*th* percentile: 0.0kg of body weight. On a multivariate analysis nutritional intervention increased body weight by 1.7 kg (95% CI: 0.204; 3.210, p = 0.027, particularly in patients with malignant lesions (2.7 kg (95% CI: 0.71; 4.76, p < 0.01.In a hospital setting, patients with suspected biliopancreatic mass lesions stabilized their body weight when receiving parenteral nutrition in fasting periods even when no total parenteral nutrition was required. Analysis showed that this effect was greatest in patients with malignant tumors. Further studies will be necessary to see whether patient outcome is affected as well.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02670265.

  16. Effects of Ginger on Serum Lipids and Lipoproteins in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibi, Hadi; Imani, Hossein; Atabak, Shahnaz; Najafi, Iraj; Hedayati, Mehdi; Rahmani, Leila

    2016-01-01

    ♦ In peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease is lipid abnormalities. This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger supplementation on serum lipids and lipoproteins in PD patients. ♦ In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 36 PD patients were randomly assigned to either the ginger or the placebo group. The patients in the ginger group received 1,000 mg ginger daily for 10 weeks, while the placebo group received corresponding placebos. At baseline and at the end of week 10, 7 mL of blood were obtained from each patient after a 12- to 14-hour fast, and serum concentrations of triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] were measured. ♦ Serum triglyceride concentration decreased significantly up to 15% in the ginger group at the end of week 10 compared with baseline (p < 0.01), and the reduction was significant in comparison with the placebo group (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in mean changes of serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, and Lp (a). ♦ This study indicates that daily administration of 1,000 mg ginger reduces serum triglyceride concentration, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  17. Musical motor feedback (MMF) in walking hemiparetic stroke patients: randomized trials of gait improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Michael; Mauritz, Karl-Heinz

    2003-11-01

    To demonstrate the effect of rhythmical auditory stimulation in a musical context for gait therapy in hemiparetic stroke patients, when the stimulation is played back measure by measure initiated by the patient's heel-strikes (musical motor feedback). Does this type of musical feedback improve walking more than a less specific gait therapy? The randomized controlled trial considered 23 registered stroke patients. Two groups were created by randomization: the control group received 15 sessions of conventional gait therapy and the test group received 15 therapy sessions with musical motor feedback. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Median post-stroke interval was 44 days and the patients were able to walk without technical aids with a speed of approximately 0.71 m/s. Gait velocity, step duration, gait symmetry, stride length and foot rollover path length (heel-on-toe-off distance). The test group showed more mean improvement than the control group: stride length increased by 18% versus 0%, symmetry deviation decreased by 58% versus 20%, walking speed increased by 27% versus 4% and rollover path length increased by 28% versus 11%. Musical motor feedback improves the stroke patient's walk in selected parameters more than conventional gait therapy. A fixed memory in the patient's mind about the song and its timing may stimulate the improvement of gait even without the presence of an external pacemaker.

  18. Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer: a randomized controlled trial of 635 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dorota; Løssl, Kristine; Nyboe Andersen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, controlled and double-blinded trial studied whether acupuncture in relation to embryo transfer could increase the ongoing pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy. A total of 635 patients undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic...... sperm injection (ICSI) were included. In 314 patients, embryo transfer was accompanied by acupuncture according to the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. In the control group, 321 patients received placebo acupuncture using a validated placebo needle. In the acupuncture group and the placebo...... group, the ongoing pregnancy rates were 27% (95% CI 22-32) and 32% (95% CI 27-37), respectively. Live birth rates were 25% (95% CI 20-30) in the acupuncture group and 30% (95% CI 25-30) in the placebo group. The differences were not statistically significant. These results suggest that acupuncture...

  19. "MY PKU": increasing self-management in patients with phenylketonuria. A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonkers Cora F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylketonuria (PKU is an autosomal recessive disorder of phenylalanine metabolism. The inability to convert phenylalanine (Phe into tyrosine causes Phe to accumulate in the body. Adherence to a protein restricted diet, resulting in reduced Phe levels, is essential to prevent cognitive decline. Frequent evaluation of plasma Phe levels and, if necessary, adjustment of the diet are the mainstay of treatment. We aimed to assess whether increased self-management of PKU patients and/or their parents is feasible and safe, by providing direct online access to blood Phe values without immediate professional guidance. Methods Thirty-eight patients aged ≥ 1 year participated in a 10 month randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized into a study group (1 or a control group (2. Group 2 continued the usual procedure: a phone call or e-mail by a dietician in case of a deviant Phe value. Group 1 was given a personal "My PKU" web page with a graph of their recent and previous Phe values, online general information about the dietary treatment and the Dutch PKU follow-up guidelines, and a message-box to contact their dietician if necessary. Phe values were provided on "My PKU" without advice. Outcome measures were: differences in mean Phe value, percentage of values above the recommended range and Phe sample frequency, between a 10-month pre-study period and the study period in each group, and between the groups in both periods. Furthermore we assessed satisfaction of patients and/or parents with the 'My PKU' procedure of online availability. Results There were no significant differences in mean Phe value, percentage of values above recommended range or in frequency of blood spot sampling for Phe determination between the pre-study period and the study period in each group, nor between the 2 groups during the periods. All patients and/or parents expressed a high level of satisfaction with the new way of disease management

  20. Cerebrovascular accidents in patients treated for choroidal neovascularization with ranibizumab in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Neil M; Boyer, David S; Williams, David F; Butler, Steven; Francom, Steven F; Brown, Benton; Di Nucci, Flavia; Cramm, Timothy; Tuomi, Lisa L; Ianchulev, Tsontcho; Rubio, Roman G

    2012-10-01

    To analyze cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) pooled from large, randomized, controlled clinical trials of ranibizumab treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Events in five trials (FOCUS, MARINA, ANCHOR, PIER, and SAILOR) were analyzed using a standard safety monitoring process. Exact methods, stratified by study, were used to test for treatment differences based on odds ratios. A stepwise logistic regression model was fit to classify subjects' risk for CVA based on medical history. Treatment differences in CVA rates at 1 year or 2 years were evaluated within risk groups using stratified exact methods. Pooled 2-year CVA rates were <3%; odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for CVA risk were 1.2 (0.4-4.4) for ranibizumab 0.3-mg versus control, 2.2 (0.8-7.1) for 0.5 mg versus control, and 1.5 (0.8-3.0) for 0.5-mg versus 0.3-mg ranibizumab. No substantial increased risk of CVA for 0.5 mg versus 0.3 mg was identified in pooled analyses or any of the individual trials. In pooled analyses, the difference between 0.5-mg ranibizumab and control was larger (7.7 [1.2-177]) among high-risk CVA patients. This analysis provided some evidence, although not definitive, of a potential increased risk of CVA with ranibizumab versus control or with 0.5-mg versus 0.3-mg ranibizumab. Continued monitoring for CVA within clinical trials seems warrented.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of Early Versus Delayed Statin Therapy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: ASSORT Trial (Administration of Statin on Acute Ischemic Stroke Patient).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinichi; Uchida, Kazutaka; Daimon, Takashi; Takashima, Ryuzo; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Several studies suggested that statins during hospitalization were associated with better disability outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke, but only 1 small randomized trial is available. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic strokes in 11 hospitals in Japan. Patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia randomly received statins within 24 hours after admission in the early group or on the seventh day in the delayed group, in a 1:1 ratio. Statins were administered for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was patient disability assessed by modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. A total of 257 patients were randomized and analyzed (early 131, delayed 126). At 90 days, modified Rankin Scale score distribution did not differ between groups ( P =0.68), and the adjusted common odds ratio of the early statin group was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-1.3; P =0.46) compared with the delayed statin group. There were 3 deaths at 90 days (2 in the early group, 1 in the delayed group) because of malignancy. Ischemic stroke recurred in 9 patients (6.9%) in the early group and 5 patients (4.0%) in the delayed group. The safety profile was similar between groups. Our randomized trial involving patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia did not show any superiority of early statin therapy within 24 hours of admission compared with delayed statin therapy 7 days after admission to alleviate the degree of disability at 90 days after onset. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02549846. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of family-based education for patients with heart failure and their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisuk, Nittaya; Cameron, Jan; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a heart failure education programme developed for patients and carers in Thailand. Heart failure is major health problem. This is the first trial of a family-based education programme for heart failure patients and carers residing in rural Thailand. Randomized controlled trial. One hundred patient-carer dyads attending cardiac clinics in southern Thailand from April 2014 - March 2015 were randomized to usual care (n = 50) or a family-based education programme (n = 50) comprising face-to-face counselling, a heart failure manual and DVD and telephone support. Assessments of heart failure knowledge, health-related quality of life, self-care behaviours and perceived control were conducted at baseline, three and six months. Linear mixed-effects model revealed that patients and carers who received the education programme had higher knowledge scores at three and six months than those who received usual care. Among those who received the education programme, when compared with those who received usual care, patients had better self-care maintenance and confidence, and health-related quality of life scores at three and six months, and better self-care management scores at six months, whereas carers had higher perceived control scores at three months. Addressing a significant service gap in rural Thailand, this family-based heart failure programme improved patient knowledge, self-care behaviours and health-related quality of life and carer knowledge and perceived control. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Design and Implementation of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Genomic Counseling for Patients with Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Sweet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development and implementation of a randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of genomic counseling on a cohort of patients with heart failure (HF or hypertension (HTN, managed at a large academic medical center, the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC. Our study is built upon the existing Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC®. OSUWMC patient participants with chronic disease (CD receive eight actionable complex disease and one pharmacogenomic test report through the CPMC® web portal. Participants are randomized to either the in-person post-test genomic counseling—active arm, versus web-based only return of results—control arm. Study-specific surveys measure: (1 change in risk perception; (2 knowledge retention; (3 perceived personal control; (4 health behavior change; and, for the active arm (5, overall satisfaction with genomic counseling. This ongoing partnership has spurred creation of both infrastructure and procedures necessary for the implementation of genomics and genomic counseling in clinical care and clinical research. This included creation of a comprehensive informed consent document and processes for prospective return of actionable results for multiple complex diseases and pharmacogenomics (PGx through a web portal, and integration of genomic data files and clinical decision support into an EPIC-based electronic medical record. We present this partnership, the infrastructure, genomic counseling approach, and the challenges that arose in the design and conduct of this ongoing trial to inform subsequent collaborative efforts and best genomic counseling practices.

  4. Effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral intervention in patients with medically unexplained symptoms: cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-García-Franco Alberto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medically unexplained symptoms are an important mental health problem in primary care and generate a high cost in health services. Cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy have proven effective in these patients. However, there are few studies on the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions by primary health care. The project aims to determine whether a cognitive-behavioral group intervention in patients with medically unexplained symptoms, is more effective than routine clinical practice to improve the quality of life measured by the SF-12 questionary at 12 month. Methods/design This study involves a community based cluster randomized trial in primary healthcare centres in Madrid (Spain. The number of patients required is 242 (121 in each arm, all between 18 and 65 of age with medically unexplained symptoms that had seeked medical attention in primary care at least 10 times during the previous year. The main outcome variable is the quality of life measured by the SF-12 questionnaire on Mental Healthcare. Secondary outcome variables include number of consultations, number of drug (prescriptions and number of days of sick leave together with other prognosis and descriptive variables. Main effectiveness will be analyzed by comparing the percentage of patients that improve at least 4 points on the SF-12 questionnaire between intervention and control groups at 12 months. All statistical tests will be performed with intention to treat. Logistic regression with random effects will be used to adjust for prognostic factors. Confounding factors or factors that might alter the effect recorded will be taken into account in this analysis. Discussion This study aims to provide more insight to address medically unexplained symptoms, highly prevalent in primary care, from a quantitative methodology. It involves intervention group conducted by previously trained nursing staff to diminish the progression to the chronicity

  5. Effects of acupuncture on patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Jorge; Modesto, Manuela; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Santos-Rey, Koldo; Benítez-Parejo, Nicolás; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco

    2011-02-28

    Fibromyalgia is a multidimensional disorder for which treatment as yet remains unsatisfactory. Studies of an acupuncture-based approach, despite its broad acceptance among patients and healthcare staff, have not produced sufficient evidence of its effectiveness in treating this syndrome. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture for patients with fibromyalgia, with respect to reducing their pain and level of incapacity, and improving their quality of life. Randomized controlled multicentre study, with 156 outpatients, aged over 17 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, either alone or associated with severe depression, according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. The participants will be randomly assigned to receive either "True acupuncture" or "Sham acupuncture". They will be evaluated using a specific measurement system, constituted of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Hamilton rating scale for depression. Also taken into consideration will be the clinical and subjective pain intensity, the patient's family structure and relationships, psychological aspects, quality of life, the duration of previous temporary disability, the consumption of antidepressant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory medication, and the potential effect of factors considered to be predictors of a poor prognosis. All these aspects will be examined by questionnaires and other suitably-validated instruments. The results obtained will be analysed at 10 weeks, and 6 and 12 months from the start of treatment. This trial will utilize high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. It may provide evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for fibromyalgia either alone or associated with severe depression. ISRCTN trial number ISRCTN60217348 (19 October 2010).

  6. Randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive therapy for low-functioning patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Paul M; Huh, Gloria A; Perivoliotis, Dimitri; Stolar, Neal M; Beck, Aaron T

    2012-02-01

    Low-functioning patients with chronic schizophrenia have high direct treatment costs and indirect costs incurred due to lost employment and productivity and have a low quality of life; antipsychotic medications and psychosocial interventions have shown limited efficacy to promote improved functional outcomes. To determine the efficacy of an 18-month recovery-oriented cognitive therapy program to improve psychosocial functioning and negative symptoms (avolition-apathy, anhedonia-asociality) in low-functioning patients with schizophrenia. Design, Setting, and A single-center, 18-month, randomized, single-blind, parallel group trial enrolled 60 low-functioning, neurocognitively impaired patients with schizophrenia (mean age, 38.4 years; 33.3% female; 65.0% African American). Cognitive therapy plus standard treatment vs standard treatment alone. The primary outcome measure was the Global Assessment Scale score at 18 months after randomization. The secondary outcomes were scores on the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms at 18 months after randomization. Patients treated with cognitive therapy showed a clinically significant mean improvement in global functioning from baseline to 18 months that was greater than the improvement seen with standard treatment (within-group Cohen d, 1.36 vs 0.06, respectively; adjusted mean [SE], 58.3 [3.30] vs 47.9 [3.60], respectively; P = .03; between-group d = 0.56). Patients receiving cognitive therapy as compared with those receiving standard treatment also showed a greater mean reduction in avolition-apathy (adjusted mean [SE], 1.66 [0.31] vs 2.81 [0.34], respectively; P = .01; between-group d = -0.66) and positive symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, disorganization) (adjusted mean [SE], 9.4 [3.3] vs 18.2 [3.8], respectively; P = .04; between-group d = -0.46) at 18 months. Age was controlled in the analyses, and there were no meaningful group differences in

  7. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  8. Emotional aspects and pranayama in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Chakrabarty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emotional disturbances are commonly experienced by cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of certain Pranayama techniques on the emotional aspects such as impatience, worry, anxiety, and frustration among breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy in India. Methods: The study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited when they were seeking radiation therapy for breast cancer. They were allocated into two groups using block randomization technique. The experimental group performed Pranayama along with radiation therapy, whereas the control group received only routine care. Results: Emotional aspects of the two groups were compared at the end of the treatment. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparison as the data were not following normality. It showed a significant difference between the two groups with the group who performed Pranayama showing a lesser mean score for these negative emotions. Conclusions: Pranayama might help in controlling the negative emotions likely to be faced by breast cancer patients, and it can be used as a supportive therapy for breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy.

  9. [Physiotherapy and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, L; Tombal, B; Opsomer, R-J; Castille, Y; Van Pesch, V; Detrembleur, C

    2014-09-01

    This randomized controlled trial compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training vs. transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation. Inclusion criteria were EDSS scorepregnancy. The primary outcome was quality of life (SF-Qualiveen questionnaire). Secondary outcomes included overactive bladder (USP questionnaire) score and frequency of urgency episodes (3-day bladder diary). Sample size was calculated after 18 patients were included. Data analysis was blinded. Each patient received 9 sessions of 30 minutes weekly. Patients were randomized in pelvic floor muscles exercises with biofeedback group (muscle endurance and relaxation) or transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation group (rectangular alternative biphasic current with low frequency). A total of 31 patients were included. No difference appeared between groups for quality of life, overactive bladder and frequency of urgency episodes (respectively P=0.197, P=0.532 et P=0.788). These parameters were significantly improved in pelvic floor muscle training group (n=16) (respectively P=0.004, P=0.002 et P=0.006) and in transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation group (n=15) (respectively P=0.001, P=0.001 et P=0.031). Pelvic floor muscle training and transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation improved in the same way symptoms related to urgency in MS patients with mild disability. 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Shared decision making in patients with low risk chest pain: prospective randomized pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Schaffer, Jason T; Kline, Jeffrey A; Torres, Carlos A; Diercks, Deborah B; Jones, Russell; Owen, Kelly P; Meisel, Zachary F; Demers, Michel; Leblanc, Annie; Shah, Nilay D; Inselman, Jonathan; Herrin, Jeph; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Montori, Victor M

    2016-12-05

     To compare the effectiveness of shared decision making with usual care in choice of admission for observation and further cardiac testing or for referral for outpatient evaluation in patients with possible acute coronary syndrome.  Multicenter pragmatic parallel randomized controlled trial.  Six emergency departments in the United States.  898 adults (aged >17 years) with a primary complaint of chest pain who were being considered for admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing (451 were allocated to the decision aid and 447 to usual care), and 361 emergency clinicians (emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) caring for patients with chest pain.  Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) by an electronic, web based system to shared decision making facilitated by a decision aid or to usual care. The primary outcome, selected by patient and caregiver advisers, was patient knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care; secondary outcomes were involvement in the decision to be admitted, proportion of patients admitted for cardiac testing, and the 30 day rate of major adverse cardiac events.  Compared with the usual care arm, patients in the decision aid arm had greater knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care (questions correct: decision aid, 4.2 v usual care, 3.6; mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.86), were more involved in the decision (observing patient involvement scores: decision aid, 18.3 v usual care, 7.9; 10.3, 9.1 to 11.5), and less frequently decided with their clinician to be admitted for cardiac testing (decision aid, 37% v usual care, 52%; absolute difference 15%; Ppatients at low risk for acute coronary syndrome increased patient knowledge about their risk, increased engagement, and safely decreased the rate of admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01969240. Published by the BMJ

  11. Mandibular response after rapid maxillary expansion in class II growing patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lione

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT was to evaluate the sagittal mandibular response induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME therapy in mixed dentition patients with class II malocclusion, comparing the effects of bonded RME and banded RME with a matched untreated class II control group. Methods This RCT was designed in parallel with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The sample consisted of 30 children with a mean age of 8.1 ± 0.6 years who were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 treated with bonded RME, group 2 treated with banded RME, and group 3 the untreated control group. All patients met the following inclusion criteria: early mixed dentition, class II molar relationship, transverse discrepancy ≥ 4 mm, overjet ≥ 5 mm, and prepubertal skeletal maturity stage (CS1–CS2. The expansion screw was activated one quarter of a turn per day (0.25 mm until overcorrection was reached. For each subject, lateral cephalograms and plaster casts were obtained before treatment (T1 and after 1 year (T2. A randomization list was created for the group assignment, with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The observer who performed all the measurements was blinded to group assignment. The study was single-blinded in regard to statistical analysis. Results RME was effective in the correction of maxillary deficiency. Class II patients treated with both types of RME showed no significant improvement of the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible at both skeletal and occlusal levels. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on reducing the skeletal vertical dimension and the gonial angle. Conclusions The orthopedic expansion did not affect the sagittal relationship of class II patients treated in the early mixed dentition when compared with the untreated control group. Additional studies with a larger sample are warranted to elucidate individual variations in dento-skeletal mandibular

  12. Family member-based supervision of patients with hypertension: a cluster randomized trial in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Peng, X; Wang, M; Zheng, X; Xu, G; Lü, L; Xu, K; Burstrom, B; Burstrom, K; Wang, J

    2017-01-01

    Empirical evidence has suggested that social support from family can help patients take their medicines correctly. This study aims to evaluate the role of a family member-based supervision package in the management of hypertension using a cluster randomized trial in rural China. We recruited patients with hypertension from four villages in Yangzhong and randomly allocated them to the control group (n=288) and the intervention group (n=266). A family member-based supervision package was applied to the intervention group, while the usual service was applied to the controls. Patients were followed for 12 months and completed face-to-face interviews at the end of 6 and 12 months. The primary outcomes were patients' medication adherence and frequency of blood pressure measurement. Secondary outcomes included changes in blood pressure, altered risk behaviours and occurrence of hypertension-related complications. To control for the effects of cluster randomization, multilevel mixed-effects regression models were used to compare group changes. We observed that the intervention improved patients' blood pressure measurement frequency (OR: 9.00, 95% CI: 4.52-17.91) and adherence to antihypertensive treatment (OR: 1.74, 95% CI: 0.91-3.32). Its effect on the blood pressure control rate was significant at the mid-term investigation (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.40-0.93), but the long-term effect was not significant (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.64-1.26). After 6 months of intervention, either systolic or diastolic blood pressure was significantly decreased in the intervention group. However, this difference was not significant at the final investigation. Findings from this study revealed that the family member-based supervised therapy may have positive effects on patients' adherence to blood monitoring and hypertensive medications.

  13. Randomized controlled trial of internal and external targeted temperature management methods in post- cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Xinqi; Li, Huihua; Ng, Mingwei; Lim, Eric Tien Siang; Pothiawala, Sohil; Tan, Kenneth Boon Kiat; Sewa, Duu Wen; Shahidah, Nur; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2017-07-05

    Targeted temperature management post-cardiac arrest is currently implemented using various methods, broadly categorized as internal and external. This study aimed to evaluate survival-to-hospital discharge and neurological outcomes (Glasgow-Pittsburgh Score) of post-cardiac arrest patients undergoing internal cooling verses external cooling. A randomized controlled trial of post-resuscitation cardiac arrest patients was conducted from October 2008-September 2014. Patients were randomized to either internal or external cooling methods. Historical controls were selected matched by age and gender. Analysis using SPSS version 21.0 presented descriptive statistics and frequencies while univariate logistic regression was done using R 3.1.3. 23 patients were randomized to internal cooling and 22 patients to external cooling and 42 matched controls were selected. No significant difference was seen between internal and external cooling in terms of survival, neurological outcomes and complications. However in the internal cooling arm, there was lower risk of developing overcooling (p=0.01) and rebound hyperthermia (p=0.02). Compared to normothermia, internal cooling had higher survival (OR=3.36, 95% CI=(1.130, 10.412), and lower risk of developing cardiac arrhythmias (OR=0.18, 95% CI=(0.04, 0.63)). Subgroup analysis showed those with cardiac cause of arrest (OR=4.29, 95% CI=(1.26, 15.80)) and sustained ROSC (OR=5.50, 95% CI=(1.64, 20.39)) had better survival with internal cooling compared to normothermia. Cooling curves showed tighter temperature control for internal compared to external cooling. Internal cooling showed tighter temperature control compared to external cooling. Internal cooling can potentially provide better survival-to-hospital discharge outcomes and reduce cardiac arrhythmia complications in carefully selected patients as compared to normothermia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease - a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol

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    Tilvis Reijo S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD. Methods During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210 living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1 tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2 group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3 control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36. Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Trial registration ACTRN12608000037303

  15. Computerized patient reported symptom assessment in radiotherapy: a pilot randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Emma B.; Nail, Lillian M.; Lyons, Karen S.; Hribar, Michelle R.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computer-based, patient-reported symptom survey tools have been described for patients undergoing chemotherapy. We hypothesized that patients undergoing radiotherapy might also benefit, so we developed a computer application to acquire symptom ratings from patients and generate summaries for use at point of care office visits and conducted a randomized-controlled pilot trial to test its feasibility. Methods Subjects were randomized prior to beginning radiotherapy. Both control and intervention group subjects completed the computerized symptom assessment, but only for the intervention group were printed symptom summaries made available before each weekly office visit. Metrics compared included the Global Distress Index (GDI), concordance of patient-reported symptoms and symptoms discussed by the physician and numbers of new and/or adjusted symptom management medications prescribed. Results 112 patients completed the study: 54 in the control and 58 in the intervention arms. There were no differences in GDI over time between the control and intervention groups. In the intervention group, more patient-reported symptoms were actually discussed in radiotherapy office visits: 46/202 vs. 19/230. A sensitivity analysis to account for within-subjects correlation yielded 23.2% vs. 10.3% (p=.03). Medications were started or adjusted at 15.4% (43/280) of control visits compared to 20.4% (65/319) of intervention visits (p=.07). Conclusions This computer application is easy to use and makes extensive patient-reported outcome data available at the point of care. Although no differences were seen in symptom trajectory, patients who had printed symptom summaries had improved communication during office visits and a trend towards more active symptom management during radiotherapy. PMID:26471280

  16. Patient navigation improves cancer diagnostic resolution: an individually randomized clinical trial in an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Peter C; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Thorland, William; Valverde, Patricia; Fairclough, Diane

    2012-10-01

    Barriers to timely resolution of abnormal cancer screening tests add to cancer health disparities among low-income, uninsured, and minority populations. We conducted a randomized trial to evaluate the impact of lay patient navigators on time to resolution and completion of follow-up testing among patients with abnormal screening tests in a medically underserved patient population. Denver Health, the safety-net health care system serving Denver, is one of 10 performance sites participating in the Patient Navigation Research Program. Of 993 eligible subjects with abnormal screening tests randomized to navigation and no-navigation (control) arms and analyzed, 628 had abnormal breast screens (66 abnormal clinical breast examinations, 304 BIRADS 0, 200 BIRADS 3, 58 BIRADS 4 or 5) whereas 235 had abnormal colorectal and 130 had abnormal prostate screens. Time to resolution was significantly shorter in the navigated group (stratified log rank test, P < 0.001). Patient navigation improved diagnostic resolution for patients presenting with mammographic BIRADS 3 (P = 0.0003) and BIRADS 0 (P = 0.09), but not BIRADS 4/5 or abnormal breast examinations. Navigation shortened the time for both colorectal (P = 0.0017) and prostate screening resolution (P = 0.06). Participant demographics included 72% minority, 49% with annual household income less than $10,000, and 36% uninsured. Patient navigation positively impacts time to resolution of abnormal screening tests for breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers in a medically underserved population. By shortening the time to and increasing the proportion of patients with diagnostic resolution patient navigation could reduce disparities in stage at diagnosis and improve cancer outcomes. 2012 AACR

  17. Music reduces patient anxiety during Mohs surgery: an open-label randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Sobanko, Joseph F; Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Miller, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Many patients undergoing Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) experience anxiety and stress. Although music has been proven to reduce anxiety and promote relaxation in other fields of medicine, scant research investigates the effect of music on anxiety during MMS. To determine whether music can reduce anxiety in patients undergoing MMS. An open-labeled randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess anxiety before and after listening to music. Subjects undergoing MMS were randomly allocated to listen to self-selected music (n = 50) or to have surgery without music (n = 50). Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects in the music group experienced statistically significantly lower STAI and VAS scores than those in the control group. STAI and VAS scores were significantly lower in subjects who underwent MMS for the first time. Anxiety measures did not correlate with sex or type of skin cancer. Listening to self-selected music reduces anxiety in patients undergoing MMS, especially those who undergo MMS for the first time. Presenting patients the opportunity to listen to music is a simple strategy to minimize anxiety during MMS. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial of Bleaching Products in Patients Wearing Orthodontic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Arana, A; Arana-Gordillo, L A; Farana, D; Davila-Sanchez, A; Jadad, E; Coelho, U; Gomes, Omm; Loguercio, A D

    2016-01-01

    This double-blind randomized clinical trial evaluated tooth sensitivity (TS) and the effectiveness (EF) of two types of bleaching agents (Trèswhite Ortho [TWO] and Trèswhite Supreme [TWS]) when used in patients wearing orthodontic appliances. Forty patients between the ages of 18 and 40 years were randomly stratified, with an equal allocation rate, into two groups (n=20), according to the bleaching agent applied. Tooth color of the six maxillary anterior teeth was measured before and after the treatment with a spectrophotometer. The TS was recorded on three scales before and during the bleaching treatment. With regard to EF, a significant reduction was found (ranging from 7.3-9.6 and 5.3-9.5 Vita scale units for TWO and TWS, respectively, p0.63). The number of patients with sensitivity was 58.8% and 73.3% for TWO and TWS groups, respectively (p=0.53); however, with each of the three scales used, the intensity of sensitivity was low and there was no statistical difference between TWO and TWS (p>0.05). In spite of producing a side effect of low TS, the two bleaching treatments tested were effective for dental bleaching in patients with fixed orthodontic appliances.

  19. Results of an Active Neurodynamic Mobilization Program in Patients With Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Janet Rodríguez; Martos, Irene Cabrera; Sánchez, Irene Torres; Rubio, Araceli Ortíz; Pelegrina, Ana Díaz; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effects of an active neurodynamic mobilization program on pain, neurodynamics, perceived health state, and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Randomized controlled trial. Local fibromyalgia association. Patients with FMS (N=48). Patients were randomly allocated to an active neurodynamic mobilization program or a control group. The intervention was performed twice a week. Pain was assessed with the Brief Pain Inventory and Pain Catastrophizing Scale; neurodynamics were evaluated using neurodynamic tests for upper and lower limbs. The functional state was evaluated with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, and perceived fatigue was evaluated with the Fatigue Severity Scale. Significant (Pneurodynamics, functional state, and fatigue. Also, significant pre- to postintervention within-group differences were found in the intervention group, whereas no significant changes were found in the control group. A neurodynamic mobilization program is effective in improving pain, neurodynamics, functional status, and fatigue in patients with FMS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular and inflammatory effects of simvastatin therapy in patients with COPD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Michelle E; Cockcroft, John R; McKeever, Tricia M; Coward, William R; Shale, Dennis J; Johnson, Simon R; Thornton, Jim G; Harrison, Timothy W; Knox, Alan J; Bolton, Charlotte E

    2015-01-01

    There is excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Aortic stiffness, an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk, and systemic and airway inflammation are increased in patients with the disease. Statins modulate aortic stiffness and have anti-inflammatory properties. A proof-of-principle, double-blind, randomized trial determined if 6 weeks of simvastatin 20 mg once daily reduced aortic stiffness and systemic and airway inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Stable patients (n=70) were randomized to simvastatin (active) or placebo. Pre-treatment and post-treatment aortic stiffness, blood pressure, spirometry, and circulating and airway inflammatory mediators and lipids were measured. A predefined subgroup analysis was performed where baseline aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was >10 m/sec. Total cholesterol dropped in the active group. There was no significant change in aortic PWV between the active group and the placebo group (-0.7 m/sec, P=0.24). In those with aortic stiffness >10 m/sec (n=22), aortic PWV improved in the active group compared with the placebo group (-2.8 m/sec, P=0.03). Neither systemic nor airway inflammatory markers changed. There was a nonsignificant improvement in aortic PWV in those taking simvastatin 20 mg compared with placebo, but in those with higher baseline aortic stiffness (a higher risk group) a significant and clinically relevant reduction in PWV was shown.

  1. Knee joint stabilization therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Gerritsen, M; Voorneman, R E; Peter, W F; de Rooij, M; Romviel, S; Lems, W F; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether an exercise program, initially focusing on knee stabilization and subsequently on muscle strength and performance of daily activities is more effective than an exercise program focusing on muscle strength and performance of daily activities only, in reducing activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and instability of the knee joint. A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 159 knee OA patients with self-reported and/or biomechanically assessed knee instability, randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Both groups received a supervised exercise program for 12 weeks, consisting of muscle strengthening exercises and training of daily activities, but only in the experimental group specific knee joint stabilization training was provided. Outcome measures included activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index - WOMAC physical function, primary outcome), pain, global perceived effect and knee stability. Both treatment groups demonstrated large (∼20-40%) and clinically relevant reductions in activity limitations, pain and knee instability, which were sustained 6 months post-treatment. No differences in effectiveness between experimental and control treatment were found on WOMAC physical function (B (95% confidence interval - CI) = -0.01 (-2.58 to 2.57)) or secondary outcome measures, except for a higher global perceived effect in the experimental group (P = 0.04). Both exercise programs were highly effective in reducing activity limitations and pain and restoring knee stability in knee OA patients with instability of the knee. In knee OA patients suffering from knee instability, specific knee joint stabilization training, in addition to muscle strengthening and functional exercises, does not seem to have any additional value. Dutch Trial Register (NTR) registration number: NTR1475. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier

  2. Early percutaneous tracheotomy versus prolonged intubation of mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Guiguet, Marguerite; Ouattara, Alexandre; Vaissier, Elisabeth; Makri, Ralouka; Nieszkowska, Ania; Leprince, Pascal; Pavie, Alain; Chastre, Jean; Combes, Alain

    2011-03-15

    Whether early percutaneous tracheotomy in patients who require prolonged mechanical ventilation can shorten mechanical ventilation duration and lower mortality remains controversial. To compare the outcomes of severely ill patients who require prolonged mechanical ventilation randomly assigned to early percutaneous tracheotomy or prolonged intubation. Prospective, randomized, controlled, single-center trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00347321). Academic center. 216 adults requiring mechanical ventilation 4 or more days after cardiac surgery. Immediate early percutaneous tracheotomy or prolonged intubation with tracheotomy 15 days after randomization. The primary end point was the number of ventilator-free days during the first 60 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes included 28-, 60-, or 90-day mortality rates; durations of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, and hospitalization; sedative, analgesic, and neuroleptic use; ventilator-associated pneumonia rate; unscheduled extubations; comfort and ease of care; and long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychosocial evaluations. There was no difference in ventilator-free days during the first 60 days after randomization between early percutaneous tracheotomy and prolonged intubation groups (mean, 30.4 days [SD, 22.4] vs. 28.3 days [SD, 23.7], respectively; absolute difference, 2.1 days [95% CI, -4.1 to 8.3 days]) nor in 28-, 60-, or 90-day mortality rates (16% vs. 21%, 26% vs. 28%, and 30% vs. 30%, respectively). The durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, as well as frequencies of ventilator-associated pneumonia and other severe infections, were also similar. However, early percutaneous tracheotomy was associated with less intravenous sedation; less time of heavy sedation; less haloperidol use for agitation, delirium, or both; fewer unscheduled extubations; better comfort and ease of care; and earlier resumption of oral nutrition. After a median

  3. Cytokine inhibition in chronic fatigue syndrome patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerink, Megan E; Knoop, Hans; Bredie, Sebastian J H; Heijnen, Michael; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2015-10-05

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a medically unexplained syndrome for which no somatic or pharmacological treatment has been proven effective. Dysfunction of the cytokine network has been suspected to play a role in the pathophysiology of CFS. The disturbances of the cytokine network detected in CFS patients are highly variable, in part due to the lack of adequate controls in many studies. Furthermore, all studies have been performed on peripheral venous blood of patients. As cytokines mainly act in tissues, for example, the brain, the information that can be derived from peripheral blood cells is limited. The information regarding the possible role of cytokines in the pathophysiology could come from intervention studies in which the activities of relevant cytokines are reduced, for example, reducing interleukin-1, interleukin-6 or tumor necrosis factor. In this study, the clinical usefulness of anakinra, an IL-1 antagonist, will be assessed in patients with CFS. A randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind trial will be conducted. Fifty adult female patients meeting the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CFS and without psychiatric co-morbidity will be included. After inclusion, patients will be randomized between treatment with anakinra (recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) or placebo. Each group will be treated for 4 weeks. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, after 4 weeks of intervention, and 6 months after baseline assessment. The primary outcome measure will be fatigue severity at 4 weeks, measured with the validated Checklist of Individual Strength (CIS). Secondary outcome measures are functional impairment, physical and social functioning, psychological distress, pain severity, presence of accompanying symptoms, and cytokine and cortisol concentrations. This is the first randomized placebo-controlled trial that will evaluate the effect of interference with IL-1 on the experience of fatigue in patients with CFS. The

  4. Prospective randomized trial of lisuride infusion versus oral levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Ruggieri, Stefano; Vacca, Laura; Olanow, C Warren

    2002-09-01

    Motor complications are a major source of disability for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Surgical therapies provide benefit to some, but these treatments are expensive and associated with adverse effects. Current research indicates that motor complications are associated with abnormal, intermittent, pulsatile stimulation of denervated dopamine receptors using short acting dopaminergic agents such as levodopa. Retrospective studies suggest that the use of longer-acting more continuous dopaminergic therapies can improve both motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. We performed a prospective, long-term (4-year) trial comparing patients randomized to receive subcutaneous infusion of the dopamine agonist lisuride versus conventional therapy with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. We demonstrate that patients receiving lisuride infusions experienced a significant reduction in both motor fluctuations and dyskinesia compared with patients receiving standard dopaminergic therapies. Benefits persisted for the 4-year duration of the study. Mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores in "ON" and "OFF" states did not significantly change between baseline and 4 years for patients in the lisuride group, but deteriorated in patients in the levodopa group. This study indicates that continuous lisuride infusion can be beneficial for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and reverse established motor fluctuations and dyskinesia.

  5. The HEART Pathway randomized trial: identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; Riley, Robert F; Hiestand, Brian C; Russell, Gregory B; Hoekstra, James W; Lefebvre, Cedric W; Nicks, Bret A; Cline, David M; Askew, Kim L; Elliott, Stephanie B; Herrington, David M; Burke, Gregory L; Miller, Chadwick D

    2015-03-01

    The HEART Pathway is a decision aid designed to identify emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge. No randomized trials have compared the HEART Pathway with usual care. Adult emergency department patients with symptoms related to acute coronary syndrome without ST-elevation on ECG (n=282) were randomized to the HEART Pathway or usual care. In the HEART Pathway arm, emergency department providers used the HEART score, a validated decision aid, and troponin measures at 0 and 3 hours to identify patients for early discharge. Usual care was based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The primary outcome, objective cardiac testing (stress testing or angiography), and secondary outcomes, index length of stay, early discharge, and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization), were assessed at 30 days by phone interview and record review. Participants had a mean age of 53 years, 16% had previous myocardial infarction, and 6% (95% confidence interval, 3.6%-9.5%) had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of randomization. Compared with usual care, use of the HEART Pathway decreased objective cardiac testing at 30 days by 12.1% (68.8% versus 56.7%; P=0.048) and length of stay by 12 hours (9.9 versus 21.9 hours; P=0.013) and increased early discharges by 21.3% (39.7% versus 18.4%; P<0.001). No patients identified for early discharge had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days. The HEART Pathway reduces objective cardiac testing during 30 days, shortens length of stay, and increases early discharges. These important efficiency gains occurred without any patients identified for early discharge suffering MACE at 30 days. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01665521. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. A randomized physiotherapy trial in patients with fecal incontinence: design of the PhysioFIT-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bie Rob A

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fecal incontinence (FI is defined as the recurrent involuntary excretion of feces in inappropriate places or at inappropriate times. It is a major and highly embarrassing health care problem which affects about 2 to 24% of the adult population. The prevalence increases with age in both men and women. Physiotherapy interventions are often considered a first-line approach due to its safe and non-invasive nature when dietary and pharmaceutical treatment fails or in addition to this treatment regime. Two physiotherapy interventions, rectal balloon training (RBT and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT are widely used in the management of FI. However, their effectiveness remains uncertain since well-designed trials on the effectiveness of RBT and PFMT versus PFMT alone in FI have never been published. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted. One hundred and six patients are randomized to receive either PFMT combined with RBT or PFMT alone. Physicians in the University Hospital Maastricht include eligible participants. Inclusion criteria are (1 adults (aged ≥ 18 years, (2 with fecal incontinence complaints due to different etiologies persisting for at least six months, (3 having a Vaizey incontinence score of at least 12, (4 and failure of conservative treatment (including dietary adaptations and pharmacological agents. Baseline measurements consist of the Vaizey incontinence score, medical history, physical examination, medication use, anorectal manometry, rectal capacity measurement, anorectal sensation, anal endosonography, defecography, symptom diary, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale (FIQL and the PREFAB-score. Follow-up measurements are scheduled at three, six and 12 months after inclusion. Skilled and registered physiotherapists experienced in women's health perform physiotherapy treatment. Twelve sessions are administered during three months according to a standardized

  7. Evaluating the angina plan in patients admitted to hospital with angina: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetta, Stella; Smith, Karen; Jones, Martyn; Allcoat, Paul; Sullivan, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the Angina Plan (AP), a cognitive-behavioral nurse-facilitated self-help intervention against standard care (SC). A randomized controlled trial of 218 patients hospitalized with angina assessed participants predischarge and 6 months later. Data were collected during a structured interview using validated questionnaires, self-report, and physiological measurement to assess between group changes in mood, knowledge and misconceptions, cardiovascular risk, symptoms, quality of life, and health service utilization. The intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis found no reliable effects on anxiety and depression at 6 months. AP participants reported increased knowledge, less misconceptions, reduced body mass index (BMI), an increase in self-reported exercise, less functional limitation, and improvements in general health perceptions and social and leisure activities compared to those receiving SC. Sensitivity analysis excluding participants with high baseline depression revealed a statistical significant reduction in depression levels in AP compared to the SC participants. Analysis excluding participants receiving cardiac surgery or angioplasty removed the ITT effects on physical limitation, self-reported exercise and general health perceptions and the improvements seen in social and leisure activities, while adaptive effects on knowledge, misconceptions and BMI remained and between-group changes in depression approached significance. Initiating the AP in a secondary care setting for patients with new and existing angina produces similar benefits to those reported in newly diagnosed primary care patients. Further evaluation is required to examine the extent of observed effects in the longer term. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Scapular-focused treatment in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, F; Nijs, J; Mollekens, S; Jeurissen, I; Truijen, S; Mottram, S; Meeusen, R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial is to compare the effectiveness of a scapular-focused treatment with a control therapy in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Therefore, a randomized clinical trial with a blinded assessor was used in 22 patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. The primary outcome measures included self-reported shoulder disability and pain. Next, patients were evaluated regarding scapular positioning and shoulder muscle strength. The scapular-focused treatment included stretching and scapular motor control training. The control therapy included stretching, muscle friction, and eccentric rotator cuff training. Main outcome measures were the shoulder disability questionnaire, diagnostic tests for shoulder impingement syndrome, clinical tests for scapular positioning, shoulder pain (visual analog scale; VAS), and muscle strength. A large clinically important treatment effect in favor of scapular motor control training was found in self-reported disability (Cohen's d = 0.93, p = 0.025), and a moderate to large clinically important improvement in pain during the Neer test, Hawkins test, and empty can test (Cohen's d 0.76, 1.04, and 0.92, respectively). In addition, the experimental group demonstrated a moderate (Cohen's d = 0.67) improvement in self-experienced pain at rest (VAS), whereas the control group did not change. The effects were maintained at three months follow-up.

  9. A Combined Patient and Provider Intervention for Management of Osteoarthritis in Veterans: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Yancy, William S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Datta, Santanu K; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2016-01-19

    Management of osteoarthritis requires both medical and behavioral strategies, but some recommended therapies are underused. To examine the effectiveness of a combined patient and provider intervention for improving osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized clinical trial with assignment to osteoarthritis intervention and usual care groups. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01130740). Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. 30 providers (clusters) and 300 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to primary care providers through the electronic medical record. The primary outcome was total score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were WOMAC function and pain subscale scores, physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8). Linear mixed models that were adjusted for clustering of providers assessed between-group differences in improvement in outcomes. At 12 months, WOMAC scores were 4.1 points lower (indicating improvement) in the osteoarthritis intervention group versus usual care (95% CI, -7.2 to -1.1 points; P = 0.009). WOMAC function subscale scores were 3.3 points lower in the intervention group (CI, -5.7 to -1.0 points; P = 0.005). WOMAC pain subscale scores (P = 0.126), physical performance, and depressive symptoms did not differ between groups. Although more patients in the osteoarthritis intervention group received provider referral for recommended osteoarthritis treatments, the numbers who received them did not differ. The study was conducted in a single Veterans Affairs medical center. The combined patient and provider intervention resulted in

  10. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Nayiga, S; Diliberto, D; Taaka, L; Nabirye, C; Haaland, A.; Staedke, SG; Chandler, CI

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including ?patient-centred services.? A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and eval...

  11. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Liv M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity, mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost

  12. MI Paste Plus to prevent demineralization in orthodontic patients: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michael A; Kau, Chung How; English, Jeryl D; Lee, Robert P; Powers, John; Nguyen, Jennifer T

    2011-11-01

    Enamel demineralization is a problem in orthodontics. Fluoride is partially effective in addressing this problem, but additional treatment options are needed. The objective of this prospective randomized controlled trial was to determine the effectiveness of a new product, MI Paste Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill), in the prevention or reduction of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients. Sixty patients who were undergoing routine orthodontic treatment were recruited for this prospective randomized clinical trial. A double-blind method of randomization was used to determine whether each patient received the MI Paste Plus or a placebo paste (Tom's of Maine, Salisbury, United Kingdom). Each patient was asked to administer the paste by using a fluoride tray for a minimum of 3 to 5 minutes each day at night after brushing. Photographic records obtained in a light-controlled environment were used to record the presence or absence of white spot lesions in both groups. The enamel decalcification index was used to determine the number of white spot lesions per surface at each time interval. Patients were followed at 4-week intervals for 3 months. A scoring system from 0 to 6 was used to determine the level of caries or cavitations. This system was also used for each tooth at each time interval. Fifty patients (26 using MI Paste Plus, 24 using the placebo paste) completed the study. The enamel decalcification index scores for all surfaces were 271 and 135 at the start of treatment and 126 and 258 at the end of treatment for the MI Paste Plus and placebo paste groups, respectively. The enamel decalcification index scores in the MI Paste Plus group reduced by 53.5%, whereas the placebo group increased by 91.1% during the study period. A 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was done for the average enamel decalcification index scores. The surface type, the product/time interactions, and the product/surface interactions of the mean enamel decalcification index scores were

  13. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arija Victoria

    2012-05-01

    view: diet, anthropometry and biochemistry in dependent patients at nutritional risk and to assess the effect of a nutritional education intervention. The design with random allocation, inclusion of all patients, validated methods, caregivers’ education and standardization between nurses allows us to obtain valuable information about nutritional status and prevention. Trial Registration number Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01360775

  14. Care management for low-risk patients with heart failure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBusk, Robert Frank; Miller, Nancy Houston; Parker, Kathleen Marie; Bandura, Albert; Kraemer, Helena Chmura; Cher, Daniel Joseph; West, Jeffrey Alan; Fowler, Michael Bruce; Greenwald, George

    2004-10-19

    Nurse care management programs for patients with chronic illness have been shown to be safe and effective. To determine whether a telephone-mediated nurse care management program for heart failure reduced the rate of rehospitalization for heart failure and for all causes over a 1-year period. Randomized, controlled trial of usual care with nurse management versus usual care alone in patients hospitalized for heart failure from May 1998 through October 2001. 5 northern California hospitals in a large health maintenance organization. Of 2786 patients screened, 462 met clinical criteria for heart failure and were randomly assigned (228 to intervention and 234 to usual care). Nurse care management provided structured telephone surveillance and treatment for heart failure and coordination of patients' care with primary care physicians. Time to first rehospitalization for heart failure or for any cause and time to a combined end point of first rehospitalization, emergency department visit, or death. At 1 year, half of the patients had been rehospitalized at least once and 11% had died. Only one third of rehospitalizations were for heart failure. The rate of first rehospitalization for heart failure was similar in both groups (proportional hazard, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.46 to 1.57]). The rate of all-cause rehospitalization was similar (proportional hazard, 0.98 [CI, 0.76 to 1.27]). The findings of this study, conducted in a single health care system, may not be generalizable to other health care systems. The overall effect of the intervention was minor. Among patients with heart failure at low risk on the basis of sociodemographic and medical attributes, nurse care management did not statistically significantly reduce rehospitalizations for heart failure or for any cause. Such programs may be less effective for patients at low risk than those at high risk.

  15. Red yeast rice for dyslipidemia in statin-intolerant patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, David J; Gordon, Ram Y; Halbert, Steven C; French, Benjamin; Morris, Patti B; Rader, Daniel J

    2009-06-16

    Red yeast rice is an herbal supplement that decreases low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level. To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of red yeast rice and therapeutic lifestyle change to treat dyslipidemia in patients who cannot tolerate statin therapy. Randomized, controlled trial. Community-based cardiology practice. 62 patients with dyslipidemia and history of discontinuation of statin therapy due to myalgias. Patients were assigned by random allocation software to receive red yeast rice, 1800 mg (31 patients), or placebo (31 patients) twice daily for 24 weeks. All patients were concomitantly enrolled in a 12-week therapeutic lifestyle change program. Primary outcome was LDL cholesterol level, measured at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Secondary outcomes included total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, liver enzyme, and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels; weight; and Brief Pain Inventory score. In the red yeast rice group, LDL cholesterol decreased by 1.11 mmol/L (43 mg/dL) from baseline at week 12 and by 0.90 mmol/L (35 mg/dL) at week 24. In the placebo group, LDL cholesterol decreased by 0.28 mmol/L (11 mg/dL) at week 12 and by 0.39 mmol/L (15 mg/dL) at week 24. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was significantly lower in the red yeast rice group than in the placebo group at both weeks 12 (P Red yeast rice and therapeutic lifestyle change decrease LDL cholesterol level without increasing CPK or pain levels and may be a treatment option for dyslipidemic patients who cannot tolerate statin therapy.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Donepezil in Chinese Patients with Severe Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianping; Wei, Cuibai; Jia, Longfei; Tang, Yi; Liang, Junhua; Zhou, Aihong; Li, Fangyu; Shi, Lu; Doody, Rachelle S

    2017-01-01

    Donepezil has been used worldwide for the treatment of severe Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether it is also appropriate for severe AD in Chinese patients remains unknown. To determine whether donepezil is effective and tolerable for Chinese patients with severe AD. The present study was a 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study conducted at 38 investigational hospitals in China. Patients with severe AD were enrolled in this trial. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either donepezil or placebo (5 mg for 6 weeks and10 mg for the remaining 18 weeks). The efficacy for donepezil were evaluated by the SIB, the Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Change-Plus caregiver input (CIBIC-plus) and the MMSE. Safety parameters were monitored throughout. A total of 313 patients included the donepezil (n = 157) and the placebo groups (n = 156). Donepezil group improved more in SIB scores (least squares [LS] mean difference: 4.8, 95% CI 1.56 to 8.08, p = 0.004) and CIBIC-plus scores (drug-placebo difference: -0.4, 95% CI -0.66 to 0.03, p = 0.04) than placebo groups at Week 24. The MMSE scores between drug and placebo groups did not differ significantly. Twenty-nine patients with serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported in donepezil (n = 11) and placebo groups (n = 18) (p = 0.08). Most SAEs were not considered drug-related. Donepezil for 24 weeks was more effective than placebo and showed good safety and tolerability in Chinese patients with severe AD. This study supports utility of the drug in severe stages of AD in the Chinese population.

  17. Chest physiotherapy during immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Roberta Munhoz; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes de; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal surgical procedures increase pulmonary complication risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing elective upper abdominal surgery. This randomized clinical trial was performed in the post-anesthesia care unit of a public university hospital. Thirty-one adults were randomly assigned to control (n = 16) and chest physiotherapy (n = 15) groups. Spirometry, pulse oximetry and anamneses were performed preoperatively and on the second postoperative day. A visual pain scale was applied on the second postoperative day, before and after chest physiotherapy. The chest physiotherapy group received treatment at the post-anesthesia care unit, while the controls did not. Surgery duration, length of hospital stay and postoperative pulmonary complications were gathered from patients' medical records. The control and chest physiotherapy groups presented decreased spirometry values after surgery but without any difference between them (forced vital capacity from 83.5 +/- 17.1% to 62.7 +/- 16.9% and from 95.7 +/- 18.9% to 79.0 +/- 26.9%, respectively). In contrast, the chest physiotherapy group presented improved oxygen-hemoglobin saturation after chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period (p postoperative day. The medical record data were similar between groups. Chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period following upper abdominal surgery was effective for improving oxygen-hemoglobin saturation without increased abdominal pain. Breathing exercises could be adopted at post-anesthesia care units with benefits for patients.

  18. Automatic control of tracheal tube cuff pressure in ventilated patients in semirecumbent position: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Mauricio; Ferrer, Miquel; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Badia, Joan Ramon; Nicolas, Josep Maria; Torres, Antoni

    2007-06-01

    The aspiration of subglottic secretions colonized by bacteria pooled around the tracheal tube cuff due to inadvertent deflation (automatic, validated device for the continuous regulation of tracheal tube cuff pressure in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Respiratory intensive care unit and general medical intensive care unit. One hundred and forty-two mechanically ventilated patients (age, 64 +/- 17 yrs; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 18 +/- 6) without pneumonia or aspiration at admission. Within 24 hrs of intubation, patients were randomly allocated to undergo continuous regulation of the cuff pressure with the automatic device (n = 73) or routine care of the cuff pressure (control group, n = 69). Patients remained in a semirecumbent position in bed. The primary end point variable was the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Main causes for intubation were decreased consciousness (43, 30%) and exacerbation of chronic respiratory diseases (38, 27%). Cuff pressure control than the automatic group (45.3 vs. 0.7% determinations, p automatic and control groups, respectively. Cuff pressure is better controlled with the automatic device. However, it did not result in additional benefits to the semirecumbent position in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  19. Timing of tracheotomy in ICU patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Koji; Nishimura, Masaji; Egi, Moritoki; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-04

    The optimal timing of tracheotomy in critically ill patients remains a topic of debate. We performed a systematic review to clarify the potential benefits of early versus late tracheotomy. We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials that compared outcomes in patients managed with early and late tracheotomy. A random-effects meta-analysis, combining data from three a priori-defined categories of timing of tracheotomy (within 4 versus after 10 days, within 4 versus after 5 days, within 10 versus after 10 days), was performed to estimate the weighted mean difference (WMD) or odds ratio (OR). Of the 142 studies identified in the search, 12, including a total of 2,689 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The tracheotomy rate was significantly higher with early than with late tracheotomy (87 % versus 53 %, OR 16.1 (5.7-45.7); p tracheotomy was associated with more ventilator-free days (WMD 2.12 (0.94, 3.30), p tracheotomy. This updated meta-analysis reveals that early tracheotomy is associated with higher tracheotomy rates and better outcomes, including more ventilator-free days, shorter ICU stays, less sedation, and reduced long-term mortality, compared to late tracheotomy.

  20. Community Health Worker Support for Disadvantaged Patients With Multiple Chronic Diseases: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangovi, Shreya; Mitra, Nandita; Grande, David; Huo, Hairong; Smith, Robyn A; Long, Judith A

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether a community health worker (CHW) intervention improved outcomes in a low-income population with multiple chronic conditions. We conducted a single-blind, randomized clinical trial in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2013-2014). Participants (n = 302) were high-poverty neighborhood residents, uninsured or publicly insured, and diagnosed with 2 or more chronic diseases (diabetes, obesity, tobacco dependence, hypertension). All patients set a disease-management goal. Patients randomly assigned to CHWs also received 6 months of support tailored to their goals and preferences. Support from CHWs (vs goal-setting alone) led to improvements in several chronic diseases (changes in glycosylated hemoglobin: -0.4 vs 0.0; body mass index: -0.3 vs -0.1; cigarettes per day: -5.5 vs -1.3; systolic blood pressure: -1.8 vs -11.2; overall P = .08), self-rated mental health (12-item Short Form survey; 2.3 vs -0.2; P = .008), and quality of care (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems; 62.9% vs 38%; P < .001), while reducing hospitalization at 1 year by 28% (P = .11). There were no differences in patient activation or self-rated physical health. A standardized CHW intervention improved chronic disease control, mental health, quality of care, and hospitalizations and could be a useful population health management tool for health care systems. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01900470.

  1. SORAFENIB FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA: SUBSET ANALYSIS FROM A RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Eisen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The perception that older cancer patients may be at higher risk than younger patients of toxic effects from cancer therapy but may obtain less clinical benefit from it may be based on the underrepresentation of older patients in clinical trials and the known toxic effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is not known how older patients respond to targeted therapy.Methods.  This retrospective subgroup analysis of data from the phase 3, randomized Treatment Approach in Renal Cancer Global Evaluation Trial examined the safety and efficacy of sorafenib in older (age ≥ 70 years, n = 115 and younger patients (age <70 years, n = 787 who received treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Patient demographics and progression-free survival were recorded. Best tumor response, clinical benefit rate (defined as complete response plus partial response plus stable disease, time to self-reported health status deterioration, and toxic effects were assessed by descriptive statistics. Health-related quality of life was assessed with a Cox proportion- al hazards model. Kaplan - Meier analyses were used to summarize time-to-event data.Results. Median progression-free survival was similar in sorafenib-treated younger patients (23.9 weeks; hazard ratio [HR] for progression compared with placebo = 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47 to 0.66 and older patients (26.3 weeks; HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.26 to 0.69. Clinical benefit rates among younger and older sorafenib-treated patients were also similar (83.5% and 84.3%, respectively and were superior to those of younger and older placebo-treated patients (53.8% and 62.2%, respectively. Adverse events were predictable and manageable regardless of age. Sorafenib treatment delayed the time to self-reported health status deterioration among both older patients (121 days with sorafenib vs 85 days with placebo; HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43 to 1.03 and younger patients (90 days with sorafenib vs 52 days with placebo

  2. SORAFENIB FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA: SUBSET ANALYSIS FROM A RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Eisen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The perception that older cancer patients may be at higher risk than younger patients of toxic effects from cancer therapy but may obtain less clinical benefit from it may be based on the underrepresentation of older patients in clinical trials and the known toxic effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is not known how older patients respond to targeted therapy.Methods.  This retrospective subgroup analysis of data from the phase 3, randomized Treatment Approach in Renal Cancer Global Evaluation Trial examined the safety and efficacy of sorafenib in older (age ≥ 70 years, n = 115 and younger patients (age <70 years, n = 787 who received treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Patient demographics and progression-free survival were recorded. Best tumor response, clinical benefit rate (defined as complete response plus partial response plus stable disease, time to self-reported health status deterioration, and toxic effects were assessed by descriptive statistics. Health-related quality of life was assessed with a Cox proportion- al hazards model. Kaplan - Meier analyses were used to summarize time-to-event data.Results. Median progression-free survival was similar in sorafenib-treated younger patients (23.9 weeks; hazard ratio [HR] for progression compared with placebo = 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47 to 0.66 and older patients (26.3 weeks; HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.26 to 0.69. Clinical benefit rates among younger and older sorafenib-treated patients were also similar (83.5% and 84.3%, respectively and were superior to those of younger and older placebo-treated patients (53.8% and 62.2%, respectively. Adverse events were predictable and manageable regardless of age. Sorafenib treatment delayed the time to self-reported health status deterioration among both older patients (121 days with sorafenib vs 85 days with placebo; HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43 to 1.03 and younger patients (90 days with sorafenib vs 52 days with placebo

  3. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups - Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results : The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion : Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway.

  4. Randomized clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise for patients with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lisa M; Katzel, Leslie I; Ivey, Frederick M; Sorkin, John D; Favors, Knachelle; Anderson, Karen E; Smith, Barbara A; Reich, Stephen G; Weiner, William J; Macko, Richard F

    2013-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of treadmill exercises and stretching and resistance exercises in improving gait speed, strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. A comparative, prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial of 3 types of physical exercise. The Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center at the University of Maryland and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. A total of 67 patients with Parkinson disease who had gait impairment were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 arms of the trial. INTERVENTIONS; (1) A higher-intensity treadmill exercise (30 minutes at 70%-80% of heart rate reserve), (2) a lower-intensity treadmill exercise (50 minutes at 40%-50% of heart rate reserve), and (3) stretching and resistance exercises (2 sets of 10 repetitions on each leg on 3 resistance machines [leg press, leg extension, and curl]). These exercises were performed 3 times a week for 3 months. The primary outcome measures were gait speed (6-minute walk), cardiovascular fitness (peak oxygen consumption per unit time [$$ VO2], and muscle strength (1-repetition maximum strength). All 3 types of physical exercise improved distance on the 6-minute walk: lower-intensity treadmill exercise (12% increase; P=.001), stretching and resistance exercises (9% increase; Pexercise (6% increase; P=.07), with no between-group differences. Both treadmill exercises improved peak $$ VO2 (7%-8% increase; Pexercises. Only stretching and resistance improved muscle strength (16% increase; Pexercise were seen across all 3 exercise groups. The lower-intensity treadmill exercise resulted in the greatest improvement in gait speed. Both the higher- and lower-intensity treadmill exercises improved cardiovascular fitness. Only the stretching and resistance exercises improved muscle strength. Therefore, exercise can improve gait speed, muscle strength, and fitness for patients with Parkinson disease. The combination of

  5. Effects of a Video on Organ Donation Consent Among Primary Care Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J Daryl; Sullivan, Catherine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Cedeño, Maria; Patrick, Bridget; Pencak, Julie; Wong, Kristine A; Allen, Margaret D; Kimble, Linda; Mekesa, Heather; Bowen, Gordon; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2016-08-01

    Low organ donation rates remain a major barrier to organ transplantation. We aimed to determine the effect of a video and patient cueing on organ donation consent among patients meeting with their primary care provider. This was a randomized controlled trial between February 2013 and May 2014. The waiting rooms of 18 primary care clinics of a medical system in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The study included 915 patients over 15.5 years of age who had not previously consented to organ donation. Just prior to their clinical encounter, intervention patients (n = 456) watched a 5-minute organ donation video on iPads and then choose a question regarding organ donation to ask their provider. Control patients (n = 459) visited their provider per usual routine. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who consented for organ donation. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who discussed organ donation with their provider and the proportion who were satisfied with the time spent with their provider during the clinical encounter. Intervention patients were more likely than control patients to consent to donate organs (22 % vs. 15 %, OR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10-2.13). Intervention patients were also more likely to have donation discussions with their provider (77 % vs. 18 %, OR 15.1, 95%CI 11.1-20.6). Intervention and control patients were similarly satisfied with the time they spent with their provider (83 % vs. 86 %, OR 0.87, 95%CI 0.61-1.25). How the observed increases in organ donation consent might translate into a greater organ supply is unclear. Watching a brief video regarding organ donation and being cued to ask a primary care provider a question about donation resulted in more organ donation discussions and an increase in organ donation consent. Satisfaction with the time spent during the clinical encounter was not affected. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01697137.

  6. Two exercise interventions for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of a 4-month comprehensive protocol of strengthening and flexibility exercises developed by our research group versus conventional exercises for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) on functional and mobility outcomes. Randomized controlled trial. Forty-five patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified criteria of New York were allocated to control or experimental groups using a random numbers table. The control group was treated with a conventional protocol of physical therapy in AS, whereas the experimental group was treated with the protocol suggested by our research group. The conventional intervention consisted of 20 exercises: motion and flexibility exercises of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; stretching of the shortened muscles; and chest expansion exercises. The experimental protocol is based on the postural affectation of the AS and the treatment of the shortened muscle chains in these patients according to the Global Posture Reeducation (GPR) method. This intervention employs specific strengthening and flexibility exercises in which the shortened muscle chains are stretched and strengthened. The study lasted 4 mos. During this period, patients received a weekly group session managed by an experienced physiotherapist. Each session lasted an hour, and there were 15 total sessions. Changes in activity, mobility, and functional capacity were evaluated by an assessor blinded to the intervention, using the following previously validated scores from the Bath group: BASMI (tragus to wall distance, modified Schober test, cervical rotation, lumbar side flexion, and intermalleolar distance), BASDAI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index), and BASFI (The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index). Both groups showed an improvement (prepost scores) in all the outcome measures, mobility measures of the BASMI index, as well as in BASFI and BASDAI indexes. In the

  7. Patient education videos for elective colorectal surgery: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihedioha, U; Vaughan, S; Mastermann, J; Singh, B; Chaudhri, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in surgery have focused on peri-operative care and interventions to improve outcome following surgery. Psychological preparation has a positive impact on recovery and incorporates a range of strategies with dissemination of information as one of the key elements. Information can be given verbally, through printed information or through use of a video. Traditionally, reliance has been on the use of written material as an adjunct to patient education in clinic. The current study is a randomized trial on the use of video education in patients undergoing elective colorectal resection within an enhanced recovery programme. Sixty-five eligible patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery were identified and 61 were randomized between August 2010 and August 2011 to either video and information leaflets or information leaflets alone. A fast track protocol was established for all the patients. Clinicians in charge of postoperative recovery were blinded. Standard discharge criteria were employed for all patients. Of 61 patients randomized, one dropped out and outcomes on 60 were analysed. There was no difference in baseline characteristics between the groups (age, P = 0.964; body mass index, P = 0.829). Twenty-eight (91%) patients in the video group had left sided resections while two (6%) had right sided resections. Nineteen (66%) in the non-video group had left sided resections while nine (31%) had right sided resections. One (3%) patient in the non-video group and one (3%) in the video group had a total colectomy. Fourteen (45%) patients in the video group and 12 (41%) in the non-video group had surgery completed laparoscopically. There was no difference in the primary (median hospital stay 5 vs 5 days; P = 0.239) or the secondary outcome measures (pain score on movement, P = 0.338; pain score at rest, P = 0.989; nausea score, P = 0.74; epidural use, P = 0.984; paracetamol use, P = 0.44; voltarol use, P = 0.506) between the groups. Use of video

  8. Effects of pregabalin on central sensitization in patients with chronic pancreatitis in a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan A W Bouwense

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intense abdominal pain is the dominant feature of chronic pancreatitis. During the disease changes in central pain processing, e.g. central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia, can result from ongoing nociceptive input. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of pregabalin on pain processing in chronic pancreatitis as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated effects of pregabalin on pain processing. QST was used to quantify pain processing by measuring thresholds to painful electrical and pressure stimulation in six body dermatomes. Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified using the conditioned pain modulation (CPM paradigm to elicit a DNIC (diffuse noxious inhibitory controls response. The main effect parameter was the change in the sum of all body pain threshold values after three weeks of study treatment versus baseline values between both treatment groups. RESULTS: 64 patients were analyzed. No differences in change in sum of pain thresholds were present for pregabalin vs. placebo after three weeks of treatment. For individual dermatomes, change vs. baseline pain thresholds was significantly greater in pregabalin vs. placebo patients for electric pain detection threshold in C5 (P = 0.005, electric pain tolerance threshold in C5 (P = 0.04 and L1 (P = 0.05, and pressure pain tolerance threshold in T4 (P = 0.004. No differences were observed between pregabalin and placebo regarding conditioned pain modulation. CONCLUSION: Our study provides first evidence that pregabalin has moderate inhibitory effects on central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis patients. These findings suggest that QST can be of clinical use for monitoring pain treatments in the context of chronic pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00755573.

  9. Effects of Pregabalin on Central Sensitization in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis in a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwense, Stefan A. W.; Olesen, Søren S.; Drewes, Asbjørn M.; Poley, Jan-Werner; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intense abdominal pain is the dominant feature of chronic pancreatitis. During the disease changes in central pain processing, e.g. central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia, can result from ongoing nociceptive input. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of pregabalin on pain processing in chronic pancreatitis as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST). Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated effects of pregabalin on pain processing. QST was used to quantify pain processing by measuring thresholds to painful electrical and pressure stimulation in six body dermatomes. Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified using the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm to elicit a DNIC (diffuse noxious inhibitory controls) response. The main effect parameter was the change in the sum of all body pain threshold values after three weeks of study treatment versus baseline values between both treatment groups. Results 64 patients were analyzed. No differences in change in sum of pain thresholds were present for pregabalin vs. placebo after three weeks of treatment. For individual dermatomes, change vs. baseline pain thresholds was significantly greater in pregabalin vs. placebo patients for electric pain detection threshold in C5 (P = 0.005), electric pain tolerance threshold in C5 (P = 0.04) and L1 (P = 0.05), and pressure pain tolerance threshold in T4 (P = 0.004). No differences were observed between pregabalin and placebo regarding conditioned pain modulation. Conclusion Our study provides first evidence that pregabalin has moderate inhibitory effects on central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis patients. These findings suggest that QST can be of clinical use for monitoring pain treatments in the context of chronic pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00755573 PMID:22879908

  10. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside versus iron sucrose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Richard; Roman, Eloy; Modiano, Manuel R; Achebe, Maureen M; Thomsen, Lars L; Auerbach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in many chronic diseases, and intravenous (IV) iron offers a rapid and efficient iron correction. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside and iron sucrose in patients with IDA who were intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron. The trial was an open-label, comparative, multi-center trial. Five hundred and eleven patients with IDA from different causes were randomized 2:1 to iron isomaltoside or iron sucrose and followed for 5 weeks. The cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was based on body weight and hemoglobin (Hb), administered as either a 1000 mg infusion over more than 15 minutes or 500 mg injection over 2 minutes. The cumulative dose of iron sucrose was calculated according to Ganzoni and administered as repeated 200 mg infusions over 30 minutes. The mean cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was 1640.2 (standard deviation (SD): 357.6) mg and of iron sucrose 1127.9 (SD: 343.3) mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline at any time between weeks 1-5. Both non-inferiority and superiority were confirmed for the primary endpoint, and a shorter time to Hb increase ≥2 g/dL was observed with iron isomaltoside. For all biochemical efficacy parameters, faster and/or greater improvements were found with iron isomaltoside. Both treatments were well tolerated; 0.6% experienced a serious adverse drug reaction. Iron isomaltoside was more effective than iron sucrose in achieving a rapid improvement in Hb. Furthermore, iron isomaltoside has an advantage over iron sucrose in allowing higher cumulative dosing in fewer administrations. Both treatments were well tolerated in a broad population with IDA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mandibular response after rapid maxillary expansion in class II growing patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lione, Roberta; Brunelli, Valerio; Franchi, Lorenzo; Pavoni, Chiara; Quiroga Souki, Bernardo; Cozza, Paola

    2017-11-06

    The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to evaluate the sagittal mandibular response induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) therapy in mixed dentition patients with class II malocclusion, comparing the effects of bonded RME and banded RME with a matched untreated class II control group. This RCT was designed in parallel with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The sample consisted of 30 children with a mean age of 8.1 ± 0.6 years who were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 treated with bonded RME, group 2 treated with banded RME, and group 3 the untreated control group. All patients met the following inclusion criteria: early mixed dentition, class II molar relationship, transverse discrepancy ≥ 4 mm, overjet ≥ 5 mm, and prepubertal skeletal maturity stage (CS1-CS2). The expansion screw was activated one quarter of a turn per day (0.25 mm) until overcorrection was reached. For each subject, lateral cephalograms and plaster casts were obtained before treatment (T1) and after 1 year (T2). A randomization list was created for the group assignment, with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The observer who performed all the measurements was blinded to group assignment. The study was single-blinded in regard to statistical analysis. RME was effective in the correction of maxillary deficiency. Class II patients treated with both types of RME showed no significant improvement of the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible at both skeletal and occlusal levels. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on reducing the skeletal vertical dimension and the gonial angle. The orthopedic expansion did not affect the sagittal relationship of class II patients treated in the early mixed dentition when compared with the untreated control group. Additional studies with a larger sample are warranted to elucidate individual variations in dento-skeletal mandibular response to the maxillary expansion protocol in class

  12. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  13. Relay model for recruiting alcohol dependent patients in general hospitals--a single-blind pragmatic randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Anne-Sophie; Bilberg, Randi; Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov

    2016-01-01

    - The Relay Model. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is a single-blind pragmatic randomized controlled trial including patients admitted to the hospital. The study group (n = 500) will receive an intervention, and the control group (n = 500) will be referred to treatment by usual procedures. All patients complete...

  14. Effectiveness of Telemonitoring in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Taiwan-A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Te-Wei Ho; Chun-Ta Huang; Herng-Chia Chiu; Sheng-Yuan Ruan; Yi-Ju Tsai; Chong-Jen Yu; Feipei Lai

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of death worldwide, and poses a substantial economic and social burden. Telemonitoring has been proposed as a solution to this growing problem, but its impact on patient outcome is equivocal. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate effectiveness of telemonitoring in improving COPD patient outcome. In total, 106 subjects were randomly assigned to the telemonitoring (n?=?53) or usual care (n?=?53) group. During the ...

  15. A Family-Centered Rounds Checklist, Family Engagement, and Patient Safety: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elizabeth D; Jacobsohn, Gwen C; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Carayon, Pascale; Kelly, Michelle M; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Rathouz, Paul J; Brown, Roger L

    2017-05-01

    Family-centered rounds (FCRs) have become standard of care, despite the limited evaluation of FCRs' benefits or interventions to support high-quality FCR delivery. This work examines the impact of the FCR checklist intervention, a checklist and associated provider training, on performance of FCR elements, family engagement, and patient safety. This cluster randomized trial involved 298 families. Two hospital services were randomized to use the checklist; 2 others delivered usual care. We evaluated the performance of 8 FCR checklist elements and family engagement from 673 pre- and postintervention FCR videos and assessed the safety climate with the Children's Hospital Safety Climate Questionnaire. Random effects regression models were used to assess intervention impact. The intervention significantly increased the number of FCR checklist elements performed (β = 1.2, P checklist elements was associated with changes in these outcomes. For example, order read-back was associated with significantly more family engagement. Asking families for questions was associated with significantly better ratings of staff's communication openness and safety of handoffs and transitions. The performance of FCR checklist elements was enhanced by checklist implementation and associated with changes in family engagement and more positive perceptions of safety climate. Implementing the checklist improves delivery of FCRs, impacting quality and safety of care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Patient-reported genitourinary dysfunction after laparoscopic and open rectal cancer surgery in a randomized trial (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, J; Abis, G; Gellerstedt, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports on patient-reported sexual dysfunction and micturition symptoms following a randomized trial of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients in the COLOR II randomized trial, comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer, completed...... the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-CR38 questionnaire before surgery, and after 4 weeks, 6, 12 and 24 months. Adjusted mean differences on a 100-point scale were calculated using changes from baseline value at the various time points in the domains of sexual functioning......, sexual enjoyment, male and female sexual problems, and micturition symptoms. RESULTS: Of 617 randomized patients, 385 completed this phase of the trial. Their mean age was 67·1 years. Surgery caused an anticipated reduction in genitourinary function after 4 weeks, with no significant differences between...

  17. Physiotherapy programme reduces fatigue in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszora, Anna; Budzyński, Jacek; Wójcik, Agnieszka; Prokop, Anna; Krajnik, Małgorzata

    2017-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and relevant symptom in patients with advanced cancer that significantly decreases their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physiotherapy programme on CRF and other symptoms in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients diagnosed with advanced cancer receiving palliative care were randomized into two groups: the treatment group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). The therapy took place three times a week for 2 weeks. The 30-min physiotherapy session included active exercises, myofascial release and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. The control group did not exercise. The outcomes included Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and satisfaction scores. The exercise programme caused a significant reduction in fatigue scores (BFI) in terms of severity of fatigue and its impact on daily functioning. In the control group, no significant changes in the BFI were observed. Moreover, the physiotherapy programme improved patients' general well-being and reduced the intensity of coexisting symptoms such as pain, drowsiness, lack of appetite and depression. The analysis of satisfaction scores showed that it was also positively evaluated by patients. The physiotherapy programme, which included active exercises, myofascial release and PNF techniques, had beneficial effects on CRF and other symptoms in patients with advanced cancer who received palliative care. The results of the study suggest that physiotherapy is a safe and effective method of CRF management.

  18. Patient-oriented rehabilitation in the management of chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, M; Tavernese, E; Cacchio, A; Tattoli, M; Melis, L; Ronconi, R; Santilli, V

    2013-06-01

    Management of chronic mechanical neck pain (CMNP) still represents a challenge. A patient-oriented (Pa-O) therapeutic approach could be considered as the one in which therapies are scheduled at the start of each therapeutic session according to the patient's current physical status, and differs from a prescription-oriented (Pr-O) therapeutic approach, in which therapies are prescribed at the first medical referral and are not adjusted at any time during the treatment period. To determine if a Pa-O approach may be more beneficial for CMNP patients when compared to a Pr-O one. Randomized controlled trial. 220 CMNP outpatients randomized to either Pa-O group (N.=114) or Pr-O group (N.=106). Each group received 10 therapeutic sessions over 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain assessment, evaluated by Visual-Analog-Scale (VAS), and disability level, evaluated by the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS-I). Secondary outcome measures included patients' response to treatment and treatment failures. Measurements were carried out at baseline (T0) and 1 month after treatment ended (T1). Data were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Patients in both groups displayed at T1 a significant reduction in VAS and NPDS-I scores. The relative changes at T1 were greater in Pa-O group when compared with Pr-O group both for VAS (61.5% versus 48.8%; Pup in suffers from CMNP. However, the occurrence of a performance-bias due to the increased level of attention from physicians to patients in Pa-O group, cannot be ruled-out. A Pa-O approach should be considered for CMNP also in an outpatient facility.

  19. Nebulized fentanyl vs intravenous morphine for ED patients with acute limb pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Shervin; Shiralizadeh, Said; Talebian, Mohammad-Taghi; Bagheri-Hariri, Shahram; Arbab, Mona; Basirghafouri, Hamed; Saeedi, Morteza; Sedaghat, Mojtaba; Mirzababai, Habibolla

    2014-09-01

    Intravenous morphine has been used as a common method of pain control in emergency care. Nebulized fentanyl is also an effective temporary substitute. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of nebulized fentanyl with intravenous (IV) morphine on management of acute limb pain. This was a placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized clinical trial. Ninety emergency department patients with moderate to severe pain aged 15 to 50 years were blocked randomized and enrolled in this study. Forty-seven patients in the experimental group received nebulized fentanyl (4 μg/kg) and IV normal saline as placebo, and the remaining 43 patients in the control group received IV morphine (0.1 mg/kg) and nebulized normal saline as placebo. All participants' pain scores were assessed by Numerical Rating Scale before and after intervention at 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, 45-, and 60-minute intervals. Patients' vital sign and possible adverse effects were recorded respectively. Finally, all participants were assessed for their satisfaction. The mean initial pain score in the experimental group was 8.7 and 8.4 in the control group (P = .1). Pain relief in both groups after 5 and 10 minutes were similar (P = .72). Although the pain relief was significantly greater with fentanyl at 15 minutes, this difference is not clinically significant. Pain management in both groups was successful and was more than 3 scores reduction in Numerical Rating Scale. Patient satisfaction in both groups was similar. No adverse effects were reported in the experimental group. This study suggests that nebulized fentanyl is a rapid, safe, and effective method for temporary control of acute limb pain in emergency department patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients' condition. The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method.

  1. Decision Support with the Personal Patient Profile-Prostate: A Multicenter Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Hong, Fangxin; Blonquist, Traci M; Halpenny, Barbara; Filson, Christopher P; Master, Viraj A; Sanda, Martin G; Chang, Peter; Chien, Gary W; Jones, Randy A; Krupski, Tracey L; Wolpin, Seth; Wilson, Leslie; Hayes, Julia H; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Sokoloff, Mitchell; Somayaji, Prabhakara

    2017-07-25

    We evaluated the efficacy of the web based P3P (Personal Patient Profile-Prostate) decision aid vs usual care with regard to decisional conflict in men with localized prostate cancer. A randomized (1:1), controlled, parallel group, nonblinded trial was performed in 4 regions of the United States. Eligible men had clinically localized prostate cancer and an upcoming consultation, and they spoke and read English or Spanish. Participants answered questionnaires to report decision making stage, personal characteristics, concerns and preferences plus baseline symptoms and decisional conflict. A randomization algorithm allocated participants to receive tailored education and communication coaching, generic teaching sheets and external websites plus a 1-page summary to clinicians (intervention) or the links plus materials provided in clinic (usual care). Conflict outcomes and the number of consultations were measured at 1 month. Univariate and multivariable models were used to analyze outcomes. A total of 392 men were randomized, including 198 to intervention and 194 to usual care, of whom 152 and 153, respectively, returned 1-month outcomes. The mean ± SD 1-month decisional conflict scale (score range 0 to 100) was 10.9 ± 16.7 for intervention and 9.9 ± 18.0 for usual care. The multivariable model revealed significantly reduced conflict in the intervention group (-5.00, 95% CI -9.40--0.59). Other predictors of conflict included income, marital or partner status, decision status, number of consultations, clinical site and D'Amico risk classification. In this multicenter trial the decision aid significantly reduced decisional conflict. Other variables impacted conflict and modified the effect of the decision aid, notably risk classification, consultations and resources. P3P is an effective adjunct for shared decision making in men with localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Randomized trial of an uncertainty self-management telephone intervention for patients awaiting liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Donald E; Hendrix, Cristina C; Steinhauser, Karen E; Stechuchak, Karen M; Porter, Laura S; Hudson, Julie; Olsen, Maren K; Muir, Andrew; Lowman, Sarah; DiMartini, Andrea; Salonen, Laurel Williams; Tulsky, James A

    2017-03-01

    We tested an uncertainty self-management telephone intervention (SMI) with patients awaiting liver transplant and their caregivers. Participants were recruited from four transplant centers and completed questionnaires at baseline, 10, and 12 weeks from baseline (generally two and four weeks after intervention delivery, respectively). Dyads were randomized to either SMI (n=56) or liver disease education (LDE; n=59), both of which involved six weekly telephone sessions. SMI participants were taught coping skills and uncertainty management strategies while LDE participants learned about liver function and how to stay healthy. Outcomes included illness uncertainty, uncertainty management, depression, anxiety, self-efficacy, and quality of life. General linear models were used to test for group differences. No differences were found between the SMI and LDE groups for study outcomes. This trial offers insight regarding design for future interventions that may allow greater flexibility in length of delivery beyond our study's 12-week timeframe. Our study was designed for the time constraints of today's clinical practice setting. This trial is a beginning point to address the unmet needs of these patients and their caregivers as they wait for transplants that could save their lives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Planning and problem-solving training for patients with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial

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    Backenstraß Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess whether planning and problem-solving training is more effective in improving functional capacity in patients with schizophrenia than a training program addressing basic cognitive functions. Methods Eighty-nine patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned either to a computer assisted training of planning and problem-solving or a training of basic cognition. Outcome variables included planning and problem-solving ability as well as functional capacity, which represents a proxy measure for functional outcome. Results Planning and problem-solving training improved one measure of planning and problem-solving more strongly than basic cognition training, while two other measures of planning did not show a differential effect. Participants in both groups improved over time in functional capacity. There was no differential effect of the interventions on functional capacity. Conclusion A differential effect of targeting specific cognitive functions on functional capacity could not be established. Small differences on cognitive outcome variables indicate a potential for differential effects. This will have to be addressed in further research including longer treatment programs and other settings. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00507988

  4. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  5. Effects of a case management program on patients with oral precancerous lesions: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Ying; Chen, Shu-Ching; Peng, Hsi-Ling; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effects of a case management program on knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and level of uncertainty for patients with oral precancerous lesions. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with two groups, using a pre- and posttest design. The experimental group received a case management program and telephone follow-up sessions; the control group received routine care. Patients were assessed at three time points: first visit to the otolaryngology clinic for biopsy examination (T0), and then at 2 weeks (T1) and 4 weeks (T2) after the biopsy examination. Patients in both groups had significantly higher levels of knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and lower level of uncertainty at T2 compared to T0. At T2, participants in the experimental group had significantly greater knowledge about oral cancer, more preventive behavior for oral cancer, and less uncertainty compared to those in the control group. The case management program with telephone counseling effectively improved knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and uncertainty levels in patients with oral precancerous lesions in the four weeks after receiving a biopsy examination. The case management program can be applied with positive results to patients receiving different types of cancer screening, including colorectal, breast, and cervical screening.

  6. A prospective, randomized trial for use of prednisolone in patients with facial nerve paralysis after parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Park, Chan Il

    2008-11-01

    A high rate of facial nerve paralysis (FNP) develops after parotid surgery, but there have been few clinical trials on treatments to improve recovery times. This study evaluated the efficacy of prednisolone in these patients. A total of 123 patients who underwent parotidectomy without injury to the facial nerve were assessed prospectively for postoperative FNP. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment with prednisolone or placebo for 10 days. FNP was evaluated by House-Brackmann grades. Recovery rates and adverse effects were monitored regularly for 6 months after surgery. Of the 123 patients, 45 had postoperative FNP. All FNPs were grades II to IV, mostly on 1 or 2 facial areas. The incidence of FNP was increased significantly with malignant pathology, increased parotidectomy extent, and neck dissection (P FNP after 6 months, whereas 1 patient had permanent FNP. Recovery rates were equal in both groups, and there was no evidence of major adverse effects. Prednisolone was ineffective in early recovery from postparotidectomy FNP.

  7. Interventions with family caregivers of cancer patients: meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Katapodi, Maria C; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Lingling; Mood, Darlene W

    2010-01-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their caregiving role. However, their psychosocial needs must be addressed so they can maintain their own health and provide the best possible care to the patient. The purpose of this article is to analyze the types of interventions offered to family caregivers of cancer patients, and to determine the effect of these interventions on various caregiver outcomes. Meta-analysis was used to analyze data obtained from 29 randomized clinical trials published from 1983 through March 2009. Three types of interventions were offered to caregivers: psychoeducational, skills training, and therapeutic counseling. Most interventions were delivered jointly to patients and caregivers, but they varied considerably with regard to dose and duration. The majority of caregivers were female (64%) and Caucasian (84%), and ranged in age from 18 to 92 years (mean age, 55 years). Meta-analysis indicated that although these interventions had small to medium effects, they significantly reduced caregiver burden, improved caregivers' ability to cope, increased their self-efficacy, and improved aspects of their quality of life. Various intervention characteristics were also examined as potential moderators. Clinicians need to deliver research-tested interventions to help caregivers and patients cope effectively and maintain their quality of life. Copyright 2010 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  8. Clinical Impact of Pharmacogenetic-Guided Treatment for Patients Exhibiting Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Marilyn C; Maciel, Alejandra; Gariepy, Jean Francois; Cullors, Ali; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Taylor, David; Centeno, Joel; Garces, Jorge A; Vaishnavi, Sandeep

    2017-03-16

    Pharmacogenetic testing holds promise as a personalized medicine tool by permitting individualization of pharmacotherapy in accordance with genes influencing therapeutic response, side effects, and adverse events. The authors evaluated the effect on outcomes for patients diagnosed with neuropsychiatric disorders of pharmacogenetics (PGx)-guided treatment compared to usual standard of care. This was a prospective, randomized study of 237 patients at an outpatient community-based psychiatric practice conducted between April 2015 and October 2015. Baseline patient assessments and a buccal swab were collected for pharmacogenetic testing at study initiation. For the experimental group, PGx results were provided to the clinicians as guides to treatment. Control subjects were treated according to the usual standard of care with no clinician reference to their PGx results. Neuropsychiatric Questionnaire (NPQ) and Symbol Digit Coding Test (SDC) scores and adverse drug events, hospitalizations, and medication information were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. More than half (53%) of patients in the control group reported at least 1 adverse drug event compared to 28% of patients with PGx-guided medication management (P = .001). NPQ and SDC scores improved for both groups, but no statistical difference in efficacy as measured by these assessments was observed within the 90-day observation period. Pharmacogenetic testing may facilitate psychiatric drug therapy with greater tolerability and similar efficacy compared to standard of care. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02411123​​.

  9. Effects of doxycycline on local and systemic inflammation in stable COPD patients, a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Hendrik J; Daniels, Johannes M A; Lindeman, Jan H; Lutter, René; Boersma, Wim G

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic inflammation plays a causal role in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Neutrophil derived myeloperoxidase(MPO) matrix metalloproteinases(MMP's), and elastases are thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the disease. The tetracycline analogue doxycycline has been shown to inhibit neutrophil-mediated inflammation. It was thus reasoned that doxycycline may attenuate neutrophil-mediated inflammation in COPD. In this double blind randomized controlled trial the effect of a 3-week course of doxycycline on sputum and systemic inflammatory parameters was evaluated in stable COPD patients. In order to exclude inflammation by bacterial colonisation patients must have 2 negative sputum cultures in the previous year. The effect of doxycycline treatment on inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and neutrophil specific markers in sputum (MPO, MMP's, and IL-8) and serum C-reactive protein was evaluated. Sputum was obtained by sputum induction with hypertonic saline. A total of 41 patients were included. Ten patients were excluded as they were not able to produce sputum at the first or second visit. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. In the remaining patients doxycycline did not influence sputum MPO concentrations. Also MMP-8 and 9, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations as well as lung function parameters were not affected by doxycycline. Systemic inflammation by means of CRP was also not influenced by doxycycline. A three week course of doxycycline did not influence MPO sputum levels nor any of the other inflammatory sputum and systemic markers. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00857038 URL: clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Randomized Trial of Coenzyme Q10 in Patients with Statin Myopathy: Rationale and Study Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Beth A.; Gregory, Sara M.; Lorson, Lindsay; Polk, Donna; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins are the most commonly prescribed and effective medications for reducing low-density lipoprotein levels. Some patients experience myopathic symptoms during statin treatment. The etiology is not known, but depletion of mevalonate pathway metabolites, including coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), has been suggested. CoQ10 supplementation has been recommended to patients who experience myalgic symptoms despite a lack of conclusive evidence supporting its utility. Objective The Co-Enzyme Q10 in Statin Myopathy study is designed to examine the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on the extent and intensity of muscle pain during treatment with simvastatin. Methods We will recruit patients with a documented history of myalgia during statin treatment. The presence of statin-related myalgia will be confirmed in a crossover run-in trial during which presence and absence of symptoms will be documented during statin and placebo treatment, respectively. Individuals with myalgic symptoms while on statin but not placebo will be randomized to receive simvastatin 20 mg daily plus either 600 mg daily of CoQ10 or placebo. Muscle pain intensity will be documented during weekly phone calls using the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form) (BPI-SF). Treatment will continue for 8 weeks or until muscle symptoms are reported continuously for one week or become intolerable, and then subjects will crossover to the alternative treatment (CoQ10 or placebo). Results This study is an ongoing clinical trial. Conclusions This study will determine the utility of CoQ10 for reducing pain intensity in myalgic patients and will provide guidance for clinicians treating patients with hypercholesterolemia who are intolerant to statins. PMID:23725917

  11. Pulse versus daily oral Alfacalcidol treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawalmeh O

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Osama Sawalmeh,1 Shaheed Moala,1 Zakaria Hamdan,2 Huda Masri,3 Khubaib Ayoub,4 Emad Khazneh,2 Mujahed Shraim5 1Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine; 2Nephrology Department, 3Pharmacy Department, 4Internal Medicine Department, An-Najah National University Hospital, Nablus, Palestine; 5Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common complication of chronic kidney disease and is managed using vitamin D replacement therapy. Very few studies have examined the effectiveness of pulse alfacalcidol therapy in comparison to daily oral alfacalcidol therapy in suppressing serum parathyroid hormone (PTH levels in hemodialysis patients. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to replicate the findings of prior studies comparing effectiveness of pulse oral alfacalcidol therapy versus daily oral alfacalcidol therapy in suppressing PTH after 13 weeks of therapy using a Palestinian sample of hemodialysis patients, and to identify demographic and biomedical characteristics of patients that are independently associated with PTH levels.Methods: One hundred and sixty-seven patients completed the study, 88 in the daily group and 79 in the pulse group. The pulse group had more clinically significant reduction in mean PTH level by 75 pg/dL at 13 weeks than the daily group, but this was not statistically significant.Results: The effect of alfacalcidol therapy on metabolism of phosphate and corrected calcium levels was comparable in both groups, and pulse therapy was not associated with increased risk of hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Serum PTH levels were independently and inversely associated with older age and diabetes.Conclusion: Switching daily alfacalcidol therapy to thrice-weekly alfacalcidol pulse therapy seems safe and convenient, especially for hemodialysis patients with poor compliance

  12. Strategies to enhance venous thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients (SENTRY: a pilot cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai Menaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common preventable cause of mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Despite rigorous randomized trials generating strong recommendations for anticoagulant use to prevent VTE, nearly 40% of medical patients receive inappropriate thromboprophylaxis. Knowledge-translation strategies are needed to bridge this gap. Methods We conducted a 16-week pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT to determine the proportion of medical patients that were appropriately managed for thromboprophylaxis (according to the American College of Chest Physician guidelines within 24 hours of admission, through the use of a multicomponent knowledge-translation intervention. Our primary goal was to determine the feasibility of conducting this study on a larger scale. The intervention comprised clinician education, a paper-based VTE risk assessment algorithm, printed physicians’ orders, and audit and feedback sessions. Medical wards at six hospitals (representing clusters in Ontario, Canada were included; three were randomized to the multicomponent intervention and three to usual care (i.e., no active strategies for thromboprophylaxis in place. Blinding was not used. Results A total of 2,611 patients (1,154 in the intervention and 1,457 in the control group were eligible and included in the analysis. This multicomponent intervention did not lead to a significant difference in appropriate VTE prophylaxis rates between intervention and control hospitals (appropriate management rate odds ratio = 0.80; 95% confidence interval: 0.50, 1.28; p = 0.36; intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.022, and thus was not considered feasible. Major barriers to effective knowledge translation were poor attendance by clinical staff at education and feedback sessions, difficulty locating preprinted orders, and lack of involvement by clinical and administrative leaders. We identified several factors that may increase uptake of a VTE

  13. The effectiveness of music in relieving pain in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Tzu; Good, Marion; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2010-11-01

    To examine effects of sedative music on cancer pain. A randomized controlled trial. Two large medical centers in Kaoshiung City, in southern Taiwan. 126 hospitalized persons with cancer pain. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (n=62) or a control group (n=64), with computerized minimization, stratifying on gender, pain, and hospital unit. Music choices included folk songs, Buddhist hymns (Taiwanese music), plus harp, and piano (American). The experimental group listened to music for 30 min; the control group rested in bed. Sensation and distress of pain were rated on 100mm VAS before and after the 30-min test. Using MANCOVA, there was significantly less posttest pain in the music versus the control group, pmusic was very helpful for pain. Thirty minutes of music provided 50% relief in 42% of the music group compared to 8% of the controls. The number needed to treat (NNT) to find one with 50% sensation relief was three patients. More patients chose Taiwanese music (71%) than American music (29%), but both were liked and effective. Offering a choice of familiar, culturally appropriate music was a key element of the intervention. Findings extend the Good and Moore theory (1996) to cancer pain. Soft music was safe, effective, and liked by participants. It provided greater relief of cancer pain than analgesics alone. Thus nurses should offer calming, familiar music to supplement analgesic medication for persons with cancer pain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

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    Allen Kelli D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers. Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection, based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function, and

  15. Emergency Department Management of Sepsis Patients: A Randomized, Goal-Oriented, Noninvasive Sepsis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Win Sen; Ibrahim, Irwani; Leong, Benjamin S H; Jain, Swati; Lu, Qingshu; Cheung, Yin Bun; Mahadevan, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    The noninvasive cardiac output monitor and passive leg-raising maneuver has been shown to be reasonably accurate in predicting fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. We examine whether using a noninvasive protocol would result in more rapid lactate clearance after 3 hours in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In this open-label randomized controlled trial, 122 adult patients with sepsis and serum lactate concentration of greater than or equal to 3.0 mmol/L were randomized to receive usual care or intravenous fluid bolus administration guided by measurements of change of stroke volume index, using the noninvasive cardiac output monitor after passive leg-raising maneuver. The primary outcome was lactate clearance of more than 20% at 3 hours. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and ICU stay, and total hospital cost. Analysis was intention to treat. Similar proportions of patients in the randomized intervention group (70.5%; N=61) versus control group (73.8%; N=61) achieved the primary outcome, with a relative risk of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77 to 1.19). Secondary outcomes were similar in both groups (P>.05 for all comparisons). Hospital mortality occurred in 6 patients (9.8%) each in the intervention and control groups on or before 28 days (relative risk=1.00; 95% CI 0.34 to 2.93). Among a subgroup of patients with underlying fluid overload states, those in the intervention group tended to receive clinically significantly more intravenous fluids at 3 hours (difference=975 mL; 95% CI -450 to 1,725 mL) and attained better lactate clearance (difference=19.7%; 95% CI -34.6% to 60.2%) compared with the control group, with shorter hospital lengths of stay (difference=-4.5 days; 95% CI -9.5 to 2.5 days). Protocol-based fluid resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock with the noninvasive cardiac output monitor and passive leg-raising maneuver did not result in better

  16. Training patients with schizophrenia to share decisions with their psychiatrists: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Johannes; Parchmann, Anna; Sassenberg, Nina; Bronner, Katharina; Albus, Margot; Richter, Alwin; Hoppstock, Sandra; Kissling, Werner

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia have a desire for shared decision-making (SDM). However, in clinical practice SDM often does not take place. One cause might be that many patients behave passively in the medical encounter, therefore not facilitating SDM. It was the aim of the study to evaluate the effects of a patient directed SDM-training on patients' communicative behavior in the consultation, their attitudes towards decision-making and their long-term adherence. Randomized-controlled trial comparing a five-session SDM-training for inpatients with schizophrenia with five sessions of non-specific group training. The SDM-training sessions included motivational (e.g. prospects of participation, patient rights) and behavioral aspects (e.g. role plays) and addressed important aspects of the patient-doctor interaction such as question asking or giving feedback. N = 264 patients were recruited in four psychiatric hospitals in Germany. The SDM-training yielded no group differences regarding the main outcome measure (treatment adherence) at 6 and 12 months after discharge. However, there were short-term effects on patients' participation preferences, their wish to take over more responsibility for medical decisions and (according to their psychiatrists' estimate) their behavior in psychiatric consultations. While there was no effect regarding treatment adherence, the shared decision-making training for inpatients with schizophrenia has been shown to increase patients' active behavior in psychiatric consultations during their inpatient treatment. When implemented it should be combined with complementary SDM interventions (decision support tools and communication training for professionals) to yield maximum effects.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of an intervention to change cardiac misconceptions in myocardial infarction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiras, Maria João; Maroco, João; Monteiro, Rita; Caeiro, Raúl; Dias Neto, David

    2017-03-01

    There is converging evidence that changing beliefs about an illness leads to positive recovery outcomes. However, cardiac misconceptions interventions have been investigated mainly in Angina or Coronary Heart Disease patients, and less in patients following Myocardial Infarction (MI). In these patients, cardiac misconceptions may play a role in the adjustment or lifestyle changes. This article reports a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to reduce the strength of misconceptions in patients after a first MI. The primary outcome was the degree of change in misconceptions and the secondary outcomes were: exercise, smoking status, return to work and mood (anxiety and depression). Patients in the intervention condition (n = 60) were compared with a control group (n = 67) receiving usual care. Both groups were evaluated at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 months after hospital discharge. There was a significant time-by-group interaction for the total score of cardiac misconceptions. Patients in the intervention group significantly decreased their total score of cardiac misconceptions at 4 months compared with the control group and this difference was sustained over time. Patients in the intervention group were also more likely to exercise at the follow-up period after MI than the control group. This intervention was effective in reducing the strength of cardiac misconceptions in MI patients and had a positive impact on health behaviour outcomes. These results support the importance of misconceptions in health behaviours and the utility of belief change interventions in promoting health in patients with Myocardial Infarction.

  18. The Effect of Music Therapy in Patients with Huntington's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique C H; Vink, Annemieke C; Wolterbeek, Ron; Achterberg, Wilco P; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-01-01

    Music therapy may have beneficial effects on improving communication and expressive skills in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies are, however, small observational studies and methodologically limited. Therefore we conducted a multi-center randomized controlled trial. To determine the efficacy of music therapy in comparison with recreational therapy in improving quality of life of patients with advanced Huntington's disease by means of improving communication. Sixty-three HD-patients with a Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score of ≤7, admitted to four long-term care facilities in The Netherlands, were randomized to receive either group music therapy or group recreational therapy in 16 weekly sessions. They were assessed at baseline, after 8, 16 and 28 weeks using the Behaviour Observation Scale for Huntington (BOSH) and the Problem Behaviour Assessment-short version (PBA-s). A linear mixed model with repeated measures was used to compare the scores between the two groups. Group music therapy offered once weekly for 16 weeks to patients with Huntington's disease had no additional beneficial effect on communication or behavior compared to group recreational therapy. This was the first study to assess the effect of group music therapy on HD patients in the advanced stages of the disease. The beneficial effects of music therapy, recorded in many, mainly qualitative case reports and studies, could not be confirmed with the design (i.e. group therapy vs individual therapy) and outcome measures that have been used in the present study. A comprehensive process-evaluation alongside the present effect evaluation is therefore performed.

  19. Randomized controlled trial of expressive writing for patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, Kathrin; Spelman, Amy; Wood, Christopher; Matin, Surena F; Tannir, Nizar; Jonasch, Eric; Pisters, Louis; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the quality-of-life benefits of an expressive writing (EW) intervention for patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and identified a potential underlying mechanism of intervention efficacy. Patients (N = 277) with stage I to IV RCC were randomly assigned to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings regarding their cancer (EW) or about neutral topics (neutral writing [NW]) on four separate occasions. Patients completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), and Impact of Event Scale (IES) at baseline and 1, 4, and 10 months after the intervention. The mean age of participants (28% stage IV; 41% female) was 58 years. Multilevel modeling analyses, using a Bonferroni-corrected α = .021 for six outcomes adjusted for the correlation among outcomes, revealed that, relative to the NW group, patients in the EW group reported significantly lower MDASI scores (P = .003) and higher physical component summary scores on the SF-36 (P = .019) at 10 months after the intervention. Mediation analyses revealed that significant group differences for MDASI scores at 10 months were mediated by lower IES scores at 1 month after the intervention in the EW group (P = .042). No significant group differences were observed in the BFI, CES-D, PSQI, and mental component summary of the SF-36. EW may reduce cancer-related symptoms and improve physical functioning in patients with RCC. Evidence suggests that this effect may occur through short-term improvements in cognitive processing.

  20. Effects of Letrozole Compared with Danazol on Patients with Confirmed Endometriosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Koleini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Letrozole is an aromatase inhibitor which can decrease estrogen production inperipheral tissues and endometriosis. Danazol, as an androgen, inhibits estrogen production inovaries and recently has been introduced as an aromatase inhibitor. This study was designed tocompare the effects of Danazol with Letrozole on endometriosis symptom relief.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial in which 105 patients withconfirmed endometriosis were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 received Letrozoletablets (2.5 mg/day, calcium (1000 mg/day and vitamin D (800 IU/day. Group 2 received Danazoltablets (600 mg/day, calcium (1000 mg/day and vitamin D (800 IU/day. Group 3 (placebo groupwere assigned to take two calcium tablets daily (500 mg/tablet and vitamin D (800 IU/day. Pelvicpain, dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia were assessed in participants at baseline and monthly duringthe study for a total of six months. Data were analyzed via SPSS version 15 software with Freidmanand Wilcoxon tests.Results: Mean age in three groups has no significant difference. Of the 105 participants who wereenrolled in this study, 38 patients were assigned to group 1 (Letrozole group, 37 patients in group 2(Danazol group and 31 patients were placed in group 3 (placebo group. This study showed that themean scores for chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia for the Letrozole group wereless than the Danazol and placebo groups.Conclusion: This study showed that Letrozole can be more effective than Danazol for reducingchronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia and dysmenorrhea in patients suffering from recurrent endometriosis(Registeration Number: IRCT138812043414N1.

  1. Improving patient knowledge and safe use of opioids: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Wolf, Michael S; McConnell, Ryan; Sears, Jill; Chevrier, Allison; Ahlstrom, Eric; Engel, Kirsten G; Cameron, Kenzie A; Adams, James G; Courtney, D Mark

    2015-03-01

    The use of opioid analgesics in the United States has significantly increased in recent years. However, there is minimal consensus on what discharge counseling should accompany these high-risk prescriptions and large variations in what is done in practice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a dual-modality (written and spoken) literacy-appropriate educational strategy on patients' knowledge of and safe use of opioid analgesics. This was a prospective, randomized controlled trial. Consecutive discharged patients at an urban academic ED (>88,000 visits) with new prescriptions for hydrocodone-acetaminophen were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either usual care or the educational intervention. The educational intervention was a one-page information sheet about hydrocodone-acetaminophen, which was both given to the patients and read aloud by the research assistant (nonblinded). Follow-up phone calls were conducted 4 to 7 days after the visit to assess patient knowledge about the medication and self-report of activities associated with safety of use (e.g., double-dipping with acetaminophen, storage, use with alcohol or while driving). A total of 274 patients were enrolled; 210 completed follow-up (110 usual care and 100 intervention). No significant differences in baseline characteristics emerged between the study arms; 42% were male, and 51% were white, with a median age of 43 years. Half of patients had non-back pain orthopedic injuries (49.5%). On follow-up, overall knowledge was poor, with only 28% able to name both active ingredients in the medication. The intervention group had better knowledge of precautions related to taking additional acetaminophen (usual care 18.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.9% to 25.5% vs. intervention 38%, 95% CI = 28.3% to 47.7%; difference = 27.6, 95% CI of difference = 21.5 to 33.7) and knowledge of side effects (usual care median = 1, interquartile range [IQR] 0 to 2 vs. intervention median = 2

  2. Pain management in cancer patients using a mobile app: study design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Stephen; Kamdar, Mihir; Flanagan, Clare; Searl, Meghan; Traeger, Lara; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2014-12-12

    Despite the availability of effective medications and clinical guidelines for pain management, pain control is suboptimal in a sizeable proportion of patients with cancer pain. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend a comprehensive and multimodal approach for management of cancer pain. We developed a mobile phone application, ePAL, based on clinical guidelines to empower patients for cancer pain management by prompting regular pain assessments and coaching for self-management. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a multidimensional mobile phone-based pain management application, ePAL, on controlling cancer pain and improving quality of life in patients with cancer pain being treated at an academic palliative care clinic. The study will be implemented as a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with 110 adult patients with CP who own a mobile phone over a follow-up period of two months. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving ePAL and usual care or to a control group receiving only usual care. The brief pain inventory will be used to assess our primary outcome which is pain intensity. We will also evaluate the effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes which include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, quality of life, adherence to analgesic medications, barriers to pain control, anxiety and patient engagement. Instruments that will be used in evaluating secondary outcomes include the Brief Pain Inventory, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Barriers Questionnaire-II, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue. The intention-to-treat approach will be used to evaluate outcomes. Our primary outcome, pain intensity, measured longitudinally over eight weeks, will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis

  3. Intravenous Esomeprazole for Prevention of Peptic Ulcer Rebleeding: A Randomized Trial in Chinese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Chen, Dong-Feng; Wang, Rong-Quan; Chen, You-Xiang; Shi, Rui-Hua; Tian, De-An; Chen, Huifang; Eklund, Stefan; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2015-11-01

    High-dose intravenous esomeprazole is the only approved pharmacological treatment for the prevention of peptic ulcer rebleeding (currently approved in over 100 countries worldwide), but has not yet been approved in China. This study aimed to evaluate a high-dose esomeprazole intravenous regimen vs. an active control (cimetidine) for the prevention of rebleeding in Chinese patients with a high risk of peptic ulcer rebleeding who had undergone primary endoscopic hemostatic treatment. This was a parallel-group study conducted at 20 centers in China. The study comprised a randomized, double-blind, intravenous treatment phase of 72 h in which 215 patients received either high-dose esomeprazole (80 mg + 8 mg/h) or cimetidine (200 mg + 60 mg/h), followed by an open-label oral treatment phase in which all patients received esomeprazole 40 mg tablets once daily for 27 days. The primary outcome was the rate of clinically significant rebleeding within the first 72 h after initial endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Secondary outcomes included the rates of clinically significant rebleeding within 7 and 30 days; proportions of patients who had endoscopic retreatment and other surgery due to rebleeding; and number of blood units transfused. The rate of clinically significant rebleeding within 72 h was low overall (3.3%) and numerically lower in patients treated with esomeprazole compared with cimetidine (0.9% vs. 5.6%). Overall, the results of the secondary outcomes also showed a numerical trend towards superiority of esomeprazole over cimetidine. All treatments were well tolerated. In this phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial conducted in China, esomeprazole showed a numerical trend towards superior clinical benefit over cimetidine in the prevention of rebleeding in patients who had successfully undergone initial hemostatic therapy of a bleeding peptic ulcer, with a similar safety and tolerability profile. These findings suggest that esomeprazole may be an

  4. Physician and patient benefit–risk preferences from two randomized long-acting injectable antipsychotic trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz EG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Eva G Katz,1 Brett Hauber,2 Srihari Gopal,3 Angie Fairchild,2 Amy Pugh,4 Rachel B Weinstein,3 Bennett S Levitan3 1Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Titusville, NJ, 4The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF, CA, USA Purpose: To quantify clinical trial participants’ and investigators’ judgments with respect to the relative importance of efficacy and safety attributes of antipsychotic treatments for schizophrenia, and to assess the impact of formulation and adherence.Methods: Discrete-choice experiment surveys were completed by patients with schizophrenia and physician investigators participating in two phase-3 clinical trials of paliperidone palmitate 3-month long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotic. Respondents were asked to choose between hypothetical antipsychotic profiles defined by efficacy, safety, and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using random-parameters logit and probit models.Results: Patients (N=214 and physicians (N=438 preferred complete improvement in positive symptoms (severe to none as the most important attribute, compared with improvement in any other attribute studied. Both respondents preferred 3-month and 1-month injectables to oral formulation (P<0.05, irrespective of prior adherence to oral antipsychotic treatment, with physicians showing greater preference for a 3-month over a 1-month LAI for nonadherent patients. Physicians were willing to accept treatments with reduced efficacy for patients with prior poor adherence. The maximum decrease in efficacy (95% confidence interval [CI] that physicians would accept for switching a patient from daily oral to 3-month injectable was as follows: adherent: 9.8% (95% CI: 7.2–12.4, 20% nonadherent: 25.4% (95% CI: 21.0–29.9, and 50% nonadherent: >30%. For patients, adherent: 10.1% (95% CI: 6.1–14.1, nonadherent: the change in efficacy studied was

  5. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegenga Boudewijn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire score (primary outcome, Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P, Global Perceived Effect (GPE scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P Conclusions The results of this study show that 12-week comprehensive treatment of MTrPs in shoulder muscles reduces the number of muscles with active MTrPs and is effective in reducing symptoms and improving shoulder function in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN75722066

  6. Improving cancer patients' knowledge about totally implantable access port: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Biagioli, Valentina; Giannarelli, Diana; Incletoli, Daniele; Grieco, Francesca; Carassiti, Massimiliano; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Providing patients with written information about totally implantable access ports (TIAPs) is recommended during the pre-implantation period to reduce anxiety and to help recalling information. No study tested the effectiveness of information about TIAP neither with oral communication nor with booklets. This study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of an information booklet, alone or together with answers to clarification questions, both in improving patients' short- and long-time knowledge about TIAP and in decreasing patients' physiological indicators of anxiety immediately after TIAP implantation. This is a randomized controlled trial with three parallel groups: group A (n = 34) receiving only the booklet, group B (n = 34) receiving the booklet with answers to clarification questions, and group C (n = 37) receiving routine care. After 3 months, pair comparisons revealed a significant improvement in knowledge of TIAP in each group (p difference in group C compared with groups A (p knowledge about TIAP immediately and at 3 months. Adding answers to clarification questions to the booklet was not more effective than the booklet alone. A well-designed booklet with attention both to scientific content and to communication techniques is useful in improving patients' knowledge about TIAP and reducing anxiety.

  7. Rigid shoulder taping with physiotherapy in patients with subacromial pain syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeldoorn, Adri T; Kamper, Steven J; Kalter, Joeri; Knol, Dirk L; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2017-04-06

    To assess the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in combination with rigid taping compared with individualized physiotherapy alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. A prospective randomized trial with concealed allocation. A total of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age from primary physiotherapy settings. The intervention group received individualized physiotherapy and shoulder taping. The control group received individualized physiotherapy only. Primary outcomes were: pain intensit (numerical rating scale) and functioning (Simple Shoulder Test). Secondary outcomes were: global perceived effect and patient-specific complaints. Data were collected at baseline, and at 4, 12 and 26 weeks' follow-up. During the 6-month follow-up period multilevel analysis showed a significant difference between groups favouring the control group on pain intensity (p = 0.02), but not on functioning. Regarding secondary outcomes, a significant difference between groups was found favouring the intervention group for global perceived effect (p = 0.02), but not for patient-specific complaints. Rigid shoulder taping, as used in this study, cannot be recommended for improving physiotherapy outcomes in people with subacromial pain syndrome.

  8. Clothes-on PUVA in psoriasis: Single blind randomized comparative trial on 21 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Sachin

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PUVASOL therapy has an inherent drawback of patient compliance in that Indian female patients with psoriasis lesions on covered parts of the body are reluctant to expose themselves. In this study we tried to evaluate a new method of administering PUVA therapy wearing a fabric. AIM: To compare the efficacy and safety of PUVA administration with and without wearing clothes in psoriasis. METHOD: We first found the UV transmissibility of plain woven, lightweight cream colored cotton fabric with 30 x 30 threads per square cm. area and calculated its sun protection factor (SPF. A single blind, randomized, comparative, clinical trial was then conducted on 21 patients with psoriasis vulgaris who were treated with bath PUVA. The study group received ultraviolet light while wearing a gown made up of the above cotton fabric and the control group received ultraviolet light without wearing the gown. The study group was given an UV dose higher in proportion to the SPF of the worn fabric so that blockage caused by cloth could be neutralized. The cloth-uncovered areas were covered with a sunscreen. UVA from artificial light source was used for better patient monitoring. RESULTS: After 12 PUVA treatments both the treatments were found to be equally effective, and there were no differences in the side effects. Conclusion: Thus we conclude that PUVA can be given wearing a fabric provided the UV dosage is increased proportional to the SPF of the fabric. The same fabric may be used for PUVASOL therapy.

  9. Effect of modafinil on cognitive functions in alcohol dependent patients: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos, Leen; Goudriaan, Anna E; Schmaal, Lianne; van den Brink, Wim; Sabbe, Bernard G C; Dom, Geert

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive deficits are highly prevalent in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients and may have a detrimental impact on treatment response and treatment outcome. Enhancing cognitive functions may improve treatment success. Modafinil is a promising compound in this respect. Therefore, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted with modafinil (300 mg/d) or placebo in 83 AD patients for 10 weeks. Various cognitive functions (digit span task, Tower of London task, Stroop task) were measured at baseline, during and after treatment. Compared to placebo, modafinil improved verbal short-term memory (number of forward digit spans) (p=0.030), but modafinil exerted a negative effect on the working memory score of the digit span task (p=0.003). However, subgroup analyses revealed that modafinil did improve both working memory and verbal short-term memory in AD patients with a poor working memory ability at baseline (25% worst performers), whereas no significant treatment effect of modafinil was found on these two dependent variables in patients with good working memory skills at baseline (25% best performers). No effect of modafinil was found on measures of planning (Tower of London task) and selective attention (Stroop task). Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between cognitive remediation and treatment outcome in order to design targeted treatments.

  10. Impact of patient access to Internet health records on glaucoma medication: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Kenji; Tsukahara, Shigeo

    2014-01-15

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness. Reduction of intraocular pressure is the only proven way to prevent progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The majority of glaucoma patients need to use antiglaucoma ophthalmic solutions over the course of their life. Thus, good adherence and persistency of glaucoma treatment are important factors for better glaucoma care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an Internet-based glaucoma care support system on glaucoma medication use. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The non-Internet access (NIA) group consisted of patients who had access to the Internet-based glaucoma care support system during the 4-year period only when they were examined by ophthalmologists. The Internet access (IA) group consisted of patients who had the same Internet-based glaucoma care support system access as the NIA group for the first 2 years following enrollment but who were also given free access to the glaucoma care support system for the remaining 2 years. Changes in glaucoma medication use were investigated. In total, 81 patients in the IA group and 90 patients in the NIA group satisfied the study protocol. The number of antiglaucoma ophthalmic solutions used during the study period significantly increased in the NIA group (PInternet access significantly shifted from an increasing intraocular pressure trend to a decreasing trend in the IA group (P=.002) among the patients who did not have any medication changes. Allowing patients to browse their medical data may reduce the use and improve the effectiveness of glaucoma medication. UMIN-CTR Clinical Trial Number: UMIN000006982; https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr.cgi?function=brows&action=brows&type=summary&recptno=R000008238&language=E (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6MRPQeEAv).

  11. Patients' ability to treat anaphylaxis using adrenaline autoinjectors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umasunthar, T; Procktor, A; Hodes, M; Smith, J G; Gore, C; Cox, H E; Marrs, T; Hanna, H; Phillips, K; Pinto, C; Turner, P J; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown patients commonly misuse adrenaline autoinjectors (AAI). It is unclear whether this is due to inadequate training, or poor device design. We undertook a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate ability to administer adrenaline using different AAI devices. We allocated mothers of food-allergic children prescribed an AAI for the first time to Anapen or EpiPen using a computer-generated randomization list, with optimal training according to manufacturer's instructions. After one year, participants were randomly allocated a new device (EpiPen, Anapen, new EpiPen, JEXT or Auvi-Q), without device-specific training. We assessed ability to deliver adrenaline using their AAI in a simulated anaphylaxis scenario six weeks and one year after initial training, and following device switch. Primary outcome was successful adrenaline administration at six weeks, assessed by an independent expert. Secondary outcomes were success at one year, success after switching device, and adverse events. We randomized 158 participants. At six weeks, 30 of 71 (42%) participants allocated to Anapen and 31 of 73 (43%) participants allocated to EpiPen were successful - RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.68-1.46). Success rates at one year were also similar, but digital injection was more common at one year with EpiPen (8/59, 14%) than Anapen (0/51, 0%, P = 0.007). When switched to a new device without specific training, success rates were higher with Auvi-Q (26/28, 93%) than other devices (39/80, 49%; P < 0.001). AAI device design is a major determinant of successful adrenaline administration. Success rates were low with several devices, but were high using the audio-prompt device Auvi-Q. © 2015 The Authors Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arija, Victoria; Martín, Núria; Canela, Teresa; Anguera, Carme; Castelao, Ana I; García-Barco, Montserrat; García-Campo, Antoni; González-Bravo, Ana I; Lucena, Carme; Martínez, Teresa; Fernández-Barrés, Silvia; Pedret, Roser; Badia, Waleska; Basora, Josep

    2012-05-24

    nutritional risk and to assess the effect of a nutritional education intervention. The design with random allocation, inclusion of all patients, validated methods, caregivers' education and standardization between nurses allows us to obtain valuable information about nutritional status and prevention. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01360775.

  13. A randomized controlled trial of IV immunoglobulin in patients with postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolasi, Laura; Frasson, Emma; Turri, Mara; Gajofatto, Alberto; Bordignon, Monia; Zanolin, Elisabetta; Martini, Millo; Pimazzoni, Fabiana; Ferlisi, Monica; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Rossi, Massimo; Monaco, Salvatore

    2013-07-15

    To investigate in a single-center randomized control trial whether a single IVIg course improves short-term outcome in patients with postpolio syndrome (PPS). Fifty-one patients with PPS were randomly allocated to receive 2g/kg IVIg body weight or placebo infused over 5 consecutive days. The primary endpoint was health-related quality of life (HRQoL) limited to the physical component score (PCS) in the Short-Form-36 (SF-36). Secondary endpoints included the SF-36 mental component score (MCS), 6-minute walk test, visual analog scale, 101-numeric rating, and fatigue severity scale. Muscle strength was graded according to the Medical Research Council scale and by dynamometer. Primary and secondary outcome variables were tested double-blind at baseline, 2months, and 4months. At two months, although SF-36 PCS scores were similar in both arms, the role physical (RP) domain improved significantly in the treatment arm (p=0.05) and so did the composite MCS (p=0.015), and role emotional (RE) subscale (p=0.02). No differences were found in the remaining outcome measures. At 4months, none of the outcome variables differed significantly between groups. Although the study did not reach the primary endpoint, we showed that a single IVIg course improves HRQoL related to mental activity, as measured by the SF-36 composite MCS, and role limitations including RP and RE SF-36 subscales at 2months, in patients with PPS. A single IVIg course leaves, gait, muscle strength, fatigue and bodily pain unchanged in patients with PPS. Class I evidence indicates that IVIg did not change SF-36 PCS, and Class II evidence indicates that IVIg improved scores on the SF-36 MCS, RP, and RE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of bedtime insulin regimens in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yki-Järvinen, H; Ryysy, L; Nikkilä, K; Tulokas, T; Vanamo, R; Heikkilä, M

    1999-03-02

    Compared with other insulin regimens, combination therapy with oral hypoglycemic agents and bedtime insulin produces similar improvement in glycemic control but induces less weight gain. To determine whether bedtime insulin regimens differ with respect to their effects on weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes. Randomized, controlled trial. Four outpatient clinics at central hospitals. 96 patients (mean age, 58 +/- 1 years; mean body mass index, 29 +/- 1 kg/m2) whose type 2 diabetes was poorly controlled with sulfonylurea therapy (mean glycosylated hemoglobin value, 9.9% +/- 0.2%; mean fasting plasma glucose level, 11.9 +/- 0.3 mmol/L [214 +/- 5 mg/dL]). Random assignment to 1 year of treatment with bedtime intermediate-acting insulin plus glyburide (10.5 mg) and placebo, metformin (2 g) and placebo, glyburide and metformin, or a second injection of intermediate-acting insulin in the morning. Patients were taught to adjust the bedtime insulin dose on the basis of fasting glucose measurements. Body weight, biochemical and symptomatic hypoglycemias, and indices of glycemic control. At 1 year, body weight remained unchanged in patients receiving bedtime insulin plus metformin (mean change, 0.9 +/- 1.2 kg; P bedtime insulin plus glyburide, those receiving bedtime insulin plus both oral drugs, and those receiving bedtime and morning insulin, respectively. The greatest decrease in the glycosylated hemoglobin value was observed in the bedtime insulin and metformin group (from 9.7% +/- 0.4% to 7.2% +/- 0.2% [difference, -2.5 +/- 0.4 percentage points] at 1 year; P bedtime insulin plus metformin prevents weight gain. This regimen also seems superior to other bedtime insulin regimens with respect to improvement in glycemic control and frequency of hypoglycemia.

  15. EFFECT OF THERAPEUTIC TOUCH ON PAIN RELATED PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaee, Amir; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Rassouli, Maryam; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; AlaviMajd, Hamid; Farahmand, Seyed Kazem

    2016-06-01

    In patients with cancer, pain may influence their life style, and feeling of satisfaction and comfort, leading to fatigue, and cause impairment of their quality of life, personal relationships, sleep and daily activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on pain related parameters of in patients with cancer. In a randomized clinical trial a total of 90 male patients referring to Specialized Oncology Hospital in Mashhad, were conveniently selected and randomly divided into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The intervention consisted of TT in 7 sessions for a 4-week period. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire along with the Brief Pain Inventory, which were then analyzed and compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. By comparing scores parameters of pain scales (general activity, mood, walking ability, relations with other people and sleep) in the three groups, there was no significant difference at the beginning of the first session. However, a significant difference was observed at the end of TT sessions between the three groups (p= 0.001). Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by using Mann-Whitney test and Bonferroni correction, and the result indicated significant differences between the two intervention and placebo groups as well as between the two intervention and control groups. The results of the study showed that TT had a positive impact on the positive management of pain related parameters in cancer patients. Therefore, TT is suggested to be used by healthcare providers as a complementary method for managing pain and its parameters.

  16. Effect of Turkish classical music on blood pressure: a randomized controlled trial in hypertensive elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiroğlu, Tansel; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ergün, Yusuf; Ekerbiçer, Hasan Çetin

    2013-06-01

    Existing studies suggest that music therapy can have favorable effects on hypertension and anxiety. We therefore set out to investigate the effect of Turkish classical music. To investigate whether Turkish classical music has positive effects on blood pressures and anxiety levels in elderly patients. This was a randomized controlled trial performed on 60 hypertensive patients living in a local elderly home in Adana, Turkey. Following the completion of a socio-demographic form for each patient, Hamilton anxiety scale was applied. Thereafter, the subjects were randomly divided into two equal-size groups and were allowed to either listen to Turkish classical music (music therapy group) or have a resting period (control group) for 25 min. The primary and secondary outcome measures were blood pressure and Hamilton anxiety scale scores, respectively. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 13.00 mmHg in the music therapy group and 6.50 mmHg in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 6.80-9.36). The median reductions in diastolic blood pressures were 10 mmHg both in the music therapy and control groups. The between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.839). The mean reduction in HAMA-A was 1.63 in the music therapy group and 0.77 in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.82-1.92). The study demonstrated that both Turkish classical music and resting alone have positive effects on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Project ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C.; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor; Byock, Ira R.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Context There are few randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of palliative care. Objective To determine the effect of a palliative care intervention on quality of life (QOL), symptom intensity, mood, and resource utilization. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial (November 2003-May 2008) of 322 patients with advanced cancer and an identified caregiver in a rural, NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center (the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH) and affiliated outreach clinics and Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center (White River Junction, VT). Intervention A multi-component, psycho-educational, palliative care intervention (Project ENABLE) conducted by an advanced practice nurse consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up until death or study completion. Main Outcome Measures (1) The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative (range: 0 to 184; higher scores indicate better QOL), (2) Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (range: 0 to 900; higher scores indicate greater symptom intensity), (3) Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (range: 0 to 60; higher scores indicate more depressive symptoms), completed at baseline, 1 month and every 3 months until death or study completion, (4) days in hospital, intensive care unit (ICU), and emergency department visits recorded in the medical record. Results 322 participants with gastrointestinal (41%), lung (36%), genitourinary (12%), and breast (10%) cancer were randomized. Estimated treatment effects (intervention minus usual care) for all subjects were 4.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −27.8 (P = .06) for symptom intensity, and −1.8 (P = .02) for depressed mood. Estimated average treatment effects in the sample of participants who died during the study were 8.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −24.2 (P = .24) for symptom intensity, and −2.7 (P = .03) for depressed mood. Days in hospital, intensive care unit, and emergency department visits were not different

  18. Internet-based early intervention to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder in injury patients: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, Joanne; Sijbrandij, Marit; de Vries, Giel-Jan; Reitsma, Johannes B; van de Schoot, Rens; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S K; Bakker, Fred C; Gersons, Berthold P R; Olff, Miranda

    2013-08-13

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops in 10-20% of injury patients. We developed a novel, self-guided Internet-based intervention (called Trauma TIPS) based on techniques from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to prevent the onset of PTSD symptoms. To determine whether Trauma TIPS is effective in preventing the onset of PTSD symptoms in injury patients. Adult, level 1 trauma center patients were randomly assigned to receive the fully automated Trauma TIPS Internet intervention (n=151) or to receive no early intervention (n=149). Trauma TIPS consisted of psychoeducation, in vivo exposure, and stress management techniques. Both groups were free to use care as usual (nonprotocolized talks with hospital staff). PTSD symptom severity was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post injury with a clinical interview (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale) by blinded trained interviewers and self-report instrument (Impact of Event Scale-Revised). Secondary outcomes were acute anxiety and arousal (assessed online), self-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and mental health care utilization. Intervention usage was documented. The mean number of intervention logins was 1.7, SD 2.5, median 1, interquartile range (IQR) 1-2. Thirty-four patients in the intervention group did not log in (22.5%), 63 (41.7%) logged in once, and 54 (35.8%) logged in multiple times (mean 3.6, SD 3.5, median 3, IQR 2-4). On clinician-assessed and self-reported PTSD symptoms, both the intervention and control group showed a significant decrease over time (PTrauma TIPS Internet-based early intervention in the prevention of PTSD symptoms for an unselected population of injury patients. Moreover, uptake was relatively low since one-fifth of individuals did not log in to the intervention. Future research should therefore focus on innovative strategies to increase intervention usage, for example, adding gameplay, embedding it in a blended care context, and

  19. Dietary beetroot juice – effects on physical performance in COPD patients: a randomized controlled crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friis AL

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anne Louise Friis,1,* Carina Bjørnskov Steenholt,1,* Anders Løkke,2 Mette Hansen1 1Section for Sport Science, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark; 2Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objective: Dietary beetroot juice (BR supplementation has been shown to reduce the oxygen (O2 consumption of standardized exercise and reduce resting blood pressure (BP in healthy individuals. However, the physiological response of BR in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD remains controversial. The objective was to test exercise performance in COPD, supplementing with higher doses of BR for a longer duration compared to previous trials in this patient group.Methods: Fifteen COPD patients consumed concentrated BR (2×70 mL twice daily, each containing 300 mg nitrate or placebo (PL (2×70 mL twice daily, nitrate-negligible in a randomized order for 6 consecutive days. On day 7, participants consumed either BR or PL 150 min before testing. BP was measured before completing 6-minute walk test (6MWT and two trials of submaximal cycling. The protocol was repeated after a minimum washout of 7 days.Results: Plasma nitrite concentration was higher in the BR condition compared to PL (P<0.01. There was no difference between the BR and PL conditions regarding the covered distance during the 6MWT (mean ± standard error of the mean: 515±35 m (BR vs 520±38 m (PL, P=0.46, O2 consumption of submaximal exercise (trial 1 P=0.31 vs trial 2 P=0.20, physical activity level (P>0.05, or systolic BP (P=0.80. However, diastolic BP (DBP was reduced after BR ingestion compared to baseline (mean difference: 4.6, 95% CI: 0.1–9.1, P<0.05.Conclusion: Seven days of BR ingestion increased plasma nitrite concentrations and lowered DBP in COPD patients. However, BR did not increase functional walking capacity, O2 consumption during submaximal cycling, or physical activity level

  20. Effects of wet-cupping on blood pressure in hypertensive patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyeidi, Nouran A; Aseri, Khaled S; Matbouli, Shadia M; Sulaiamani, Albaraa A; Kobeisy, Sumayyah A

    2015-11-01

    Although cupping remains a popular treatment modality worldwide, its efficacy for most diseases, including hypertension, has not been scientifically evaluated. We aimed to determine the efficacy of wet-cupping for high blood pressure, and the incidence of the procedure's side effects in the intervention group. This is a randomized controlled trial conducted in the General Practice Department at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between May 2013 and February 2014. There were two groups (40 participants each): intervention group undergoing wet-cupping (hijama) in addition to conventional hypertension treatment, and a control group undergoing only conventional hypertension treatment. Three wet-cupping sessions were performed every other day. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured using a validated automatic sphygmomanometer. The follow-up period was 8 weeks. Wet-cupping provided an immediate reduction of systolic blood pressure. After 4 weeks of follow-up, the mean systolic blood pressure in the intervention group was 8.4 mmHg less than in the control group (P=0.046). After 8 weeks, there were no significant differences in blood pressures between the intervention and control groups. In this study, wet-cupping did not result in any serious side effects. Wet-cupping therapy is effective for reducing systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients for up to 4 weeks, without serious side effects. Wet-cupping should be considered as a complementary hypertension treatment, and further studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01987583.

  1. Does transfusion improve the outcome for HNSCC patients treated with radiotherapy? - results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 and 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla; Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2011-01-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and a low level of hemoglobin often have a poor response to radiation that may be related to hypoxia-induced radioresistance. We have previously published the importance of hemoglobin level and the effect of transfusion by the results from...... the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial, including 414 patients in the analysis. Aim of the current analysis was to gain additional power by adding patients from the continued subrandomization in the DAHANCA 7 trial, now including a total of almost 1200 patients....

  2. Effectiveness of 32 versus 20 weeks of prednisolone in leprosy patients with recent nerve function impairment: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Inge; Post, Erik; Brandsma, Wim; Bowers, Bob; Alam, Khorshed; Shetty, Vanaja; Pai, Vivek; Husain, Sajid; Sigit Prakoeswa, Cita Rosita; Astari, Linda; Hagge, Deanna; Shah, Mahesh; Neupane, Kapil; Tamang, Krishna Bahadur; Nicholls, Peter; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    While prednisolone is commonly used to treat recent nerve function impairment (NFI) in leprosy patients, the optimal treatment duration has not yet been established. In this "Treatment of Early Neuropathy in Leprosy" (TENLEP) trial, we evaluated whether a 32-week prednisolone course is more effective than a 20-week course in restoring and improving nerve function. In this multi-centre, triple-blind, randomized controlled trial, leprosy patients who had recently developed clinical NFI (leprosy patients. Twenty weeks is therefore the preferred initial treatment duration for leprosy neuropathy, after which likely only a minority of patients require further individualized treatment.

  3. Economic evaluation of an extended nutritional intervention in older Australian hospitalized patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Thompson, Campbell; Miller, Michelle; Shahi, Rashmi; Hakendorf, Paul; Horwood, Chris; Kaambwa, Billingsley

    2018-02-05

    Prevalence of malnutrition in older hospitalized patients is 30%. Malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes in terms of high morbidity and mortality and is costly for hospitals. Extended nutrition interventions improve clinical outcomes but limited studies have investigated whether these interventions are cost-effective. In this randomized controlled trial, 148 malnourished general medical patients ≥60 years were recruited and randomized to receive either an extended nutritional intervention or usual care. Nutrition intervention was individualized and started with 24 h of admission and was continued for 3 months post-discharge with a monthly telephone call whereas control patients received usual care. Nutrition status was confirmed by Patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured using EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D-5 L) questionnaire at admission and at 3-months follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted for the primary outcome (incremental costs per unit improvement in PG-SGA) while a cost-utility analysis (CUA) was undertaken for the secondary outcome (incremental costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained). Nutrition status and HRQoL improved in intervention patients. Mean per included patient Australian Medicare costs were lower in intervention group compared to control arm (by $907) but these differences were not statistically significant (95% CI: -$2956 to $4854). The main drivers of higher costs in the control group were higher inpatient ($13,882 versus $13,134) and drug ($838 versus $601) costs. After adjusting outcomes for baseline differences and repeated measures, the intervention was more effective than the control with patients in this arm reporting QALYs gained that were higher by 0.0050 QALYs gained per patient (95% CI: -0.0079 to 0.0199). The probability of the intervention being cost-effective at willingness to pay values as low as $1000 per unit

  4. Evaluation of the interdisciplinary PSYMEPHY treatment on patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Josune; Torre, Fernando; Aguirre, Urko; González, Nerea; Padierna, Angel; Matellanes, Begoña; Quintana, José Ma

    2014-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disorder that can have a devastating effect on patients' lives. This study assessed the efficacy of a 6-week interdisciplinary treatment that combines coordinated PSYchological, Medical, Educational, and PHYsiotherapeutic interventions (PSYMEPHY) compared with standard pharmacologic care. The study was a randomized controlled trial (54 participants in the PSYMEPHY group and 56 in the control group [CG] ) with follow-up at 6 months. PSYMEPHY patients were also assessed at 12 months. The main outcomes were changes in total Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, pain, fatigue, morning tiredness, anxiety, and use of pain coping strategies as measured by the FIQ, the visual analog scale, and the Coping with Chronic Pain Questionnaire. After the 6-month assessment, patients in the CG were offered the PSYMEPHY treatment, and completed all of the instruments immediately after treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits (N = 93). Subjects received therapy at two different outpatient clinical locations. Fibromyalgia patients. Six months after the intervention, significant improvements in total FIQ score (P = 0.04), and pain (P = 0.03) were seen in the PSYMEPHY group compared with controls. Twelve months after the intervention, all patients in the PSYMEPHY group maintained statistically significant improvements in total FIQ score, and pain, and showed an improvement in fatigue, rested, anxiety, and current pain compared with baseline. Data from the control patients who underwent the PSYMEPHY intervention corroborated the initial results. This study highlights the beneficial effects of an interdisciplinary treatment for FM patients in a hospital pain management unit. A 6-week interdisciplinary intervention showed significant improvement in key domains of fibromyalgia, as quality of life, pain, fatigue, rested, and anxiety at 12 months. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Occlusive vs gauze dressings for local wound care in surgical patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Vermeulen, Hester; Goossens, Astrid; Kelner, Raoul B; Schreuder, Sanne M; Lubbers, Maarten J

    2008-10-01

    To compare effectiveness and costs of gauze-based vs occlusive, moist-environment dressing principles. Randomized clinical trial. Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Two hundred eighty-five hospitalized surgical patients with open wounds. Patients received occlusive (ie, foams, alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, hydrofibers, or films) or gauze-based dressings until their wounds were completely healed. Primary end points were complete wound healing, pain during dressing changes, and costs. Secondary end point was length of hospital stay. Time to complete wound healing did not differ significantly between occlusive (median, 66 days; interquartile range [IQR], 29-133 days) and gauze-based dressing groups (median, 45 days; IQR, 26-106 days; log-rank P = .31). Postoperative wounds (62% of the wounds included) healed significantly (P = .02) quicker using gauze dressings (median, 45 days; IQR, 22-93 days vs median, 72 days; IQR, 36-132 days). Median pain scores were low and similar in the occlusive (0.90; IQR, 0.29-2.34) and the gauze (0.64; IQR, 0.22-1.95) groups (P = .32). Daily costs of occlusive materials were significantly higher (occlusive, euro6.34 [US $9.95] vs gauze, euro1.85 [US $2.90]; P wound care per patient per day during hospitalization was euro7.48 (US $11.74) in the occlusive group and euro3.98 (US $6.25) in the gauze-based group (P = .002). The occlusive, moist-environment dressing principle in the clinical surgical setting does not lead to quicker wound healing or less pain than gauze dressings. The lower costs of less frequent dressing changes do not balance the higher costs of occlusive materials. Trial Registration trialregister.nl Identifier: 56264738.

  6. The effects of two health information texts on patient recognition memory: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Erin; Long, Debra; Rodriguez, Tonantzin; Franks, Peter; Kravitz, Richard L; Jerant, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    To compare the effects of two health information texts on patient recognition memory, a key aspect of comprehension. Randomized controlled trial (N=60), comparing the effects of experimental and control colorectal cancer (CRC) screening texts on recognition memory, measured using a statement recognition test, accounting for response bias (score range -0.91 to 5.34). The experimental text had a lower Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level (7.4 versus 9.6), was more focused on addressing screening barriers, and employed more comparative tables than the control text. Recognition memory was higher in the experimental group (2.54 versus 1.09, t=-3.63, P=0.001), including after adjustment for age, education, and health literacy (β=0.42, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.68, P=0.001), and in analyses limited to persons with college degrees (β=0.52, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.86, P=0.004) or no self-reported health literacy problems (β=0.39, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.71, P=0.02). An experimental CRC screening text improved recognition memory, including among patients with high education and self-assessed health literacy. CRC screening texts comparable to our experimental text may be warranted for all screening-eligible patients, if such texts improve screening uptake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Creative art therapy to enhance rehabilitation for stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkasuwan, Ratcharin; Voraakhom, Kotchakorn; Pisolayabutra, Prim; Maneechai, Pichai; Boonin, Jiraporn; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2016-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of creative art therapy plus conventional physical therapy, compared with physical therapy only, in increasing cognitive ability, physical functions, psychological status and quality of life of stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. An in-patient setting PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients aged ⩾50 years who could communicate verbally. All participants received conventional physical therapy five days per week. An intervention group received additional creative art therapy, twice a week for four weeks, in a rehabilitation ward. Cognitive function, anxiety and depression, physical performance and quality of life were measured with the Abbreviated Mental Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the modified Barthel Index scale and the pictorial Thai Quality of Life questionnaire, respectively. Mean differences for the intervention group were significantly greater than the control group for depression (-4.5, 95% CI -6.5, -2.5, part therapy and most reported improved concentration (68.5%), emotion (79.6%), self-confidence (72.2%) and motivation (74.1%). Creative art therapy combined with conventional physical therapy can significantly decrease depression, improve physical functions and increase quality of life compared with physical therapy alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. [Effectiveness of acupuncture in treating schizophrenia: a clinical randomized trial of 31 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Saoussen; El-Hechmi, Safouene; Ghanmi, Latifa; Ghaouar, Mabrouk; Besbes, Chokri; Khaled, Mehrez; Melki, Wahid; El-Hechmi, Zouhaier

    2011-10-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most popular types of complementary/alternative medicine in the world. It is sometimes used as a treatment for schizophrenia mainly in China. To assess the contribution of acupuncture in the treatment of patients treated for schizophrenia in Tunisian population. Our study is a clinical randomized trial about 31 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia or schizo-affectif disorder (DSM IV). They were evaluated by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) the first and 23nd day of the study. Manual acupuncture was used for 10 sessions at the rate of three sessions per week. All patients were under drug therapy. Among them, 15 were treated by acupuncture and 16 by sham acupuncture. Scores of the PANSS, SAPS and SANS were similar in the two groups at the end of the study. Our study did not provide any evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating schizophrenic symptoms.

  9. Stress reduction and analgesia in patients exposed to calming music postoperatively: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, U; Unosson, M; Rawal, N

    2005-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate, first, whether intra- or postoperative music therapy could influence stress and immune response during and after general anaesthesia and second, if there was a different response between patients exposed to music intra- or postoperatively. Seventy-five patients undergoing open hernia repair as day care surgery were randomly allocated to three groups: intraoperative music, postoperative music and silence (control group). Anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia were standardized and the same surgeon performed all the operations. Stress response was assessed during and after surgery by determining the plasma cortisol and blood glucose levels. Immune function was evaluated by studying immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels. Patients' postoperative pain, anxiety, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation were also studied as stress markers. There was a significantly greater decrease in the level of cortisol in the postoperative music group vs. the control group (206 and 72 mmol L(-1) decreases, respectively) after 2 h in the post anaesthesia care unit. The postoperative music group had less anxiety and pain and required less morphine after 1 h compared with the control group. In the postoperative music group the total requirement of morphine was significantly lower than in the control group. The intraoperative music group reported less pain after 1 h in the post anaesthesia care unit. There was no difference in IgA, blood glucose, BP, HR and oxygen saturation between the groups. This study suggests that intraoperative music may decrease postoperative pain, and that postoperative music therapy may reduce anxiety, pain and morphine consumption.

  10. Pain Reduction After Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Geriatric Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi R Helianthi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to compare the effectiveness of active laser acupuncture with placebo on reducing pain intensity and improving functional outcome in geriatric patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods: a double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in geriatrics with knee OA at Medical Acupuncture Outpatient Clinic, Integrated Geriatric Outpatient Clinic, Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, during May to October 2015. Sixty two patients with knee OA  were randomly assigned into two groups: active laser acupuncture group or placebo laser acupuncture group. Interventions were carried out using a gallium aluminum arsenide laser device at the ST35 Dubi, ST36 Zusanli, SP9 Yinlingquan, GB34 Yanglingquan and EX - LE - 4 Neixiyan acupuncture points on the affected knee for ten sessions of treatment, i.e. twice a week. Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS and Lequesne index at baseline, after four sessions, after nine sessions and at 2 weeks after the treatment had been stopped. Results: the VAS scores were significantly improved in the active laser acupuncture group compared to the placebo group. The evaluation of VAS scores was carried out after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 0.39; p<0.001, after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 37.48; p<0.001 and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 39.15; p<0.001. The evaluation also showed significant improvement of Lequesne index after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 4.68; p<0.001, after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 5.90; p<0.001 and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 6.48; p<0.001. Conclusion: active laser acupuncture is effective in reducing pain.

  11. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida María Castro-Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD (Leriche-Fontaine classification were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P<.05 in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg. A significant difference (P<.05 was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P<.05 for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD.

  12. Randomized clinical trial of a family intervention for prostate cancer patients and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Mood, Darlene W; Schafenacker, Ann; Montie, James E; Sandler, Howard M; Forman, Jeffrey D; Hussain, Maha; Pienta, Kenneth J; Smith, David C; Kershaw, Trace

    2007-12-15

    Few intervention studies have been conducted to help couples manage the effects of prostate cancer and maintain their quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether a family-based intervention could improve appraisal variables (appraisal of illness or caregiving, uncertainty, hopelessness), coping resources (coping strategies, self-efficacy, communication), symptom distress, and quality of life in men with prostate cancer and their spouses. For this clinical trial, 263 patient-spouse dyads were stratified by research site, phase of illness, and treatment; then, they were randomized to the control group (standard care) or the experimental group (standard care plus a 5-session family intervention). The intervention targeted couples' communication, hope, coping, uncertainty, and symptom management. The final sample consisted of 235 couples: 123 couples in the control group and 112 couples in the experimental group. Data collection occurred at baseline before randomization and at 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months. At 4-month follow-up, intervention patients reported less uncertainty and better communication with spouses than control patients, but they reported no other effects. Intervention spouses reported higher quality of life, more self-efficacy, better communication, and less negative appraisal of caregiving, uncertainty, hopelessness, and symptom distress at 4 months compared with controls, and some effects were sustained to 8 months and 12 months. Men with prostate cancer and their spouses reported positive outcomes from a family intervention that offered them information and support. Programs of care need to be extended to spouses who likely will experience multiple benefits from intervention. 2007 American Cancer Society

  13. Does Provider Self-Reporting of Etiquette Behaviors Improve Patient Experience? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zishan; Qayyum, Rehan; Bertram, Amanda; Durkin, Nowella; Kebede, Sosena; Ponor, Lucia; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Allen, Lisa; Brotman, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    There is a glaring lack of published evidence-based strategies to improve the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience scores on the physician domain. Strategies that have been used are resource intensive and difficult to sustain. We hypothesized that prompting providers to assess their own etiquette-based practices every 2 weeks over the course of 1 year would improve patient experience on the physician domain. Randomized controlled trial. 4 acute care hospitals. Hospitalists. Hospitalists were randomized to the study or the control arm. The study arm was prompted every 2 weeks for 12 months to report how frequently they engaged in 7 best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors. Control arm participants received similarly worded questions on quality improvement behaviors. Provider experience scores were calculated from the physician HCAHPS and Press Ganey survey provider items. Physicians reported high rates of etiquette-based behavior at baseline, and this changed modestly over the study period. Self-reported etiquette behaviors were not associated with experience scores. The difference in difference analysis of the baseline and postintervention physician experience scores between the intervention arm and the control arm was not statistically significant (P = 0.71). In this 12-month study, biweekly reflection and reporting of best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors did not result in significant improvement on physician domain experience scores. It is likely that hospitalists' self-assessment of their bedside etiquette may not reflect patient perception of these behaviors. Furthermore, hospitalists may be resistant to improvement in this area since they rate themselves highly at baseline. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:402-406.

  14. Swimming Improves Pain and Functional Capacity of Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Giovana; Jennings, Fabio; Nery Cabral, Michele Vieira; Pirozzi Buosi, Ana Letícia; Natour, Jamil

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of swimming on pain, functional capacity, aerobic capacity, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Randomized controlled trial. Rheumatology outpatient clinics of a university hospital. Women with FM (N=75; age range, 18-60y) randomly assigned to a swimming group (SG) (n=39) or a walking group (WG) (n=36). The SG performed 50 minutes of swimming 3 times a week for 12 weeks, with a heart rate at 11 beats under the anaerobic threshold. The WG performed walking with a heart rate at the anaerobic threshold, with the same duration and frequency as the SG. Participants were evaluated before the exercise protocols (t0), at 6 weeks (t6), and at 12 weeks (t12) after the onset of the protocols. The primary outcome measure was the visual analog scale for pain. The secondary measurements were the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey for quality of life; a spiroergometric test for cardiorespiratory variables; and the timed Up & Go test for functional performance. Patients in both groups experienced improvement in pain after the 12-week program, with no difference between groups (P=.658). The same results were found regarding functional capacity and quality of life. Moreover, no statistical difference between groups was found regarding aerobic capacity over time. Swimming, like walking, is an effective method for reducing pain and improving both functional capacity and quality of life in patients with FM. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Laser and photochemotherapy for the treatment of oral mucositis in young patients: Randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Filho, João Batista; Maia Filho, Etevaldo Matos; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) combined with photochemotherapy (PCT) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in young patients. A randomized, blind, clinical trial with a split-mouth design was conducted involving a sample of 15 cancer patients aged three to 16 years at the Aldenora Bello Hospital in the city of São Luís, Brazil. The treatments (PCT+LLLT and LLLT alone) were randomly determined for each side of the oral cavity. The patients were blinded to the type of therapy performed on each side. The outcome was the area of the lesion measured in cm2 over an eight-day evaluation period. Treatment and follow up of the lesions under evaluation as well as other lesions occurred until complete remission. Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were employed. Significance was set at a 95% confidence level (α=0.05) and the effect size was calculated. A statistically significant difference was found between therapies for lesion area on Days 6-8 (p=0.020, 0.011 and 0.005, respectively), which was confirmed by the moderate effect size. Lesions submitted to PCT+LLLT had a smaller area at the end of the evaluation period. Based on the present findings, PCT+LLLT had a greater therapeutic effect in comparison to LLLT alone regarding the reduction in the degree of severity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-frequency chest wall oscillation in prolonged mechanical ventilation patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chang; Wu, Pi-Chu; Chen, Chao-Jung; Cheng, Ya-Hua; Shih, Sou-Jen; Chen, Hui-Chen; Wu, Chieh-Liang

    2016-05-01

    Patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) often retain airway secretions, which may be cleared with the assistance of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). This study aimed to determine the effectiveness, safety and tolerance/comfort of HFCWO after extubation in PMV patients. This parallel-designed, randomized controlled trial enrolled subjects with both intra-tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilator support continuously for at least 21 days between January 2011 and December 2012. Upon extubation, the participants were randomly assigned to either receive HFCWO for 5 days or not. The effectiveness [based on weaning success rates, daily clearance volume of sputum, serial changes in sputum coloration and chest X-ray (CXR) improvement rates], safety (by physiologic parameters) and tolerance/comfort [using the Modified Borg Scale (MBS) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS)] of HFCWO were investigated. There were 43 PMV subjects, including 23 in the HFCWO group and 20 in the non-HFCWO group. The weaning success rates were 82.6% (19/23) and 85% (17/20) in the HFCWO and non-HFCWO groups, respectively (P = 1.000). The HFCWO group had persistently greater numbers of daily sputum suctions and higher CXR improvement rates compared with the non-HFCWO group. There was significant sputum coloration lightening in the HFCWO group only. There was no significant difference in the MBS and HAS between the two groups and between pre- and post-HFCWO physiologic parameters. In PMV patients, HFCWO was safe, comfortable and effective in facilitating airway hygiene after removal of endotracheal tubes, but had no positive impact on weaning success. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Does transfusion improve the outcome for HNSCC patients treated with radiotherapy? - Results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 and 7 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla Molich; Lassen, Pernille; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and a low level of hemoglobin often have a poor response to radiation that may be related to hypoxia-induced radioresistance. We have previously published the importance of hemoglobin level and the effect...... of transfusion by the results from the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial, including 414 patients in the analysis. Aim of the current analysis was to gain additional power by adding patients from the continued subrandomization in the DAHANCA 7 trial, now including a total of almost 1200 patients. Material and methods....... Patients were randomized to treatment in the DAHANCA 5 and 7 study (nimorazole vs. placebo and five fx/week vs. six fx/week), and in addition, patients with "low" pre-irradiation hemoglobin values (females...

  18. Does Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trial Change Outcomes? An Evaluation of Patients Not Enrolled in the SPRINT Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Carol Alice; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Walter, Stephen D.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Tornetta, Paul; Sanders, David W.; Walter, Stephen; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; Jones, Alan; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Ford, Michael; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    To determine the extent to which knowledge from clinical trial protocols is transferred to nonparticipating patients. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a large clinical trial. Six level-1 international trauma centers. We compared rates and timing of reoperation in a subset of

  19. A Randomized Trial of an Intensive Physical Therapy Program for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Nordon-Craft, Amy; Malone, Dan; Van Pelt, David; Frankel, Stephen K; Warner, Mary Laird; Kriekels, Wendy; McNulty, Monica; Fairclough, Diane L; Schenkman, Margaret

    2016-05-15

    Early physical therapy (PT) interventions may benefit patients with acute respiratory failure by preventing or attenuating neuromuscular weakness. However, the optimal dosage of these interventions is currently unknown. To determine whether an intensive PT program significantly improves long-term physical functional performance compared with a standard-of-care PT program. Patients who required mechanical ventilation for at least 4 days were eligible. Enrolled patients were randomized to receive PT for up to 4 weeks delivered in an intensive or standard-of-care manner. Physical functional performance was assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months in survivors who were not currently in an acute or long-term care facility. The primary outcome was the Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance Test short form (CS-PFP-10) score at 1 month. A total of 120 patients were enrolled from five hospitals. Patients in the intensive PT group received 12.4 ± 6.5 sessions for a total of 408 ± 261 minutes compared with only 6.1 ± 3.8 sessions for 86 ± 63 minutes in the standard-of-care group (P Physical function assessments were available for 86% of patients at 1 month, for 76% at 3 months, and for 60% at 6 months. In both groups, physical function was reduced yet significantly improved over time between 1, 3, and 6 months. When we compared the two interventions, we found no differences in the total CS-PFP-10 scores at all three time points (P = 0.73, 0.29, and 0.43, respectively) or in the total CS-PFP-10 score trajectory (P = 0.71). An intensive PT program did not improve long-term physical functional performance compared with a standard-of-care program. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01058421).

  20. Seven-day intensive preoperative rehabilitation for elderly patients with lung cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yutian; Huang, Jian; Yang, Mei; Su, Jianhua; Liu, Jing; Che, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    As a newly developed treatment, preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been studied in depth. However, few studies have assessed the relationship between advanced age and a shorter term intensive pattern of preoperative PR in patients with lung cancer (LC) and especially those patients waiting for therapeutic LC surgeries. This study investigated short-term preoperative PR combined with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and aerobic endurance training in elderly patients scheduled to undergo LC lobectomy. A prospective randomized controlled trial with a total of 60 subjects aged ≥70 y was conducted. The intervention group (PR group) was treated for 1 wk with systematic and highly intensive preoperative PR training before lobectomy, and the control group (NPR group) was treated with conventional preoperative respiratory management. We analyzed the 6-min walking distance (6-MWD), the peak expiratory flow (PEF), and quality-of-life scores before and after the rehabilitation regimen as well as the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). In total, 30 patients (PR group) completely executed the 7-d intensive preoperative PR, and 30 patients (NPR group) served as the control group. The two groups were comparable at baseline. During the preoperative PR, a significantly longer 6-MWD (increase: 28.6 ± 18.2 versus 9.4 ± 27.0 m; between-groups difference: 19.2 m, P = 0.029) and an increased PEF (increase: 26.2 ± 22.5 versus 8.2 ± 10.3 L/min; between-groups difference: 18.0 L/min, P elderly LC patients scheduled to undergo surgery in China, a 7-d intensive pattern of preoperative PR combined with IMT and aerobic endurance training may be a feasible rehabilitation strategy with positive physical and psychological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Continuous Care model on lifestyle modification in patients with hypertension: Randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsane Shahrani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable cardiovascular disease. One of the main factors affecting the risk of hypertension is people’s lifestyle, for which appropriate changes in lifestyle-related factors creating cardiovascular risks need to be developed through new and effective approaches in long-term. Follow-up is an important tool for active participation in treatment and behavior changes; therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous care model on the lifestyle of patients with hypertension. In this two-stage clinical trial, two groups of 64 patients with hypertension at the Isfahan Hypertension Center were selected through simple sampling, who hold the study criteria. The samples were randomly divided into two groups of 32 people as the experimental and control groups. The continuous care in the test group was carried out in the form of a four-stage program including orientation, sensitization, control and evaluation for 3 months. The control patients received usual care. Two questionnaires were employed to collect demographic data and lifestyle inventory data for hypertension used in two stages of pre- and post-intervention. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests such as chisquare, Mann-Whitney, independent and paired t-test and analysis of covariance by SPSS version 20. Statistical tests showed no significant differences between the mean scores of two groups in life style dimensions before the intervention. After the intervention, however, the mean scores of lifestyle and its dimensions were significantly higher in the test group than those in the control group (p <0.001 According to the results, it can be concluded that applying continuous care model has significantly been effective in lifestyle modification of patients with high blood pressure. Training the patients and strengthening by repetition, monitoring and management of nurses can be important factors in promoting

  2. Anabolic effects of nandrolone decanoate in patients receiving dialysis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K L; Mulligan, K; Schambelan, M

    1999-04-14

    Patients receiving dialysis commonly experience malnutrition, reduced muscle mass (sarcopenia), and fatigue for which no effective treatment has been identified. Anabolic steroids are known to increase muscle mass and strength in healthy individuals, but their effect on the sarcopenia and fatigue associated with long-term dialysis has not been evaluated. To assess the effects of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, on lean body mass (LBM), functional status, and quality of life in dialysis patients. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between April 1996 and July 1997. Hospital-based outpatient dialysis unit. Twenty-nine patients undergoing dialysis for at least 3 months. Nandrolone decanoate, 100 mg (n = 14), or placebo (n = 15) by intramuscular injection once a week for 6 months. Weight, LBM, fatigue, grip strength, walking and stair-climbing times, and treadmill performance after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Lean body mass increased significantly in patients given nandrolone compared with patients given placebo (mean change [SD], +4.5 [2.3] kg; Pmuscle mass. Time to complete the walking and stair-climbing test decreased from 36.5 to 32.7 seconds in the nandrolone group, while those in the placebo group increased from 38.7 to 42.1 seconds (P = .05). Peak oxygen consumption increased in the individuals in the nandrolone group who performed treadmill tests, but not to a statistically significant degree. Grip strength did not change in either group. Treatment with nandrolone for 6 months resulted in a significant increase in LBM associated with functional improvement in patients undergoing dialysis.

  3. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  4. Randomized controlled trial of supervised patient self-testing of warfarin therapy using an internet-based expert system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2009-08-01

    Increased frequency of prothrombin time testing, facilitated by patient self-testing (PST) of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) can improve the clinical outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). However, oversight of this type of management is often difficult and time-consuming for healthcare professionals. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of an automated direct-to-patient expert system, enabling remote and effective management of patients on OAT.

  5. Physical exercise for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, I.E.P.M.; Timmerman, H.; Potting, C.M.J.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment-related burden for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be relieved by physical exercises. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to summarize and analyze the evidence provided by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on physical exercise

  6. Lipid profiles for etravirine versus efavirenz in treatment-naive patients in the randomized, double-blind SENSE trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fätkenheuer, G; Duvivier, C; Rieger, A

    2012-01-01

    Etravirine is approved for use in treatment-experienced patients at a dose of 200 mg twice daily. Efavirenz has been associated with greater increases in serum lipids compared with other non-nucleosides in randomized trials of first-line treatment....

  7. Comparing patient characteristics, type of intervention, control, and outcome (PICO) queries with unguided searching: a randomized controlled crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, A.; Vries Robbé, P.F. de; Overbeke, A.J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Translating a question into a query using patient characteristics, type of intervention, control, and outcome (PICO) should help answer therapeutic questions in PubMed searches. The authors performed a randomized crossover trial to determine whether the PICO format was useful for quick

  8. Long-term effectiveness of computer-generated tailored patient education on benzodiazepines : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Wolde, Geeske Brecht; Dijkstra, Arie; Van Empelen, Pepijn; van den Hout, Wilbert; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Zitman, Frans

    Aims Chronic benzodiazepine use is highly prevalent and is associated with a variety of negative health consequences. The present study examined the long-term effectiveness of a tailored patient education intervention on benzodiazepine use. Participants A randomized controlled trial was conducted

  9. Patient and Partner Feedback Reports to Improve Statin Medication Adherence: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Huseman, Tiffany L; Canamucio, Anne; Marcus, Steven C; Asch, David A; Volpp, Kevin; Long, Judith A

    2017-03-01

    Simple nudges such as reminders and feedback reports to either a patient or a partner may facilitate improved medication adherence. To test the impact of a pill bottle used to monitor adherence, deliver a daily alarm, and generate weekly medication adherence feedback reports on statin adherence. Three-month, three-arm randomized clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02480530). One hundred and twenty-six veterans with known coronary artery disease and poor adherence (medication possession ratio medication adherence feedback report; and (3) a partner feedback group (n = 54) that received an alarm and a weekly feedback report that was shared with a friend, family member, or a peer. The intervention continued for 3 months, and participants were followed for an additional 3 months after the intervention period. Adherence as measured by pill bottle. Secondary outcomes included change in LDL (mg/dl), patient activation, and social support. During the 3-month intervention period, medication adherence was higher in both feedback arms than in the control arm (individual feedback group 89 %, partner feedback group 86 %, control group 67 %; p medication adherence between either of the feedback groups and the control (individual feedback 60 %, partner feedback 52 %, control group 54 %; p = 0.75 and 0.97). Daily alarms combined with individual or partner feedback reports improved statin medication adherence. While neither an individual feedback nor partner feedback strategy created a sustainable medication adherence habit, the intervention itself is relatively easy to implement and low cost.

  10. Effect of creatine monohydrate on clinical progression in patients with Parkinson disease: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieburtz, Karl; Tilley, Barbara C; Elm, Jordan J; Babcock, Debra; Hauser, Robert; Ross, G Webster; Augustine, Alicia H; Augustine, Erika U; Aminoff, Michael J; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan G; Boyd, James; Cambi, Franca; Chou, Kelvin; Christine, Chadwick W; Cines, Michelle; Dahodwala, Nabila; Derwent, Lorelei; Dewey, Richard B; Hawthorne, Katherine; Houghton, David J; Kamp, Cornelia; Leehey, Maureen; Lew, Mark F; Liang, Grace S Lin; Luo, Sheng T; Mari, Zoltan; Morgan, John C; Parashos, Sotirios; Pérez, Adriana; Petrovitch, Helen; Rajan, Suja; Reichwein, Sue; Roth, Jessie Tatsuno; Schneider, Jay S; Shannon, Kathleen M; Simon, David K; Simuni, Tanya; Singer, Carlos; Sudarsky, Lewis; Tanner, Caroline M; Umeh, Chizoba C; Williams, Karen; Wills, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-10

    There are no treatments available to slow or prevent the progression of Parkinson disease, despite its global prevalence and significant health care burden. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease program was established to promote discovery of potential therapies. To determine whether creatine monohydrate was more effective than placebo in slowing long-term clinical decline in participants with Parkinson disease. The Long-term Study 1, a multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, 1:1 randomized efficacy trial. Participants were recruited from 45 investigative sites in the United States and Canada and included 1741 men and women with early (within 5 years of diagnosis) and treated (receiving dopaminergic therapy) Parkinson disease. Participants were enrolled from March 2007 to May 2010 and followed up until September 2013. Participants were randomized to placebo or creatine (10 g/d) monohydrate for a minimum of 5 years (maximum follow-up, 8 years). The primary outcome measure was a difference in clinical decline from baseline to 5-year follow-up, compared between the 2 treatment groups using a global statistical test. Clinical status was defined by 5 outcome measures: Modified Rankin Scale, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, PDQ-39 Summary Index, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living scale, and ambulatory capacity. All outcomes were coded such that higher scores indicated worse outcomes and were analyzed by a global statistical test. Higher summed ranks (range, 5-4775) indicate worse outcomes. The trial was terminated early for futility based on results of a planned interim analysis of participants enrolled at least 5 years prior to the date of the analysis (n = 955). The median follow-up time was 4 years. Of the 955 participants, the mean of the summed ranks for placebo was 2360 (95% CI, 2249-2470) and for creatine was 2414 (95% CI, 2304-2524). The global statistical test

  11. Randomized trial of two swallowing assessment approaches in patients with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Annette; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann; Sjölund, Bengt H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether patients assessed for initiation of oral intake only by Facial-Oral Tract Therapy had a greater risk of developing aspiration pneumonia during neurorehabilitation than patients assessed by Fibreoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing. DESIGN: Randomized controlled ...

  12. The Addition of Dexmedetomidine to Analgesia for Patients After Abdominal Operations: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Minhua; Shi, Jialiang; Gao, Tao; Shen, Juanhong; Zhao, Chenyan; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Weiqin; Li, Qiurong; Yu, Wenkui

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pain and anxiety are two common factors influencing patient's recovery. Benefits and safety in the use of sedative agents after abdominal operations to improve recovery are not well known. The present study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine use in this population. A prospective randomized controlled trial of 145 patients undergoing abdominal operations was conducted in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit of Jinling Hospital between October and December 2015. Thirty-two patients were excluded, and 113 were included and divided into the experimental group (59 patients) receiving dexmedetomidine and analgesics for 72 h after abdominal operations, and the control group (54 patients) receiving only analgesics. Postoperative pain, inflammatory response, recovery of gastrointestinal function, adverse events, and sedation level were analyzed. Pain scores, assessed by Prince Henry Pain Scale (PHPS), in the experimental group were significantly lower than in the control group on the first (1.53 vs. 2.07, p ≤ 0.01), second (1.07 vs. 1.63, p ≤ 0.01), and third day (1.08 vs. 1.82, p = 0.01). Time to defecation was 0.60 days shorter in the experimental group than the control group (2.51 vs. 3.11, p = 0.01). There was no significant difference between inflammatory responses in the two groups (p > 0.05). Both groups had similar blood pressure, heart rate, prevalence of bradycardia, and hypotension requiring interventions (p > 0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to analgesia after abdominal operations is safe and could enhance gastrointestinal function recovery and pain control when monitored carefully. The capacity of dexmedetomidine to attenuate inflammatory responses requires further investigation.

  13. Aftercare services for patients with severe mental disorder: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Barekatain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although evidences emphasize on the importance of aftercare programs to achieve continuity of care, different studies have revealed controversial results about the outcome. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aftercare program on outcome measures of patients with severe mental disorders. Materials and Methods: Of a total 123 eligible patients with severe mental disorders, 61 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 62 patients to the control group. The interventions included follow-up phone calls, home visits, and psychoeducation for families. Assessments were performed on hospital admission, discharge and the following 3 rd , 6 th and 12 th month. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF, Clinical Global Impression (CGI, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHO-QOL were used. Data were analyzed through Chi square, t-test, Mann-Whitney-U, and Repeated Measures Analysis of Co-Variance. Results: Mean of the HDRS scores revealed significant difference between the two groups when HDRS scores on the admission day were controlled (P = 0.028. The level of functioning was significantly different between the two groups based on the sequential assessments of GAF (P = 0.040. One year after the onset of trial, the number of psychiatric readmissions were significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.036. Conclusion: Readmission rates could be reduced by aftercare services, through the first year, after discharge of patients with severe mental disorders. On the other hand, higher levels of functioning would be expected after one year.

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of fluoride varnish in preventing dental caries of Sjogrens syndrome patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weini Xin; Katherine Chiu Man Leung; Edward Chin Man Lo; Mo Yin Mok; Moon Ho Leung

    2016-01-01

    .... Topical fluoride is commonly prescribed for caries prevention. Methods In this 24-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, SS patients were randomly assigned to receive either fluoride varnish or placebo gel quarterly...

  15. Stress in caregivers of aphasic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Brian; Bowring, Greg; Thompson, Claire; Van Heyst, Jocelyn; Conroy, Philip; Thompson, Julie

    2007-02-01

    Communication difficulties due to aphasia following stroke are particularly stressful to caregivers. To examine the impact of a psychoeducation programme on caregivers' burden and stress and communication between the caregiver and aphasic stroke patient. Randomized wait-list controlled trial with immediate or three-month delayed treatment. Three public hospital rehabilitation services in Sydney, Australia. Thirty-nine caregivers of aphasic stroke patients, up to 12 months post stroke: 19 given immediate treatment and 20 in a delayed treatment control group. Four-session weekly caregiver programme that included elements of education, support and communication skills conducted by a speech pathologist, social worker and clinical psychologist. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was used to measure caregiver stress, the Relatives' Stress Scale was used to measure caregiver burden and a communication questionnaire was designed specifically for this project. Thirty-one caregivers completed the study. Caregivers in the immediate treatment group had significant reductions in GHQ measured stress (GHQ mean (SD) at baseline= 6.26 (5.67), GHQ post treatment 3.21 (SD 4.20), P = 0.006). There was no improvement in wait-listed caregivers. Improvement was not maintained at three-month follow-up. There were no significant effects of the programme on communication skills or on caregiver burden. Stroke caregiver support, education and training programmes have short-term effects on caregiver stress levels but are likely to require ongoing involvement to maintain their effect.

  16. Mental Fitness for patients with acute coronary syndrome: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Cavallero, Erika; Rabellino, Daniela; Palumbo, Luigi; Bianchino, Claudia; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Bergerone, Serena; Bara, Bruno G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of a manualized, cognitively oriented psychological intervention, called Mental Fitness, in improving the mental and physical health of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Mental Fitness is a small-group four-session treatment aimed at increasing awareness of one's own bodily perceptions, emotions, and thoughts and is overall tailored on participants' perception of control over their health. Prospective randomized controlled single-blind trial. Patients with ACS were recruited within a week from their acute cardiac event. Patients in the intervention group underwent one of two variants of Mental Fitness, depending on their perceived (internal or external) control over their health. Patients in the control group underwent standard treatment. All the patients were submitted to a clinical and psychological follow-up for 8 months. The patients who underwent the Mental Fitness intervention (N = 31) showed, compared to the control patients (N = 34), increased quality of life in its physical, psychological, social and environmental domains, more functional emotional and problem-centred coping strategies, and higher emotional awareness. They also showed improved high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, heart rate, and left ventricular ejection fraction compared to the controls. In addition, they were more successful in maintaining physical exercise. This study demonstrates the efficacy of Mental Fitness in modifying specific psychological and physical variables conditioning cardiological patients' prognosis. It also confirms the importance of differentiating psychological interventions based on the psychological characteristics of the patients. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Traditional symptom-based interventions in heart disease are aimed at diagnosing and reducing psychological symptomatology (e.g., depression), but recent work has shown the usefulness of

  17. Oral and parenteral pyridostigmine in preparing Myasthenia Gravis patients for thymectomy;a randomized Clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadjeddein A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory failure and crisis is one of major complications of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients. There are different medication regimes for preparing these patients for surgery and reducing post-operative side effects. The goal of this study is to compare respiratory complications of oral vs. Parenteral preoperative administration of anticholinesterase agents for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients. Methods: This randomized controlled trial included 101 patients in class IIA or IIB of myasthenia gravis according to the Osserman classification system. The control group fasted for eight hours before surgery and oral anticholines-terase agents were replaced with parenteral ones. The case group also fasted for 8 hours before surgery, but pyridostigmine was continued at its usual dose until the time of operation and the last dose was given to patients with a small amount of water in the operating room on the operating bed. Results: There was no statistically meaningful difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex and pathologic findings. In comparison, the mean hospital stay for the case group was 3.98 days and 6.34 for the control group (p value = 0.003. There were eight cases of respiratory crisis or failure (16% in the control group but only 1 case (2% was observed in case group (p value = 0.014. Only one patient in the case group required re-intubation after the surgery; however, six patients in control group were re-intubated (p value = 0.053. Plasmapheresis was required for five patients in the control group and one patient in the case group (p value = 0.098. Tracheostomy was performed on two patients in the control group to accommodate prolonged intubation, but none of the case group required this procedure. Conclusion: This study shows that continuing oral anticholinesterase agents up to the time of operation, with the last dose at the operative theater, lowers the incidence of post-operative myasthenia

  18. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P), Global Perceived Effect (GPE) scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P pain (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 25.0), on the VAS-P2 for pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 10.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 19.7) and VAS-P3 most severe pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 0.8 to 28.4). After 12 weeks, 55% of the patients in the intervention group reported improvement (from slightly improved to completely recovered) versus 14% in the control group. The mean number of muscles with active MTrPs decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). Conclusions The results of this study show that 12-week comprehensive treatment of MTrPs in shoulder muscles reduces the number of muscles with active

  19. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Saltin, Bengt; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners......: Our findings do not support a biologically mediated effect of exercise on symptom severity in depressed patients, but they do support a beneficial effect of strength training on work capacity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: (ClinicalTrials.gov) Identifier: NCT00103415....... or psychiatrists and were eligible if they fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, criteria for unipolar depression and were aged between 18 and 55 years. Patients (N = 165) were allocated to supervised strength, aerobic, or relaxation training during a 4-month period. The primary...

  20. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  1. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teut Michael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4 and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control. Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity and Quality of Life (SF-36 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2 and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8. After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3 compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1 in the control group (p = 0.001. After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2 vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3 p = 0.032, however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed

  2. Robot training for hand motor recovery in subacute stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Roldán, Giovana Femat; Sánchez-Villavicencio, Israel; Palafox, Lorena; Leder, Ronald; Sucar, Luis Enrique; Hernández-Franco, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of superiority of robot training for the hand over classical therapies in stroke patients remains controversial. During the subacute stage, hand training is likely to be the most useful. To establish whether robot active assisted therapies provides any additional motor recovery for the hand when administered during the subacute stage (occupational therapy, robot based therapies for hand recovery will show significant differences at subacute stages. A randomized clinical trial. A between subjects randomized controlled trial was carried out on subacute stroke patients (n = 17) comparing robot active assisted therapy (RT) with a classical occupational therapy (OT). Both groups received 40 sessions ensuring at least 300 repetitions per session. Treatment duration was (mean ± std) 2.18 ± 1.25 months for the control group and 2.44 ± 0.88 months for the study group. The primary outcome was motor dexterity changes assessed with the Fugl-Meyer (FMA) and the Motricity Index (MI). Both groups (OT: n = 8; RT: n = 9) exhibited significant improvements over time (Non-parametric Cliff's delta-within effect sizes: dwOT-FMA = 0.5, dwOT-MI = 0.5, dwRT-FMA = 1, dwRT-MI = 1). Regarding differences between the therapies; the Fugl-Meyer score indicated a significant advantage for the hand training with the robot (FMA hand: WRS: W = 8, p hand prehension for RT with respect to OT but failed to reach significance (MI prehension: W = 17.5, p = 0.080). No harm occurred. Robotic therapies may be useful during the subacute stages of stroke - both endpoints (FM hand and MI prehension) showed the expected trend with bigger effect size for the robotic intervention. Additional benefit of the robotic therapy over the control therapy was only significant when the difference was measured with FM, demanding further investigation with larger samples. Implications of this study are important for decision making during therapy administration and resource allocation

  3. [Effect of chest physiotherapy in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation: a prospective randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Gong, Yuan; Chen, Miao

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of chest physiotherapy (CPT) on patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV). A prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted. Sixty-eight adult patients undergoing invasive MV over 48 hours admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from December 2014 to October 2016 were enrolled, and they were divided into CPT group (n = 37) and control group (n = 31) by random number table. The patients in control group received routine physical therapy; while those in the CPT group received comprehensive CPT including manual lung inflation, vibration expectoration and early functional exercise etc. on the basis of the treatment in control group. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score and oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2) before and after the treatment in both two groups were observed as well as the respiratory function and vital signs before and after CPT. The laboratory indicators after treatment, incidence of complications, duration of MV and the length of ICU stay in the two groups were recorded. The incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in the CPT group was significantly lower than that of control group (5.4% vs. 25.8%, P respiratory function parameters including tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and mean airway pressure (Pmean) before and after treatment in CPT group excepting pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) was significantly higher than that before treatment (0.985±0.016 vs. 0.978±0.018, P 2 0.05), indicating that CPT treatment did not cause fluctuations in respiratory function and vital signs. Blood lactate in CPT group was significantly lower than that of control group (mmol/L: 1.10±0.79 vs. 1.32±1.09, P < 0.05), indicating that CPT treatment, especially early functional exercise, could improve the oxygen supply and limb circulation. CPT treatment has some effect on prevention of VAP and other complications

  4. Computer tablet distraction reduces pain and anxiety in pediatric burn patients undergoing hydrotherapy: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Nader, Sherwood; Joe, Lindsay; Pinion, Kelly

    2017-09-01

    Distraction is often used in conjunction with analgesics to minimize pain in pediatric burn patients during treatment procedures. Computer tablets provide many options for distraction items in one tool and are often used during medical procedures. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of tablet distraction in improving the care of pediatric burn patients. This study examines the effectiveness of tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist to minimize pain and anxiety in pediatric burn patients undergoing hydrotherapy. Thirty pediatric patients (4-12) undergoing hydrotherapy for the treatment of burns participated in this randomized clinical trial. The tablet distraction group received tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist while those in the control group received standard care. Pain was assessed through self-reports and observation reports. Anxiety was assessed through behavioral observations. Length of procedure was also recorded. Nurses reported significantly less pain for the tablet distraction group compared to the control group. There was no significant difference between groups on self-reported pain. The tablet distraction group displayed significantly less anxiety during the procedure compared to the control group. Also, the tablet distraction group returned to baseline after the procedure while those in the control group displayed higher anxiety post-procedure. There was no difference in the length of the procedure between groups. These findings suggest tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist may be an effective method for improving pain and anxiety in children undergoing hydrotherapy treatment for burns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Prewarming neurosurgical patients to minimize hypotension on induction of anesthesia: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvall, Jai; Vijayakumar, Rukman; Leslie, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Prewarming prior to surgery is effective in preventing perioperative hypothermia. There is a paucity of evidence, however, regarding the hemodynamic effects of prewarming. We hypothesized that the nadir mean arterial pressure during anesthesia induction would be higher after prewarming than after no prewarming. We randomized 32 patients prior to elective neurosurgery to receive either one hour of forced-air convective warming at 46°C or routine care (full body blanket with convective warmer attached but not turned on). All patients had invasive blood pressure, heart rate, and core temperature monitoring before and during warming and underwent a protocolized intravenous anesthetic induction with propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusions. The primary endpoint was the nadir mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during induction. Hypotension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) 20% from baseline values. No difference was found in the mean (SD) nadir MAP between the prewarmed group and the control group [64 (11) mmHg vs 68 (16) mmHg, respectively; mean difference, 5 mmHg; 95% confidence interval (CI), -6 to 15; P = 0.36]. Similarly, there was no difference between groups in the incidence of hypotension (100% of prewarmed vs 93% of control patients; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.23; P = 0.32) or in the requirement for vasopressors during induction (four patients in each group required metaraminol; P = 1.00). Prewarming with convective forced air for one hour prior to intravenous anesthetic induction did not prevent hypotension during the induction period (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [ANZCTR] ACTRN12615000431527).

  6. Efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Miguel; Larraz, Concepción; Gómez, Amalia; Ripoll, Joana; Mir, Isabel; Miranda, Eduardo Z; Macho, Ana; Thomas, Vicenç; Esteva, Magdalena

    2013-02-11

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in primary care could improve patients' quality of life. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a 3-month Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) program with a further 9 months of maintenance (RHBM group) compared with both PR for 3 months without further maintenance (RHB group) and usual care in improving the quality of life of patients with moderate COPD.We conducted a parallel-group, randomized clinical trial in Majorca primary health care in which 97 patients with moderate COPD were assigned to the 3 groups. Health outcomes were quality of life, exercise capacity, pulmonary function and exacerbations. We found statistically and clinically significant differences in the three groups at 3 months in the emotion dimension (0.53; 95%CI0.06-1.01) in the usual care group, (0.72; 95%CI0.26-1.18) the RHB group (0.87; 95%CI 0.44-1.30) and the RHBM group as well as in fatigue (0.47; 95%CI 0.17-0.78) in the RHBM group. After 1 year, these differences favored the long-term rehabilitation group in the domains of fatigue (0.56; 95%CI 0.22-0.91), mastery (0.79; 95%CI 0.03-1.55) and emotion (0.75; 95%CI 0.17-1.33). Between-group analysis only showed statistically and clinically significant differences between the RHB group and control group in the dyspnea dimension (0.79 95%CI 0.05-1.52). No differences were found for exacerbations, pulmonary function or exercise capacity. We found that patients with moderate COPD and low level of impairment did not show meaningful changes in QoL, exercise tolerance, pulmonary function or exacerbation after a one-year, community based rehabilitation program. However, long-term improvements in the emotional, fatigue and mastery dimensions (within intervention groups) were identified. ISRCTN94514482.

  7. The efficacy of isotonic and hypotonic intravenous maintenance fluid for pediatric patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Wenying

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of isotonic versus hypotonic solution as intravenous maintenance fluid on level of plasma sodium in hospitalized children. A fully recursive literature search in May 2013 was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE to identify potentially relevant randomized controlled trials. Jadad score and allocation concealment were adopted to evaluate the methodological quality of each trial. RevMan5.2 was used for statistical analysis. Eight randomized controlled trials with 752 patients were included. Combined analysis showed a significant lower risk of hyponatremia with isotonic solution (odds ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.51). The isotonic intravenous maintenance did not increase the possibility of hypernatremia (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-2.06). The meta-analysis revealed that there was potential risk of hyponatremia for routine infusion of hypotonic maintenance fluid. The use of isotonic solution was warranted in hospitalized pediatric patients.

  8. Comparing two low-energy diets for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms in obese patients: a pragmatic randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, Birgit Falk; Christensen, R; Christensen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks.......To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks....

  9. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  10. Randomized trial to evaluate indinavir/ritonavir versus saquinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients: the MaxCmin1 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Court

    2003-01-01

    This trial assessed the rate of virological failure at 48 weeks in adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients assigned indinavir/ritonavir (Idv/Rtv; 800/100 mg 2 times daily) or saquinavir/ritonavir (Sqv/Rtv; 1000/100 mg 2 times daily) in an open-label, randomized (1:1...

  11. Balance versus resistance training on postural control in patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Suhaila M; da Silva, Rubens A; Terra, Marcelle B; Almeida, Isabela A; de Melo, Lúcio B; Ferraz, Henrique B

    2017-04-01

    Evidences have shown that physiotherapy programs may improve the balance of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD), although it is not clear which specific exercise program is better. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of balance versus resistance training on postural control measures in PD patients. Randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a physiotherapy outpatient clinic of a university hospital. A total of 40 PD participants were randomly divided into two groups: balance training (BT) and resistance training (RT). The BT group focused on balance training, functional independence and gait while the RT group performed resistance exercises emphasizing the lower limbs and trunk, both supervised by trained physiotherapists. Therapy sessions were held twice a week (at 60 minutes), totaling 24 sessions. The primary outcome was evaluated by force platform with center of pressure sway measures in different balance conditions and the secondary outcome was evaluated by Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) scale to determine the effects of the intervention on postural control. Significant improvement of postural control (pre vs. post 15.1 vs. 9.6 cm2) was only reported in favor of BT group (d=1.17) for one-legged stand condition on force platform. The standardized mean difference between groups was significantly (PPostural control in Parkinson's disease is improved when training by a directional and specific balance program than a resistance training program. Balance training is superior to resistance training in regard to improving postural control of individuals with PD. Gold standard instruments (high in cost and difficult to access) were used to assess balance, as well as scales with clinical applicability (low cost, easily acceptable, applicable and valid), which can guide the management of physiotherapists both in their decision-making and in clinical practice.

  12. Intranasal Oxytocin to Prevent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuiden, Mirjam; Frijling, Jessie L; Nawijn, Laura; Koch, Saskia B J; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S; Biesheuvel, Tessa H; Honig, Adriaan; Veltman, Dick J; Olff, Miranda

    2017-06-15

    There are currently few preventive interventions available for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Intranasal oxytocin administration early after trauma may prevent PTSD, because oxytocin administration was previously found to beneficially impact PTSD vulnerability factors, including neural fear responsiveness, peripheral stress reactivity, and socioemotional functioning. Therefore, we investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration early after trauma on subsequent clinician-rated PTSD symptoms. We then assessed whether baseline characteristics moderated the intervention's effects. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Adult emergency department patients with moderate to severe acute distress (n = 120; 85% accident victims) were randomized to intranasal oxytocin (8 days/40 IU twice daily) or placebo (8 days/10 puffs twice daily), initiated within 12 days posttrauma. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was administered at baseline (within 10 days posttrauma) and at 1.5, 3, and 6 months posttrauma. The intention-to-treat sample included 107 participants (oxytocin: n = 53; placebo: n = 54). We did not observe a significant group difference in CAPS total score at 1.5 months posttrauma (primary outcome) or across follow-up (secondary outcome). Secondary analyses showed that participants with high baseline CAPS scores receiving oxytocin had significantly lower CAPS scores across follow-up than participants with high baseline CAPS scores receiving placebo. Oxytocin administration early after trauma did not attenuate clinician-rated PTSD symptoms in all trauma-exposed participants with acute distress. However, participants with high acute clinician-rated PTSD symptom severity did show beneficial effects of oxytocin. Although replication is warranted, these findings suggest that oxytocin administration is a promising preventive intervention for PTSD for individuals with high acute PTSD symptoms

  13. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Astrid T; Stafne, Signe N; Aud Hiller; Slørdahl, Stig A.; Inger-Lise Aamot

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pac...

  14. Resveratrol Supplementation Did Not Improve Cognition in Patients with Schizophrenia: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortea, Karine; Franco, Viviane C; Guimarães, Paula; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo S

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with psychotic experiences and cognitive deficits. Therefore, cognitive function is one of the most critical determinants of quality of life in this pathology. Resveratrol has been related to neuroprotective action, but there are no studies evaluating resveratrol in SZ. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of resveratrol supplementation on cognition in individuals with SZ. This is a 1-month randomized, double-blind, and controlled trial (NCT 02062190), in which 19 men with diagnosis of SZ, aged 18-65 years, were assigned to a resveratrol supplementation group (200 mg) or placebo group (200 mg), with a 1-month follow-up. Applying a series of cognitive tests assessed neuropsychology performance (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test, Stroop Color and Word Test, and Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale assessed psychopathology severity. There were no significant improvement in neuropsychology performance (episodic memory, working memory, attention and concentration capacity, inhibitory control, interference measures, selective attention, and mental flexibility) and psychopathology severity after 1 month of resveratrol supplementation (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we have shown that 1 month of a resveratrol supplementation (200 mg/day) did not improve episodic memory, working memory, attention and concentration capacity, inhibitory control, interference measures, selective attention, and mental flexibility as compared with placebo in patients with SZ.

  15. Resveratrol supplementation did not improves cognition in patients with schizophrenia: results from a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARINE ZORTEA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is associated with psychotic experiences and cognitive deficits. Therefore, cognitive function is one of the most critical determinants of quality of life in this pathology. Resveratrol has been related with neuroprotective action but there are no studies evaluating resveratrol in schizophrenia. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of resveratrol supplementation on cognition in individuals with schizophrenia. Methods: This is a 1-month randomized, double-blind controlled trial (NCT 02062190, in which 19 men with diagnosis of schizophrenia, aged 18 to 65 years, were assigned to a resveratrol supplement group (200mg or placebo group (200mg, with a 1-month follow-up. Applying a series of cognitive tests assessed neuropsychology performance (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test, Stroop Color and Word Test, Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale assessed psychopathology severity. Results: There were no significant improvement in neuropsychology performance (episodic memory, working memory, attention and concentration capacity, inhibitory control, interference measures, selective attention and mental flexibility and psychopathology severity after 1-month of resveratrol supplementation (p>0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, we have shown that 1-month of a resveratrol supplementation (200 mg/day did not improve episodic memory, working memory, attention and concentration capacity, inhibitory control, interference measures, selective attention and mental flexibility as compared with placebo in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Individual Placement and Support (IPS) for Methadone Maintenance Therapy Patients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lones, Carrie E; Bond, Gary R; McGovern, Mark P; Carr, Kathryn; Leckron-Myers, Teresa; Hartnett, Tim; Becker, Deborah R

    2017-05-01

    Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidence-based employment model for people with severe mental illness, but it has not been evaluated for clients enrolled in substance abuse treatment programs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of IPS for people with opioid use disorders enrolled in an opioid treatment program. Within a randomized controlled experiment, 45 patients receiving methadone maintenance therapy were assigned to either IPS or a 6-month waitlist. The waitlist group received IPS after 6 months. The primary outcome assessed over 1 year compared the attainment of a job for the IPS condition to the waitlist comparison group. During the first 6 months after enrollment, 11 (50%) active IPS participants gained competitive employment compared to 1 (5%) waitlist participant (Χ (2) = 12.0, p IPS participants gained competitive employment compared to 5 (22%) waitlist participants (Χ (2) = 3.92, p = 0.07). We conclude that IPS holds promise as an employment intervention for people with opioid use disorders in methadone maintenance treatment, but larger trials with longer follow-up are needed.

  17. Hypotonic versus isotonic maintenance fluids in critically ill pediatric patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorro Barón, Facundo A; Meregalli, Claudia N; Rombolá, Valeria A; Bolasell, Cecilia; Pigliapoco, Vilma E; Bartoletti, Silvia E; Debaisi, Gustavo E

    2013-01-01

    Hypotonic fluids have been associated with the development of iatrogenic hyponatremia. To assess variations in serum sodium (sNa) following the intravenous administration of isotonic maintenance fluids (0.9% NaCl/5% dextrose) compared to hypotonic maintenance fluids (0.45% NaCl/5% dextrose). Randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial. Pediatric patients with an expected length of stay in the intensive care unit of more than 24 hours were enrolled, with normal serum Na, and IV fluids >80% of total maintenance fluids. Serum Na level was measured before administering maintenance fluids and when reducing the administration to hypotonic (n= 32) or isotonic (n= 31) maintenance fluids. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. There were no differences in terms of volume of fluid administered (hypotonic group: 865 ± 853 mL; isotonic group: 778 ± 649 mL; p= 0.654) or infusion duration (hypotonic group: 24 ± 10.8 hours; isotonic group: 27.6 ± 12.8 hours; p= 0.231). A difference was found in the serum Na following the administration of maintenance fluids (hypotonic group: 137.8 ± 4.3 mmol/L; isotonic group: 140.0 ± 4.1 mmol/L, p= 0.04). None of these two maintenance fluids increased the risk of hyponatremia (Na 145 mmol/L). Neither hypotonic nor isotonic maintenance fluids increased the risk of developing iatrogenic hyponatremia with the 24 hour infusion.

  18. A double blind randomized trial of ketofol versus propofol for endodontic treatment of anxious pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, N; Goyal, A; Gauba, K; Kapur, A; Jain, K

    2013-01-01

    To find out the safe and efficient sedative agent for primary molar pulpectomy in uncooperative pediatric patients. This double blind randomized trial enrolled 40 anxious and healthy 2-6 year olds. All subjects received IV propofol (1-1.5 mg/kg) or ketofol (1-1.5 mg/kg propofol with 0.25 mg/kg ketamine) as per group assignment after oral midazolam premedication (0.5 mg/kg). Sedation maintenance was done with propofol infusion at 25-75 microg/kg/min titrated to a predefined Worse level as per Houpt's sedation rating scale. Additional bolus/es was/were administered in the dosage similar to induction dose in case of inadequate sedation. Primary outcomes were intraoperative and postoperative adverse events. Secondary outcomes were vital signs, success of procedure, operator satisfaction, sedation quality, treatment time, recovery time and total propofol dose. Significantly greater incidence of respiratory depression was reported for ketofol group (11/20; 55%) when compared to propofol group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.008). Desaturation was the most common adverse respiratory event with significantly greater incidence in ketofol group (9/20; 45%) when compared to propofol only group (3/20; 15%) (p = 0.033). No significant differences regarding secondary outcomes were reported in two groups. Both the regimen exhibited similar sedation profile while propofol alone emerged as a safer option.

  19. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Saltin, Bengt; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D(17)), the secondary outcome measure was the percentage of days absent from work during the last 10 working days, and the tertiary outcome measure was effect on cognitive abilities. RESULTS: At 4 months, the strength measured by 1......: Our findings do not support a biologically mediated effect of exercise on symptom severity in depressed patients, but they do support a beneficial effect of strength training on work capacity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: (ClinicalTrials.gov) Identifier: NCT00103415.......OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners...

  20. Video Colposcopy for Reducing Patient Anxiety During Colposcopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Ziad; Alici, Ferizan; Tempfer, Clemens B; Seebacher, Veronika; Rezniczek, Günther A

    2017-08-01

    To test whether video colposcopy reduces anxiety among patients undergoing colposcopy. In a prospective, randomized multicenter trial, we compared video colposcopy and no video colposcopy in a one-to-one ratio. Situation-specific anxiety was measured before (S1) and after (S2) colposcopy using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The primary endpoint was the reduction of the situation-specific anxiety scores (ΔS=S2-S1). Secondary endpoints were pain during and 10 minutes after colposcopy, general unpleasantness, anxiety during colposcopy, satisfaction with the information about the procedure, and overall satisfaction (11-item visual analog scales). Analysis was by intention to treat. A sample size of 104 per group (n=208) was planned to achieve 80% power to detect a difference of 4.8 with a SD of 12.3 in the primary outcome. Between August 2016 and March 2017, 225 women were randomized. The mean ΔS was -10.3±11.3 SD in 111 women in the video colposcopy group and -10.3±11.0 SD in 105 women without video colposcopy (P=.50). The secondary endpoints pain during examination (median 2 [interquartile range 1-3] compared with 2 [1-4]; P=.91), pain 10 minutes after examination (1 [0-3] compared with 1 [0-2.5]; P=.24), general unpleasantness (3 [1-5] compared with 3 [1-5]; P=.90), anxiety during examination (3 [1-5] compared with 3 [1-5]; P=.61), satisfaction with the information about the procedure (10 [9-10] compared with 10 [9-10]; P=.88), and overall satisfaction (10 [9-10] compared with 10 [9-10]; P=.54) were also not different between the two study groups. In a multivariate linear regression analysis, study center (P=.028), body mass index (P=.033), and smoking status (P=.025) independently affected the reduction of anxiety. Video colposcopy does not reduce anxiety in women undergoing colposcopy. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02697175.

  1. EXERCISE in pediatric autologous stem cell transplant patients: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamorro-Viña Carolina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an intensive therapy used to improve survivorship and cure various oncologic diseases. However, this therapy is associated with high mortality rates and numerous negative side-effects. The recovery of the immune system is a special concern and plays a key role in the success of this treatment. In healthy populations it is known that exercise plays an important role in immune system regulation, but little is known about the role of exercise in the hematological and immunological recovery of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The primary objective of this randomized-controlled trial (RCT is to study the effect of an exercise program (in- and outpatient on immune cell recovery in patients undergoing an autologous stem cell transplantation. The secondary objective is to determine if an exercise intervention diminishes the usual deterioration in quality of life, physical fitness, and the acquisition of a sedentary lifestyle. Methods This RCT has received approval from The Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board (CHREB of the University of Calgary (Ethics ID # E-24476. Twenty-four participants treated for a malignancy with autologous stem cell transplant (5 to 18 years in the Alberta Children’s Hospital will be randomly assigned to an exercise or control group. The exercise group will participate in a two-phase exercise intervention (in- and outpatient from hospitalization until 10 weeks after discharge. The exercise program includes strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise. During the inpatient phase this program will be performed 5 times/week and will be supervised. The outpatient phase will combine a supervised session with two home-based exercise sessions with the use of the Wii device. The control group will follow the standard protocol without any specific exercise program. A range of outcomes, including quantitative and functional recovery of immune system

  2. Efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Miguel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary Rehabilitation for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in primary care could improve patients’ quality of life. Methods This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a 3-month Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR program with a further 9 months of maintenance (RHBM group compared with both PR for 3 months without further maintenance (RHB group and usual care in improving the quality of life of patients with moderate COPD. We conducted a parallel-group, randomized clinical trial in Majorca primary health care in which 97 patients with moderate COPD were assigned to the 3 groups. Health outcomes were quality of life, exercise capacity, pulmonary function and exacerbations. Results We found statistically and clinically significant differences in the three groups at 3 months in the emotion dimension (0.53; 95%CI0.06-1.01 in the usual care group, (0.72; 95%CI0.26-1.18 the RHB group (0.87; 95%CI 0.44-1.30 and the RHBM group as well as in fatigue (0.47; 95%CI 0.17-0.78 in the RHBM group. After 1 year, these differences favored the long-term rehabilitation group in the domains of fatigue (0.56; 95%CI 0.22-0.91, mastery (0.79; 95%CI 0.03-1.55 and emotion (0.75; 95%CI 0.17-1.33. Between-group analysis only showed statistically and clinically significant differences between the RHB group and control group in the dyspnea dimension (0.79 95%CI 0.05-1.52. No differences were found for exacerbations, pulmonary function or exercise capacity. Conclusions We found that patients with moderate COPD and low level of impairment did not show meaningful changes in QoL, exercise tolerance, pulmonary function or exacerbation after a one-year, community based rehabilitation program. However, long-term improvements in the emotional, fatigue and mastery dimensions (within intervention groups were identified. Trial registration ISRCTN94514482

  3. Aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Totzeck Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is one of the most frequent headache diseases and impairs patients’ quality of life. Up to now, many randomized studies reported efficacy of prophylactic therapy with medications such as beta-blockers or anti-epileptic drugs. Non-medical treatment, like aerobic endurance training, is considered to be an encouraging alternative in migraine prophylaxis. However, there is still a lack of prospective, high-quality randomized trials. We therefore designed a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG. Methods This is a single-center, open-label, prospective, randomized trial. Sixty participants with migraine are randomly allocated to either endurance training or a relaxation group. After baseline headache diary documentation over at least 4 weeks, participants in the exercise group will start moderate aerobic endurance training under a sport therapist’s supervision at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. The second group will perform Jacobson’s progressive muscle relaxation training guided by a trained relaxation therapist, also at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. Both study arms will train in groups of up to 10 participants. More frequent individual training is possible. The follow-up period will be 12 weeks after the training period. The general state of health, possible state of anxiety or depression, impairments due to the headache disorder, pain-related disabilities, the headache-specific locus of control, and the motor fitness status are measured with standardized questionnaires. Discussion The study design is adequate to generate meaningful results. The trial will be helpful in gaining important data on exercise training for non-medical migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01407861.

  4. Physical methods for the treatment of fever in critically ill patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Patrícia de Oliveira; Silva, Ludmila Christiane Rosa da; Silva, Priscila Marinho Aleixo; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of physical methods of reducing body temperature (ice pack and warm compression) in critically ill patients with fever. A randomized clinical trial involving 102 adult patients with tympanic temperature ≥ 38.3°C of an infectious focus, and randomized into three groups: Intervention I - ice pack associated with antipyretic; Intervention II - warm compress associated with antipyretic; and Control - antipyretic. Tympanic temperature was measured at 15 minute intervals for 3 hours. The effect of the interventions was evaluated through the Mann-Whitney test and Survival Analysis. "Effect size" calculation was carried out. Patients in the intervention groups I and II presented greater reduction in body temperature. The group of patients receiving intervention I presented tympanic temperature below 38.3°C at 45 minutes of monitoring, while the value for control group was lower than 38.3°C starting at 60 minutes, and those who received intervention II had values lower than 38.3°C at 75 minutes of monitoring. No statistically significant difference was found between the interventions, but with the intervention group I patients showed greater reduction in tympanic temperature compared to the other groups. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-2k3kbq. Avaliar o efeito de métodos físicos (bolsa de gelo e compressa morna) na redução da temperatura corporal de pacientes críticos com febre. Ensaio clínico randomizado com 102 pacientes adultos e temperatura timpânica ≥ 38,3°C de foco infeccioso, aleatorizados em três grupos: Intervenção I ‒ bolsa de gelo associada a antitérmico; Intervenção II ‒ compressa morna associada a antitérmico; e Controle ‒ antitérmico. A temperatura timpânica foi mensurada em intervalos de 15 minutos durante 3 horas. O efeito das intervenções foi avaliado pelo teste Mann-Whitney e Análise de Sobrevivência. Cálculo do "Effect size" foi procedido. Os pacientes dos grupos Intervenção I e II

  5. A randomized controlled trial of levosimendan to reduce mortality in high-risk cardiac surgery patients (CHEETAH): Rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrillo, Alberto; Alvaro, Gabriele; Pisano, Antonio; Guarracino, Fabio; Lobreglio, Rosetta; Bradic, Nikola; Lembo, Rosalba; Gianni, Stefano; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Likhvantsev, Valery; Grigoryev, Evgeny; Buscaglia, Giuseppe; Pala, Giovanni; Auci, Elisabetta; Amantea, Bruno; Monaco, Fabrizio; De Vuono, Giovanni; Corcione, Antonio; Galdieri, Nicola; Cariello, Claudia; Bove, Tiziana; Fominskiy, Evgeny; Auriemma, Stefano; Baiocchi, Massimo; Bianchi, Alessandro; Frontini, Mario; Paternoster, Gianluca; Sangalli, Fabio; Wang, Chew-Yin; Zucchetti, Maria Chiara; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Gemma, Marco; Lipinski, Michael J; Lomivorotov, Vladimir V; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk of perioperative low cardiac output syndrome due to postoperative myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial dysfunction in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is a potential indication for the use of levosimendan, a calcium sensitizer with 3 beneficial cardiovascular effects (inotropic, vasodilatory, and anti-inflammatory), which appears effective in improving clinically relevant outcomes. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter randomized trial. Tertiary care hospitals. Cardiac surgery patients (n = 1,000) with postoperative myocardial dysfunction (defined as patients with intraaortic balloon pump and/or high-dose standard inotropic support) will be randomized to receive a continuous infusion of either levosimendan (0.05-0.2 μg/[kg min]) or placebo for 24-48 hours. The primary end point will be 30-day mortality. Secondary end points will be mortality at 1 year, time on mechanical ventilation, acute kidney injury, decision to stop the study drug due to adverse events or to start open-label levosimendan, and length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. We will test the hypothesis that levosimendan reduces 30-day mortality in cardiac surgery patients with postoperative myocardial dysfunction. This trial is planned to determine whether levosimendan could improve survival in patients with postoperative low cardiac output syndrome. The results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial may provide important insights into the management of low cardiac output in cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Haloperidol prophylaxis decreases delirium incidence in elderly patients after noncardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Hong-Liang; Wang, Dong-Xin; Zhu, Xi; Li, Shuang-Ling; Yao, Gai-Qi; Chen, Kai-Sheng; Gu, Xiu-E; Zhu, Sai-Nan

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-term low-dose intravenous haloperidol for delirium prevention in critically ill elderly patients after noncardiac surgery. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial in two centers. Intensive care units of two large tertiary teaching hospitals. Four hundred fifty-seven patients 65 yrs or older who were admitted to the intensive care unit after noncardiac surgery. Haloperidol (0.5 mg intravenous bolus injection followed by continuous infusion at a rate of 0.1 mg/h for 12 hrs; n = 229) or placebo (n = 228) was randomly administered from intensive care unit admission. The primary end point was the incidence of delirium within the first 7 days after surgery. Secondary end points included time to onset of delirium, number of delirium-free days, length of intensive care unit stay, all-cause 28-day mortality, and adverse events. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method for the intensive care unit. The incidence of delirium during the first 7 days after surgery was 15.3% (35/229) in the haloperidol group and 23.2% (53/228) in the control group (p = .031). The mean time to onset of delirium and the mean number of delirium-free days were significantly longer (6.2 days [95% confidence interval 5.9-6.4] vs. 5.7 days [95% confidence interval 5.4-6.0]; p = .021; and 6.8 ± 0.5 days vs. 6.7 ± 0.8 days; p = .027, respectively), whereas the median length of intensive care unit stay was significantly shorter (21.3 hrs [95% confidence interval 20.3-22.2] vs. 23.0 hrs [95% confidence interval 20.9-25.1]; p = .024) in the haloperidol group than in the control group. There was no significant difference with regard to all-cause 28-day mortality between the two groups (0.9% [2/229] vs. 2.6% [6/228]; p = .175). No drug-related side effects were documented. For elderly patients admitted to intensive care unit after noncardiac surgery, short-term prophylactic administration of low-dose intravenous

  7. Permissive underfeeding versus target enteral feeding in adult critically ill patients (PermiT Trial: a study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

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    Arabi Yaseen M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutritional support is an essential part of the management of critically ill patients. However, optimal caloric intake has not been systematically evaluated. We aim to compare two strategies of enteral feeding: permissive underfeeding versus target feeding. Method/Design This is an international multi-center randomized controlled trial in critically ill medical- surgical adult patients. Using a centralized allocation, 862 patients will be randomized to permissive underfeeding or target feeding. Patients in the permissive group receive 50% (acceptable range is 40% to 60% of the calculated caloric requirement, while those in the targeted group receive 100% (acceptable range 70% to 100% of the calculated caloric requirement. The primary outcome is 90-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes include ICU and hospital mortality, 28-day, and 180-day mortality as well as health care-associated infections, organ failure, and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. The trial has 80% power to detect an 8% absolute reduction in 90-day mortality assuming a baseline risk of death of 25% at an alpha level of 0.05. Discussion Patient recruitment started in November 2009 and is currently active in five centers. The Data Monitoring Committee advised continuation of the trial after the first interim analysis. The study is expected to finish by November 2013. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68144998

  8. Clinical application of a novel endoscopic mask: A randomized controlled trial in aged patients undergoing painless gastroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guangyu; Huang, Zhenling; Zou, Tianxiao; He, Miao; Wang, Shanjuan; Huang, Ping; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Desaturation during painless gastroscopy in aged patients leads to discontinuation of the procedure, prolonged manipulation time and increased risk of severe complications. An endoscopic nasal mask was designed to control hypoxia during the above procedures. A randomized trial was performed to test whether the novel endoscopic mask is helpful for hypoxia during painless gastroscopy in aged patients. Methods: In this randomized, controlled trial, 141 aged patients undergoing painless gastroscopy were randomized into nasal catheter group (69 patients) and endoscopic mask group (65 patients). Primary outcomes were minimum pulse oxygen saturation and incidence of pulse oxygen saturation ≤ 90%. Results: Finally, 134 aged patients were analyzed, including 69 patients in nasal catheter group and 65 patients endoscopic mask group. The minimum pulse oxygen saturation (96.4% ± 4.8%) was higher in the aged endoscopic mask group than in the aged nasal catheter group (94.3% ± 5.6%, P = 0.0075). The incidence of pulse oxygen saturation ≤ 90% did not significantly differ between the endoscopic mask group and nasal catheter group (6.2% VS 15.9%, P = 0.07). There were no severe adverse events in either groups. Conclusion: The endoscopic mask was safely used in aged patients during painless gastroscopy under propofol sedation and significantly improved the minimum pulse oxygen saturation without increasing time to examination or recovery time.

  9. Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Female Patients With Eating Disorders: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Huurne, Elke D; de Haan, Hein A; Postel, Marloes G; van der Palen, Job; VanDerNagel, Joanne E L; DeJong, Cornelis A J

    2015-06-18

    Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support to improve eating disorder psychopathology, and to reduce body dissatisfaction and related health problems among patients with eating disorders. A two-arm open randomized controlled trial comparing a Web-based CBT intervention to a waiting list control condition (WL) was carried out among female patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The eating disorder diagnosis was in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, and was established based on participants' self-report. Participants were recruited from an open-access website, and the intervention consisted of a structured two-part program within a secure Web-based application. The aim of the first part was to analyze participant's eating attitudes and behaviors, while the second part focused on behavioral change. Participants had asynchronous contact with a personal therapist twice a week, solely via the Internet. Self-report measures of eating disorder psychopathology (primary outcome), body dissatisfaction, physical health, mental health, self-esteem, quality of life, and social functioning were completed at baseline and posttest. A total of 214 participants were randomized to either the Web-based CBT group (n=108) or to the WL group (n=106) stratified by type of eating disorder (BN: n=44; BED: n=85; EDNOS: n=85). Study attrition was low with 94% of the participants completing the posttest assignment. Overall, Web-based CBT showed a significant improvement over time for eating disorder psychopathology (F97=63.07, Peating disorder psychopathology (F201

  10. Effect of methylphenidate on attention in apathetic AD patients in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctôt, Krista L; Chau, Sarah A; Herrmann, Nathan; Drye, Lea T; Rosenberg, Paul B; Scherer, Roberta W; Black, Sandra E; Vaidya, Vijay; Bachman, David L; Mintzer, Jacobo E

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). MPH has shown to improve apathy in AD, and both apathy and attention have been related to dopaminergic function. The goal was to investigate MPH effects on attention in AD and assess the relationship between attention and apathy responses. MPH (10 mg PO twice daily) or placebo was administered for six weeks in a randomized, double-blind trial in mild-to-moderate AD outpatients with apathy (Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) Apathy ≥ 4). Attention was measured with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Digit Span (DS) subtest (DS forward, selective attention) and apathy with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). A mixed effects linear regression estimated the difference in change from baseline between treatment groups, defined as δ (MPH (DS week 6-DS baseline)) - (placebo (DS week 6-DS baseline)). In 60 patients (37 females, age = 76 ± 8, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) = 20 ± 5, NPI Apathy = 7 ± 2), the change in DS forward (δ = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.06-1.68), p = 0.03) and DS total (δ = 1.01 (95% CI: 0.09-1.93), p = 0.03) favored MPH over placebo. Of 57 completers, 17 patients had improved apathy (≥3.3 points on the AES from baseline to end point) and 40 did not. There were no significant associations between AES and NPI Apathy with DS change scores in the MPH, placebo, AES responder, or non-responder groups. DS scores did not predict apathy response to MPH treatment. These results suggest MPH can improve attention and apathy in AD; however, the effects appear independent in this population.

  11. ACAT inhibition and progression of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: the CAPTIVATE randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese, Marijn C; de Groot, Eric; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Trip, Mieke D; Ose, Leiv; Maritz, Frans J; Basart, Dick C G; Kastelein, John J P; Habib, Rafik; Davidson, Michael H; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Schwocho, Lee R; Stein, Evan A

    2009-03-18

    Inhibition of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), an intracellular enzyme involved in cholesterol accumulation, with pactimibe was developed to assist in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pactimibe in inhibition of atherosclerosis. A prospective, randomized, stratified, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Trial Investigating Vascular ACAT Inhibition Treatment Effects [CAPTIVATE]) of 892 patients heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia conducted at 40 lipid clinics in the United States, Canada, Europe, South Africa, and Israel between February 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005. Study was terminated on October 26, 2005. Participants received either 100 mg/d of pactimibe (n = 443) or matching placebo (n = 438), in addition to standard lipid-lowering therapy. Carotid atherosclerosis, assessed by ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), at baseline, 12, 18, and 24 months. Maximum CIMT was the primary end point and mean CIMT the secondary end point. Because pactimibe failed to show efficacy in the intravascular coronary ultrasound ACTIVATE study, the CAPTIVATE study was terminated prematurely after a follow-up of 15 months. After 6 months of treatment with pactimibe, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 7.3% (SD, 23%) compared with 1.4% (SD, 28%) in the placebo group (P = .001). The carotid ultrasonographic scans of the 716 patients with at least 2 scans and obtained at least 40 weeks apart were analyzed. Maximum CIMT measurements did not show a pactimibe treatment effect (difference, 0.004 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.023 to 0.015 mm; P = .64); however, the less variable mean CIMT measurement revealed an increase of 0.014 mm (95% CI, -0.027 to 0.000 mm; P = .04) in patients administered pactimibe vs placebo. Major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke) occurred more often in patients administered

  12. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; de Gast, Arthur; Dommerholt, Jan; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Wensing, Michel; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2011-01-24

    Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P), Global Perceived Effect (GPE) scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P < 0.05) on the DASH after 12 weeks (mean difference, 7.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.2 to 14.2), on the VAS-P1 for current pain (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 25.0), on the VAS-P2 for pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 10.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 19.7) and VAS-P3 most severe pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 0.8 to 28.4). After 12 weeks, 55% of the patients in the intervention group reported improvement (from slightly improved to completely recovered) versus 14% in the control group. The mean number of muscles with active MTrPs decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). The results of this study show that 12-week

  13. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    Socially assistive robots are being developed for patients to help manage chronic health conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adherence to medication and availability of rehabilitation are suboptimal in this patient group, which increases the risk of hospitalization. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a robot delivering telehealth care to increase adherence to medication and home rehabilitation, improve quality of life, and reduce hospital readmission compared with a standard care control group. At discharge from hospital for a COPD admission, 60 patients were randomized to receive a robot at home for 4 months or to a control group. Number of hospitalization days for respiratory admissions over the 4-month study period was the primary outcome. Medication adherence, frequency of rehabilitation exercise, and quality of life were also assessed. Implementation interviews as well as benefit-cost analysis were conducted. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses showed no significant differences in the number of respiratory-related hospitalizations between groups. The intervention group was more adherent to their long-acting inhalers (mean number of prescribed puffs taken per day=48.5%) than the control group (mean 29.5%, P=.03, d=0.68) assessed via electronic recording. Self-reported adherence was also higher in the intervention group after controlling for covariates (P=.04). The intervention group increased their rehabilitation exercise frequency compared with the control group (mean difference -4.53, 95% CI -7.16 to -1.92). There were no significant differences in quality of life. Of the 25 patients who had the robot, 19 had favorable attitudes. This pilot study suggests that a homecare robot can improve adherence to medication and increase exercise. Further research is needed with a larger sample size to further investigate effects on hospitalizations after improvements are made to the robots. The robots could be

  14. Internet-based guided self-help for glioma patients with depressive symptoms: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boele, Florien W; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Cuijpers, Pim; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Heimans, Jan J; Klein, Martin

    2014-04-10

    Among glioma patients, depression is estimated to be more prevalent than in both the general population and the cancer patient population. This can have negative consequences for both patients and their primary informal caregivers (e.g., a spouse, family member or close friend). At present, there is no evidence from randomized controlled trials for the effectiveness of psychological treatment for depression in glioma patients. Furthermore, the possibility of delivering mental health care through the internet has not yet been explored in this population. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial is warranted to evaluate the effects of an internet-based, guided self-help intervention for depressive symptoms in glioma patients. The intervention is based on problem-solving therapy. An existing 5-week course is adapted for use by adult glioma patients with mild to moderate depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale score ≥12). Sample size calculations yield 126 glioma patients to be included, who are randomly assigned to either the intervention group or a waiting list control group. In addition, we aim to include 63 patients with haematological cancer in a non-central nervous system malignancy control group. Assessments take place at baseline, after 6 and 12 weeks, and after 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure is the change in depressive symptoms. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, fatigue, costs and patient satisfaction. In addition, all patients are asked to assign a primary informal caregiver, who does not participate in the intervention but who is asked to complete similar assessments. Their mood, health-related quality of life and fatigue is evaluated as well. This is the first study to evaluate the effects of problem-solving therapy delivered through the internet as treatment for depressive symptoms in glioma patients. If proven effective, this treatment will contribute to the mental health care of

  15. Patients' general satisfaction with telephone counseling by pharmacists and effects on satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines : Results from a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, Marcel Jan; Van Geffen, Erica C G; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Van Dijk, Liset; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Assess effects of pharmacists' counseling by telephone on patients' satisfaction with counseling, satisfaction with information and beliefs about medicines for newly prescribed medicines. Methods: A cluster randomized trial in Dutch community pharmacies. Patients ≥18 years were included when

  16. A randomized trial of propranolol versus sodium valproate for the prophylaxis of migraine in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Elham; Mashouf, Mehryar

    2010-08-01

    Migraine is the most common of the paroxysmal disorders to affect the brain in the pediatric population. Both propranolol and sodium valproate (valproic acid) have been advocated as prophylactic agents for childhood migraine. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of propranolol and sodium valproate in the prevention of migraine in the pediatric population. Sixty-three children (aged 5-15 years) with migraine without aura, as defined by the 2004 International Headache Society (IHS) criteria, were included in this prospective, double-blind clinical trial and were randomly assigned to two groups. Group A (n = 32 patients) received propranolol 3 mg/kg/day and group B (n = 31 patients) received sodium valproate 30 mg/kg/day, with at least 6 months of follow up. The propranolol dosage was adjusted to 2 mg/kg/day and the sodium valproate dosage to 15 mg/kg/day, after the first follow-up visit. Participants were evaluated by using a detailed questionnaire that asked about the features of headaches and general health characteristics. The study endpoints were successful treatment for a 4- to 6-month period; 3 months of a persistent unsuccessful or incomplete response to treatment; intolerable side effects; and/or patient non-adherence. All data were analyzed longitudinally by comparing baseline data with data from each follow-up. A total of 60 patients completed the full headache prophylaxis period. The baseline headache frequency was reduced by more than 50% in 83% of propranolol recipients and in 63% of sodium valproate recipients (statistically not significant); the overall reduction of baseline headache frequency per month was better in group A (p = 0.044). The mean headache frequency per month was reduced from 13.86 +/- 2.11 to 4.23 +/- 3.24 in group A, and from 13.23 +/- 2.43 to 5.83 +/- 4.04 in group B; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p sodium valproate, headache duration was markedly improved with each drug (p sodium valproate

  17. [Wuling Capsule for climacteric patients with depression and anxiety state: a randomized, positive parallel controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-juan; Li, Ji; Zou, Qin-di; Jin, Ling

    2009-11-01

    The incidence of menopausal anxiety and depression is increasing. It can induce and aggravate a variety of somatic symptoms. Despite of the good effects of psychotropic drugs on the disease, patients' compliance is poor. Therefore, it is necessary to find a drug which is practical, effective, and easy for patients to take. To evaluate the efficacy of Wuling Capsule (WC), a Chinese herbal medicine, in treatment of female climacteric syndrome with depression and anxiety state. A total of 96 outpatients of female climacteric syndrome from Department of Gynecology of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Department of Gynecology of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University were included. The study was designed as a randomized, positive drug parallel controlled trial. The patients were divided into WC group (64 cases) and control group (32 cases) and were orally administered Wuling Capsule and Gengnianan Tablet, respectively. The efficacy was evaluated with Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) before treatment, and after 3-week and 6-week treatment. The total response rate was 89.66% (52/58) in the WC group, which was superior to that in the control group [76.67% (23/30)]. Ridit test showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). Kupperman score of the two groups decreased markedly after the treatment (P<0.01), but there was no statistical difference between the two groups. The scales of SAS and SDS in both groups were improved obviously after the treatment (P<0.01). Covariance analysis showed that the decrease of SAS score in the WC group was more significant than that in the control group after 3- and 6-week treatment (P<0.05, P<0.01), but the SDS score was

  18. A randomized trial to determine the impact of a 5 moments for patient hand hygiene educational intervention on patient hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Herleen; Knighton, Shanina; Zabarsky, Trina F; Donskey, Curtis J

    2017-05-01

    We conducted a randomized trial of a simple educational intervention encouraging patients to perform hand hygiene at 5 specific moments, including on entry of health care personnel into their room as a reminder of the importance of hand hygiene. The intervention resulted in a significant increase in patient hand hygiene. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Racial variation in treatment preferences and willingness to randomize in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arega, Addisalem; Birkmeyer, Nancy J O; Lurie, Jon D N; Tosteson, Tor; Gibson, Jennifer; Taylor, Brett A; Morgan, Tamara Shawver; Weinstein, James N

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of baseline data for patients enrolled in Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT), a project conducting three randomized and three observational cohort studies of surgical and nonoperative treatments for intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). To explore racial variation in treatment preferences and willingness to be randomized. Increasing minority participation in research has been a priority at the NIH. Prior studies have documented lower rates of participation in research and preferences for invasive treatment among African-Americans. Patients enrolled in SPORT (March 2000 to February 2005) that reported data on their race (n = 2,323) were classified as White (87%), Black (8%), or Other (5%). Treatment preferences (nonoperative, unsure, surgical), and willingness to be randomized were compared among these groups while controlling for baseline differences using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS.: There were numerous significant differences in baseline characteristics among the racial groups. Following adjustment for these differences, Blacks remained less likely to prefer surgical treatment among both IDH (White, 55%; Black, 37%; Other, 55%, P = 0.023) and SpS/DS (White, 46%; Black, 30%; Other, 43%; P = 0.017) patients. Higher randomization rates among Black IDH patients (46% vs. 30%) were no longer significant following adjustment (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, P = 0.235). Treatment preference remained a strong independent predictor of randomization in multivariate analyses for both IDH (unsure OR = 3.88, P race and willingness to be randomized.

  20. Home telemonitoring for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Fusello, Massimo; Gubian, Lorenzo; Rinaldo, Claudia; Dario, Claudio; Concas, Alessandra; Saccavini, Claudio; Battistella, Laura; Pellizzon, Giulia; Zanardi, Giuseppe; Mancin, Silvia

    2016-11-22

    Although a number of studies have suggested that the use of Telemonitoring (TM) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) can be useful and efficacious, its real utility in detecting Acute Exacerbation (AE) signaling the need for prompt treatment is not entirely clear. The current study aimed to investigate the benefits of a TM system in managing AE in advanced-stage COPD patients to improve their Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and to reduce utilization of healthcare services. A 12-month Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted in the Veneto region (Italy). Adult patients diagnosed with Class III-IV COPD in accordance with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification were recruited and provided a TM system to alert the clinical staff via a trained operator whenever variations in respiratory parameters fell beyond the individual's normal range. The study's primary endpoint was HRQL, measured by the Italian version of the two Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF36v2). Its secondary endpoints were: scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); the number and duration of hospitalizations; the number of readmissions; the number of appointments with a pulmonary specialist; the number of visits to the emergency department; and the number of deaths. Three hundred thirty-four patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups for a 1 year period. At its conclusion, changes in the SF36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores did not significantly differ between the TM and control groups [(-2.07 (8.98) vs -1.91 (7.75); p = 0.889 and -1.08 (11.30) vs -1.92 (10.92); p = 0.5754, respectively]. Variations in HADS were not significantly different between the two groups [0.85 (3.68) vs 0.62 (3.6); p = 0.65 and 0.50 (4.3) vs 0.72 (4.5); p = 0.71]. The hospitalization rate for AECOPD and/or for any cause was not significantly different in the two groups [IRR = 0.89 (95% CI

  1. Medium term effects of kinesio taping in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Amanda Costa; do Carmo Silva Parreira, Patrícia; Junior, Luiz Carlos Hespanhol; da Silva, Tatiane Mota; da Luz Junior, Maurício Antônio; da Cunha Menezes Costa, Lucíola; Pena Costa, Leonardo Oliveira

    2016-12-23

    Kinesio taping is a commonly used intervention for patients with chronic low back pain. However, the medium term effects of kinesio taping in these patients are unknown. To investigate the effectiveness of kinesio taping in patients with chronic low back pain after 6 months from randomization. This was a randomized controlled trial with a 6 months follow up. One hundred and forty eight participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (kinesio taping with skin convolutions) or control (kinesio taping without convolutions-Sham Taping) group. Participants from both groups had the tape reapplied twice a week for four weeks. The outcomes were pain, disability and global impression of recovery after 6 months. One participant was lost to follow up in the experimental group (n=73, response rate 99%) and two in the control group (n=72, response rate 97%). After 6 months there were no statistically significant between-group differences in pain intensity (between-group difference -0.8 points, 95% CI -1.7 to 0.2), global impression of recovery (0.4, -0.7 to 1.5), or disability (-1.1, -3.0 to 0.7). Four weeks of kinesio taping treatment was no better than sham taping for patients with chronic low back pain, at 6 months follow-up. Trial Registration Number (http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/): RBR-7ggfkv (Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials). Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  3. Music therapy to promote psychological and physiological relaxation in palliative care patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Koenig, Julian; Wormit, Alexander F; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in different palliative care settings. Despite its long tradition and high acceptance by other health-care professionals, evidence on the effectiveness of music therapy interventions for terminally ill patients is rare. Recent reviews and health-care reports consistently point out the need of music therapists to provide an evidence-based rationale for their clinical treatments in this field. Therefore, the present study evaluates the psychological and physiological response of palliative care patients to a standardized music therapy relaxation intervention in a randomized controlled trial. A sample of 84 participants from a palliative care unit in Heidelberg is randomized to either two sessions of music therapy or two sessions of a verbal relaxation exercise, each lasting 30 minutes. The music therapy sessions consist of live played monochord music and a vocal improvisation, the control group uses a prerecorded excerpt from the mindfulness-based stress reduction program containing no musical elements. Outcome measures include self-report data on subjective relaxation, well-being, pain intensity, and quality of life, as well as continuous recording of heart rate variability and blood volume pulse as indicators of autonomous nervous system functioning. To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial in Europe and one of very few randomized controlled trials worldwide to systematically examine the effects of music therapy in palliative care. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137.

  4. A randomized clinical trial comparing fitness and biofeedback training versus basic treatment in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, Marijke; Bolwijn, Paulien; Verstappen, Frans; Bakker, Carla; Hidding, Alita; Houben, Harry; van der Heijde, Desiree; Landewé, Robert; van der Linden, Sjef

    2002-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of physical fitness training or biofeedback training with the results of usual care in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). One hundred forty-three female patients with FM (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were randomized into 3 groups: a fitness program (n =

  5. Combined spa-exercise therapy is effective in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tubergen, A.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Hidding, A.; Wolter, N.; Asscher, M.; Falkenbach, A.; Genth, E.; Thè, H. G.; van der Linden, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of combined spa-exercise therapy in addition to standard treatment with drugs and weekly group physical therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 120 Dutch outpatients with AS were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 40 patients each. Group 1 (mean

  6. Effective group training for patients with unexplained physical symptoms: a randomized controlled trial with a non-randomized one-year follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonne N L Zonneveld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cognitive-behavioral therapy for Unexplained Physical Symptoms (UPS is effective in secondary care, studies done in primary care produced implementation problems and conflicting results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group training tailored to primary care patients and provided by a secondary community mental-health service reaching out into primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effectiveness of this training was explored in a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, 162 patients with UPS classified as undifferentiated somatoform disorder or as chronic pain disorder were randomized either to the training or a waiting list. Both lasted 13 weeks. The preservation of the training's effect was analyzed in non-randomized follow-ups, for which the waiting group started the training after the waiting period. All patients attended the training were followed-up after three months and again after one year. The primary outcomes were the physical and the mental summary scales of the SF-36. Secondary outcomes were the other SF-36-scales and the SCL-90-R. The courses of the training's effects in the randomized controlled trial and the follow-ups were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. In the randomized controlled trial, the training had a significantly positive effect on the quality of life in the physical domain (Cohen's d = 0.38;p = .002, but this overall effect was not found in the mental domain. Regarding the secondary outcomes, the training resulted in reporting an improved physical (Cohen's d = 0.43;p = 0.01, emotional (Cohen's d = 0.44;p = 0.01, and social (Cohen's d = 0.36;p = 0.01 functioning, less pain and better functioning despite pain (Cohen's d = 0.51;p =

  7. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    is the primary outcome measure of the study. Secondary outcome measures include survival and economic consequences. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge the Pal-Rehab study is the first randomized, controlled, phase III trial to evaluate individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation in standard oncology care......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation....... The patients are randomized to a specialized palliative rehabilitation intervention integrated in standard oncology care or to standard oncology care alone. The intervention consists of a multidisciplinary group program, individual consultations, or a combination of both. At baseline and after six and 12 weeks...

  8. Delirium Outcomes in a Randomized Trial of Blood Transfusion Thresholds Among Hospitalized Older Patients with Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Marcantonio, Edward; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay; Terrin, Michael; Barr, Erik; Brown, Jessica Pelletier; Paris, Barbara; Zagorin, Aleksandra; Roffey, Darren M.; Zakriya, Khwaja; Blute, Mary-Rita; Hebel, J. Richard; Carson, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine if a higher blood transfusion threshold would prevent new or worsening delirium symptoms in the hospital after hip fracture surgery. Design Ancillary study to a randomized clinical trial. Setting Thirteen hospitals in United States and Canada. Participants One-hundred-thirty-nine hospitalized hip fracture patients, age ≥50, with cardiovascular disease or risk factors, and hemoglobin10 g/dL; 2) Restrictive: received transfusions if developed symptoms of anemia or hemoglobin fell below 8 g/dL. Measurements Delirium assessments performed pre-randomization and up to three times post-randomization. Primary outcome: Severity of delirium using Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) scale. Secondary outcome: presence or absence of delirium defined by Confusion Assessment Method Diagnostic Algorithm (CAM). Results Mean age was 81.5 (SD=9.1). Liberal group received a median 2 units and Restrictive group 0 units of blood. Hemoglobin concentration on day 1 post randomization was 1.4 g/dL higher in the Liberal group. Treatment groups did not significantly differ at any time point or over time on either MDAS delirium severity (p=0.28) or CAM delirium presence (p=0.83). Conclusion Blood transfusion to maintain hemoglobin >10 g/dL alone is unlikely to influence delirium severity or rate in postoperative hip fracture patients with hemoglobin concentration <10 g/dL. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00071032 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00071032 PMID:23898894

  9. Understanding breast cancer patients' preference for two types of exercise training during chemotherapy in an unblinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallance Jeffrey K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient preference for group assignment may affect outcomes in unblinded trials but few studies have attempted to understand such preferences. The purpose of the present study was to examine factors associated with breast cancer patients' preference for two types of exercise training during chemotherapy. Methods Breast cancer patients (N = 242 completed a battery of tests including a questionnaire that assessed patient preference and the theory of planned behavior (TPB prior to being randomized to usual care, resistance exercise training (RET, or aerobic exercise training (AET. Results 99 (40.9% participants preferred RET, 88 (36.4% preferred AET, and 55 (22.7% reported no preference. Past exercisers (p = 0.023, smokers (p = 0.004, and aerobically fitter participants (p = 0.005 were more likely to prefer RET. As hypothesized, participants that preferred AET had more favorable TPB beliefs about AET whereas participants that preferred RET had more favorable TPB beliefs about RET. In multivariate modeling, patient preference for RET versus AET was explained (R2 = .46; p 2 = .48; p Conclusion Breast cancer patients' preference for RET versus AET during chemotherapy was predicted largely by a difference in motivation for each type of exercise which, in turn, was based on differences in their beliefs about the anticipated benefits, enjoyment, and difficulty of performing each type of exercise during chemotherapy. These findings may help explain patient preference effects in unblinded behavioral trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00115713.

  10. Effects of Shenfu Injection in the Treatment of Septic Shock Patients: A Multicenter, Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Shenfu on biochemical parameters and survival during resuscitation in patients with septic shock was examined. This was a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label trial carried out in 210 patients with septic shock from seven medical centers in China. They were randomized to Shenfu or saline. The primary outcome was lactate clearance. The secondary outcomes were shock index normalization, dose of vasopressors, ICU stay, hospital stay, and mortality. A total of 199 patients completed the trial. Blood pressure, heart rate, and other routine lab tests showed no difference between the groups. Lactate levels and lactate clearance were similar between the two groups. Hospital and ICU stay were similar between the two groups. When considering all patients, the 7- and 28-day mortality were similar between the two groups, but when considering only patients with lactate levels ≥4.5 mmol/L, the Shenfu group showed a better 7-day survival than the control group (7 days: 83.3% versus 54.5%, P=0.034; 28 days: 72.7% versus 47.6%, P=0.092. Shenfu may improve the 7-day survival in patients with impaired lactate clearance (≥4.5 mmol/L, but the mechanism for this effect is unclear. Additional studies are necessary to characterize the hemodynamic changes after Shenfu infusion. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-TRC-11001369.

  11. PREVENTion of a parastomal hernia with a prosthetic mesh in patients undergoing permanent end-colostomy; the PREVENT-trial: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandsma Henk-Thijs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parastomal hernia is a common complication of a colostomy. Ultimately, one-third of patients with a parastomal hernia will need surgical correction due to frequent leakage or life-threatening bowel obstruction or strangulation. However, treatment remains a challenge resulting in high recurrence rates. Two single center trials demonstrated that the frequency of parastomal hernias decreases by prophylactic placement of a mesh around the stoma at the time of formation. Unfortunately, both studies were small-sized, single-center studies and with these small numbers less common complications could be missed which were the reasons to initiate a prospective randomized multicenter trial to determine if a retromuscular, preperitoneal mesh at the stoma site prevents parastomal hernia and does not cause unacceptable complications. Methods One hundred and fifty patients undergoing open procedure, elective formation of a permanent end-colostomy will be randomized into two groups. In the intervention group an end-colostomy is created with placement of a preperitioneal, retromuscular lightweight monofilament polypropylene mesh, and compared to a group with a traditional stoma without mesh. Patients will be recruited from 14 teaching hospitals in the Netherlands during a 2-year period. Primary endpoint is the incidence of parastomal hernia. Secondary endpoints are stoma complications, cost-effectiveness, and quality of life. Follow-up will be performed at 3 weeks, 3 months and at 1, 2, and 5 years. To find a difference of 20% with a power of 90%, a total number of 134 patients must be included. All results will be reported according to the CONSORT 2010 statement. Discussion The PREVENT-trial is a multicenter randomized controlled trial powered to determine whether prophylactic placement of a polypropylene mesh decreases the incidence of a parastomal hernia versus the traditional stoma formation without a mesh. Trial registration The PREVENT-trial

  12. Apriori feasibility testing of randomized clinical trial design in patients with cleft deformities and Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvaine, Elizabeth; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lane, Christianne J; Azen, Stanley P; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2014-05-01

    To assess the feasibility of randomizing treatment (surgical vs. non-surgical) for correction of a Class III malocclusion (underbite) resulting from an earlier repair of cleft lip and palate. Surveys about willingness to accept randomized treatment during adolescence were mailed to the parents of cleft lip and palate patients under the care of Children's Hospital Los Angeles between 2005 and 2010. The inclusion criteria were patients with cleft lip and palate, Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency, and absence of medical and cognitive contraindications to treatment. Out of 287 surveys, 82 (28%) were completed and returned; 47% of the subjects held a strong treatment preference (95% CI, 35-58%), while 30% were willing to accept randomization (95% CI, 20-41%). Seventy-eight percent would drop out of a randomized trial if dissatisfied with the assigned treatment (95% CI, 67-86%). The three most commonly cited reasons for being unwilling to accept random treatment assignment were 1) the desire for doctors to choose the best treatment, 2) the desire for parents to have input on treatment, and 3) the desire to correct the underbite as early as possible. Based on this study, parents and patients would be unwilling to accept a randomly assigned treatment and would not remain in an assigned group if treatment did not meet expectations. This highlight the limitations associated with randomization trials involving surgical modalities and provide justification for other research models (e.g., cohort studies) to compare two treatment options when randomization is not feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Closed-Incision Negative-Pressure Therapy in Obese Patients Undergoing Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gunatilake, Ravindu P.; Swamy, Geeta K.; Brancazio, Leo R.; Smrtka, Michael P.; Thompson, Jennifer L.; Gilner, Jennifer B.; Gray, Beverly A.; Heine, Robert Phillips

    2017-01-01

    Background ?Postcesarean wound morbidity is a costly complication of cesarean delivery for which preventative strategies remain understudied. Objective ?We compared surgical site occurrences (SSOs) in cesarean patients receiving closed-incision negative-pressure therapy (ciNPT) or standard-of-care (SOC) dressing. Study Design ?A single-center randomized controlled trial compared ciNPT (5?7 days) to SOC dressing (1?2 days) in obese women (body mass index [BMI]???35), undergoing cesarean delive...

  14. The Effects of Exercise with TENS on Spasticity, Balance, and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Junhyuck; Seo, DongKwon; Choi, Wonjae; Lee, Seungwon

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a useful modality for pain control. TENS has recently been applied to decrease spasticity. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the addition of TENS to an exercise program reduces spasticity and improves balance and gait in chronic stroke patients. Material/Methods This was a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Thirty-four ambulatory individuals with chronic stroke participated and were randoml...

  15. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    in a 12-week individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation program initiated shortly after a diagnosis of advanced cancer. METHODS: This single center, randomized, controlled trial will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer recruited from the Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital...... initiated shortly after an advanced cancer diagnosis. The study will contribute with evidence on the effectiveness of implementing early palliative care in standard oncology treatment and hopefully offer new knowledge and future directions as to the content of palliative rehabilitation programs. TRIAL......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation...

  16. Intravaginal stimulation randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J J

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravaginal electrical stimulation was compared to standard therapy in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability. A total of 57 women with urinary incontinence was evaluated with video urodynamics and voiding diaries before and after treatment. Of the women 18 with stress urinary incontinence were randomized to electrical stimulation or Kegel exercise and 38 with detrusor instability were randomized to anticholinergic therapy or electrical stimulation. Of patients using electrical stimulation in the stress urinary incontinence group 66% improved and 72% of the patients with detrusor instability treated with electrical stimulation improved. These rates were not statistically significant when compared to traditional therapy. Electrical stimulation is safe and at least as effective as properly performed Kegel and anticholinergic therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability.

  17. Randomized-controlled trial of esomeprazole in functional dyspepsia patients with epigastric pain or burning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talley, N J; Vakil, N; Lauritsen, K

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early identification of true responders to acid suppression in functional dyspepsia patients with symptoms of epigastric pain or burning may enable clinicians to optimally tailor treatment. AIM: To evaluate whether a 1-w acid suppression trial is useful for identifying true responders...

  18. OPPORTUNITY™: a large-scale randomized clinical trial of growth hormone in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopple, Joel D; Cheung, Alfred K; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2011-01-01

    Adult maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients experience high mortality and morbidity and poor quality of life (QoL). Markers of protein-energy wasting are associated with these poor outcomes. The OPPORTUNITY™ Trial examined whether recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) reduces mortality...

  19. OPPORTUNITYTM: a large-scale randomized clinical trial of growth hormone in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopple, Joel D; Cheung, Alfred K; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2011-01-01

    Adult maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients experience high mortality and morbidity and poor quality of life (QoL). Markers of protein-energy wasting are associated with these poor outcomes. The OPPORTUNITY™ Trial examined whether recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) reduces mortality...

  20. Using a partially randomized patient preference study design to evaluate the therapeutic effect of acupuncture and cupping therapy for fibromyalgia: study protocol for a partially randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Conducting randomized controlled trials on traditional Chinese non-drug therapies has been limited by factors such as patient preference to specific treatment modality. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of applying a partially randomized patient preference (PRPP) trial model in evaluating the efficacy of two types of traditional Chinese medicine therapies, acupuncture and cupping, for fibromyalgia while accounting for patients’ preference of either therapeutic modality. Methods This protocol was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of affiliated Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (approval number: 2013052104-2). One hundred participants with fibromyalgia will be included in this study. Diagnosis of fibromyalgia will be based on the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Before treatment, participants will be interviewed for their preference toward acupuncture or cupping therapy. Fifty participants with no preference will be randomly assigned to one of the two groups and another 50 participants with strong preference to either acupuncture or cupping will receive what they choose. For acupuncture and cupping therapy, the main acupoints used will be tender points (Ashi). Treatment will be three times a week for 5 consecutive weeks with a follow-up period of 12 weeks. Outcome measures will be qualitative (patient expectation and satisfaction) and quantitative (pain intensity, quality of life, depression assessment). Trial registration number NCT01869712 (in clinicaltrials.gov, on 22nd May 2013). PMID:25012121

  1. Hemodialysis without systemic anticoagulation: a prospective randomized trial to evaluate 3 strategies in patients at risk of bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Guéry

    Full Text Available In this clinical trial, we aimed to compare three means of performing chronic hemodialysis in patients with contra-indication to systemic heparinization.This open-label monocentric randomized « n-of-one » trial, conducted in a single tertiary care center, recruited chronic hemodialysis patients with a contra-indication to systemic heparinization for at least 3 consecutive sessions. All patients underwent hemodialysis with an AN69ST dialyzer, and were administered three alternative dialysis procedures in a random sequence: intermittent saline flushes, constant saline infusion, or pre-dialysis heparin coating of the membrane. The primary outcome was the need to interrupt the dialysis session because of clotting events due to either (i a complete coagulation of the circuit; (ii a partial coagulation of the circuit; (iii a>50% rise over baseline in the venous pressure.At the end of the inclusion period (May, 2007 to December, 2008, the number of patients to include (n=75 was not reached: only 46 patients were included and underwent randomization. The study was terminated, and statistical analysis took into account 224 hemodialysis sessions performed in 44 patients with analyzable data. Heparin adsorption was associated with a significant reduction of the need to interrupt the dialysis session because of clotting events: odds ratio 0.3 (CI 95% 0.2 to 0.6; p3 h dialysis sessions and for having complete blood restitution. There were no significant effects of the dialysis procedure on weight loss, online ionic dialysance, and adverse events.Heparin-coated AN69ST dialysis membrane is a safe and effective method to avoid or delay per-dialytic clotting events in patients with contra-indication to systemic anticoagulation. However, results are not generalizable safely to patients with active bleeding, since weak heparinemia, not assessed in this study, may occur.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00473109.

  2. [Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials of Eye-acupuncture Therapy for Patients with Post-stroke Insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Yang; Wang, Peng-Qin

    2017-02-25

    To observe the therapeutic effect of eye-acupuncture therapy for post-stroke insomnia. Sixty patients (45-70 years in age) with post-stroke insomnia were randomized into eye-acupuncture group and routine acupuncture (body acupuncture) group (30 cases in each). Patients of the eye-acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of bilateral Shangjiao (Upper-energizer) and Xin (Heart) regions and those of the routine acupuncture group treated by acupuncture stimulation of Baihui (GV 20), Sishencong (EX-HN 1), Anmian (EX-HN 16), etc. After Deqi, the filiform needles were retained for 20 min, and the treatment in both groups was conducted once a day, with 15 days being one therapeutic course and 2 courses altogether. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) including the subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, daytime dysfunction, and total PSQI score was used to evaluate the overall sleep quality. The clinical efficacy was assessed according to the "Guiding Principles of Clinical Trials for New Drugs of Traditional Chinese Medicine" formulated by Chinese Ministry of Health. Following the treatment, of the two 30 cases in the eye-and routine acupuncture groups, 21 and 9 experienced a marked improvement in their symptoms, 8 and 17 were effective, and 1 and 4 invalid, with the effective rate being 96.7% and 86.7%, respectively. The PSQI scores of the subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, daytime dysfunction, and the total PSQI score were all significantly decreased in comparison with pre-treatment in each group (Pacupuncture was markedly superior to those of routine acupuncture in reducing sleep latency, sleep disturbances and daytime dysfunction (Pefficiency and total PSQI score (P>0.05). Both eye-acupuncture and routine acupunture are effective in the treatment of post-stroke insomnia, and the eye-acupuncture is better than

  3. The effectiveness of anxiety treatment on alcohol-dependent patients with a comorbid phobic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadé, Annemiek; Marquenie, Loes A; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Koeter, Maarten W J; de Beurs, Edwin; van den Brink, Wim; van Dyck, Richard

    2005-05-01

    Evidence has emerged which indicates that the post-treatment relapse rate for alcohol-dependent patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder is higher than for alcohol-dependent patients without a comorbid anxiety disorder. The question raised by this evidence is whether the relapse rate in these dually diagnosed patients could be reduced if they were given additional treatment for the comorbid anxiety disorder. We attempted to answer this question by conducting a trial among patients with a double diagnosis of alcohol dependence and agoraphobia or social phobia. We conducted a 32-week randomized controlled trial among 96 abstinent patients with a primary diagnosis of alcohol dependence and a comorbid anxiety disorder involving agoraphobia or social phobia. The patients were randomly assigned to an intensive psychosocial relapse-prevention program on its own (n = 49) or in combination with an anxiety treatment program comprising cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and optional pharmacotherapy consisting of an SSRI (n = 47). The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients who suffered an alcohol relapse during a 32-week period. The secondary outcome measures were total abstinence, a reduction in the days of heavy drinking, and less severe anxiety symptoms. Although the additional therapy clearly reduced the anxiety symptoms, it had no significant effect on the alcohol relapse rates. Anxiety treatment for alcohol-dependent patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder can alleviate anxiety symptoms, but it has no significant effect on the outcome of alcohol treatment programs.

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine combination therapy for patients with steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Shen, Hong; Jia, Jia; Lu, Yuelin; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Lu; Shen, Zhaofeng

    2017-01-10

    Approximately 20% of patients with ulcerative colitis become steroid dependent. Azathioprine is recommended in steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis, but its side effects limit its use. Chinese herbal medicine has been widely used to treat ulcerative colitis in China. However, its effectiveness in steroid-dependent patients has not been evaluated. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine combination therapy with 5-aminosalicylic acid in patients with steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis. This is a parallel, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and twenty eligible patients will be randomly assigned to a traditional Chinese medicine group or azathioprine group. All patients will be given basic treatment, which includes steroids and 5-aminosalicylic acid. Patients allocated to the traditional Chinese medicine group will receive basic treatment plus Chinese herbal medicine granules, while patients in the azathioprine group will receive basic treatment plus azathioprine. The whole study will last 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is the steroid-free remission rate. Secondary outcome measures are health-related quality of life, efficacy of endoscopic response, degree of mucosal healing, and inflammation indicators. Results from this study may provide evidence for the effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine combined with 5-aminosalicylic acid in patients with steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis. The findings will provide a basis for further confirmatory studies. Chinese Clinical Trial Register, ChiCTR-IPR-15005760 . Registered on 2 January 2015.

  5. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients (REACT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierink Joanne C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computed tomography (CT scanning has become essential in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care because of its high diagnostic accuracy. The introduction of multi-slice CT scanners and infrastructural improvements made total-body CT scanning technically feasible and its usage is currently becoming common practice in several trauma centers. However, literature provides limited evidence whether immediate total-body CT leads to better clinical outcome then conventional radiographic imaging supplemented with selective CT scanning in trauma patients. The aim of the REACT-2 trial is to determine the value of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients. Methods/design The REACT-2 trial is an international, multicenter randomized clinical trial. All participating trauma centers have a multi-slice CT scanner located in the trauma room or at the Emergency Department (ED. All adult, non-pregnant, severely injured trauma patients according to predefined criteria will be included. Patients in whom direct scanning will hamper necessary cardiopulmonary resuscitation or who require an immediate operation because of imminent death (both as judged by the trauma team leader are excluded. Randomization will be computer assisted. The intervention group will receive a contrast-enhanced total-body CT scan (head to pelvis during the primary survey. The control group will be evaluated according to local conventional trauma imaging protocols (based on ATLS guidelines supplemented with selective CT scanning. Primary outcome will be in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes are differences in mortality and morbidity during the first year post trauma, several trauma work-up time intervals, radiation exposure, general health and quality of life at 6 and 12 months post trauma and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The REACT-2 trial is a multicenter randomized clinical trial that will provide evidence on the value of immediate total-body CT scanning

  6. Effects of sertindole on cognition in clozapine-treated schizophrenia patients - a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R E; Levander, S; Nielsen, Jimmi

    . Method:  A 12-week, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, augmentation study of patients treated with clozapine. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive 16 mg of sertindole or placebo as adjunctive treatment to clozapine. Results:  Participants displayed substantial cognitive deficits......Nielsen RE, Levander S, Thode D, Nielsen J. Effects of sertindole on cognition in clozapine-treated schizophrenia patients. Objective:  To assess the cognitive effects of sertindole augmentation in clozapine-treated patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Cognition is secondary outcome of the trial...... changes in cognitive test performance, and found no significant correlations. Conclusion:  The clozapine-treated patients displayed marked cognitive deficits at baseline. Adding sertindole did not improve or worsen cognitive functioning, which is in line with previous negative studies of the effect...

  7. Effects of a resistance training program on balance and fatigue perception in patients with Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rubio, Araceli; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Casilda-López, Jesús; López-López, Laura; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2017-11-22

    Fatigue and balance impairment leads to a loss of independence and are important to adequately manage. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a resistance training program on dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial. Forty-six patients with PD were randomly allocated to an intervention group receiving a 8-week resistance training program focused on lower limbs or to a control group. Balance was assessed using the Mini-BESTest and fatigue was assessed by the Piper Fatigue Scale. Patients in the intervention group improved significantly (p<0.05) on dynamic balance (reactive postural control and total values) and perceived fatigue. An 8-week resistance training program was found to be effective at improving dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Probiotic Fermented Milk (Kefir) on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profile In Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Ostadrahimi; Akbar Taghizadeh; Majid Mobasseri; Nazila Farrin; Laleh Payahoo; Zahra Beyramalipoor Gheshlaghi; Morteza Vahedjabbari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a global health problem in the world. Probiotic food has anti-diabetic property. The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of probiotic fermented milk (kefir) on glucose and lipid profile control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 60 diabetic patients aged 35 to 65 years.Patients were randomly and equally (n=30) assigned to consume either probiotic fermented milk (k...

  9. Prevention of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (DECARD) randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten Rygaard; Hansen, Baiba Hedegaard; Hanash, Jamal Abed

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Escitalopram may prevent depression following acute coronary syndrome. We sought to estimate the effects of escitalopram on self-reported health and to identify subgroups with higher efficacy. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a 12-month double-blind clinical trial randomizing non...... trajectories on any scale compared with placebo (P > 0.28). Efficacy of escitalopram may have been better among those scoring at least the normative score on general health perceptions (hazard ratio (HR) for depression 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.02-1.42) ) or social functioning (HR = 0.12 (0...

  10. The effect of geriatric intervention in frail elderly patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: a randomized trial (GERICO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, C M; Vistisen, K K; Dehlendorff, C; Rønholt, F; Johansen, J S; Nielsen, D L

    2017-06-28

    Better surgical techniques, chemotherapy and biological therapy have improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), most markedly in younger patients. About half of patients over 70 years receive dose reductions or early treatment discontinuation of the planned adjuvant or first-line treatment due to side effects. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary evaluation of an elderly individual's health status. This assessment in older patients with cancer can predict survival, chemotherapy toxicity and morbidity. This randomized phase II trial (GERICO) is designed to investigate whether comprehensive geriatric assessment and intervention before and during treatment with chemotherapy in frail elderly patients with stages II-IV CRC will increase the number of patients completing chemotherapy. All patients ≥70 years in whom chemotherapy for CRC is planned to start at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital are screened for frailty using the G8 questionnaire at the first visit to the outpatient clinic. The G8 questionnaire is a multi-domain screening tool to identify frail or vulnerable patients at risk of increased toxicity and morbidity. Frail patients are offered inclusion and are then randomized to two groups (the intervention group and the control group). Patients in the intervention group receive a full geriatric assessment of comorbidity, medication, psycho-cognitive function, physical, functional and nutrition status, and interventions are undertaken on identified health issues. Simultaneously, they are treated for their cancer according to international guidelines. Patients in the control group receive the same chemotherapy regimens and standard of care. Primary outcome is number of patients completing scheduled chemotherapy at starting dose. Secondary outcomes are dose reductions, treatment delays, toxicity, time to recurrence, survival, cancer-related mortality and quality of life. This ongoing trial is one of the first to

  11. Treatment of new-onset atrial fibrillation in noncardiac intensive care unit patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Salmaan; Stewart, Robert; Fergusson, Dean A; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Turgeon, Alexis F; Hébert, Paul C

    2008-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common problem associated with morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients; however, evidence-based treatment recommendations are lacking. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacologic rhythm control of new-onset atrial fibrillation in noncardiac, critically ill adults. Citations identified from an electronic search of Medline, the Cochrane register of controlled trials, and Embase databases (1966 to August 2006) were independently reviewed by two investigators. All prospective randomized controlled trials evaluating pharmacologic rhythm conversion regimens for new-onset atrial fibrillation in (noncardiac surgery) critically ill adult patients were included. The primary end point was atrial fibrillation resolution. Using a standardized data extraction form, data related to study design, population characteristics, pharmacologic intervention, and outcome measures were collected. Four trials met inclusion criteria from 1995 citations screened. Of the 143 evaluable patients in these trials 89 (76%) had atrial fibrillation while the remaining ones had other atrial tachyarrhythmias. Drugs evaluated for rhythm conversion included amiodarone (n = 26), procainamide (n = 14), magnesium (n = 18), flecainide (n = 15), esmolol (n = 28), verapamil (n = 15), and diltiazem (n = 27). The definition of treatment success ranged from conversion within 1 hr to conversion within 24 hrs. No study evaluated maintenance of conversion, and one study included hemodynamically unstable patients. Lack of methodologic homogeneity prevented any pooled analysis. Using the current published literature, we cannot recommend a standard treatment for atrial fibrillation in noncardiac critically ill adult patients. Clinical trials evaluating rhythm conversion in critically ill populations outside of cardiac surgery are lacking. Further trials that address goals of care in hemodynamically stable and unstable patients and utilize

  12. Effects of exercise and diet in nonobese asthma patients - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Meteran, Howraman; Hostrup, Morten

    2017-01-01

    the effects of an 8-week intervention of either exercise (high-intensity interval training), diet (high protein/low glycemic index), or a combination of the 2, on asthma control and clinical outcomes in nonobese patients with asthma. METHODS: Nonobese adult patients with asthma (n = 149) were randomized to 1......BACKGROUND: Behavioral interventions focusing on exercise and healthy diet improve asthma control in obese patients with asthma, but whether these interventions can lead to improvements in nonobese patients remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: In a randomized, controlled parallel-group design, we studied...... of 4 groups: an exercise group, a diet group, an exercise + diet group, or a control group. Outcomes included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, asthma-related quality-of-life (Asthma-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [AQLQ]) score, inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum, FEV1...

  13. Efficacy of dignity therapy on depression and anxiety in Portuguese terminally ill patients: a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Miguel; Oliveira, Fátima; Nunes, Baltazar; Vaz Carneiro, António; Barbosa, António

    2014-06-01

    Dignity therapy is a brief psychotherapy developed for patients living with a life-limiting illness. To determine the influence of dignity therapy on depression and anxiety in inpatients with a terminal illness and experiencing a high level of distress in a palliative care unit. A nonblinded phase II randomized controlled trial of 80 patients who were randomly assigned to one of two groups: intervention group (dignity therapy+standard palliative care [SPC]) or control group (SPC alone). The main outcomes were depression and anxiety scores, as measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and assessed at baseline (T1), day 4 (T2), day 15 (T3), and day 30 (T4) of follow-up. This study is registered with www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN34354086. Of the final 80 participants, 41 were randomly assigned to SPC and 39 to dignity therapy. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Dignity therapy was associated with a decrease in depression scores (median, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.00, -6.00 to -2.00, pdepression and anxiety symptoms in end-of-life care. The therapeutic benefit of dignity therapy was sustained over a 30-day period. Having established its efficacy, future trials of dignity therapy may now begin, comparing it with other psychotherapeutic approaches within the context of terminal illness.

  14. The effects of reducing worry in patients with persecutory delusions: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our approach to advancing the treatment of psychosis is to focus on key single symptoms and develop interventions that target the mechanisms that maintain them. In our theoretical research we have found worry to be an important factor in the development and maintenance of persecutory delusions. Worry brings implausible ideas to mind, keeps them there, and makes the experience distressing. Therefore the aim of the trial is to test the clinical efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for worry for patients with persecutory delusions and determine how the worry treatment might reduce delusions. Methods/Design An explanatory randomized controlled trial - called the Worry Intervention Trial (WIT - with 150 patients with persecutory delusions will be carried out. Patients will be randomized to the worry intervention in addition to standard care or to standard care. Randomization will be carried out independently, assessments carried out single-blind, and therapy competence and adherence monitored. The study population will be individuals with persecutory delusions and worry in the context of a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis. They will not have responded adequately to previous treatment. The intervention is a six-session cognitive-behavioral treatment provided over eight weeks. The control condition will be treatment as usual, which is typically antipsychotic medication and regular appointments. The principal hypotheses are that a worry intervention will reduce levels of worry and that it will also reduce the persecutory delusions. Assessments will be carried out at 0 weeks (baseline, 8 weeks (post treatment and 24 weeks (follow-up. The statistical analysis strategy will follow the intention-to-treat principle and involve the use of linear mixed models to evaluate and estimate the relevant between- and within-subjects effects (allowing for the possibility of missing data. Both traditional regression and newer instrumental

  15. Effect of modafinil on cognitive functions in alcohol dependent patients: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joos, Leen; Goudriaan, Anna E.; Schmaal, Lianne; van den Brink, Wim; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Dom, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are highly prevalent in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients and may have a detrimental impact on treatment response and treatment outcome. Enhancing cognitive functions may improve treatment success. Modafinil is a promising compound in this respect. Therefore, a randomized

  16. Cytokine Inhibition in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerink, M.E.; Bredie, S.J.H.; Heijnen, M.; Dinarello, C.A.; Knoop, H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1), an important proinflammatory cytokine, is suspected to play a role in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Objective: To evaluate the effect of subcutaneous anakinra versus placebo on fatigue severity in female patients with CFS. Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled

  17. Partnering around cancer clinical trials (PACCT): study protocol for a randomized trial of a patient and physician communication intervention to increase minority accrual to prostate cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggly, Susan; Hamel, Lauren M; Heath, Elisabeth; Manning, Mark A; Albrecht, Terrance L; Barton, Ellen; Wojda, Mark; Foster, Tanina; Carducci, Michael; Lansey, Dina; Wang, Ting; Abdallah, Rehab; Abrahamian, Narineh; Kim, Seongho; Senft, Nicole; Penner, Louis A

    2017-12-02

    Cancer clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments and represent state-of-the-art cancer treatment, but only a small percentage of patients ever enroll in a trial. Under-enrollment is an even greater problem among minorities, particularly African Americans, representing a racial/ethnic disparity in cancer care. One understudied cause is patient-physician communication, which is often of poor quality during clinical interactions between African-American patients and non-African-American physicians. Partnering Around Cancer Clinical Trials (PACCT) involves a transdisciplinary theoretical model proposing that patient and physician individual attitudes and beliefs and their interpersonal communication during racially discordant clinical interactions influence outcomes related to patients' decisions to participate in a trial. The overall goal of the study is to test a multilevel intervention designed to increase rates at which African-American and White men with prostate cancer make an informed decision to participate in a clinical trial. Data collection will occur at two NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Participants include physicians who treat men with prostate cancer and their African-American and White patients who are potentially eligible for a clinical trial. The study uses two distinct research designs to evaluate the effects of two behavioral interventions, one focused on patients and the other on physicians. The primary goal is to increase the number of patients who decide to enroll in a trial; secondary goals include increasing rates of physician trial offers, improving the quality of patient-physician communication during video recorded clinical interactions in which trials may be discussed, improving patients' understanding of trials offered, and increasing the number of patients who actually enroll. Aims are to 1) determine the independent and combined effects of the two interventions on outcomes; 2) compare the effects of the

  18. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy by intravascular ultrasound in heart transplant patients: substudy from the Everolimus versus mycophenolate mofetil randomized, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Jon A; Pauly, Daniel F; Starling, Randall C; Eisen, Howard; Ross, Heather; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Cantin, Bernard; Hill, James A; Lopez, Patricia; Dong, Gaohong; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    A pre-planned substudy of a larger multicenter randomized trial was undertaken to compare the efficacy of everolimus with reduced-dose cyclosporine in the prevention of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation to that of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with standard-dose cyclosporine. CAV is a major cause of long-term mortality following heart transplantation. Everolimus has been shown to reduce the severity and incidence of CAV as measured by first year intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). MMF, in combination with cyclosporine, has also been shown to have a beneficial effect in slowing the progression of CAV. Study patients were a pre-specified subgroup of the 553-patient Everolimus versus mycophenolate mofetil in heart transplantation: a randomized, multicenter trial who underwent heart transplantation and were randomized to everolimus 1.5 mg or MMF 3 g/day. IVUS was performed at baseline and at 12 months. Evaluable IVUS data were available in 189 patients (34.6%). Increase in average maximal intimal thickness (MIT) from baseline to month 12 was significantly smaller in the everolimus 1.5 mg group compared with the MMF group (0.03 mm vs. 0.07 mm, p transplant recipients after 1 year, a finding, which was maintained in a range of patient subpopulations. CV surgery: transplantation, ventricular assistance, cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Methodology for randomized trials of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: recommendations from an international consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Spiegel, Brennan; Rostom, Alaa; Moayyedi, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bardou, Marc; Sung, Joseph; Barkun, Alan N

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this document is to provide a methodological framework for the design, performance, analysis, interpretation, and communication of randomized trials that assess management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Literature searches were performed and an iterative process with electronic and face-to-face meetings was used to achieve consensus among panel members as part of an International Consensus Conference on Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Recommendations of the panel include the following. Randomized trials must explicitly state their primary hypothesis. A nonmanipulable randomization schedule with concealed allocation should be used. Stratification (e.g., for age and stigmata of hemorrhage) may be considered, especially in smaller studies. The patient and personnel providing care or recording information should be blinded. Inclusion criteria should be overt bleeding with endoscopy performed within 24 h or less. One type of lesion (e.g., ulcer) should be studied with stigmata to be included predefined. Use of placebo/no therapy vs. active controls depends on current standard practice. Standardizing study and key non-study interventions should ensure uniform provision of interventions. Criteria for repeat endoscopy and subsequent interventions should be predefined. The primary end point should be further bleeding (persistent and recurrent bleeding) with primary assessment at 7 days; mortality, with primary assessment at 30 days, would be appropriate in very large trials. Sample size calculation based on assumptions regarding primary end point results with regard to study intervention and control must be provided, and all patients enrolled must be accounted for. In general, the primary population for analysis is all patients randomized, although a per-protocol population may be used if this is the more conservative approach (e.g., equivalence study).

  20. Early identification of and proactive palliative care for patients in general practice, incentive and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoonsen Bregje

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the Word Health Organization, patients who can benefit from palliative care should be identified earlier to enable proactive palliative care. Up to now, this is not common practice and has hardly been addressed in scientific literature. Still, palliative care is limited to the terminal phase and restricted to patients with cancer. Therefore, we trained general practitioners (GPs in identifying palliative patients in an earlier phase of their disease trajectory and in delivering structured proactive palliative care. The aim of our study is to determine if this training, in combination with consulting an expert in palliative care regarding each palliative patient's tailored care plan, can improve different aspects of the quality of the remaining life of patients with severe chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure and cancer. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial was performed. As outcome variables we studied: place of death, number of hospital admissions and number of GP out of hours contacts. Discussion We expect that this study will increase the number of identified palliative care patients and improve different aspects of quality of palliative care. This is of importance to improve palliative care for patients with COPD, CHF and cancer and their informal caregivers, and to empower the GP. The study protocol is described and possible strengths and weaknesses and possible consequences have been outlined. Trial Registration The Netherlands National Trial Register: NTR2815

  1. Effects of a leukocyte depleting arterial line filter on perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a controlled randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Noval, Santiago R; Amaya, Rosario; Herruzo, Angel; Hernández, Ana; Ordóñez, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Camacho, Pedro

    2005-10-01

    Activated leukocytes may increase morbidity in cardiac surgery. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence on morbidity of leukocyte-depleting blood filters placed into the arterial line of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Simple, blind, prospective, randomized and controlled clinical trial carried out in a cardiac surgery ICU at a university center. We included 159 consecutive low-risk patients (ie, Parsonnet score < 10) undergoing cardiac surgery who were initially stratified in three risk levels according to the Parsonnet score at admission into the hospital (ie, low, < 4; middle, 4 to 7; and high, 8 to 10). Once stratified, all patients were randomized to undergo cardiopulmonary bypass either with a conventional blood filter or with a leukocyte filter (randomization ratio, 2:1). The outcome variable was morbidity. Patients were considered to have a high morbidity if any of the following clinical situations were present (ie, pulmonary dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction, perioperative infections, postoperative hyperthermia, and hyperdynamic states). The leukocyte filter was used in 52 patients and the conventional filter in 107 patients. The morbidity rate was similar in both groups, but patients with leukocyte filter had a lower incidence of perioperative infections, fever, and hyperdynamic states as compared with patients with the conventional filter. Leukocyte filtration in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal perfusion showed no measurable effects on postoperative morbidity. However, although not statistically significant, a decrease was observed in the rates of perioperative infection, fever, and hyperdynamic states.

  2. Using a partially randomized patient preference study design to evaluate the therapeutic effect of acupuncture and cupping therapy for fibromyalgia: study protocol for a partially randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui-Juan; Liu, Jian-Ping; Hu, Hui; Wang, Nissi S

    2014-07-10

    Conducting randomized controlled trials on traditional Chinese non-drug therapies has been limited by factors such as patient preference to specific treatment modality. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of applying a partially randomized patient preference (PRPP) trial model in evaluating the efficacy of two types of traditional Chinese medicine therapies, acupuncture and cupping, for fibromyalgia while accounting for patients' preference of either therapeutic modality. This protocol was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of affiliated Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (approval number: 2013052104-2). One hundred participants with fibromyalgia will be included in this study. Diagnosis of fibromyalgia will be based on the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Before treatment, participants will be interviewed for their preference toward acupuncture or cupping therapy. Fifty participants with no preference will be randomly assigned to one of the two groups and another 50 participants with strong preference to either acupuncture or cupping will receive what they choose. For acupuncture and cupping therapy, the main acupoints used will be tender points (Ashi). Treatment will be three times a week for 5 consecutive weeks with a follow-up period of 12 weeks. Outcome measures will be qualitative (patient expectation and satisfaction) and quantitative (pain intensity, quality of life, depression assessment). NCT01869712 (in clinicaltrials.gov, on 22nd May 2013).

  3. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: a qualitative review of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, M; Møller, A M

    2010-01-01

    In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient......-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003...... of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid...

  4. A Randomized Trial to Determine the Impact of an Educational Patient Hand-Hygiene Intervention on Contamination of Hospitalized Patient's Hands with Healthcare-Associated Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Knighton, Shanina; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Donskey, Curtis J

    2017-05-01

    We conducted a non-blinded randomized trial to determine the impact of a patient hand-hygiene intervention on contamination of hospitalized patients' hands with healthcare-associated pathogens. Among patients with negative hand cultures on admission, recovery of pathogens from hands was significantly reduced in those receiving the intervention versus those receiving standard care. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:595-597.

  5. Teaching Medical Students to Help Patients Quit Smoking: Outcomes of a 10-School Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockene, Judith K; Hayes, Rashelle B; Churchill, Linda C; Crawford, Sybil L; Jolicoeur, Denise G; Murray, David M; Shoben, Abigail B; David, Sean P; Ferguson, Kristi J; Huggett, Kathryn N; Adams, Michael; Okuliar, Catherine A; Gross, Robin L; Bass, Pat F; Greenberg, Ruth B; Leone, Frank T; Okuyemi, Kola S; Rudy, David W; Waugh, Jonathan B; Geller, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Early in medical education, physicians must develop competencies needed for tobacco dependence treatment. To assess the effect of a multi-modal tobacco dependence treatment curriculum on medical students' counseling skills. A group-randomized controlled trial (2010-2014) included ten U.S. medical schools that were randomized to receive either multi-modal tobacco treatment education (MME) or traditional tobacco treatment education (TE). Students from the classes of 2012 and 2014 at ten medical schools participated. Students from the class of 2012 (N = 1345) completed objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), and 50 % (N = 660) were randomly selected for pre-intervention evaluation. A total of 72.9 % of eligible students (N = 1096) from the class of 2014 completed an OSCE and 69.7 % (N = 1047) completed pre and post surveys. The MME included a Web-based course, a role-play classroom demonstration, and a clerkship booster session. Clerkship preceptors in MME schools participated in an academic detailing module and were encouraged to be role models for third-year students. The primary outcome was student tobacco treatment skills using the 5As measured by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) scored on a 33-item behavior checklist. Secondary outcomes were student self-reported skills for performing 5As and pharmacotherapy counseling. Although the difference was not statistically significant, MME students completed more tobacco counseling behaviors on the OSCE checklist (mean 8.7 [SE 0.6] vs. mean 8.0 [SE 0.6], p = 0.52) than TE students. Several of the individual Assist and Arrange items were significantly more likely to have been completed by MME students, including suggesting behavioral strategies (11.8 % vs. 4.5 %, p < 0.001) and providing information regarding quitline (21.0 % vs. 3.8 %, p < 0.001). MME students reported higher self-efficacy for Assist, Arrange, and Pharmacotherapy counseling items (ps

  6. Effects of myofascial release techniques on pain, physical function, and postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Saavedra-Hernández, Manuel; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    To determine the effect of myofascial release techniques on pain symptoms, postural stability and physical function in fibromyalgia syndrome. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Eighty-six patients with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a placebo group. Patients received treatments for 20 weeks. The experimental group underwent 10 myofascial release modalities and the placebo group received sham short-wave and ultrasound electrotherapy. Outcome variables were number of tender points, pain, postural stability, physical function, clinical severity and global clinical assessment of improvement. Outcome measures were assessed before and immediately after, at six months and one year after the last session of the corresponding intervention. After 20 weeks of myofascial therapy, the experimental group showed a significant improvement (P  myofascial release techniques can be a complementary therapy for pain symptoms, physical function and clinical severity but do not improve postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

  7. Patient navigation for breast and colorectal cancer treatment: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Whitley, Elizabeth; Hendren, Samantha; Raich, Peter; Humiston, Sharon; Winters, Paul; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Valverde, Patricia; Thorland, William; Epstein, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    There is limited high-quality evidence about the impact of patient navigation (PN) on outcomes for patients with diagnosed cancer. We pooled data from two sites from the national Patient Navigation Research Program. Patients (n = 438) with newly diagnosed breast (n = 353) or colorectal cancer (n = 85) were randomized to PN or usual care. Trained lay navigators met with patients randomized to PN to help them assess treatment barriers and identify resources to overcome barriers. We used intent-to-treat analysis to assess time to completion of primary treatment, psychologic distress (impact of events scale), and satisfaction (patient satisfaction with cancer-related care) within 3 months after initiation of cancer treatment. The sample was predominantly middle-aged (mean age = 57) and female (90%); 44% were race-ethnic minorities (44%), 46% reported lower education levels, 18% were uninsured, and 9% reported a non-English primary language. The randomized groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Primary analysis showed no statistically significant group differences in time to completion of primary cancer treatment, satisfaction with cancer-related care, or psychologic distress. Subgroup analysis showed that socially disadvantaged patients (i.e., uninsured, low English proficiency, and non-English primary language) who received PN reported higher satisfaction than those receiving usual care (all P < 0.05). Navigated patients living alone reported greater distress than those receiving usual care. Although the primary analysis showed no overall benefit, the subgroup analysis suggests that PN may improve satisfaction with care for certain disadvantaged individuals. PN for cancer patients may not necessarily reduce treatment time nor distress. 2012 AACR

  8. Biomarker-based strategy for early discontinuation of empirical antifungal treatment in critically ill patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, Anahita; Loridant, Séverine; Poissy, Julien; Dervaux, Benoit; Sendid, Boualem; Cornu, Marjorie; Nseir, Saad

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a biomarker-based strategy on early discontinuation of empirical antifungal treatment. Prospective randomized controlled single-center unblinded study, performed in a mixed ICU. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to a strategy in which empirical antifungal treatment duration was determined by (1,3)-β-D-glucan, mannan, and anti-mannan serum assays, performed on day 0 and day 4; or to a routine care strategy, based on international guidelines, which recommend 14 days of treatment. In the biomarker group, early stop recommendation was determined using an algorithm based on the results of biomarkers. The primary outcome was the percentage of survivors discontinuing empirical antifungal treatment early, defined as a discontinuation strictly before day 7. A total of 109 patients were analyzed (one patient withdraw consent). Empirical antifungal treatment was discontinued early in 29 out of 54 patients in the biomarker strategy group, compared with one patient out of 55 in the routine strategy group [54% vs 2%, p empirical antifungal treatment among critically ill patients with suspected invasive Candida infection. These results confirm previous findings suggesting that early discontinuation of empirical antifungal treatment had no negative impact on outcome. However, further studies are needed to confirm the safety of this strategy. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02154178.

  9. The efficacy of guided self-instruction for patients with idiopathic chronic fatigue: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, A; Wiborg, J F; Bleijenberg, G; Tummers, M; Knoop, H

    2016-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for patients meeting U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for idiopathic chronic fatigue (ICF). ICF is thought to be a less severe disorder than chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The intervention consisted of a booklet with self-instructions combined with e-mail contact with a therapist. Randomized controlled trial conducted at an outpatient facility. All patients suffered from severe and persistent fatigue with moderate impairment levels or fewer than 4 additional symptoms. Patients were randomly allocated to either guided self-instruction or a wait-list control group. Primary outcome measures were fatigue severity assessed with the Checklist Individual Strength and level of overall impairment assessed with the Sickness Impact Profile. Outcome measures were assessed prior to randomization and following treatment or wait-list control group. One hundred patients were randomly allocated to the intervention or a wait-list control group and 95 completed second assessment. An intention-to-treat analysis showed significant treatment effects for fatigue severity (-8.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] [-13.99, -3.97], Cohen's d = 0.68, p fatigue severity. Baseline overall impairment moderated posttreatment impairment. Patients with ICF can be treated effectively with a minimal intervention. This is relevant as ICF is more prevalent than CFS and treatment capacity is limited. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. [Benefits of cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure therapy in obese patients: a randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, V; Castro Sánchez, A Ma; Matarán Peñarocha, G A; Lara Palomo, I; Aguilar Ferrándiz, Ma E; Moreno Lorenzo, C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze change of lifestyle in obese patients with cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure. An experimental study was performed with placebo control group. Forty patients were randomly assigned to intervention group (cognitive behaviour therapy + acupressure) and control group (information session). Outcome measure was a questionnaire for the assessment and quantification of obesity related lifestyles. Measures were performed at baseline and, after 3-months intervention. After 3 months of treatment, the intervention group showed significant differences (pobese patient, cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure, it has lost at least three kilograms over three months and has changed lifestyles related to obesity.

  11. A randomized, controlled clinical trial: the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on generalized anxiety disorder among Chinese community patients: protocol for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Y S; Mak, Winnie W S; Cheung, Eliza Y L; Ling, Candy Y M; Lui, Wacy W S; Tang, W K; Wong, Rebecca L P; Lo, Herman H M; Mercer, Stewart; Ma, Helen S W

    2011-11-29

    Research suggests that an eight-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) program may be effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorders. Our objective is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the MBCT program with a psycho-education programme and usual care in reducing anxiety symptoms in people suffering from generalized anxiety disorder. A three armed randomized, controlled clinical trial including 9-month post-treatment follow-up is proposed. Participants screened positive using the Structure Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) for general anxiety disorder will be recruited from community-based clinics. 228 participants will be randomly allocated to the MBCT program plus usual care, psycho-education program plus usual care or the usual care group. Validated Chinese version of instruments measuring anxiety and worry symptoms, depression, quality of life and health service utilization will be used. Our primary end point is the change of anxiety and worry score (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Penn State Worry Scale) from baseline to the end of intervention. For primary analyses, treatment outcomes will be assessed by ANCOVA, with change in anxiety score as the baseline variable, while the baseline anxiety score and other baseline characteristics that significantly differ between groups will serve as covariates. This is a first randomized controlled trial that compare the effectiveness of MBCT with an active control, findings will advance current knowledge in the management of GAD and the way that group intervention can be delivered and inform future research. Unique Trail Number (assigned by Centre for Clinical Trails, Clinical Trials registry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong): CUHK_CCT00267.

  12. A randomized, controlled clinical trial: the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on generalized anxiety disorder among Chinese community patients: protocol for a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Samuel YS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that an eight-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT program may be effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorders. Our objective is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the MBCT program with a psycho-education programme and usual care in reducing anxiety symptoms in people suffering from generalized anxiety disorder. Methods A three armed randomized, controlled clinical trial including 9-month post-treatment follow-up is proposed. Participants screened positive using the Structure Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID for general anxiety disorder will be recruited from community-based clinics. 228 participants will be randomly allocated to the MBCT program plus usual care, psycho-education program plus usual care or the usual care group. Validated Chinese version of instruments measuring anxiety and worry symptoms, depression, quality of life and health service utilization will be used. Our primary end point is the change of anxiety and worry score (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Penn State Worry Scale from baseline to the end of intervention. For primary analyses, treatment outcomes will be assessed by ANCOVA, with change in anxiety score as the baseline variable, while the baseline anxiety score and other baseline characteristics that significantly differ between groups will serve as covariates. Conclusions This is a first randomized controlled trial that compare the effectiveness of MBCT with an active control, findings will advance current knowledge in the management of GAD and the way that group intervention can be delivered and inform future research. Unique Trail Number (assigned by Centre for Clinical Trails, Clinical Trials registry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong: CUHK_CCT00267

  13. Evidence-based Status of Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment for Patients with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Miao; Ma, Chiyuan; Yan, Shigui

    2016-04-01

    Review the current evidence-based status of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment for patients with shoulder pain based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to provide a comprehensive analysis and a balanced view of the strengths and weaknesses of this treatment. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science were searched up to July 2014, using the Boolean operators as follows: shoulder pain OR painful shoulder AND pulsed radiofrequency). All prospective randomized controlled trials of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain were retrieved. No limitation of the language or publication year existed in our analysis. Five of 114 studies that involved PRF treatment met the inclusion criteria of this review article. These studies compared the clinical outcomes of PRF with those of other treatments such as intra-articular corticosteroid injection and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. All the studies reported improvements in passive range of motion (PROM), visual analog scale (VAS), and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) in PRF treatment that persisted for at least 12 weeks. In addition, no complications were reported in all trials. The use of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain was observed to result in good clinical efficacy for at least 12 weeks with no complication reported. However, it is still unclear from the currently available publications whether PRF is superior to other treatment techniques such as intra-articular corticosteroid and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  14. Efficacy and safety of adding mizoribine to standard treatment in patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Hirai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mizoribine (MZR is an immunosuppressive drug used in Japan for treating patients with lupus nephritis and nephrotic syndrome and has been also reportedly effective in patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA nephropathy. However, to date, few randomized control studies of MZR are performed in patients with IgA nephropathy. Therefore, this prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled trial aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of adding MZR to standard treatment in these patients, and was conducted between April 1, 2009, and March 31, 2016, as a multicenter study. Methods: Patients were randomly assigned (1:1 to receiving standard treatment plus MZR (MZR group or standard treatment (control group. MZR was administered orally at a dose of 150 mg once daily for 12 months. Results: Primary outcomes were the percentage reduction in urinary protein excretion from baseline and the rate of patients with hematuria disappearance 36 months after study initiation. Secondary outcomes were the rate of patients with proteinuria disappearance, clinical remission rate, absolute changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, and the change in daily dose of prednisolone. Forty-two patients were randomly assigned to MZR (n = 21 and control groups (n = 21. Nine patients in MZR group and 15 patients in the control group completed the study. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to primary and secondary outcomes. Conclusion: The addition of MZR to standard treatment has no beneficial effect on reducing urinary protein excretion and hematuria when treating patients with IgA nephropathy.

  15. How to improve drug dosing for patients with renal impairment in primary care - a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erler Antje

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are at increased risk for inappropriate or potentially harmful prescribing. The aim of this study was to examine whether a multifaceted intervention including the use of a software programme for the estimation of creatinine clearance and recommendation of individual dosage requirements may improve correct dosage adjustment of relevant medications for patients with CKD in primary care. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted between January and December 2007 in small primary care practices in Germany. Practices were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. In each practice, we included patients with known CKD and elderly patients (≥70 years suffering from hypertension. The practices in the intervention group received interactive training and were provided a software programme to assist with individual dose adjustment. The control group performed usual care. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 months. The outcome measures, analyzed across individual patients, included prescriptions exceeding recommended maximum daily doses, with the primary outcome being prescriptions exceeding recommended standard daily doses by more than 30%. Results Data from 44 general practitioners and 404 patients are included. The intervention was effective in reducing prescriptions exceeding the maximum daily dose per patients, with a trend in reducing prescriptions exceeding the standard daily dose by more than 30%. Conclusions A multifaceted intervention including the use of a software program effectively reduced inappropriately high doses of renally excreted medications in patients with CKD in the setting of small primary care practices. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN02900734

  16. Personalised Prehabilitation in High-risk Patients Undergoing Elective Major Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Blinded Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberan-Garcia, Anael; Ubré, Marta; Roca, Josep; Lacy, Antonio M; Burgos, Felip; Risco, Raquel; Momblán, Dulce; Balust, Jaume; Blanco, Isabel; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of personalized prehabilitation on postoperative complications in high-risk patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery. Prehabilitation, including endurance exercise training and promotion of physical activity, in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery has been postulated as an effective preventive intervention to reduce postoperative complications. However, the existing studies provide controversial results and show a clear bias toward low-risk patients. This was a randomized blinded controlled trial. Eligible candidates accepting to participate were blindly randomized (1:1 ratio) to control (standard care) or intervention (standard care + prehabilitation) groups. Inclusion criteria were: i) age >70 years; and/or, ii) American Society of Anesthesiologists score III/IV. Prehabilitation covered 3 actions: i) motivational interview; ii) high-intensity endurance training; and promotion of physical activity. The main study outcome was the proportion of patients suffering postoperative complications. Secondary outcomes included the endurance time (ET) during cycle-ergometer exercise. We randomized 71 patients to the control arm and 73 to intervention. After excluding 19 patients because of changes in the surgical plan, 63 controls and 62 intervention patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The intervention group enhanced aerobic capacity [ΔET 135 (218) %; P high-risk candidates for elective major abdominal surgery, which can be explained by the increased aerobic capacity.

  17. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of niacinamide for reduction of phosphorus in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Steven C; Young, Daniel O; Huang, Yihung; Delmez, James A; Coyne, Daniel W

    2008-07-01

    Niacinamide inhibits intestinal sodium/phosphorus transporters and reduces serum phosphorus in open-label studies. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial was performed for assessment of the safety and efficacy of niacinamide. Hemodialysis patients with phosphorus levels > or =5.0 mg/dl were randomly assigned to 8 wk of niacinamide or placebo, titrated from 500 to 1500 mg/d. After a 2-wk washout period, patients switched to 8 wk of the alternative therapy. Vitamin D analogs and calcimimetics were held constant; phosphorus binders were not changed unless safety criteria were met. Thirty-three patients successfully completed the trial. Serum phosphorus fell significantly from 6.26 to 5.47 mg/dl with niacinamide but not with placebo (5.85 to 5.98 mg/dl). A concurrent fall in calcium-phosphorus product was seen with niacinamide, whereas serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, uric acid, platelet, triglyceride, LDL, and total cholesterol levels remained stable in both arms. Serum HDL levels rose with niacinamide (50 to 61 mg/dl but not with placebo. Adverse effects were similar between both groups. Among patients who were > or =80% compliant, results were similar, although the decrease in serum phosphorus with niacinamide was more pronounced (6.45 to 5.28 mg/dl) and the increase in HDL approached significance (49 to 58 mg/dl). In hemodialysis patients, niacinamide effectively reduces serum phosphorus when co-administered with binders and results in a potentially advantageous increase in HDL cholesterol. Further study in larger randomized trials and other chronic kidney disease populations is indicated.

  18. Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Decreased Limb Survival in Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia : Pooled Data From Two Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreen, Marlon I; Gremmels, Hendrik; Teraa, Martin; Sprengers, Ralf W; Verhaar, Marianne C; Statius van Eps, Randolph G; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Mali, Willem P.Th.M.; van Overhagen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although never assessed prospectively, diabetes mellitus (DM) is assumed to negatively affect the outcomes of critical limb ischemia (CLI). DM was highly prevalent in two recently conducted randomized controlled trials in CLI patients, the PADI (Percutaneous Transluminal Balloon

  19. Long-term effects of addition of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to angiotensin II receptor blocker in patients with diabetic nephropathy: a randomized clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Esteghamati, Alireza; Noshad, Sina; Jarrah, Sorour; Mousavizadeh, Mostafa; Khoee, Seyed Hamid; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2013-01-01

    .... In an open-label, parallel-group, single-center, randomized clinical trial (NCT01667614), 136 patients with diabetes and proteinuria, already treated with enalapril and losartan, were included...

  20. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive Deficits in Middle-aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Ying Pan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Cognition partially improved in patients with OSAS after CPAP treatment. The only domain with significant improvement was vigilance. Rigorous randomized controlled trials need to be performed to obtain clear results.

  1. Education by general practitioners or education and exercises by physiotherapists for patients with whiplash-associated disorders? : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Neeleman-van der Steen, Catharina W M; van der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Hendriks, Erik J M; Verhagen, Arianne P; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of education and advice given by general practitioners (GPs) with education, advice, and active exercise therapy given by physiotherapists (PTs) for patients with whiplash-associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND

  2. Education by general practitioners or education and exercises by physiotherapists for patients with whiplash-associated disorders? A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten-Peeters, G G; Neeleman-van der Steen, Catharina W M; van der Windt, D.A.; Hendriks, E.J.; Verhagen, Arianne P; Oostendorp, R A

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of education and advice given by general practitioners (GPs) with education, advice, and active exercise therapy given by physiotherapists (PTs) for patients with whiplash-associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND

  3. Matching of treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients to medical prescription of heroin or oral methadone treatment: results from two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent M.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate which baseline patient characteristics of treatment-resistant heroin addicts differentially predicted treatment response to medical heroin prescription compared to standard methadone maintenance treatment. DESIGN: Two open-label randomized controlled trials; pooled data.

  4. Pregabalin in patients with central neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a flexible-dose regimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Kruis, M. R.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Hollmann, M. W.; Heesen, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effective treatment of patients suffering from central neuropathic pain remains a clinical challenge, despite a standard pharmacological approach in combination with anticonvulsants and antidepressants. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the effects of pregabalin on

  5. More complications in uncemented compared to cemented hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: a randomized controlled trial of 201 patients, with one year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Moerman (Sophie); N.M.C. Mathijssen (Nina M.C.); D.D. Niesten (Dieu-Donné); R. Riedijk (Roeland); W.J. Rijnberg (Willard); S. Koëter (Sander); K. Kremers van de Hei (Keetie); Tuinebreier, W.E. (Wim E.); T.L. Molenaar (Tim L.); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclear whether cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty is the best treatment option in elderly patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. Previous randomized trials comparing cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty have conflicting results. We conducted a

  6. More complications in uncemented compared to cemented hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures : A randomized controlled trial of 201 patients, with one year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Moerman (Sophie); N.M.C. Mathijssen (Nina M.C.); D.D. Niesten (Dieu-Donné); R. Riedijk (Roeland); W.J. Rijnberg (Willard); S. Koëter (Sander); K. Kremers van de Hei (Keetie); W.E. Tuinebreier (Wim E.); T.L. Molenaar (Tim L.); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: It is unclear whether cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty is the best treatment option in elderly patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. Previous randomized trials comparing cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty have conflicting results. We conducted a

  7. Liberal versus restricted fluid administration in heart failure patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Fu, Biao; Qian, Xiaoxian

    2015-01-01

    Restrictive fluid intake is recommended, in addition to standard pharmacologic treatment, in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, this recommendation lacks firm scientific evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials to estimate the effect of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure.Randomized controlled trials were identified in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases using the search-keywords "fluid" and "heart failure". Outcomes were compared in heart failure patients with liberal and restricted fluid intake. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated using random effects models. Studies focusing on decompensated heart failure were analyzed separately.Six small randomized trials comparing liberal and restricted fluid intake met the inclusion criteria. Significant heterogeneity was noted in the reported studies for several outcomes. There were no differences in readmission rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.32; 95% CI: 0.86 to 2.01; P = 0.2), mortality rate (5 studies, pooled RR = 1.50; 95% CI: 0.87 to 2.57; P = 0.14), perceived thirst (4 studies, WMD = -0.7; 95% CI: -2.58 to 1.17; P = 0.46), duration of intravenous diuretics (2 studies, WMD = 0.17; 95% CI: -1.26 to 1.6; P = 0.81) or serum sodium levels (WMD = -1.61; 95% CI: -3.28 to 0.07; P = 0.06) between the liberal fluid intake group and the restrictive fluid intake group. Mean serum creatinine and BNP levels were significantly higher in the liberal fluid group: WMD 0.20 (95% CI: 0.15 to 0.25; P restrictive fluid intake. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  8. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment versus cognitive behavioural therapy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos-Vromans, D C W M; Smeets, R J E M; Huijnen, I P J; Köke, A J A; Hitters, W M G C; Rijnders, L J M; Pont, M; Winkens, B; Knottnerus, J A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the difference in treatment effect, at 26 and 52 weeks after the start of treatment, between cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment (MRT) for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Multicentre, randomized controlled trial of patients with CFS. Participants were randomly assigned to MRT or CBT. Four rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands. A total of 122 patients participated in the trial. Primary outcomes were fatigue measured by the fatigue subscale of the Checklist Individual Strength and health-related quality of life measured by the Short-Form 36. Outcomes were assessed prior to treatment and at 26 and 52 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 114 participants completed the assessment at 26 weeks, and 112 completed the assessment at 52 weeks. MRT was significantly more effective than CBT in reducing fatigue at 52 weeks. The estimated difference in fatigue between the two treatments was -3.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) -8.07 to 2.03; P = 0.24] at 26 weeks and -5.69 (95% CI -10.62 to -0.76; P = 0.02) at 52 weeks. Patients showed an improvement in quality of life over time, but between-group differences were not significant. This study provides evidence that MRT is more effective in reducing long-term fatigue severity than CBT in patients with CFS. Although implementation in comparable populations can be recommended based on clinical effectiveness, it is advisable to analyse the cost-effectiveness and replicate these findings in another multicentre trial. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  9. Sensory-motor training versus resistance training among patients with knee osteoarthritis: randomized single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Bassoli Gomiero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis of the knee is defined as a progressive disease of the synovial joints and is characterized by failure of joint damage repair. The objective here was to compare the effectiveness of sensory-motor training versus resistance training among patients with knee osteoarthritis. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, single-blinded controlled trial conducted at the outpatient service of the University of Santo Amaro. METHODS: A total of 64 patients were randomly assigned to sensory-motor training or resistance training. The evaluations were performed at baseline and 16 weeks after the intervention and included pain evaluation on a visual analogue scale, isometric quadriceps femoris force measurement using a dynamometer, Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti balance scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index, and the SF-36 quality-of-life questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using analysis of variance with repeated measurements and Cohen’s effect size. RESULTS: Sensory-motor training may be a plausible alternative and showed a small effect on pain and a medium effect on maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Resistance training showed a small effect on balance and a medium effect on mobility. CONCLUSION: Resistance training and sensory motor training for the lower limbs among patients with knee osteoarthritis seemed to present similar effects on pain and function. However, because there was a considerable risk of type 2 error, further randomized clinical trials are still needed to provide a sound conclusion.

  10. Clinical benefit of steroid use in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitlock, R.P.; Chan, S.; Devereaux, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish the efficacy and safety of prophylactic steroids in adult patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials reporting the effects of prophylactic steroids on clinical outcomes after CPB. Outcomes examined were mortality...... randomizing 3205 patients. Steroids reduced new onset atrial fibrillation [relative risk (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59 to 0.87], postoperative bleeding [weighted mean difference (WMD) -99.6 mL, 95% CI -149.8 to -49.3], and duration of ICU stay (WMD -0.23 days, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.07). Length...... of hospital stay was also reduced (WMD -0.59 days, 95% CI -1.17 to -0.02), but this result was less robust. A trend towards reduction in mortality was observed (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.18). Randomized trials suggest that perioperative steroids have significant clinical benefit in CPB patients by decreasing...

  11. Characteristics and Medication Use of Psoriasis Patients Who May or May Not Qualify for Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatestinic, William; Nordstrom, Beth; Wu, Jashin J; Goldblum, Orin; Solotkin, Kathleen; Lin, Chen-Yen; Kistler, Kristin; Fraeman, Kathy; Johnston, Joseph; Hawley, Lcdr Lesley; Sicignano, Nicholas; Araujo, Andre

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials impose exclusion criteria that may limit the generalizability of results. To (a) determine the percentage of real-world patients who would qualify for psoriasis randomized controlled trials; (b) ascertain differences between moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients who would be eligible, ineligible, or potentially eligible for clinical trials; and (c) compare their biologic treatment patterns. Moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients were identified from the U.S. Department of Defense health care database from January 1, 2008, to October 31, 2013. Eligibility classification for psoriasis trials was based on common trial exclusion criteria involving medical conditions and recent treatment history. Patient characteristics and treatment patterns of 4 biologics (adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, and ustekinumab) were compared between groups. Adherence was measured by medication possession ratio and persistence as continuous time on drug with ≤ 90-day gap between supply times. Among 16,284 qualifying psoriasis patients, 4,677 (28.7%) were medically ineligible, and 8,466 (52.0%) had ineligibility-related treatments that could be stopped prior to trial entry; the latter patients were considered potentially eligible for psoriasis trials. Common reasons for medical ineligibility included malignancies and hematologic disorders; treatment ineligibilities included use of topical corticosteroids and phototherapy. Medically ineligible patients were older and had more comorbidities, while potentially eligible patients were younger and healthier than trial-eligible patients. Most treatment patterns were similar across groups, except that, compared with the trial-eligible group, medically ineligible patients had greater adherence to infliximab and potentially trial-eligible patients had greater adherence and persistence to adalimumab. This large real-world study found that patients who may be ineligible for psoriasis trials differ in important respects (e

  12. Telemonitoring Adherence to Medications in Heart Failure Patients (TEAM-HF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Benjamin D; Moise, Nathalie; Haerizadeh, Mytra; Ye, Siqin; Medina, Vivian; Kronish, Ian M

    2017-04-01

    Medication nonadherence contributes to hospitalizations in recently discharged patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to test the feasibility of telemonitoring medication adherence in patients with HF. We randomized 40 patients (1:1) hospitalized for HF to 30 days of loop diuretic adherence monitoring with telephonic support or to passive adherence monitoring alone. Eighty-three percent of eligible patients agreed to participate. The median age of patients was 64 years, 25% were female, and 45% were Hispanic. Overall, 67% of patients were nonadherent (percentage of days that the correct number of doses were taken patients, respectively, in adherence (median correct dosing adherence 82% vs 73%; P = .41) or in the proportion readmitted within 30 days (30% vs 20%; P = .72). Eighty-eight percent of patients rated the wireless electronic adherence device as somewhat or very easy to use, and 88% agreed to use it again. Adherence telemonitoring was acceptable to most patients with HF. Diuretic nonadherence was common even when patients knew they were being monitored. Future studies should assess whether adherence telemonitoring can improve adherence and reduce readmissions among patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: The Mint Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juch, Johan N S; Maas, Esther T; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Groeneweg, J George; Kallewaard, Jan-Willem; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P; van Dongen, Johanna M; Huygen, Frank J P M; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-07-04

    Radiofrequency denervation is a commonly used treatment for chronic low back pain, but high-quality evidence for its effectiveness is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation added to a standardized exercise program for patients with chronic low back pain. Three pragmatic multicenter, nonblinded randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of minimal interventional treatments for participants with chronic low back pain (Mint study) were conducted in 16 multidisciplinary pain clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants were included between January 1, 2013, and October 24, 2014, and had chronic low back pain, a positive diagnostic block at the facet joints (facet joint trial, 251 participants), sacroiliac joints (sacroiliac joint trial, 228 participants), or a combination of facet joints, sacroiliac joints, or intervertebral disks (combination trial, 202 participants) and were unresponsive to conservative care. All participants received a 3-month standardized exercise program and psychological support if needed. Participants in the intervention group received radiofrequency denervation as well. This is usually a 1-time procedure, but the maximum number of treatments in the trial was 3. The primary outcome was pain intensity (numeric rating scale, 0-10; whereby 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain imaginable) measured 3 months after the intervention. The prespecified minimal clinically important difference was defined as 2 points or more. Final follow-up was at 12 months, ending October 2015. Among 681 participants who were randomized (mean age, 52.2 years; 421 women [61.8%], mean baseline pain intensity, 7.1), 599 (88%) completed the 3-month follow-up, and 521 (77%) completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean difference in pain intensity between the radiofrequency denervation and control groups at 3 months was -0.18 (95% CI, -0.76 to 0.40) in the facet joint trial; -0.71 (95% CI, -1.35 to -0.06) in the sacroiliac joint

  14. Randomized placebo controlled trial of furosemide on subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Richling, Nina; Holzer, Michael; Herkner, Harald; Riedmüller, Eva; Havel, Christof; Kaff, Alfred; Malzer, Reinhard; Schreiber, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    To compare the administration of furosemide with placebo on the subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with acute pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis. Design  Randomized, controlled and double-blinded clinical trial. Municipal emergency medical service system and university-based emergency department. Fifty-nine patients with pulmonary oedema because of hypertensive crisis. Additional to administration of oxygen, morphine-hydrochloride and urapidil until the systolic blood pressure was below 160mmHg, the patients were randomized to receive furosemide 80mg IV bolus (furosemide group) or saline placebo (placebo group). The primary outcome was the subjective perception of dyspnoea as measured with a modified BORG scale at one hour after randomization. Secondary outcome parameters were the subjective perception of dyspnoea of patients as measured with a modified BORG scale and a visual analogue scale at 2, 3 and 6h after randomization of the patient; course of the systolic arterial pressure and peripheral oxygen saturation and lactate at admission and at 6h after admission. In 25 patients in the furosemide group and in 28 patients in the placebo group, a BORG score could be obtained. There was no statistically significant difference in the severity of dyspnoea at one hour after randomization (P=0·40). The median BORG score at 1h after randomization in the furosemide group was 3 (IQR 2 to 4) compared to 3 (IQR 2 to 7) in the placebo group (P=0·40). Those patients who were randomized to the placebo group needed higher doses of urapidil at 20min after randomization. There were no significant differences in the rate of adverse events, nonfatal cardiac arrests or death between the two groups. The subjective perception of dyspnoea in patients with hypertensive pulmonary oedema was not influenced by the application of a loop-diuretic. Therefore, additional furosemide therapy needs to be scrutinized in the therapy of these patients. © 2010 The Authors

  15. Survival Outcomes With Short-Course Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma: Data From a Randomized Phase 3 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes de Castro, Douglas; Matiello, Juliana; Roa, Wilson; Ghosh, Sunita; Kepka, Lucyna; Kumar, Narendra; Sinaika, Valery; Lomidze, Darejan; Hentati, Dalenda; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Fidarova, Elena

    2017-07-15

    To perform a subset analysis of survival outcomes in elderly patients with glioblastoma from a randomized phase 3 trial comparing 2 short-course radiation therapy (RT) regimens in elderly and/or frail patients. The original trial population included elderly and/or frail patients with a diagnosis of glioblastoma. Patients joined the phase 3, randomized, multicenter, prospective, noninferiority trial; were assigned to 1 of 2 groups in a 1:1 ratio, either short-course RT (25 Gy in 5 fractions, arm 1) or commonly used RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions, arm 2); and were stratified by age (elderly and frail patients were defined as patients aged ≥65 years with KPS of 50%-70%; elderly and non-frail patients were defined as patients aged ≥65 years with KPS of 80%-100%); 61 of the 98 initial patients comprised the patient population, with 26 patients randomized to arm 1 and 35 to arm 2. In this unplanned analysis, the short-course RT results were not statistically significantly different from the results of commonly used RT in elderly patients. The median overall survival time was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5-9.1 months) in arm 1 and 6.2 months (95% CI, 4.7-7.7 months) in arm 2 (P=.936). The median progression-free survival time was 4.3 months (95% CI, 2.6-5.9 months) in arm 1 and 3.2 months (95% CI, 0.1-6.3 months) in arm 2 (P=.706). A short-course RT regimen of 25 Gy in 5 fractions is an acceptable treatment option for patients aged ≥65 years, mainly those with a poor performance status or contraindication to chemotherapy, which would be indicated in cases of methylated O6 methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase promoter tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Frances M; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C; Duda, John E; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D

    2009-01-07

    Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age ( or = 70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage > or = 2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n = 60) or globus pallidus (n = 61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n = 134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. The primary outcome was time spent in the "on" state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P function improved significantly (P deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (> or = 5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD quality-of-life scores (P deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy. At least 1 serious adverse event occurred in

  17. The effect of modafinil on fatigue, cognitive functioning, and mood in primary brain tumor patients: a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boele, Florien W.; Douw, Linda; de Groot, Marjolein; van Thuijl, Hinke F.; Cleijne, Wilmy; Heimans, Jan J.; Taphoorn, Martin J.B.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Klein, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatigue, cognitive deficits, and depression are frequently reported but often undertreated symptoms that can profoundly affect daily life in patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). To evaluate the effects of the psychostimulant modafinil on fatigue, depression, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and cognitive functioning in PBT patients, we performed a multicenter, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial. Methods Patients randomly received either 6 weeks of treatment with modafinil (up to 400 mg/day) or 6 weeks with placebo. After a 1-week washout period, the opposite treatment was provided. Assessments took place at baseline and immediately after the first and second condition. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on fatigue (Checklist Individual Strength [CIS]), depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]), HRQOL (Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]), and self-perceived cognitive functioning (Medical Outcomes Study [MOS]). They also underwent comprehensive neurocognitive testing. Results In total, 37 patients participated. Relative to baseline, patients reported lower fatigue severity (CIS) and better motivation (CIS) in both the modafinil (P = .010 and P = .021, respectively) and the placebo condition (P Modafinil did not exceed the effects of placebo with respect to symptom management. Patient accrual was slow, and relatively many patients dropped out during the trial, due mostly to side effects. Other, preferably nonpharmacologic intervention studies should be considered to improve symptom management of PBT patients. PMID:23925452

  18. Effects of Yoga in Managing Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadiraja, H S; Rao, Raghavendra Mohan; Nagarathna, R; Nagendra, H R; Patil, Shekhar; Diwakar, Ravi B; Shashidhara, H P; Gopinath, K S; Ajaikumar, B S

    2017-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is widely prevalent in cancer patients and affects quality of life in advanced cancer patients. Fatigue is caused due to both psychologic distress and physiological sequel following cancer progression and its treatment. In this study, we evaluate the effects of yogic intervention in managing fatigue in metastatic breast cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with metastatic breast cancer were randomized to receive integrated yoga program (n = 46) or supportive therapy and education (n = 45) over a 3-month period. Assessments such as perceived stress, fatigue symptom inventory, diurnal salivary cortisol, and natural killer cell counts were carried out before and after intervention. Analysis was done using an intention-to-treat approach. Postmeasures for the above outcomes were assessed using ANCOVA with respective baseline measure as a covariate. The results suggest that yoga reduces perceived stress (P = 0.001), fatigue frequency (P yoga reduces fatigue in advanced breast cancer patients.

  19. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Saltin, Bengt; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners...... or psychiatrists and were eligible if they fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, criteria for unipolar depression and were aged between 18 and 55 years. Patients (N = 165) were allocated to supervised strength, aerobic, or relaxation training during a 4-month period. The primary...... repetition maximum for chest press increased by a mean (95% CI) of 4.0 kg (0.8 to 7.2; p = .014) in the strength training group versus the relaxation group, and maximal oxygen uptake increased by 2.7 mL/kg/min (1.2 to 4.3; p = .001) in the aerobic group versus the relaxation group. At 4 months, the mean...

  20. Feasibility of a home-based exercise intervention with remote guidance for patients with stable grade II and III gliomas : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, K.; Kloek, C.J.J.; Aaronson, Neil K; Janssen, K.; Jones, Lee; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Stuiver, M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, we investigated the feasibility of a home-based, remotely guided exercise intervention for patients with gliomas. Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization (2:1) to exercise or control group. Subjects: Patients with stable grade II and III

  1. The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery in older patients with low risk breast cancer- a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    OpenAIRE

    Matuschek, Christiane; B?lke, Edwin; Haussmann, Jan; Mohrmann, Svjetlana; Nestle-Kr?mling, Carolin; Gerber, Peter Arne; Corradini, Stefanie; Orth, Klaus; Kammers, Kai; Budach, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) It is currently unclear whether patients with low risk breast cancer receiving adjuvant endocrine therapy need adjuvant radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. The data of randomized trials are available. Materials/Methods In a database search 5 randomized trials including in total 3766 mostly elderly patients with early stage breast cancer tr?eated either with adjuvant endocrine therapy or with endocrine therapy and additional whole breast radiation after brea...

  2. Cost effectiveness of patient education for the prevention of falls in hospital: economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry P; Hill, Anne-Marie; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Hoffmann, Tammy; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven M

    2013-05-22

    Falls are one of the most frequently occurring adverse events that impact upon the recovery of older hospital inpatients. Falls can threaten both immediate and longer-term health and independence. There is need to identify cost-effective means for preventing falls in hospitals. Hospital-based falls prevention interventions tested in randomized trials have not yet been subjected to economic evaluation. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the health service provider perspective, over the period of hospitalization (time horizon) using the Australian Dollar (A$) at 2008 values. Analyses were based on data from a randomized trial among n = 1,206 acute and rehabilitation inpatients. Decision tree modeling with three-way sensitivity analyses were conducted using burden of disease estimates developed from trial data and previous research. The intervention was a multimedia patient education program provided with trained health professional follow-up shown to reduce falls among cognitively intact hospital patients. The short-term cost to a health service of one cognitively intact patient being a faller could be as high as A$14,591 (2008). The education program cost A$526 (2008) to prevent one cognitively intact patient becoming a faller and A$294 (2008) to prevent one fall based on primary trial data. These estimates were unstable due to high variability in the hospital costs accrued by individual patients involved in the trial. There was a 52% probability the complete program was both more effective and less costly (from the health service perspective) than providing usual care alone. Decision tree modeling sensitivity analyses identified that when provided in real life contexts, the program would be both more effective in preventing falls among cognitively intact inpatients and cost saving where the proportion of these patients who would otherwise fall under usual care conditions is at least 4.0%. This economic evaluation was designed to assist

  3. Respiratory Muscle Training in Patients Recovering Recent Open Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Randomized-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Crisafulli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and feasibility of an expiratory muscle training (EMT device (Respilift applied to patients recovering from recent open cardiothoracic surgery (CTS. Design. Prospective, double-blind, 14-day randomised-controlled trial. Participants and Setting. A total of 60 inpatients recovering from recent CTS and early admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Interventions. Chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a resistive load of 30 cm H2O for active group and chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a sham load for control group. Measures. Changes in maximal expiratory pressure (MEP were considered as primary outcome, while maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP, dynamic and static lung volumes, oxygenation, perceived symptoms of dyspnoea, thoracic pain, and well being (evaluated by visual analogic scale—VAS and general health status were considered secondary outcomes. Results. All outcomes recorded showed significant improvements in both groups; however, the change of MEP (+34.2 mmHg, and +26.1%, for absolute and % of predicted, resp. was significantly higher in active group. Also VAS dyspnoea improved faster and more significantly ( at day 12, and 14 in active group when compared with control. The drop-out rate was 6%, without differences between groups. Conclusions. In patients recovering from recent CTS, specific EMT by Respilift is feasible and effective. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510275.

  4. Enhanced depression care for patients with acute coronary syndrome and persistent depressive symptoms: coronary psychosocial evaluation studies randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W; Rieckmann, Nina; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E; Shimbo, Daichi; Medina, Vivian; Albanese, Gabrielle; Kronish, Ian; Hegel, Mark; Burg, Matthew M

    2010-04-12

    Depressive symptoms are an established predictor of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (defined as nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization for unstable angina or urgent/emergency revascularizations) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study was conducted to determine the acceptability and efficacy of enhanced depression treatment in patients with ACS. A 3-month observation period to identify patients with ACS and persistent depressive symptoms was followed by a 6-month randomized controlled trial. From January 1, 2005, through February 29, 2008, 237 patients with ACS from 5 hospitals were enrolled, including 157 persistently depressed patients randomized to intervention (initial patient preference for problem-solving therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, then a stepped-care approach; 80 patients) or usual care (77 patients) and 80 nondepressed patients who underwent observational evaluation. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with depression care. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptom changes (assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory), major adverse cardiac events, and death. At the end of the trial, the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their depression care was higher in the intervention group (54% of 80) than in the usual care group (19% of 77) (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-12.9 [P < .001]). The Beck Depression Inventory score decreased significantly more (t(155) = 2.85 [P = .005]) for intervention patients (change, -5.7; 95% CI, -7.6 to -3.8; df = 155) than for usual care patients (change, -1.9; 95% CI, -3.8 to -0.1; df = 155); the depression effect size was 0.59 of the standard deviation. At the end of the trial, 3 intervention patients and 10 usual care patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events (4% and 13%, respectively; log-rank test, chi(2)(1) = 3.93 [P = .047]), as well as 5 nondepressed patients (6%) (for the intervention vs nondepressed cohort, chi(2)(1) = 0

  5. Effects of physical therapy on quality of life in osteoporosis patients - a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Guido

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Summary The aim of this prospective randomized single-center study was to investigate whether sling exercise therapy is superior to conventional exercises in osteoporosis patients. Background Patients with osteoporosis frequently experience fractures of the vertebral body, which may cause chronic back pain and other symptoms. These, in turn, may lead to immobilization, muscular atrophy, and restrictions in activities of daily living. The situation can be improved with specific medication and physiotherapy. We explored the effects of a variety of physical treatments on activities of daily living in patients with osteoporosis. Method Fifty patients were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Group A received traditional physiotherapy (PT while group B underwent sling exercise therapy (ST. Both treatments were given twice a week for three months. The results of the treatment were registered on the quality of life questionnaire (Qualeffo-41 devised by the International Osteoporosis Foundation. After a further three months with no specific exercise treatment, we again tested all patients in order to draw conclusions about the long-term effects of both types of exercise. Results Forty-four patients (88% completed the study. Patients were assigned to small groups (a maximum of 5 patients in each group and thus received individual attention and motivation. Quality of life was improved in both groups; a significantly greater improvement was registered in patients who performed sling exercises (Global score Qualeffo: p = 0.002. Conclusion The test results confirm the known positive effects of physical therapy on the quality of life of osteoporosis patients, as well as the fact that sling exercises are a sound alternative treatment for this condition.

  6. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate decision support for men with localized prostate cancer: a multi-center randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna L; Halpenny, Barbara; Hong, Fangxin; Wolpin, Seth; Lober, William B; Russell, Kenneth J; Ellis, William J; Govindarajulu, Usha; Bosco, Jaclyn; Davison, B Joyce; Bennett, Gerald; Terris, Martha K; Barsevick, Andrea; Lin, Daniel W; Yang, Claire C; Swanson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this trial was to compare usual patient education plus the Internet-based Personal Patient Profile-Prostate, vs. usual education alone, on conflict associated with decision making, plus explore time-to-treatment, and treatment choice. A randomized, multi-center clinical trial was conducted with measures at baseline, 1-, and 6 months. Men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer (CaP) who sought consultation at urology, radiation oncology, or multi-disciplinary clinics in 4 geographically-distinct American cities were recruited. Intervention group participants used the Personal Patient Profile-Prostate, a decision support system comprised of customized text and video coaching regarding potential outcomes, influential factors, and communication with care providers. The primary outcome, patient-reported decisional conflict, was evaluated over time using generalized estimating equations to fit generalized linear models. Additional outcomes, time-to-treatment, treatment choice, and program acceptability/usefulness, were explored. A total of 494 eligible men were randomized (266 intervention; 228 control). The intervention reduced adjusted decisional conflict over time compared with the control group, for the uncertainty score (estimate -3.61; (confidence interval, -7.01, 0.22), and values clarity (estimate -3.57; confidence interval (-5.85,-1.30). Borderline effect was seen for the total decisional conflict score (estimate -1.75; confidence interval (-3.61,0.11). Time-to-treatment was comparable between groups, while undecided men in the intervention group chose brachytherapy more often than in the control group. Acceptability and usefulness were highly rated. The Personal Patient Profile-Prostate is the first intervention to significantly reduce decisional conflict in a multi-center trial of American men with newly diagnosed localized CaP. Our findings support efficacy of P3P for addressing decision uncertainty and facilitating patient selection of

  7. The effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on depression and happiness in breast cancer patients: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahmadi, Seyed Mojtaba; Sorbi, Mohammad Hossein; Beiki, Omid; Razavi, Tayebeh Khademeh; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in women in the world. It causes fear, despair, and takes a tremendous toll on psychological status. Objective To determine the effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on the depression and happiness of breast cancer patients. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted with 42 breast cancer patients in The Oncology Center at Kermanshah, Iran in 2015. The Data were gathered before intervention and ten weeks afterwards. The data were collected using Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Oxford’s happiness Inventory (OHI). The data were analyzed by SPSS-16, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S), chi-squared, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results The results showed a significant reduction in the depression of the group on positive psychotherapy compared with the control group. Also the positive psychotherapy group experienced a significant increase in the patients’ happiness, while there was no significant increase in the control group. Conclusion The results of this research showed the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy on the reduction of mental pressure and the improvement of the mental status of breast cancer patients. This economical therapy can be used to increase patients’ psychological health. Clinical Trial Registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRST) with the identification number IRCT2013101410063N4. Funding The authors received financial support for the research from Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. PMID:27123227

  8. Frequency of aspirating gastric tubes for patients receiving enteral nutrition in the ICU: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa A; Leslie, Gavin; Mills, Lauren; Leen, Tim; Davies, Hugh; Hendron, David; Dobb, Geoffrey J

    2014-09-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) tolerance is often monitored by aspirating stomach contents by syringe at prescribed intervals. No studies have been conducted to assess the most appropriate time interval for aspirating gastric tubes. We compared gastric tube aspirations every 4 hours (usual care) with a variable regimen (up to every 8 hours aspirations). This randomized controlled trial (RCT) enrolled patients who stayed in the intensive care unit (ICU) for >48 hours, had a gastric tube, and were likely to receive EN for 3 or more days. Patients were randomized (computer-generated randomization) to either the control (every 4 hours) or intervention group (variable regimen). The primary outcome was number of gastric tube aspirations per day from randomization until EN was ceased or up to 2 weeks postrandomization. Following Institutional Ethics Committee approval, 357 patients were recruited (control group, n = 179; intervention group, n = 178). No differences were found in age, sex, worst APACHE II score, or time to start of EN. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the intervention group had fewer tube aspirations per day (3.4 versus 5.4 in the control group, P tube aspirations. The frequency of gastric tube aspirations was reduced in the variable-regimen group with no increase in risk to the patient. Reducing the frequency of aspirations saves nursing time, decreases risk of contamination of feeding circuit, and minimizes risk of body fluid exposure. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Targeting Patient Subgroups With Chronic Low Back Pain for Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment: Responder Analyses From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardone, John C; Gatchel, Robert J; Aryal, Subhash

    2016-03-01

    Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is often used to treat patients with low back pain (LBP). To identify subgroups of patients with chronic LBP who achieve medium to large treatment effects with OMT based on responder analyses involving pain and functioning outcomes from the OSTEOPAThic Health outcomes In Chronic low back pain (OSTEOPATHIC) Trial. This randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial involving 455 patients in Dallas-Fort Worth was conducted from 2006 to 2011. A 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP intensity and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) for back-specific functioning were used to assess primary and secondary outcomes, respectively. Substantial improvement was defined as 50% or greater reduction at week 12 compared with baseline. Cumulative distribution functions for the RR and number-needed-to-treat (NNT) were used to assess response. Medium treatment effects for LBP intensity were observed overall (RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.13-1.76; P=.002; NNT, 6.9; 95% CI, 4.3-18.6). However, large treatment effects were observed in patients with baseline VAS scores of 35 mm or greater. Although OMT was not associated with overall substantial improvement in back-specific functioning, patients with baseline RMDQ scores of 7 or greater experienced medium effects, and patients with baseline scores 16 or greater experienced large effects that were significant. The OMT effects for LBP intensity and back-specific functioning were independent of baseline patient demographic characteristics, comorbid medical conditions, and medication use for LBP during the trial. Subgrouping according to baseline levels of chronic LBP intensity and back-specific functioning appears to be a simple strategy for identifying sizeable numbers of patients who achieve substantial improvement with OMT and may thereby be less likely to use more costly and invasive interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00315120).

  10. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J M; Bos, Willem Jan W; van Montfrans, Gert A; van Dijk, Sandra

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Open randomized controlled trial. Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands. Regular care was compared with regular care plus an intervention comprising education, motivational interviewing, coaching, and self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and sodium. Primary outcomes were sodium excretion and BP after the 3-month intervention and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were protein excretion, kidney function, antihypertensive medication, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). At baseline, mean sodium excretion rate was 163.6±64.9 (SD) mmol/24 h; mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 49.7±25.6mL/min/1.73m2; median protein excretion rate was 0.8 (IQR, 0.4-1.7) g/24 h; and mean 24-hour ambulatory systolic and diastolic BPs were 129±15 and 76±9mmHg, respectively. Compared to regular care only (n=71), at 3 months, the intervention group (n=67) showed reduced sodium excretion rate (mean change, -30.3 [95% CI, -54.7 to -5.9] mmol/24 h), daytime ambulatory diastolic BP (mean change, -3.4 [95% CI, -6.3 to -0.6] mmHg), diastolic office BP (mean change, -5.2 [95% CI, -8.4 to -2.1] mmHg), protein excretion (mean change, -0.4 [95% CI, -0.7 to -0.1] g/24h), and improved self-efficacy (mean change, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.9]). At 6 months, differences in sodium excretion rates and ambulatory BPs between the groups were not significant, but differences were detected in systolic and diastolic office BPs (mean changes of -7.3 [95% CI, -12.7 to -1.9] and -3.8 [95% CI, -6.9 to -0.6] mmHg, respectively), protein excretion (mean changes, -0.3 [95% CI, -0.6 to -0.1] g/24h), and self-efficacy (mean change, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.0 to 0.9]). No differences in kidney function, medication, and HRQoL were observed. Nonblinding, relatively low response rate, and missing data

  11. Multimedia support for improving preoperative patient education: a randomized controlled trial using the example of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes; Ihrig, Andreas; Yass, Mohammed; Bruckner, Tom; Peters, Tim; Huber, Christian G; Konyango, Beryl; Lozankovski, Novica; Stredele, Regina J F; Moll, Peter; Schneider, Meike; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the use of multimedia presentations for informing patients. Therefore, we supported preoperative education by adding a multimedia tool and examined the effects in a randomized controlled trial. We randomized German-speaking patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy at our center to receive either a multimedia-supported (MME) or a standard education (SE). Outcomes were measured in a structured interview. Primary outcome was patient satisfaction. In addition, we applied validated instruments to determine anxiety and measures of decision-making. Results were given by mean and standard deviation. For comparison of groups we used t test and chi-square test. For an explorative analysis we applied multivariate logistic regression. We randomized 203 patients to receive MME (n=102) or SE (n=101). Complete satisfaction with preoperative education was more frequent in the MME group (69 vs 52%, p=.016) and patients after MME reported more questions (5.7 vs 4.2, p=.018). There was no difference concerning the duration of talks and the number of recalled risks. However, perceived knowledge was higher after MME (1.3 vs 1.6, p=.037). Anxiety and measures of decision-making were comparable. Patients judged the multimedia tool very positive, and 74% of the MME group thought that their preoperative education had been superior to SE. Multimedia support should be considered worthwhile for improving the informed consent process before surgery (www.germanctr.de; DRKS00000096).

  12. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary; Møller, Tom; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    , sit to stand and bicep curl test, physical activity levels, patient reported outcomes (quality of life, anxiety and depression, symptom prevalence, intensity and interference). Evaluation of clinical outcomes will be explored including incidence of infection, hospitalization days, body mass index......Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease...... and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured...

  13. Lapatinib versus hormone therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a randomized phase III clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravaud, Alain; Hawkins, Robert; Gardner, Jason P

    2008-01-01

    of metastatic sites--were randomly assigned to lapatinib 1,250 mg daily or HT. The primary end point was time to progression (TTP); secondary end points included overall survival (OS), safety, and biomarker analyses. RESULTS: Four hundred sixteen patients were enrolled onto the study. Median TTP was 15.3 weeks......PURPOSE: Lapatinib is an orally reversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) tyrosine kinases with demonstrated activity in patients with HER-2-positive breast cancer. In the current phase III open-label trial, lapatinib...... was compared with hormone therapy (HT) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) that express EGFR and/or HER-2. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with advanced RCC who had experienced disease progression through first-line cytokine therapy--stratified by Karnofsky performance status and number...

  14. Early Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Biliopancreatic Mass Lesions, a Prospective, Randomized Intervention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kr?ger, Janine; Meffert, Peter J.; Vogt, Lena J.; G?rtner, Simone; Steveling, Antje; Kraft, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Aghdassi, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with biliopancreatic tumors frequently suffer from weight loss and cachexia. The in-hospital work-up to differentiate between benign and malignant biliopancreatic lesions requires repeated pre-interventional fasting periods that can aggravate this problem. We conducted a randomized intervention study to test whether routine in-hospital peripheral intravenous nutrition on fasting days (1000 ml/24 h, 700 kcal) has a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition. Materia...

  15. Carrageenan nasal spray in virus confirmed common cold: individual patient data analysis of two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenighofer, Martin; Lion, Thomas; Bodenteich, Angelika; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Grassauer, Andreas; Unger, Hermann; Mueller, Christian A; Fazekas, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials applying iota-carrageenan nasal spray have previously shown to reduce duration of virus-confirmed common cold. The present study pooled data of two similar clinical trials to provide further evidence for the antiviral effectiveness of carrageenan. Individual patient data were analyzed from two randomized double blind placebo controlled trials assessing the therapeutic effectiveness of carrageenan nasal spray in acute common cold. Patients with virus-confirmed common cold (n = 254, verum 126, placebo 128) were included and the following parameters were appraised: duration of disease, number of patients with relapses, number of respiratory viruses and viral titers at inclusion (visit 1) compared to days 3-5 (visit 2). Carrageenan treated patients showed a significant reduction in duration of disease of almost 2 days (p cold was caused by three main virus subtypes: human rhinovirus (46%), human coronavirus (25%) and influenza A (14%) virus. Carrageenan nasal spray showed significant antiviral efficacy in all three virus subgroups, the highest effectiveness was observed in human corona virus-infected patients. The reduced duration of disease was 3 days (p spray in children as well as in adults suffering from virus-confirmed common cold reduced duration of disease, increased viral clearance and reduced relapses of symptoms. Carrageenan nasal spray appeared as an effective treatment of common cold in children and adults. Pooled data from ISRCTN52519535 and ISRCTN80148028.

  16. Nintedanib in Japanese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A subgroup analysis of the INPULSIS® randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Arata; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Takashi; Homma, Sakae; Fujimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Wataru; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a specific form of chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Nintedanib significantly reduced the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) compared with placebo in patients with IPF in two replicate trials (INPULSIS®). We examined the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in Japanese patients. We conducted pre-specified subgroup analyses of the annual rate of decline in FVC, time to first acute exacerbation (AE), change from baseline in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score and safety using pooled data from the INPULSIS® trials for Japanese patients. In the overall population, 76 of 638 and 50 of 423 patients in the nintedanib and placebo groups, respectively, were Japanese. Results in Japanese patients were consistent with those in the overall population. In Japanese patients, the adjusted annual rate of decline in FVC was -135.9 mL/year in the nintedanib group and -267.7 mL/year in the placebo group (difference (95% CI): 131.9 (50.7, 213.1) mL/year); the hazard ratio for the time to first AE was 0.25 (0.06, 1.02); and the adjusted mean change from baseline in SGRQ total score at week 52 was 5.81 in the nintedanib group and 9.68 in the placebo group (difference: -3.87 (-8.51, 0.76)). Diarrhoea and liver-related adverse events were the most common events in the nintedanib group, but were reversible following dose reduction, drug interruption or symptomatic therapy. The present results indicate that the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in Japanese patients are comparable with those in the overall population. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Effect of Pentoxifylline on Microalbuminuria in Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shahidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pentoxifylline is a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties. Human studies have proved its antiproteinuric effect in patients with glomerular diseases, but this study was designed to assess the effects of add-on pentoxifylline to available treatment on reduction of microalbuminuria in diabetic patients without glomerular diseases. Methods. In a double-blind placebo-controlled, randomized study we evaluated the influence of pentoxifylline on microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. 40 diabetic patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of more than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 in eight weeks and microalbuminuria were randomized to two groups which will receive pentoxifylline 1200 mg/day or placebo added to regular medications for 6 months. albuminuria; eGFR was evaluated at three- and six-month follow-up period. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. At six months, the mean estimated GFR and albuminuria were not different between two groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Trend of albumin to creatinine ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and eGFR in both groups were decreased, but no significant differences were noted between two groups (P value > 0.05. Conclusion. Pentoxifylline has not a significant additive antimicroalbuminuric effect compared with placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes with early stage of kidney disease; however, further clinical investigations are necessary to be done.

  18. [Randomized clinical trial with a inulin enriched cookie on risk cardiovascular factor in obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; de la Fuente, B; Izaola, O; Conde, R; Gutiérrez, S; Morillo, M; Teba Torres, C

    2010-01-01

    Inulin is a prebiotic with potential benefit in cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of our work is to evaluate in obese patients the effect of a inulin enriched cookie on cardiovascular risk factors. 34 patients were randomized in both branches: group I (inulin enriched cookie) Gullon SL(R) and group II (control cookie). Previous and after 1 month of the treatment, a nutritional and biochemical study was realized. 15 patients finished the procotol in each group. In group I, an increase in soluble fiber intake (inulin) was detected. In this group a significant decrease of total cholesterol (223.1 +/- 45.3 mg/dl vs 208.8 +/- 33.1 mg/dl; p cookie group, too. Anthropometric parameters did not change in both groups. The increase in soluble fiber intake did not produce any gastrointestinal adverse effect. The increase of fiber intake (3 g of inulin) from an enriched cookie reduced LDL cholesterol levels in obese patients.

  19. [Hepatotoxicity in patients treated with endothelin receptor antagonists: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; de la Fuente Honrubia, César; Montero Corominas, Dolores; Catalá-López, Ferrán

    2014-04-22

    We evaluated the risk of hepatotoxicity associated to endothelin receptor antagonists. Systematic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library as well as regulatory agencies websites were performed. Randomized controlled trials in patients receiving endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan or ambrisentan) in at least one treatment group were included. Prior to data extraction, definitions of hepatotoxicity were established. Effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was analysed using Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Publication bias was assessed using Egger's method and funnel plots were generated. Twenty-one trials met the inclusion criteria (3,644 patients). Bosentan was the evaluated drug in 1,689 (74%) patients who received endothelin receptor antagonists. Compared with controls, relative risk for any hepatic adverse reaction was 2.92 (1.85-4.62; I(2)=30.6%). When hepatotoxicity was defined as elevations of liver alanine or aspartate aminotransferases equal or greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal, relative risk was 2.98 (1.69-5.25; I(2) = 40.9%). No evidence of publication bias was found (Egger's method: p = 0.68). Our results suggest an increased risk of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving endothelin receptor antagonists. Given the limited data available for endothelin receptor antagonists other than bosentan, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions about the individual risk associated for the remaining endothelin receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical Activity and Early Rehabilitation in Hospitalized Elderly Medical Patients: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Velilla, N; Cadore, L; Casas-Herrero, Á; Idoate-Saralegui, F; Izquierdo, M

    2016-01-01

    To critically review the effect of interventions incorporating exercise and early rehabilitation (physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physical activity) in the functional outcomes (i.e., active daily living tests, such as Barthel Index Scores, Timed-up-and go, mobility tests), and feasibility in hospitalized elderly medical patients. Systematic review of the literature. A literature search was conducted using the following databases and medical resources from 1966 to January 2014: PubMed (Medline), PEDro, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, ClinicalTrials.gov, Clinical Evidence, SportsDiscus, EMBASE and UptoDate. Studies must have mentioned the effects of early rehabilitation on the above mentioned functional outcomes and feasibility. Data on the mortality, economic profile and average stay were also described. From the 6564 manuscripts potentially related to exercise performance in hospitalized elderly patients, the review focused on 1086, and 17 articles were ultimately included. Regarding functional outcomes after discharge, four studies observed significant improvement in functional outcomes following early rehabilitation, even up to twelve months after discharge. Eight studies directly or indirectly assessed the economic impact of exercise intervention. Five of them did not show any increase in costs, while three concluded that the intervention was cost effective. No adverse effect related with the interventions were mentioned. The introduction of an exercise program for hospitalized elderly patients may be feasible, and may not increase costs. Importantly, early rehabilitation may also improve the functional and healthcare.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous Urapidil for Older Hypertensive Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Yu Jie; Fu, Yan; Qin, Jian; Qin, Shu; Chen, Xiao Min; Guo, Jin Cheng; Wang, De Zhao; Zhan, Hong; Li, Jing; He, Jing Yu; Hua, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Urapidil is putatively effective for patients with hypertension and acute heart failure, although randomized controlled trials thereon are lacking. We investigated the efficacy and safety of intravenous urapidil relative to that of nitroglycerin in older patients with hypertension and heart failure in a randomized controlled trial. Patients (>60 y) with hypertension and heart failure were randomly assigned to receive intravenous urapidil (n=89) or nitroglycerin (n=91) for 7 days. Hemodynamic parameters, cardiac function, and safety outcomes were compared. Patients in the urapidil group had significantly lower mean systolic blood pressure (110.1±6.5 mm Hg) than those given nitroglycerin (126.4±8.1 mm Hg, p=0.022), without changes in heart rate. Urapidil was associated with improved cardiac function as reflected by lower N terminal-pro B type natriuretic peptide after 7 days (3311.4±546.1 ng/mL vs. 4879.1±325.7 ng/mL, p=0.027) and improved left ventricular ejection fraction (62.2±3.4% vs. 51.0±2.4%, p=0.032). Patients given urapidil had fewer associated adverse events, specifically headache (p=0.025) and tachycardia (p=0.004). The one-month rehospitalization and all-cause mortality rates were similar. Intravenous administration of urapidil, compared with nitroglycerin, was associated with better control of blood pressure and preserved cardiac function, as well as fewer adverse events, for elderly patients with hypertension and acute heart failure.

  2. A video to improve patient and surrogate understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation choices in the ICU: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael E; Krupa, Artur; Hinds, Richard F; Litell, John M; Swetz, Keith M; Akhoundi, Abbasali; Kashyap, Rahul; Gajic, Ognjen; Kashani, Kianoush

    2015-03-01

    To determine if a video depicting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitation preference options would improve knowledge and decision making among patients and surrogates in the ICU. Randomized, unblinded trial. Single medical ICU. Patients and surrogate decision makers in the ICU. The usual care group received a standard pamphlet about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation preference options plus routine code status discussions with clinicians. The video group received usual care plus an 8-minute video that depicted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, showed a simulated hospital code, and explained resuscitation preference options. One hundred three patients and surrogates were randomized to usual care. One hundred five patients and surrogates were randomized to video plus usual care. Median total knowledge scores (0-15 points possible for correct answers) in the video group were 13 compared with 10 in the usual care group, p value of less than 0.0001. Video group participants had higher rates of understanding the purpose of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitation options and terminology and could correctly name components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. No statistically significant differences in documented resuscitation preferences following the interventions were found between the two groups, although the trial was underpowered to detect such differences. A majority of participants felt that the video was helpful in cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making (98%) and would recommend the video to others (99%). A video depicting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and explaining resuscitation preference options was associated with improved knowledge of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation options and cardiopulmonary resuscitation terminology among patients and surrogate decision makers in the ICU, compared with receiving a pamphlet on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Patients and surrogates found the video helpful in decision

  3. Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lucy V; McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D

    2016-06-08

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), is characterized by chronic disabling fatigue and other symptoms, which are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Previous trials have suggested that graded exercise therapy (GET) is an effective and safe treatment. GET itself is therapist-intensive with limited availability. While guided self-help based on cognitive behavior therapy appears helpful to patients, Guided graded Exercise Self-help (GES) is yet to be tested. This pragmatic randomized controlled trial is set within 2 specialist CFS/ME services in the South of England. Adults attending secondary care clinics with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)-defined CFS/ME (N=218) will be randomly allocated to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus GES while on a waiting list for therapist-delivered rehabilitation. GES will consist of a structured booklet describing a 6-step graded exercise program, supported by up to 4 face-to-face/telephone/Skype™ consultations with a GES-trained physiotherapist (no more than 90 minutes in total) over 8 weeks. The primary outcomes at 12-weeks after randomization will be physical function (SF-36 physical functioning subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes will include healthcare costs, adverse outcomes, and self-rated global impression change scores. We will follow up all participants until 1 year after randomization. We will also undertake qualitative interviews of a sample of participants who received GES, looking at perceptions and experiences of those who improved and worsened. The project was funded in 2011 and enrolment was completed in December 2014, with follow-up completed in March 2016. Data analysis is currently underway and the first results are expected to be submitted soon. This study will indicate whether adding GES to SMC will benefit patients who often spend many months waiting for rehabilitative therapy with little or

  4. Repeated Melatonin Supplementation Improves Sleep in Hypertensive Patients Treated with Beta-Blockers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Morris, Christopher J.; Garcia, Joanna I.; Smales, Carolina; Kelly, Erin E.; Marks, Jenny; Malhotra, Atul; Shea, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    positive carryover effect was demonstrated). These findings may assist in developing countermeasures against sleep disturbances associated with beta-blocker therapy. Clinical Trial Information: his study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT00238108; trial name: Melatonin Supplements for Improving Sleep in Individuals with Hypertension; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00238108. Citation: Scheer FAJL; Morris CJ; Garcia JI; Smales C; Kelly EE; Marks J; Malhotra A; Shea SA. Repeated melatonin supplementation improves sleep in hypertensive patients treated with beta-blockers: a randomized controlled trial. SLEEP 2012;35(10):1395-1402. PMID:23024438

  5. a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Yıldırım

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching and Mulligan technique on hip flexion range of motion (ROM in subjects with bilateral hamstring tightness. A total of 40 students (mean age: 21.5±1.3 years, mean body height: 172.8±8.2 cm, mean body mass index: 21.9±3.0 kg • m-2 with bilateral hamstring tightness were enrolled in this randomized trial, of whom 26 completed the study. Subjects were divided into 4 groups performing (I typical static stretching, (II PNF stretching, (III Mulligan traction straight leg raise (TSLR technique, (IV no intervention. Hip flexion ROM was measured using a digital goniometer with the passive straight leg raise test before and after 4 weeks by two physiotherapists blinded to the groups. 52 extremities of 26 subjects were analyzed. Hip flexion ROM increased in all three intervention groups (p<0.05 but not in the no-intervention group after 4 weeks. A statistically significant change in initial–final assessment differences of hip flexion ROM was found between groups (p<0.001 in favour of PNF stretching and Mulligan TSLR technique in comparison to typical static stretching (p=0.016 and p=0.02, respectively. No significant difference was found between Mulligan TSLR technique and PNF stretching (p=0.920. The initial–final assessment difference of hip flexion ROM was similar in typical static stretching and no intervention (p=0.491. A 4-week stretching intervention is beneficial for increasing hip flexion ROM in bilateral hamstring tightness. However, PNF stretching and Mulligan TSLR technique are superior to typical static stretching. These two interventions can be alternatively used for stretching in hamstring tightness.

  6. Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Øiestad, Britt Elin; Østerås, Nina; Frobell, Richard; Grotle, Margreth; Brøgger, Helga; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Open Access Highly Accessed Study protocol Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Britt Elin Øiestad1*, Nina Østerås2, Richard Frobell3, Margreth Grotle4, Helga Brøgger5 and May Arna Risberg16 * Corresponding author: Britt E Øiestad Author Affiliations 1 Norwegian Research Center for Active Rehabilitation ...

  7. High-flow nasal cannula to prevent postextubation respiratory failure in high-risk non-hypercapnic patients: a randomized multicenter trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Rafael; Subira, Carles; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Rialp, Gemma; Laborda, Cesar; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Lesmes, Amanda; Panadero, Luna; Hernandez, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Background Extubation failure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but cannot be safely predicted or avoided. High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) prevents postextubation respiratory failure in low-risk patients. Objective To demonstrate that HFNC reduces postextubation respiratory failure in high-risk non-hypercapnic patients compared with conventional oxygen. Methods Randomized, controlled multicenter trial in patients who passed a spontaneous breathing trial. We enrolled patient...

  8. The Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction Among Subgroups of Patients With Low Back Pain and Leg Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Anne; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John D; Brennan, Gerard P

    2016-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Background The recommended initial management strategy for patients with low back pain and signs of nerve root compression is conservative treatment, but there is little evidence to guide the most appropriate management strategy. Preliminary research suggests that a treatment protocol of mechanical traction and extension-oriented exercises may be effective, particularly in a specific subgroup of patients. To examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction in patients with lumbar nerve root compression and within a predefined subgroup. One hundred twenty patients with low back pain with nerve root compression were recruited from physical therapy clinics. Using predefined subgrouping criteria, patients were stratified at baseline and randomized to receive an extension-oriented treatment approach with or without the addition of mechanical traction. During a 6-week period, patients received up to 12 treatment visits. Primary outcomes of pain and disability were collected at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year by assessors blinded to group allocation. Outcomes were examined using linear mixed-model analyses examining change over time by treatment and the interaction between treatment and subgrouping status. The mean ± SD age of participants was 41.1 ± 11.3 years, median duration of symptoms was 62 days, and 57% were male. No significant differences in disability or pain outcomes were noted between treatment groups at any time point, nor was any interaction found between subgroup status and treatment. Patients with lumbar nerve root compression presenting for physical therapy can expect significant changes in disability and pain over a 6-week treatment period. There is no evidence that mechanical lumbar traction in combination with an extension-oriented treatment is superior to extension-oriented exercises alone in the management of these patients or within a predefined subgroup of patients. The study protocol was registered with ClinicalTrials

  9. Effect of Losmapimod on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Glaser, Ruchira; Cavender, Matthew A; Aylward, Philip E; Bonaca, Marc P; Budaj, Andrzej; Davies, Richard Y; Dellborg, Mikael; Fox, Keith A A; Gutierrez, Jorge Antonio T; Hamm, Christian; Kiss, Robert G; Kovar, František; Kuder, Julia F; Im, Kyung Ah; Lepore, John J; Lopez-Sendon, Jose L; Ophuis, Ton Oude; Parkhomenko, Alexandr; Shannon, Jennifer B; Spinar, Jindrich; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Ruda, Mikhail; Steg, P Gabriel; Theroux, Pierre; Wiviott, Stephen D; Laws, Ian; Sabatine, Marc S; Morrow, David A

    2016-04-19

    p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-stimulated inflammation is implicated in atherogenesis, plaque destabilization, and maladaptive processes in myocardial infarction (MI). Pilot data in a phase 2 trial in non-ST elevation MI indicated that the p38 MAPK inhibitor losmapimod attenuates inflammation and may improve outcomes. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of losmapimod on cardiovascular outcomes in patients hospitalized with an acute myocardial infarction. LATITUDE-TIMI 60, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group trial conducted at 322 sites in 34 countries from June 3, 2014, until December 8, 2015. Part A consisted of a leading cohort (n = 3503) to provide an initial assessment of safety and exploratory efficacy before considering progression to part B (approximately 22,000 patients). Patients were considered potentially eligible for enrollment if they had been hospitalized with an acute MI and had at least 1 additional predictor of cardiovascular risk. Patients were randomized to either twice-daily losmapimod (7.5 mg; n = 1738) or matching placebo (n = 1765) on a background of guideline-recommended therapy. Patients were treated for 12 weeks and followed up for an additional 12 weeks. The primary end point was the composite of cardiovascular death, MI, or severe recurrent ischemia requiring urgent coronary revascularization with the principal analysis specified at week 12. In part A, among the 3503 patients randomized (median age, 66 years; 1036 [29.6%] were women), 99.1% had complete ascertainment for the primary outcome. The primary end point occurred by 12 weeks in 123 patients treated with placebo (7.0%) and 139 patients treated with losmapimod (8.1%; hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.91-1.47; P = .24). The on-treatment rates of serious adverse events were 16.0% with losmapimod and 14.2% with placebo. Among patients with acute MI, use of losmapimod compared with placebo did not reduce the risk of major ischemic

  10. Efficacy and safety of ginger in osteoarthritis patients: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, E M; Folmer, V N; Bliddal, H; Altman, R D; Juhl, C; Tarp, S; Zhang, W; Christensen, R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of oral ginger for symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) by carrying out a systematic literature search followed by meta-analyses on selected studies. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral ginger treatment with placebo in OA patients aged >18 years. Outcomes were reduction in pain and reduction in disability. Harm was assessed as withdrawals due to adverse events. The efficacy effect size was estimated using Hedges' standardized mean difference (SMD), and safety by risk ratio (RR). Standard random-effects meta-analysis was used, and inconsistency was evaluated by the I-squared index (I(2)). Out of 122 retrieved references, 117 were discarded, leaving five trials (593 patients) for meta-analyses. The majority reported relevant randomization procedures and blinding, but an inadequate intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. Following ginger intake, a statistically significant pain reduction SMD = -0.30 ([95% CI: [(-0.50, -0.09)], P = 0.005]) with a low degree of inconsistency among trials (I(2) = 27%), and a statistically significant reduction in disability SMD = -0.22 ([95% CI: ([-0.39, -0.04)]; P = 0.01; I(2) = 0%]) were seen, both in favor of ginger. Patients given ginger were more than twice as likely to discontinue treatment compared to placebo ([RR = 2.33; 95% CI: (1.04, 5.22)]; P = 0.04; I(2) = 0%]). Ginger was modestly efficacious and reasonably safe for treatment of OA. We judged the evidence to be of moderate quality, based on the small number of participants and inadequate ITT populations. Prospero: CRD42011001777. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Massage on Blood Pressure in Patients With Hypertension and Prehypertension: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, I-Chen; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Wang, Mei-Yeh; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Massage may help reduce blood pressure; previous studies on the effect of massage on blood pressure have presented conflicting findings. In addition, no systematic review is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence concerning the effect of massage on blood pressure in patients with hypertension or prehypertension. A search was performed on electronic database records up to October 31, 2013, based on the following medical subject headings or keywords: hypertension, massage, chiropractic, manipulation, and blood pressure. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials was assessed based on the Cochrane collaboration tool. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of massage on hypertension. The study selection, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by 2 reviewers. Nine randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. The results of this study show that massage contributes to significantly enhanced reduction in both systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mean difference, -7.39 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mean difference, -5.04 mm Hg) as compared with control treatments in patients with hypertension and prehypertension. The effect size (Hedges g) for SBP and DBP was -0.728 (95% confidence interval, -1.182 to -0.274; P = .002) and -0.334 (95% confidence interval, -0.560 to -0.107; P = .004), respectively. This systematic review found a medium effect of massage on SBP and a small effect on DBP in patients with hypertension or prehypertension. High-quality randomized controlled trials are urgently required to confirm these results, although the findings of this study can be used to guide future research.

  12. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayiga, Susan; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Nabirye, Christine; Haaland, Ane; Staedke, Sarah G; Chandler, Clare I R

    2014-10-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including 'patient-centred services.' A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and evaluate the implementation and programme theories of the intervention. This article evaluates one hypothesized mechanism of change within the programme theory: the impact of the Patient Centred Services component on health-worker communication. The theory-driven approach extended to evaluation of the outcome measures. The study found that the proximal outcome of patient-centred communication was rated 10 percent higher ( p < 0.008) by care seekers consulting with the health workers who were at the intervention health centres compared with those at control health centres. This finding will strengthen interpretation of more distal trial outcomes.

  13. Effects of Deqi on Autonomic Balance in Adult Tinnitus Patients: Study Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent reports suggest that a proportion of tinnitus patients suffer from mental illness. Autonomic nervous system plays a useful role in tinnitus therapy since electrical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS has been frequently used to alleviate tinnitus-induced depression in clinic. heart rate variability (HRV, which is reflective of autonomic nervous system function, has been proved to be modulated by acupuncture. In the present study, we aim to compare the effect of deqi sensation on heart rate variability in adult tinnitus patients. Methods. Thirty participants are randomly assigned to verum acupuncture (creating deqi or shallow acupuncture (not creating deqi at Baihui (Du-20, Shenting (Du-24, Tinghui (GB-2, Waiguan (SJ-5, and Zulinqi (GB-41 for 3 weeks. The primary outcome measure is heart rate variability, which is measured at the first acupuncture, as well as the last acupuncture. Discussion. Completion of this trial will help to identify the role of deqi sensation in acupuncture effect for tinnitus and reveal an autonomic modulation mechanism for acupuncture effect. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number ISRCTN58013563.

  14. Patient recruitment into a multicenter randomized clinical trial for kidney disease: report of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis clinical trial (FSGS CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Maria; Norwood, Victoria; Radeva, Milena; Gassman, Jennifer J; Al-Uzri, Amira; Askenazi, David; Matoo, Tej; Pinsk, Maury; Sharma, Amita; Smoyer, William; Stults, Jenna; Vyas, Shefali; Weiss, Robert; Gipson, Debbie; Kaskel, Frederick; Friedman, Aaron; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Trachtman, Howard

    2013-02-01

    We describe the experience of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis clinical trial (FSGS CT) in the identification and recruitment of participants into the study. This National Institutes of Health funded study, a multicenter, open-label, randomized comparison of cyclosporine versus oral dexamethasone pulses plus mycophenolate mofetil, experienced difficulty and delays meeting enrollment goals. These problems occurred despite the support of patient advocacy groups and aggressive recruitment strategies. Multiple barriers were identified including: (1) inaccurate estimates of the number of potential incident FSGS patients at participating centers; (2) delays in securing one of the test agents; (3) prolonged time between IRB approval and execution of a subcontract (mean 7.5 ± 0.8 months); (4) prolonged time between IRB approval and enrollment of the first patient at participating sites (mean 19.6 ± 1.4 months); and (5) reorganization of clinical coordinating core infrastructure to align resources with enrollment. A Web-based anonymous survey of site investigators revealed site-related barriers to patient recruitment. The value of a variety of recruitment tools was of marginal utility in facilitating patient enrollment. We conclude that improvements in the logistics of study approval and regulatory start-up and testing of promising novel agents are important factors in promoting enrollment into randomized clinical trials in nephrology. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Randomized trial of three phototherapy methods for the treatment of acne vulgaris in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Hong; Fan, Xin; An, Yu-Xi; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Cong-Min; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2014-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is common in Asian populations. We compared three methods of phototherapy for the treatment of moderate to severe facial acne vulgaris in Chinese patients. Patients were randomly assigned to receive photodynamic therapy (PDT), intense pulsed light (IPL) or blue-red light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy to the right side of the face until the inflammatory lesion count reduced by ≥ 90%. Patients were examined at 1 and 3 months after the final treatment. We enrolled 150 patients (92 males; mean age, 28 years). At 1 month, ≥90% clearance or moderate improvement occurred in 46/50 (92%), 29/50 (58%) and 22/50 (44%) patients in the PDT, IPL and LED groups, respectively (mean number of sessions required, PDT: 3 ± 1.52; IPL: 6 ± 2.15; LED: 9 ± 3.34). Forty-six (92%) patients experienced mild to moderate pain, erythema and edema after PDT, which resolved within 5-7 days. Slight erythema and stinging were reported immediately after IPL and LED, resolving within 2 h. After 3 months, minimal papules and pustules were observed in 4 patients in the PDT group, 7 in the IPL group and 12 in the LED group, but no nodular pustules recurred. Phototherapy is efficacious for moderate to severe facial acne vulgaris. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A randomized trial comparing levo-alpha acetylmethadol with methadone maintenance for patients in primary care settings in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, AJ; Lintzeris, N; Clark, N; Kutin, JJ; Bammer, G; Panjari, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) and methadone, as measured by retention in treatment and heroin use, in a randomized trial conducted under naturalistic conditions. Setting This study is the first randomized trial comparing LAAM with methadone

  17. Randomized controlled trial of modafinil for the treatment of fatigue in postpolio patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K Ming; Strohschein, Fay J; Rydz, David; Allidina, Amyn; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Westbury, Chris F

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether modafinil is effective in alleviating the symptoms of fatigue in postpolio patients, because it has been helpful for such symptoms in other neurologic disorders. Using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design, 14 postpolio patients with moderate to severe fatigue were assigned to receive modafinil or placebo first. Piper Fatigue Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, digit span, and reaction time tests were done at baseline and then at weekly intervals. The Piper Fatigue Scale scores improved by 27 +/- 40% (mean +/- SD) following modafinil and by 43 +/- 36% following placebo. Scores for most of the other tests did not change during the study. Therefore, we conclude that modafinil was not effective in alleviating the symptoms of fatigue in postpolio patients.

  18. Effectiveness of humor intervention for patients with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunfeng; Yu, Liping; Rong, Lan; Zhong, Hanling

    2014-12-01

    The primary aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of a 10-session humor intervention program in improving rehabilitative outcomes and the effects of the intervention on patients' sense of humor among patients with schizophrenia. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned into either the intervention (humor skill training) group (n = 15) or the control (doing handwork) group (n = 15). The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests and ANOVA. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted to examine the differences across conditions and time. A group by time interaction effect was observed on all of the outcomes, except positive symptoms of PANSS. The time main effect was also significant on the total score (p humor skill training in a mental health service can improve rehabilitative outcomes and sense of humor for schizophrenia patients who were in the rehabilitation stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prospective randomized trial of docetaxel versus doxorubicin in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; Friedrichs, K; Noel, D; Pintér, T; Van Belle, S; Vorobiof, D; Duarte, R; Gil Gil, M; Bodrogi, I; Murray, E; Yelle, L; von Minckwitz, G; Korec, S; Simmonds, P; Buzzi, F; González Mancha, R; Richardson, G; Walpole, E; Ronzoni, M; Murawsky, M; Alakl, M; Riva, A; Crown, J

    1999-08-01

    This phase III study compared docetaxel and doxorubicin in patients with metastatic breast cancer who had received previous alkylating agent-containing chemotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive an intravenous infusion of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) or doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of seven treatment cycles. A total of 326 patients were randomized, 165 to receive doxorubicin and 161 to receive docetaxel. Overall, docetaxel produced a significantly higher rate of objective response than did doxorubicin (47.8% v 33.3%; P =.008). Docetaxel was also significantly more active than doxorubicin in patients with negative prognostic factors, such as visceral metastases (objective response, 46% v 29%) and resistance to prior chemotherapy (47% v 25%). Median time to progression was longer in the docetaxel group (26 weeks v 21 weeks; difference not significant). Median overall survival was similar in the two groups (docetaxel, 15 months; doxorubicin, 14 months). There was one death due to infection in each group, and an additional four deaths due to cardiotoxicity in the doxorubicin group. Although neutropenia was similar in both groups, febrile neutropenia and severe infection occurred more frequently in the doxorubicin group. For severe nonhematologic toxicity, the incidences of cardiac toxicity, nausea, vomiting, and stomatitis were higher among patients receiving doxorubicin, whereas diarrhea, neuropathy, fluid retention, and skin and nail changes were higher among patients receiving docetaxel. The observed differences in activity and toxicity profiles provide a basis for therapy choice and confirms the rationale for combination studies in early breast cancer.

  20. A novel effect of Noscapine on patients with massive ischemic stroke: A pseudo-randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Massoud; Rezvani, Mohammad; Rohani, Mohammad; Benaissa, Foozya; Jalili, Mehdi; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2015-01-05

    Massive ischemic stroke causes significant mortality and morbidity in stroke patients. The main treatments for massive ischemic stroke are recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), craniotomy, and endovascular interventions. Due to destructive effects of bradykinin on the nervous system in ischemic stroke, it seems reasonable that using Noscapine as a Bradykinin antagonist may improve patients' outcome after ischemic stroke. The effect of Noscapine on massive ischemic stroke was shown by the previous pilot study by our group. This pseudo-randomized clinical trial study was designed to assess the result of the pilot study. Patients who had clinical symptoms or computed tomography scan indicative of massive stroke (in full middle cerebral artery territory) were entered to the study. The cases received the drugs according to their turns in emergency ward (pseudo-randomized). The patient group received Noscapine, and the control group received common supportive treatments. The patients and data analyzer were blinded about the data. At the end of the study, to adjust confounding variables we used logistic regression. After 1-month follow-up, 16 patients in the control group and 11 patients in the case group expired (P = 0.193). Analyzing the data extracted from Rankin scale and Barthel index check lists, revealed no significant differences in the two groups. Despite the absence of significant statistical results in our study, the reduction rate of 16% for mortality rate in Noscapine recipients is clinically remarkable and motivates future studies with larger sample sizes.

  1. Perioperative synbiotics administration decreases postoperative infections in patients with colorectal cancer: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINE TABORDA FLESCH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of perioperative administration of symbiotics on the incidence of surgical wound infection in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a randomized clinical trial with colorectal cancer patients undergoing elective surgery, randomly assigned to receive symbiotics or placebo for five days prior to the surgical procedure and for 14 days after surgery. We studied 91 patients, 49 in the symbiotics group (Lactobacillus acidophilus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus casei 108 to 109 CFU, Bifi dobacterium 108 to 109 CFU and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS 6g and 42 in the placebo group. Results: surgical site infection occurred in one (2% patient in the symbiotics group and in nine (21.4% patients in the control group (p=0.002. There were three cases of intraabdominal abscess and four cases of pneumonia in the control group, whereas we observed no infections in patients receiving symbiotics (p=0.001. Conclusion: the perioperative administration of symbiotics significantly reduced postoperative infection rates in patients with colorectal cancer. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of symbiotics in the surgical treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. A phase II study in advanced cancer patients to evaluate the early transition to palliative care (the PREPArE trial): protocol study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Thamires Monteiro; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; de Siqueira, Milena Ruas; da Rosa, Luciana de Toledo Bernardes; de Oliveira, Cleyton Zanardo; Nascimento, Maria Salete de Angelis; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-04-12

    Previous studies have demonstrated the benefit of early integration of palliative care (PC) in oncology. However, patients continue to receive late referrals to PC even in comprehensive cancer centers. Patients and health professionals may perceive PC as 'a place to die,' and this stigma is a barrier to timely referrals and to patient acceptance of treatment. The primary objective is to evaluate the feasibility of psychosocial intervention and PC in patients with advanced cancer. The patients will be submitted to a series of brief psychosocial interventions that are based on cognitive behavioral therapy, and patient acceptance and satisfaction will be assessed. In addition, the impact of these interventions on depressive symptoms will be evaluated. A randomized, open-label, phase II trial with two intervention arms and a control group will be conducted. Patients who are started on palliative chemotherapy and who meet the inclusion criteria will be enrolled. The study participants will be recruited from the outpatient oncology clinics at Barretos Cancer Hospital and will be randomized into one of the following three treatment arms: Arm A, which will include five weekly psychosocial interventions based on CBT in combination with early PC; Arm B, which will include early PC only; and Arm C, which will include standard oncologic care. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS-br), the Family Satisfaction with End-of-Life Care (FAMCARE)-Patient scale, and the Disease Understanding Protocol will be used for data collection. The patients will answer these questionnaires at baseline and 45, 90, 120 and 180 days after randomization. Despite evidence of the positive impact of early PC, it is often provided to patients only at later stages. The inadequate awareness and stigmatization of PC as a place to die are barriers that complicate the early referral. Patients with advanced

  3. Effects of Positive Psychology Interventions on Risk Biomarkers in Coronary Patients: A Randomized, Wait-List Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrahan, Gholam Reza; Laferton, Johannes A C; Asgari, Karim; Kalantari, Mehrdad; Abedi, Mohammad Reza; Etesampour, Ali; Rezaei, Abbas; Suarez, Laura; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-01-01

    Among cardiac patients, positive psychologic factors are consistently linked with superior clinical outcomes and improvement in key markers of inflammation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning. Further, positive psychology interventions (PPI) have effectively increased psychologic well-being in a wide variety of populations. However, there has been minimal study of PPIs in cardiac patients, and no prior study has evaluated their effect on key prognostic biomarkers of cardiac outcome. Accordingly, we investigated the effect of 3 distinct PPIs on risk biomarkers in cardiac patients. In an exploratory trial, 69 patients with recent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous intervention were randomized to (1) one of three 6-week in-person PPIs (based on the work of Seligman, Lyubomirsky, or Fordyce) or (2) a wait-list control group. Risk biomarkers were assessed at baseline, postintervention (7 weeks), and at 15-week follow-up. Between-group differences in change from baseline biomarker levels were examined via random effects models. Compared with the control group, participants randomized to the Seligman (B = -2.06; p = 0.02) and Fordyce PPI (B = -1.54; p = 0.04) had significantly lower high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels at 7 weeks. Further, the Lyubomirsky PPI (B = -245.86; p = 0.04) was associated with a significantly lower cortisol awakening response at 7 weeks when compared with control participants. There were no other significant between-group differences. Despite being an exploratory pilot study with multiple between-group comparisons, this initial trial offers the first suggestion that PPIs might be effective in reducing risk biomarkers in high-risk cardiac patients. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized, Controlled Trial of TRC101 to Increase Serum Bicarbonate in Patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushinsky, David A; Hostetter, Thomas; Klaerner, Gerrit; Stasiv, Yuri; Lockey, Claire; McNulty, Sarah; Lee, Angela; Parsell, Dawn; Mathur, Vandana; Li, Elizabeth; Buysse, Jerry; Alpern, Robert

    2017-11-04

    Metabolic acidosis is common in patients with CKD and has significant adverse effects on kidney, muscle, and bone. We tested the efficacy and safety of TRC101, a novel, sodium-free, nonabsorbed hydrochloric acid binder, to increase serum bicarbonate in patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis. One hundred thirty-five patients were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, in-unit study (designated the TRCA-101 Study). Patients had a mean baseline eGFR of 35 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), a mean baseline serum bicarbonate of 17.7 mEq/L, and comorbidities, including hypertension (93%), diabetes (70%), and heart failure (21%). Patients ate a controlled diet and were treated for 14 days with placebo or one of four TRC101 dosing regimens (1.5, 3, or 4.5 g twice daily or 6 g once daily). After treatment, patients were discharged and followed for 7-14 days. All TRC101 treatment groups had a mean within-group increase in serum bicarbonate of ≥1.3 mEq/L (Pbicarbonate of 3.2-3.9 mEq/L (Pbicarbonate did not change. In the combined TRC101 treatment group, serum bicarbonate was normalized (22-29 mEq/L) at the end of treatment in 35% of patients and increased by ≥4 mEq/L in 39% of patients. After discontinuation of TRC101, serum bicarbonate decreased nearly to baseline levels within 2 weeks. All adverse events were mild or moderate, with gastrointestinal events most common. All patients completed the study. TRC101 safely and significantly increased the level of serum bicarbonate in patients with metabolic acidosis and CKD. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Effectiveness of diclofenac versus acetaminophen in primary care patients with knee osteoarthritis: [NTR1485], DIPA-Trial: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohnen Arthur M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis is the most frequent chronic joint disease which causes pain and disability of especially hip and knee. According to international guidelines and the Dutch general practitioners guidelines for non-traumatic knee symptoms, acetaminophen should be the pain medication of first choice for osteoarthritis. However, of all prescribed pain medication in general practice, 90% consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs compared to 10% of acetaminophen. Because general practitioners may lack evidence showing a similar efficacy of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, we present the design of a randomized open-label trial to investigate the efficacy of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac compared with acetaminophen in new consulters with knee osteoarthritis in general practice. Methods/Design Patients aged 45 years or older consulting their general practitioner with non-traumatic knee pain, meeting the clinical American College of Rheumatology criteria, and with a pain severity score of 2 or higher (on a 0-10 scale, will be randomly allocated to either diclofenac (maximum daily dose of 150 mg or acetaminophen (maximum daily dose of 3000 mg for 2 weeks and, if required, an additional 1-2 weeks, with a total follow-up period of 12 weeks. The primary outcomes are knee pain measured with a daily diary, and pain and function measured with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS at baseline, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12-weeks follow-up. Secondary outcomes are patients' perceived recovery, quality of life, medical, patient, and productivity costs, compliance to therapy, co-interventions, and adverse reactions. Discussion The successful completion of this trial would lead to a better understanding of which medication should be used in the treatment of primary care patients with mild knee osteoarthritis. Trial registration Dutch trial registry NTR1485.

  6. Extension traction treatment for patients with discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Diab, Aliaa A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lumbar extension traction in patients with unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy due to L5-S1 disc herniation. A randomized controlled study with six-month follow-up. University research laboratory. Sixty-four patients with confirmed unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy due to L5-S1 disc herniation and a lumbar lordotic angle less than 39°, randomly assigned to traction or control group. The control group (n = 32) received hot packs and interferential therapy, whereas the traction group (n = 32) received lumbar extension traction in addition to hot packs and interferential therapy. Absolute rotatory angle, back and leg pain rating scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Modified Schober test, H-reflex (latency and amplitude) and intervertebral movements were measured for all patients three times (before treatment, after 10 weeks of treatment and at six-month follow-up). There was a significant difference between the traction group and the control group adjusted to baseline values at 10 weeks post treatment with respect to: absolute rotatory angle (P traction group receiving lumbar extension traction in addition to hot packs and interferential therapy had better effects than the control group with regard to pain, disability, H-reflex parameters and segmental intervertebral movements.

  7. The Clinical Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Reducing Pain for the Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Hao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Aromatherapy massage is an alternative treatment in reducing the pain of the cancer patients. This study was to investigate whether aromatherapy massage could improve the pain of the cancer patients. Methods. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for relevant randomized controlled trials without language limitations between 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2015 with a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The search terms included aromatherapy, essential oil, pain, ache, cancer, tumor, and carcinoma. There were 7 studies which met the selection criteria and 3 studies were eventually included among 63 eligible publications. Results. This meta-analysis included three randomized controlled trials with a total of 278 participants (135 participants in the massage with essential oil group and 143 participants in the control (usual care group. Compared with the control group, the massage with essential oil group had nonsignificant effect on reducing the pain (standardized mean difference = 0.01; 95% CI [-0.23,0.24]. Conclusion. Aromatherapy massage does not appear to reduce pain of the cancer patients. Further rigorous studies should be conducted with more objective measures.

  8. Active warming of critically ill trauma patients during intrahospital transfer: a prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, Thomas; Kober, Alexander; Bertalanffy, Petra; Aram, Laleh; Andel, Harald; Molnár, Csilla; Hoerauf, Klaus

    2004-02-16

    Hypothermia in trauma victims is a frequently observed phenomenon in acute care. Known complications of hypothermia are impaired wound healing, cardiac complications, hemodynamic instability, impaired immune function and increased blood loss. We compared active warming versus passive warming in hypothermia in critical-care patients undergoing intrahospital transfer from ICU to computer tomography (CT). Thirty critically ill patients were randomized either to an actively warmed group, covered with a carbon-fiber heating blanket (set to 42 degrees C) during the entire transport including the time spent in the CT, or to a passively warmed group, covered with a carbon-fiber heating blanket (switched off) during the entire transport and in the CT. The carbon-fiber blanket was covered with a conventional wool blanket in both groups. Vital parameters and core temperatures were recorded. Patients' characteristics and vital parameters were similar in each treatment group. Initial average core temperature in group A was 36.4 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C and remained stable at 36.4 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C; core temperature in group B started at 36.4 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C but decreased to 34.7 degrees C +/- 0.6 degrees C. Hypothermia is common when critically ill trauma patients require intrahospital transport for diagnostic procedures. Resistive heating during intrahospital transport kept the core temperature stable and assured normothermia in all actively warmed patients. We therefore recommend active warming for critically ill trauma patients during intrahospital transport.

  9. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2010-01-01

    An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N=90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients' emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Training Medical Specialists to Communicate Better with Patients with Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Anne; Blankenstein, Annette H.; Van Saase, Jan L. C. M.; Van der Molen, Henk T.; Jacobs, Mariël E.; Abels, Dineke C.; Köse, Nedim; Van Dulmen, Sandra; Vernhout, René M.; Arends, Lidia R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are prevalent 25–50% in general and specialist care. Medical specialists and residents often find patients without underlying pathology difficult to deal with, whereas patients sometimes don’t feel understood. We developed an evidence-based communication training, aimed to improve specialists’ interviewing, information-giving and planning skills in MUPS consultations, and tested its effectiveness. Methods The interventi