WorldWideScience

Sample records for random two-body forces

  1. Effects of Three-Nucleon Forces and Two-Body Currents on Gamow-Teller Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, K. A.; Hagen, G.; Papenbrock, T.; Bacca, S.; Carlsson, B.; Gazit, D.

    2014-12-01

    We optimize chiral interactions at next-to-next-to leading order to observables in two- and three-nucleon systems and compute Gamow-Teller transitions in 14C O,2422 using consistent two-body currents. We compute spectra of the daughter nuclei 14N and F,2422 via an isospin-breaking coupled-cluster technique, with several predictions. The two-body currents reduce the Ikeda sum rule, corresponding to a quenching factor q2≈0.84 - 0.92 of the axial-vector coupling. The half-life of 14C depends on the energy of the first excited 1+ state, the three-nucleon force, and the two-body current.

  2. Experimental study of the two-body spin-orbit force in nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgunder, G; Sorlin, O; Nowacki, F; Giron, S; Hammache, F; Moukaddam, M; de Séréville, N; Beaumel, D; Càceres, L; Clément, E; Duchêne, G; Ebran, J P; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Flavigny, F; Franchoo, S; Gibelin, J; Gillibert, A; Grévy, S; Guillot, J; Lepailleur, A; Matea, I; Matta, A; Nalpas, L; Obertelli, A; Otsuka, T; Pancin, J; Poves, A; Raabe, R; Scarpaci, J A; Stefan, I; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Thomas, J C

    2014-01-31

    Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first 7/2-, 3/2-, 1/2-, and 5/2- states in the (35)Si21 nucleus were determined by means of the (d, p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the Si35 and S37 isotones, a reduction of the p3/2-p1/2 spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the f7/2-f5/2 spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the two-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei.

  3. Experimental study of the two-body spin-orbit force

    CERN Document Server

    Burgunder, G; Nowacki, F; Giron, S; Hammache, F; Moukaddam, M; eville, N De S er; Beaumel, D; aceres, L C; ément, E Cl; Duchêne, G; Ebran, J P; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Flavigny, F; Franchoo, S; Gibelin, J; Gillibert, A; évy, S Gr; Guillot, J; Lapoux, V; Lepailleur, A; Matea, I; Matta, A; Nalpas, L; Obertelli, A; Otsuka, T; Pancin, J; Poves, A; Raabe, R; Scarpaci, J A; Stefan, I; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Thomas, J C

    2014-01-01

    Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first $7/2^-$, $3/2^-$, $1/2^-$ and $5/2^-$ states in the $^{35}$Si$_{21}$ nucleus were determined by means of the (d,p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the $^{35}$Si and $^{37}$S isotones, a reduction of the $p_{3/2} - p_{1/2}$ spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the $f_{7/2} -f_{5/2}$ spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the 2-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei.

  4. High-order post-Newtonian contributions to the two-body gravitational interaction potential from analytical gravitational self-force calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2013-01-01

    We extend the analytical determination of the main radial potential describing (within the effective one-body formalism) the gravitational interaction of two bodies beyond the 4th post-Newtonian approximation recently obtained by us. This extension is done to linear order in the mass ratio by applying analytical gravitational self-force theory (for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole) to Detweiler's gauge-invariant redshift variable. By using the version of black hole perturbation theory developed by Mano, Suzuki and Takasugi, we have pushed the analytical determination of the (linear in mass ratio) radial potential to the 6th post-Newtonian order (passing through 5 and 5.5 post-Newtonian terms). In principle, our analytical method can be extended to arbitrarily high post-Newtonian orders.

  5. Analytic determination of the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian self-force contributions to the two-body gravitational interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    We {\\it analytically} compute, to the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and to linear order in the mass ratio, the radial potential describing (within the effective one-body formalism) the gravitational interaction of two bodies, thereby extending previous analytic results. These results are obtained by applying analytical gravitational self-force theory (for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole) to Detweiler's gauge-invariant redshift variable. We emphasize the increase in \\lq\\lq transcendentality" of the numbers entering the post-Newtonian expansion coefficients as the order increases, in particular we note the appearance of $\\zeta(3)$ (as well as the square of Euler's constant $\\gamma$) starting at the seventh post-Newtonian order. We study the convergence of the post-Newtonian expansion as the expansion parameter $u=GM/(c^2r)$ leaves the weak-field domain $u\\ll 1$ to enter the strong field domain $u=O(1)$.

  6. two-body random matrix ensembles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Abstract. Probability distribution (P(r)) of the level spacing ratios has been introduced recently and is used to investigate many-body localization as well as to quantify the distance from inte- grability on finite size lattices. In this paper, we study the distribution of the ratio of consecutive level spacings using ...

  7. The general relativistic two body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault

    2013-01-01

    The two-body problem in General Relativity has been the subject of many analytical investigations. After reviewing some of the methods used to tackle this problem (and, more generally, the N-body problem), we focus on a new, recently introduced approach to the motion and radiation of (comparable mass) binary systems: the Effective One Body (EOB) formalism. We review the basic elements of this formalism, and discuss some of its recent developments. Several recent comparisons between EOB predictions and Numerical Relativity (NR) simulations have shown the aptitude of the EOB formalism to provide accurate descriptions of the dynamics and radiation of various binary systems (comprising black holes or neutron stars) in regimes that are inaccessible to other analytical approaches (such as the last orbits and the merger of comparable mass black holes). In synergy with NR simulations, post-Newtonian (PN) theory and Gravitational Self-Force (GSF) computations, the EOB formalism is likely to provide an efficient way of...

  8. Random forcing of geostrophic motion in rotating stratified turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Michael L.

    2017-12-01

    Random forcing of geostrophic motion is a common approach in idealized simulations of rotating stratified turbulence. Such forcing represents the injection of energy into large-scale balanced motion, and the resulting breakdown of quasi-geostrophic turbulence into inertia-gravity waves and stratified turbulence can shed light on the turbulent cascade processes of the atmospheric mesoscale. White noise forcing is commonly employed, which excites all frequencies equally, including frequencies much higher than the natural frequencies of large-scale vortices. In this paper, the effects of these high frequencies in the forcing are investigated. Geostrophic motion is randomly forced with red noise over a range of decorrelation time scales τ, from a few time steps to twice the large-scale vortex time scale. It is found that short τ (i.e., nearly white noise) results in about 46% more gravity wave energy than longer τ, despite the fact that waves are not directly forced. We argue that this effect is due to wave-vortex interactions, through which the high frequencies in the forcing are able to excite waves at their natural frequencies. It is concluded that white noise forcing should be avoided, even if it is only applied to the geostrophic motion, when a careful investigation of spontaneous wave generation is needed.

  9. Search for resonant two-bodies decays

    CERN Document Server

    Radogna, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Two-bodies decays are very common signatures for New Physics. Several results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at p $\\sqrt s$= 13 TeV are summarized, including results from diboson, dijet and diphoton searches.

  10. High-energy two-body photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Salin, P

    1974-01-01

    Considers three aspects of two-body photoproduction reactions: vector meson production as a tool to investigate properties of diffractive reactions; the occurrence of a possible J=0 fixed pole in the Compton amplitude; and pseudoscalar meson photoproduction. (73 refs).

  11. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  12. Analytic interatomic forces in the random phase approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramberger, Benjamin; Kresse, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We discuss that in the random phase approximation (RPA) the first derivative of the energy with respect to the Green's function is the self-energy in the GW approximation. This relationship allows to derive compact equations for the RPA interatomic forces. We also show that position dependent overlap operators are elegantly incorporated in the present framework. The RPA force equations have been implemented in the projector augmented wave formalism, and we present illustrative applications, including ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, the calculation of phonon dispersion relations for diamond and graphite, as well as structural relaxations for water on boron nitride. The present derivation establishes a concise framework for forces within perturbative approaches and is also applicable to more involved approximations for the correlation energy.

  13. Superdiffusion induced by a long-correlated external random force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despósito, M A

    2011-12-01

    We consider a particle immersed in a thermal reservoir and simultaneously subjected to an external random force that drives the system to a nonequilibrium situation. Starting from a Langevin equation description, we derive exact expressions for the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function of the diffusing particle. An effective temperature is introduced to characterize the deviation from the internal equilibrium situation. Using a power-law force autocorrelation function, the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function are analytically obtained in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. In this case, we show that the present model exhibits a superdiffusive regime as a consequence of the competition between passive and active processes.

  14. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    calculate the {sup 4}He ground-state energy. As they are of direct interest for nuclear astrophysics collective excitation modes, namely giant resonances, are investigated in the framework of the Random Phase Approximation. Including the full three-body interaction would be very time-demanding. Therefore, a density-dependent two-body interaction is used instead. This simple interaction leads to a significant improvement in the description of the isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole resonances while the isoscalar monopole resonances remain in good agreement with experimental data compared to the results obtained with pure unitarily transformed two-body interactions. (orig.)

  15. Influence of random roughness on the Casimir force at small separations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    The influence of random surface roughness of Au films on the Casimir force is explored with atomic force microscopy in the plate-sphere geometry. The experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions for separations ranging between 20 and 200 nm. The optical response and roughness of the

  16. Investigation on two-body abrasive wear behavior of titanium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation on two-body abrasive wear behavior of titanium carbide filled glass fabric-epoxy composites- a Box-Behnken approach. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The two-body abrasive wear behavior of Glass–Epoxy (G–E) composites has been evaluated by the addition of Titanium

  17. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. Random walker in temporally deforming higher-order potential forces observed in a financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2009-11-01

    Basic peculiarities of market price fluctuations are known to be well described by a recently developed random-walk model in a temporally deforming quadratic potential force whose center is given by a moving average of past price traces [M. Takayasu, T. Mizuno, and H. Takayasu, Physica A 370, 91 (2006)]. By analyzing high-frequency financial time series of exceptional events, such as bubbles and crashes, we confirm the appearance of higher-order potential force in the markets. We show statistical significance of its existence by applying the information criterion. This time series analysis is expected to be applied widely for detecting a nonstationary symptom in random phenomena.

  19. Random walker in temporally deforming higher-order potential forces observed in a financial crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2009-11-01

    Basic peculiarities of market price fluctuations are known to be well described by a recently developed random-walk model in a temporally deforming quadratic potential force whose center is given by a moving average of past price traces [M. Takayasu, T. Mizuno, and H. Takayasu, Physica A 370, 91 (2006)]. By analyzing high-frequency financial time series of exceptional events, such as bubbles and crashes, we confirm the appearance of higher-order potential force in the markets. We show statistical significance of its existence by applying the information criterion. This time series analysis is expected to be applied widely for detecting a nonstationary symptom in random phenomena.

  20. One-dimensional classical diffusion in a random force field with weakly concentrated absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, C.; Hagendorf, C.

    2009-05-01

    A one-dimensional model of classical diffusion in a random force field with a weak concentration ρ of absorbers is studied. The force field is taken as a Gaussian white noise with langphi(x)rang=0 and langphi(x)phi(x')rang=g δ(x- x'). Our analysis relies on the relation between the Fokker-Planck operator and a quantum Hamiltonian in which absorption leads to breaking of supersymmetry. Using a Lifshits argument, it is shown that the average return probability is a power law \\langle {P(x,t\\vert x,0)} \\rangle \\sim t^{-\\sqrt{2\\rho/g}} (to be compared with the usual Lifshits exponential decay exp-(ρ2t)1/3 in the absence of the random force field). The localisation properties of the underlying quantum Hamiltonian are discussed as well.

  1. Contact force sensing for ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: A randomized, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Weerasooriya, Rukshen; Novak, Paul; Champagne, Jean; Lim, Hong Euy; Macle, Laurent; Khaykin, Yaariv; Pantano, Alfredo; Verma, Atul

    2018-02-01

    Impact of contact force sensing (CFS) on ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF) is unknown. The purpose of the TOUCH AF (Therapeutic Outcomes Using Contact force Handling during Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation) randomized trial was to compare CFS-guided ablation to a CFS-blinded strategy. Patients (n = 128) undergoing first-time ablation for persistent AF were randomized to a CFS-guided vs CFS-blinded strategy. In the CFS-guided procedure, operators visualized real-time force data. In the blinded procedure, force data were hidden. Wide antral pulmonary vein isolation plus a roof line were performed. Patients were followed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months with clinical visit, ECG, and 48-hour Holter monitoring. The primary endpoint was cumulative radiofrequency (RF) time for all procedures. Atrial arrhythmia >30 seconds after 3 months was a recurrence. PeAF was continuous for 26 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 13-52), and left atrial size was 45 ± 5 mm. Force in the CFS-blinded and CFS-guided arms was 12 g [IQR 6-20] and 14 g [IQR 9-20] (P = .10), respectively. Total RF time did not differ between CFS-guided and CFS-blinded groups (49 ± 14 min vs 50 ± 20 min, respectively; P = .70). Single procedure freedom from atrial arrhythmia was 60% in the CFS-guided arm and 63% in the CFS-blinded arm off drugs. Lesions with gaps were associated with significantly less force (11.4 g [IQR 6-19] vs 13.2 g [IQR 8-20], respectively; P = .0007) and less force-time integral (174 gs [IQR 91-330] vs 210 gs [IQR 113-388], respectively; P force/force-time integral was associated with significantly more gaps. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Classical and Quantum Two-Body Problem in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Maheshwari, Amar; Todorov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The two-body problem in general relativity is reduced to the problem of an effective particle (with an energy-dependent relativistic reduced mass) in an external field. The effective potential is evaluated from the Born diagram of the linearized quantum theory of gravity. It reduces to a Schwarzschild-like potential with two different `Schwarzschild radii'. The results derived in a weak field approximation are expected to be relevant for relativistic velocities.

  3. Homogenization for rigid suspensions with random velocity-dependent interfacial forces

    KAUST Repository

    Gorb, Yuliya

    2014-12-01

    We study suspensions of solid particles in a viscous incompressible fluid in the presence of random velocity-dependent interfacial forces. The flow at a small Reynolds number is modeled by the Stokes equations, coupled with the motion of rigid particles arranged in a periodic array. The objective is to perform homogenization for the given suspension and obtain an equivalent description of a homogeneous (effective) medium, the macroscopic effect of the interfacial forces and the effective viscosity are determined using the analysis on a periodicity cell. In particular, the solutions uωε to a family of problems corresponding to the size of microstructure ε and describing suspensions of rigid particles with random surface forces imposed on the interface, converge H1-weakly as ε→0 a.s. to a solution of a Stokes homogenized problem, with velocity dependent body forces. A corrector to a homogenized solution that yields a strong H1-convergence is also determined. The main technical construction is built upon the Γ-convergence theory. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Generation of random numbers on graphics processors: forced indentation in silico of the bacteriophage HK97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmurov, A; Rybnikov, K; Kholodov, Y; Barsegov, V

    2011-05-12

    The use of graphics processing units (GPUs) in simulation applications offers a significant speed gain as compared to computations on central processing units (CPUs). Many simulation methods require a large number of independent random variables generated at each step. We present two approaches for implementation of random number generators (RNGs) on a GPU. In the one-RNG-per-thread approach, one RNG produces a stream of random numbers in each thread of execution, whereas the one-RNG-for-all-threads method builds on the ability of different threads to communicate, thus, sharing random seeds across an entire GPU device. We used these approaches to implement Ran2, Hybrid Taus, and Lagged Fibonacci algorithms on a GPU. We profiled the performance of these generators in terms of the computational time, memory usage, and the speedup factor (CPU time/GPU time). These generators have been incorporated into the program for Langevin simulations of biomolecules fully implemented on the GPU. The ∼250-fold computational speedup on the GPU allowed us to carry out single-molecule dynamic force measurements in silico to explore the mechanical properties of the bacteriophage HK97 in the experimental subsecond time scale. We found that the nanomechanical response of HK97 depends on the conditions of force application, including the rate of change and geometry of the mechanical perturbation. Hence, using the GPU-based implementation of RNGs, presented here, in conjunction with Langevin simulations, makes it possible to directly compare the results of dynamic force measurements in vitro and in silico.

  5. Representation and Estimation of Trajectories from Two-body Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Widl, Edmund

    2007-01-01

    A novel parametrization of the trajectories stemming from two-body decays is presented, based on the kinematics of the decay. The core component of this parametrization is a decay model which is derived using the relativistic energy-momentum conservation law and geometrical fundamentals. The estimation of the decay parameters, also including the beam profile and a mass constraint, is described. Some applications in realistics scenarios are presented. In addition, the representation of the trajectories for the use in track-based alignment algorithms is briefly discussed.

  6. Edge-based SEIR dynamics with or without infectious force in latent period on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ahmad, Bashir

    2017-04-01

    In nature, most of the diseases have latent periods, and most of the networks look as if they were spun randomly at the first glance. Hence, we consider SEIR dynamics with or without infectious force in latent period on random networks with arbitrary degree distributions. Both of these models are governed by intrinsically three dimensional nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations, which are the same as classical SEIR models. The basic reproduction numbers and the final size formulae are explicitly derived. Predictions of the models agree well with the large-scale stochastic SEIR simulations on contact networks. In particular, for SEIR model without infectious force in latent period, although the length of latent period has no effect on the basic reproduction number and the final epidemic size, it affects the arrival time of the peak and the peak size; while for SEIR model with infectious force in latent period it also affects the basic reproduction number and the final epidemic size. These accurate model predictions, may provide guidance for the control of network infectious diseases with latent periods.

  7. Wear characteristics in a two-body wear test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassell, R W; McCabe, J F; Walls, A W

    1994-07-01

    A previous report compared spherical steatite (ceramic enamel substitute) abraders with those of natural enamel in a two-body wear test. The wear rates and coefficients of friction of the two abraders against various composites and an amalgam were well correlated although the wear rates were slightly higher with steatite. This report investigates the characteristics of the worn abrader and specimen surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy and laser profilometry were used. Similar wear characteristics were found for the two types of abraders. Adhesive wear was evident for the amalgam, Dispersalloy (Johnson & Johnson), and the heat/pressure-cured microfill composite, Isosit (Ivoclar-Vivadent). Abrasion was seen with the hybrid composite, Occlusin (ICI), and, to a lesser extent, the microfill composite, Heliomolar (Ivoclar-Vivadent). The appearance of the worn small particle hybrid composite, Brilliant Dentin (Coltène), suggested that fatigue and delamination were involved. Laser profilometry showed that the hybrid composites caused much greater wear to the abraders than either the microfill composites or amalgam. The Ra values of the worn abraders and specimens were similar, suggesting conformal contact between them and endorsing the well controlled conditions of the wear test. The results of this and other publications suggest that steatite can be used as an alternative to enamel in performing two-body wear tests on dental composites. This should help significantly in materials evaluation and development.

  8. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  9. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  10. Response of oxygen saturation in preterm infants receiving rib cage stabilization with an elastic band in two body positions: a randomized clinical trial Resposta da saturação de oxigênio no recém-nascido pré-termo com estabilização do gradil costal por meio da faixa elástica em duas posições corporais: ensaio clínico randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa A. A. Brunherotti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm newborns have higher thoracic compliance, providing less stability to the different forces of distortion imposed on the rib cage, leading to instability of the chest. Adequate body position may reduce this instability and facilitate respiratory work. OBJECTIVE: To assess the oxygen saturation response of preterm newborns receiving rib cage stabilization with an elastic band in two body positions. METHOD: A clinical, prospective, randomized crossover study was conducted, including sixteen newborns with a gestational age of 31 to 35 weeks (mean 32.8 weeks at a tertiary care facility, who did not receive supplemental oxygen. The infants were placed in a sequence of prone and supine positions with and without chest stabilization with an elastic band. Respiratory rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were measured at 10-minute intervals, corresponding to 7 samplings of 60 minutes. Data collection was interrupted when oxygen saturation was less than 90%. RESULTS: The mean gestational age of the infants was 32.8±1.5 weeks and the mean birth weight was 1,789±255g. Better values for the variables studied were observed in the supine position with an elastic chest band compared to the supine position without the band. The positions using an elastic band resulted in lower mean respiratory rate and heart rate and higher oxygen saturation. CONCLUSION: The use of an elastic chest band improves respiratory indicators such as oxygen saturation. CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Os recém-nascidos pré-termos possuem maior complacência torácica, oferecendo menor estabilidade às diferentes forças de distorção impostas à parede torácica, o que leva à instabilidade da caixa torácica. A posição corporal adequada pode diminuir essa instabilidade, facilitando o trabalho respiratório. OBJETIVO: Verificar a resposta da saturação de oxigênio em recém-nascido pré-termo com estabilização do gradil costal com faixa elástica em dois

  11. Reducing Trunk Compensation in Stroke Survivors: A Randomized Crossover Trial Comparing Visual and Force Feedback Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Bulmaro Adolfo; Schneider, Andrea Nicole; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether the compensatory trunk movements of stroke survivors observed during reaching tasks can be decreased by force and visual feedback, and to examine whether one of these feedback modalities is more efficacious than the other in reducing this compensatory tendency. Randomized crossover trial. University research laboratory. Community-dwelling older adults (N=15; 5 women; mean age, 64±11y) with hemiplegia from nontraumatic hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke (>3mo poststroke), recruited from stroke recovery groups, the research group's website, and the community. In a single session, participants received augmented feedback about their trunk compensation during a bimanual reaching task. Visual feedback (60 trials) was delivered through a computer monitor, and force feedback (60 trials) was delivered through 2 robotic devices. Primary outcome measure included change in anterior trunk displacement measured by motion tracking camera. Secondary outcomes included trunk rotation, index of curvature (measure of straightness of hands' path toward target), root mean square error of hands' movement (differences between hand position on every iteration of the program), completion time for each trial, and posttest questionnaire to evaluate users' experience and system's usability. Both visual (-45.6% [45.8 SD] change from baseline, P=.004) and force (-41.1% [46.1 SD], P=.004) feedback were effective in reducing trunk compensation. Scores on secondary outcome measures did not improve with either feedback modality. Neither feedback condition was superior. Visual and force feedback show promise as 2 modalities that could be used to decrease trunk compensation in stroke survivors during reaching tasks. It remains to be established which one of these 2 feedback modalities is more efficacious than the other as a cue to reduce compensatory trunk movement. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuous time random walk with generic waiting time and external force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau; Wang, K G

    2010-05-01

    We derive an integrodifferential diffusion equation for decoupled continuous time random walk that is valid for a generic waiting time probability density function and external force. Using this equation we also study diffusion behaviors for a couple of specific waiting time probability density functions such as exponential, a combination of power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler function and a sum of exponentials under the influence of a harmonic trap. We show that first two waiting time probability density functions can reproduce the results of the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations for all the time regions from small to large times. But the third one shows a much more complicated pattern. Furthermore, from the integrodifferential diffusion equation we show that the second Einstein relation can hold for any waiting time probability density function.

  13. Frequency domain response of a parametrically excited riser under random wave forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Song; Zhang, Wen-Shou; Lin, Jia-Hao; Yue, Qian-Jin; Kennedy, D.; Williams, F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Floating Production, Drilling, Storage and Offloading units represent a new technology with a promising future in the offshore oil industry. An important role is played by risers, which are installed between the subsea wellhead and the Tension Leg Deck located in the middle of the moon-pool in the hull. The inevitable heave motion of the floating hull causes a time-varying axial tension in the riser. This time dependent tension may have an undesirable influence on the lateral deflection response of the riser, with random wave forces in the frequency domain. To investigate this effect, a riser is modeled as a Bernoulli-Euler beam. The axial tension is expressed as a static part, along with a harmonic dynamic part. By linearizing the wave drag force, the riser's lateral deflection is obtained through a partial differential equation containing a time-dependent coefficient. Applying the Galerkin method, the equation is reduced to an ordinary differential equation that can be solved using the pseudo-excitation method in the frequency domain. Moreover, the Floquet-Liapunov theorem is used to estimate the stability of the vibration system in the space of parametric excitation. Finally, stability charts are obtained for some numerical examples, the correctness of the proposed method is verified by comparing with Monte-Carlo simulation and the influence of the parametric excitation on the frequency domain responses of the riser is discussed.

  14. Investigation of effects beyond two-body forces in three-nucleon systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermisch, K.; van den Berg, A.M.; Bieber, R.; Hagemann, M.; Hannen, V.M.; Harakeh, M.N.; de Huu, M.A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Micherdzilska, A.; Shafiei, M.; Wörtche, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    An experiment has been performed at KVI to measure vector analyzing powers and differential cross sections of the D((p) over right arrow pd) reaction as a function of incident beam energy. The measurements have been performed so far at several kinetic energies of the incoming particle between 108

  15. A Lagrangian description of nearshore hydrodynamics and rip currents forced by a random wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, S.; Cienfuegos, R.; Escauriaza, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear processes become important for waves propagating in the shoaling and surf zones. Wave shape changes when approaching the coast under the influence of bathymetry, becoming increasingly asymmetric until reaching the breaking limit. In the shoaling zone, non-linearities induce a net velocity in the direction of wave propagation, a phenomenon called Stokes drift, while in the surf zone, currents are mainly driven by spatio-temporal variations in energy dissipation gradients. In this work we aim at investigating and characterizing the nearshore circulation forced by a random wave field propagating over a variable bathymetry. We carry out numerical simulations over a laboratory experiment conducted in a wave basin over a realistic bathymetry [Michallet et al. 2010]. For the hydrodynamics, we use a 2D shock-capturing finite-volume model that solves the non-linear shallow water equations, taking into account energy dissipation by breaking, friction, bed-slope variations, and an accurate description for the moving shoreline in the swash zone [Marche et al. 2007;Guerra et al. 2010]. Model predictions are compared and validated against experimental data giving confidence for its use in the description of wave propagation in the surf/swash zone, together with mean eulerian velocities. The resulting wave propagation and circulation provided by the 2D model will then be used to describe drifter's patterns in the surf zone and construct Lagrangian particle tracking. The chosen experimental configuration is of great interest due to the random wave forcing (slowly modulated), the beach non-uniformities, and the existence of several bar-rip channels that enhance quasi-periodic rip instabilities. During the experiment, balloons filled with water, with a diameter between 5 and 10 cm, were placed in the surf zone in order to characterize circulation in a Lagrangian framework [Castelle et al. 2010]. The time-location of the balloons was continuously tracked by a shore

  16. Age and Individual Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined age group and individual differences in controlled force exertion by emulating sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 222 right-handed female adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength by the dominant hand to changing demand values displayed as either a sinusoidal or a quasi-random…

  17. High-Force Versus Low-Force Lumbar Traction in Acute Lumbar Sciatica Due to Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Schaeffer, Michael; Sauleau, Erik; Vautravers, Philippe; Lecocq, Jehan; Dupeyron, Arnaud

    This study compared the effects of high-force versus low-force lumbar traction in the treatment of acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation. A randomized double blind trial was performed, and 17 subjects with acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation were assigned to high-force traction at 50% body weight (BW; LT50, n = 8) or low force traction at 10% BW (LT10, n = 9) for 10 sessions in 2 weeks. Radicular pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), lumbo-pelvic-hip complex motion (finger-to-toe test), lumbar-spine mobility (Schöber-Macrae test), nerve root compression (straight-leg-raising test), disability (EIFEL score), drug consumption, and overall evaluation of each patient were measured at days 0, 7, 1, 4, and 28. Significant (P traction treatment was independent of the level of medication. During the 2-week follow-up at day 28, only the LT10 group improved (P lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation who received 2 weeks of lumbar traction reported reduced radicular pain and functional impairment and improved well-being regardless of the traction force group to which they were assigned. The effects of the traction treatment were independent of the initial level of medication and appeared to be maintained at the 2-week follow-up. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Identification of Random Dynamic Force Using an Improved Maximum Entropy Regularization Combined with a Novel Conjugate Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChunPing Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel mathematical algorithm to offer a solution for the inverse random dynamic force identification in practical engineering. Dealing with the random dynamic force identification problem using the proposed algorithm, an improved maximum entropy (IME regularization technique is transformed into an unconstrained optimization problem, and a novel conjugate gradient (NCG method was applied to solve the objective function, which was abbreviated as IME-NCG algorithm. The result of IME-NCG algorithm is compared with that of ME, ME-CG, ME-NCG, and IME-CG algorithm; it is found that IME-NCG algorithm is available for identifying the random dynamic force due to smaller root mean-square-error (RMSE, lower restoration time, and fewer iterative steps. Example of engineering application shows that L-curve method is introduced which is better than Generalized Cross Validation (GCV method and is applied to select regularization parameter; thus the proposed algorithm can be helpful to alleviate the ill-conditioned problem in identification of dynamic force and to acquire an optimal solution of inverse problem in practical engineering.

  19. Quasiparticle random phase approximation predictions of the gamma-ray strength functions using the Gogny force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane; Péru, Sophie; Lechaftois, François; Deloncle, Isabelle; Martini, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Dipole excitations of nuclei are crucial since they play an important role in nuclear reaction modeling in connection with the photoabsorption and the radiative capture processes. We present here results for the gamma-ray strength function obtained in large-scale axially-symmetric deformed quasiparticle (qp) random phase approximations approach using the finite-range Gogny force, with a particular emphasis on the E1 mode. The convergence with respect to the number of harmonic oscillator shells adopted and the cut-off introduced in the 2-quasiparticle excitation energy space is analyzed. The microscopic nature of our self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov plus QRPA (HFB+QRPA) calculation has unfortunately to be broken, some phenomenological corrections being needed to take into account effects beyond the standard 2-qp QRPA excitations and the coupling between the single-particle and low-lying collective phonon degrees of freedom. The corresponding phenomenological parameters are adjusted on experimental photoabsorption data. In such a procedure, a rather satisfactory description of experimental data is obtained. To study the sensitivity of these phenomenological corrections on the extrapolation, both at low energies and towards exotic neutron-rich nuclei, three different prescriptions are considered. They are shown to lead to rather similar predictions of the E1 strength at low energies as well as for exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The Gogny-HFB+QRPA strength is finally applied to the calculation of radiative neutron capture cross sections and the predictions compared with those obtained with more traditional Lorentzian-type approaches.

  20. Distribution of level spacing ratios using one-plus two-body random ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Probability distribution (()) of the level spacing ratios has been introduced recently and is used to investigate many-body localization as well as to quantify the distance from integrability on finite size lattices. In this paper, we study the distribution of the ratio of consecutive level spacings using one-body ...

  1. Force limited random vibration testing: the computation of the semi-empirical constant C2 for a real test article and unknown supporting structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijker, Jacob J; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria; de Boer, Andries

    2015-01-01

    To prevent over-testing of the test-item during random vibration testing Scharton proposed and discussed the force limited random vibration testing (FLVT) in a number of publications. Besides the random vibration specification, the total mass and the turn-over frequency of the test article (load),

  2. Quartet correlations in N = Z nuclei induced by realistic two-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambataro, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Sandulescu, N. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-03-15

    Two variational quartet models previously employed in a treatment of pairing forces are extended to the case of a general two-body interaction. One model approximates the nuclear states as a condensate of identical quartets with angular momentum J = 0 and isospin T = 0 while the other let these quartets to be all different from each other. With these models we investigate the role of alpha-like quartet correlations both in the ground state and in the lowest J = 0, T = 0 excited states of even-even N = Z nuclei in the sd -shell. We show that the ground-state correlations of these nuclei can be described to a good extent in terms of a condensate of alpha-like quartets. This turns out to be especially the case for the nucleus {sup 32}S for which the overlap between this condensate and the shell model wave function is found close to one. In the same nucleus, a similar overlap is found also in the case of the first excited 0{sup +} state. No clear correspondence is observed instead between the second excited states of the quartet models and the shell model eigenstates in all the cases examined. (orig.)

  3. A randomized comparison of intraoperative PerfecTemp and forced-air warming during open abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Cameron; Bernstein, Ethan; Reddy, Desigen; Ali, Madi; Paul, James; Yang, Dongsheng; Sessler, Daniel I

    2011-11-01

    The PerfecTemp is an underbody resistive warming system that combines servocontrolled underbody warming with viscoelastic foam pressure relief. Clinical efficacy of the system has yet to be formally evaluated. We therefore tested the hypothesis that intraoperative distal esophageal (core) temperatures with the PerfecTemp (underbody resistive) warming system are noninferior to upper-body forced-air warming in patients undergoing major open abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. Adults scheduled for elective major open abdominal surgery (liver, pancreas, gynecological, and colorectal surgery) under general anesthesia were enrolled at 2 centers. Patients were randomly assigned to underbody resistive or forced-air warming. Resistive heating started when patients were transferred to the operating room table; forced-air warming started after patients were draped. The primary outcome was noninferiority of intraoperative time-weighted average core temperature, adjusted for baseline characteristics and using a buffer of 0.5°C. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to underbody resistive heating and 34 to forced-air warming. Baseline and surgical characteristics were generally similar. We had sufficient evidence (P=0.018) to conclude that underbody resistive warming is not worse than (i.e., noninferior to) upper-body forced-air warming in the time-weighted average intraoperative temperature, with a mean difference of -0.12°C [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.37 to 0.14]. Core temperatures at the end of surgery averaged 36.3°C [95% CI 36 to 36.5] in the resistive warming patients and 36.6°C [95% CI 36.4 to 36.8] in those assigned to forced-air warming for a mean difference of -0.34°C [95% CI -0.69 to 0.01]. Mean intraoperative time-weighted average core temperatures were no different, and significantly noninferior, with underbody resistive heating in comparison with upper-body forced-air warming. Underbody resistive heating may be an alternative to forced

  4. Postdeployment Battlemind Training for the U.K. Armed Forces: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kathleen; Fear, Nicola T.; Jones, Norman; Alvarez, Helen; Hull, Lisa; Naumann, Ulrike; Wessely, Simon; Greenberg, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Combat exposure can increase the risk of subsequent psychological ill-health in armed forces (AF) personnel. A U.S. postdeployment psycho-educational intervention, Battlemind, showed a beneficial effect on mental health in U.S. military personnel exposed to high combat levels. We evaluated the effectiveness of an anglicized version of…

  5. On The Dynamics and Design of a Two-body Wave Energy Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Changwei; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A two-body wave energy converter oscillating in heave is studied in this paper. The energy is extracted through the relative motion between the floating and submerged bodies. A linearized model in the frequency domain is adopted to study the dynamics of such a two-body system with consideration of both the viscous damping and the hydrodynamic damping. The closed form solution of the maximum absorption power and corresponding power take-off parameters are obtained. The suboptimal and optimal designs for a two-body system are proposed based on the closed form solution. The physical insight of the optimal design is to have one of the damped natural frequencies of the two body system the same as, or as close as possible to, the excitation frequency. A case study is conducted to investigate the influence of the submerged body on the absorption power of a two-body system subjected to suboptimal and optimal design under regular and irregular wave excitations. It is found that the absorption power of the two-body system can be significantly higher than that of the single body system with the same floating buoy in both regular and irregular waves. In regular waves, it is found that the mass of the submerged body should be designed with an optimal value in order to achieve the maximum absorption power for the given floating buoy. The viscous damping on the submerged body should be as small as possible for a given mass in both regular and irregular waves.

  6. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training-Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training-progression styles. To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Randomized controlled trial. Research laboratory. A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P .05) for any of the outcome measures. A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition-based balance-training program in improving postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults.

  7. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H; Ebbesen, Frederik S; Christiansen, David H; Skotte, Jørgen; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque. Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31.0 Nm s(-1) [95% confidence interval: (1.33-11.80)] in the 2-min group and 33.2 Nm s(-1) (1.66-12.33) in the 12-min group from baseline to 10-week follow-up, corresponding to an increase of 16.0% and 18.2% for the two groups, respectively. The increase was significantly different compared to controls (Pmuscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant relationship existed between changes in rapid force development and pain (r = 0.27, Pmuscle strength and pain. Small daily amounts of progressive resistance training in adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and, to a less extent, maximal force capacity. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  8. Analytical method for parameterizing the random profile components of nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Polyakov, Yuriy S; Misurkin, Pavel I; Musaev, Ibrahim; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2010-01-01

    The functional properties of many technological surfaces in biotechnology, electronics, and mechanical engineering depend to a large degree on the individual features of their nanoscale surface texture, which in turn are a function of the surface manufacturing process. Among these features, the surface irregularities and self-similarity structures at different spatial scales, especially in the range of 1 to 100 nm, are of high importance because they greatly affect the surface interaction forces acting at a nanoscale distance. An analytical method for parameterizing the surface irregularities and their correlations in nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is proposed. In this method, flicker noise spectroscopy - a statistical physics approach - is used to develop six nanometrological parameters characterizing the high-frequency contributions of jump- and spike-like irregularities into the surface texture. These contributions reflect the stochastic processes of anomalous diffusion and inertial e...

  9. The rate of separation of magnetic lines of force in a random magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mixing of magnetic lines of force, as represented by their rate of separation, as a function of distance along the magnetic field, is considered with emphasis on neighboring lines of force. This effect is particularly important in understanding the transport of charged particles perpendicular to the average magnetic field. The calculation is carried out in the approximation that the separation changes by an amount small compared with the correlation scale normal to the field, in a distance along the field of a few correlation scales. It is found that the rate of separation is very sensitive to the precise form of the power spectrum. Application to the interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields is discussed, and it is shown that in some cases field lines, much closer together than the correlation scale, separate at a rate which is effectively as rapid as if they were many correlation lengths apart.

  10. Magnetic force analysis and performance of a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester under random excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yonggang; Tan, Dan; Liu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yuyang; Fan, Shengbo

    2017-10-01

    Recently, harvesting energy from environment has attracted lots of researchers' interests. Ambient vibrations are deemed as a promising power supply since it can be found almost everywhere. Piezoelectric effect has been exploited to convert mechanical energy to electricity. Nonlinearity techniques are favorable for improving the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters. This paper focuses on a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (TPEH) with two fixed external magnets. The lumped-parameter method is used to investigate the large-amplitude and broadband voltage response. A method based on equivalent magnetizing current theory is first applied to calculate the magnetic force and the potential function with triple wells. We find that this calculation method for magnetic force is more applicable for different magnet intervals compared with the magnetic dipoles method used before. Once the system parameters are chosen appropriately, large-amplitude interwell motion among three wells can be achieved. In our study, a filtered Gaussian noise within the frequency of 0-120 Hz is selected as harvester's excitation, which is similar with the realistic low-frequency vibration in environment. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the TPEH enhances the output voltage significantly compared to the conventional bi-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (BPEH). Also, the TPEH's frequency bandwidth is further broadened. Besides, it has been proved that the corresponding optimum magnet interval only changes slightly when the excitation intensity varies, therefore there is no need of adjusting the system parameters to meet practical conditions.

  11. Analytical method for parameterizing the random profile components of nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Timashev, Serge F; Polyakov, Yuriy S; Misurkin, Pavel I; Musaev, Ibrahim; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2011-02-07

    The functional properties of many technological surfaces in biotechnology, electronics, and mechanical engineering depend to a large degree on the individual features of their nanoscale surface texture, which in turn is a function of the surface manufacturing process. Among these features, the surface irregularities and self-similarity structures at different spatial scales, especially in the range of 1 to 100 nm, are of high importance because they greatly affect the surface interaction forces acting at a nanoscale distance. An analytical method for parameterizing the surface irregularities and their correlations in nanosurfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is proposed. In this method, flicker noise spectroscopy--a statistical physics approach--is used to develop six nanometrological parameters characterizing the high-frequency contributions of jump- and spike-like irregularities into the surface texture. These contributions reflect the stochastic processes of anomalous diffusion and inertial effects, respectively, in the process of surface manufacturing. The AFM images of the texture of corrosion-resistant magnetite coatings formed on low-carbon steel in hot nitrate solutions with coating growth promoters at different temperatures are analyzed. It is shown that the parameters characterizing surface spikiness are able to quantify the effect of process temperature on the corrosion resistance of the coatings. It is suggested that these parameters can be used for predicting and characterizing the corrosion-resistant properties of magnetite coatings.

  12. Stochastic sensitivity technique in a persistence analysis of randomly forced population systems with multiple trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev; Ryazanova, Tatyana

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by important ecological applications we study how noise can reduce a number of trophic levels in hierarchically related multidimensional population systems. A nonlinear model with three trophic levels under the influence of external stochastic forcing is considered as a basic conceptual example. We analyze a probabilistic mechanism of noise-induced extinction of separate populations in this "prey-predator-top predator" system. We propose a new general mathematical approach for the estimation of the proximity of equilibrium regimes of this stochastic model to hazardous borders where abrupt changes in dynamics of ecological systems can occur. Our method is based on the stochastic sensitivity function technique and visualization method of confidence domains. Constructive abilities of this mathematical approach are demonstrated in the analysis of different scenaria of noise-induced reducing of the number of trophic levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutral weak-current two-body contributions in inclusive scattering from {sup 12}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovato, Alessandro [ANL; Gandolfi, Stefano [LANL; Carlson, Joseph [LANL; Pieper, S. C. [ANL; Schiavilla, Rocco [JLAB, ODU

    2014-05-01

    An {\\it ab initio} calculation of the sum rules of the neutral weak response functions in $^{12}$C is reported, based on a realistic Hamiltonian, including two- and three-nucleon potentials, and on realistic currents, consisting of one- and two-body terms. We find that the sum rules of the response functions associated with the longitudinal and transverse components of the (space-like) neutral current are largest and that a significant portion ($\\simeq 30$\\%) of the calculated strength is due to two-body terms. This fact may have implications for the MiniBooNE and other neutrino quasi-elastic scattering data on nuclei.

  14. The two-body problem of a pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Vereshchagin, M.; Gózdziewski, K.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper we consider the two-body problem of a spherical pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere. Due to the rotational and "re-labelling" symmetries, the system is shown to possess conservation of angular momentum and circulation. We follow a reduction procedure similar to that undertaken...... in the study of the two-body problem of a rigid body and a sphere so that the computed reduced non-canonical Hamiltonian takes a similar form. We then consider relative equilibria and show that the notions of locally central and planar equilibria coincide. Finally, we show that Riemann's theorem on pseudo...

  15. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training–Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training–progression styles. Objective:  To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Design:  Randomized controlled trial. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). Intervention(s):  All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Results:  Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P .05) for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions:  A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition-based balance-training program in improving postural control and ankle force production in

  16. Keratoconus progression is not inhibited by reducing eyelid muscular force with botulinum toxin A treatment: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adimara da Candelaria Renesto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate whether reducing eyelid muscular force through the administration of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A to the orbicularis oculi muscles of patients with keratoconus affected corneal parameters indicative of disease progression. Methods: In this prospective parallel randomized clinical trial, 40 eyes of 40 patients with keratoconus were randomized into equally sized control and BTX-A groups. Patients in the BTX-A group received subcutaneous BTX-A injections into the orbicularis muscle. The control group received no intervention. Palpebral fissure height, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, and corneal topographic parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups. Results: The mean ± standard deviation vertical palpebral fissure heights were 9.74 ± 1.87 mm and 9.45 ± 1.47 mm at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups, respectively, and 10.0 ± 1.49 mm and 9.62 ± 1.73 mm at 18 months, with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.337. BSCVA values were 0.63 ± 0.56 and 0.60 ± 0.27 at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups (p=0.643, and 0.52 ± 0.59 and 0.45 ± 0.26 at 18 months, again with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.452. In addition, there were no statistical differences between the groups at 18 months for the three keratometry topographic parameters: flattest (K1, steepest (K2, and mean (Km keratometry (p=0.562. Conclusion: BTX-A inhibition of eyelid force generation did not result in detectable changes in corneal parameters in keratoconic patients during 18 months of follow-up.

  17. Driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature: existence of an anomalous zero-velocity phase at small external force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The motion of driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature T and small external force F is usually described by a linear displacement h{G}(t) approximately V(F,T)t at large times, where the velocity vanishes according to the creep formula as V(F,T) approximately e;{-K(T)F;{mu}} for F-->0 . In this paper, we question this picture on the specific example of the directed polymer in a two-dimensional random medium. We have recently shown [C. Monthus and T. Garel, J. Phys. A 41, 255002 (2008)] that its dynamics for F=0 can be analyzed in terms of a strong disorder renormalization procedure, where the distribution of renormalized barriers flows towards some "infinite disorder fixed point." In the present paper, we obtain that for small F , this "infinite disorder fixed point" becomes a "strong disorder fixed point" with an exponential distribution of renormalized barriers. The corresponding distribution of trapping times then only decays as a power law P(tau) approximately 1tau;{1+alpha} , where the exponent alpha(F,T) vanishes as alpha(F,T) proportional, variant F micro as F-->0 . Our conclusion is that in the small force region alpha(F,T)infinity induces strong non-self-averaging effects that invalidate the usual creep formula obtained by replacing all trapping times by the typical value. We find instead that the motion is only sublinearly in time h{G}(t) approximately t;{alpha(F,T)} , i.e., the asymptotic velocity vanishes V=0 . This analysis is confirmed by numerical simulations of a directed polymer with a metric constraint driven in a traps landscape. We moreover obtain that the roughness exponent, which is governed by the equilibrium value zeta{eq}=23 up to some large scale, becomes equal to zeta=1 at the largest scales.

  18. Study on driving forces of wetland change in the Western Liaohe River basin based on random forest model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghong; Yang, Changbao; Zhang, Yanhong; Lin, Nan

    2017-05-01

    Based on the platform of RS and GIS, random forest progression model is used for study driving force of wetland change in western Liaohe river basin, five influencing factors which include elevation, slope, temperature, precipitation and population density are chosen to establish random forest progression model about the wetland change and the driving factors. Using the the mean value of the prediction accuracy outside the bag calculated by the model to evaluate the importance of the variables. The result indicates that the coefficient of partial correlation between precipitation and wetland density is the largest among the five influencing factors, followed by temperature, population density, elevation and slope is smallest. The influence of natural factors on the change of wetland density is mainly reflected in precipitation and temperature factors, and the precipitation is obviously higher than that of temperature, under the influence of human factors, the influence of population density factor on wetland density is higher than that of elevation and slope factor. The result shows that in the past 40 years, the human activities in the study area have increased the density of wetland to some extent, but it is not the main factor.

  19. Analytical Treatment of the Two-Body Problem with Slowly Varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The present work is concerned with the two-body problem with varying mass in case of isotropic mass loss from both components of the binary systems. The law of mass variation used gives rise to a perturbed. Keplerian problem depending on two small parameters. The problem is treated analytically in the ...

  20. 78 FR 54756 - Extension of Expiration Dates for Two Body System Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 404 RIN 0960-AH60 Extension of Expiration Dates for Two Body System Listings AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are extending the expiration dates of the... claims and continuing disability reviews. DATES: This final rule is effective on September 6, 2013. FOR...

  1. Searching for new physics in two-body decays: Ideas and pitfalls

    CERN Document Server

    Arrieta Diaz, E; Büchler, A; Cieri, L J; Florez, A; Garces-Garcia, E; Gonçalves, B; Koetsveld, F; Leney, K J C; Marquez Falcon, H; Moncada, M; Quintero, P; Romero, D; Shaw, K; Swain, J; Zurita, M P

    2010-01-01

    Many new physics processes, and indeed many Standard Model interactions involve two-body decays. Although the kinematics are relatively simple, mistakes can easily be made when applying cuts to data in order to separate the signal from backgrounds. We present a short, but relevant list of possible sources of errors, and discuss the consequences of these.

  2. Two body loss rate in a magneto-optical trap of metastable He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browaeys, A.; Poupard, J.; Robert, A.; Nowak, S.; Rooijakkers, W.; Boiron, D.; Westbrook, C.I.; Aspect, A. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Arimondo, E. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Piazza Torricelli 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Marcassa, L. [IFSC, Universidad of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2000-02-01

    We have measured the two body loss rate in a magneto-optical trap containing triplet metastable He atoms. We find a rate constant {beta}=3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 3}/s at a -8 MHz detuning, with an uncertainty of a factor 2. This measurement is in disagreement with a recent experiment which measures the absolute, ion-producing collision rate, but agrees with several other published measurements. (orig.)

  3. Direct and mixing-induced CP violation in charmless two-body B decays.

    CERN Document Server

    Derkach, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The recent analyses performed by the LHCb collaboration in the sector of the charmless two-body B-decays. The following analyses are included: time-integrated CP asymmetry measurement of Bd ! Kp and Bs ! pK decays, time-dependent measurements of Bd ! pp and Bs ! KK decays, effective lifetime measurements of Bs ! KK decays, and triple asymmetries of Bs ! f f.

  4. Complex step-size dependences in tracking a simple two-body dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Umeno, K

    1997-01-01

    In molecular simulations, one of the most difficult points is to track the real dynamics of many-body systems from the first principle. The present study shows that step-size dependences have an unexpected effect on simulation results, even when we use the standard high-precision numerical integrators to apply to a simple system with a two-body interaction. The validity of our analysis is checked by the theory of adiabatic approximations.

  5. Evidence for the two-body charmless baryonic decay B+→ pΛ¯

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Everse, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d’Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Castano-Betancourt, M.C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M-O.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.D.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, C.R.; D’Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall’Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; Paula, L.E.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T. M.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Prieto, A. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, Mark; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Martin, L. M.Garcia; Pardiñas, J. García; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Carvalho-Gaspar, M.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T. J.; Ghez, Ph; Gian, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.Q.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A.Granado; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.J.G.A.M.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.M.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T. E.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, S.C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Martinez, M. Lucio; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli-Boneschi, F.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B. T.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, Karl; von Müller, L.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O’Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Goicochea, J. M.Otalora; Otto, E.A.; Owen, R.P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Parker, W.S; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, D.A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, M. E.; Price, J.D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, C.A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, Y.W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Alepuz, C. Remon; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, Jennifer S; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, L.E.T.; Lopez, J. A.Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Silva, J. J.Saborido; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, R. H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; de Oliveira, L. Silva; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Lavra, Soares; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T’Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M. N.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, N.T.M.T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, M.A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel-Plandsoen, M.M.; Velthuis, M.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, John; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, James F; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    A search for the rare two-body charmless baryonic decay B+→ pΛ¯ is performed with pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb−1, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An excess of B+→pΛ¯ candidates with respect to background expectations

  6. Two-body and three-body wear of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K H; Bürkle, V; Bauer, C

    2003-11-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) have been modified in an attempt to improve their mechanical properties. The objective of the present paper was to compare the two-body and three-body wear of four modified GIC. The tested materials were Fuji IX (GC Corporation), Hi-Fi (Shofu) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (3M/ESPE). The cermet cement Ketac Silver Maxicap (3M/ESPE) was used as reference material. Two-body wear tests were carried out in the computer controlled 'artificial mouth' of the Munich Dental School, three-body wear was tested with the ACTA wear machine. The resulting average two-body wear rates (in microm) were: Fuji IX 327 (SD +/- 82) Ketac Molar 379 (SD +/- 94) Ketac silver 449 (SD +/- 127). The differences between the materials were significant (P Ketac Molar and Hi-Fi. The average three-body wear rates (in microm) were: Hi-Fi 30 (SD +/- 10) Ketac Molar +/- 42 (SD +/- 12) Ketac silver 73 (SD +/- 23). The difference between Ketac silver and the three other materials was significant (P Ketac Molar and Fuji IX. As Ketac Molar, Hi-Fi and Fuji IX show better wear resistance compared to Ketac silver both in occlusal-contact and contact-free areas, it may be assumed that the wear resistance of a glass ionomer cement may be improved more by changing the powder: liquid ratio than by incorporating silver particles into the glass powder.

  7. One dimensional two-body collisions experiment based on LabVIEW interface with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saphet, Parinya; Tong-on, Anusorn; Thepnurat, Meechai

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to build a physics lab apparatus that is modern, low-cost and simple. In one dimensional two-body collisions experiment, we used the Arduino UNO R3 as a data acquisition system which was controlled by LabVIEW program. The photogate sensors were designed using LED and LDR to measure position as a function of the time. Aluminium frame houseware and blower were used for the air track system. In both totally inelastic and elastic collision experiments, the results of momentum and energy conservation are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  8. C P -violating polarization asymmetry in charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark, the b-baryons, have been discovered. The charmless two-body decays of b-baryons can provide a new platform for C P violating studies in a similar way provided by charmless two-body decays of B-meson. There are new C P violating observables related to baryon polarization in b-baryon decays. We show that in the flavor S U (3 ) limit, there exists relations involving different combinations of the decay amplitudes compared with those in C P violating rate asymmetry. These new relations therefore provide interesting tests for the mechanism of C P violations in the standard model (SM) and flavor S U (3 ) symmetry. Such tests could complement the b-meson decay studies which hint at a better flavor S U (3 ) conservation in b-hadron decays than in kaon and hyperon decays. Future data from LHCb can provide new information about C P violation in the SM.

  9. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-01-01

    We have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the SM particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial b...

  10. Searches for two-body charmless baryonic $B^0$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083570; Eklund, Lars

    2016-09-26

    The results of two separate searches for the rare two-body charmless baryonic decays B0 -> p pbar and B0s -> p pbar at the LHCb experiment are reported in this thesis. The first analysis uses a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb^-1, of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. An excess of B0 -> p pbar candidates with respect to background expectations is seen with a statistical significance of 3.3 standard deviations. This constitutes the first evidence for a two-body charmless baryonic B0 decay. No significant B0s -> p pbar signal was observed. However, a small excess of B0s -> p pbar events allowed the extraction of two sided confidence level intervals for the B0s -> p pbar branching fraction using the Feldman-Cousins frequentist method. This improved the upper limit on the B0s -> p pbar branching fraction by three orders of magnitude over previous bounds. The 68.3% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions w...

  11. Effective quantum-memory Hamiltonian from local two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Adrian; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Wootton, James R.; Loss, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    In Phys. Rev. A 88, 062313 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.062313 we proposed and studied a model for a self-correcting quantum memory in which the energetic cost for introducing a defect in the memory grows without bounds as a function of system size. This positive behavior is due to attractive long-range interactions mediated by a bosonic field to which the memory is coupled. The crucial ingredients for the implementation of such a memory are the physical realization of the bosonic field as well as local five-body interactions between the stabilizer operators of the memory and the bosonic field. Here, we show that both of these ingredients appear in a low-energy effective theory of a Hamiltonian that involves only two-body interactions between neighboring spins. In particular, we consider the low-energy, long-wavelength excitations of an ordered Heisenberg ferromagnet (magnons) as a realization of the bosonic field. Furthermore, we present perturbative gadgets for generating the required five-spin operators. Our Hamiltonian involving only local two-body interactions is thus expected to exhibit self-correcting properties as long as the noise affecting it is in the regime where the effective low-energy description remains valid.

  12. Improving the Volume Dependence of Two-Body Binding Energies Calculated with Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2011-01-01

    Volume modifications to the binding of two-body systems in large cubic volumes of extent L depend upon the total momentum and exponentially upon the ratio of L to the size of the boosted system. Recent work by Bour et al determined the momentum dependence of the leading volume modifications to nonrelativistic systems with periodic boundary conditions imposed on the single-particle wavefunctions, enabling them to numerically determine the scattering of such bound states using a low-energy effective field theory and Luschers finite-volume method. The calculation of bound nuclear systems directly from QCD using Lattice QCD has begun, and it is important to reduce the systematic uncertainty introduced into such calculations by the finite spatial extent of the gauge-field configurations. We extend the work of Bour et al from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to quantum field theory by generalizing the work of Luscher and of Gottlieb and Rummukainen to boosted two-body bound states. The volume modifications to bind...

  13. A detailed study of nonperturbative solutions of two-body Dirac equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crater, H.W.; Becker, R.L.; Wong, C.Y.; Van Alstine, P.

    1992-12-01

    In quark model calculations of the meson spectrums fully covariant two-body Dirac equations dictated by Dirac's relativistic constraint mechanics gave a good fit to the entire meson mass spectrum for light quark mesons as well as heavy quark mesons with constituent world scalar and vector potentials depending on just one or two parameters. In this paper, we investigate the properties of these equations that made them work so well by solving them numerically for quantum electrodynamics (QED) and related field theories. The constraint formalism generates a relativistic quantum mechanics defined by two coupled Dirac equations on a sixteen component wave function which contain Lorentz covariant constituent potentials that are initially undetermined. An exact Pauli reduction leads to a second order relativistic Schroedinger-like equation for a reduced eight component wave function determined by an effective interaction -- the quasipotential. We first determine perturbatively to lowest order the relativistic quasipotential for the Schroedinger-like equation by comparing that form with one derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Insertion of this perturbative information into the minimal interaction structures of the two-body Dirac equations then completely determines their interaction structures. Then we give a procedure for constructing the full sixteen component solution to our coupled first-order Dirac equations from a solution of the second order equation for the reduced wave function. Next, we show that a perturbative treatment of these equations yields the standard spectral results for QED and related interactions.

  14. Two-Body Approximations in the Design of Low-Energy Transfers Between Galilean Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, Elena; Castelli, Roberto

    Over the past two decades, the robotic exploration of the Solar System has reached the moons of the giant planets. In the case of Jupiter, a strong scientific interest towards its icy moons has motivated important space missions (e.g., ESAs' JUICE and NASA's Europa Mission). A major issue in this context is the design of efficient trajectories enabling satellite tours, i.e., visiting the several moons in succession. Concepts like the Petit Grand Tour and the Multi-Moon Orbiter have been developed to this purpose, and the literature on the subject is quite rich. The models adopted are the two-body problem (with the patched conics approximation and gravity assists) and the three-body problem (giving rise to the so-called low-energy transfers, LETs). In this contribution, we deal with the connection between two moons, Europa and Ganymede, and we investigate a two-body approximation of trajectories originating from the stable/unstable invariant manifolds of the two circular restricted three body problems, i.e., Jupiter-Ganymede and Jupiter-Europa. We develop ad-hoc algorithms to determine the intersections of the resulting elliptical arcs, and the magnitude of the maneuver at the intersections. We provide a means to perform very fast and accurate evaluations of the minimum-cost trajectories between the two moons. Eventually, we validate the methodology by comparison with numerical integrations in the three-body problem.

  15. The efficacy of a resistive heating under-patient blanket versus a forced-air warming system: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Andrea; Danelli, Giorgio; Ghisi, Daniela; Ortu, Andrea; Moschini, Elisa; Fanelli, Guido

    2009-01-01

    We compared temperature changes in patients undergoing hip replacement during warming with a resistive heating blanket or air-forced system. Fifty-six patients were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to the "forced-air group" (forced-air system) or to the "heating-blanket group" (resistive heating under-patient blanket). Baseline tympanic temperatures were 36.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C in the forced-air group and 36.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C in the heating-blanket group (P > 0.05). At the end of surgery tympanic temperatures were 35.3 +/- 0.5 degrees C in the forced-air group and 35.1 +/- 0.6 degrees C in the heating-pad group (P > 0.05). We demonstrated that, using either a resistive heating-blanket or forced-air warming systems, patients ended surgery in mild hypothermia after elective total hip replacement, but without significant differences between these two warming devices.

  16. Age-Related Corresponding Relationships of Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-group corresponding relationships of the controlled force exertion based on sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 175 right-handed male adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects were divided into 3 groups based on age-level: 53 young (mean age 24.6, SD = 3.3 years), 71 middle aged (mean age 44.3, SD = 8.7 years), and 51…

  17. Effects of Computer-Aided Interlimb Force Coupling Training on Paretic Hand and Arm Motor Control following Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chou, Li-Wei; Luo, Hong-Ji; Tsai, Po-Yi; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the training effects of interlimb force coupling training on paretic upper extremity outcomes in patients with chronic stroke and analyzed the relationship between motor recovery of the paretic hand, arm and functional performances on paretic upper limb. A randomized controlled trial with outcome assessment at baseline and after 4 weeks of intervention. Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University. Thirty-three subjects with chronic stroke were recruited and randomly assigned to training (n = 16) and control groups (n = 17). The computer-aided interlimb force coupling training task with visual feedback included different grip force generation methods on both hands. The Barthel Index (BI), the upper extremity motor control Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-UE), the Motor Assessment Score (MAS), and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). All assessments were executed by a blinded evaluator, and data management and statistical analysis were also conducted by a blinded researcher. The training group demonstrated greater improvement on the FMA-UE (pcontrol group after 4 weeks of intervention. In addition, a moderate correlation was found between the improvement of scores for hand scales of the FMA and other portions of the FMA UE (r = .528, p = .018) or MAS (r = .596, p = .015) in the training group. Computer-aided interlimb force coupling training improves the motor recovery of a paretic hand, and facilitates motor control and enhances functional performance in the paretic upper extremity of people with chronic stroke. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02247674.

  18. CP violation in charmless two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The study of CP violation in charmless charged two-body decays of neutral B mesons provides a test of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa picture of the Standard Model, and is a sensitive probe to contributions of processes beyond it. Using a data sample of proton-proton collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, CP violation has been observed for the first time in the B0_s to K-pi+ decay with a significance of more than 5 sigma. Furthermore, first measurements of direct and mixing-induced CP-violating asymmetries in the B0_s to K+K- decay have been performed, opening new avenues to the determination of the unitarity triangle angle gamma using decays affected by penguin processes.

  19. Low-Thrust Orbital Transfers in the Two-Body Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sukhanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust transfers between given orbits within the two-body problem are considered; the thrust is assumed power limited. A simple method for obtaining the transfer trajectories based on the linearization of the motion near reference orbits is suggested. Required calculation accuracy can be reached by means of use of a proper number of the reference orbits. The method may be used in the case of a large number of the orbits around the attracting center; no averaging is necessary in this case. The suggested method also is applicable to the cases of partly given final orbit and if there are constraints on the thrust direction. The method gives an optimal solution to the linearized problem which is not optimal for the original nonlinear problem; the difference between the optimal solutions to the original and linearized problems is estimated using a numerical example. Also examples illustrating the method capacities are given.

  20. Relativistic two-body Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian in an external weak gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. A.; Urrutia, L. F.

    2011-11-01

    A construction of the Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian for a pair of fermions, considered as a quantum two-body system, immersed in an arbitrary background gravitational field described by Einstein's General Relativity is presented. Working with Fermi normal coordinates for a freely falling observer in a spacetime region where there are no background sources and ignoring the gravitational back-reaction of the system, the effective Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian is obtained starting from the S-matrix element corresponding to the one-photon exchange between the charged fermionic currents. The contributions due to retardation are considered up to order (v / c) 2 and they are subsequently written as effective operators in the relativistic quantum mechanical Hilbert space of the system. The final Hamiltonian includes effects linear in the curvature and up to order (v / c) 2.

  1. Relativistic two-body Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian in an external weak gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Urrutia, L.F., E-mail: urrutia@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-03

    A construction of the Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian for a pair of fermions, considered as a quantum two-body system, immersed in an arbitrary background gravitational field described by Einstein's General Relativity is presented. Working with Fermi normal coordinates for a freely falling observer in a spacetime region where there are no background sources and ignoring the gravitational back-reaction of the system, the effective Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian is obtained starting from the S-matrix element corresponding to the one-photon exchange between the charged fermionic currents. The contributions due to retardation are considered up to order (v/c){sup 2} and they are subsequently written as effective operators in the relativistic quantum mechanical Hilbert space of the system. The final Hamiltonian includes effects linear in the curvature and up to order (v/c){sup 2}.

  2. Minimal physical constraints on the angular distributions of two-body boson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Faccioli, Pietro; Seixas, Joao; Woehri, Hermine

    2013-01-01

    The angular distribution of the two-body decay of a boson of unknown properties is strongly constrained by angular momentum conservation and rotation invariance, as well as by the nature of the detected decay particles and of the colliding ones. Knowing the border between the "physical" and "unphysical" parameter domains defined by these "minimal constraints" (excluding specific hypotheses on what is still subject of measurement) is a useful ingredient in the experimental determinations of angular distributions and can provide model-independent criteria for spin characterizations. In particular, analysing the angular decay distribution with the general parametrization for the J = 2 case can provide a model-independent discrimination between the J = 0 and J = 2 hypotheses for a particle produced by two real gluons and decaying into two real photons.

  3. Numerical integration of a relativistic two-body problem via a multiple scales method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelmagd, Elbaz I.; Elshaboury, S. M.; Selim, H. H.

    2016-01-01

    We offer an analytical study on the dynamics of a two-body problem perturbed by small post-Newtonian relativistic term. We prove that, while the angular momentum is not conserved, the motion is planar. We also show that the energy is subject to small changes due to the relativistic effect. We also offer a periodic solution to this problem, obtained by a method based on the separation of time scales. We demonstrate that our solution is more general than the method developed in the book by Brumberg (Essential Relativistic Celestial Mechanics, Hilger, Bristol, 1991). The practical applicability of this model may be in studies of the long-term evolution of relativistic binaries (neutron stars or black holes).

  4. Two-body bound and edge states in the extended SSH Bose-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Liberto, M.; Recati, A.; Carusotto, I.; Menotti, C.

    2017-07-01

    We study the bosonic two-body problem in a Su-Schrieffer-Heeger dimerized chain with on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions. We find two classes of bound states. The first, similar to the one induced by on-site interactions, has its center of mass on the strong link, whereas the second, existing only thanks to nearest-neighbor interactions, is centered on the weak link. We identify energy crossings between these states and analyse them using exact diagonalization and perturbation theory. In the presence of open boundary conditions, novel strongly-localized edge-bound states appear in the spectrum as a consequence of the interplay between lattice geometry, on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions. Contrary to the case of purely on-site interactions, such EBS persist even in the strongly interacting regime.

  5. Production of recycled pulsars in globular clusters via two-body tidal capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, R; Rappaport, S.

    1992-01-01

    The numbers of binary systems containing a neutron star that are formed in the cores of globular clusters via two-body tidal capture are investigated. The subsequent evolution of the resulting binary systems is examined. Monte Carlo techniques are employed to trace the histories of many neutron stars in the core of a model globular cluster. Various scenarios for mass stripping during capture and orbital circularization, and the effects of magnetic braking on the circularized orbits are explored. Calculations are carried out for two model clusters: 47 Tuc and Omega Cen. Distributions of orbital periods for newly formed binaries containing a neutron star in orbit with either a main-sequence star or a giant are presented. Each binary is followed until contact between the captured star and the neutron star is established. It is argued that these systems should be regarded as potential progenitors of 'recycled' pulsars.

  6. Branching ratios for pbarp annihilation at rest into two-body final states

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Bischoff, S; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Crowe, K M; Degener, T; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Herz, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Hodd, C; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; McCrady, R; Meier, J; Meyer, C A; Montanet, Lucien; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Spanier, S; Stöck, H; Strassburger, C; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of two-body branching ratios for pbarp annihilations at rest in liquid and gaseous (12 rho sub S sub T sub P) hydrogen are reported. Channels studied are pbarp-> pi sup 0 pi sup 0 ,pi sup 0 eta, K sup 0 sub S K sup 0 sub L , K sup + K sup -. The branching ratio for the pi sup 0 pi sup 0 channel in liquid H sub 2 is measured to be (6.14+-0.40)x10 sup - sup 4. The results are compared with those from other experiments. The fraction of P-state annihilation for a range of target densities from 0.002 rho sub S sub T sub P to liquid H sub 2 is determined. Values obtained include 0.11+-0.02 in liquid H sub 2 and 0.48+-0.04 in 12 rho sub S sub T sub P H sub 2 gas.

  7. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies - Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J; Aspell, Jane E; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty J; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location - measured by anterior posterior drift - was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body.

  8. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  9. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, Mark D.; Liebler, Stefan; Staub, Florian

    2017-11-01

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wave-function corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a \\overline{ {DR}} (or \\overline{ {MS}}) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop-induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infrared divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infrared counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiatively induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  10. Generic calculation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Liebler, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-15

    We describe a fully generic implementation of two-body partial decay widths at the full one-loop level in the SARAH and SPheno framework compatible with most supported models. It incorporates fermionic decays to a fermion and a scalar or a gauge boson as well as scalar decays into two fermions, two gauge bosons, two scalars or a scalar and a gauge boson. We present the relevant generic expressions for virtual and real corrections. Whereas wavefunction corrections are determined from on-shell conditions, the parameters of the underlying model are by default renormalised in a DR (or MS) scheme. However, the user can also define model-specific counter-terms. As an example we discuss the renormalisation of the electric charge in the Thomson limit for top-quark decays in the standard model. One-loop induced decays are also supported. The framework additionally allows the addition of mass and mixing corrections induced at higher orders for the involved external states. We explain our procedure to cancel infra-red divergences for such cases, which is achieved through an infra-red counter-term taking into account corrected Goldstone boson vertices. We compare our results for sfermion, gluino and Higgs decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) against the public codes SFOLD, FVSFOLD and HFOLD and explain observed differences. Radiative induced gluino and neutralino decays are compared against the original implementation in SPheno in the MSSM. We exactly reproduce the results of the code CNNDecays for decays of neutralinos and charginos in R-parity violating models. The new version SARAH 4.11.0 by default includes the calculation of two-body decay widths at the full one-loop level. Current limitations for certain model classes are described.

  11. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  12. Implications of two-body fragment decay for the interpretation of emission chronology from velocity-gated correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Helgesson, J; Ekman, J; Helgesson, Johan; Ghetti, Roberta; Jorgen Ekman

    2006-01-01

    From velocity-gated small-angle correlation functions the emission chronology can be deduced for non-identical particles, if the emission is independent. This is not the case for non-identical particles that originate from two-body decay of fragments. Experimental results may contain contributions from both independent emission and two-body decay, so care is needed in interpreting the velocity-gated correlation functions. It is shown that in some special cases, it is still possible to deduce the emission chronology, even if there is a contribution from two-body decay.

  13. Force limited random vibration testing: the computation of the semi-empirical constant $C(2) $ C 2 for a real test article and unknown supporting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijker, J. J.; Ellenbroek, M. H. M.; Boer, A. de

    2015-09-01

    To prevent over-testing of the test-item during random vibration testing Scharton proposed and discussed the force limited random vibration testing (FLVT) in a number of publications. Besides the random vibration specification, the total mass and the turn-over frequency of the test article (load), C^2 is a very important parameter for FLVT. A number of computational methods to estimate C^2 are described in the literature, i.e. the simple and the complex two degree of freedom system, STDFS and CTDFS, respectively. The motivation of this work is to evaluate the method for the computation of a realistic value of C^2 to perform a representative random vibration test based on force limitation, when the description of the supporting structure (source) is more or less unknown. Marchand discussed the formal description of obtaining C^2, using the maximum PSD of the acceleration and maximum PSD of the force, both at the interface between test article and supporting structure. Stevens presented the coupled systems modal approach (CSMA), where simplified asparagus patch models (parallel-oscillator representation) of load and source are connected. The asparagus patch model consists of modal effective masses and spring stiffnesses associated with the natural frequencies. When the random acceleration vibration specification is given the CSMA method is suitable to compute the value of the parameter C^2. When no mathematical model of the source can be made available, estimations of the value C^2 can be find in literature. In this paper a probabilistic mathematical representation of the unknown source is proposed, such that the asparagus patch model of the source can be approximated. The chosen probabilistic design parameters have a uniform distribution. The computation of the value C^2 can be done in conjunction with the CSMA method, knowing the apparent mass of the load and the random acceleration specification at the interface between load and source, respectively. Data of two

  14. Study of matter current effects in two-body inelastic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rulison, M.K.

    1979-01-01

    At the present time no comprehensive model of high energy hadronic scattering exists. Most of the existing models have a very restricted range of application. The geometrical model of hadronic scattering proposed by Chou and Yang has had great success in predicting high energy scattering phenomena. For example, the dip in pp elastic scattering, and pion and kaon radii were quite accurately predicted by the model. Use of pp differential cross section data also yields an excellent fit of the measured proton form factor in this model. The possible existence of hadronic matter current inside a polarized hadron and an experimental test of this idea were discussed by Chou and Yang in 1973. Subsequently the geometrical model was generalized to include the matter current effect by the same authors in 1976. The proposed experimental test of the matter current idea consists of determining the spin-rotation parameter, R, in polarized elastic meson-proton scatterings. The measurement of R usually requires a second scattering of the recoil proton off a known analyzer such as /sup 12/C. The purpose of this work is to offer another method by which the hadronic matter current effect can be detected. Instead of elastic scattering the two-body inelastic scattering process ..pi../sup -/ p ..-->.. K/sup 0/..lambda.. in which the final state hyperon is unstable against weak decay is considered. By observing the angular distribution of the decay products the rotation parameter, R, may be inferred.

  15. CP Violation and Lifetime Measurements of Two-body Charmless Decays of B Hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00453516; Eklund, Lard

    This thesis presents lifetime measurements of charmless two-body decays of b hadrons, specifically the decay modes known as $B\\to h^+ h^{'-}$, where $B$ refers to meson or baryon containing a $b$ quark and $h^{(')}$ refers to a proton $p$, pion $\\pi$ or kaon $K$. Using the large data samples collected by the LHCb detector, the $B\\to h^+ h^{'-}$ channels with the largest branching fractions provide an opportunity to perform high-precision measurements of the properties of the decays. The leading-order processes in $B \\rightarrow h^{+}h'^{-}$ decays are tree and penguin topologies, where the loop-dominated channels could be sensitive to non-standard model physics. The $B^0_S \\to K^+ K^{-}$ mode is particularly interesting as it has a $CP$-even final state, as well as being dominated by penguin decay processes. The $B^0_S \\to K^+ K^{-}$ effective lifetime can be used to calculate the $B_{s}^{0}$ decay-rate asymmetry $A_{\\Delta \\Gamma}$, which quantifies the amount of $CP$ violation in the decay. Using LHCb ...

  16. Entropy theorems in classical mechanics, general relativity, and the gravitational two-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Oltean, Marius; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M; Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    In classical Hamiltonian theories, entropy may be understood either as a statistical property of canonical systems, or as a mechanical property, that is, as a monotonic function of the phase space along trajectories. In classical mechanics, there are theorems which have been proposed for proving the non-existence of entropy in the latter sense. We explicate, clarify and extend the proofs of these theorems to some standard matter (scalar and electromagnetic) field theories in curved spacetime, and then we show why these proofs fail in general relativity; due to properties of the gravitational Hamiltonian and phase space measures, the second law of thermodynamics holds. As a concrete application, we focus on the consequences of these results for the gravitational two-body problem, and in particular, we prove the non-compactness of the phase space of perturbed Schwarzschild-Droste spacetimes. We thus identify the lack of recurring orbits in phase space as a distinct sign of dissipation and hence entropy producti...

  17. Charmless charged two-body $B$ decays at LHCb with 2011 data

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrated luminosity of 320 $\\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$ collected by LHCb in the first part of the 2011 run, we reconstruct a large sample of the charmless charged two-body decay modes of $B$ hadrons, providing measurements of the direct $CP$ asymmetries $A_{CP}(B^0 \\rightarrow K\\pi)=-0.088 \\pm 0.011\\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.008\\mathrm{(syst)}$ and $A_{CP}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\pi K)=0.27 \\pm 0.08\\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.02\\mathrm{(syst)}$. The former constitutes the best measurement in the world as well as the first observation of $CP$ violation at LHCb, while the latter is the first evidence of $CP$ violation in the $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\pi K$ decay. Furthermore, we measure the branching fractions $\\mathcal{BR}(B^0 \\rightarrow K^+K^-)=(0.13 ^{+0.06}_{-0.05} \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-6}$ and $\\mathcal{BR}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-)=(0.98 ^{+0.23}_{-0.19} \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.11\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-6}$. In particular, the absence of a $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^- $ signal is rejected ...

  18. Electromagnetic two-body problem: recurrent dynamics in the presence of state-dependent delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Luca, Jayme [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Caixa Postal 676, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo 13565-905 (Brazil); Guglielmi, Nicola [Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, I-67010, L' Aquila (Italy); Humphries, Tony [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Politi, Antonio, E-mail: deluca@df.ufscar.b [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, CNR Via Madonna del Piano 10-Sesto, Fiorentino I-50019 (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    We study the electromagnetic two-body problem of classical electrodynamics as a prototype dynamical system with state-dependent delays. The equations of motion are analysed with reference to motion along a straight line in the presence of an electrostatic field. We consider the general electromagnetic equations of motion for point charges with advanced and retarded interactions and study two limits, (a) retarded-only interactions (Dirac electrodynamics) and (b) half-retarded plus half-advanced interactions (Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics). A fixed point is created where the electrostatic field balances the Coulombian attraction, and we use local analysis near this fixed point to derive necessary conditions for a Hopf bifurcation. In case (a), we study a Hopf bifurcation about an unphysical fixed point and find that it is subcritical. In case (b), there is a Hopf bifurcation about a physical fixed point and we study several families of periodic orbits near this point. The bifurcating periodic orbits are illustrated and simulated numerically, by introducing a surrogate dynamical system into the numerical analysis which transforms future data into past data by exploiting the periodicity, thus obtaining systems with only delays.

  19. Unmasking the Effect of Analgesics on Endodontic Diagnosis Using a Novel Bite Force Sensor Device: A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishnani, Sushil; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Bhardwaj, Anuj; Dubey, Sandeep; Saha, Mainak; Kala, Shubham; Jain, Sohini; Narwani, Shweta

    2016-10-01

    A definitive diagnosis is of primary importance before initiating any endodontic treatment; yet, there are occasions when the dental professional is unable to accurately reproduce the patient's chief complaint, as it can pose a dilemma and may require consideration of multiple variables in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. So to overcome this problem, a methodical approach in providing endodontic treatment should be implemented which includes diagnosis, definitive dental treatment and adjunctive drug therapy, known as the "3D" strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible "masking" effect of these analgesics on endodontic diagnosis using a novel bite force sensor device. A total of 90 patients with endodontic pain were selected and they were given either a placebo or 400 mg ibuprofen (brufen) or 50mg diclofenac sodium (voveron). Both patients and operators were completely blinded to the drugs administered. Bite force tolerance values were noted before and one hour after administration of medication using the self designed bite force sensor. The pre- and post-bite force tolerance values were tabulated for both contralateral and affected tooth. For the affected tooth, there was statistically significant difference between pre- and post-bite force tolerance values in Group I (i.e., ibuprofen) and Group II (i.e., diclofenac sodium) (p<0.05) with no significant difference observed in Group III (placebo). The easily available over the counter self administered analgesics in addition to providing symptomatic relief to patients suffering from symptomatic apical periodontitis may also cloud the definitive diagnosis of the clinician, thus jeopardising the treatment plan. The self designed bite force sensor was effective in arriving at a definitive diagnosis in teeth with chronic irreversible pulpitis with symptomatic apical periodontitis, where the allodynia has been camouflaged by the use of analgesics like ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium.

  20. Effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation on the balance and prevention of falls in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Force platform training with functional electric stimulation aimed at improving balance may be effective in fall prevention for older adults. Aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform balance training with functional electric stimulation on balance and fall prevention in older adults. Methods A single-centre, unblinded, randomized controlled trial was conducted. One hundred and twenty older adults were randomly allocated to two groups: the control group (n = 60, one-leg standing balance exercise, 12 min/d or the intervention group (n = 60, force platform training with functional electric stimulation, 12 min/d. The training was provided 15 days a month for 3 months by physical therapists. Medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed, the Berg Balance Scale, the Barthel Index, the Falls Efficacy scale-International were assessed at baseline and after the 3-month intervention. A fall diary was kept by each participant during the 6-month follow-up. Results On comparing the two groups, the intervention group showed significantly decreased (p < 0.01 medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed. There was significantly higher improvement in the Berg Balance Scale (p < 0.05, the Barthel Index (p < 0.05 and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (p < 0.05, along with significantly lesser number of injurious fallers (p < 0.05, number of fallers (p < 0.05, and fall rates (p < 0.05 during the 6-month follow-up in the intervention group. Conclusion This study showed that the visual feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation improved balance and prevented falls in older adults.

  1. Forced use of the upper extremity in chronic stroke patients : results from a single-blind randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J H; Wagenaar, R C; Lankhorst, G J; Vogelaar, T W; Devillé, W L; Bouter, L M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Of all stroke survivors, 30% to 66% are unable to use their affected arm in performing activities of daily living. Although forced use therapy appears to improve arm function in chronic stroke patients, there is no conclusive evidence. This study evaluates the effectiveness

  2. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gundappa, Mohan

    2013-07-01

    A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) by using Magnifying Loupes (ML) and dental operating microscope (DOM). A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided), Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i) evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii) presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii) elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD) and Chi-square test. Statistically significant (P Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  3. Microscopy of the interacting Harper-Hofstadter model in the two-body limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Schittko, Robert; Menke, Tim; Dan Borgnia; Preiss, Philipp M.; Grusdt, Fabian; Kaufman, Adam M.; Greiner, Markus

    2017-06-01

    The interplay between magnetic fields and interacting particles can lead to exotic phases of matter that exhibit topological order and high degrees of spatial entanglement. Although these phases were discovered in a solid-state setting, recent innovations in systems of ultracold neutral atoms—uncharged atoms that do not naturally experience a Lorentz force—allow the synthesis of artificial magnetic, or gauge, fields. This experimental platform holds promise for exploring exotic physics in fractional quantum Hall systems, owing to the microscopic control and precision that is achievable in cold-atom systems. However, so far these experiments have mostly explored the regime of weak interactions, which precludes access to correlated many-body states. Here, through microscopic atomic control and detection, we demonstrate the controlled incorporation of strong interactions into a two-body system with a chiral band structure. We observe and explain the way in which interparticle interactions induce chirality in the propagation dynamics of particles in a ladder-like, real-space lattice governed by the interacting Harper-Hofstadter model, which describes lattice-confined, coherently mobile particles in the presence of a magnetic field. We use a bottom-up strategy to prepare interacting chiral quantum states, thus circumventing the challenges of a top-down approach that begins with a many-body system, the size of which can hinder the preparation of controlled states. Our experimental platform combines all of the necessary components for investigating highly entangled topological states, and our observations provide a benchmark for future experiments in the fractional quantum Hall regime.

  4. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  5. The General Relativistic Two Body Problem and the Effective One Body Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical approach to the motion and radiation of (comparable mass) binary systems has been introduced in 1999 under the name of Effective One Body (EOB) formalism. We review the basic elements of this formalism, and discuss some of its recent developments. Several recent comparisons between EOB predictions and Numerical Relativity (NR) simulations have shown the aptitude of the EOB formalism to provide accurate descriptions of the dynamics and radiation of various binary systems (comprising black holes or neutron stars) in regimes that are inaccessible to other analytical approaches (such as the last orbits and the merger of comparable mass black holes). In synergy with NR simulations, post-Newtonian (PN) theory and Gravitational Self-Force (GSF) computations, the EOB formalism is likely to provide an efficient way of computing the very many accurate template waveforms that are needed for Gravitational Wave (GW) data analysis purposes.

  6. Anomalous random correlations of force constants on the lattice dynamical properties of disordered Au-Fe alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangsabanik, Jiban; Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Johnson, D. D.; Alam, Aftab

    2017-09-01

    Gold iron (Au-Fe) alloys are of immense interest due to their biocompatibility, anomalous Hall conductivity, and applications in various medical treatments. However, irrespective of the method of preparation, they often exhibit a high level of disorder with properties sensitive to the thermal or magnetic annealing temperatures. We calculate the lattice dynamical properties of Au1 -xFex alloys using density functional theory methods where, being multisite properties, reliable interatomic force constant (IFC) calculations in disordered alloys remain a challenge. We follow a twofold approach: (1) an accurate IFC calculation in an environment with nominally zero chemical pair correlations to mimic the homogeneously disordered alloy and (2) a configurational averaging for the desired phonon properties (e.g., dispersion, density of states, and entropy). We find an anomalous change in the IFC's and phonon dispersion (split bands) near x =0.19 , which is attributed to the local stiffening of the Au-Au bonds when Au is in the vicinity of Fe. Other results based on mechanical and thermophysical properties reflect a similar anomaly: Phonon entropy, e.g., becomes negative below x =0.19 , suggesting a tendency for chemical unmixing, reflecting the onset of a miscibility gap in the phase diagram. Our results match fairly well with reported data wherever available.

  7. A randomized trial investigating a chiropractic manual placebo: a novel design using standardized forces in the delivery of active and control treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Long, Cynthia R; Rowell, Robert M; Gudavalli, M Ram; Jedlicka, James

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the proposed manual placebo in terms of success in blinding patients to treatment group assignment and outcomes between the treatment groups. Randomized controlled trial. A chiropractic college research clinic in the midwestern United States. One hundred and eleven (111) individuals aged 18 years and over with subacute or chronic lowback pain. The active treatment consisted of flexion-distraction chiropractic manipulation and trigger point therapy and the control treatment of sham manipulation and effleurage; both groups received eight treatments over a 3-week period. The application of prescribed ranges of biomechanical forces for each treatment was standardized using specialized computerized equipment. "Nontreatment" aspects of the clinical encounter were to be standardized across groups. A primary clinician blinded to treatment assignment provided interpersonal interactions and treating clinicians delivered treatments with a minimum of interaction. The accuracy of the patient's perception of group assignment at visit 4 and the mean change in the Pain Disability Index (PDI) over the treatment period were the primary outcome variables. Patients in the control group were more likely to perceive their treatment assignment accurately than those in the active group (78% versus 54%, respectively). Patients in both treatment groups improved on the PDI and the Roland-Morris Questionnaire; there were no significant differences in improvement between the groups. Age, gender, prior chiropractic experience and expectation of treatment at baseline had no effect on outcomes. Patients in the control group were not successfully blinded; however, patients' perceptions of treatment group assignment did not significantly affect outcomes. The clinically significant improvement in both groups, independent of patient or clinician expectations, suggests the presence of therapeutic factors common to both groups, other than biomechanical force. Further studies examining other

  8. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  9. Exact and approximate multiple diffraction calculations. [Fixed-scatterer model, three-body problem, two-body amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Y.; Wallace, S.J.; Sparrow, D.A.

    1976-08-01

    A three-body potential scattering problem is solved in the fixed scatterer model exactly and approximately to test the validity of commonly used assumptions of multiple scattering calculations. The model problem involves two-body amplitudes that show diffraction-like differential scattering similar to high energy hadron-nucleon amplitudes. The exact fixed scatterer calculations are compared to Glauber approximation, eikonal-expansion results and a noneikonal approximation.

  10. Measurement of branching fractions and CP violation for charmless charged two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzini, Stefano

    Charmless charged two-body B decays are sensitive probes of the CKM matrix, that parameterize CP violation in the Standard Model (SM), and have the potential to reveal the presence of New Physics. The framework of CP violation within the SM, the role of the CKM matrix, with its basic formalism, and the current experimental status are presented. The theoretical tools commonly used to deal with hadronic B decays and an overview of the phenomenology of charmless two-body B decays are outlined. LHCb is one of the four main experiments operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), devoted to the measurement of CP violation and rare decays of charm and beauty hadrons. The LHCb detector is described, focusing on the technologies adopted for each sub-detector and summarizing their performances. The status-of-the-art of the LHCb measurements with charmless two-body B decays is then presented. Using the 37/pb of integrated luminosity collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV by LHCb during 2010, the direct CP asymmetries ACP(B0 -> ...

  11. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the current work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.

  12. Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Safety and Effectiveness of a Contact Force-Sensing Irrigated Catheter for Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Results of the TactiCath Contact Force Ablation Catheter Study for Atrial Fibrillation (TOCCASTAR) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Neuzil, Petr; Natale, Andrea; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Kautzner, Josef; Shah, Dipen; Michaud, Gregory; Wharton, Marcus; Harari, David; Mahapatra, Srijoy; Lambert, Hendrik; Mansour, Moussa

    2015-09-08

    Contact force (CF) is a major determinant of lesion size and transmurality and has the potential to improve efficacy of atrial fibrillation ablation. This study sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a novel irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter that measures real-time CF in the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. A total of 300 patients with symptomatic, drug-refractory, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial and randomized to radiofrequency ablation with either a novel CF-sensing catheter or a non-CF catheter (control). The primary effectiveness end point consisted of acute electrical isolation of all pulmonary veins and freedom from recurrent symptomatic atrial arrhythmia off all antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 months. The primary safety end point included device-related serious adverse events. End points were powered to show noninferiority. All pulmonary veins were isolated in both groups. Effectiveness was achieved in 67.8% and 69.4% of subjects in the CF and control arms, respectively (absolute difference, -1.6%; lower limit of 1-sided 95% confidence interval, -10.7%; P=0.0073 for noninferiority). When the CF arm was stratified into optimal CF (≥90% ablations with ≥10 g) and nonoptimal CF groups, effectiveness was achieved in 75.9% versus 58.1%, respectively (P=0.018). The primary safety end point occurred in 1.97% and 1.40% of CF patients and control subjects, respectively (absolute difference, 0.57%; upper limit of 1-sided 95% confidence interval, 3.61%; P=0.0004 for noninferiority). The CF ablation catheter met the primary safety and effectiveness end points. Additionally, optimal CF was associated with improved effectiveness. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01278953. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Relation between the change of density of states and the shape of the potential in two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than +1 /r2 everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  14. Interaction for the trapped fermi gas from a unitary transformation of the exact two-body spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Rotureau, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    We study systems of few two-component fermions interacting in a Harmonic Oscillator trap. The fermion-fermion interaction is generated in a finite basis with a unitary transformation of the exact two-body spectrum given by the Busch formula. The few-body Schr\\"odinger equation is solved with the formalism of the No-Core Shell Model. We present results for a system of three fermions interacting at unitarity as well as for finite values of the S-wave scattering length $a_2$ and effective range ...

  15. Exchanged naturality contributions from high-energy polarization measurements in two-body inclusive and exclusive reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ader, J P

    1974-01-01

    In the paper, dealing with high-energy quasi-two-body or multiparticle production, the authors focus on what can be learned about exchanged naturality amplitudes from final polarization measurements with polarized or unpolarized beam amd/or target. The separation of t- channel (boson exchange) and u-channel (baryon exchange) exchanges into components of natural and unnatural parity and the measure of naturality interferences are extensively studied in all cases which are now or will be soon available with present experimental techniques. Special attention is paid to the transversity amplitudes which are shown to be always naturality conserving. (19 refs).

  16. Complete angular distribution measurements of two-body deuteron photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Mirazita; F. Ronchetti; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; CLAS Collaboration

    2004-07-12

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer detector and the tagged photon beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10{sup o}-160{sup o}. The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well described by the nonperturbative quark gluon string model.

  17. First evidence for the two-body charmless baryonic decay $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The results of a search for the rare two-body charmless baryonic decays $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ and $B_s^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ are reported. The analysis uses a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb$^{-1}$, of $pp$ collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. An excess of $B^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ candidates with respect to background expectations is seen with a statistical significance of 3.3 standard deviations. This is the first evidence for a two-body charmless baryonic $B^0$ decay. No significant $B_s^0 \\to p \\bar{p}$ signal is observed, leading to an improvement of three orders of magnitude over previous bounds. If the excess events are interpreted as signal, the 68.3\\% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions are \\begin{eqnarray} \\cal{B}(\\rm{B}^0 \\to p \\bar{p}) & = & ( 1.47 \\,^{+0.62}_{-0.51} \\,^{+0.35}_{-0.14} ) \\times 10^{-8} \\,, \

  18. Some calculator programs for particle physics. [LEGENDRE, ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE, CONFIDENCE, TWO BODY, ELLIPSE, DALITZ RECTANGULAR, and DALITZ TRIANGULAR codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Seven calculator programs that do simple chores that arise in elementary particle physics are given. LEGENDRE evaluates the Legendre polynomial series ..sigma..a/sub n/P/sub n/(x) at a series of values of x. ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE evaluates the first-associated Legendre polynomial series ..sigma..b/sub n/P/sub n//sup 1/(x) at a series of values of x. CONFIDENCE calculates confidence levels for chi/sup 2/, Gaussian, or Poisson probability distributions. TWO BODY calculates the c.m. energy, the initial- and final-state c.m. momenta, and the extreme values of t and u for a 2-body reaction. ELLIPSE calculates coordinates of points for drawing an ellipse plot showing the kinematics of a 2-body reaction or decay. DALITZ RECTANGULAR calculates coordinates of points on the boundary of a rectangular Dalitz plot. DALITZ TRIANGULAR calculates coordinates of points on the boundary of a triangular Dalitz plot. There are short versions of CONFIDENCE (EVEN N and POISSON) that calculate confidence levels for the even-degree-of-freedom-chi/sup 2/ and the Poisson cases, and there is a short version of TWO BODY (CM) that calculates just the c.m. energy and initial-state momentum. The programs are written for the HP-97 calculator. (WHK)

  19. The swim force as a body force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  20. Detecting the (quasi-) two-body decays of {tau} leptons in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asratyan, A. E-mail: asratyan@vitep5.itep.ru; Balatz, M.; Boehnlein, D.; Childres, S.; Davidenko, G.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Kaftanov, V.; Kubantsev, M.; Reay, N.W.; Musser, J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Stanton, N.R.; Thun, R.; Tzanakos, G.S.; Verebryusov, V.; Vishnyakov, V

    1999-05-01

    Novel detector schemes are proposed for the short-baseline neutrino experiments of next generation, aimed at exploring the large-{delta}m{sup 2} domain of {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations in the appearance mode. These schemes emphasize good spectrometry for charged particles and for electromagnetic showers and efficient reconstruction of {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decays. The basic elements are a sequence of relatively thin emulsion targets, immersed in magnetic field and interspersed with electronic trackers, and a fine-grained electromagnetic calorimeter built of lead glass. These elements act as an integral whole in reconstructing the electromagnetic showers. This conceptual scheme shows good performance in identifying the {tau} (quasi-) two-body decays by their characteristic kinematics and in selecting the electronic decays of the {tau}.

  1. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dodds, Trevor J.; Aspell, Jane E.; Herbelin, Bruno; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Mohler, Betty J.; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e., participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2) that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body. PMID:24385970

  2. Visual capture and the experience of having two bodies – Evidence from two different virtual reality techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eHeydrich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In neurology and psychiatry the detailed study of illusory own body perceptions has suggested close links between bodily processing and self-consciousness. One such illusory own body perception is heautoscopy where patients have the sensation of being reduplicated and to exist at two or even more locations. In previous experiments, using a video head-mounted display, self-location and self-identification were manipulated by applying conflicting visuo-tactile information. Yet the experienced singularity of the self was not affected, i.e. participants did not experience having multiple bodies or selves. In two experiments presented in this paper, we investigated self-location and self-identification while participants saw two virtual bodies (video-generated in study 1 and 3D computer generated in study 2 that were stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their own body. In both experiments, we report that self-identification with two virtual bodies was stronger during synchronous stroking. Furthermore, in the video generated setup with synchronous stroking participants reported a greater feeling of having multiple bodies than in the control conditions. In study 1, but not in study 2, we report that self-location – measured by anterior posterior drift – was significantly shifted towards the two bodies in the synchronous condition only. Self-identification with two bodies, the sensation of having multiple bodies, and the changes in self-location show that the experienced singularity of the self can be studied experimentally. We discuss our data with respect to ownership for supernumerary hands and heautoscopy. We finally compare the effects of the video and 3D computer generated head-mounted display technology and discuss the possible benefits of using either technology to induce changes in illusory self-identification with a virtual body.

  3. HFOLD - A program package for calculating two-body MSSM Higgs decays at full one-loop level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, W; Eberl, H; Hluchá, H

    2011-10-01

    HFOLD (Higgs Full One Loop Decays) is a Fortran program package for calculating all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The package is done in the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention and supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. PROGRAM SUMMARY: Program title: HFOLD Catalogue identifier: AEJG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 340 621 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 760 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 524 288 000 Bytes Classification: 11.1 External routines: LoopTools 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/looptools/), SLHALib 2.2 (http://www.feynarts.de/slha/). The LoopTools code is included in the distribution package. Nature of problem: A future high-energy e+e- linear collider will be the best environment for the precise measurements of masses, cross sections, branching ratios, etc. Experimental accuracies are expected at the per-cent down to the per-mile level. These must be matched from the theoretical side. Therefore higher order calculations are mandatory. Solution method: This program package calculates all MSSM Higgs two-body decay widths and the corresponding branching ratios at full one-loop level. The renormalization is done in the DR scheme following the SUSY Parameter Analysis convention. The program supports the SUSY Les Houches Accord input and output format. Running time: The example provided takes only a few seconds to run.

  4. Two-body decays of gluino at full one-loop level in the quark-flavour violating MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, Helmut; Ginina, Elena [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Hidaka, Keisho [Tokyo Gakugei University, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    We study the two-body decays of the gluino at full one-loop level in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with quark-flavour violation (QFV) in the squark sector. The renormalisation is done in the DR scheme. The gluon and photon radiations are included by adding the corresponding three-body decay widths. We discuss the dependence of the gluino decay widths on the QFV parameters. The main dependence stems from the c{sub R}-t{sub R} mixing in the decays to up-type squarks, and from the s{sub R}-b{sub R} mixing in the decays to down-type squarks due to the strong constraints from B-physics on the other quark-flavour-mixing parameters. The full one-loop corrections to the gluino decay widths are mostly negative and of the order of about -10%. The QFV part stays small in the total width but can vary up to -8% for the decay width into the lightest u squark. For the corresponding branching ratio the effect is somehow washed out by at least a factor of two. The electroweak corrections can be as large as 35% of the SUSY QCD corrections. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of Branching Fractions for Two-Body Charmless B Decays to Charged Pions and Kaons at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-28

    The authors present preliminary results of a search for charmless two-body B decays to charged pions and kaons using data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II Storage ring. In a sample of 8.8 million produced B anti-B pairs the authors measure the branching fractions beta(B{sup 0} --> pi{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (9.3{sub {minus}2.3{minus}1.4}{sup +2.6+1.2}) x 10{sup {minus}6} and beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}pi{sup {minus}}) = (12.5{sub {minus}2.6{minus}1.7}{sup +3.0+1.3}) x 10{sup {minus}6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. For the decay B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} they find no significant signal and set an upper limit of beta(B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}) < 6.6 x 10{sup {minus}6} at the 90% confidence level.

  6. Measurement of time dependent CP asymmetries in charged charmless hadronic two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Pennazzi, S

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four experiments that are installed at the protonproton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The experiment is at the latest stage of its setting-up. The first collisions at high energy in LHC are planned to mid-2008, with the first results on the experiments soon after. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer conceived to pursue an extensive study of CP violation in the B meson system, over-constraining the Standard Model predictions and looking for any possible effect beyond this theory, and to look for rare phenomena in the b quark sector with very high precision. The subject of the present work is the study of the non-leptonic B meson decays into charged charmless two-body final states. This class of decays has been extensively studied and it is still matter of great interest at the B-factories and at Tevatron. In fact the current knowledge of this class of decays in the Bd/Bu sector starts to be quite constrained, but the Bs still remains a field where a r...

  7. Two-body decays of gluino at full one-loop level in the quark-flavour violating MSSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Helmut; Ginina, Elena; Hidaka, Keisho

    2017-01-01

    We study the two-body decays of the gluino at full one-loop level in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with quark-flavour violation (QFV) in the squark sector. The renormalisation is done in the [Formula: see text] scheme. The gluon and photon radiations are included by adding the corresponding three-body decay widths. We discuss the dependence of the gluino decay widths on the QFV parameters. The main dependence stems from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to up-type squarks, and from the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] mixing in the decays to down-type squarks due to the strong constraints from B-physics on the other quark-flavour-mixing parameters. The full one-loop corrections to the gluino decay widths are mostly negative and of the order of about -10%. The QFV part stays small in the total width but can vary up to -8% for the decay width into the lightest [Formula: see text] squark. For the corresponding branching ratio the effect is somehow washed out by at least a factor of two. The electroweak corrections can be as large as 35% of the SUSY QCD corrections.

  8. Towards numerically robust multireference theories: The driven similarity renormalization group truncated to one- and two-body operators

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    The first nonperturbative version of the multireference driven similarity renormalization group (MR-DSRG) theory [C. Li and F. A. Evangelista, J. Chem. Theory Comput. $\\mathbf{11}$, 2097 (2015)] is introduced. The renormalization group structure of the MR-DSRG equations ensures numerical robustness and avoidance of the intruder state problem, while the connected nature of the amplitude and energy equations guarantees size consistency and extensivity. We approximate the MR-DSRG equations by keeping only one- and two-body operators and using a linearized recursive commutator approximation of the Baker--Campbell--Hausdorff expansion [T. Yanai and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{124}$, 194106 (2006)]. The resulting MR-LDSRG(2) equations contain only 39 terms and scales as ${\\cal O}(N^2 N_{\\rm P}^2 N_{\\rm H}^2)$ where $N_{\\rm H}$, $N_{\\rm P}$, and $N$ correspond to the number of hole, particle, and total orbitals, respectively. Benchmark MR-LDSRG(2) computations on the hydrogen fluoride and molecular nitrog...

  9. How well can polarization models of pairwise nonadditive forces describe liquid water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-14

    Properties of liquid water have been computed using a near-exact rigid-monomer two-body (pairwise-additive) force field and the same field supplemented by a simple, non-empirical polarization model of pairwise nonadditive many-body forces. The inclusion of nonadditive polarization forces leads to a dramatic decrease, sometimes by an order of magnitude, of the deviations of water properties computed using classical molecular dynamics from experiment results. The remaining deviations are typically of the order of 10%. The model correctly predicts the temperature dependence of the properties except for the density of supercooled water. This good performance is achieved despite the known failure of the polarization model in reproducing trimer nonadditive interaction energies, confirmed here by showing that for a random set of trimers with all O-O separations smaller than 3.4 Å, selected from simulation snapshots, the average error of the model relative to accurate ab initio values is 71%. However, the errors gradually decrease for larger trimers, more abundant in liquid, and one can estimate that the polarization model should reproduce the exact liquid interaction energy to within about 6%. Although this accuracy is consistent with the observed performance of the polarization model, it does not explain the dramatic improvements over the two-body model. These improvements are due to the restructuring of liquid into tetrahedral arrangements instigated by the nonadditive polarization forces. The deviations of our predictions from experiments are generally also consistent with the estimated contributions from leading neglected effects other than the exchange nonadditive forces: the monomer flexibility and quantum nuclear motion effects.

  10. Spin {ital M}1 excitations in deformed nuclei from self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Nojarov, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    1996-08-01

    We present a method to study spin magnetic dipole excitations in deformed nuclei within the quasiparticle random phase approximation based on self-consistent Hartree-Fock mean fields and residual interactions derived from the same effective two-body force. We perform a comprehensive study covering different Skyrme forces and various mass regions, and discussing the role of the mean field and of the residual interaction. An overall agreement with experimental data is obtained with the SG2 force. We study the systematics and the deformation dependence of the spin {ital M}1 strength distributions of {ital K}{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} excitations. It is found for the first time that the summed spin {ital M}1 strength obeys a quadratic dependence on deformation in the two isotope chains studied, {sup 142,146,148,150}Nd and {sup 144,148,150,152,154}Sm. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  12. Self-expanding nitinol stents of high versus low chronic outward force in de novo femoropopliteal occlusive arterial lesions (BIOFLEX-COF trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wressnegger, Alexander; Kaider, Alexandra; Funovics, Martin A

    2017-12-14

    Self-expanding nitinol stents must be oversized at least by a minimal amount to ensure contact with the vessel wall and prevent migration. Once the stent is deployed it exerts a continuous force upon the vascular wall, termed chronic outward force (COF). Animal studies have found an increased neointimal hyperplasia in stents with high oversizing and thus high COF. Data about correlation between COF and neointimal hyperplasia in humans are currently lacking. The objective of the BIOFLEX-COF trial is to prospectively investigate differences in formation of intimal hyperplasia at 1 and 2 years after implantation of nitinol stents with high versus low COF in de novo femoropopliteal occlusive arterial lesions. The BIOFLEX-COF trial is a prospective, quantitative, randomized study. Eighty subjects with symptomatic peripheral arterial lesions eligible for endovascular stent implantation will be enrolled and randomly assigned to either a high COF group (LifeStent Flexstar, Bard Peripheral Vascular Inc., Tempe, AZ, USA) or low COF group (Pulsar, Biotronik AG, Bülach, Switzerland) using an online randomization program to generate a random 1:1 group allocation (block randomization). After implantation and dilatation, COF at every 2 mm along the stent axis will be calculated from the actual stent diameter versus its nominal diameter. There will be two follow-up evaluations at 12 and 24 months. Primary endpoint is the amount of in-stent neointima at 1 year, assessed by contrast-enhanced CT angiography (CTA). In the control examinations, stent diameter and true lumen diameter will be measured on DICOM images every 2 mm along the stent axis to quantify the relative amount of in-stent restenosis. Secondary objectives are the amount of in-stent neointima at 2 years, device- and procedure-related adverse events and target lesion revascularization (TLR) rate. The scheduled time for recruitment is 2 years. Recruitment is expected to be complete in October 2017. This trial is the

  13. Dynamical study of sup 1 H(d,gamma) sup 3 He tensor observables in the energy range of 80 kev to 95 MeV tests of effective two-body models

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, A C

    2000-01-01

    Realistic interactions are used to study sup 1 H(d, gamma) sup 3 He tensor observables in the energy range of 80 keV to 95 MeV deuteron laboratory energy, as well as the differential cross section for the two-body photodisintegration of sup 3 He. The Siegert form of the E1 multipole operator in the long-wavelength limit is taken as the sole component of the electromagnetic interaction. The three-body Faddeev equations for the bound-state and continuum wave functions are solved using the Paris, Argonne V14, Bonn-A, and Bonn-B potentials. The corresponding nucleon-nucleon t-matrices are represented in a separable form using the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler representation. The Coulomb force between protons is neglected and no three-nucleon force is included. The contribution of nucleon-nucleon P-wave components to the observables is carefully studied, not only in the angular distribution of the observables, but also as a function of the deuteron laboratory energy for fixed centre-of-mass angle. Comparison with data is sh...

  14. Effects of hard chrome and MoN-coated stainless steel on wear behaviour and tool life model under two-body abrasion wear testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srisattayakul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of the electroplated hard chrome (HC and the MoNcoated AISI 316 stainless steel coatings on weight loss under two-body abrasion wear testing and to predict the tool life of both materials used as a fishing net-weaving machine component, namely the hook. Both materials were used to carry out the wear experiments under two-body abrasion behavior. These specimens were wear tested with the in-house wear testing apparatus base on ASTM: G133-05 standard. The Taylor’s equation was used to formulate the tool life model whereas the Monte Carlo simulation was used to predict the tool life of the machine part. The results showed that the MoN-HC exhibited higher wear resistance than that of the HC.

  15. Effect of slow release-Fampridine on muscle strength, rate of force development, functional capacity and cognitive function in an enriched population of MS patients. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H B; Nielsen, J L; Ravnborg, M.

    2016-01-01

    contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) of the lower extremities and 2) to replicate previously published data on the effect of slow release-Fampridine (SR-Fampridine) on the functional capacity of the lower limbs, the upper limb and cognitive function, in persons with multiple sclerosis (pw......-Fampridine on functional capacity of the lower limbs were replicated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01656148.......DESIGN: This study was conducted as a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial preceded by open label enrichment phase. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the effect of SR-Fampridine treatment on muscle strength in terms of maximal voluntary...

  16. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: application to noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, Fernando; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  17. Alveolar bone response to light-force tipping and bodily movement in maxillary incisor advancement:A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Priyakorn; Thongudomporn, Udom; Lindauer, Steven J

    2017-10-30

    To compare alveolar bone thickness and height changes between untreated incisors (control), incisors advanced with light-force tipping, and incisors advanced with bodily movement mechanics. Forty-three subjects (aged 9.49 ± 1.56 years) with anterior crossbite were allocated into an untreated group (control), tipping group, or bodily movement group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before advancement (T0) and after obtaining normal overjet (T1). Changes in labial and palatal alveolar bone thickness and height surrounding maxillary incisors were evaluated with limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography before advancement (CT0) and 4 months after normal overjet was obtained (CT1). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA tests were used to compare changes within and between groups, as appropriate. The significance level was set at .05. Labial alveolar bone thickness at the midroot and apical levels were significantly decreased in the bodily movement group (P tipping group compared with the control and bodily movement groups (P tipping and bodily movement in growing patients resulted in labial alveolar bone thickness and labial and palatal alveolar bone height changes that were similar to the untreated group.

  18. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  19. Effects of ground and joint reaction force exercise on lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley George A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low bone mineral density (BMD and subsequent fractures are a major public health problem in postmenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to use the aggregate data meta-analytic approach to examine the effects of ground (for example, walking and/or joint reaction (for example, strength training exercise on femoral neck (FN and lumbar spine (LS BMD in postmenopausal women. Methods The a priori inclusion criteria were: (1 randomized controlled trials, (2 exercise intervention ≥ 24 weeks, (3 comparative control group, (4 postmenopausal women, (5 participants not regularly active, i.e., less than 150 minutes of moderate intensity (3.0 to 5.9 metabolic equivalents weight bearing endurance activity per week, less than 75 minutes of vigorous intensity (> 6.0 metabolic equivalents weight bearing endurance activity per week, resistance training g was calculated for each FN and LS BMD result and pooled using random-effects models. Z-score alpha values, 95%confidence intervals (CI and number-needed-to-treat (NNT were calculated for pooled results. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2. Mixed-effects ANOVA and simple meta-regression were used to examine changes in FN and LS BMD according to selected categorical and continuous variables. Statistical significance was set at an alpha value ≤0.05 and a trend at >0.05 to ≤ 0.10. Results Small, statistically significant exercise minus control group improvements were found for both FN (28 g’s, 1632 participants, g = 0.288, 95% CI = 0.102, 0.474, p = 0.002, Q = 90.5, p I2 = 70.1%, NNT = 6 and LS (28 g’s, 1504 participants, g = 0.179, 95% CI = −0.003, 0.361, p = 0.05, Q = 77.7, p I2 = 65.3%, NNT = 6 BMD. Clinically, it was estimated that the overall changes in FN and LS would reduce the 20-year relative risk of osteoporotic fracture at any site by approximately 11% and 10%, respectively. None of the mixed

  20. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  1. Triple-Bead Mixed Amphetamine Salts (SHP465) in Adults With ADHD: Results of a Phase 3, Double-Blind, Randomized, Forced-Dose Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Glen; Yan, Brian; Adler, Lenard A

    2017-04-01

    Evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of triple-bead mixed amphetamine salts (MAS) in ADHD. Adults with ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV) total scores ≥32 were randomized to 6 weeks of triple-bead MAS (25, 50, or 75 mg) or placebo. The primary endpoint was ADHD-RS-IV total score change from baseline at end of study (EOS). Least squares mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) treatment differences for ADHD-RS-IV total score changes from baseline to EOS significantly favored triple-bead MAS (all doses combined: -10.6 [-13.2, -8.0]; p triple-bead MAS dosages. The most frequently reported TEAEs with triple-bead MAS (all doses combined) included insomnia, decreased appetite, and dry mouth. Mean ± SD pulse and systolic blood pressure increases at EOS were 3.5 ± 10.33 bpm and 0.3 ± 10.48 mmHg with triple-bead MAS (all doses combined). Triple-bead MAS significantly reduced adult ADHD symptoms; the safety profile was consistent with previous triple-bead MAS studies.

  2. Drinking water to reduce alcohol craving? A randomized controlled study on the impact of ghrelin in mediating the effects of forced water intake in alcohol addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Anne; Lippmann, Katharina; Schuster, Rilana; Reinhard, Iris; Bach, Patrick; Weil, Georg; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H; Wiedemann, Klaus; Kiefer, Falk

    2017-11-01

    Recent data suggest that ghrelin is involved in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders, affecting alcohol self-administration and craving. Gastric ghrelin secretion is reduced by stomach distension. We now tested the hypothesis whether the clinically well-known effects of high-volume water intake on craving reduction in alcoholism is mediated by acute changes in ghrelin secretion. In this randomized human laboratory study, we included 23 alcohol-dependent male inpatient subjects who underwent alcohol cue exposure. Participants of the intervention group drank 1000ml of mineral water within 10min directly thereafter, compared to the participants of the control group who did not. Craving and plasma concentrations of acetylated ghrelin were measured ten times during the 120min following the alcohol cue exposure session. In the intervention group, a significant decrease in acetylated ghrelin in plasma compared to the control group was observed. This decrease was correlated to a reduction in patients' subjective level of craving. In the control group, no decrease of acetylated ghrelin in plasma and no association between alcohol craving and changes in plasma concentrations of acetylated ghrelin were observed. Our results present new evidence that the modulation in the ghrelin system by oral water intake mediates the effects of volume intake with craving reduction in alcohol use disorders. Hence, in addition to pharmacological interventions with ghrelin antagonists, the reduction of physiological ghrelin secretion might be a target for future interventions in the treatment of alcohol craving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  4. Three-Body Nuclear Forces from a Matrix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji

    2010-01-01

    We compute three-body nuclear forces at short distances by using the nuclear matrix model of holographic QCD proposed in our previous paper with P. Yi. We find that the three-body forces at short distances are repulsive for (a) aligned three neutrons with averaged spins, and (b) aligned proton-proton-neutron / proton-neutron-neutron. These indicate that in dense states of neutrons such as cores of neutron stars, or in Helium-3 / tritium nucleus, the repulsive forces are larger than the ones estimated from two-body forces only.

  5. Forced marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Guidelines to help A&E staff and other healthcare professionals who suspect cases of forced marriage were launched this month by the government. The guidelines provide practical advice on how to recognise the warning signs, and what to do if patients disclose that they have been, or are about to be, forced to marry. The guidelines, Dealing with Cases of Forced Marriage, are available at www.fco.gov.uk/forcedmarriage.

  6. Roles of physical and mental health in suicidal ideation in Canadian Armed Forces Regular Force veterans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, James M; Zamorski, Mark A; Sweet, Jill; VanTil, Linda; Sareen, Jitender; Pietrzak, Robert H; Hopman, Wilma H; MacLean, Mary Beth; Pedlar, Dave

    2014-01-01

    .... Subjects were a stratified random sample of 2,658 veterans who had been released from the Canadian Armed Forces Regular Force during 1998-2007 and had participated in the 2010 Survey on Transition to Civilian Life...

  7. Comparison of two-body and three-body decomposition of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2012-01-14

    We investigated two-body (binary) and three-body (triple) dissociations of ethanedial, propanal, propenal, n-butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene on the ground potential-energy surfaces using quantum-chemical and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations; most attention is paid on the triple dissociation mechanisms. The triple dissociation includes elimination of a hydrogen molecule from a combination of two separate terminal hydrogen atoms; meanwhile, the rest part simultaneously decomposes to two stable fragments, e.g., C(2)H(4), C(2)H(2), or CO. Transition structures corresponding to the concerted triple dissociation were identified using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory and total energies were computed using the method CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df, 2p). The forward barrier height of triple dissociation has a trend of ethanedial butane butane, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene were investigated for the first time. To outline a whole picture of dissociation mechanisms, some significant two-body dissociation channels were investigated for the calculations of product branching ratios. The triple dissociation plays an important role in the three carbonyl compounds, but plays a minor or negligible role in the three hydrocarbons.

  8. Theoretical analysis of the astrophysical S-factor for the capture reaction α + d → {sup 6}Li + γ in the two-body model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tursunov, E. M., E-mail: tursune@inp.uz; Turakulov, S. A., E-mail: turakulov@inp.uz [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan); Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    Theoretical estimates for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li were obtained on the basis of the two-body model involving an α−d potential that has a simple Gaussian form and which describes correctly S-, P-, and D-wave phase shifts, the binding energy, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the S-wave bound state. The wave functions for the bound and continuum channels were calculated with the aid of the highly precise Numerov algorithm. The results for the contributions of the E1 and E2 transition components reveal a good convergence as the upper limit in the effective integrals increases up to 40 fm. The results obtained for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li in the temperature range of 10{sup 6}K ≤ T ≤ 10{sup 10} K agree well with the results of the calculations performed by A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and his coauthors [Phys. Rev. C 83, 055805 (2011)] by using the known asymptotic form of the wave function at low energies and a complicated two-body potential at higher energies.

  9. Reducing the two-body problem in scalar-tensor theories to the motion of a test particle: A scalar-tensor effective-one-body approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julié, Félix-Louis

    2018-01-01

    Starting from the second post-Keplerian (2PK) Hamiltonian describing the conservative part of the two-body dynamics in massless scalar-tensor (ST) theories, we build an effective-one-body (EOB) Hamiltonian which is a ν deformation (where ν =0 is the test mass limit) of the analytically known ST Hamiltonian of a test particle. This ST-EOB Hamiltonian leads to a simple (yet canonically equivalent) formulation of the conservative 2PK two-body problem, but also defines a resummation of the dynamics which is well-suited to ST regimes that depart strongly from general relativity (GR) and which may provide information on the strong field dynamics; in particular, the ST innermost stable circular orbit location and associated orbital frequency. Results will be compared and contrasted with those deduced from the ST-deformation of the (5PN) GR-EOB Hamiltonian previously obtained in [Phys. Rev. D 95, 124054 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.124054].

  10. Effect of slow release-Fampridine on muscle strength, rate of force development, functional capacity and cognitive function in an enriched population of MS patients. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, H B; Nielsen, J L; Ravnborg, M; Dalgas, U; Aagaard, P; Stenager, E

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted as a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial preceded by open label enrichment phase. The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the effect of SR-Fampridine treatment on muscle strength in terms of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) of the lower extremities and 2) to replicate previously published data on the effect of slow release-Fampridine (SR-Fampridine) on the functional capacity of the lower limbs, the upper limb and cognitive function, in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Previously identified responders to SR-Fampridine were randomized to SR- Fampridine or placebo treatment for four weeks. On days 0 and 26-28 participants underwent testing by isokinetic dynamometry, Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Six Spot Step Test (SSST), Timed 25 Foot Walk Test (T25FW) and 5-Times Sit-to-Stand (5-STS). A statistical significant effect of SR-Fampridine on MVC was demonstrated during knee extension, knee flexion and hip flexion of the weakest leg, as well as on RFD during knee extension and knee flexion of the weakest leg. Furthermore, a significant effect of SR-Fampridine on T25FW, SSST and 5-STS was demonstrated. Gold standard dynamometry assessment of muscle strength showed improved MVC and RFD in persons with MS treated with SR-Fampridine compared to placebo. Furthermore, previous findings on the effects of SR-Fampridine on functional capacity of the lower limbs were replicated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01656148. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Force-plate analyses of balance following a balance exercise program during acute post-operative phase in individuals with total hip and knee arthroplasty: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Jogi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Typical rehabilitation programs following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty include joint range of motion and muscle-strengthening exercises. Balance and balance exercises following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty have not received much attention. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intervention of balance exercises added to a typical rehabilitation program positively affects patients’ balance. Methods: A total of 63 patients were provided with outpatient physical therapy at their home. Patients were randomly assigned to either typical (n = 33 or balance (n = 30 exercise group. The typical group completed seven typical surgery-specific joint range of motion and muscle-strengthening exercises, while the balance group completed the typical exercises plus three balance exercises. After 5 weeks of administering the rehabilitation program, patients’ balance was assessed on a force plate using 95% ellipse area of the center of pressure amplitude. Results: Patients in the balance group demonstrated significant reduction in the 95% ellipse area for the anterior and posterior lean standing conditions (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Balance exercises added to the typical outpatient physical therapy program resulted in significantly greater improvements in balance for participants with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty, compared to the typical exercise program alone. Physical therapists might consider the use of balance exercises to improve balance in individuals in the acute post-operative phase following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Evolution from few- to many-body physics in one-dimensional Fermi systems: One- and two-body density matrices and particle-partition entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelmüller, Lukas; Porter, William J.; Braun, Jens; Drut, Joaquín E.

    2017-09-01

    We study the evolution from few- to many-body physics of fermionic systems in one spatial dimension with attractive pairwise interactions. We determine the detailed form of the momentum distribution, the structure of the one-body density matrix, and the pairing properties encoded in the two-body density matrix. From the low- and high-momentum scaling behavior of the single-particle momentum distribution we estimate the speed of sound and Tan's contact, respectively. Both quantities are found to be in agreement with previous calculations. Based on our calculations of the one-body density matrices, we also present results for the particle-partition entanglement entropy, for which we find a logarithmic dependence on the total particle number.

  13. Measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decays to charmless two-body states containing a K(0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamelde Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Raven, G; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Cavoto, G; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Bellini, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Lodovico, F Di; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-05-21

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in decays of B mesons to two-body final states containing a K0. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 88 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure B(B+-->K(0)pi(+))=(22.3+/-1.7+/-1.1)x10(-6), B(B0-->K(0)pi(0)=(11.4+/-1.7+/-0.8)x10(-6), B(B+-->K(0)K+)K(0)K(0)K(0)pi(+))=-0.05+/-0.08+/-0.01 and A(CP)(B0-->K(0)pi(0)=0.03+/-0.36+/-0.11.

  14. A first-order secular theory for the post-Newtonian two-body problem with spin -- I: The restricted case

    CERN Document Server

    Biscani, Francesco; 10.1093/mnras/sts198

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the relativistic restricted two-body problem with spin employing a perturbation scheme based on Lie series. Starting from a post-Newtonian expansion of the field equations, we develop a first-order secular theory that reproduces well-known relativistic effects such as the precession of the pericentre and the Lense-Thirring and geodetic effects. Additionally, our theory takes into full account the complex interplay between the various relativistic effects, and provides a new explicit solution of the averaged equations of motion in terms of elliptic functions. Our analysis reveals the presence of particular configurations for which non-periodical behaviour can arise. The application of our results to real astrodynamical systems (such as Mercury-like and pulsar planets) highlights the contribution of relativistic effects to the long-term evolution of the spin and orbit of the secondary body.

  15. Relativistic effects and two-body currents in $^{2}H(\\vec{e},e^{\\prime}p)n$ using out-of-plane detection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Z L; Soong, S B; Young, A; Jiang, X; Alarcon, R; Arenhövel, H; Bernstein, A; Bertozzi, W; Comfort, J; Dodson, G

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the ${^2}H(\\vec{e},e^{\\prime}p)n$ reaction were performed using an 800-MeV polarized electron beam at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator and with the out-of-plane magnetic spectrometers (OOPS). The longitudinal-transverse, $f_{LT}$ and $f_{LT}^{\\prime}$, and the transverse-transverse, $f_{TT}$, interference responses at a missing momentum of 210 MeV/c were simultaneously extracted in the dip region at Q$^2$=0.15 (GeV/c)$^2$. On comparison to models of deuteron electrodisintegration, the data clearly reveal strong effects of relativity and final-state interactions, and the importance of the two-body meson-exchange currents and isobar configurations. We demonstrate that these effects can be disentangled and studied by extracting the interference response functions using the novel out-of-plane technique.

  16. Random matrix theory for transition strengths: Applications and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, V. K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Embedded random matrix ensembles are generic models for describing statistical properties of finite isolated interacting quantum many-particle systems. A finite quantum system, induced by a transition operator, makes transitions from its states to the states of the same system or to those of another system. Examples are electromagnetic transitions (then the initial and final systems are same), nuclear beta and double beta decay (then the initial and final systems are different) and so on. Using embedded ensembles (EE), there are efforts to derive a good statistical theory for transition strengths. With m fermions (or bosons) in N mean-field single particle levels and interacting via two-body forces, we have with GOE embedding, the so called EGOE(1+2). Now, the transition strength density (transition strength multiplied by the density of states at the initial and final energies) is a convolution of the density generated by the mean-field one-body part with a bivariate spreading function due to the two-body interaction. Using the embedding U(N) algebra, it is established, for a variety of transition operators, that the spreading function, for sufficiently strong interactions, is close to a bivariate Gaussian. Also, as the interaction strength increases, the spreading function exhibits a transition from bivariate Breit-Wigner to bivariate Gaussian form. In appropriate limits, this EE theory reduces to the polynomial theory of Draayer, French and Wong on one hand and to the theory due to Flambaum and Izrailev for one-body transition operators on the other. Using spin-cutoff factors for projecting angular momentum, the theory is applied to nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay (NDBD). In this paper we will describe: (i) various developments in the EE theory for transition strengths; (ii) results for nuclear matrix elements for 130Te and 136Xe NDBD; (iii) important open questions in the current form of the EE theory.

  17. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency νg is much smaller than the particle's orbital one nb. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector kˆ nor on the orbital configuration of the particle. While the semi-major axis a is left unaffected, the eccentricity e, the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of pericenter ϖ and the mean anomaly ℳ undergo non-vanishing long-term changes of the form dΨ/dt=F(Kij;e,I,Ω,ω,Ψ=e,I,Ω,ϖ,M, where Kij, i,j=1,2,3 are the coefficients of the tidal matrix K. Thus, in addition to the variations of its orientation in space, the shape of the orbit would be altered as well. Strictly speaking, such effects are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by K and by the orbital elements themselves: they exhibit peculiar long-term temporal patterns which would be potentially of help for their detection in multidecadal analyses of extended data records of planetary observations of various kinds. In particular, they could be useful in performing independent tests of the inflation-driven ultra-low gravitational waves whose imprint may have been indirectly detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Earth-based experiment BICEP2. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose orbital frequency nb is much larger than the frequency νg of the external wave, like, e.g., extrasolar planets and the stars orbiting the Galactic black hole. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  18. Predictive CP violating relations for charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons Ξb-,0 and Λb0 with flavor SU (3) symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark have been discovered. The decays of these states provide new platform for testing the standard model (SM). We study CP violation in SM for charmless two-body decays of the flavor SU (3) anti-triplet beauty baryon (b-baryon) B = (Ξb-, Ξb0, Λb0) in a model independent way. We found, in the flavor SU (3) symmetry limit, a set of new predictive relations among the branching ratio Br and CP asymmetry ACP for B decays, such as ACP (Ξb- →K0Ξ-) /ACP (Ξb- →Kbar0Σ-) = - Br (Ξb- →Kbar0Σ-) / Br (Ξb- →K0Σ-), ACP (Λb0 →π- p) /ACP (Ξb0 →K-Σ+) = - Br (ΞbwSUP>0 →K-Σ+)τ Λb0 / Br (Λb0 →π- p)τ Ξb0, and ACP (Λb0 →K- p) /ACP (Ξb0 →π-Σ+) = - Br (Ξb0 →π-Σ+)τ Λb0 / Br (Λb0 →K- p)τ Ξb0. Future data from LHCb can test these relations and also other relations found.

  19. Predictive CP violating relations for charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons Ξb−,0 and Λb0 with flavor SU(3 symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Gang He

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark have been discovered. The decays of these states provide new platform for testing the standard model (SM. We study CP violation in SM for charmless two-body decays of the flavor SU(3 anti-triplet beauty baryon (b-baryon B=(Ξb−,Ξb0,Λb0 in a model independent way. We found, in the flavor SU(3 symmetry limit, a set of new predictive relations among the branching ratio Br and CP asymmetry ACP for B decays, such as ACP(Ξb−→K0Ξ−/ACP(Ξb−→K¯0Σ−=−Br(Ξb−→K¯0Σ−/Br(Ξb−→K0Σ−, ACP(Λb0→π−p/ACP(Ξb0→K−Σ+=−Br(Ξb0→K−Σ+τΛb0/Br(Λb0→π−pτΞb0, and ACP(Λb0→K−p/ACP(Ξb0→π−Σ+=−Br(Ξb0→π−Σ+τΛb0/Br(Λb0→K−pτΞb0. Future data from LHCb can test these relations and also other relations found.

  20. The Calculation of Single-Nucleon Energies of Nuclei by Considering Two-Body Effective Interaction, n(k,ρ, and a Hartree-Fock Inspired Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mariji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleon single-particle energies (SPEs of the selected nuclei, that is, O16, Ca40, and Ni56, are obtained by using the diagonal matrix elements of two-body effective interaction, which generated through the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV calculations for the symmetric nuclear matter with the Aυ18 phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potential. The SPEs at the major levels of nuclei are calculated by employing a Hartree-Fock inspired scheme in the spherical harmonic oscillator basis. In the scheme, the correlation influences are taken into account by imposing the nucleon effective mass factor on the radial wave functions of the major levels. Replacing the density-dependent one-body momentum distribution functions of nucleons, n(k,ρ, with the Heaviside functions, the role of n(k,ρ in the nucleon SPEs at the major levels of the selected closed shell nuclei is investigated. The best fit of spin-orbit splitting is taken into account when correcting the major levels of the nuclei by using the parameterized Wood-Saxon potential and the Aυ18 density-dependent mean field potential which is constructed by the LOCV method. Considering the point-like protons in the spherical Coulomb potential well, the single-proton energies are corrected. The results show the importance of including n(k,ρ, instead of the Heaviside functions, in the calculation of nucleon SPEs at the different levels, particularly the valence levels, of the closed shell nuclei.

  1. Accurate Three-Nucleon Bound-State Calculation with an Extended Separable Expansion of the Two-Body T-Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Y.; Parke, W. C.; Maximon, L. C.; Lehman, D. R.

    An accurate solution for the three-nucleon bound state is obtained within 1 keV in the binding energy and, on the whole, better than 1% in the wave function, using a new systematic and efficient method. The method is based on a recently developed separable expansion for any finite-range interaction, in which a rigorous separable series for the two-body t-matrix is obtained by expanding the wave function in terms of a complete set of basis functions inside the range of the potential. In order to treat a potential with a strong repulsive core, as in the case of the Argonne potential, we develop a two-potential formalism. The expansion starts with a few EST (Ernst, Shakin, and Thaler) terms in order to accelerate the convergence and continues with an orthogonal set of polynomials, avoiding the known difficulties of a pure EST expansion. Thus, several techniques are combined in the present extended separable expansion (ESE). In this way, the method opens a new systematic treatment for accurate few-body calculations resulting in a dramatic reduction in the CPU time required to solve few-body equations.

  2. Effect of the band structure in a rigorous two-body model with long-range interactions in 1D optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Tom; Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We compute scattering and bound state properties for two ultracold molecules in a pure 1D optical lattice. We introduce reference functions with complex quasi-momentum that naturally account for the effect of excited energy bands. Our exact results for a short-range interaction are first compared with the simplest version of the standard Bose-Hubbard (BH) model. Such comparison allows us to highlight the effect of the excited bands, of the non-on-site interaction and of tunneling with distant neighbor, that are not taken into account in the BH model. The effective interaction can depend strongly on the particle quasi-momenta and can present a resonant behavior even in a deep lattice. As a second step, we study scattering of two polar particles in the optical lattice. Peculiar Wigner threshold laws stem from the interplay of the long range dipolar interaction and the presence of the energy bands. We finally assess the validity of an extended Bose-Hubbard model for dipolar gases based on our exact two-body calculations. This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Contract No. ANR-12-BS04-0020-01).

  3. What are effective a{sub 1} and a{sub 2} in two-body hadronic decays of D and B mesons?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoddoussi, F.; Kamal, A. N.; Santral, A. B. [Edmonton, Univ. of Alberta (Canada). Theoretical Phisycs Institute, Dept. of Physics

    1998-02-01

    Through a specific example of two-body color-favored charm decay, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}, the authors illustrate how an effective and complex (unitarized) a{sub 1}, denoted by a{sub 1}{sup U,eff}, may be defined such that it includes non factorized, annihilation and inelastic final-state interaction (f.s.i.) effects. The procedure can be generalized to color-suppressed processes to define an effective, and complex a{sub 2}{sup U,eff}. The authors determine a{sub 1}{sup U,eff} and, where relevant, a{sub 2}{sup U,eff} for D {yields} {Kappa}{pi}, {Kappa}{rho}, {Kappa}{sup *}{pi},D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{sup `}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{rho}{sup +}, {eta}{sup `}{rho}{sup +}, and for b{sup O}{yields}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup -}{rho}{sup +} from the hadronic and semileptonic decay data.

  4. Comparison of four monolithic zirconia materials with conventional ones: Contrast ratio, grain size, four-point flexural strength and two-body wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Frevert, Kathrin; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Sener, Beatrice; Wimmer, Timea

    2016-06-01

    To test the mechanical and optical properties of monolithic zirconia in comparison to conventional zirconia. Specimens were prepared from: monolithic zirconia: Zenostar (ZS), DD Bio ZX(2) hochtransluzent (DD), Ceramill Zolid (CZ), InCoris TZI (IC) and a conventional zirconia Ceramill ZI (CZI). Contrast ratio (N=75/n=15) was measured according to ISO 2471:2008. Grain sizes (N=75/n=15) were investigated with scanning electron microscope. Four-point flexural strength (N=225/n=15/zirconia and aging regime) was measured initially, after aging in autoclave or chewing simulator (ISO 13356:2008). Two-body wear of polished and glazed/veneered specimens (N=108/n=12) was analyzed in a chewing simulator using human teeth as antagonists. Data were analyzed using 2-/1-way ANOVA with post-hoc Scheffé, Kruskal-Wallis-H, Mann-Whitney-U, Spearman-Rho, Weibull statistics and linear mixed models (pzirconia showed higher optical, but lower mechanical properties than conventional zirconia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of branching fractions and search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless two-body B decays into pions and kaons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bartelt, J; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Trunov, A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobering, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-10-08

    We present measurements, based on a sample of approximately 23x10(6) BB pairs, of the branching fractions and a search for CP-violating charge asymmetries in charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states of kaons and pions. We find the branching fractions B(B0-->pi(+)pi(-)) = (4.1+/-1.0+/-0.7)x10(-6), B(B0-->K+pi(-)) = (16.7+/-1.6+/-1.3)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0)) = (10.8(+2.1)(-1.9)+/-1.0)x10(-6), B(B+-->K0pi(+)) = (18.2(+3.3)(-3.0)+/-2.0)x10(-6), B(B0-->K0pi(0)) = (8.2(+3.1)(-2.7)+/-1.2)x10(-6). We also report 90% confidence level upper limits for B meson decays to the pi(+)pi(0), K+K-, and K0K+ final states. In addition, charge asymmetries have been found to be consistent with zero, where the statistical precision is in the range of +/-0.10 to +/-0.18, depending on the decay mode.

  6. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  7. Two- and quasi-two-body strange particle final state production in. pi. /sup +/p interactions at low to intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.

    1982-10-01

    The two and quasi-two body final states ..sigma../sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma../sup +/K* (892)/sup +/, ..sigma..*(1385)/sup +/K/sup +/, ..sigma..(1385)/sup +/K*(892)/sup +/ produced by neutral strangeness exchange in ..pi../sup +/p interactions are studied using our own 1-3 GeV/c data, comprising the 14 incident momenta of a two million picture bubble chamber experiment, in combination with the world data on the same and related channels. Because low energy resonance formation is not strongly coupled to the ..sigma..,..sigma..* production channels, at very modest incident momenta their dominant features are seen to be understandable in terms of high energy hypercharge exchange phenomenology. We find that Regge models fitted to data in the 10 to 20 GeV/c range adequately describe the ..sigma.. and ..sigma..* channels down to within a few hundred MeV/c of threshold and out to large center of mass scattering angles, and that over the range of the available world data weak exchange degeneracy expectations for these reactions are at least qualitatively successful. We observe that the SU(2), SU(3) flavor symmetries successfully describe these hypercharge exchange processes and relate them to charge exchange via sum rules and equalities expressing flavor independence of the strong interaction; in particular, we derive and test on the available world data a mass broken SU(3) sum rule for ..pi../sup +/p ..-->.. K/sup +/..sigma../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup 0/..lambda.., K/sup -/p ..-->.. anti K/sup 0/n and test over a wider range of momenta than before an earlier expression relating ..sigma..* and ..delta.. production. We also find at least qualitative agreement between quark model predictions for forward hypercharge exchange and the data, and we find that 90/sup 0/ hypercharge exchange cross sections also conform to the expectations of the quark constituent picture for hadrons.

  8. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco-industrialism...

  9. Coriolis Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  10. Test of three-body contact Skyrme forces with spin excitations in deformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarriguren, P. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia; Moya de Guerra, E. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia; Nojarov, R. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia

    1997-03-01

    Experimental data on spin M1 strength distributions in even-even rare-earth nuclei are compared to theoretical results of selfconsistent HF+RPA calculations with separable spin-spin residual interactions derived from the two alternative versions (two-body density-dependent and three-body contact terms) of the Skyrme force Sk3. It is shown that the two versions produce quite different spin M1 strength distributions, though they generate the same HF mean field. The experimental data favour the two-body over the three-body version of the Skyrme interactions Sk1-Sk6. (orig.)

  11. Friction in two-body abrasive wear of a WC-Co composite by SiC{sup 1,2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen-Basse, J. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Friction was measured for the abrasion of a WC-Co cemented carbide by 120 {mu}m SiC papers as a function of specimen length in the direction of sliding. The coefficient of friction extrapolates to near 1.0 for zero length and drops rapidly with specimen length to a steady value of 0.33 for long specimens. The effect is attributed to wear of the abrasives during contact with the hard specimen surface. As the contacting abrasives wear, their average indentations into the surface become increasingly shallower, and the deformation pattern goes through a series of changes from plastic to surface plastic to elastic-plastic and perhaps finally to elastic wave. With these changes the friction forces gradually decrease. The length-adjusted friction value for the cemented carbide extends the friction coefficient-hardness plot described earlier for metals, single-phase alloys, and hardened and tempered steels. This indicates that there is a continuum of friction-causing events in the abrasion process which stretches across the hardness spectrum. (orig.)

  12. Characterisation of dry powder inhaler formulations using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Cordula; McLoughlin, Peter; Cathcart, Helen

    2015-10-15

    Inhalation formulations are a popular way of treating the symptoms of respiratory diseases. The active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is delivered directly to the site of action within the deep lung using an inhalation device such as the dry powder inhaler (DPI). The performance of the formulation and the efficiency of the treatment depend on a number of factors including the forces acting between the components. In DPI formulations these forces are dominated by interparticulate interactions. Research has shown that adhesive and cohesive forces depend on a number of particulate properties such as size, surface roughness, crystallinity, surface energetics and combinations of these. With traditional methods the impact of particulate properties on interparticulate forces could be evaluated by examining the bulk properties. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, enables the determination of local surface characteristics and the direct measurement of interparticulate forces using the colloidal probe technique. AFM is considered extremely useful for evaluating the surface topography of a substrate (an API or carrier particle) and even allows the identification of crystal faces, defects and polymorphs from high-resolution images. Additionally, information is given about local mechanical properties of the particles and changes in surface composition and energetics. The assessment of attractive forces between two bodies is possible by using colloidal probe AFM. This review article summarises the application of AFM in DPI formulations while specifically focussing on the colloidal probe technique and the evaluation of interparticulate forces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Malaysia and forced migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of "forced migration" in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants...

  14. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  15. Embedded random matrix ensembles in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kota, V K B

    2014-01-01

    Although used with increasing frequency in many branches of physics, random matrix ensembles are not always sufficiently specific to account for important features of the physical system at hand. One refinement which retains the basic stochastic approach but allows for such features consists in the use of embedded ensembles.  The present text is an exhaustive introduction to and survey of this important field. Starting with an easy-to-read introduction to general random matrix theory, the text then develops the necessary concepts from the beginning, accompanying the reader to the frontiers of present-day research. With some notable exceptions, to date these ensembles have primarily been applied in nuclear spectroscopy. A characteristic example is the use of a random two-body interaction in the framework of the nuclear shell model. Yet, topics in atomic physics, mesoscopic physics, quantum information science and statistical mechanics of isolated finite quantum systems can also be addressed using these ensemb...

  16. Neural adaptations in isometric contractions with EMG and force biofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Locks; Heleodório Honorato dos Santos; Luis Carlos Carvalho; Lígia Raquel Ortiz Gomes Stolt; José Jamacy de Almeida Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quadriceps femoris neural adaptations during isometric contractions using force and electromyogram (EMG) signals as visual biofeedback. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to three groups: EMG group, tested with EMG biofeedback; Force group, tested with force biofeedback; and Control group, tested without biofeedback. Evaluations were performed pre (baseline) and post-tests to determine the maximum force and EMG amplitude during maximal voluntary iso...

  17. Thermal Creep Force: Analysis And Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    pressure does exist, it produces a small force and would tend to move the vanes with the black side leading contrary to the observed motion . The same year...the simulation. After the particles have completed their motion , particles are randomly selected for collision . The probability that an individual...of the mean free time between collisions at lower pressures. Each simulation ran 100 thousand time steps. We calculated the force by multiplying

  18. Van der Waals dispersion forces between dielectric nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Sofo, Jorge O; Velegol, Darrell; Cole, Milton W; Lucas, Amand A

    2007-02-13

    Various methods are evaluated for their ability to calculate accurate van der Waals (VDW) dispersion forces between nanoclusters. We compare results for spheres using several methods: the simple Hamaker two-body method, the Lifshitz (DLP) theory with the Derjaguin approximation, the Langbein result for spheres, and our "coupled dipole method" (CDM). The assumptions and shortcomings of each method are discussed. The CDM accounts for all n-body forces, does not assume a continuous and homogeneous dielectric function in each material, accounts for the discreteness of atoms in the particles, can be used for particles of arbitrary shape, and can exactly include the effects of various media. At present, the CDM does not account for retardation. It is shown that even for spheres, methods other than the CDM often give errors of 20% or more for VDW dispersion forces between typical dielectric materials. A related calculation for metals reveals an error in the Hamaker two-body result of nearly a factor of 2.

  19. Neural adaptations in isometric contractions with EMG and force biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Locks

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quadriceps femoris neural adaptations during isometric contractions using force and electromyogram (EMG signals as visual biofeedback. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to three groups: EMG group, tested with EMG biofeedback; Force group, tested with force biofeedback; and Control group, tested without biofeedback. Evaluations were performed pre (baseline and post-tests to determine the maximum force and EMG amplitude during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. The tests consisted of series of MVICs in which the participants were encouraged to surpass the force or EMG thresholds determined at baseline. The vastus lateralis EMG amplitude and knee extensor force increased significantly in all groups when compared the baseline and post-test evaluations values (p < .05. EMG percentage gain was significantly different between Force and Control groups (p < .01, while force percentage gain was not different between groups. Force biofeedback was more effective in producing neural adaptations.

  20. Study of Two-Body B Decays to Kaons and Pions Observation of $B \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}, B \\to K^{\\pm}\\pi^{0}$, and $B \\to K^{0}\\pi^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lorenc, J; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V

    2000-01-01

    We have studied charmless hadronic decays of B mesons into two-body final states with kaons and pions and observe three new processes with the following branching fractions: BR(B-> pi+ pi-) = (4.3^{+1.6}_{-1.4} \\pm 0.5) \\times 10^{-6}, BR(B-> K0 pi0) = (14.6^{+5.9+2.4}_{-5.1-3.3}) \\times 10^{-6}, and BR(B-> K+- pi0) = (11.6^{+3.0+1.4}_{-2.7-1.3}) \\times 10^{-6}. We also update our previous measurements for the decays B->K+- pi-+ and B-> K0 pi+-.

  1. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  2. Forces in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-07-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  3. The Two-Body Inversion Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papeo, L.; Stein, T.; Soto-Faraco, S.

    2017-01-01

    How does one perceive groups of people? It is known that functionally interacting objects (e.g., a glass and a pitcher tilted as if pouring water into it) are perceptually grouped. Here, we showed that processing of multiple human bodies is also influenced by their relative positioning. In a series

  4. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  5. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  6. Trois familles, quatre forces

    CERN Multimedia

    Augereau, J F

    2002-01-01

    ENSEMBLE DE QUATRE ARTICLES - LARGE HADRON COLLIDER: Le monde des particules tel que nous le connaissons aujourd'hui est constitue de trois familles de quatre membres. Ces particules sont collees les unes aux autres par des forces. Celles-ci, au nombre de quatre - gravitation, force forte, force electromagnetique et force faible -, sont " portees " par d'autres particules dont certaines sont a decouvrir (graviton) et d'autres deja identifiees (gluons, photons, bosons W et Z) (1/2 page).

  7. French Nuclear Forces,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-05

    International Defense Review, and Foreign Affairs have published articles treating various as- .1 pects of France’s Forces Nucleaires Strategiques(FNS...forces(La Force Nucleaire Strategique or FNS) consist of three systems similar to the American triad. France’s tactical nuclear forces(L’Arme... Nucleaire Tactique or ANT) include a variety of land- and carrier-based aircraft and a tactical missile--Pluton--deployed by the French Army. Thirty-four M

  8. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  10. Mechanotransduction: use the force(s)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paluch, Ewa K; Nelson, Celeste M; Biais, Nicolas; Fabry, Ben; Moeller, Jens; Pruitt, Beth L; Wollnik, Carina; Kudryasheva, Galina; Rehfeldt, Florian; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction - how cells sense physical forces and translate them into biochemical and biological responses - is a vibrant and rapidly-progressing field, and is important for a broad range of biological phenomena...

  11. Random triangles

    OpenAIRE

    Matula, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The author summarizes some previous results concerning random triangles. He describes the Gaussian triangle and random triangles whose vertices lie in a unit n-dimensional ball, in a rectangle or in a general bounded convex set. In the second part, the author deals with an inscribed triangle in a triangle - let ABC be an equilateral triangle and let M, N, O be three points, each laying on one side of the ABC. We call MNO inscribed triangle (in an equi- laterral triangle). The median triangle ...

  12. Random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1990-01-01

    Since the publication of Random Matrices (Academic Press, 1967) so many new results have emerged both in theory and in applications, that this edition is almost completely revised to reflect the developments. For example, the theory of matrices with quaternion elements was developed to compute certain multiple integrals, and the inverse scattering theory was used to derive asymptotic results. The discovery of Selberg's 1944 paper on a multiple integral also gave rise to hundreds of recent publications. This book presents a coherent and detailed analytical treatment of random matrices, leading

  13. Nonequilibrium Fluctuational Quantum Electrodynamics: Heat Radiation, Heat Transfer, and Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Emig, Thorsten; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Quantum-thermal fluctuations of electromagnetic waves are the cornerstone of quantum statistics and inherent to phenomena such as thermal radiation and van der Waals forces. Although the principles are found in elementary texts, recent experimental and technological advances make it necessary to come to terms with counterintuitive consequences at short scales—the so-called near-field regime. We focus on three manifestations: (a) The Stefan-Boltzmann law describes radiation from macroscopic bodies but fails for small objects. (b) The heat transfer between two bodies at close proximity is dominated by evanescent waves and can be orders of magnitude larger than the classical (propagating) contribution. (c) Casimir forces, dominant at submicron separation, are not sufficiently explored for objects at different temperatures (at least experimentally). We explore these phenomena using fluctuational quantum electrodynamics (QED), introduced by Rytov in the 1950s, combined with scattering formalisms. This enables investigation of different material properties, shapes, separations, and arrangements.

  14. Attainment and retention of force moderation following laparoscopic resection training with visual force feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rafael; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Travascio, Francesco; Asfour, Shihab

    2017-11-01

    Laparoscopic training with visual force feedback can lead to immediate improvements in force moderation. However, the long-term retention of this kind of learning and its potential decay are yet unclear. A laparoscopic resection task and force sensing apparatus were designed to assess the benefits of visual force feedback training. Twenty-two male university students with no previous experience in laparoscopy underwent relevant FLS proficiency training. Participants were randomly assigned to either a control or treatment group. Both groups trained on the task for 2 weeks as follows: initial baseline, sixteen training trials, and post-test immediately after. The treatment group had visual force feedback during training, whereas the control group did not. Participants then performed four weekly test trials to assess long-term retention of training. Outcomes recorded were maximum pulling and pushing forces, completion time, and rated task difficulty. Extreme maximum pulling force values were tapered throughout both the training and retention periods. Average maximum pushing forces were significantly lowered towards the end of training and during retention period. No significant decay of applied force learning was found during the 4-week retention period. Completion time and rated task difficulty were higher during training, but results indicate that the difference eventually fades during the retention period. Significant differences in aptitude across participants were found. Visual force feedback training improves on certain aspects of force moderation in a laparoscopic resection task. Results suggest that with enough training there is no significant decay of learning within the first month of the retention period. It is essential to account for differences in aptitude between individuals in this type of longitudinal research. This study shows how an inexpensive force measuring system can be used with an FLS Trainer System after some retrofitting. Surgical

  15. Search for the pair production of third-generation squarks with two-body decays to a bottom or charm quark and a neutralino in proton-proton collisions at √{ s } = 13TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Courbon, B.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Starodumov, A.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Negro, G.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Charlot, C.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Lobanov, A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Jansová, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Tonon, N.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.

    2018-03-01

    Results are presented from a search for the pair production of third-generation squarks in proton-proton collision events with two-body decays to bottom or charm quarks and a neutralino, which produces a significant imbalance in the transverse momentum. The search is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data at √{ s } = 13TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb-1. No statistically significant excess of events is observed beyond the expected contribution from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are set in the context of simplified models of bottom or top squark pair production. Models with bottom squark masses up to 1220 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for light neutralinos, and models with top squark masses of 510 GeV are excluded assuming that the mass splitting between the top squark and the neutralino is small.

  16. Search for the pair production of third-generation squarks with two-body decays to a bottom or charm quark and a neutralino in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; 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    2018-03-10

    Results are presented from a search for the pair production of third-generation squarks in proton-proton collision events with two-body decays to bottom or charm quarks and a neutralino, which produces a significant imbalance in the transverse momentum. The search is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$. No statistically significant excess of events is observed beyond the expected contribution from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are set in the context of simplified models of bottom or top squark pair production. Models with bottom squark masses up to 1220 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for light neutralinos, and models with top squark masses of 510 GeV are excluded assuming that the mass splitting between the top squark and the neutralino is small.

  17. Cooling force on ions in a magnetized electron plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrachya B. Nersisyan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron cooling is a well-established method to improve the phase space quality of ion beams in storage rings. In the common rest frame of the ion and the electron beam, the ion is subjected to a drag force and it experiences a loss or a gain of energy which eventually reduces the energy spread of the ion beam. A calculation of this process is complicated as the electron velocity distribution is anisotropic and the cooling process takes place in a magnetic field which guides the electrons. In this paper the cooling force is calculated in a model of binary collisions (BC between ions and magnetized electrons, in which the Coulomb interaction is treated up to second order as a perturbation to the helical motion of the electrons. The calculations are done with the help of an improved BC theory which is uniformly valid for any strength of the magnetic field and where the second-order two-body forces are treated in the interaction in Fourier space without specifying the interaction potential. The cooling force is explicitly calculated for a regularized and screened potential which is both of finite range and less singular than the Coulomb interaction at the origin. Closed expressions are derived for monochromatic electron beams, which are folded with the velocity distributions of the electrons and ions. The resulting cooling force is evaluated for anisotropic Maxwell velocity distributions of the electrons and ions.

  18. Random organization and plastic depinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We provide evidence that the general phenomenon of plastic depinning can be described as an absorbing phase transition, and shows the same features as the random organization which was recently studied in periodically driven particle systems [L. Corte, Nature Phys. 4, 420 (2008)]. In the plastic flow system, the pinned regime corresponds to the absorbing state and the moving state corresponds to the fluctuating state. When an external force is suddenly applied, the system eventually organizes into one of these two states with a time scale that diverges as a power law at a nonequilibrium transition. We propose a simple experiment to test for this transition in systems with random disorder.

  19. StringForce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barendregt, Wolmet; Börjesson, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the forced collaborative interaction game StringForce. StringForce is developed for a special education context to support training of collaboration skills, using readily available technologies and avoiding the creation of a "mobile bubble". In order to play String......Force two or four physically collocated tablets are required. These tablets are connected to form one large shared game area. The game can only be played by collaborating. StringForce extends previous work, both technologically and regarding social-emotional training. We believe String......Force to be an interesting demo for the IDC community, as it intertwines several relevant research fields, such as mobile interaction and collaborative gaming in the special education context....

  20. Measurement of Surface Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-16

    structural force is often observed on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. These forces are referred to in the literature as hydration and...47,481. One parameter, the effective molecular diffusivity in a pore (e.g., zeolite or polymer), has been indirectly related to transport limited rates...adhesion force (2 g.N) and a marked increase in rate of Fe(CN)6 -3 reduction. Both effects were ascribed to the more hydrophilic nature of the activated

  1. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  2. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  3. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Random walks as well as diffusions in random media are considered. Methods are developed that allow one to establish large deviation results for both the 'quenched' and the 'averaged' case. Keywords. Large deviations; random walks in a random environment. 1. Introduction. A random walk on Zd is a stochastic ...

  4. Forces in yeast flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  5. ``Force-free'' electrophoresis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yariv, Ehud

    2006-03-01

    When a colloidal particle is exposed to an externally applied electric field, it acquires an electrophoretic velocity, resulting from fluid slip occurring across the Debye screening layer. When the field is uniformly applied, it is usually assumed that the net neutrality of the combined particle-layer system implies that the net electric force acting on it must vanish. This assumption of "force-free" phoretic motion has been employed extensively to describe electrophoresis in both unbounded and bounded fluid domains [J. L. Anderson, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 21, 61 (1989)]. A careful inspection reveals here that this intuitive premise may fail when the fluid domain is bounded, in which case a nonzero electric force (resembling dielectrophoretic forces in nonuniformly applied fields) may actually exist. Such forces (represented via surface integrals of Maxwell stresses) result in particle motion above and beyond the one driven by the phoretic slip mechanism. A positive demonstration for the existence of a such a force is provided for a standard sphere-wall configuration, where the applied field acts parallel to the wall. In that scenario, particle motion consists of a (familiar) slip-driven contribution parallel to the wall, together with a superimposed force-driven drift away from the wall. An analogy with pressure forces occurring at incompressible and inviscid potential flows is presented.

  6. Quantum fictitious forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii) ...

  7. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  8. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  9. Probing the stochastic, motor-driven properties of the cytoplasm using force spectrum microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Ehrlicher, Allen J.; Jensen, Mikkel H.; Renz, Malte; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Goldman, Robert D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular motors in cells typically produce highly directed motion; however, the aggregate, incoherent effect of all active processes also creates randomly fluctuating forces, which drive diffusive-like, non-thermal motion. Here we introduce force-spectrum-microscopy (FSM) to directly quantify random forces within the cytoplasm of cells and thereby probe stochastic motor activity. This technique combines measurements of the random motion of probe particles with independent micromechanical measurements of the cytoplasm to quantify the spectrum of force fluctuations. Using FSM, we show that force fluctuations substantially enhance intracellular movement of small and large components. The fluctuations are three times larger in malignant cells than in their benign counterparts. We further demonstrate that vimentin acts globally to anchor organelles against randomly fluctuating forces in the cytoplasm, with no effect on their magnitude. Thus, FSM has broad applications for understanding the cytoplasm and its intracellular processes in relation to cell physiology in healthy and diseased states. PMID:25126787

  10. Search for the pair production of third-generation squarks with two-body decays to a bottom or charm quark and a neutralino in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-07-23

    Results are presented from a search for the pair production of third-generation squarks in proton-proton collision events with two-body decays to bottom or charm quarks and a neutralino, which produces a significant imbalance in the transverse momentum. The search is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 inverse-femtobarns. No statistically significant excess of events is observed beyond the expected contribution from standard model processes. Exclusion limits are set in the context of simplified models of bottom or top squark pair production. Models with bottom squark masses up to 1220 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for light neutralinos, and models with top squark masses of 510 GeV are excluded assuming that the mass splitting between the top squark and the neutralino is small.

  11. Neuroses among Armed Forces Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, C; Banerjee, A; Chaudhary, S; Singh, Z

    2008-04-01

    The phenomenon of "Military Family Syndrome" has been hotly debated. Mental disorders are however, important causes of morbidity in the armed forces. A cross sectional study was carried out on 600 randomly selected troops and families in a large military station. General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12) was used as a screening test for neuroses. Neuroses was defined as score of three and above on the GHQ-12. Overall prevalence of neuroses was 31.34% with 95% confidence interval between 27.41% and 35.55%. Gender did not have any effect on prevalence of neuroses nor did marital status. The soldiers in the age group of 25-36 years were most affected. Neuroses was more common in the lower ranks and among troops who belonged to arms. Among wives, age, rank and type of service (whether from arms or services) of husband were not associated with neuroses. There is a need for preventive psychological services in the armed forces. Leadership and man-management sensitive to changing needs of the soldier should be promoted.

  12. Multidomain proteins under force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  13. Multidomain proteins under force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Andrés Rivas-Pardo, Jaime; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-01

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91—two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins—ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  14. OOTW Force Design Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  15. Forced magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekstein, G.

    2017-10-01

    This is a tutorial-style selective review explaining basic concepts of forced magnetic reconnection. It is based on a celebrated model of forced reconnection suggested by J. B. Taylor. The standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of this process has been pioneered by Hahm & Kulsrud (Phys. Fluids, vol. 28, 1985, p. 2412). Here we also discuss several more recent developments related to this problem. These include energetics of forced reconnection, its Hall-mediated regime, and nonlinear effects with the associated onset of the secondary tearing (plasmoid) instability.

  16. Hanscom Air Force Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MIT Lincoln Laboratory occupies 75 acres (20 acres of which are MIT property) on the eastern perimeter of Hanscom Air Force Base, which is at the nexus of Lexington,...

  17. Bow Crushing Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to present a basis for the estimation of the internal collision forces between conventinal merchant vessels and large volume offshore structures in the form of gravity-supported offshore installations and bridges crossing international shipping routes.The main emphasis...... is on the presentation of impact loads on fixed offshore structures due to bow collisions. The crushing forces are determined as functions of vessels size, vessels speed, bow profile, collision angles and eccentric impacts....

  18. The amazing normal forces

    OpenAIRE

    Petrache, Horia I.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript is written for students in introductory physics classes to address some of the common difficulties and misconceptions of the normal force, especially the relationship between normal and friction forces. Accordingly, it is intentionally informal and conversational in tone to teach students how to build an intuition to complement mathematical formalism. This is accomplished by beginning with common and everyday experience and then guiding students toward two realizations: (i) Th...

  19. Air Force Leadership Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    general officer statistics bear out that the group is 94% white and only 7% female as opposed to the overall Air Force population that is 72% white and 20...programmed, over time, to think about skin color and gender. The Air Force is trying to change this programming by adding other words to describe...Officer Corps, those officers in the ranks of O-7 through O-10 indicates that cohort of officers is 94% white and only 7% female. Since officer

  20. A simple force platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, F

    1975-01-01

    The force platform consists of a sandwhich of steel, Rockwool and concrete plates about 900 X 700 mm in surface. Four steel rings were bolted to the under side of the steel plate in each corner. Each steel ring was furnished with only one strain gauge, two of which were placed on the outer- respectively on the inner side of each ring. The four strain gauges were connected to a measuring bridge. Before mounting the rings on the steel plate, the sensitivity to pressure of each ring was adjusted in such a way that they were all similar. Because of this the platform responded with a signal which was independent of where a pressure was applied within the surface of the platform. The platform showed a rectilinear response for static forces up to 500 kp with a stable zero value. In response to dynamic forces the platform showed a resononance frequency of about 50 Hz, with a damping factor of 0.15. Calibration of dynamic forces was carried out by calculation of the forces during a vertical jump compared with what would be expected from the time of flight also registered by the platform-measuring-bridge-ink-writer-set-up. The time of flight was significantly higher (11%) than exected from the time-force relations beforetake-off. This was esplained partly by the relatively low damping factor in the system, partly by the subjects not extending their knees at landing on the platform.

  1. Random fixed points and random differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos S. Papageorgiou

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we study random best approximations to random sets, using fixed point techniques, obtaining this way stochastic analogues of earlier deterministic results by Browder-Petryshyn, KyFan and Reich. Then we prove two fixed point theorems for random multifunctions with stochastic domain that satisfy certain tangential conditions. Finally we consider a random differential inclusion with upper semicontinuous orientor field and establish the existence of random solutions.

  2. Effects and cost of glycyrrhizin in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in members of the Japanese maritime self-defense force: Preliminary report of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel-group, alternate-day treatment assignment clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ogura, Masatsune; Fujimoto, Eita; Shono, Satoshi; Okuda, Eriya

    2004-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) account for at least half of all acute illnesses. Specific antiviral therapy has not been developed against most respiratory viruses thought to cause URTIs. The pharmacologic action of glycyrrhizin has been shown to produce anti-inflammatory activity, modulation of the immune system, inhibition of virus growth, and inactivation of viruses. The aim of this study was to assess the tolerability, efficacy, and cost of glycyrrhizin in improving the severity and duration of signs and symptoms of URTIs. The primary end point was tolerability, and the secondary and points included improvement in signs and symptoms of URTI and cost. Members of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (SDF) treated for URTIs from January 2002 to May 2002 in the SDF Etajima Hospital (Hiroshima, Japan) were eligible for this prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel-group, alternate-day treatment assignment study. All patients in this study fulfilled the following enrollment criteria: admitted to the hospital on the first arrival day as an outpatient; fever (body temperature women; mean [SD] age, 25.2 [1.5] years) were assigned to the glycyrrhizin group and 269 patients (24 men, 2 women; mean [SD] age, 22.6 [0.9] years) were assigned to the control group. The 2 groups were similar in terms of baseline characteristics. The mean duration of hospitalization was shorter (P = 0.01), the mean maximum body temperature 24 to 48 hours after admission was less (P = 0.05), and the cost of therapy (P = 0.03) was less in the glycyrrhizin group than the control group. No AEs were reported. In this study of hospitalized patients with URTIs, glycyrrhizin therapy was associated with a shorter hospitalization, lower-grade fever, and lower cost of therapy compared with controls, showing that it may be beneficial to patients with URTIs without acute bacterial infections.

  3. Confusion around the tidal force and the centrifugal force

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Takuya; Boffin, Henri M J

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the tidal force, whose notion is sometimes misunderstood in the public domain literature. We discuss the tidal force exerted by a secondary point mass on an extended primary body such as the Earth. The tidal force arises because the gravitational force exerted on the extended body by the secondary mass is not uniform across the primary. In the derivation of the tidal force, the non-uniformity of the gravity is essential, and inertial forces such as the centrifugal force are not needed. Nevertheless, it is often asserted that the tidal force can be explained by the centrifugal force. If we literally take into account the centrifugal force, it would mislead us. We therefore also discuss the proper treatment of the centrifugal force.

  4. Scattering-matrix approach to Casimir-Lifshitz force and heat transfer out of thermal equilibrium between arbitrary bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Riccardo [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8630, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Antezza, Mauro [Universite Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095, Montpellier (France); CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095, Montpellier (France)

    2011-10-15

    We study the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir-Lifshitz force occurring between two bodies in a system out of thermal equilibrium. We consider bodies of arbitrary shape and dielectric properties, held at two different temperatures and immersed in environmental radiation at a third different temperature. We derive explicit closed-form analytic expressions for the correlations of the electromagnetic field and for the heat transfer and Casimir-Lifshitz force in terms of the bodies' scattering matrices. We then consider some particular cases which we investigate in detail: the atom-surface and the slab-slab configurations.

  5. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied. This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the act...

  6. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meerkötter

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm-2 daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · radiative processes

  7. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meerkötter

    Full Text Available A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm-2 daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · radiative processes

  8. Radiative forcing by contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U. [DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Phys. der Atmosphaere; Doelling, D.R.; Minnis, P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Center for Climate System Research

    1999-08-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmosphere. The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, midlatitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres. Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere, a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 Wm{sup -2} daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude. The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover. (orig.) 78 refs.

  9. Efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (adderall XR) in the management of oppositional defiant disorder with or without comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in school-aged children and adolescents: A 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J; Abikoff, Howard B; Connor, Daniel F; Biederman, Joseph; Pliszka, Steven R; Boellner, Samuel; Read, Stephanie C; Pratt, Raymond

    2006-03-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)is associated with a high degree of impairment in social skills, family interaction, and academic functioning. Comorbid ODD is reportedly present in 40% to 70% of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (MAS XR) for the treatment of ODD in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years. This was a 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study. Patients were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/d or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the ODD subscale of the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham-IV (SNAP-IV) parent rating. Primary safety measures included adverse events recorded at each visit and for 30 days after study drug discontinuation, and changes in vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) findings, laboratory tests and physical examinations, and body weight. A post hoc efficacy reanalysis was completed based on the results for the per-protocol population. For this analysis, patients were divided into high and low baseline severity categories according to the dichotomized baseline ODD parent or teacher score or dichotomized baseline ADHD parent or teacher score (high defined as scores at the median or greater and low defined as scores less than the median). A total of 308 children and adolescents (age range, 6-17 years; 213 males, 95 females) were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10 mg/d (n = 60) 20 mg/d (n = 58), 30 mg/d (n = 69), or 40 mg/d (n = 61) or placebo (n = 60). Of the 308 study patients, 244 (79.2%) had comorbid ADHD. A significant change from baseline in the ODD symptoms measured with the SNAP-IV parent rating subscale was found for the MAS XR 30-mg/d (-0.52; P < 0.001) and 40-mg/d (-0.56; P = 0.002) groups in the per-protocol analysis and for the MAS XR

  10. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied....... This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the actual force(s) applied to the structure. The white noise input(s) and the structures responses are then used...... to identify the compined system. Identification results are then sorted as either structural parameters or input force(s) characteristics....

  11. Parkinson’s Disease and Forced Exercise: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Qutubuddin; Timothy Reis; Raed Alramadhani; David X. Cifu; Alan Towne; William Carne

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The concept of forced exercise has drawn attention for the treatment of Parkinson's disease symptoms with anecdotal reports of success. This study sought to ascertain any significant effect of forced exercise using a motorized stationary bicycle when compared to controls on Parkinson's disease symptoms in a blinded, randomized, and controlled setting. Setting. Parkinson's disease outpatient clinic, Veterans Administration Medical Center. Method. We assessed 23 patients (13 experime...

  12. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  13. ForcePAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Damkilde, Lars

    2009-01-01

    ForcePAD is a 2-dimensional finite element application that started as a concept application for finite element modeling. Over the course of 10 years the application has been evolved into an application that is used extensively in both an educational setting as well as a tool for design and engin......ForcePAD is a 2-dimensional finite element application that started as a concept application for finite element modeling. Over the course of 10 years the application has been evolved into an application that is used extensively in both an educational setting as well as a tool for design...... and engineering. In the latest version of ForcePAD an optimization module was added to enable to take advantage of topology optimization in the design process....

  14. Rate of force development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Aagaard, Per; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force...... development and to discuss various methodological considerations inherent to its evaluation for research and clinical purposes. Rate of force development (1) seems to be mainly determined by the capacity to produce maximal voluntary activation in the early phase of an explosive contraction (first 50-75 ms......), particularly as a result of increased motor unit discharge rate; (2) can be improved by both explosive-type and heavy-resistance strength training in different subject populations, mainly through an improvement in rapid muscle activation; (3) is quite difficult to evaluate in a valid and reliable way...

  15. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social......This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  16. Clinician proficiency in delivering manual treatment for neck pain within specified force ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D; Salsbury, Stacie A; Corber, Lance G; Long, Cynthia R; Patwardhan, Avinash G; Goertz, Christine M

    2015-04-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint responsive to manual therapies. Doctors of chiropractic commonly use manual cervical distraction, a mobilization procedure, to treat neck pain patients. However, it is unknown if clinicians can consistently apply standardized cervical traction forces, a critical step toward identifying an optimal therapeutic dose. To assess clinicians' proficiency in delivering manually applied traction forces within specified ranges to neck pain patients. An observational study nested within a randomized clinical trial. Two research clinicians provided study interventions to 48 participants with neck pain. Clinician proficiency in delivering cervical traction forces within three specified ranges (low force, less than 20 N; medium force, 21-50 N; and high force 51-100 N). Participants were randomly allocated to three force-based treatment groups. Participants received five manual cervical distraction treatments over 2 weeks while lying prone on a treatment table instrumented with force sensors. Two clinicians delivered manual traction forces according to treatment groups. Clinicians treated participants first without real-time visual feedback displaying traction force and then with visual feedback. Peak traction force data were extracted and descriptively analyzed. Clinicians delivered manual cervical distraction treatments within the prescribed traction force ranges 75% of the time without visual feedback and 97% of the time with visual feedback. This study demonstrates that doctors of chiropractic can successfully deliver prescribed traction forces while treating neck pain patients, enabling the capability to conduct force-based dose response clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  18. Rate of force development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Aagaard, Per; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    ), particularly as a result of increased motor unit discharge rate; (2) can be improved by both explosive-type and heavy-resistance strength training in different subject populations, mainly through an improvement in rapid muscle activation; (3) is quite difficult to evaluate in a valid and reliable way......The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force...

  19. Effects of oncoming target velocities on rapid force production and accuracy of force production intensity and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the effects of oncoming target velocities on the ability of rapid force production and accuracy and variability of simultaneous control of both force production intensity and timing. Twenty male participants (age: 21.0 ± 1.4 years) performed rapid gripping with a handgrip dynamometer to coincide with the arrival of an oncoming target by using a horizontal electronic trackway. The oncoming target velocities were 4, 8, and 12 m · s -1 , which were randomly produced. The grip force required was 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Although the peak force (Pf) and rate of force development (RFD) increased with increasing target velocity, the value of the RFD to Pf ratio was constant across the 3 target velocities. The accuracy of both force production intensity and timing decreased at higher target velocities. Moreover, the intrapersonal variability in temporal parameters was lower in the fast target velocity condition, but constant variability in 3 target velocities was observed in force intensity parameters. These results suggest that oncoming target velocity does not intrinsically affect the ability for rapid force production. However, the oncoming target velocity affects accuracy and variability of force production intensity and timing during rapid force production.

  20. Air Force Security Forces Professionalism: Useful Insights for Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Air Force Security Forces Professionalism· tns19hts for Leaders Secrest Justin D .. Major, USAF USMC Command and Staff...corporateness characteristics as theorized by Samuel P. Huntingon, yields helpful insights for current and future-generation leaders . Huntington theorizes...theory, this analysis examines professoonalism in Air Force Security Forces. Security Forces expertise developed as career field leaders constantly

  1. Activation force splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Erleben, Kenny

    We present a method for simulating the active contraction of deformable models, usable for interactive animation of soft deformable objects. We present a novel physical principle as the governing equation for the coupling between the low dimensional 1D activation force model and the higher...

  2. Muscle contraction and force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Risbo, Jens; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction studies often focus solely on myofibres and the proteins known to be involved in the processes of sarcomere shortening and cross-bridge cycling, but skeletal muscle also comprises a very elaborate ancillary network of capillaries, which not only play a vital role in terms of nu...... contributor to force transfer within muscular tissue....

  3. Forced Displacement and Refugee

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rutinwa: Forced Displacement and Refugee Rights in the Great Lakes 1 3 with the new problems associated with refugees, such as those outlined above. An effective system for refugee protection must be holistic and address the refugee problem at the levels of pre- vention, response and solution. At the level of prevention, ...

  4. The Dynamic Force Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  5. Wearing Forces Spectacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Graham

    2012-01-01

    When providing training to teachers struggling with the concept of forces, the author encourages them to start with something within the experience of the children they are teaching. For example, show them photographs taken on windy days, such as that of a tree, and ask them to explain what is happening. This encourages the children to focus on…

  6. Perpendicular-Force Latch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, John P.; Buck, Peter A.; Williams, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Latching mechanism simultaneously applies force in two perpendicular directions to install or remove electronic-equipment modules. Used to simplify installation and removal of modular equipment where movement restricted by protective clothing as in hazardous environments or where installation and removal to be performed by robots or remote manipulators. Concept adaptable to hydraulic, pneumatic, and mechanical systems.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  8. Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon

    Principle of MFM In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the magnetic stray field above a very flat specimen, or sample, is detected by placing a small magnetic element, the tip, mounted on a cantilever spring very close to the surface of the sample (Figure 1). Typical dimensions are a cantilever length

  9. Biodegradable Piezoelectric Force Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Eli J; Ke, Kai; Chorsi, Meysam T; Wrobel, Kinga S; Miller, Albert N; Patel, Avi; Kim, Insoo; Feng, Jianlin; Yue, Lixia; Wu, Qian; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Lo, Kevin W-H; Laurencin, Cato T; Ilies, Horea; Purohit, Prashant K; Nguyen, Thanh D

    2018-01-30

    Measuring vital physiological pressures is important for monitoring health status, preventing the buildup of dangerous internal forces in impaired organs, and enabling novel approaches of using mechanical stimulation for tissue regeneration. Pressure sensors are often required to be implanted and directly integrated with native soft biological systems. Therefore, the devices should be flexible and at the same time biodegradable to avoid invasive removal surgery that can damage directly interfaced tissues. Despite recent achievements in degradable electronic devices, there is still a tremendous need to develop a force sensor which only relies on safe medical materials and requires no complex fabrication process to provide accurate information on important biophysiological forces. Here, we present a strategy for material processing, electromechanical analysis, device fabrication, and assessment of a piezoelectric Poly-l-lactide (PLLA) polymer to create a biodegradable, biocompatible piezoelectric force sensor, which only employs medical materials used commonly in Food and Drug Administration-approved implants, for the monitoring of biological forces. We show the sensor can precisely measure pressures in a wide range of 0-18 kPa and sustain a reliable performance for a period of 4 d in an aqueous environment. We also demonstrate this PLLA piezoelectric sensor can be implanted inside the abdominal cavity of a mouse to monitor the pressure of diaphragmatic contraction. This piezoelectric sensor offers an appealing alternative to present biodegradable electronic devices for the monitoring of intraorgan pressures. The sensor can be integrated with tissues and organs, forming self-sensing bionic systems to enable many exciting applications in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and medical devices.

  10. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa V. G. B. Serra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : Kinesio Taping (KT is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective : To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results : There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666 or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after (F=0.528, p=0.868, and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986 for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension.

  11. Principles and applications of force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kyu; Kim, Woong; Park, Joon Won [Dept. of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful technique for addressing single molecules. Unseen structures and dynamics of molecules have been elucidated using force spectroscopy. Atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy studies have provided picoNewton force resolution, subnanometer spatial resolution, stiffness of substrates, elasticity of polymers, and thermodynamics and kinetics of single-molecular interactions. In addition, AFM has enabled mapping the distribution of individual molecules in situ, and the quantification of single molecules has been made possible without modification or labeling. In this review, we describe the basic principles, sample preparation, data analysis, and applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy and its future.

  12. A random dynamical systems perspective on stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Anna Maria; Lamb, Jeroen S. W.; Rasmussen, Martin; Sato, Yuzuru

    2017-07-01

    We study stochastic resonance in an over-damped approximation of the stochastic Duffing oscillator from a random dynamical systems point of view. We analyse this problem in the general framework of random dynamical systems with a nonautonomous forcing. We prove the existence of a unique global attracting random periodic orbit and a stationary periodic measure. We use the stationary periodic measure to define an indicator for the stochastic resonance.

  13. A random dynamical systems perspective on stochastic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Cherubini, Anna Maria; Lamb, Jeroen S. W.; Rasmussen, Martin; Sato, Yuzuru

    2015-01-01

    We study stochastic resonance in an over-damped approximation of the stochastic Duffing oscillator from a random dynamical systems point of view. We analyse this problem in the general framework of random dynamical systems with a nonautonomous forcing. We prove the existence of a unique global attracting random periodic orbit and a stationary periodic measure. We use the stationary periodic measure to define an indicator for the stochastic resonance.

  14. Force Modulator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  15. Force Feedback Joystick

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  16. Suicide and forced marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-03-01

    The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of "predicaments", in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder.

  17. Air Force Smart Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-19

    bases and missions toward an enterprise solution for incorporating smart technologies in the future (defined in the Information Environment Mission... technology might enrich and protect our nation, businesses, and lives. As a human-centric design center, we seek out unique ways to connect Air Force...warfighters with current and future technology in meaningful ways. We look to transfer, license, and share promising prototypes, solutions, and knowledge

  18. Is Gravity Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjia Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available If we assume that the source of thermodynamic system, ρ and p, are also the source of gravity, then either thermal quantities, such as entropy, temperature, and chemical potential, can induce gravitational effects, or gravity can induce thermal effects. We find that gravity can be seen as entropic force only for systems with constant temperature and zero chemical potential. The case for Newtonian approximation is discussed.

  19. Health of the Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    for disease preven- tion which can also reduce the transmission of other sexually transmitted infec- tions (STIs). However, rates are considered con...65 HEALTH OF THE FORCE Chlamydia Sexually transmitted infections such as chla- mydia can impact medical readiness and Soldier well-being. Most...particularly among women , who may experience pelvic inflammatory disease , ec- topic pregnancy, and infertility. Therefore, it is rec- ommended that

  20. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  1. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  2. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under multiple correlated normal random excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbin; Mulani, Sameer B.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Fei, Qingguo; Wu, Shaoqing

    2017-07-01

    An algorithm that integrates Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) and the finite element method (FEM) is proposed to perform non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under excitations, represented by multiple random processes that are correlated in both time and spatial domains. In KLE, the auto-covariance functions of random excitations are discretized using orthogonal basis functions. The KLE for multiple correlated random excitations relies on expansions in terms of correlated sets of random variables reflecting the cross-covariance of the random processes. During the response calculations, the eigenfunctions of KLE used to represent excitations are applied as forcing functions to the structure. The proposed algorithm is applied to a 2DOF system, a 2D cantilever beam and a 3D aircraft wing under both stationary and non-stationary correlated random excitations. Two methods are adopted to obtain the structural responses: a) the modal method and b) the direct method. Both the methods provide the statistics of the dynamic response with sufficient accuracy. The structural responses under the same type of correlated random excitations are bounded by the response obtained by perfectly correlated and uncorrelated random excitations. The structural response increases with a decrease in the correlation length and with an increase in the correlation magnitude. The proposed methodology can be applied for the analysis of any complex structure under any type of random excitation.

  4. Optimizing Global Force Management for Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    FORCE MANAGEMENT FOR SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES by Emily A. LaCaille December 2016 Thesis Advisor: Paul L. Ewing Second Reader: Jeffrey...Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPTIMIZING GLOBAL FORCE MANAGEMENT FOR SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6

  5. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elsasser, Robert [UNIV OF PADERBORN; Friedrich, Tobias [ICSI/BERKELEY; Sauerwald, Tomas [ICSI/BERKELEY

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  6. Special Operations Forces and Conventional Forces: Integration, Interoperability, and Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    in enemy territory, working with indige - nous forces, and performing deep reconnais- sance, strikes, and raids. The 1993 version of the manual still...designated combat zones, like training and advising indig - enous security forces, and operating differently SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES AND CONVENTIONAL

  7. Force modulation for improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.; Sebastian, Abu; Despont, Michel; Pozidis, Haris

    We present an improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) method by modulating the applied loading force on the tip. Unreliable electrical contact and tip wear are the primary challenges for electrical characterization at the nanometer scale. The experiments show that force modulation

  8. Force tracing: a method to sculpt the optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Caloz, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    A brief description of the long-standing problem of the optical momentum in media and its resolution is given. The method of force tracing to trace optical force fields along the trajectories of light rays is reviewed and a few illustrative examples are shown. Then, based on the method of force tracing, several graded-index devices performing interesting optical manipulations are reviewed.

  9. Ergodicity of Random Walks on Random DFA

    OpenAIRE

    Balle, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Given a DFA we consider the random walk that starts at the initial state and at each time step moves to a new state by taking a random transition from the current state. This paper shows that for typical DFA this random walk induces an ergodic Markov chain. The notion of typical DFA is formalized by showing that ergodicity holds with high probability when a DFA is sampled uniformly at random from the set of all automata with a fixed number of states. We also show the same result applies to DF...

  10. Random fractional Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2007-08-01

    We propose a novel random fractional Fourier transform by randomizing the transform kernel function of the conventional fractional Fourier transform. The random fractional Fourier transform inherits the excellent mathematical properties from the fractional Fourier transform and can be easily implemented in optics. As a primary application the random fractional Fourier transform can be directly used in optical image encryption and decryption. The double phase encoding image encryption schemes can thus be modeled with cascaded random fractional Fourier transformers.

  11. Grasping 2010 with Naval Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnett, Roger

    1998-01-01

    This article focuses on how naval combat forces should be employed in 2010. Narrowing that focus presumes the Nation will want to maintain capable forces to underwrite its security and that of its allies and friends around the globe...

  12. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  13. Pain Management Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    increased infection, tumor spread or recurrence. Muscular Muscle weakness, limitation of movement, muscle atrophy, fatigue . Psychological Anxiety, fear...in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial. JAMA . 2009;301(12):1242-1252. Dowden S, McCarthy M, and Chalkiadis G. (2008). Achieving organizational...in Primary Care Patients With Depression and Musculoskeletal Pain JAMA . 2009;301(20):2099-2110. Lew HL, Otis JD, Tun C, Kerns RD, Clark ME, Cif DX

  14. The law of electromagnetic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J. Kutkovetskyy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calculation peculiarities for Lorentz force, Ampere force, interaction of parallel electric currents, and the moment of electrical machines are analyzed. They have exceptions on application, and they are the rules which result from the law of electromagnetic force as coordinate derivative of the operating magnetic flow. An addition to the direction of electromagnetic force action is proposed. Standards of salient-pole electrical machine designing are considered.

  15. Why is the magnetic force similar to a Coriolis force?

    OpenAIRE

    Royer, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the underlying reason why the magnetic force is similar to a Coriolis force is that it is caused by Thomas rotations, induced by successions of non-collinear Lorentz boosts. The magnetic force may even be viewed as a kind of Coriolis force (making perhaps more acceptable the apparent non-existence of magnetic monopoles). We also show that under a change of inertial frames, Faraday lines of force Lorentz contract as if 'etched' in space, while 'Coriolis' terms get added on.

  16. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  17. Causal Entropic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  18. Small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Ebeling, Daniel; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Bhushan, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    Over the years atomic force microscopy has developed from a pure imaging technique to a tool that can be employed for measuring quantitative tip–sample interaction forces. In this chapter we provide an overview of various techniques to extract quantitative tip–sample forces focusing on both

  19. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  20. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 4. Random Walks in a Random Environment. S R S Varadhan. Invited Articles Volume 114 Issue ... Author Affiliations. S R S Varadhan1. Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012, USA ...

  1. Random walks on random Koch curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, S; Hoffmann, K H [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Essex, C [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2009-06-05

    Diffusion processes in porous materials are often modeled as random walks on fractals. In order to capture the randomness of the materials random fractals are employed, which no longer show the deterministic self-similarity of regular fractals. Finding a continuum differential equation describing the diffusion on such fractals has been a long-standing goal, and we address the question of whether the concepts developed for regular fractals are still applicable. We use the random Koch curve as a convenient example as it provides certain technical advantages by its separation of time and space features. While some of the concepts developed for regular fractals can be used unaltered, others have to be modified. Based on the concept of fibers, we introduce ensemble-averaged density functions which produce a differentiable estimate of probability explicitly and compare it to random walk data.

  2. Force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Intimidated by inertia? Frightened by forces? Mystified by Newton s law of motion? You re not alone and help is at hand. The stop Faking It! Series is perfect for science teachers, home-schoolers, parents wanting to help with homework all of you who need a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching middle school physical science with confidence. With Bill Roberton as your friendly, able but somewhat irreverent guide, you will discover you CAN come to grips with the basics of force and motion. Combining easy-to-understand explanations with activities using commonly found equipment, this book will lead you through Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. The book is as entertaining as it is informative. Best of all, the author understands the needs of adults who want concrete examples, hands-on activities, clear language, diagrams and yes, a certain amount of empathy. Ideas For Use Newton's laws, and all of the other motion principles presented in this book, do a good job of helping us to underst...

  3. Magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  4. Force-gradient sensitive Kelvin probe force microscopy by dissipative electrostatic force modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We report a Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) implementation using the dissipation signal of a frequency modulation atomic force microscopy that is capable of detecting the gradient of electrostatic force rather than electrostatic force. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low frequency modulation. We show that applying a coherent ac voltage with two times the cantilever oscillation frequency induces the dissipation signal proportional to the electrost...

  5. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  6. Probing the Stochastic, Motor-Driven Properties of the Cytoplasm Using Force Spectrum Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, M.; Ehrlicher, A.J.; Jensen, M.H.; Renz, M.; Moore, J.R.; Goldman, R.D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, J.; MacKintosh, F.C.; Weitz, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular motors in cells typically produce highly directed motion; however, the aggregate, incoherent effect of all active processes also creates randomly fluctuating forces, which drive diffusive-like, nonthermal motion. Here, we introduce force-spectrum-microscopy (FSM) to directly quantify

  7. Force limited vibration testing: an evaluation of the computation of C2 for real load and probabilistic source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijker, Jacob J; de Boer, Andries; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria

    2015-01-01

    To prevent over-testing of the test-item during random vibration testing Scharton proposed and discussed the force limited random vibration testing (FLVT) in a number of publications. Besides the random vibration specification, the total mass and the turn-over frequency of the load (test item), is a

  8. Equivalent linearization of nonlinear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guang; Xue, Zhongqing

    1987-07-01

    A method used for equivalent linearization of the two orthogonal squeeze-film forces is extended here to the general case of n degrees of freedom and n components of nonlinear forces, and the expressions for equivalent linear coefficients are derived. Nonlinear forces can be linearized by the methods of Fourier expansion, active and reactive powers, or mean-square error. The n components of nonlinear forces can all be expressed formally as the sum of an average force, a linear spring force, and a linear damping force. This paper also gives a flow chart for calculating the steady-state responses of a nonlinear system with many degrees of freedom, using the method of equivalent linearization. The resulting saving in computation time is demonstrated by a numerical example of a flexible rotor-bearing system with a noncentralized squeeze-film damper.

  9. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  10. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  11. Interface mobility from interface random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautt, Zachary; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Karma, Alain

    2007-03-01

    Computational studies aimed at extracting interface mobilities require driving forces orders of magnitude higher than those occurring experimentally. We present a computational methodology that extracts the absolute interface mobility in the zero driving force limit by monitoring the one-dimensional random walk of the mean interface position along the interface normal. The method exploits a fluctuation-dissipation relation similar to the Stokes-Einstein relation, which relates the diffusion coefficient of this Brownian-like random walk to the interface mobility. Atomic-scale simulations of grain boundaries in model crystalline systems validate the theoretical predictions, and also highlight the profound effect of impurities. The generality of this technique combined with its inherent spatial-temporal efficiency should allow computational studies to effectively complement experiments in understanding interface kinetics in diverse material systems.

  12. Fabrication of protein chip by magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Jang, Gil-Soo; Hong, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Sup

    2009-12-01

    This research describes a new immobilizing method of many kinds of biomaterials (enzyme, antibody, and DNA) on a transducer array using magnetic force interaction as the short-range force. The method composes two immobilizing steps. In the first step, same biomaterials are immobilized on metal particles. In the second step, the particles are arranged by the fluidic self-assembly method at random on an array. An array immobilized many kinds of the particles become multichannel biosensor. The biosensor can apply to DNA chip, protein chip, multienzyme electrode, and so on. The metal particles and the array were fabricated by micromachining manufacture. The metal particles were multilayer structure (gold, titanium, and nickel). In the array case, sidewalls of patterning nickel dots on an array were covered by thick negative photoresist (SU-8), and the array was magnetized. The array and the particles were mixed in buffer solution, and were arranged by magnetic force interaction. A quarter of total nickel dots were covered by the particles. The binding direction of the particles was controllable, and condition of particles was almost with gold surface on top. The immobilization of the biomaterials to metal particles was able to materialize it by using 3-CPD. This confirmed an activity by the luminol radiation.

  13. Chin force in violin playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  14. Absorbing boundary conditions for inertial random processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoliver, J.; Porra, J.M. [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal, 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain); Lindenberg, K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0340 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    A recent paper by J. Heinrichs [Phys. Rev. E {bold 48}, 2397 (1993)] presents analytic expressions for the first-passage times and the survival probability for a particle moving in a field of random correlated forces. We believe that the analysis there is flawed due to an improper use of boundary conditions. We compare that result, in the white noise limit, with the known exact expression of the mean exit time. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Force protection: today's reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors.

  16. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  17. Silicon force sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  18. Forced cocurrent smoldering combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Pagni, Patrick J.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model of cocurrent smoldering combustion through a very porous solid fuel is developed. Smoldering is initiated at the top of a long radially insulated uniform fuel cylinder, so that the smolder wave propagates downward, opposing an upward-forced flow of oxidizer, with the solid fuel and the gaseous oxidizer entering the reaction zone from the same direction (hence, cocurrent). Radiative heat transfer was incorporated using a diffusion approximation, and smoldering was modeled using a one-step reaction mechanism. The results indicate that, for a given fuel, the final temperature depends only on the initial oxygen mass flux, increasing logarithmically with the mass flux. The smolder velocity is linearly dependent on the initial oxygen mass flux, and, at a fixed value of the flux, increases with initial oxygen mass fraction. The mathematical relationship determining the conditions for steady smolder propagation is presented.

  19. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  20. Maximum bite force analysis in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Patricia; Vieira, Marilena; Bommarito, Silvana

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Maximum bite force (MBF) is the maximum force performed by the subject on the fragmentation of food, directly related with the mastication and determined by many factors. Objective Analyze the MBF of subjects according to age groups. Methods One hundred individuals from the city of São Paulo were equally divided according to age groups and gender. Each individual submitted to a myotherapy evaluation composed of anthropometric measurements of height and weight to obtain body mass index (BMI), using a tape and a digital scale (Magna, G-life, São Paulo), and a dental condition and maximum bite force evaluation, using a digital dynamometer model DDK/M (Kratos, São Paulo, Brazil), on Newton scale. The dental and bite force evaluations were monitored by a professional from the area. Analysis of variance was used with MBF as a dependent variable, age group and gender as random factors, and BMI as a control variable. Results Till the end of adolescence, it was possible to observe a decrease in MBF in both sexes, with the male force greater than the female force. In young adults, the female force became greater the males, then decreased in adulthood. There was no correlation between MBF and BMI. Conclusion There are MBF variations that characterizes the human development stages, according to age groups.

  1. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  2. Random matrices, random processes and integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This book explores the remarkable connections between two domains that, a priori, seem unrelated: Random matrices (together with associated random processes) and integrable systems. The relations between random matrix models and the theory of classical integrable systems have long been studied. These appear mainly in the deformation theory, when parameters characterizing the measures or the domain of localization of the eigenvalues are varied. The resulting differential equations determining the partition function and correlation functions are, remarkably, of the same type as certain equations appearing in the theory of integrable systems. They may be analyzed effectively through methods based upon the Riemann-Hilbert problem of analytic function theory and by related approaches to the study of nonlinear asymptotics in the large N limit. Associated with studies of matrix models are certain stochastic processes, the "Dyson processes", and their continuum diffusion limits, which govern the spectrum in random ma...

  3. An In-vitro Comparison of Force Loss of Orthodontic Non-Latex Elastics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Alavi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The amount and consistency of the applied forces to the tooth are important factors in tooth movements; therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the initial force and the force loss of three brands of elastics in 24 hours.In this in-vitro study sixty non-latex elastics (3/16 medium from three companies (Forestadent, Dentaurum and Ortho Technology were randomly selected. Two static tests were performed, the first in a dry environment to evaluate the initial force and the other performed in a wet environment (artificial saliva to evaluate the force loss in 24 hours. The Universal testing machine measured the forces after stretching the elastics to three times the lumen diameter. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, One-way ANOVA, Tukey-HSD, Paired samples test, and one sample test.The difference between the brands was significant (p=0.002. Force loss was observed in all samples; 4-7.5% force loss occurred after one hour and 19-38% force loss occurred after 24 hours. The average initial force of Forestadent and Ortho Technology was significantly higher than marketed forces (pDentaurum>Ortho-Technology. According to the initial force and force loss percentage it is suggested to replace the non-latex elastics several times a day.

  4. Quadriceps force and anterior tibial force occur obviously later than vertical ground reaction force: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Ueno, Ryo; Ishida, Tomoya; Yamanaka, Masanori; Taniguchi, Shohei; Ikuta, Ryohei; Samukawa, Mina; Saito, Hiroshi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although it is well known that quadriceps force generates anterior tibial force, it has been unclear whether quadriceps force causes great anterior tibial force during the early phase of a landing task. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the quadriceps force induced great anterior tibial force during the early phase of a landing task. Methods: Fourteen young, healthy, female subjects performed a single-leg landing task. Muscle force and anterior tibial force w...

  5. Mutual gravitational potential, force, and torque of a homogeneous polyhedron and an extended body: an application to binary asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Wang, Yue; Xu, Shijie

    2017-11-01

    Binary systems are quite common within the populations of near-Earth asteroids, main-belt asteroids, and Kuiper belt asteroids. The dynamics of binary systems, which can be modeled as the full two-body problem, is a fundamental problem for their evolution and the design of relevant space missions. This paper proposes a new shape-based model for the mutual gravitational potential of binary asteroids, differing from prior approaches such as inertia integrals, spherical harmonics, or symmetric trace-free tensors. One asteroid is modeled as a homogeneous polyhedron, while the other is modeled as an extended rigid body with arbitrary mass distribution. Since the potential of the polyhedron is precisely described in a closed form, the mutual gravitational potential can be formulated as a volume integral over the extended body. By using Taylor expansion, the mutual potential is then derived in terms of inertia integrals of the extended body, derivatives of the polyhedron's potential, and the relative location and orientation between the two bodies. The gravitational forces and torques acting on the two bodies described in the body-fixed frame of the polyhedron are derived in the form of a second-order expansion. The gravitational model is then used to simulate the evolution of the binary asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4, and compared with previous results in the literature.

  6. Compressive force magnitude and intervertebral joint flexion/extension angle influence shear failure force magnitude in the porcine cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P

    2012-02-02

    Despite the findings that peak anterior shear load is highly correlated with low-back pain reporting, very little research has been conducted to determine how vertebral shear injury potential is influenced. The current study quantified the combined effects of vertebral joint compression and flexion/extension postural deviation from neutral on ultimate shear failure. Ninety-six porcine cervical specimens (48C3-C4, 48C5-C6) were tested. Each specimen was randomly assigned to one of twelve combinations of compressive force (15%, 30%, 45%, or 60% of predicted compressive failure force) and flexion/extension postural deviation (extended, neutral, or flexed). Vertebral joint shear failure was induced by applying posterior shear displacement of the caudal vertebra at a constant rate of 0.15 mm/s. Throughout shear failure tests, vertebral joint kinematics were measured using an optoelectronic camera and a series of infrared light emitting diodes while shear force was measured from load cells rigidly interfaced in series with linear actuators that applied the shear displacement. Measurements of shear stiffness, ultimate force, displacement, and energy stored were made from the force-displacement data. Compressive force and postural deviation demonstrated main effects without a statistically significant interaction for any of the measurements. Shear failure force increased by 11.1% for each 15% increment in compressive force (pincrease with extension (pDisplacement at ultimate failure was not significantly altered by either compressive force or postural deviation. These results demonstrate that shear failure force may be governed by changes in facet articulation, either by postural deviation or by reducing vertebral joint height through compression that alter the moment arm length between the center of facet contact pressure and the pars interarticularis location. However, objective evidence of this alteration currently does not exist. Both compression and flexion

  7. Misuse of randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Kjaergard, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The quality of randomization of Chinese randomized trials on herbal medicines for hepatitis B was assessed. Search strategy and inclusion criteria were based on the published protocol. One hundred and seventy-six randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving 20,452 patients with chronic hepatitis B....../150) of the studies were imbalanced at the 0.05 level of probability for the two treatments and 13.3% (20/150) imbalanced at the 0.01 level in the randomization. It is suggested that there may exist misunderstanding of the concept and the misuse of randomization based on the review....

  8. MEMS Bragg grating force sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a new type of all-optical frequency modulated MEMS force sensor based on a mechanically amplified double clamped waveguide beam structure with integrated Bragg grating. The sensor is ideally suited for force measurements in harsh...... environments and for remote and distributed sensing and has a measured sensitivity of -14 nm/N, which is several times higher than what is obtained in conventional fiber Bragg grating force sensors. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  9. Stochastic force in gravitational systems

    OpenAIRE

    Del Popolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper I study the probability distribution of the gravitational force in gravitational systems through numerical experiments. I show that Kandrup's (1980) and Antonuccio-Delogu & Atrio-Barandela's (1992) theories describe correctly the stochastic force probability distribution respectively in inhomogeneous and clustered systems. I find equations for the probability distribution of stochastic forces in finite systems, both homogeneous and clustered, which I use to compare the theoretic...

  10. Species selection and random drift in macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Species selection resulting from trait-dependent speciation and extinction is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of phenotypic macroevolution. However, the recent bloom in statistical methods quantifying this process faces a scarcity of dynamical theory for their interpretation, notably regarding the relative contributions of deterministic versus stochastic evolutionary forces. I use simple diffusion approximations of birth-death processes to investigate how the expected and random components of macroevolutionary change depend on phenotype-dependent speciation and extinction rates, as can be estimated empirically. I show that the species selection coefficient for a binary trait, and selection differential for a quantitative trait, depend not only on differences in net diversification rates (speciation minus extinction), but also on differences in species turnover rates (speciation plus extinction), especially in small clades. The randomness in speciation and extinction events also produces a species-level equivalent to random genetic drift, which is stronger for higher turnover rates. I then show how microevolutionary processes including mutation, organismic selection, and random genetic drift cause state transitions at the species level, allowing comparison of evolutionary forces across levels. A key parameter that would be needed to apply this theory is the distribution and rate of origination of new optimum phenotypes along a phylogeny. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Force generation by titin folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Bianco, Pasquale; Naftz, Katalin; Ferenczy, György G; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2017-07-01

    Titin is a giant protein that provides elasticity to muscle. As the sarcomere is stretched, titin extends hierarchically according to the mechanics of its segments. Whether titin's globular domains unfold during this process and how such unfolded domains might contribute to muscle contractility are strongly debated. To explore the force-dependent folding mechanisms, here we manipulated skeletal-muscle titin molecules with high-resolution optical tweezers. In force-clamp mode, after quenching the force (force trace contained rapid fluctuations and a gradual increase of average force, indicating that titin can develop force via dynamic transitions between its structural states en route to the native conformation. In 4 M urea, which destabilizes H-bonds hence the consolidated native domain structure, the net force increase disappeared but the fluctuations persisted. Thus, whereas net force generation is caused by the ensemble folding of the elastically-coupled domains, force fluctuations arise due to a dynamic equilibrium between unfolded and molten-globule states. Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating a compact molten-globule intermediate in the folding landscape recovered all features of our nanomechanics results. The ensemble molten-globule dynamics delivers significant added contractility that may assist sarcomere mechanics, and it may reduce the dissipative energy loss associated with titin unfolding/refolding during muscle contraction/relaxation cycles. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  12. Wind Forces on Container Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the wind forces acting on a 9,000+ TEU container ship has been carried out through a series of wind tunnel tests. It was investigated how the wind forces depend on the container configuration on the deck using a 1:450 scale model and a series of appropriate container...... are presented as nondimensional coefficients. It is concluded, that the measured forces and moment depend on the container configuration on deck, and the results may provide a general idea of how the magnitude of the wind forces is affected by a given container stacking configuration on a similar container ship....

  13. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  14. Random field estimation approach to robot dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo

    1990-01-01

    The difference equations of Kalman filtering and smoothing recursively factor and invert the covariance of the output of a linear state-space system driven by a white-noise process. Here it is shown that similar recursive techniques factor and invert the inertia matrix of a multibody robot system. The random field models are based on the assumption that all of the inertial (D'Alembert) forces in the system are represented by a spatially distributed white-noise model. They are easier to describe than the models based on classical mechanics, which typically require extensive derivation and manipulation of equations of motion for complex mechanical systems. With the spatially random models, more primitive locally specified computations result in a global collective system behavior equivalent to that obtained with deterministic models. The primary goal of applying random field estimation is to provide a concise analytical foundation for solving robot control and motion planning problems.

  15. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  16. Role of attractive forces in tapping tip force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results demonstrating the drastic influence of attractive forces on the behaviour of the atomic force microscope when operated in the resonant tapping tip mode in an ambient environment. It is often assumed that tapping is related to repulsive interaction...

  17. Deep atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  18. Comprehending illocutionary force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, T; Ashley, A

    2001-01-01

    According to speech act theory (Searle, 1969), utterances have both a propositional content and an illocutionary force (the speech act performed with the utterance). Four experiments were conducted to examine whether utterance comprehension involves speech act recognition. Participants in all experiments first read remarks that could be characterized by a particular speech act (e.g., beg). A recognition probe reaction time procedure was used in Experiments 1 and 2; participants indicated whether a probe word had literally appeared in the last remark that they had read. Participants were significantly slower at making this judgment (and made significantly more errors) when the probe represented the speech act performed with the prior remark than when it did not. A lexical decision task was used in Experiments 3 and 4, and participants were significantly faster at verifying target words representing the speech act performed with a remark, relative to control words. Overall, the results suggest that speech act recognition may be an important component of the comprehension of conversational remarks.

  19. Forces of nature

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072602

    2016-01-01

    A breathtaking and beautiful exploration of our planet. This groundbreaking book, which accompanies the new BBC1 TV series, provides the deepest answers to the simplest questions. 'Why is the sky blue?' 'Why is the Earth round?' 'Why is every snowflake unique?' To answer these and many other questions, Professor Brian Cox will reveal some of the most extraordinary phenomena and events on Earth and in the Universe and beyond. From the immensity of Earth's globe to all the world's myriad snowflakes, the forces of nature shape everything we see. Pushed to extremes, the results are astonishing. From the realm of auroras to the heart of our planet, the ingredients that make everything on Earth connect each one of us in an eternal cycle of life. Brian will reveal why Earth is the most colourful world we know, exploring the white light of the sun as it travels through the darkness of space until it hits Earth's atmosphere where it begins a new journey, splitting into a rainbow of colours. From the great plains of th...

  20. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  1. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  2. Force-gradient sensitive Kelvin probe force microscopy by dissipative electrostatic force modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report a Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) implementation using the dissipation signal of a frequency modulation atomic force microscopy that is capable of detecting the gradient of electrostatic force rather than electrostatic force. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low frequency modulation. We show that applying a coherent ac voltage with two times the cantilever oscillation frequency induces the dissipation signal proportional to the electrostatic force gradient which depends on the effective dc bias voltage including the contact potential difference. We demonstrate the KPFM images of a MoS2 flake taken with the present method are in quantitative agreement with those taken with the frequency modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy technique.

  3. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branderhorst, W., E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl; Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam 1100 DD (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, Amsterdam 1105 BA (Netherlands); Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam 1100 DD (Netherlands); Neeleman, C. [Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, Amsterdam 1105 BA (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  4. Force balancing in mammographic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branderhorst, W; de Groot, J E; Neeter, L M F H; van Lier, M G J T B; Neeleman, C; den Heeten, G J; Grimbergen, C A

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. In mammographic breast compression, even small changes in the

  5. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  6. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  7. Societal Forces That ERODE Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert; Kaufman, James C.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Creativity is an indispensable force in intellectual, social, cultural, and economic development. Yet societal forces conspire to erode it. Educators have despaired for many years over how schools often fail to encourage creativity, but society as a whole is just as guilty. But how do schools and society fail to encourage, or…

  8. Force.com enterprise architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Fawcett, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This book is for advanced Force.com developers and architects who need to understand the Salesforce platform from the perspective of enterprise-level requirements. You should have an existing understanding of Apex and Visualforce. Those familiar with other enterprise software ecosystems will also find this book ideal as they adopt Force.com.

  9. Grasp force control in telemanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Duffie, Neil A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two experiments which focus upon the issue of grasp force control in telemanipulation. The first experiment examines the ability to control and stabilize master-controller grasp force during a 30-s compensatory tracking task under different levels of master controller digit mass, friction, and backlash. The second experiment explores the potential for substituting tactile feedback in lieu of direct force-feedback to gage and control remote grasp force. Results show that subjects were better able to control force when mass and friction levels were increased. Even when perceptual gains between tactile and direct force feedback displays were matched, force reflection produced better grasp control. The lack of backlash effects and improvements in performance with direct force reflection in comparison to tactile feedback are attributable to reflexive short-loop adjustment of grasp tension afforded by the muscle's length-tension control system. The criterion of acceptable operator performance, dependent upon both the quality of the transmission of control commands and feedback, and the response of the remote device, is discussed.

  10. Multiphase forces on bend structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nennie, E.D.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Piping structures are generally subjected to high dynamic loading due to multiphase forces. In particular subsea structures are very vulnerable as large flexibility is required to cope for instance with thermal stresses. The forces due to multiphase flow are characterized by a broadband spectrum

  11. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  12. Random walks, random fields, and disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Černý, Jiří; Kotecký, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the mathematics that lies at the intersection of probability theory, statistical physics, combinatorics and computer science, this volume collects together lecture notes on recent developments in the area. The common ground of these subjects is perhaps best described by the three terms in the title: Random Walks, Random Fields and Disordered Systems. The specific topics covered include a study of Branching Brownian Motion from the perspective of disordered (spin-glass) systems, a detailed analysis of weakly self-avoiding random walks in four spatial dimensions via methods of field theory and the renormalization group, a study of phase transitions in disordered discrete structures using a rigorous version of the cavity method, a survey of recent work on interacting polymers in the ballisticity regime and, finally, a treatise on two-dimensional loop-soup models and their connection to conformally invariant systems and the Gaussian Free Field. The notes are aimed at early graduate students with a mod...

  13. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  14. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  15. Single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Jonne; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Gaub, Hermann E; Muller, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The controlled adhesion of cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix is crucial for tissue development and maintenance. Numerous assays have been developed to quantify cell adhesion. Among these, the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) has recently been established. This assay permits the adhesion of living cells to be studied in near-physiological conditions. This implementation of AFM allows unrivaled spatial and temporal control of cells, as well as highly quantitative force actuation and force measurement that is sufficiently sensitive to characterize the interaction of single molecules. Therefore, not only overall cell adhesion but also the properties of single adhesion-receptor-ligand interactions can be studied. Here we describe current implementations and applications of SCFS, as well as potential pitfalls, and outline how developments will provide insight into the forces, energetics and kinetics of cell-adhesion processes.

  16. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy by Dissipative Electrostatic Force Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Topple, Jessica; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental technique for Kelvin probe force microscopy using the dissipation signal of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy for bias-voltage feedback. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low-frequency modulation. The dissipation is caused by the oscillating electrostatic force that is coherent with the tip oscillation, which is induced by a sinusoidally oscillating voltage applied between the tip and sample. We analyze the effect of the phase of the oscillating force on the frequency shift and dissipation and found that the relative phase of 90° that causes only the dissipation is the most appropriate for Kelvin-probe-force-microscopy measurements. The present technique requires a significantly smaller ac-voltage amplitude by virtue of enhanced force detection due to the resonance enhancement and the use of fundamental flexural-mode oscillation for electrostatic force detection. This feature will be of great importance in the electrical characterizations of technically relevant materials whose electrical properties are influenced by the externally applied electric field as is the case in semiconductor electronic devices.

  17. Quantum random number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  18. Random roots and lineage sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Payne, Ansel; DeSalle, Rob

    2012-07-01

    Lineage sorting has been suggested as a major force in generating incongruent phylogenetic signal when multiple gene partitions are examined. The degree of lineage sorting can be estimated using the coalescent process and simulation studies have also pointed to a major role for incomplete lineage sorting as a factor in phylogenetic inference. Some recent empirical studies point to an extreme role for this phenomenon with up to 50-60% of all informative genes showing incongruence as a result of lineage sorting. Here, we examine seven large multi-partition genome level data sets over a large range of taxonomic representation. We took the approach of examining outgroup choice and its impact on tree topology, by swapping outgroups into analyses with successively larger genetics distances to the ingroup. Our results indicate a linear relationship of outgroup distance with incongruence in the data sets we examined suggesting a strong random rooting effect. In addition, we attempted to estimate the degree of lineage sorting in several large genome level data sets by examining triads of very closely related taxa. This exercise resulted in much lower estimates of incongruent genes that could be the result of lineage sorting, with an overall estimate of around 10% of the total number of genes in a genome showing incongruence as a result of true lineage sorting. Finally we examined the behavior of likelihood and parsimony approaches on the random rooting phenomenon. Likelihood tends to stabilize incongruence as outgroups get further and further away from the ingroup. In one extreme case, likelihood overcompensates for sequence divergence but increases random rooting causing long branch repulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Random Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Rob; Rinaldo, Alessandro; Wasserman, Larry

    2011-01-01

    We propose a relaxed privacy definition called {\\em random differential privacy} (RDP). Differential privacy requires that adding any new observation to a database will have small effect on the output of the data-release procedure. Random differential privacy requires that adding a {\\em randomly drawn new observation} to a database will have small effect on the output. We show an analog of the composition property of differentially private procedures which applies to our new definition. We sh...

  20. Role of small-norm components in extended random-phase approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    2017-09-01

    The role of the small-norm amplitudes in extended random-phase approximation (RPA) theories such as the particle-particle and hole-hole components of one-body amplitudes and the two-body amplitudes other than two-particle/two-hole components are investigated for the one-dimensional Hubbard model using an extended RPA derived from the time-dependent density matrix theory. It is found that these amplitudes cannot be neglected in strongly interacting regions where the effects of ground-state correlations are significant.

  1. 6Li in a three-body model with realistic Forces: Separable versus nonseparable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlophe, L.; Lei, Jin; Elster, Ch.; Nogga, A.; Nunes, F. M.

    2017-12-01

    Background: Deuteron induced reactions are widely used to probe nuclear structure and astrophysical information. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. However, it needs to be demonstrated that their solution based on separable interactions agrees exactly with solutions based on nonseparable forces. Methods: Momentum space Faddeev equations are solved with nonseparable and separable forces as coupled integral equations. Results: The ground state of 6Li is calculated via momentum space Faddeev equations using the CD-Bonn neutron-proton force and a Woods-Saxon type neutron(proton)-4He force. For the latter the Pauli-forbidden S -wave bound state is projected out. This result is compared to a calculation in which the interactions in the two-body subsystems are represented by separable interactions derived in the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) framework. Conclusions: We find that calculations based on the separable representation of the interactions and the original interactions give results that agree to four significant figures for the binding energy, provided that energy and momentum support points of the EST expansion are chosen independently. The momentum distributions computed in both approaches also fully agree with each other.

  2. High force 10 kN piezoresistive silicon force sensor with output independent of force distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijze, A.F.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Peeters, Eric; Paul, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    A 10 kN silicon force sensor is realized in which the force is measured by compressing a meander shaped polysilicon strain gage. A second gage which is not loaded, is used for temperature compensation, for compensation of bending and stretching stresses in the chip and for common changes in zero

  3. Embedded Media - A Force Multiplier or Force Divider

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sipes, John A

    2006-01-01

    .... forces operating in Iraq. Some had preconceived agendas about how they were going to exploit the terrible horrors they were about to encounter in an effort to degrade the military leadership, dissuade the civilian leadership...

  4. Utilization of random process spectral properties for the calculation of fatigue life under combined loading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svoboda J; Balda M; Fröhlich V

    2009-01-01

    ... of forces and moments of random character. Considering the fracture mechanics theory, then the damaging of material is both in the micro- and macro-plastic area connected with the rise of plastic deformation and hence with the plastic...

  5. Consistent force fields for saccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld

    1999-01-01

    Consistent force fields for carbohydrates were hitherto developed by extensive optimization ofpotential energy function parameters on experimental data and on ab initio results. A wide range of experimental data is used: internal structures obtained from gas phase electron diffraction and from x......-anomeric effects are accounted for without addition of specific terms. The work is done in the framework of the Consistent Force Field which originatedin Israel and was further developed in Denmark. The actual methods and strategies employed havebeen described previously. Extensive testing of the force field...

  6. Random errors revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    the random errors of estimates of the sound intensity in, say, one-third octave bands from the power and cross power spectra of the signals from an intensity probe determined with a dual channel FFT analyser. This is not very practical, though. In this paper it is demonstrated that one can predict the random...

  7. a randomized controlled trial.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milk, only an estimated one -fourth of neonates in India were breastfed within ... standard of care in India and mothers are informed about. 6 months of ... weeks postpartum. A random number sequence was generated using a com- puter program. Block randomization was used with a fixed block size of four. Concealment of ...

  8. Hashing, Randomness and Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus

    time and memory space. To some extent we also consider lower bounds, i.e., we attempt to show limitations on how efficient algorithms are possible. A central theme in the thesis is randomness. Randomized algorithms play an important role, in particular through the key technique of hashing. Additionally...

  9. Random Walks and Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available These notes provide an elementary and self-contained introduction to branching random walks. Section 1 gives a brief overview of Galton–Watson trees, whereas Section 2 presents the classical law of large numbers for branching random walks. These two short sections are not exactly indispensable, but they introduce the idea of using size-biased trees, thus giving motivations and an avant-goût to the main part, Section 3, where branching random walks are studied from a deeper point of view, and are connected to the model of directed polymers on a tree. Tree-related random processes form a rich and exciting research subject. These notes cover only special topics. For a general account, we refer to the St-Flour lecture notes of Peres [47] and to the forthcoming book of Lyons and Peres [42], as well as to Duquesne and Le Gall [23] and Le Gall [37] for continuous random trees.

  10. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  11. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a lethal...

  12. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  13. Physical forcing and phytoplankton distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Platt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available At the global and regional scales, the distribution and abundance of marine phytoplankton are under the control of physical forcing. Moreover, the community structure and the size structure of phytoplankton assemblages also appear to be under physical control. Areas of the ocean with common physical forcing (ecological provinces may be expected to have phytoplankton communities that respond in a similar fashion to changes in local forcing, and with ecophysiological rate parameters that are predictable from local environmental conditions. In modelling the marine ecosystem, relevant parameters may be assigned according to a partition into ecological provinces. To the extent that physical forcing of the ocean is not constant within or between years, the boundaries of the provinces should be considered as dynamic. The dynamics and the associated changes in taxa can be revealed by remote sensing.

  14. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  15. Air Force Afloat Prepostion Fleet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dugan, Richard

    2000-01-01

    ...) to assist assigned airmen with operations tempo. AEFs present pre-designated combat, mobility, support and leadership capabilities from which the Joint Force Commander can tailor the desired operational effect...

  16. Understanding Irish Labour Force Participation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephen Byrne; Martin D O'Brien

    2017-01-01

    .... Given the important role of labour supply in explaining Irish economic growth, we aim to identify the relative influence of structural and cyclical factors in the recent dynamics of Irish labour force participation...

  17. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  18. WORK FORCE OPTIMIZATION FOR 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    gain maximum return on investment in the workforce.15 Within the military, this applies to the total work force; Active, National Guard, Reserve...in a team environment.18 The best example of this application is the ability of Special Forces teams (Seals, Rangers, Green Beret) to execute...execution of a capital investment program is required to provide other capabilities within fitness facilities. Civilian personnel involvement in

  19. Forces in Liquid Metal Contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using rather well known theory about capillary bridges between two electrodes we calculate the tensile force that can be applied to liquid metal contacts in the micrometer regime. Assuming circular symmetry, full wetting of the electrodes, and neglecting gravity, we present a brief review...... of the necessary theory and find numerically the forces to be in the 100μN range for liquid metals as mercury and liquid Gallium suspended between electrodes of 20μm radius....

  20. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing the molec......Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing...

  1. Magnetic Forces on Moving Charges

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim drag Simulation Drag-and-Drop Exercise Interactive Media Element This interactive tutorial provides the practice to reinforce the concept of magnetic force of moving charges. The key concepts covered include: The direction of the resultant magnetic force is always perpendicular to the plane defined by the velocity vector of the charge and the magnetic field vector., The direction of motion of the charge is also influenced by the sign/polarity of the charge., If the velocity...

  2. Wave Forces on Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested.......A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested....

  3. The Generalized Centrifugal Force Model

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A spatially continuous force-based model for simulating pedestrian dynamics is introduced which includes an elliptical volume exclusion of pedestrians. We discuss the phenomena of oscillations and overlapping which occur for certain choices of the forces. The main intention of this work is the quantitative description of pedestrian movement in several geometries. Measurements of the fundamental diagram in narrow and wide corridors are performed. The results of the proposed model show good agreement with empirical data obtained in controlled experiments.

  4. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  5. Electromagnetic forces in photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Antonoyiannakis, M. I.; Pendry, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a general methodology for numerical computations of electromagnetic (EM) fields and forces in matter, based on solving the macroscopic Maxwell's equations in real space and adopting the Maxwell Stress Tensor formalism. Our approach can be applied to both dielectric and metallic systems of frequency-dependent dielectric function; as well as to objects of any size and geometrical properties in principle. We are particularly interested in calculating forces on nanostructures. We find ...

  6. Concentric and impact forces of single-leg jumps in an aquatic environment versus on land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, N Travis; Colado, Juan C; Benavent, Juan; Alakhdar, Yasser; Madera, Joaquin; Gonzalez, Luis M; Tella, Victor

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the kinetic and the kinematic differences in female athletes in single-leg static jumps in an aquatic environment compared with those performed on dry land. Twelve healthy, junior national team handball players participated. Subjects completed a familiarization and a testing session. The subjects performed a series of single-leg jumps, dry land and aquatic with and without devices, which were randomized to avoid fatigue effects. Peak concentric force, rate of force development, impact force, and time of the jumps were determined using a force plate. Peak concentric force and rate of force development were significantly (P type of exercise include an exercise mode that can be performed without compromising speed while reducing the potential for joint injury.

  7. Galilean invariance and homogeneous anisotropic randomly stirred flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berera, Arjun; Hochberg, David

    2005-11-01

    The Ward-Takahashi identities for incompressible flow implied by Galilean invariance are derived for the randomly forced Navier-Stokes equation, in which both the mean and fluctuating velocity components are explicitly present. The consequences of the Galilean invariance for the vertex renormalization are drawn from this identity.

  8. Labor force activity after 60

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Larsen, Mona

    2015-01-01

    In most OECD member countries labor force attachement has increased in recent years in the 60+ group. Focus in the paper is on the development in this area in Denmark, Norway and Sweden since the 1990s. The development in the same period in the German labor market is included as a frame of refere......In most OECD member countries labor force attachement has increased in recent years in the 60+ group. Focus in the paper is on the development in this area in Denmark, Norway and Sweden since the 1990s. The development in the same period in the German labor market is included as a frame...... in labor force participation is described based on register data and on labor force surveys along with indicators of cohort relevant changes in education and health. Focus in the paper includes also the gender aspect to accommodate stronger cohort effects for women than for men. The impact on labor force...... a brief survey of policy changes in the Scandinavian countries and Germany as other determinants of labor force participation in the 60 and older group....

  9. Is Gravity an Entropic Force?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable connections between gravity and thermodynamics seem to imply that gravity is not fundamental but emergent, and in particular, as Verlinde suggested, gravity is probably an entropic force. In this paper, we will argue that the idea of gravity as an entropic force is debatable. It is shown that there is no convincing analogy between gravity and entropic force in Verlinde’s example. Neither holographic screen nor test particle satisfies all requirements for the existence of entropic force in a thermodynamics system. Furthermore, we show that the entropy increase of the screen is not caused by its statistical tendency to increase entropy as required by the existence of entropic force, but in fact caused by gravity. Therefore, Verlinde’s argument for the entropic origin of gravity is problematic. In addition, we argue that the existence of a minimum size of spacetime, together with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in quantum theory, may imply the fundamental existence of gravity as a geometric property of spacetime. This may provide a further support for the conclusion that gravity is not an entropic force.

  10. Comparison of forced-air warming and resistive heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, T; Flöther, L; Weyland, W; Quintel, M; Bräuer, A

    2008-12-01

    Perioperative hypothermia is common during anesthesia and surgery and is accompanied by several complications. Forced-air warming is recognized as an effective procedure to prevent hypothermia. The aim of this study was to compare a resistive heating device with a forced-air warming device. Prospective randomized trial. heat transfer laboratory of a University hospital. six healthy volunteers. warming with a forced-air warming device (BairHugger 505 and Upper Body Blanket 522; Arizant Healthcare Inc., Eden Prairie, MN, USA) or a resistive heating device (Geratherm Adult system; Geratherm Medical AG, Geschwenda, Germany). heat transfer was measured with 11 calibrated heat flux transducers on the upper body. Additionally, blanket and skin temperatures were measured. The t-test for matched pairs was used for statistical evaluation. Skin temperature under the covered surface was not statistically different between the two groups (37.3+/-0.2 degrees C in the forced-air warming group and 37.8+/-0.2 degrees C in the resistive heating group). In contrast, blanket temperature (40.3+/-0.6 degrees C vs 38.1+/-0.4 degrees C, P=0.002) and heat transfer (13.2+/-3.6 W vs 7.8+/-1.9 W, P=0.048) were significantly higher in the resistive heating group. Heat transfer in the resistive heating system was significantly greater than that of the forced-air warming system.

  11. Parkinson’s Disease and Forced Exercise: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Qutubuddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The concept of forced exercise has drawn attention for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease symptoms with anecdotal reports of success. This study sought to ascertain any significant effect of forced exercise using a motorized stationary bicycle when compared to controls on Parkinson’s disease symptoms in a blinded, randomized, and controlled setting. Setting. Parkinson’s disease outpatient clinic, Veterans Administration Medical Center. Method. We assessed 23 patients (13 experimental and 10 controls on a number of standard Parkinson’s measures at baseline, after participation in eight weeks of twice weekly forced exercise or eight weeks of conventional clinic care, and then after a three-month period had elapsed. Dependent measures were UPDRS-III, Berg Balance Scale, finger taping test, and the PDQ-39. Results. Results did not demonstrate any main effect differences between the exercise and control groups on any measure at any point in time. A within subjects effect was demonstrated for the forced exercise group on overall UPDRS-III scores at the three-month end point. No other within group effects were noted. Results suggest that early enthusiasm for forced exercise may need tempering. Limitations of the study are discussed as well as numerous logistical challenges to this type of study.

  12. A New Conservative Scheme for Solving the Two Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Vogelaere [23], Scraton [20] and others). Also, linear multistep methods of the form k k’= h2 O.jYn+j = Sjfn+j (2) j=0 J=o exist. See, for example, Henrici ...equations based on trigonometric polynomials, Numer. Math., a, 381-397 (1961). 11. P. Henrici , Discrete Variable Methods in Ordinary Differen- tial

  13. The Queen's Two Bodies: Sor Juana and New Spain's Vicereines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz contains many examples of positive representations of the Queens of Spain and the Vicereines of New Spain. These poetic portraits serve to counter the primarily misogynistic portrayals of ruling women of the seventeenth century. Most importantly, Sor Juana increased the visibility of the vicereine in colonial…

  14. Human Activity Recognition With Two Body-Worn Accelerometer Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hessen, Hans-Olav; Tessem, Astrid Johnsen

    2016-01-01

    Data used in studies about physical activity is primarily collected from questionnaires and other subjective methods, which may lead to biased and inaccurate data. As subjective data collection methods have shown to be unreliable, enhancing or even replacing these methods with objective methods like the use of wearable technology and human activity recognition (HAR) systems, will lead to more accurate data. HAR systems are systems that can recognize what kind of activity a subject is performi...

  15. Reconstruction of two-body B decays in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068023

    2007-01-01

    The observed dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe leads to the hypothesis of the Sakharov conditions for the laws of nature. One of them implies the breaking of the charge-parity (CP) symmetry. The violation of the CP symmetry has been observed in several decays of kaons and B mesons and is incorporated in the Standard Model via the CKM matrix, describing the quark transitions in the charged current weak interactions. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides a copious source of bb quark pairs, offering an excellent facility to study CP violation in the B meson system. The LHC is a powerful pp collider, which will accelerate proton bunches in opposite directions in a ring of 27 km circumference. Protons will collide every 25 ns at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. It is foreseen to start operation in 2008. LHCb, one of the four experiments along the LHC ring, is dedicated to the study of CP violation and rare decays in the B meson system. Since bb pairs are mostly produced in a forward cone alo...

  16. Two-Body Reactions at Large Transverse Momentum

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Large-angle exclusive reactions are studied, in particular elastic scattering and @*p annihilations into @p|+@p|- and K|+K|-. In a previous geometry, the 90|0 c.m. region was covered. The present geometry covers the -t range from about 1 to 8 (GeV/c)|2. The aim is to tie these two regions together and attem understading of large-angle scattering up to our highest energies. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment uses a 1 m liquid H^2 target surrounded by scintillator and lead sandwiches for vetoing neutral and charged particles missing the acceptance. An aerogel Cerenkov counter in the recoil arm can be used to veto charged pions above 0.8 GeV/c. Otherwise the events are selected as previously with fast coincidence matrices using pulses from arrays of scintillator counters. Identification of particles is carried out with threshold Cerenkov counters and iron calorimeters. MWPC's are used to establish the trajectories of the particles.

  17. Combining configurational energies and forces for molecular force field optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Lukas; Sun, Weiwei; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2017-10-01

    While quantum chemical simulations have been increasingly used as an invaluable source of information for atomistic model development, the high computational expenses typically associated with these techniques often limit thorough sampling of the systems of interest. It is therefore of great practical importance to use all available information as efficiently as possible, and in a way that allows for consistent addition of constraints that may be provided by macroscopic experiments. Here we propose a simple approach that combines information from configurational energies and forces generated in a molecular dynamics simulation to increase the effective number of samples. Subsequently, this information is used to optimize a molecular force field by minimizing the statistical distance similarity metric. We illustrate the methodology on an example of a trajectory of configurations generated in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of argon and water and compare the results with those based on the force matching method.

  18. Random maintenance policies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Exploring random maintenance models, this book provides an introduction to the implementation of random maintenance, and it is one of the first books to be written on this subject.  It aims to help readers learn new techniques for applying random policies to actual reliability models, and it provides new theoretical analyses of various models including classical replacement, preventive maintenance and inspection policies. These policies are applied to scheduling problems, backup policies of database systems, maintenance policies of cumulative damage models, and reliability of random redundant systems. Reliability theory is a major concern for engineers and managers, and in light of Japan’s recent earthquake, the reliability of large-scale systems has increased in importance. This also highlights the need for a new notion of maintenance and reliability theory, and how this can practically be applied to systems. Providing an essential guide for engineers and managers specializing in reliability maintenance a...

  19. Drawing a random number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard; Sørensen, Majken Vildrik

    2006-01-01

    highly uniform multidimensional draws, which are highly relevant for todays traffic models. This paper shows among others combined shuffling and scrambling seems needless, that scrambling gives the lowest correlation and that there are detectable differences between random numbers, dependent...

  20. Theory of random sets

    CERN Document Server

    Molchanov, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    This monograph, now in a thoroughly revised second edition, offers the latest research on random sets. It has been extended to include substantial developments achieved since 2005, some of them motivated by applications of random sets to econometrics and finance. The present volume builds on the foundations laid by Matheron and others, including the vast advances in stochastic geometry, probability theory, set-valued analysis, and statistical inference. It shows the various interdisciplinary relationships of random set theory within other parts of mathematics, and at the same time fixes terminology and notation that often vary in the literature, establishing it as a natural part of modern probability theory and providing a platform for future development. It is completely self-contained, systematic and exhaustive, with the full proofs that are necessary to gain insight. Aimed at research level, Theory of Random Sets will be an invaluable reference for probabilists; mathematicians working in convex and integ...

  1. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in...

  2. Qualification of the JWST MIRI Instrument Using Force Limited Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J.; Eccleston, P.; Laine, B.; Ngan, I.; Salvignol, J. C.

    2012-07-01

    The MIRI instrument design was qualified for sine and random environments using force limited testing to limit the dynamic responses of the sensitive optical components and mechanisms while demonstrating adequate margin with regard to the environmental flight conditions. Force limiting was achieved using force transducers located between the interface of the instrument and the shaker adapter during the vibration test. Interface forces for each of the three interface points were measured in three orthogonal axes during the low level sine test and used to compute the overturning moment, while the resulting global interface force was directly measured by combining the signals from three individual interfaces during the high level vibrations such that automatic notching could be applied. The test was performed in the recently upgraded vibration facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. In order to demonstrate and develop the MIRI flight model test approach and procedures, a pull- through test was carried out using the Structural Model of the instrument which had been previously vibrated in 2005 at a different facility. This early test allowed measurement of the facility behaviour with the test article, exercising the notching and abort functions, and highlighting an issue with the stiffness of the adapter, as well as several other lessons learned. An adapter with additional in-plane stiffness to ensure in-phase movement of the interfaces and correct functioning of the force-limiting system was subsequently designed, manufactured and tested in time for the instrument FM test. The vibration test was executed very smoothly thanks to the lessons learned from the preparatory test and the work carried out by the team in advance of the test in preparing modelling and analysis tools which could be used in quasi-real time during the test campaign. The paper intends to present the force limited vibration notching approach as well as the lessons learned from this test.

  3. Ultrastable atomic force microscopy: improved force and positional stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, Allison B; Perkins, Thomas T

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an exciting technique for biophysical studies of single molecules, but its usefulness is limited by instrumental drift. We dramatically reduced positional drift by adding two lasers to track and thereby actively stabilize the tip and the surface. These lasers also enabled label-free optical images that were spatially aligned to the tip position. Finally, sub-pN force stability over 100 s was achieved by removing the gold coating from soft cantilevers. These enhancements to AFM instrumentation can immediately benefit research in biophysics and nanoscience. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Quasiclassical Random Matrix Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Prange, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    We directly combine ideas of the quasiclassical approximation with random matrix theory and apply them to the study of the spectrum, in particular to the two-level correlator. Bogomolny's transfer operator T, quasiclassically an NxN unitary matrix, is considered to be a random matrix. Rather than rejecting all knowledge of the system, except for its symmetry, [as with Dyson's circular unitary ensemble], we choose an ensemble which incorporates the knowledge of the shortest periodic orbits, th...

  5. Climate hypersensitivity to solar forcing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Soon

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the equilibrium climate responses of a quasi-dynamical energy balance model to radiative forcing by equivalent changes in CO2, solar total irradiance (Stot and solar UV (SUV. The response is largest in the SUV case, in which the imposed UV radiative forcing is preferentially absorbed in the layer above 250 mb, in contrast to the weak response from global-columnar radiative loading by increases in CO2 or Stot. The hypersensitive response of the climate system to solar UV forcing is caused by strongly coupled feedback involving vertical static stability, tropical thick cirrus ice clouds and stratospheric ozone. This mechanism offers a plausible explanation of the apparent hypersensitivity of climate to solar forcing, as suggested by analyses of recent climatic records. The model hypersensitivity strongly depends on climate parameters, especially cloud radiative properties, but is effective for arguably realistic values of these parameters. The proposed solar forcing mechanism should be further confirmed using other models (e.g., general circulation models that may better capture radiative and dynamical couplings of the troposphere and stratosphere.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · general or miscellaneous · Solar physics · astrophysics · and astronomy (ultraviolet emissions

  6. Quantum randomness and unpredictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Gregg [Quantum Communication and Measurement Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Division of Natural Science and Mathematics, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Quantum mechanics is a physical theory supplying probabilities corresponding to expectation values for measurement outcomes. Indeed, its formalism can be constructed with measurement as a fundamental process, as was done by Schwinger, provided that individual measurements outcomes occur in a random way. The randomness appearing in quantum mechanics, as with other forms of randomness, has often been considered equivalent to a form of indeterminism. Here, it is argued that quantum randomness should instead be understood as a form of unpredictability because, amongst other things, indeterminism is not a necessary condition for randomness. For concreteness, an explication of the randomness of quantum mechanics as the unpredictability of quantum measurement outcomes is provided. Finally, it is shown how this view can be combined with the recently introduced view that the very appearance of individual quantum measurement outcomes can be grounded in the Plenitude principle of Leibniz, a principle variants of which have been utilized in physics by Dirac and Gell-Mann in relation to the fundamental processes. This move provides further support to Schwinger's ''symbolic'' derivation of quantum mechanics from measurement. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Signatures of hydrophobic collapse in extended proteins captured with force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Kirstin A.; Gräter, Frauke; Dougan, Lorna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2007-01-01

    We unfold and extend single proteins at a high force and then linearly relax the force to probe their collapse mechanisms. We observe a large variability in the extent of their recoil. Although chain entropy makes a small contribution, we show that the observed variability results from hydrophobic interactions with randomly varying magnitude from protein to protein. This collapse mechanism is common to highly extended proteins, including nonfolding elastomeric proteins like PEVK from titin. O...

  8. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  9. CD Review: Tour de Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Golden

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of Tour de Force, the third album from C Force, an ensemble comprised of flutist Christine Gangelhoff, euphoniumist Christian Justilien, and pianist Christy Lee. With repertoire spanning over two centuries, the trio embarks on a musical tour to Guadaloupe, Jamaica, and Haiti on Disc One, and then Trinidad and Tobago, Curaçao, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Bahamas on Disc Two. Just as the eclectic album artwork by John Cox might suggest, Tour de Force provides listeners with a sense of the rich tapestry of musical connections shared in art music across the Caribbean. This two-disc set (released March 2016 was recorded at the Performing Arts Center of The College of The Bahamas and produced by Terry Manning of Lucky Seven Records.

  10. BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE SALES FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Building an effective sales force starts with selecting good salespeople, but good salespeople are very difficult to find. The reason for this is that most sales jobs are very demanding and require a great deal from the salesperson. There are many different types of sales jobs. Before it can hire salespeople, each company must do a careful job analysis to see what particular types of selling and other skills are necessary for each sales job. One task of the market planner is to establish clear objectives each year for the entire sales force, for each region, each sales office, and each salesperson. Sales jobs are different from in-house jobs in some significant ways. Nevertheless, each company must continually work on building and maintaining an effective sales force using the following steps: recruitment, selection, training, compensation and evaluation of each salesperson.

  11. The theory of intermolecular forces

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The theory of intermolecular forces has advanced very greatly in recent years. It has become possible to carry out accurate calculations of intermolecular forces for molecules of useful size, and to apply the results to important practical applications such as understanding protein structure and function, and predicting the structures of molecular crystals. The Theory of Intermolecular Forces sets out the mathematical techniques that are needed to describe and calculate intermolecular interactions and to handle the more elaborate mathematical models. It describes the methods that are used to calculate them, including recent developments in the use of density functional theory and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. The use of higher-rank multipole moments to describe electrostatic interactions is explained in both Cartesian and spherical tensor formalism, and methods that avoid the multipole expansion are also discussed. Modern ab initio perturbation theory methods for the calculation of intermolecular inte...

  12. Transversal light forces in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, M

    2003-01-01

    The transversal light force is a well established effect in atomic and molecular systems that are exposed to spatially inhomogeneous light fields. In this paper it is shown theoretically that in an excited semiconductor, containing an electron-hole plasma or excitons, a similar light force exists, if the semiconductor is exposed to an ultrashort spatially inhomogeneous light field. The analysis is based on the equations of motion for the Wigner distribution functions of charge carrier populations and interband polarizations. The results show that, while the light force on the electron-hole plasma or the excitons does exist, its effects on the kinetic behaviour of the electron-hole plasma or the excitons are different compared to the situation in an atomic or molecular system. A detailed analysis presented here traces this difference back to the principal differences between atoms and molecules on the one hand and electron-hole plasmas or excitons on the other hand.

  13. Atomic force microscopy and direct surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ralston, J.; Larson, I.; Rutland, M.; Feiler, A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is designed to provide high-resolution (in the ideal case, atomic) topographical analysis, applicable to both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The basic imaging principle is very simple: a sample attached to a piezoelectric positioner is rastered beneath a

  14. Development of isometric force and force control in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-six children between 5 and 12 years of age and 15 adults performed a task (pressing on a lever with the index finger of the preferred hand), in which a force had to be maintained constant at five levels with on-line visual feedback. Since this is a simple isometric task, the hypothesis is that

  15. Development of isometric force and force control in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-six children between 5 and 12 years of age and 15 adults performed a task (pressing on a lever with the index finger of the preferred hand), in which a force had to be maintained constant at five levels with on-line visual feedback. Since this is a simple isometric task, the hypothesis is that

  16. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  18. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hofmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17 and professional clarinettists (N = 6 were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 x 2 x 2 design (register: low--high; tempo: slow--fast, dynamics: soft--loud. There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low--high of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions. The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean and peak force (Fmax were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g. guitar. Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N.For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N. Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  19. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  20. Radiohumeral stability to forced translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Seki, Atsuhito

    2002-01-01

    Radiohumeral stability to forced translation was experimentally analyzed in 8 osteocartilaginous joint preparations. The joints were dislocated in 8 centrifugal directions at 12 different combinations of joint flexion and rotation while a constant joint compression force of 23 N was applied...... did not. In supination, the greatest stability was observed for anteromedial dislocations, in neutral rotation for posteromedial dislocations, and in pronation for posterolateral dislocations. The findings from this study indicate systematic variations in wall height around the radial head concavity...... as well as individual variations in joint constraint. This may have implications for the treatment of conditions involving radiohumeral joint dislocation....

  1. Archimedes Force on Casimir Apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchenko, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We address a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium and weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  2. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Observation of Two Types of Behaviors of Financial Bubbles and the Related Higher-Order Potential Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Takayasu, H.; Takayasu, M.

    Market prices are known to be well described by the random walk modelin a time-dependent potential force whose center is given by the trace of the random walker [Physica A 370 (2006), 91]. We analytically show that the higher-order potential force determines the dynamic price behaviors of the single-exponential growth and the double exponential growth. We confirm the existence of such price behaviors in real financial data and we observe the higher-order potential forces in some periods.

  4. The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rachel E.; Boulos, David; Garber, Bryan G.; Jetly, Rakesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) collected detailed information on mental health problems, their impacts, occupational and nonoccupational determinants of mental health, and the use of mental health services from a random sample of 8200 serving personnel. The objective of this article is to provide a firm scientific foundation for understanding and interpreting the CFMHS findings. Methods: This narrative review first provides a snapshot of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), focusing on 2 key determinants of mental health: the deployment of more than 40,000 personnel in support of the mission in Afghanistan and the extensive renewal of the CAF mental health system. The findings of recent population-based CAF mental health research are reviewed, with a focus on findings from the very similar mental health survey done in 2002. Finally, key aspects of the methods of the 2013 CFMHS are presented. Results: The findings of 20 peer-reviewed publications using the 2002 mental health survey data are reviewed, along with those of 25 publications from other major CAF mental health research projects executed over the past decade. Conclusions: More than a decade of population-based mental health research in the CAF has provided a detailed picture of its mental health and use of mental health services. This knowledge base and the homology of the 2013 survey with the 2002 CAF survey and general population surveys in 2002 and 2012 will provide an unusual opportunity to use the CFMHS to situate mental health in the CAF in a historical and societal perspective. PMID:27270738

  5. Reduced-Force Closed Trocar Entry Technique: Analysis of Trocar Insertion Force Using a Mechanical Force Gauge

    OpenAIRE

    Fanning, James; Shah, Manish; Fenton, Bradford

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Trocar insertion injury has a high morbidity, mortality, and cost. The purpose of this study was to compare standard trocar entry with our reduced-force closed trocar entry technique by measuring trocar insertion force using a mechanical force gauge. Methods: In the operating room, the force gauge was inserted into a sterile glove and connected to the proximal portion of the trocar to measure insertion force. Through one incision, we used a standard closed trocar en...

  6. The Central Gravitational Force and Its Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Iaco Veris, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    As has been shown in Chap. 2, Sect. 2.1, the two-body scheme applies to the case of two isolated point-masses which are subject only to their mutual gravitational attraction. In this case, such masses move, with respect to an inertial reference system having its origin in their centre of mass, along Keplerian orbits, each of which is identified by a set of orbital elements.

  7. Annual Report 2009 (Project Air Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Through 60 years of collaboration, RAND Project AIR FORCE (PAF) has acquired unparalleled insight into Air Force strategy, forces, policy, resources, and manpower. We have developed a body of expertise and intellectual capital and are uniquely poised to provide policy recommendations on critical national security challenges. Working with the Air Force to translate these recommendations into decisions that have

  8. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard, as...

  9. 77 FR 30875 - Armed Forces Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8823 of May 18, 2012 Armed Forces Day, 2012 By the President of the United... circumstances. On Armed Forces Day, we pay tribute to the unparalleled service of our Armed Forces and recall... Day. I direct the Secretary of Defense on behalf of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, and...

  10. Wave Forces on Offshore Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    The present report on the wave forces is the first report on the Borkum Riff project. A testprogramme has been performed to dertermine the wave forces on windturbine foundations.......The present report on the wave forces is the first report on the Borkum Riff project. A testprogramme has been performed to dertermine the wave forces on windturbine foundations....

  11. Constructive consequences of leaders' forcing influence styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, B.J.M.; Munduate, L; Klaver, E; Van de Vliert, E.

    In contrast to non-forcing influence styles used by leaders, their forcing influence styles are commonly found to be ineffective, evoking sheer resistance, rather than compliance. As a corollary of conglomerate conflict behavior theory, we state that forcing, if combined with non-forcing, may

  12. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  13. [Force platforms, a technological innovation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Myriam; Dumez, Kévin; Cool, Gaëlle; Luyat, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a public health issue due to the seriousness of the physical and psychological consequences as well as the resulting financial cost. Static posturography with the help of a force platform helps to guide therapeutic decisions and to rehabilitate patients who have fallen.

  14. Interaction Forces between Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, James; Ventrici, João; Kittleson, Gregory; Kuhl, Tonya L

    2017-01-10

    Cellular membranes containing sphingolipids and cholesterol have been shown to self-organize into lipid rafts-specialized domains that host integral membrane proteins and modulate the bioactivity of cells. In this work, force-distance profiles between raft membranes in the liquid-ordered phase consisting of singly unsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), a complex mixture of brain sphingomyelin (BSM), and cholesterol were measured using the surface force apparatus (SFA). Two distinct force profiles were detected corresponding to uniform raft membranes and raft membranes with a higher level of topological membrane defects (heterogeneous) as corroborated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans. In all cases a weak, long-range electrostatic repulsion was observed with some variation in the surface charge density. The variation in electrostatic repulsion was attributed to charged lipid species primarily from the constituent lipids in the BSM mixture. The adhesion between the uniform raft membranes was comparable to our previous work with pure component, liquid-ordered POPC-DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine)-cholesterol membranes. Raft membranes with more topological defects adhered more strongly owing to hydrophobic attraction between exposed acyl chains. Even though the rafts were in the liquid-ordered phase and membrane defects were present in the contact region, the raft membranes were stable, and no structural rearrangement was observed throughout the measurements. Our findings demonstrate that liquid-ordered membranes are stable to mechanical loading and not particularly sensitive to compositional variation.

  15. Forcing Entry into the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, Alexis; Nader, Guilherme; Piel, Matthieu

    2017-12-04

    Nuclear pore complexes tightly regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, controlling the nuclear concentration of several transcription factors. In a recent issue of Cell, Elosegui-Artola et al. (2017) show that nuclear deformation modulates the nuclear entry rates of YAP/TAZ via nuclear pore stretching, clarifying how forces affect gene transcription. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Fast evaluation of polarizable forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Skeel, Robert D.

    2005-10-01

    Polarizability is considered to be the single most significant development in the next generation of force fields for biomolecular simulations. However, the self-consistent computation of induced atomic dipoles in a polarizable force field is expensive due to the cost of solving a large dense linear system at each step of a simulation. This article introduces methods that reduce the cost of computing the electrostatic energy and force of a polarizable model from about 7.5 times the cost of computing those of a nonpolarizable model to less than twice the cost. This is probably sufficient for the routine use of polarizable forces in biomolecular simulations. The reduction in computing time is achieved by an efficient implementation of the particle-mesh Ewald method, an accurate and robust predictor based on least-squares fitting, and non-stationary iterative methods whose fast convergence is accelerated by a simple preconditioner. Furthermore, with these methods, the self-consistent approach with a larger timestep is shown to be faster than the extended Lagrangian approach. The use of dipole moments from previous timesteps to calculate an accurate initial guess for iterative methods leads to an energy drift, which can be made acceptably small. The use of a zero initial guess does not lead to perceptible energy drift if a reasonably strict convergence criterion for the iteration is imposed.

  17. Ranking the European armed forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeres, R.J.M.; Bogers, M.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of collectiveness aimed for in European defence policy raises issues such as burden sharing and relative performance measurement of the European Armed Forces (EAF). This paper compares EAF performance rates on three dimensions: input, throughput and output. In order to express

  18. Mechanical forces during muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sandra B; Schnorrer, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Muscles are the major force producing tissue in the human body. While certain muscle types specialize in producing maximum forces, others are very enduring. An extreme example is the heart, which continuously beats for the entire life. Despite being specialized, all body muscles share similar contractile mini-machines called sarcomeres that are organized into regular higher order structures called myofibrils. The major sarcomeric components and their organizational principles are conserved throughout most of the animal kingdom. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the understanding of myofibril and sarcomere development largely obtained from in vivo models. We focus on the role of mechanical forces during muscle and myofibril development and propose a tension driven self-organization mechanism for myofibril formation. We discuss recent technological advances that allow quantification of forces across tissues or molecules in vitro and in vivo. Although their application towards muscle development is still in its infancy, these technologies are likely to provide fundamental new insights into the mechanobiology of muscle and myofibril development in the near future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Air Force Handbook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Hughes Space (CO); Boeing (FL); Contraves (PA); TRAK Microwave (FL); RT Logic (CO); ADC (MN); ENSCO (FL); Net Acquire (WA); Freescale ...ContrACtor THE AIR FORCE HANDBOOK 2007 Ford Aerospace AIM-9M Sidewinder Freescale Semiconductor Inc Launch & Test Range System (LTRS) GDE

  20. A Qualitative Force Structure Analysis of the Global Mobility Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Force GSTF Global Strike Task Force HLSTF Homeland Response Task Force HUMRO Humanitarian Relief Operation ISR Intelligence...Task Force (S&C4ISRTF) 3. Global Strike Task Force ( GSTF ) 4. Global Response Task Force (GRTF) 5. Homeland Security Task Force (HLSTF) 6. Global...enable the “ GSTF and GRTF to deploy and employ rapidly anywhere in the world at any time” (DAF, 2002:16). Therefore, the GMTF has three key

  1. Using Data Mining Approaches for Force Prediction of a Dynamically Loaded Flexible Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlechtingen, Meik; Achiche, Sofiane; Lourenco Costa, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    -deterministic excitation forces with different excitation frequencies and amplitudes. Additionally, the influence of the sampling frequency and sensor location on the model performance is investigated. The results obtained in this paper show that most data mining approaches can be used, when a certain degree of inaccuracy...... of freedom and a force transducer for validation and training. The models are trained using data obtained from applying a random excitation force on the flexible structure. The performance of the developed models is evaluated by analyzing the prediction capabilities based on a normalized prediction error...

  2. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P muscles is highly responsive......Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well...... as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg...

  3. Coded Random Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paolini, Enrico; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Liva, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    , in which the structure of the access protocol can be mapped to a structure of an erasure-correcting code defined on graph. This opens the possibility to use coding theory and tools for designing efficient random access protocols, offering markedly better performance than ALOHA. Several instances of coded......The rise of machine-to-machine communications has rekindled the interest in random access protocols as a support for a massive number of uncoordinatedly transmitting devices. The legacy ALOHA approach is developed under a collision model, where slots containing collided packets are considered...... as waste. However, if the common receiver (e.g., base station) is capable to store the collision slots and use them in a transmission recovery process based on successive interference cancellation, the design space for access protocols is radically expanded. We present the paradigm of coded random access...

  4. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  5. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-07-01

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  6. A discrete fractional random transform

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2006-01-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  7. Force 2025 and Beyond Strategic Force Design Analytic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    type has characteristics that give it capabilities for completing different tasks, as described in our unit type task list, which is initially derived... initial work in using this type of methodology to construct force design models using a mission-focused, task-based, capability architecture. We... DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  8. Keeping Special Forces Special: Regional Proficiency in Special Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Poole for their support in this project. I would also like to thank the many people (too many to list) who took precious time out of their day to...Soldier may be required to translate documents or listen to intercepted conversations. This education is merely a stepping stone as Special Forces...North Africa (MENA) Algeria Bahrain Egypt Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Israel Jordan Kuwait Lebanon Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Morocco Oman Qatar

  9. Molecular motors: thermodynamics and the random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N; Imafuku, Y; Tawada, K

    2001-10-22

    The biochemical cycle of a molecular motor provides the essential link between its thermodynamics and kinetics. The thermodynamics of the cycle determine the motor's ability to perform mechanical work, whilst the kinetics of the cycle govern its stochastic behaviour. We concentrate here on tightly coupled, processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and myosin V, which hydrolyse one molecule of ATP per forward step. Thermodynamics require that, when such a motor pulls against a constant load f, the ratio of the forward and backward products of the rate constants for its cycle is exp [-(DeltaG + u(0)f)/kT], where -DeltaG is the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis and u(0) is the motor's step size. A hypothetical one-state motor can therefore act as a chemically driven ratchet executing a biased random walk. Treating this random walk as a diffusion problem, we calculate the forward velocity v and the diffusion coefficient D and we find that its randomness parameter r is determined solely by thermodynamics. However, real molecular motors pass through several states at each attachment site. They satisfy a modified diffusion equation that follows directly from the rate equations for the biochemical cycle and their effective diffusion coefficient is reduced to D-v(2)tau, where tau is the time-constant for the motor to reach the steady state. Hence, the randomness of multistate motors is reduced compared with the one-state case and can be used for determining tau. Our analysis therefore demonstrates the intimate relationship between the biochemical cycle, the force-velocity relation and the random motion of molecular motors.

  10. Aerosol absorption and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006 significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the short-wave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative forcing clear-sky from −0.79 to −0.53 W m−2 (33% and all-sky from −0.47 to −0.13 W m−2 (72%. Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19 W m−2 (36% clear-sky and of 0.12 W m−2 (92% all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W

  11. Random regression models

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zlukovi

    modelled as a quadratic regression, nested within parity. The previous lactation length was ... This proportion was mainly covered by linear and quadratic coefficients. Results suggest that RRM could .... The multiple trait models in scalar notation are presented by equations (1, 2), while equation. (3) represents the random ...

  12. Randomized response methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, P.G.M.; Cruyff, Maarten; Bockenholt, U.

    2014-01-01

    In survey research it is often problematic to ask people sensitive questions because they may refuse to answer or they may provide a socially desirable answer that does not reveal their true status on the sensitive question. To solve this problem Warner (1965) proposed randomized response (RR). Here

  13. Random eigenvalue problems revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The description of real-life engineering structural systems is associated with some amount of uncertainty in specifying material properties, geometric parameters, boundary conditions and applied loads. In the context of structural dynamics it is necessary to consider random eigenvalue problems in order to account for these ...

  14. absolutely regular random sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Harel

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the central limit theorems for the density estimator and for the integrated square error are proved for the case when the underlying sequence of random variables is nonstationary. Applications to Markov processes and ARMA processes are provided.

  15. A random matrix analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chaos to galaxies. We demonstrate the applicability of random matrix theory for networks by pro- viding a new dimension to complex systems research. We show that in spite of huge differences ... as mentioned earlier, different types of networks can be constructed based on the nature of connections. For example,.

  16. Random eigenvalue problems revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several studies have been conducted on this topic since the mid-sixties. The. A list of .... Random eigenvalue problems revisited. 297 and various elements of Hij ,i ≤ j are statistically independent and Gaussian. The pdf of H can be expressed as, ...... Generality of this result however remains to be verified in future studies.

  17. On Randomness and Probability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. On Randomness and Probability How to Mathematically Model Uncertain Events ... Author Affiliations. Rajeeva L Karandikar1. Statistics and Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 7 S J S Sansanwal Marg, New Delhi 110 016, India.

  18. 78 FR 49484 - Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... Department of Air Force Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property SUMMARY: Notice identifies excess Federal real property under administrative jurisdiction of the United States Air Force it... under the administrative jurisdiction of the Air Force. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Arthur...

  19. Force Reproduction Error Depends on Force Level, whereas the Position Reproduction Error Does Not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onneweer, B.; Mugge, W.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    When reproducing a previously perceived force or position humans make systematic errors. This study determined the effect of force level on force and position reproduction, when both target and reproduction force are self-generated with the same hand. Subjects performed force reproduction tasks at

  20. Alzheimer random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Kasuya, Keisuke

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we investigate a memory-impaired self-avoiding walk on a square lattice in which a random walker marks each of sites visited with a given probability p and makes a random walk avoiding the marked sites. Namely, p = 0 and p = 1 correspond to the simple random walk and the self-avoiding walk, respectively. When p> 0, there is a finite probability that the walker is trapped. We show that the trap time distribution can well be fitted by Stacy's Weibull distribution b(a/b){a+1}/{b}[Γ({a+1}/{b})]-1x^a\\exp(-a/bx^b)} where a and b are fitting parameters depending on p. We also find that the mean trap time diverges at p = 0 as p- α with α = 1.89. In order to produce sufficient number of long walks, we exploit the pivot algorithm and obtain the mean square displacement and its Flory exponent ν(p) as functions of p. We find that the exponent determined for 1000 step walks interpolates both limits ν(0) for the simple random walk and ν(1) for the self-avoiding walk as [ ν(p) - ν(0) ] / [ ν(1) - ν(0) ] = pβ with β = 0.388 when p ≪ 0.1 and β = 0.0822 when p ≫ 0.1. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  1. Multistage Force Amplification of Piezoelectric Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Zuo, Lei (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the disclosure include an apparatus and methods for using a piezoelectric device, that includes an outer flextensional casing, a first cell and a last cell serially coupled to each other and coupled to the outer flextensional casing such that each cell having a flextensional cell structure and each cell receives an input force and provides an output force that is amplified based on the input force. The apparatus further includes a piezoelectric stack coupled to each cell such that the piezoelectric stack of each cell provides piezoelectric energy based on the output force for each cell. Further, the last cell receives an input force that is the output force from the first cell and the last cell provides an output apparatus force In addition, the piezoelectric energy harvested is based on the output apparatus force. Moreover, the apparatus provides displacement based on the output apparatus force.

  2. The nature of motive force

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanick, Achintya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph Prof. Pramanick explicates the law of motive force, a fundamental law of nature that can be observed and appreciated as an addition to the existing laws of thermodynamics. This unmistakable and remarkable tendency of nature is equally applicable to all other branches of studies. He first conceptualized the law of motive force in 1989, when he was an undergraduate student. Here he reports various applications of the law in the area of  thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics, and shows how it is possible to solve analytically century-old unsolved problems through its application. This book offers a comprehensive account of the law and its relation to other laws and principles, such as the generalized conservation principle, variational formulation, Fermat’s principle, Bejan’s constructal law, entropy generation minimization, Bejan’s method of intersecting asymptotes and equipartition principle. Furthermore, the author addresses some interrelated fundamental p...

  3. FY11 Force Structure Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    FY11 N/A N/A 6 - MARIETTA RegAF Military Reserve AGR Guard AGR Civilians Reserve Drill Guard Drill -2 0 0 +1 0 0 FY10 FY11 N/A N/A I n t e g r i t...A I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Legend: AD Air Force Base Reserve Base Guard Base Other 85 FY11 Ohio Fact Sheet...5 C-5A I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Legend: AD Air Force Base Reserve Base Guard Base Other 86 FY11 Ohio Fact

  4. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  5. Bottom Up Review, Carrier Force Levels and the Bureaucratic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    at least some of these cuts wrll be allocated to the defense area, since defense accounts for half of all dlscretronary spending ‘132 From Xew ...were quack to contmue then- strong advocacy for both a 12 carrier force and CVX76 Newport Xews Shrpburldmg and Drydock Co 1s located m an area winch...Persrco, My American Joum~ ( Xew York Random House, 1995) 352 9 Allison, 75 lo Patncra ,4 G-rlmartm, “Mamtammg Defense Base A Challenge for the “90’s

  6. Skillful prediction of multidecadal variations in volcanic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuel, A.; Naveau, P.; Ammann, C. M.

    2017-03-01

    Stratospheric sulfate injections from explosive volcanic eruptions are a primary natural climate forcing. Improved statistical models can now capture and simulate dynamical relationships in temporal variations of binary data. Leveraging these new techniques, the presented analysis clearly indicates that the number of large eruptions in the most recent records of explosive volcanism cannot be considered to be fully random. Including dynamical dependence in our models improves their ability to reproduce the historical record and thus forms a strong basis for skill in statistical prediction. Possible geophysical mechanisms behind the identified multidecadal variations are discussed, including variations in the observed length of day.

  7. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  8. Quantum state atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2017-01-01

    New classical modalities of atomic force microscopy continue to emerge to achieve higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution for nanometrology of materials. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum mechanical modality that capitalizes on squeezed states of probe displacement. We show that such squeezing is enabled nanomechanically when the probe enters the van der Waals regime of interaction with a sample. The effect is studied in the non-contact mode, where we consider the paramete...

  9. Air Force Pilot Retention-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Politica l Science from Texas A&M University in 1973. He earned his commission S’- ,t the same time. This project will fulfill partial r(,quir(,m,nts...12 years of Air Force pilot retention rates , (2:12: 5:2). 0>. _ , FISCAL YEAR PILOT RETENTION RATES 1976 50.6% 1977 47.9% 1978 39.6% 1979 26.0% 1980

  10. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excer...

  11. Pseudorandomness in Central Force Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Formato, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Central Force Optimization is a deterministic metaheuristic for an evolutionary algorithm that searches a decision space by flying probes whose trajectories are computed using a gravitational metaphor. CFO benefits substantially from the inclusion of a pseudorandom component (a numerical sequence that is precisely known by specification or calculation but otherwise arbitrary). The essential requirement is that the sequence is uncorrelated with the decision space topology, so that its effect i...

  12. Performance contracts for police forces

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Vollaard

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the government will enter into performance contracts with each of the 25 regional police forces. The performance contracts establish a direct link between meeting a number of quantitative performance targets and financial incentives. A major improvement in police performance is necessary to meet the objective of 20 to 25 percent less criminal and disorderly behavior by 2006. A closer look at the performance contracts learns that they may not be the most appropriate policy instrument ...

  13. Effective forcing with Cantor manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    A set $A$ of integers is called total if there is an algorithm which, given an enumeration of $A$, enumerates the complement of $A$, and called cototal if there is an algorithm which, given an enumeration of the complement of $A$, enumerates $A$. Many variants of totality and cototality have been studied in computability theory. In this note, by an effective forcing construction with strongly infinite dimensional Cantor manifolds, which can be viewed as an effectivization of Zapletal's "half-...

  14. Friction forces in cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bini, Donato [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo ' ' M. Picone,' ' CNR, Rome (Italy); University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , ICRA, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Torino, Pino Torinese (Italy); Geralico, Andrea [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , ICRA, Rome (Italy); University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Physics Department, Rome (Italy); Gregoris, Daniele [University of Stockholm, Physics Department, Stockholm (Sweden); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Potsdam (Germany); Succi, Sauro [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo ' ' M. Picone,' ' CNR, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the dynamics of test particles undergoing friction forces in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. The interaction with the background fluid is modeled by introducing a Poynting-Robertson-like friction force in the equations of motion, leading to measurable (at least in principle) deviations of the particle trajectories from geodesic motion. The effect on the peculiar velocities of the particles is investigated for various equations of state of the background fluid and different standard cosmological models. The friction force is found to have major effects on particle motion in closed FRW universes, where it turns the time-asymptotic value (approaching the recollapse) of the peculiar particle velocity from ultra-relativistic (close to light speed) to a co-moving one, i.e., zero peculiar speed. On the other hand, for open or flat universes the effect of the friction is not so significant, because the time-asymptotic peculiar particle speed is largely non-relativistic also in the geodesic case. (orig.)

  15. Origin of Knudsen forces on heated microbeams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2010-09-09

    The presented work probes the fundamentals of Knudsen forces. Using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, the flows induced by temperature inhomogeneity within a representative configuration and the Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam are captured as functions of Knudsen number in the entire flow regime. Both flow strength and Knudsen force peak in the transition regime and negative Knudsen force absent in experimental data is observed. The mechanisms of the thermally induced flows and Knudsen forces are studied. It has been found that thermal edge flow is the main driven source for the formation of the Knudsen force on microbeams and domain configuration plays an important role in the process.

  16. Parallel hyperspectral image reconstruction using random projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Jorge; Martín, Gabriel; Nascimento, José M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Spaceborne sensors systems are characterized by scarce onboard computing and storage resources and by communication links with reduced bandwidth. Random projections techniques have been demonstrated as an effective and very light way to reduce the number of measurements in hyperspectral data, thus, the data to be transmitted to the Earth station is reduced. However, the reconstruction of the original data from the random projections may be computationally expensive. SpeCA is a blind hyperspectral reconstruction technique that exploits the fact that hyperspectral vectors often belong to a low dimensional subspace. SpeCA has shown promising results in the task of recovering hyperspectral data from a reduced number of random measurements. In this manuscript we focus on the implementation of the SpeCA algorithm for graphics processing units (GPU) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). Experimental results conducted using synthetic and real hyperspectral datasets on the GPU architecture by NVIDIA: GeForce GTX 980, reveal that the use of GPUs can provide real-time reconstruction. The achieved speedup is up to 22 times when compared with the processing time of SpeCA running on one core of the Intel i7-4790K CPU (3.4GHz), with 32 Gbyte memory.

  17. Effects of age and content of augmented feedback on learning an isometric force-production task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Henk; Mulder, Theo; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2007-01-01

    This study addressed the interaction between age and the informational content of feedback on learning an isometric force-production task. Healthy men and women (30 young adults: 20 to 35 years; 30 older adults: 55 to 70 years) were randomly assigned to a certain type of feedback: knowledge of

  18. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  19. Effects of age and content of augmented feedback on learning an isometric force-production task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H; Mulder, T.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    This study addressed the interaction between age and the informational content of feedback on learning an isometric force-production task. Healthy men and women (30 young adults: 20 to 35 years; 30 older adults: 55 to 70 years) were randomly assigned to a certain type of feedback: knowledge of

  20. Random vibrations theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wirsching, Paul H; Ortiz, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice covers the theory and analysis of mechanical and structural systems undergoing random oscillations due to any number of phenomena— from engine noise, turbulent flow, and acoustic noise to wind, ocean waves, earthquakes, and rough pavement. For systems operating in such environments, a random vibration analysis is essential to the safety and reliability of the system. By far the most comprehensive text available on random vibrations, Random Vibrations: Theory and Practice is designed for readers who are new to the subject as well as those who are familiar with the fundamentals and wish to study a particular topic or use the text as an authoritative reference. It is divided into three major sections: fundamental background, random vibration development and applications to design, and random signal analysis. Introductory chapters cover topics in probability, statistics, and random processes that prepare the reader for the development of the theory of random vibrations a...

  1. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  2. Random Raman lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Beier, Hope T; Rockwll, Benjamin A; Thomas, Robert J; Noojin, Gary D; Petrov, Georgi I; Golovan, Leonid A; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of light in a highly scattering medium is among the most fascinating optical effect that everyone experiences on an everyday basis and possesses a number of fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. Conventional wisdom suggests that non-linear effects do not play a significant role because the diffusive nature of scattering acts to spread the intensity, dramatically weakening these effects. We demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing on a Raman transition in a bulk three-dimensional random media. From a practical standpoint, Raman transitions allow for spectroscopic analysis of the chemical makeup of the sample. A random Raman laser could serve as a bright Raman source allowing for remote, chemically specific, identification of powders and aerosols. Fundamentally, the first demonstration of this new light source opens up an entire new field of study into non-linear light propagation in turbid media, with the most notable application related to non-invasive biomedical imaging.

  3. On fairness and randomness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the behavior of non-deterministic systems under fairness constraints, and the behavior of probabilistic systems. To this end, first a framework based on computable stopping strategies is developed that provides a common foundation for describing both fair...... and probabilistic behavior. On the basis of stopping strategies it is then shown that fair behavior corresponds in a precise sense to random behavior in the sense of Martin-Löf's definition of randomness. We view probabilistic systems as concrete implementations of more abstract non-deterministic systems. Under...... this perspective the question is investigated what probabilistic properties are needed in such an implementation to guarantee (with probability one) certain required fairness properties in the behavior of the probabilistic system. Generalizing earlier concepts of ε -bounded transition probabilities, we introduce...

  4. Free random variables

    CERN Document Server

    Voiculescu, Dan; Nica, Alexandru

    1992-01-01

    This book presents the first comprehensive introduction to free probability theory, a highly noncommutative probability theory with independence based on free products instead of tensor products. Basic examples of this kind of theory are provided by convolution operators on free groups and by the asymptotic behavior of large Gaussian random matrices. The probabilistic approach to free products has led to a recent surge of new results on the von Neumann algebras of free groups. The book is ideally suited as a textbook for an advanced graduate course and could also provide material for a seminar. In addition to researchers and graduate students in mathematics, this book will be of interest to physicists and others who use random matrices.

  5. Intravaginal stimulation randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J J

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravaginal electrical stimulation was compared to standard therapy in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability. A total of 57 women with urinary incontinence was evaluated with video urodynamics and voiding diaries before and after treatment. Of the women 18 with stress urinary incontinence were randomized to electrical stimulation or Kegel exercise and 38 with detrusor instability were randomized to anticholinergic therapy or electrical stimulation. Of patients using electrical stimulation in the stress urinary incontinence group 66% improved and 72% of the patients with detrusor instability treated with electrical stimulation improved. These rates were not statistically significant when compared to traditional therapy. Electrical stimulation is safe and at least as effective as properly performed Kegel and anticholinergic therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence and detrusor instability.

  6. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  7. Certified randomness in quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-01

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  8. University of Amsterdam selects Force10 Networks

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks Inc. today announced the University of Amsterdam has selected Force10 E-Series switch/routers to provide a high performance network infra- structure for next-generation grid computing applications" (1/2 page).

  9. Elite Forces - The Army of the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Floca, Mihai

    1997-01-01

    ...) information warfare; (f) foreign internal defense; (g) counter- proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; (h) civil affairs; (i) war by proxy. This paper will demonstrate that activities 'c-i' need elite forces or/and Special Operation Forces.

  10. Special Forces Command and Control in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhyne, Richard

    2004-01-01

    .... The author examines how Special Forces and conventional forces worked together in the past in Vietnam, Panama, Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield...

  11. The Radiation Magnetic Force (FmR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The detection of Circular Magnetic Field (CMF), associated with electrons movement, not incorporated in theoretical works; is introduced as elements of attraction and repulsion for magnetic force between two conductors carrying electric currents; it also created magnetic force between charged particles and magnetic field, or Lorentz force; CMF contain energy of Electromagnetic Radiation (EM-R); a relationship has been established between the magnetic part of the EM-R, and radiation force, showing the magnetic force as a frequency controlled entity, in which a Radiation Magnetic Force formula is derived, the force embedded EM-Wave, similar to Electromagnetic Radiation Energy given by Planck's formula; the force is accountable for electron removal from atom in the Photoelectric Effects, stabilizing orbital atoms, excitation and ionization atoms, initiating production of secondary EM-R in Compton Effect mechanism; the paper aimed at reviving the wave nature of EM-R, which could reflects in a better understanding of the microscopic-world.

  12. Computer-Controlled Force Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research, Inc proposes to develop a compact, low power, high life-cycle computer controlled Programmable Force Generator (PFG) that can generate any force...

  13. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T A Alexeeva; S V Gorobets; O Yu Gorobets; I V Demianenko; O M Lazarenko

    2014-01-01

    In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated...

  14. Physical Fitness and the Expeditionary Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    ... that the Air Force bas a physical fitness program to keep its members healthy and productive. By doing this, it can ensure success in completing the Air Force mission while keeping the organization at the highest level of readiness possible...

  15. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in PMMA, acetal and polyamide removable partial denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macura-Karbownik, Anna; Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Thermoplastic materials, such as acetal (AC) and polyamide (PA), constitute an alternative to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based resins as the materials for removable partial dentures. However, none of the previous studies compared chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in the wearers of dentures made of various materials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine and compare the chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in PMMA, PA and AC RPDs' wearers. The hypothesis was that the type of denture base material shows a significant effect on chewing efficiency (expressed as a degree of food fragmentation) and occlusal force. The experiment included the group of 30 patients using removable partial dentures. The dentures made of PMMA, acetal and polyamide were tested in each patient. Each denture was worn for 90 days, with a random sequence of the denture manufacturing and insertion. After 7, 30 and 90 days of each denture wear, chewing efficiency coefficient was determined with the aid of a sieving method, and occlusal force was measured with a dynamometer. The use of dentures made of PMMA or acetal was reflected by a marked increase in chewing efficiency and occlusal force. None of these parameters changed significantly with the time of denture wear. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between chewing efficiency and occlusal forces. Denture base material exerts significant effects on the degree of food fragmentation and the level of occlusal forces. The use of dentures and clasps made of materials with lower modulus of elasticity is associated with lower chewing efficiency and lower occlusal forces.

  17. Knowledge of Repetitions Range Affects Force Production in Trained Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Halperin, Saied J. Aboodarda, Fabien A. Basset, David G. Behm

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies have examined pacing strategies with cyclical activities (running and cycling. It has been demonstrated that males employ different pacing strategies during repeated maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs dependent upon a known endpoint. Since different fatiguing mechanisms have been identified between the genders, it is not known if females use comparable pacing strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine if informing female subjects regarding the number of MVCs to perform would affect force and electromyography (EMG. Twenty well-trained females completed 3 fatiguing protocols in a randomized order. In the control condition participants were informed they would perform twelve MVCs and then actually completed twelve. In the unknown condition they were not told how many MVCs to perform but were stopped after twelve. In the deception condition they were initially informed to perform 6 MVCs, but after the 6th MVC they were asked to perform a few more MVCs and were stopped after twelve. During the first 6 MVCs, forces in the deception condition were greater compared to the unknown (p = 0.021, ES = 0.65, 5% and control (p = 0.022, ES = 0.42, 3% conditions. No differences were found between conditions in the last 6 MVCs. A main effect for repetitions showed force deficits during the first 6 MVCs (p = 0.000, ES = 1.81, 13% and last 6 MVCs (p = 0.05, ES = 0.34, 3%. No differences were found between conditions in biceps and triceps EMG. However, EMG decreased during the first 6 MVCs for biceps (p = 0.001, ES = 1.0, 14% and triceps (p = 0.001, ES = 0.76, 14% across conditions. No differences were found in the last 6 MVCs. The anticipation of performing fewer MVCs led to increased force, whereas no endpoint led to decreased force production.

  18. Structure of transition metal clusters: A force-biased Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Dil K.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2017-11-01

    We present a force-biased Monte Carlo (FMC) method for structural modeling of transition metal clusters of Fe, Ni, and Cu with 5 to 60 atoms. By employing the Finnis-Sinclair potential for Fe and the Sutton-Chen potential for Ni and Cu, the total energy of the clusters is minimized using a method that utilizes atomic forces in Monte Carlo simulations. The structural configurations of the clusters obtained from this biased Monte Carlo approach are analyzed and compared with the same from the Cambridge Cluster Database (CCD). The results show that the total-energy of the FMC clusters is very close to the corresponding value of the CCD clusters as listed in the Cambridge Cluster Database. A comparison of the FMC and CCD clusters is presented by computing the pair-correlation function, the bond-angle distribution, and the distribution of atomic-coordination numbers in the first-coordination shell, which provide information about the two-body and three-body correlation functions, the local atomic structure, and the bonding environment of the atoms in the clusters.

  19. Air Force Civilian Senior Leadership Development Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Air Force Civilian Leadership Developmental Challenges Although the Air Force has an approved and codified process for developing its future civilian...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE CIVILIAN SENIOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES by Billy P. Webb, DAF A Research Report Submitted...to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Civilian Senior Leadership Development Challenges 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. Grasp force sensor for robotic hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinman, Victor D. (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A grasp force sensor for robotic hands is disclosed. A flexible block is located in the base of each claw through which the grasp force is exerted. The block yields minute parallelogram deflection when the claws are subjected to grasping forces. A parallelogram deflection closely resembles pure translational deflection, whereby the claws remain in substantial alignment with each other during grasping. Strain gauge transducers supply signals which provide precise knowledge of and control over grasp forces.

  1. Reducing Air Force Fighter Pilot Shortages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-31

    FORCE as part of a fiscal year 2014 study “Rated Requirements Assessment.” RAND Project AIR FORCE RAND Project AIR FORCE ( PAF ), a division of the...RAND Corporation, is the U.S. Air Force’s federally funded research and development center for studies and analyses. PAF provides the Air Force with...and Strategy and Doctrine. Additional information about PAF is available on our website: http://www.rand.org/ paf This report documents work

  2. Collective light forces on atoms in resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Adam T; Thompson, James K; Vuletic, Vladan [Department of Physics, MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2005-05-14

    We study resonator-induced light forces arising from cooperative atom-light interaction. For such collective processes, the force on the sample can be orders of magnitude larger than the sum of conventional light forces on individual atoms. Since resonator-induced light forces can be dissipative even when the incident light is far detuned from atomic transitions, they may be applicable to target particles with a complex level structure.

  3. A system identification technique based on the random decrement signatures. Part 1: Theory and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedewi, Nabih E.; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the system parameters of a randomly excited structure may be treated using a variety of statistical techniques. Of all these techniques, the Random Decrement is unique in that it provides the homogeneous component of the system response. Using this quality, a system identification technique was developed based on a least-squares fit of the signatures to estimate the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of a linear randomly excited system. The mathematics of the technique is presented in addition to the results of computer simulations conducted to demonstrate the prediction of the response of the system and the random forcing function initially introduced to excite the system.

  4. Surfaces of forced vergence disparity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rubin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To introduce the concept of surfaces offorced vergence disparity using measurementsof fixation disparity from three young, healthy individuals.Method: Fixation disparities were measured in three individuals in relation to variation in stimulus distance and vergence demand.  All measurementswere obtained by means of the Sheedy disparometerwhich can be used to measure not only fixation disparity but also associated phorias.  For each individual, consecutive measurements of fixation disparity only were determined over a short time period at four stimulus distances (0.25 m, 0.4 m, 1 m and 2 m and under five different vergence demands as produced with the application of different amounts of prism (either base in or base out and also without any prism.  Parametric and non-parametric statistical methods are used to understand short-term variation of fixation disparity and pseudo-3D and stereo-pairs represent thesurfaces of forced vergence disparity with which this paper is mainly concerned.Results:  Surfaces of forced vergence disparity are very useful to study variation of fixation disparity inrelation to change in stimulus distance and vergence demand.  They are effectively 3-dimensional equivalents of 2-dimensional Ogle curves of forcedvergence disparity.Conclusion: Surfaces of forced vergence disparity may be useful in many contexts - both in relation to normal or unusual binocular behaviour.  This paper introduces such surfaces in relation to three individuals who were considered as having satisfactory binocular and accommodative-vergence function.  The surfaces assist one in understanding complicated three-dimensional or trivariate data that involves fixation disparities, different stimulus locations and different accommodative-vergence demands upon the oculo-motor system.  (S Afr Optom 2013 72(1 25-33 

  5. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Lin, J.; Ni, R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RFof aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissionsper unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size.South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions,its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency.The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is loweredbyasmall per capita GDP.Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The resulting

  6. SOF: A Joint Force Integrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-05

    11, it didn’t matter. The enemy quickly made clear that the United States not only had a bulls -eye on it, but they struck dead center. The ensuing...kids’ soccer game in which everyone on the field congregates around the ball. In the mid to late 1970s, one couldn’t shake a tree without COIN...military organization is more uniquely suited for this than the men and women of US Special Operations Command. Since Vietnam, Special Forces 32

  7. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  8. Labour Force Activity after 65:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mona; Pedersen, Peder J.

    2017-01-01

    in Denmark is rather small in this age group. While the increase in Germany mainly seems to be a result of policy reforms, the increase in Sweden appear to be a result of a combination of policy changes and an increasing educational level. Financial incentives seem most important in Germany and only of minor...... group and cohort relevant changes in education and health is examined and discussed. Further, country differences in the impact from education and health is examined. Results show that the largest increase in labour force participation has taken place in Sweden following by Germany, while the increase...

  9. The Chinese Communist Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    According to the Coin- and the First Front Army was able to cross the Tatu, munist accounts, the Long Marchers "had to sleep thus avoiding a long detour...people in- China and the northeast, the inertia generated by volved and is, therefore, extremely dubious as a the strategy of confining his forces to the...Liberation Army (New Śen-minioh- pfo . 6 September 1963. or Peking Review. 13 September York. McGraw-Hill. 1967). p. 228, General Griffith’s Iook is the

  10. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  11. 18 CFR 701.58 - Task forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Task forces. 701.58... Headquarters Organization § 701.58 Task forces. The Director with Council concurrence or the Council may establish task forces from time to time to aid in the preparation of issues for presentation to the Council...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Siting Requirements § 193.2067 Wind forces. (a) LNG facilities must be designed to withstand without loss of structural or functional integrity: (1) The direct effect of wind forces...

  13. Forces on Architecture Decisions – A Viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, Uwe van; Avgeriou, Paris; Hilliard, Rich

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the notion of forces as influences upon architecture decisions is introduced. To facilitate the documentation of forces as a part of architecture descriptions, we specify a decision forces viewpoint, which extends our existing framework for architecture decisions, following the

  14. Hydrodynamic forces on inundated bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The hydrodynamic forces experienced by an inundated bridge deck have great importance in the design of bridges. Specifically, the drag force, lift force, and the moment acting on the bridge deck under various levels of inundation and a range of flow ...

  15. Interaction Force Estimation During Manipulation of Microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Metz, R.M.P.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the utilization of microparticles for the wireless sensing of interaction forces in magneticbased manipulation systems. The proposed force estimation approach allows for using microparticles in sensing the interaction forces at hard-to-reach regions to avoid the mechanical and

  16. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    of during the latter part of the 1990s. The ideas generated by the Danish Air Force later came to good use when Danish air force officers participated in the work that led to the formulation of the NATO Air Power Doctrine (AJP 3.3). During the latter part of the 2000s, the Danish Air Force found...

  17. 24 CFR 968.120 - Force account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force account. 968.120 Section 968... PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION General § 968.120 Force account. (a) For both CIAP and CGP, a PHA may undertake the activities using force account labor, only where specifically approved by HUD in the CIAP...

  18. Crystal morphology change by magnetic susceptibility force

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Aiko; Aibara, Shigeo; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    We found a change in morphology when lysozyme crystals were grown in a magnetic field. The phenomenon was caused by the magnetic force derived from the magnetic susceptibility gradient. We propose that this force should be called the “magnetic susceptibility force".

  19. Application of the Semi-Empirical Force-Limiting Approach for the CoNNeCT SCAN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Lucas D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Akers, James C.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Jones, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    The semi-empirical force-limiting vibration method was developed and implemented for payload testing to limit the structural impedance mismatch (high force) that occurs during shaker vibration testing. The method has since been extended for use in analytical models. The Space Communications and Navigation Testbed (SCAN Testbed), known at NASA as, the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT), project utilized force-limiting testing and analysis following the semi-empirical approach. This paper presents the steps in performing a force-limiting analysis and then compares the results to test data recovered during the CoNNeCT force-limiting random vibration qualification test that took place at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) December 19, 2010 to January 7, 2011. A compilation of lessons learned and considerations for future force-limiting tests is also included.

  20. Grip force and force sharing in two different manipulation tasks with bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepriá-Bernal, Javier; Pérez-González, Antonio; Mora, Marta C; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L

    2017-07-01

    Grip force and force sharing during two activities of daily living were analysed experimentally in 10 right-handed subjects. Four different bottles, filled to two different levels, were manipulated for two tasks: transporting and pouring. Each test subject's hand was instrumented with eight thin wearable force sensors. The grip force and force sharing were significantly different for each bottle model. Increasing the filling level resulted in an increase in grip force, but the ratio of grip force to load force was higher for lighter loads. The task influenced the force sharing but not the mean grip force. The contributions of the thumb and ring finger were higher in the pouring task, whereas the contributions of the palm and the index finger were higher in the transport task. Mean force sharing among fingers was 30% for index, 29% for middle, 22% for ring and 19% for little finger. Practitioner Summary: We analysed grip force and force sharing in two manipulation tasks with bottles: transporting and pouring. The objective was to understand the effects of the bottle features, filling level and task on the contribution of different areas of the hand to the grip force. Force sharing was different for each task and the bottles features affected to both grip force and force sharing.