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Sample records for random time intervals

  1. Online evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals for quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Su, Yang; Wang, Rong; Zhu, Yong; Shen, Huiping; Pu, Tao; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhao, Jiyong; Zhang, Baofu; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Online reconstruction of a time-variant quantum state from the encoding/decoding results of quantum communication is addressed by developing a method of evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals. A time-variant two-dimensional state is reconstructed on the basis of recovering its expectation value functions of three nonorthogonal projectors from a random single measurement record, which is composed from the discarded qubits of the six-state protocol. The simulated results prove that our method is robust to typical metro quantum channels. Our work extends the Fourier-based method of evolution reconstruction from the version for a regular single measurement record with equal time intervals to a unified one, which can be applied to arbitrary single measurement records. The proposed protocol of evolution reconstruction runs concurrently with the one of quantum communication, which can facilitate the online quantum tomography.

  2. A Chemical Reaction Network to Generate Random, Power-Law-Distributed Time Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Patrick; Schulze, Holger; Metzner, Claus

    2017-10-06

    In Lévy walks (LWs), particles move with a fixed speed along straight line segments and turn in new directions after random time intervals that are distributed according to a power law. Such LWs are thought to be an advantageous foraging and search strategy for organisms. While complex nervous systems are certainly capable of producing such behavior, it is not clear at present how single-cell organisms can generate the long-term correlated control signals required for a LW. Here, we construct a biochemical reaction system that generates long-time correlated concentration fluctuations of a signaling substance, with a tunable fractional exponent of the autocorrelation function. The network is based on well-known modules, and its basic function is highly robust with respect to the parameter settings.

  3. On the gap and time interval between the first two maxima of long continuous time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounaix, Philippe; Schehr, Grégory; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional continuous time random walk (CTRW) on a fixed time interval T where at each time step the walker waits a random time τ, before performing a jump drawn from a symmetric continuous probability distribution function (PDF) f(η ) , of Lévy index 0PDF \\Psi(τ ) has a power law tail, \\Psi(τ )\\propto {τ-1-γ} , with 0μ /2 ). We investigate the joint PDF of the gap g between the first two highest positions of the CTRW and the time t separating these two maxima. We show that this PDF reaches a stationary limiting joint distribution p(g, t) in the limit of long CTRW, T\\to ∞ . Our exact analytical results show a very rich behavior of this joint PDF in the (γ,μ ) plane, which we study in great detail. Our main results are verified by numerical simulations. This work provides a non trivial extension to CTRWs of the recent study in the discrete time setting by Majumdar et al (2014 J. Stat. Mech. P09013).

  4. Fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control for the discrete-time system with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, and randomly occurring interval delays and nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaozheng; Wang, Yan; Hu, Manfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback control problem is investigated for a class of discrete-time T-S fuzzy systems with channel fadings, sector nonlinearities, randomly occurring interval delays (ROIDs) and randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs). A series of variables of the randomly occurring phenomena obeying the Bernoulli distribution is used to govern ROIDs and RONs. Meanwhile, the measurement outputs are subject to the sector nonlinearities (i.e. the sensor saturations) and we assume the system output is [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]. The Lth-order Rice model is utilized to describe the phenomenon of channel fadings by setting different values of the channel coefficients. The aim of this work is to deal with the problem of designing a full-order dynamic fuzzy [Formula: see text] output-feedback controller such that the fuzzy closed-loop system is exponentially mean-square stable and the [Formula: see text] performance constraint is satisfied, by means of a combination of Lyapunov stability theory and stochastic analysis along with LMI methods. The proposed fuzzy controller parameters are derived by solving a convex optimization problem via the semidefinite programming technique. Finally, a numerical simulation is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design technique.

  5. Perceptions of Time and Long Time Intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Psychology

    2006-09-15

    There are certainly many perspectives presented in the literature on time and time perception. This contribution has focused on perceptions of the time frames related to risk and danger of radiation from a planned Swedish repository for spent nuclear fuel. Respondents from two municipalities judged SSI's reviews of the entrepreneur's plans and work of high importance, and more important the closer to our time the estimate was given. Similarly were the consequences of potential leakage from a repository perceived as more serious the closer it would be to our time. Judgements of risks related to the storage of spent nuclear fuel were moderately large on the used measurement scales. Experts are experts because they have more knowledge, and in this context they underlined e.g. the importance of reviews of the radiation situation of time periods up to 100,000 years. It was of interest to note that 55% of the respondents from the municipalities did not believe that the future repository would leak radioactivity. They were much more pessimistic with respect to world politics, i.e. a new world war. However, with respect to the seriousness of the consequences given a leakage from the repository, the public group consistently gave high risk estimates, often significantly higher than those of the expert group. The underestimations of time estimates, as seen in the tasks of pinpointing historic events, provide examples of the difficulty of making estimations involving long times. Similar results showed that thinking of 'the future' most often involved about 30 years. On average, people reported memories of about 2.5 generations back in time, and emotional relationships stretching approximately 2.5 generations into the future; 94% of the responses, with respect to how many future generations one had an emotional relationship, were given in the range of 1-5 generations. Similarly, Svenson and Nilsson found the opinion that the current generations

  6. Fast transfer of crossmodal time interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihan; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    Sub-second time perception is essential for many important sensory and perceptual tasks including speech perception, motion perception, motor coordination, and crossmodal interaction. This study investigates to what extent the ability to discriminate sub-second time intervals acquired in one sensory modality can be transferred to another modality. To this end, we used perceptual classification of visual Ternus display (Ternus in Psychol Forsch 7:81-136, 1926) to implicitly measure participants' interval perception in pre- and posttests and implemented an intra- or crossmodal sub-second interval discrimination training protocol in between the tests. The Ternus display elicited either an "element motion" or a "group motion" percept, depending on the inter-stimulus interval between the two visual frames. The training protocol required participants to explicitly compare the interval length between a pair of visual, auditory, or tactile stimuli with a standard interval or to implicitly perceive the length of visual, auditory, or tactile intervals by completing a non-temporal task (discrimination of auditory pitch or tactile intensity). Results showed that after fast explicit training of interval discrimination (about 15 min), participants improved their ability to categorize the visual apparent motion in Ternus displays, although the training benefits were mild for visual timing training. However, the benefits were absent for implicit interval training protocols. This finding suggests that the timing ability in one modality can be rapidly acquired and used to improve timing-related performance in another modality and that there may exist a central clock for sub-second temporal processing, although modality-specific perceptual properties may constrain the functioning of this clock.

  7. Learned Interval Time Facilitates Associate Memory Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Vincent; Kochs, Sarah; Smulders, Fren; De Weerd, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The extent to which time is represented in memory remains underinvestigated. We designed a time paired associate task (TPAT) in which participants implicitly learned cue-time-target associations between cue-target pairs and specific cue-target intervals. During subsequent memory testing, participants showed increased accuracy of identifying…

  8. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zięba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  9. Timing intervals using population synchrony and spike timing dependent plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model by which ensembles of regularly spiking neurons can encode different time intervals through synchronous firing. We show that a neuron responding to a large population of convergent inputs has the potential to learn to produce an appropriately-timed output via spike-time dependent plasticity. We explain why temporal variability of this population synchrony increases with increasing time intervals. We also show that the scalar property of timing and its violation at short intervals can be explained by the spike-wise accumulation of jitter in the inter-spike intervals of timing neurons. We explore how the challenge of encoding longer time intervals can be overcome and conclude that this may involve a switch to a different population of neurons with lower firing rate, with the added effect of producing an earlier bias in response. Experimental data on human timing performance show features in agreement with the model’s output.

  10. Time-interval analysis of beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, V.; Hardy, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    A time-interval method of beta-decay half-life analysis is described. The method is expected to produce results that are highly accurate (for the given number of events analyzed), regardless of the event rate, nature of the detection-system dead time, and/or extent of the dead time. This was verified by applying the method in a systematic way to an array of simulated data sets characterized by typical as well as extreme combinations of simulation parameters. The results of the analysis are presented and discussed.

  11. Image memorability across longer time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetschalckx, Lore; Moors, Pieter; Wagemans, Johan

    2017-10-03

    You may find some images easier to remember than others. Recent studies of visual memory have found remarkable levels of consistency for this inter-item variability across observers, suggesting that memorability can be considered an intrinsic image property. The current study replicated and extended previous results, while adopting a more traditional visual long-term memory task with retention intervals of 20 min, one day, and one week, as opposed to the previously used repeat-detection task, which typically relied on short retention intervals (5 min). Our memorability rank scores show levels of consistency across observers in line with those reported in previous research. They correlate strongly with previous quantifications and appear stable over time. Furthermore, we show that the way consistency of memorability scores increases with the number of responses per image follows the Spearman-Brown formula. Interestingly, our results also seem to show an increase in consistency with an increase in retention interval. Supported by simulated data, this effect is attributed to a decrease of extraneous influences on recognition over time. Finally, we also provide evidence for a log-linear, rather than linear, decline of the raw memorability scores over time, with more memorable images declining less strongly.

  12. Overestimation of the second time interval replaces time-shrinking when the difference between two adjacent time intervals increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka eNakajima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When the onsets of three successive sound bursts mark two adjacent time intervals, the second time interval can be underestimated when it is physically longer than the first time interval by up to 100 ms. This illusion, time-shrinking, is very stable when the first time interval is 200 ms or shorter (Nakajima et al., 2004, Perception, 33. Time-shrinking had been considered a kind of perceptual assimilation to make the first and the second time interval more similar to each other. Here we investigated whether the underestimation of the second time interval was replaced by an overestimation if the physical difference between the neighboring time intervals was too large for the assimilation to take place; this was a typical situation in which a perceptual contrast could be expected. Three experiments to measure the overestimation/underestimation of the second time interval by the method of adjustment were conducted. The first time interval was varied from 40 to 280 ms, and such overestimations indeed took place when the first time interval was 80-280 ms. The overestimations were robust when the second time interval was longer than the first time interval by 240 ms or more, and the magnitude of the overestimation was larger than 100 ms in some conditions. Thus, a perceptual contrast to replace time-shrinking was established. An additional experiment indicated that this contrast did not affect the perception of the first time interval substantially: The contrast in the present conditions seemed unilateral.

  13. Randomized Comparison of Surveillance Intervals in Familial Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennink, Simone D.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Wolterbeek, Ron; Crobach, A. Stijn L. P.; Becx, Marco C. J. M.; Crobach, Wiet F. S. J.; van Haastert, Michiel; ten Hove, W. Rogier; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Meijssen, Maarten A. C.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Rijk, Marno C. M.; Salemans, Jan M. J. I.; Stronkhorst, Arnold; Tuynman, Hans A. R. E.; Vecht, Juda; Verhulst, Marie-Louise; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Walinga, Herman; Weinhardt, Olaf K.; Westerveld, Dik; Witte, Anne M. C.; Wolters, Hugo J.; Cats, Annemieke; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Morreau, Hans; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colonoscopic surveillance is recommended for individuals with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the appropriate screening interval has not yet been determined. The aim of this randomized trial was to compare a 3-year with a 6-year screening interval. Patients and Methods Individuals

  14. Neurocomputational Models of Interval and Pattern Timing.

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    Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V

    2016-04-01

    Most of the computations and tasks performed by the brain require the ability to tell time, and process and generate temporal patterns. Thus, there is a diverse set of neural mechanisms in place to allow the brain to tell time across a wide range of scales: from interaural delays on the order of microseconds to circadian rhythms and beyond. Temporal processing is most sophisticated on the scale of tens of milliseconds to a few seconds, because it is within this range that the brain must recognize and produce complex temporal patterns-such as those that characterize speech and music. Most models of timing, however, have focused primarily on simple intervals and durations, thus it is not clear whether they will generalize to complex pattern-based temporal tasks. Here, we review neurobiologically based models of timing in the subsecond range, focusing on whether they generalize to tasks that require placing consecutive intervals in the context of an overall pattern, that is, pattern timing.

  15. Introduction to the neurobiology of interval timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; de Lafuente, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Time is a fundamental variable that organisms must quantify in order to survive. In humans, for example, the gradual development of the sense of duration and rhythm is an essential skill in many facets of social behavior such as speaking, dancing to-, listening to- or playing music, performing a wide variety of sports, and driving a car (Merchant H, Harrington DL, Meck WH. Annu Rev Neurosci. 36:313-36, 2013). During the last 10 years there has been a rapid growth of research on the neural underpinnings of timing in the subsecond and suprasecond scales, using a variety of methodological approaches in the human being, as well as in varied animal and theoretical models. In this introductory chapter we attempt to give a conceptual framework that defines time processing as a family of different phenomena. The brain circuits and neural underpinnings of temporal quantification seem to largely depend on its time scale and the sensorimotor nature of specific behaviors. Therefore, we describe the main time scales and their associated behaviors and show how the perception and execution of timing events in the subsecond and second scales may depend on similar or different neural mechanisms.

  16. Perception of short time scale intervals in a hypnotic virtuoso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Arstila, Valtteri; Wearden, John H.; Kallio, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hypnotized individuals underestimate temporal intervals in the range of several seconds to tens of minutes. However, no previous work has investigated whether duration perception is equally disorderly when shorter time intervals are probed. In this study, duration

  17. Discrete-time optimal control and games on large intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2017-01-01

    Devoted to the structure of approximate solutions of discrete-time optimal control problems and approximate solutions of dynamic discrete-time two-player zero-sum games, this book presents results on properties of approximate solutions in an interval that is independent lengthwise, for all sufficiently large intervals. Results concerning the so-called turnpike property of optimal control problems and zero-sum games in the regions close to the endpoints of the time intervals are the main focus of this book. The description of the structure of approximate solutions on sufficiently large intervals and its stability will interest graduate students and mathematicians in optimal control and game theory, engineering, and economics. This book begins with a brief overview and moves on to analyze the structure of approximate solutions of autonomous nonconcave discrete-time optimal control Lagrange problems.Next the structures of approximate solutions of autonomous discrete-time optimal control problems that are discret...

  18. Frequency interval balanced truncation of discrete-time bilinear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jazlan, Ahmad; Sreeram, Victor; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a new model reduction method for discrete-time bilinear systems based on the balanced truncation framework. In many model reduction applications, it is advantageous to analyze the characteristics of the system with emphasis on particular frequency intervals...... of interest. In order to analyze the degree of controllability and observability of discrete-time bilinear systems with emphasis on particular frequency intervals of interest, new generalized frequency interval controllability and observability gramians are introduced in this paper. These gramians...

  19. Composite continuous time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfer, Rudolf

    2017-12-01

    Random walks in composite continuous time are introduced. Composite time flow is the product of translational time flow and fractional time flow [see Chem. Phys. 84, 399 (2002)]. The continuum limit of composite continuous time random walks gives a diffusion equation where the infinitesimal generator of time flow is the sum of a first order and a fractional time derivative. The latter is specified as a generalized Riemann-Liouville derivative. Generalized and binomial Mittag-Leffler functions are found as the exact results for waiting time density and mean square displacement.

  20. Emotional modulation of interval timing and time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jessica I; LaBar, Kevin S; Meck, Warren H

    2016-05-01

    Like other senses, our perception of time is not veridical, but rather, is modulated by changes in environmental context. Anecdotal experiences suggest that emotions can be powerful modulators of time perception; nevertheless, the functional and neural mechanisms underlying emotion-induced temporal distortions remain unclear. Widely accepted pacemaker-accumulator models of time perception suggest that changes in arousal and attention have unique influences on temporal judgments and contribute to emotional distortions of time perception. However, such models conflict with current views of arousal and attention suggesting that current models of time perception do not adequately explain the variability in emotion-induced temporal distortions. Instead, findings provide support for a new perspective of emotion-induced temporal distortions that emphasizes both the unique and interactive influences of arousal and attention on time perception over time. Using this framework, we discuss plausible functional and neural mechanisms of emotion-induced temporal distortions and how these temporal distortions may have important implications for our understanding of how emotions modulate our perceptual experiences in service of adaptive responding to biologically relevant stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Emotional Modulation of Interval Timing and Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jessica I.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Meck, Warren H.

    2017-01-01

    Like other senses, our perception of time is not veridical, but rather, is modulated by changes in environmental context. Anecdotal experiences suggest that emotions can be powerful modulators of time perception; nevertheless, the functional and neural mechanisms underlying emotion-induced temporal distortions remain unclear. Widely accepted pacemaker-accumulator models of time perception suggest that changes in arousal and attention have unique influences on temporal judgments and contribute to emotional distortions of time perception. However, such models conflict with current views of arousal and attention suggesting that current models of time perception do not adequately explain the variability in emotion-induced temporal distortions. Instead, findings provide support for a new perspective of emotion-induced temporal distortions that emphasizes both the unique and interactive influences of arousal and attention on time perception over time. Using this framework, we discuss plausible functional and neural mechanisms of emotion-induced temporal distortions and how these temporal distortions may have important implications for our understanding of how emotions modulate our perceptual experiences in service of adaptive responding to biologically relevant stimuli. PMID:26972824

  2. A model of interval timing by neural integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes; that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition; that neural populations can act as integrators; and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule’s predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior. PMID:21697374

  3. Precise Time and Time Interval Applications to Electric Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    instability problems in a power system are really system problerx~s. [23] These researchers found that the Pdst~st and most global indicators of irnmi...14s [39]. 1 constructed a similar system [3]. For their work on stability assessment and global relaying, Hansen and Ddpiaz initially selected the...100, No. 1 1, November 1981, pp. 4428-4434. 38. G. Missout, J . Bkland, P. Lebd, G. Bkdard, P. Bussi &res, "Time Transfer by IRIG-B Time Code Via

  4. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Mogelvang, Rasmus; de Knegt, Martina Chantal

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV). Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI) obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI) and the conventional method of obtaining...... MPI (MPIConv), with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. METHODS: In a large community based population study (n = 974), where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic...... the MPITDI and MPIConv measured. RESULTS: IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (pcardiac function. MPITDI...

  5. Infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations with continuous coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhaojun; Hu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions to a class of 1-dimensional infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs) under the conditions that the coefficients are continuous and have linear growths. We also obtain the existence of a minimal solution. Furthermore, we study the existence and uniqueness theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions of infinite time interval BSDEs with non-uniformly Lipschitz coefficients. It should be pointed out that the assumptions of this result is weaker than that of Theorem 3.1 in Zong (Turkish J Math 37:704-718, 2013).

  6. Constructing seasonally adjusted data with time-varying confidence intervals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Koopman (Siem Jan); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractSeasonal adjustment methods transform observed time series data into estimated data, where these estimated data are constructed such that they show no or almost no seasonal variation. An advantage of model-based methods is that these can provide confidence intervals around the seasonally

  7. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Mogelvang, Rasmus; de Knegt, Martina Chantal

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV). Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI) obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI) and the conventional method of obtaining...

  8. A study of systolic time intervals in lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, P B; Chawhan, R N; Mahajani, V V

    1983-10-01

    Systolic time intervals (STI) were measured in 20 control subjects and 20 cases of lepromatous leprosy in lepra reaction. Significant differences in the pre-ejection period (PEP), PEP/LVET and isovolumic contraction (IVCT) were observed between the groups. The abnormalities of STI observed in patients of lepra reaction are characteristic of left ventricular dysfunction in patients of lepra reaction.

  9. Effects of Increasing the Time to Reinforcement on Interval Timing in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Higa, Jennifer J.; Tillou, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    The experiment examined interval timing in rats during a momentary, unsignaled, increase in the time to reinforcement. A session began with intervals programmed according to a fixed interval (FI) 60 s reinforcement schedule, changed to either an FI 90 s, FI 120 s, or FI 180 s schedule at an unpredictable point, and then returned to an FI 60 s schedule after 1, 8, or 24 successive long intervals had elapsed. Overall, postreinforcement wait time duration increased with increases in the schedule...

  10. The Evolutionary Random Interval Fingerprint for a More Secure Wireless Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Kun Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel evolutionary Random Interval Fingerprint (RIF for active RFID and ZigBee systems. This new approach can enable more secure multi-party communication since, if the wireless packets are forged by another wireless communication party, the interval fingerprint can provide another way to detect the spoofing packet. Moreover, the random evolutionary algorithms, both genetic and memetic, are also proposed as a means to generate the random interval fingerprint. Compared to the conventional random generator, our approach is flexible in generating uniform random and long cycle numbers, and more robust for the anti-cracking. It is difficult for the forged party to produce the fake random intervals. Finally, we provide an application example, a completed work survey, pseudo-code and analysis result to prove that our concept is feasible for the Wireless communication.

  11. Systolic time intervals measured by pulsed ultrasound-Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Jensen, T

    1981-12-01

    A new method for measuring systolic time intervals (STI) is presented. By using a pulsed ultrasound Doppler-velocity-meter, which is able to differentiate the velocity signals, it is possible to pick up signals just above the aortic valve. Combining the velocity signals and an ECG, the STI can be measured. The STI measured by this method were compared with STI measured by using a phonocardiograph. The results showed no significant difference.

  12. Encounter distribution of two random walkers on a finite one-dimensional interval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, Vincent; Schad, Michaela; Metzler, Ralf [Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, James Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); Benichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.de [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR 7600), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75255 Paris Cedex (France)

    2011-09-30

    We analyse the first-passage properties of two random walkers confined to a finite one-dimensional domain. For the case of absorbing boundaries at the endpoints of the interval, we derive the probability that the two particles meet before either one of them becomes absorbed at one of the boundaries. For the case of reflecting boundaries, we obtain the mean first encounter time of the two particles. Our approach leads to closed-form expressions that are more easily tractable than a previously derived solution in terms of the Weierstrass' elliptic function. (paper)

  13. An efficient method of wavelength interval selection based on random frog for multivariate spectral calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong-Huan; Li, Hong-Dong; Wood, Leslie R. E.; Fan, Wei; Wang, Jia-Jun; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Xu, Qing-Song; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2013-07-01

    Wavelength selection is a critical step for producing better prediction performance when applied to spectral data. Considering the fact that the vibrational and rotational spectra have continuous features of spectral bands, we propose a novel method of wavelength interval selection based on random frog, called interval random frog (iRF). To obtain all the possible continuous intervals, spectra are first divided into intervals by moving window of a fix width over the whole spectra. These overlapping intervals are ranked applying random frog coupled with PLS and the optimal ones are chosen. This method has been applied to two near-infrared spectral datasets displaying higher efficiency in wavelength interval selection than others. The source code of iRF can be freely downloaded for academy research at the website: http://code.google.com/p/multivariate-calibration/downloads/list.

  14. Perception of acoustically presented time series with varied intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Jiří; Pacer, Jakob; Wittmann, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Data from three experiments on serial perception of temporal intervals in the supra-second domain are reported. Sequences of short acoustic signals ("pips") separated by periods of silence were presented to the observers. Two types of time series, geometric or alternating, were used, where the modulus 1+δ of the inter-pip series and the base duration Tb (range from 1.1 to 6s) were varied as independent parameters. The observers had to judge whether the series were accelerating, decelerating, or uniform (3 paradigm), or to distinguish regular from irregular sequences (2 paradigm). "Intervals of subjective uniformity" (isus) were obtained by fitting Gaussian psychometric functions to individual subjects' responses. Progression towards longer base durations (Tb=4.4 or 6s) shifts the isus towards negative δs, i.e., accelerating series. This finding is compatible with the phenomenon of "subjective shortening" of past temporal intervals, which is naturally accounted for by the lossy integration model of internal time representation. The opposite effect observed for short durations (Tb=1.1 or 1.5s) remains unexplained by the lossy integration model, and presents a challenge for further research. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interval time-place learning in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Christina M; Hallett, Darcy; Murphy, Melanie; Fitzpatrick, Cheryll L; Bakhtiar, Aishah

    2012-10-01

    While previous research has investigated the ability of animals to learn the spatial and temporal contingencies of biologically significant events (known as time-place learning), this ability has not been studied in humans. Children ranging from 5 to 10 years old were tested on a modified interval time-place learning task using a touchscreen computer. Results demonstrate the children were able to quickly learn both the timing and the sequence of this task. Despite a lack of anticipation on baseline trials, the children continued to follow the spatio-temporal contingencies in probe sessions where these contingencies were removed. Performance on the probe sessions provide strong evidence that the children had learned the spatio-temporal contingencies. Future research is needed to determine what age-related changes in iTPL occur. Furthermore, it is argued that this procedure can be used to extend interval timing in research in children, including, but not limited to, investigation of scalar timing with longer durations than have previously been investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Probing interval timing with scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kwun Kei; Penney, Trevor B

    2014-01-01

    Humans, and other animals, are able to easily learn the durations of events and the temporal relationships among them in spite of the absence of a dedicated sensory organ for time. This chapter summarizes the investigation of timing and time perception using scalp-recorded electroencephalography (EEG), a non-invasive technique that measures brain electrical potentials on a millisecond time scale. Over the past several decades, much has been learned about interval timing through the examination of the characteristic features of averaged EEG signals (i.e., event-related potentials, ERPs) elicited in timing paradigms. For example, the mismatch negativity (MMN) and omission potential (OP) have been used to study implicit and explicit timing, respectively, the P300 has been used to investigate temporal memory updating, and the contingent negative variation (CNV) has been used as an index of temporal decision making. In sum, EEG measures provide biomarkers of temporal processing that allow researchers to probe the cognitive and neural substrates underlying time perception.

  17. A High Performance Digital Time Interval Spectrometer: An Embedded, FPGA-Based System With Reduced Dead Time Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkani Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fast 32-bit one-million-channel time interval spectrometer is proposed based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. The time resolution is adjustable down to 3.33 ns (= T, the digitization/discretization period based on a prototype system hardware. The system is capable to collect billions of time interval data arranged in one million timing channels. This huge number of channels makes it an ideal measuring tool for very short to very long time intervals of nuclear particle detection systems. The data are stored and updated in a built-in SRAM memory during the measuring process, and then transferred to the computer. Two time-to-digital converters (TDCs working in parallel are implemented in the design to immune the system against loss of the first short time interval events (namely below 10 ns considering the tests performed on the prototype hardware platform of the system. Additionally, the theory of multiple count loss effect is investigated analytically. Using the Monte Carlo method, losses of counts up to 100 million events per second (Meps are calculated and the effective system dead time is estimated by curve fitting of a non-extendable dead time model to the results (τNE = 2.26 ns. An important dead time effect on a measured random process is the distortion on the time spectrum; using the Monte Carlo method this effect is also studied. The uncertainty of the system is analysed experimentally. The standard deviation of the system is estimated as ± 36.6 × T (T = 3.33 ns for a one-second time interval test signal (300 million T in the time interval.

  18. The Time Is Up: Compression of Visual Time Interval Estimations of Bimodal Aperiodic Patterns

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    Fabiola Duarte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to estimate time intervals subserves many of our behaviors and perceptual experiences. However, it is not clear how aperiodic (AP stimuli affect our perception of time intervals across sensory modalities. To address this question, we evaluated the human capacity to discriminate between two acoustic (A, visual (V or audiovisual (AV time intervals of trains of scattered pulses. We first measured the periodicity of those stimuli and then sought for correlations with the accuracy and reaction times (RTs of the subjects. We found that, for all time intervals tested in our experiment, the visual system consistently perceived AP stimuli as being shorter than the periodic (P ones. In contrast, such a compression phenomenon was not apparent during auditory trials. Our conclusions are: first, the subjects exposed to P stimuli are more likely to measure their durations accurately. Second, perceptual time compression occurs for AP visual stimuli. Lastly, AV discriminations are determined by A dominance rather than by AV enhancement.

  19. Time Perception in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Interval Length and Subjective Passage of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Sara; Guerreiro, Manuela; Chester, Catarina; Silva, Dina; Maroco, João; Coelho, Miguel; Paglieri, Fabio; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may have difficulties in time perception, which in turn might contribute to some of their symptoms, especially memory deficits. The aim of this study was to evaluate perception of interval length and subjective passage of time in MCI patients as compared to healthy controls. Fifty-five MCI patients and 57 healthy controls underwent an experimental protocol for time perception on interval length, a questionnaire for the subjective passage of time and a neuropsychological evaluation. MCI patients presented no changes in the perception of interval length. However, for MCI patients, time seemed to pass more slowly than it did for controls. This experience was significantly correlated with memory deficits but not with performance in executive tests, nor with complaints of depression or anxiety. Memory deficits do not affect the perception of interval length, but are associated with alterations in the subjective passage of time. (JINS, 2016, 22, 755-764).

  20. Time perception in mild cognitive impairment: Interval length and subjective passage of time

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Sara; Guerreiro, Manuela; Chester, Catarina Carapeto da Silva; Silva, Dina Lúcia Gomes da, 1981-; Maroco, João; Coelho, Miguel; Paglieri, Fabio; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may have difficulties in time perception, which in turn might contribute to some of their symptoms, especially memory deficits. The aim of this study was to evaluate perception of interval length and subjective passage of time in MCI patients as compared to healthy controls. Methods: Fifty-five MCI patients and 57 healthy controls underwent an experimental protocol for time perception on interval length, a questionnaire for...

  1. Interval carcinomas in the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC)-Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.W. van der Cruijsen (Ingrid W); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The interval cancer rate is an important parameter for determining the sensitivity of a screening procedure and the screening interval. We evaluated the time and mechanism of detection and the stage distribution of interval prostate cancers diagnosed during

  2. Notes on interval estimation of the generalized odds ratio under stratified random sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kung-Jong; Chang, Kuang-Chao

    2013-05-01

    It is not rare to encounter the patient response on the ordinal scale in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Under the assumption that the generalized odds ratio (GOR) is homogeneous across strata, we consider four asymptotic interval estimators for the GOR under stratified random sampling. These include the interval estimator using the weighted-least-squares (WLS) approach with the logarithmic transformation (WLSL), the interval estimator using the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) type of estimator with the logarithmic transformation (MHL), the interval estimator using Fieller's theorem with the MH weights (FTMH) and the interval estimator using Fieller's theorem with the WLS weights (FTWLS). We employ Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the performance of these interval estimators by calculating the coverage probability and the average length. To study the bias of these interval estimators, we also calculate and compare the noncoverage probabilities in the two tails of the resulting confidence intervals. We find that WLSL and MHL can generally perform well, while FTMH and FTWLS can lose either precision or accuracy. We further find that MHL is likely the least biased. Finally, we use the data taken from a study of smoking status and breathing test among workers in certain industrial plants in Houston, Texas, during 1974 to 1975 to illustrate the use of these interval estimators.

  3. Random integral equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Lupulescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the existence and uniqueness of random solution of a random integral equation of Volterra type on time scales. We also study the asymptotic properties of the unique random solution.

  4. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  5. Automatic Identification of Systolic Time Intervals in Seismocardiogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Tatinati, Sivanagaraja; Ang, Wei Tech; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2016-11-01

    Continuous and non-invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters through unobtrusive wearable sensors can potentially aid in early detection of cardiac abnormalities, and provides a viable solution for long-term follow-up of patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases without disrupting the daily life activities. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and siesmocardiogram (SCG) signals can be readily acquired from light-weight electrodes and accelerometers respectively, which can be employed to derive systolic time intervals (STI). For this purpose, automated and accurate annotation of the relevant peaks in these signals is required, which is challenging due to the inter-subject morphological variability and noise prone nature of SCG signal. In this paper, an approach is proposed to automatically annotate the desired peaks in SCG signal that are related to STI by utilizing the information of peak detected in the sliding template to narrow-down the search for the desired peak in actual SCG signal. Experimental validation of this approach performed in conventional/controlled supine and realistic/challenging seated conditions, containing over 5600 heart beat cycles shows good performance and robustness of the proposed approach in noisy conditions. Automated measurement of STI in wearable configuration can provide a quantified cardiac health index for long-term monitoring of patients, elderly people at risk and health-enthusiasts.

  6. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is which suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall–runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet transform tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall–runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass-filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of a data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the probability distributed model (PDM with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive moving-average (ARMA model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications of the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly, the future is that higher

  7. Microbiome Data Accurately Predicts the Postmortem Interval Using Random Forest Regression Models

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    Aeriel Belk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Death investigations often include an effort to establish the postmortem interval (PMI in cases in which the time of death is uncertain. The postmortem interval can lead to the identification of the deceased and the validation of witness statements and suspect alibis. Recent research has demonstrated that microbes provide an accurate clock that starts at death and relies on ecological change in the microbial communities that normally inhabit a body and its surrounding environment. Here, we explore how to build the most robust Random Forest regression models for prediction of PMI by testing models built on different sample types (gravesoil, skin of the torso, skin of the head, gene markers (16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA, 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS, and taxonomic levels (sequence variants, species, genus, etc.. We also tested whether particular suites of indicator microbes were informative across different datasets. Generally, results indicate that the most accurate models for predicting PMI were built using gravesoil and skin data using the 16S rRNA genetic marker at the taxonomic level of phyla. Additionally, several phyla consistently contributed highly to model accuracy and may be candidate indicators of PMI.

  8. A new neural network model for solving random interval linear programming problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmandzadeh, Ziba; Safi, Mohammadreza; Nazemi, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a neural network model for solving random interval linear programming problems. The original problem involving random interval variable coefficients is first transformed into an equivalent convex second order cone programming problem. A neural network model is then constructed for solving the obtained convex second order cone problem. Employing Lyapunov function approach, it is also shown that the proposed neural network model is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and it is globally convergent to an exact satisfactory solution of the original problem. Several illustrative examples are solved in support of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined Interval Training and Post-exercise Nutrition in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Monique E; Durrer, Cody; Pistawka, Kevin J; Halperin, Frank A; Chang, Courtney; Little, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) can improve several aspects of cardiometabolic health. Previous studies have suggested that adaptations to exercise training can be augmented with post-exercise milk or protein consumption, but whether this nutritional strategy can impact the cardiometabolic adaptations to HIIT in type 2 diabetes is unknown. Objective: To determine if the addition of a post-exercise milk or protein beverage to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention improves cardiometabolic health in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design: In a proof-of-concept, double-blind clinical trial 53 adults with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes were randomized to one of three nutritional beverages (500 mL skim-milk, macronutrient control, or flavored water placebo) consumed after exercise (3 days/week) during a 12 week low-volume HIIT intervention. HIIT involved 10 X 1-min high-intensity intervals separated by 1-min low-intensity recovery periods. Two sessions per week were cardio-based (at ~90% of heart rate max) and one session involved resistance-based exercises (at RPE of 5-6; CR-10 scale) in the same interval pattern. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), cardiorespiratory fitness ([Formula: see text]), blood pressure, and endothelial function (%FMD) were measured before and after the intervention. Results: There were significant main effects of time (all p 0.71) for CGM 24-h mean glucose (-0.5 ± 1.1 mmol/L), HbA1c (-0.2 ± 0.4%), percent body fat (-0.8 ± 1.6%), and lean mass (+1.1 ± 2.8 kg). Similarly, [Formula: see text] (+2.5 ± 1.6 mL/kg/min) and %FMD (+1.4 ± 1.9%) were increased, and mean arterial blood pressure reduced (-6 ± 7 mmHg), after 12 weeks of HIIT (all p 0.11). Conclusion: High-intensity interval training is a potent stimulus for improving several important metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. The benefits of

  10. Combined Interval Training and Post-exercise Nutrition in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique E. Francois

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT can improve several aspects of cardiometabolic health. Previous studies have suggested that adaptations to exercise training can be augmented with post-exercise milk or protein consumption, but whether this nutritional strategy can impact the cardiometabolic adaptations to HIIT in type 2 diabetes is unknown.Objective: To determine if the addition of a post-exercise milk or protein beverage to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT intervention improves cardiometabolic health in individuals with type 2 diabetes.Design: In a proof-of-concept, double-blind clinical trial 53 adults with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes were randomized to one of three nutritional beverages (500 mL skim-milk, macronutrient control, or flavored water placebo consumed after exercise (3 days/week during a 12 week low-volume HIIT intervention. HIIT involved 10 X 1-min high-intensity intervals separated by 1-min low-intensity recovery periods. Two sessions per week were cardio-based (at ~90% of heart rate max and one session involved resistance-based exercises (at RPE of 5–6; CR-10 scale in the same interval pattern. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak, blood pressure, and endothelial function (%FMD were measured before and after the intervention.Results: There were significant main effects of time (all p < 0.05 but no difference between groups (Interaction: all p > 0.71 for CGM 24-h mean glucose (−0.5 ± 1.1 mmol/L, HbA1c (−0.2 ± 0.4%, percent body fat (−0.8 ± 1.6%, and lean mass (+1.1 ± 2.8 kg. Similarly, V˙O2peak (+2.5 ± 1.6 mL/kg/min and %FMD (+1.4 ± 1.9% were increased, and mean arterial blood pressure reduced (−6 ± 7 mmHg, after 12 weeks of HIIT (all p < 0.01 with no difference between beverage groups (Interaction: all p > 0.11.Conclusion: High-intensity interval training is a

  11. Interval estimation of the risk difference in non-compliance randomized trials with repeated binary measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kung-Jong

    2007-07-20

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), we often encounter non-compliance with the treatment protocol for a subset of patients. The intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis is probably the most commonly used method in a RCT with non-compliance. However, the ITT analysis estimates 'the programmatic effectiveness' rather than 'the biological efficacy'. In this paper, we focus attention on the latter index and consider use of the risk difference (RD) to measure the effect of a treatment. Based on a simple additive risk model proposed elsewhere, we develop four asymptotic interval estimators of the RD for repeated binary measurements in a RCT with non-compliance. We apply Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate and compare the finite-sample performance of these interval estimators in a variety of situations. We find that all interval estimators considered here can perform well with respect to the coverage probability. We further find that the interval estimator using a tanh(-1)(x) transformation is probably more precise than the others, while the interval estimator derived from a randomization-based approach may cause a slight loss of precision. When the number of patients per treatment is large and the probability of compliance to an assigned treatment is high, we find that all interval estimators discussed here are essentially equivalent. Finally, we illustrate use of these interval estimators with data simulated from a trial of using macrophage colony-stimulating factor to reduce febrile neutropenia incidence in acute myeloid leukaemia patients. (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Notes on interval estimation of the gamma correlation under stratified random sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kung-Jong; Chang, Kuang-Chao

    2012-07-01

    We have developed four asymptotic interval estimators in closed forms for the gamma correlation under stratified random sampling, including the confidence interval based on the most commonly used weighted-least-squares (WLS) approach (CIWLS), the confidence interval calculated from the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) type estimator with the Fisher-type transformation (CIMHT), the confidence interval using the fundamental idea of Fieller's Theorem (CIFT) and the confidence interval derived from a monotonic function of the WLS estimator of Agresti's α with the logarithmic transformation (MWLSLR). To evaluate the finite-sample performance of these four interval estimators and note the possible loss of accuracy in application of both Wald's confidence interval and MWLSLR using pooled data without accounting for stratification, we employ Monte Carlo simulation. We use the data taken from a general social survey studying the association between the income level and job satisfaction with strata formed by genders in black Americans published elsewhere to illustrate the practical use of these interval estimators. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Real-time correction of heart interbeat intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jeromie; Hoover, Adam; Fishel, Stephanie; Moss, Jason; Pappas, Jennifer; Muth, Eric

    2007-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is traditionally analyzed while a subject is in a controlled environment, such as at rest in a clinic, where it can be used as a medical indicator. This paper concerns analyzing HRV outside of controlled environments, such as on an actively moving person. We describe automated methods for inter-heartbeat interval (IBI) error detection and correction. We collected 124,998 IBIs from 18 subjects, undergoing a variety of active motions, for use in evaluating our methods. Two human graders manually labeled each IBI, evaluating 10% of the IBIs as having an error, which is a far greater error percentage than has been examined in any previous study. Our automated method had a 96% agreement rate with the two human graders when they themselves agreed, with a 49% rate of matching specific error corrections and a 0.01% false alarm rate.

  14. On confidence intervals for the hazard ratio in randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Dai, Luyan; Cheng, Gang; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The log-rank test is widely used to compare two survival distributions in a randomized clinical trial, while partial likelihood (Cox, 1975) is the method of choice for making inference about the hazard ratio under the Cox (1972) proportional hazards model. The Wald 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio may include the null value of 1 when the p-value of the log-rank test is less than 0.05. Peto et al. (1977) provided an estimator for the hazard ratio based on the log-rank statistic; the corresponding 95% confidence interval excludes the null value of 1 if and only if the p-value of the log-rank test is less than 0.05. However, Peto's estimator is not consistent, and the corresponding confidence interval does not have correct coverage probability. In this article, we construct the confidence interval by inverting the score test under the (possibly stratified) Cox model, and we modify the variance estimator such that the resulting score test for the null hypothesis of no treatment difference is identical to the log-rank test in the possible presence of ties. Like Peto's method, the proposed confidence interval excludes the null value if and only if the log-rank test is significant. Unlike Peto's method, however, this interval has correct coverage probability. An added benefit of the proposed confidence interval is that it tends to be more accurate and narrower than the Wald confidence interval. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method through extensive simulation studies and a colon cancer study. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  15. Nonparametric Estimation of Interval Reliability for Discrete-Time Semi-Markov Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiadis, Stylianos; Limnios, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider a repairable discrete-time semi-Markov system with finite state space. The measure of the interval reliability is given as the probability of the system being operational over a given finite-length time interval. A nonparametric estimator is proposed for the interval...

  16. Model Reduction via Time-Interval Balanced Stochastic Truncation for Linear Time Invariant Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a new method for model reduction of linear dynamical systems is presented. The proposed technique is from the family of gramian-based relative error model reduction methods. The method uses time-interval gramians in the reduction procedure rather than ordinary gramians and in suc......In this article, a new method for model reduction of linear dynamical systems is presented. The proposed technique is from the family of gramian-based relative error model reduction methods. The method uses time-interval gramians in the reduction procedure rather than ordinary gramians...... accuracy and efficiency. In order to avoid numerical instability and also to further increase the numerical efficiency, projector matrices are constructed instead of the similarity transform approach for reduction. The method is illustrated by a numerical example and finally it is applied to a practical CD...

  17. Random time series in astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-02-13

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain, we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and we see persistent aperiodic variations ('noise') from powerful systems such as accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of time domain astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multi-variate time series.

  18. Using learning curves and confidence intervals in a time study for the calculation of standard times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitzy Natalia Roncancio Avila

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article explores the use of learning curves and confidence intervals in a time study carry out in a scale assembly line during a laboratory practice at the University of La Salle. Objective: The objective of this research is to show the use of confidence intervals and learning curves for the identification of stable processes and subsequent standardization of timing Methodology: The methodology used consists in two phases: Analysis for the study of times and establishment of standard times; the first consist in the calculation of the number of cycles, depuration of atypical data and the use of the curves to determine the processes suitable for the standardization, and the second phase is the calculation of the standard times. Results: The analysis allowed to determine that is only possible to standardize two of the five processes of the system under study because of the variability of them. Conclusions: Given the research, is possible to conclude that a process should be standardized only if it presents a stable behavior respect to the normal rhythm of work, which is showed in the learning curve; otherwise, the process will obtain partial standard times.

  19. A Combined Weighting Method Based on Hybrid of Interval Evidence Fusion and Random Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of system and lack of expertise, epistemic uncertainties may present in the experts’ judgment on the importance of certain indices during group decision-making. A novel combination weighting method is proposed to solve the index weighting problem when various uncertainties are present in expert comments. Based on the idea of evidence theory, various types of uncertain evaluation information are uniformly expressed through interval evidence structures. Similarity matrix between interval evidences is constructed, and expert’s information is fused. Comment grades are quantified using the interval number, and cumulative probability function for evaluating the importance of indices is constructed based on the fused information. Finally, index weights are obtained by Monte Carlo random sampling. The method can process expert’s information with varying degrees of uncertainties, which possesses good compatibility. Difficulty in effectively fusing high-conflict group decision-making information and large information loss after fusion is avertible. Original expert judgments are retained rather objectively throughout the processing procedure. Cumulative probability function constructing and random sampling processes do not require any human intervention or judgment. It can be implemented by computer programs easily, thus having an apparent advantage in evaluation practices of fairly huge index systems.

  20. Conception intervals and the substitution of fertility over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R J; Farkas, G

    1985-04-01

    This paper applies the waiting-time regression methods of Olsen and Wolpin (1983) to an analysis of fertility. A utility maximizing model is set up and used to provide some guidance for an empirical analysis. The data are from an experimental guaranteed job program, the Youth Incentive Entitlement Pilot Project, aimed at young women 16 to 20 years old, from poverty-level families, and not yet high school graduates. The waiting-time regression method of estimation permits the youth in question to be used as her own control revealing how eligibility for the jobs program changes the durations of periods between live-birth conceptions. 3890 women surveyed had 1 birth, 429 had 2, 112 had 3, 26 had 4, and 7 had 5. Without this person specific control described here, the most important factors affecting fertility are number of siblings (negative effect), labor market attachment by parents, especially the father, and the presence of the natural father. With the person specific control, the results predicted from economic theory do emerge: even adolescent and young women consider the economic consequences of fertility reflected in effects of fertility when wages are high in favor of fertility with lower wages. Post program effects (taking place after youths lose eligibility for the program) are a rather rapid making up for foregone fertility, reducing likelihood of net reductions of total fertility.

  1. Effect of missing RR-interval data on heart rate variability analysis in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ko Keun; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Jung Soo; Park, Kwang Suk

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the effects of missing RR-interval data on time-domain analysis were investigated using simulated missing data in real RR-interval tachograms and actual missing RR data in an ECG obtained by an unconstrained measurement. For the simulation, randomly selected data (0-100 s) were removed from real RR data obtained from the MIT-BIH normal sinus rhythm database. In all, 2615 tachograms of 5 min durations were used for this analysis. For certain durations of missing data, the analysis was performed by 1000 Monte Carlo runs. MeanNN, SDNN, SDSD, RMSSD and pNN50 were calculated as the time-domain parameters in each run, and the relative errors between the original and the incomplete tachograms for these parameters were computed. The results of the simulation revealed that MeanNN is the parameter most robust to missing data; this feature can be explained by the theory of finite population correction (FPC). pNN50 is the parameter most sensitive to missing data. MeanNN was also found to be the most robust to real missing RR data derived from a capacitive-coupled ECG recorded during sleep; furthermore, the parameter patterns for the missing data were considerably similar to those for the original RR data, although the relative errors may exceed those of the simulation results.

  2. Brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep eTeki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging.We used a novel behavioral paradigm to investigate time-interval representation in working memory as a function of the temporal jitter and memory load of the sequences containing those time intervals. Human participants were presented with a sequence of intervals and required to reproduce the duration of a particular probed interval. We found that perceptual timing areas including the cerebellum and the striatum were more or less active as a function of increasing and decreasing jitter of the intervals held in working memory respectively whilst the activity of the inferior parietal cortex is modulated as a function of memory load. Additionally, we also analyzed structural correlations between grey and white matter density and behavior and found significant correlations in the cerebellum and the striatum, mirroring the functional results.Our data demonstrate neural substrates of working memory for time intervals and suggest that the cerebellum and the striatum represent core areas for representing temporal information in working memory.

  3. Interval-Censored Time-to-Event Data Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ding-Geng

    2012-01-01

    Interval-Censored Time-to-Event Data: Methods and Applications collects the most recent techniques, models, and computational tools for interval-censored time-to-event data. Top biostatisticians from academia, biopharmaceutical industries, and government agencies discuss how these advances are impacting clinical trials and biomedical research. Divided into three parts, the book begins with an overview of interval-censored data modeling, including nonparametric estimation, survival functions, regression analysis, multivariate data analysis, competing risks analysis, and other models for interva

  4. Cardiac time intervals by tissue Doppler imaging M-mode echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor

    2016-01-01

    of whether the LV is suffering from impaired systolic or diastolic function. A novel method of evaluating the cardiac time intervals has recently evolved. Using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV) to estimate the cardiac time intervals may be an improved method reflecting global...

  5. Oscillatory multiplexing of neural population codes for interval timing and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Bon-Mi; van Rijn, Hedderik; Meck, Warren H.

    Interval timing and working memory are critical components of cognition that are supported by neural oscillations in prefrontal-striatal-hippocampal circuits. In this review, the properties of interval timing and working memory are explored in terms of behavioral, anatomical, pharmacological, and

  6. Assessment of cardiac time intervals using high temporal resolution real-time spiral phase contrast with UNFOLDed-SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Grzegorz T; Knight, Daniel S; Steeden, Jennifer A; Tann, Oliver; Odille, Freddy; Atkinson, David; Taylor, Andrew; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    To develop a real-time phase contrast MR sequence with high enough temporal resolution to assess cardiac time intervals. The sequence utilized spiral trajectories with an acquisition strategy that allowed a combination of temporal encoding (Unaliasing by fourier-encoding the overlaps using the temporal dimension; UNFOLD) and parallel imaging (Sensitivity encoding; SENSE) to be used (UNFOLDed-SENSE). An in silico experiment was performed to determine the optimum UNFOLD filter. In vitro experiments were carried out to validate the accuracy of time intervals calculation and peak mean velocity quantification. In addition, 15 healthy volunteers were imaged with the new sequence, and cardiac time intervals were compared to reference standard Doppler echocardiography measures. For comparison, in silico, in vitro, and in vivo experiments were also carried out using sliding window reconstructions. The in vitro experiments demonstrated good agreement between real-time spiral UNFOLDed-SENSE phase contrast MR and the reference standard measurements of velocity and time intervals. The protocol was successfully performed in all volunteers. Subsequent measurement of time intervals produced values in keeping with literature values and good agreement with the gold standard echocardiography. Importantly, the proposed UNFOLDed-SENSE sequence outperformed the sliding window reconstructions. Cardiac time intervals can be successfully assessed with UNFOLDed-SENSE real-time spiral phase contrast. Real-time MR assessment of cardiac time intervals may be beneficial in assessment of patients with cardiac conditions such as diastolic dysfunction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interval-walking training for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H.

    [CGM]). Resultater: Training adherence was high (89 + 4%), and training energy expenditure and mean intensity were comparable between training groups. Nine and four of the subjects reported “Improved Health” in the IWT and CWT group, respectively. VO2max increased 16.1 + 3.7% in the IWT group (P...Formål: To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetes patients, and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training (IWT) versus continuous-walking training (CWT) upon self reported health, physical fitness, body composition and glycemic control. Metoder......: Subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomized to a control (n = 8), CWT (n = 12), or IWT group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed five sessions per week (60 min/session) and were controlled with an accelerometer and a heart-rate monitor. CWT performed all training at moderate intensity, whereas IWT...

  8. Sample size calculations for pilot randomized trials: a confidence interval approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Kim; Torgerson, David J

    2013-02-01

    To describe a method using confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the sample size for a pilot randomized trial. Using one-sided CIs and the estimated effect size that would be sought in a large trial, we calculated the sample size needed for pilot trials. Using an 80% one-sided CI, we estimated that a pilot trial should have at least 9% of the sample size of the main planned trial. Using the estimated effect size difference for the main trial and using a one-sided CI, this allows us to calculate a sample size for a pilot trial, which will make its results more useful than at present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-produced Time Intervals Are Perceived as More Variable and/or Shorter Depending on Temporal Context in Subsecond and Suprasecond Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita eMitani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The processing of time intervals is fundamental for sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Perceptual and motor timing are often performed concurrently (e.g., playing a musical instrument. Although previous studies have shown the influence of body movements on time perception, how we perceive self-produced time intervals has remained unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the timing mechanisms are distinct for the sub- and suprasecond ranges. Here, we compared perceptual performances for self-produced and passively presented time intervals in random contexts (i.e., multiple target intervals presented in a session across the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 1 and within the sub- (Experiment 2 and suprasecond (Experiment 3 ranges, and in a constant context (i.e., a single target interval presented in a session in the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 4. We show that self-produced time intervals were perceived as shorter and more variable across the sub- and suprasecond ranges and within the suprasecond range but not within the subsecond range in a random context. In a constant context, the self-produced time intervals were perceived as more variable in the suprasecond range but not in the subsecond range. The impairing effects indicate that motor timing interferes with perceptual timing. The dependence of impairment on temporal contexts suggests multiple timing mechanisms for the subsecond and suprasecond ranges. In addition, violation of the scalar property (i.e., a constant variability to target interval ratio was observed between the sub- and suprasecond ranges. The violation was clearer for motor timing than for perceptual timing. This suggests that the multiple timing mechanisms for the sub- and suprasecond ranges overlap more for perception than for motor. Moreover, the central tendency effect (i.e., where shorter base intervals are overestimated and longer base intervals are underestimated disappeared with subsecond

  10. Home-based aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen uptake equal to residential cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moholdt, Trine; Bekken Vold, Mona; Grimsmo, Jostein; Slørdahl, Stig Arild; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT), walking/running four times four minutes at 85-95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7) and 3.9 (±3.6) mL·kg(-1) min(-1) (both peffect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval -1.8, 3.5). AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922.

  11. Palm theory for random time changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakiyo Miyazawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Palm distributions are basic tools when studying stationarity in the context of point processes, queueing systems, fluid queues or random measures. The framework varies with the random phenomenon of interest, but usually a one-dimensional group of measure-preserving shifts is the starting point. In the present paper, by alternatively using a framework involving random time changes (RTCs and a two-dimensional family of shifts, we are able to characterize all of the above systems in a single framework. Moreover, this leads to what we call the detailed Palm distribution (DPD which is stationary with respect to a certain group of shifts. The DPD has a very natural interpretation as the distribution seen at a randomly chosen position on the extended graph of the RTC, and satisfies a general duality criterion: the DPD of the DPD gives the underlying probability P in return.

  12. Estimation of postmortem interval based on colony development time for Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, M L; Win, B H

    1997-11-01

    The postmortem interval for a set of human remains discovered inside a metal tool box was estimated using the development time required for a stratiomyid fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), Hermetia illucens, in combination with the time required to establish a colony of the ant Anoplolepsis longipes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) capable of producing alate (winged) reproductives. This analysis resulted in a postmortem interval estimate of 14 + months, with a period of 14-18 months being the most probable time interval. The victim had been missing for approximately 18 months.

  13. Subsecond timing in primates: comparison of interval production between human subjects and rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco, Wilbert; Merchant, Hugo; Prado, Luis; Mendez, Juan Carlos

    2009-12-01

    This study describes the psychometric similarities and differences in motor timing performance between 20 human subjects and three rhesus monkeys during two timing production tasks. These tasks involved tapping on a push-button to produce the same set of intervals (range of 450 to 1,000 ms), but they differed in the number of intervals produced (single vs. multiple) and the modality of the stimuli (auditory vs. visual) used to define the time intervals. The data showed that for both primate species, variability increased as a function of the length of the produced target interval across tasks, a result in accordance with the scalar property. Interestingly, the temporal performance of rhesus monkeys was equivalent to that of human subjects during both the production of single intervals and the tapping synchronization to a metronome. Overall, however, human subjects were more accurate than monkeys and showed less timing variability. This was especially true during the self-pacing phase of the multiple interval production task, a behavior that may be related to complex temporal cognition, such as speech and music execution. In addition, the well-known human bias toward auditory as opposed to visual cues for the accurate execution of time intervals was not evident in rhesus monkeys. These findings validate the rhesus monkey as an appropriate model for the study of the neural basis of time production, but also suggest that the exquisite temporal abilities of humans, which peak in speech and music performance, are not all shared with macaques.

  14. Interval tuning in the primate medial premotor cortex as a general timing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Pérez, Oswaldo; Zarco, Wilbert; Gámez, Jorge

    2013-05-22

    The precise quantification of time during motor performance is critical for many complex behaviors, including musical execution, speech articulation, and sports; however, its neural mechanisms are primarily unknown. We found that neurons in the medial premotor cortex (MPC) of behaving monkeys are tuned to the duration of produced intervals during rhythmic tapping tasks. Interval-tuned neurons showed similar preferred intervals across tapping behaviors that varied in the number of produced intervals and the modality used to drive temporal processing. In addition, we found that the same population of neurons is able to multiplex the ordinal structure of a sequence of rhythmic movements and a wide range of durations in the range of hundreds of milliseconds. Our results also revealed a possible gain mechanism for encoding the total number of intervals in a sequence of temporalized movements, where interval-tuned cells show a multiplicative effect of their activity for longer sequences of intervals. These data suggest that MPC is part of a core timing network that uses interval tuning as a signal to represent temporal processing in a variety of behavioral contexts where time is explicitly quantified.

  15. Cardiac Time Intervals Measured by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Schnohr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    function was evaluated in 1915 participants by using both conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). The cardiac time intervals, including the isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), and ejection time (ET), were obtained by TDI M-mode through the mitral...

  16. How long did it last? Memorizing interval timings in a simple robotic task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubert, J.G.; Ikegami, Takashi; Gershenson, Carlos; Froese, Tom; Siqueiros, Jesus M.; Aguilar, Wendy; Izquierdo, Eduardo J.; Sayama, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Time perception is the capacity to sense the passing of time, but in most living creatures it also involves memorizing how much time passed, and eventually acting when it reaches a specific amount. The later is referred as interval timing. This capacity allows animals to detect temporally repeating

  17. Efficient Estimation for Diffusions Sampled at High Frequency Over a Fixed Time Interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Nina Munkholt; Sørensen, Michael

    Parametric estimation for diffusion processes is considered for high frequency observations over a fixed time interval. The processes solve stochastic differential equations with an unknown parameter in the diffusion coefficient. We find easily verified conditions on approximate martingale...

  18. Cardiac Time Intervals Measured by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Schnohr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that the cardiac time intervals reveal reduced myocardial function in persons with hypertension and are strong predictors of future ischemic cardiovascular diseases in the general population. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a large community-based population study, cardiac...... function was evaluated in 1915 participants by using both conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). The cardiac time intervals, including the isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), and ejection time (ET), were obtained by TDI M-mode through the mitral......). Additionally, they displayed a significant dose-response relationship, between increasing severity of elevated blood pressure and increasing left ventricular mass index (Pdisease (ischemic heart disease...

  19. A semiparametric probit model for case 2 interval-censored failure time data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lianming

    2010-04-30

    Interval-censored data occur naturally in many fields and the main feature is that the failure time of interest is not observed exactly, but is known to fall within some interval. In this paper, we propose a semiparametric probit model for analyzing case 2 interval-censored data as an alternative to the existing semiparametric models in the literature. Specifically, we propose to approximate the unknown nonparametric nondecreasing function in the probit model with a linear combination of monotone splines, leading to only a finite number of parameters to estimate. Both the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian estimation methods are proposed. For each method, regression parameters and the baseline survival function are estimated jointly. The proposed methods make no assumptions about the observation process and can be applicable to any interval-censored data with easy implementation. The methods are evaluated by simulation studies and are illustrated by two real-life interval-censored data applications. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Comparative physiology of short-interval conditioned reflexes to time in different species of animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, A S; Kosteĭko, N D; Kurmaeva, A O

    1983-01-01

    Conditioned reflexes (CR) to short time intervals (from 0.25 to 20 min) were studied in rabbits, white rats and pigeons by motor food-procuring method. Some significant distinctions between species were revealed. The mean duration of formation of CR to time in rabbits amounted to 74 pairings, in rats--to 121, in pigeons--to 217. The optimal time interval varied in rabbits from 2 to 10 min, in rats from 1 to 4 min and in pigeons in was from 1 to 1,5 min. The longest interval which allowed to form the trace CR to time was not in excess of 22 min in rabbits, 10 min in rats and 4-5 min in pigeons. The shortest interval was within 15-45 s. Unstable and incorrect CR to time was formed when the intervals were shorter or longer than the optimal one. The accuracy of CR to time was: in rabbits approximately equal to 0.93-0.95 in rats approximately equal to 0.85-0.94, in pigeons approximately equal to 0.78-0.85. The data obtained have satisfactory explanation in the light of I. P. Pavlov's hypothesis on physiological mechanism of CR to time.

  1. Comparative study of two linearization methods for time intervals generation of SVPWM technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N. Faris

    2016-12-01

    In this paper a comparative study for two linearization methods are carried out for generating the time intervals of SVPWM technique. The proposed linearization methods achieve a minimum computational time rather than the trigonometric sine function which is considered the base for the time interval calculations of the SVPWM technique. The first linearization method is based on the first order equation, and the second method is the (Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy modeling system. The comparative study includes the accuracy of the two models, also a simulation model is carried out for current THD estimation using the two proposed methods compared with the current THD generated by SVPWM based on the trigonometric sine function.

  2. Home-based aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen uptake equal to residential cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Moholdt

    Full Text Available Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT, walking/running four times four minutes at 85-95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7 and 3.9 (±3.6 mL·kg(-1 min(-1 (both p<0.005, non-significant between-group difference after residential rehabilitation and AIT, respectively. Quality of life increased significantly in both groups, with no statistical significant difference between groups. We found no evidence for a different treatment effect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval -1.8, 3.5. AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922.

  3. Congestion Behavior under Uncertainty on Morning Commute with Preferred Arrival Time Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LingLing Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the bottleneck model to study congestion behavior of morning commute with flexible work schedule. The proposed model assumes a stochastic bottleneck capacity which follows a uniform distribution and homogeneous commuters who have the same preferred arrival time interval. The commuters are fully aware of the stochastic properties of travel time and schedule delay distributions at all departure times that emerge from day-to-day capacity variations. The commuters’ departure time choice follows user equilibrium (UE principle in terms of the expected trip cost. Analytical and numerical solutions of this model are provided. The equilibrium departure time patterns are examined which show that the stochastic capacity increases the mean trip cost and lengthens the rush hour. The adoption of flexitime results in less congestion and more efficient use of bottleneck capacity than fixed-time work schedule. The longer the flexi-time interval is, the more uniformly distributed the departure times are.

  4. An integrated theory of prospective time interval estimation : The role of cognition, attention, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John

    A theory of prospective time perception is introduced and incorporated as a module in an integrated theory of cognition, thereby extending existing theories and allowing predictions about attention and learning. First, a time perception module is established by fitting existing datasets (interval

  5. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different

  6. Combined Interval Training and Post-exercise Nutrition in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Control Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Francois, Monique E.; Cody Durrer; Pistawka, Kevin J.; Halperin, Frank A.; Courtney Chang; Little, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) can improve several aspects of cardiometabolic health. Previous studies have suggested that adaptations to exercise training can be augmented with post-exercise milk or protein consumption, but whether this nutritional strategy can impact the cardiometabolic adaptations to HIIT in type 2 diabetes is unknown. Objective: To determine if the addition of a post-exercise milk or protein beverage to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT) interv...

  7. Prognostic ability of VE/VCO2 slope calculations using different exercise test time intervals in subjects with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Humphrey, Reed; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2003-12-01

    The minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) slope, obtained during exercise testing, possesses prognostic value in heart failure (HF). The VE-VCO2 relationship is generally linear thereby hypothetically producing similar slope values regardless of the exercise-test time interval used for calculation. This study assesses the ability of the VE/VCO2 slope, calculated at different time intervals throughout a progressive exercise test, to predict 1-year cardiac-related hospitalization and mortality in subjects with HF. Seventy-two subjects underwent symptom-limited exercise testing with ventilatory expired gas analysis. Mean age and left ventricular ejection fraction for 44 male and 28 female subjects were 51.2 years (+/-13.0) and 27.0% (+/-12.3) respectively. The VE/VCO2 slope was calculated from time 0 to 25, 50, 75 and 100% of exercise time and subsequently used to create five randomly selected VE/VCO2 slope categories. (The intraclass correlation coefficient found calculation of the VE/VCO2 slope, when divided into quartiles, to be a reliable measure (alpha=0.94, Pslope categories (25-100% and random selections) were significant predictors of cardiac-related hospitalization and mortality over a 1-year period. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed all VE/VCO2 slope categories outperformed peak oxygen consumption (VO2) in predicting hospitalization and mortality at 1 year. Although the different classification schemes were not identical, these results suggest VE/VCO2 slope maintains prognostic significance regardless of exercise-test time interval. Calculation of VE/VCO2 slope may therefore still be valuable in subjects putting forth a sub-maximal effort while effort-dependent measures, such as peak VO2, are not.

  8. Salivary cortisol concentration after high-intensity interval exercise: Time of day and chronotype effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Matteo; La Torre, Antonio; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; Merati, Giampiero; Vitale, Jacopo Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Due to personal and working necessities, the time for exercise is often short, and scheduled early in the morning or late in the afternoon. Cortisol plays a central role in the physiological and behavioral response to a physical challenge and can be considered as an index of exercise stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the circadian phenotype classification on salivary cortisol concentration in relation to an acute session of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) performed at different times of the day. Based on the morningness-eveningness questionnaire, 12 M-types (N = 12; age 21 ± 2 years; height 179 ± 5 cm; body mass 74 ± 12 kg, weekly training volume 8 ± 1 hours) and 11 E-types (N = 11; age 21 ± 2 years; height 181 ± 11 cm; body mass 76 ± 11 kg, weekly training volume 7 ± 2 hours) were enrolled in a randomized crossover study. All subjects underwent measurements of salivary cortisol secretion before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 15 min (+15 min), 30 min (+30 min), 45 min (+45 min) and 60 min (+60 min) after the completion of both morning (08.00 am) and evening (08.00 p.m.) high-intensity interval exercise. Two-way analysis of variance with Tuckey's multiple comparisons test showed significant increments over PRE-cortisol concentrations in POSTcondition both in the morning (4.88 ± 1.19 ng · mL-1 vs 6.60 ± 1.86 ng · mL-1, +26.1%, P 0.8) and in the evening (1.56 ± 0.48 ng · mL-1 vs 2.34 ± 0.37, +33.4%, P = 0.034, d > 0.6) exercise in all the 23 subject that performed the morning and the evening HIIE. In addition, during morning exercise, significant differences in cortisol concentration between M-types and E-types at POST (5.49 ± 0.98 ng · mL-1 versus 8.44 ± 1.08 ng · mL-1, +35%, P 0.8), +15 min (4.52 ± 0.42 ng · mL-1 versus 6.61 ± 0.62 ng · mL-1, +31.6%, P 0.8), +30 min (4.10 ± 1.44 ng · mL-1 versus 6.21 ± 1.60 ng · mL-1, +34.0%, P evening HIIE on post-exercise cortisol concentration were

  9. Influence of Inter-Training Intervals on Intermanual Transfer Effects in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Training: A Randomized Pre-Posttest Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske Romkema

    Full Text Available Improvement in prosthetic training using intermanual transfer (the transfer of motor skills from the trained, “unaffected” hand to the untrained, “affected” hand has been shown in previous studies. The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the inter-training interval on the magnitude of the intermanual transfer effects. This was done using a mechanistic, randomized, single-blinded pretest-posttest design. Sixty-four able-bodied, right-handed participants were randomly assigned to the Short and Long Interval Training Groups and the Short and Long Interval Control Groups. The Short and Long Interval Training Groups used a prosthesis simulator in their training program. The Short and Long Interval Control Groups executed a sham training program, that is, a dummy training program in which the same muscles were trained as with the prosthesis simulator. The Short Interval Training Group and the Short Interval Control Groups trained on consecutive days, while the Long Interval Training Group and Long Interval Control Group trained twice a week. To determine the improvement in skills, a test was administered before, immediately after, and at two points in time after the training. Training was performed with the “unaffected” arm; tests were performed with the “affected” arm. The outcome measurements were: the movement time (the time from the beginning of the movement until completion of the task; the duration of maximum hand opening, (the opening of the prosthetic hand while grasping an object; and the grip-force control (the error from the required grip-force during a tracking task. Intermanual transfer was found in movement times, but not in hand opening or grip-force control. The length of the inter-training interval did not affect the magnitude of intermanual transfer effects. No difference in the intermanual transfer effect in upper-limb prosthesis training was found for training on a daily basis as compared to training

  10. Time interval between cover crop termination and planting influences corn seedling disease, plant growth, and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were established in controlled and field environment to evaluate the effect of time intervals between cereal rye cover crop termination and corn planting on corn seedling disease, corn growth, and grain yield in 2014 and 2015. Rye termination dates ranged from 25 days before planting (DB...

  11. Considerations for Time Sampling Interval Durations in the Measurement of Young Children's Classroom Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakszeski, Brittany N.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Wood, Brenna K.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom engagement is important to young children's academic and social development. Accurate methods of capturing this behavior are needed to inform and evaluate intervention efforts. This study compared the accuracy of interval durations (i.e., 5 s, 10 s, 15 s, 20 s, 30 s, and 60 s) of momentary time sampling (MTS) in approximating the…

  12. Automatic, time-interval traffic counts for recreation area management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. L. Erickson; C. J. Liu; H. K. Cordell

    1980-01-01

    Automatic, time-interval recorders were used to count directional vehicular traffic on a multiple entry/exit road network in the Red River Gorge Geological Area, Daniel Boone National Forest. Hourly counts of entering and exiting traffic differed according to recorder location, but an aggregated distribution showed a delayed peak in exiting traffic thought to be...

  13. Photon time interval distributions of cathodoluminescence light from a YVO4 − Eu3+ phosphor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, F.C. van; Zijlstra, R.J.J.

    Measured photon time interval distributions and spectral noise densities justify the assumption of a Poisson distribution for the number of excitations per bombarding electron. A lifetime of 0.50 ± 0.02 ms was found for the 5D0 excited Eu3+ state.

  14. Nonparametric estimation in an "illness-death" model when all transition times are interval censored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Halina; Gerds, Thomas; Grøn, Randi

    2013-01-01

    veneers. Using the self-consistency algorithm we obtain the maximum likelihood estimators of the cumulative incidences of the times to events 1 and 2 and of the intensity of the 1 → 2 transition. This work generalizes previous results on the estimation in an "illness-death" model from interval censored...

  15. Heterogeneous continuous-time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Tupikina, Liubov

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous continuous-time random walk (HCTRW) model as a versatile analytical formalism for studying and modeling diffusion processes in heterogeneous structures, such as porous or disordered media, multiscale or crowded environments, weighted graphs or networks. We derive the exact form of the propagator and investigate the effects of spatiotemporal heterogeneities onto the diffusive dynamics via the spectral properties of the generalized transition matrix. In particular, we show how the distribution of first-passage times changes due to local and global heterogeneities of the medium. The HCTRW formalism offers a unified mathematical language to address various diffusion-reaction problems, with numerous applications in material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences.

  16. Spartan random processes in time series modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, M.; Hristopulos, D. T.

    2008-06-01

    A Spartan random process (SRP) is used to estimate the correlation structure of time series and to predict (interpolate and extrapolate) the data values. SRPs are motivated from statistical physics, and they can be viewed as Ginzburg-Landau models. The temporal correlations of the SRP are modeled in terms of ‘interactions’ between the field values. Model parameter inference employs the computationally fast modified method of moments, which is based on matching sample energy moments with the respective stochastic constraints. The parameters thus inferred are then compared with those obtained by means of the maximum likelihood method. The performance of the Spartan predictor (SP) is investigated using real time series of the quarterly S&P 500 index. SP prediction errors are compared with those of the Kolmogorov-Wiener predictor. Two predictors, one of which is explicit, are derived and used for extrapolation. The performance of the predictors is similarly evaluated.

  17. Exploring the impact of high intensity interval training on adolescents' objectively measured physical activity: Findings from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, Sarah A; Ridgers, Nicola D; Eather, Narelle; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Harris, Nigel; Lubans, David R

    2018-05-01

    High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) may be effective for accumulating VPA. However, the contribution of HIIT to overall physical activity is unknown. Our primary aim was to explore the impact of school-based HIIT on physical activity. The secondary aim was to explore within-individual changes in physical activity after participating in HIIT. Participants [n = 65; 15.8(0.6)years] were randomized to a HIIT or control group. Intervention groups participated in three HIIT sessions/week. GENEActiv accelerometers assessed objective physical activity at baseline and week-one, to detect changes in MPA and VPA. Intervention effects were examined using linear mixed models and evidence of a change in physical activity (i.e., compensation) were examined using multilevel linear regression models. The group-by-time interaction effects for MPA and VPA were small and moderate, respectively. Adjusted difference between groups for VPA was 1.70 min/day, 95%CI -1.96 to 5.36; p = 0.354; d = 0.55). Embedding HIIT within the school-day had a moderate effect on VPA compared to controls. Compensation analyses (i.e., individual level) suggested that adolescents were more active on days when they participated in HIIT. Further studies are needed to test the effects of HIIT on adolescents' physical activity over extended time periods.

  18. Effects of a Reduced Time-Out Interval on Compliance with the Time-Out Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Yakich, Theresa M.; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we…

  19. Assessment of time intervals in the pathway to oral cancer diagnosis in north-westerm Spain. Relative contribution of patient interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Centelles, P; López-Cedrún, J-L; Fernández-Santromán, J; Álvarez-Nóvoa, P; Luaces-Rey, R; Pombo-Castro, M-J; López-Jornet, M-P; Seoane, J

    2017-07-01

    Despite continuous advances in diagnosis and therapy, oral cancers are mostly diagnosed at advanced stages with minor survival improvements in the last two decades. Both phenomena have been attributed to delays in the diagnosis. This study aims at quantifying the time elapsed until definitive diagnosis in these patients and the patient interval's contribution. A hospital-based, ambispective, observational study was undertaken on incident cases with a pathological diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma recruited during 2015 at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery services of CHUAC (A Coruña) and POVISA (Vigo) hospitals. 74 consecutive oral cancer patients (59.5% males; median age: 65.0 years (IQ:57-74)) were studied. Most cases (52.7%; n=39) were at advanced stages (TNM III-IV) at diagnosis. The period since first sign/symptom until the patient seeks health care was the longest interval in the pathway to diagnosis and treatment (median: 31.5 days; IQR= 7.0 - 61.0) and represents >60% of the interval since symptom onset until referral to specialised care (pre-referral interval). The average interval assigned to the patient resulted to be relatively larger than the time elapsed since the patient is seen at primary care until a definitive diagnosis is reached (diagnostic interval). Median of the referral interval for primary care professionals: 6.5 days (IQR= 0.0 - 49.2) and accounts for 35% (19% - 51%) of the diagnostic interval. The patient interval is the main component of the pathway to treatment since the detection of a bodily change until the definitive diagnosis. Therefore, strategies focused on risk groups to shorten this interval should be implemented in order to ease an early diagnosis of symptomatic oral cancer.

  20. Comparison of cardiac time intervals between echocardiography and impedance cardiography at various heart rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen A.J.M. van Eijnatten

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-invasively measured Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI reflects a time difference between the electrical and pumping activity of the heart and depends on cardiac preload, afterload, autonomic nervous control and training level. However, the duration of the ISTI has not yet been compared to other time markers of the heart cycle. The present study gauges the duration of the ISTI by comparing the end point of this interval, the C-point, with heart cycle markers obtained by echocardiography. The heart rate of 16 healthy subjects was varied by means of an exercise stimulus. It was found that the C-point, and therefore the end point of ISTI, occurred around the moment of the maximum diameter of the aortic arch in all subjects and at all heart rates. However, while the time difference between the opening of the aortic valves and the maximum diameter of the aortic arch decreased significantly with decreasing RR-interval, the time difference with respect to the moment of the C-point remained constant within the subjects. This means that the shortening of the ISTI with increasing heart rate in response to an exercise stimulus was caused by a shortening of the pre-ejection period (PEP. It is concluded that the ISTI can be used as a non-invasive parameter indicating the time difference between the electrical and mechanical pumping activity of the heart, both inside and outside the clinic.

  1. The Role of Multiple Internal Timekeepers and Sources of Feedback on Interval Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenka, Breanna E; Cummins, Daisha L; Pope, Megan A

    2017-08-31

    The aim of the present experiment was to document the role of multiple internal clock mechanisms and external sources of temporal feedback on reducing timing variability when two fingers tap instead of one (a phenomenon known as the bimanual advantage). Previous research documents a reduction in timed interval variability when two effectors time instead of one. In addition, interval variability decreases with multiple sources of feedback. To date, however, no research has explored the separate roles of feedback and internal timing on the bimanual advantage. We evaluated the bimanual advantage in a task that does not utilize an internal clock (circle drawing). Participants performed both unimanual and bimanual timing while tapping or drawing circles. Both tasks were performed with and without tactile feedback at the timing goal. We document reduced bimanual timing variability only for tasks that utilize internal clock-like timing (tapping). We also document reduced timing variability for timing with greater sensory feedback (tactile vs. no-tactile feedback tapping). We conclude that internal clock mechanisms are necessary for bimanual advantage to occur, but that multiple sources of feedback can also serve to improve internal timing, which ties together current theories of bimanual advantage.

  2. Modeling circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on short-term interval timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub eSpäti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term interval timing i.e., perception and action relating to durations in the seconds range, has been suggested to display time-of-day as well as wake dependent fluctuations due to circadian and sleep-homeostatic changes to the rate at which an underlying pacemaker emits pulses; pertinent human data being relatively sparse and lacking in consistency however, the phenomenon remains elusive and its mechanism poorly understood.To better characterize the putative circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on interval timing and to assess the ability of a pacemaker-based mechanism to account for the data, we measured timing performance in eighteen young healthy male subjects across two epochs of sustained wakefulness of 38.67 h each, conducted prior to (under entrained conditions and following (under free-running conditions a 28 h sleep-wake schedule, using the methods of duration estimation and duration production on target intervals of 10 and 40 s.Our findings of opposing oscillatory time courses across both epochs of sustained wakefulness that combine with increasing and, respectively, decreasing, saturating exponential change for the tasks of estimation and production are consistent with the hypothesis that a pacemaker emitting pulses at a rate controlled by circadian oscillator and increasing with time awake determines human short-term interval timing; the duration-specificity of this pattern is interpreted as reflecting challenges to maintaining stable attention to the task that progressively increase with stimulus magnitude and thereby moderate the effects of pacemaker-rate changes on overt behavior.

  3. Timing analysis of First-Come First-Served scheduled interval-timed Directed Acyclic Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijns, R.M.W.; Adyanthaya, S.; Stuijk, S.; Voeten, J.P.M.; Geilen, M.C.W.; Schiffelers, R.R.H.; Corporaal, H.

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing worst-case application timing for systems with shared resources is difficult, especially when non-monotonic arbitration policies like First-Come-First-Served (FCFS) scheduling are used in combination with varying task execution times. Analysis methods that conservatively analyze these

  4. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess QTc interval prolongation of standard dose aflibercept in cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Vermorken, Jan B; Goksel, Tuncay

    2013-01-01

    : The effect of repeated doses of aflibercept on ventricular repolarization in cancer patients was evaluated in an intensive electrocardiogram trial. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted in 87 treated solid tumor patients. Treatment was with 6 mg/kg aflibercept, 1...... were assessed at similar time points. Eighty-four patients (43 placebo and 41 aflibercept) were evaluable for QT interval, Fridericia correction (QTcF) at cycle 1 and 59 (31 placebo and 28 aflibercept) at cycle 3. During cycle 3, from 30 minutes to 6 hours after the start of aflibercept, the maximum...... observed upper limit of the QTcF 90% confidence interval was 16 ms, for a mean of 8.4 ms. QTcF prolongation above 480 ms and 60 ms above baseline was observed in 1 aflibercept patient (2%). The slope of the relationship between free aflibercept concentration and QTcF was 0.048 (95% confidence interval, 0...

  6. Ring Laser Gyro-based Digital Processing Technique for Detecting Rotation Rate over Short Time Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Enin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates capabilities of digital techniques to improve measurement accuracy of dithering ring laser gyro (DRLG in detecting constant rotation rate over short time intervals. An array of the GL-1 device output within a LG triad to measure the vertical component of the angular rate of rotation of the Earth in the laboratory setting is selected as the object of study. The selected time of a single measurement is 2 minutes, and as a full standard deviation error of measurement is selected the magnitude at least 0.002 "/ min. The objective of this study is to develop and underpin a new effective technique of LG digital information processing to enable providing an appropriate accuracy to meet modern requirements with reducing measurement time of a constant rate Ωz component. The specific objectives are the comparative analysis of the precision capabilities of the known techniques over limited measurement time intervals, development and support of new, more efficient technique of digital information processing of dithering ring LG, and experimental verification and evaluation of effectiveness of the technique proposed. The article presents a comparative error analysis of practically applied digital techniques such a simple averaging method, Hamming method, and method of "conditional sample of regression lines" with the proposed technique of "recognition of the output signal of the image N". To compare the techniques were used the real digital processing device output data taken at a frequency of 400 Hz over 94 two-minute measurement intervals after the device has been switched on. The proposed LG output image recognition technique enables us to reach about three times higher measuring accuracy over two-minute interval as compared to the known techniques.

  7. Novel Method of Unambiguous Moving Target Detection in Pulse-Doppler Radar with Random Pulse Repetition Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Blind zones and ambiguities in range and velocity measurement are two important issues in traditional pulse-Doppler radar. By generating random deviations with respect to a mean Pulse Repetition Interval (PRI, this paper proposes a novel algorithm of Moving Target Detection (MTD based on the Compressed Sensing (CS theory, in which the random deviations of the PRIare converted to the Restricted Isometry Property (RIP of the observing matrix. The ambiguities of range and velocity are eliminated by designing the signal parameters. The simulation results demonstrate that this scheme has high performance of detection, and there is no ambiguity and blind zones as well. It can also shorten the coherent processing interval compared to traditional staggered PRI mode because only one pulse train is needed instead of several trains.

  8. A New Algorithm of Compensation of the Time Interval Error GPS-Based Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Paul ZAVALA DE PAZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new algorithm of compensation of the time interval error (TIE applying an unbiased p-step predictive finite impulse response (FIR filter at the signal of the receiver Global Positioning System (GPS-based measurements. The practical use of the system GPS involves various inherent problems of the signal. Two of the most important problems are the TIE and the instantaneous loss of the signal of the GPS by a small interval of time, called "holdover". The error holdover is a problem that at present does not possess solution and the systems that present this type of error produce lines of erroneous synchronization in the signal of the GPS. Basic holdover algorithms are discussed along with their most critical properties. Efficiency of the predictive filter in holdover is demonstrated in applications to GPS-based measurements of the TIE.

  9. Proceedings of the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    la Armada (ROA). ROA is connected to the Spanish R&D network (RedIRIS) through the Red Informatica de Andalucia (RICA) using a point-to-point...Teddington, Section Time and Frequency Corso Montecucco 95 Middlesex, TWl 1 01W London 654 P.O. Box Torino 10141 United Kingdom Delft 2600 AR Italy Tel

  10. Sleep-dependent consolidation benefits fast transfer of time interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihan; Guo, Lu; Bao, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Previous study has shown that short training (15 min) for explicitly discriminating temporal intervals between two paired auditory beeps, or between two paired tactile taps, can significantly improve observers' ability to classify the perceptual states of visual Ternus apparent motion while the training of task-irrelevant sensory properties did not help to improve visual timing (Chen and Zhou in Exp Brain Res 232(6):1855-1864, 2014). The present study examined the role of 'consolidation' after training of temporal task-irrelevant properties, or whether a pure delay (i.e., blank consolidation) following pretest of the target task would give rise to improved ability of visual interval timing, typified in visual Ternus display. A procedure of pretest-training-posttest was adopted, with the probe of discriminating Ternus apparent motion. The extended implicit training of timing in which the time intervals between paired auditory beeps or paired tactile taps were manipulated but the task was discrimination of the auditory pitches or tactile intensities, did not lead to the training benefits (Exps 1 and 3); however, a delay of 24 h after implicit training of timing, including solving 'Sudoku puzzles,' made the otherwise absent training benefits observable (Exps 2, 4, 5 and 6). The above improvements in performance were not due to a practice effect of Ternus motion (Exp 7). A general 'blank' consolidation period of 24 h also made improvements of visual timing observable (Exp 8). Taken together, the current findings indicated that sleep-dependent consolidation imposed a general effect, by potentially triggering and maintaining neuroplastic changes in the intrinsic (timing) network to enhance the ability of time perception.

  11. Longest interval between zeros of the tied-down random walk, the Brownian bridge and related renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude

    2017-05-01

    The probability distribution of the longest interval between two zeros of a simple random walk starting and ending at the origin, and of its continuum limit, the Brownian bridge, was analysed in the past by Rosén and Wendel, then extended by the latter to stable processes. We recover and extend these results using simple concepts of renewal theory, which allows to revisit past and recent works of the physics literature.

  12. Dimensional Stability of Two Polyvinyl Siloxane Impression Materials in Different Time Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalaei Sh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Dental prosthesis is usually made indirectly; there- fore dimensional stability of the impression material is very important. Every few years, new impression materials with different manufacturers’ claims regarding their better properties are introduced to the dental markets which require more research to evaluate their true dimensional changes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate dimensional stability of additional silicone impression material (Panasil® and Affinis® in different time intervals. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, using two additional silicones (Panasil® and Affinis®, we made sixty impressions of standard die in similar conditions of 23 °C and 59% relative humidity by a special tray. The die included three horizontal and two vertical lines that were parallel. The vertical line crossed the horizontal ones at a point that served as reference for measurement. All impressions were poured with high strength dental stone. The dimensions were measured by stereo-microscope by two examiners in three interval storage times (1, 24 and 168 hours.The data were statistically analyzed using t-test and ANOVA. Results: All of the stone casts were larger than the standard die. Dimensional changes of Panasil and Affinis were 0.07%, 0.24%, 0.27% and 0.02%, 0.07%, 0.16% after 1, 24 and 168 hours, respectively. Dimensional change for two impression materials wasn’t significant in the interval time, expect for Panasil after one week (p = 0.004. Conclusions: According to the limitations of this study, Affinis impressions were dimensionally more stable than Panasil ones, but it was not significant. Dimensional change of Panasil impression showed a statistically significant difference after one week. Dimensional changes of both impression materials were based on ADA standard limitation in all time intervals (< 0.5%; therefore, dimensional stability of this impression was accepted at least

  13. Improving Delay-Range-Dependent Stability Condition for Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the delay-range-dependent stability for systems with interval time-varying delay. Through defining the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and estimating the derivative of the LKF by introducing new vectors, using free matrices and reciprocally convex approach, the new delay-range-dependent stability conditions are obtained. Two well-known examples are given to illustrate the less conservatism of the proposed theoretical results.

  14. The Initial Systolic Time Interval in patients with spinal cord injury measured with impedance cardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2012-12-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay is influenced by the sympathetic nerve system. Therefore, an observational study was performed in a group of patients (SCI) with spinal cord injuries. The relationship between the ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was established by varying the RR-interval using an exercise stimulus to increase the heart rate. The slope of this relationship was observed to be significantly higher in the SCI-group as compared with a control group, although there was no difference in ISTI in the range of common heart rates during the test between the groups. This slope and the ISTI was observed to be significantly different in an acute patient having a recent spinal cord injury at a high level. Because of the variety in injury levels and incompleteness of the injuries further, more specific research is necessary to draw decisive conclusions with respect to the contribution of autonomic nervous control on the ISTI in SCI, although the present observations are notable.

  15. BOT SPAMMER DETECTION IN TWITTER USING TWEET SIMILARITY AND TIME INTERVAL ENTROPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Setya Perdana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of Twitter has attracted spammers to disseminate large amount of spam messages. Preliminary studies had shown that most spam messages were produced automatically by bot. Therefore bot spammer detection can reduce the number of spam messages in Twitter significantly. However, to the best of our knowledge, few researches have focused in detecting Twitter bot spammer. Thus, this paper proposes a novel approach to differentiate between bot spammer and legitimate user accounts using time interval entropy and tweet similarity. Timestamp collections are utilized to calculate the time interval entropy of each user. Uni-gram matching-based similarity will be used to calculate tweet similarity. Datasets are crawled from Twitter containing both normal and spammer accounts. Experimental results showed that legitimate user may exhibit regular behavior in posting tweet as bot spammer. Several legitimate users are also detected to post similar tweets. Therefore it is less optimal to detect bot spammer using one of those features only. However, combination of both features gives better classification result. Precision, recall, and f-measure of the proposed method reached 85,71%, 94,74% and 90% respectively. It outperforms precision, recall, and f-measure of method which only uses either time interval entropy or tweet similarity.

  16. Transient overexpression of striatal D2 receptors impairs operant motivation and interval timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Michael R; Simpson, Eleanor H; Kellendonk, Christoph; Herzberg, William G; Lipatova, Olga; Fairhurst, Stephen; Kandel, Eric R; Malapani, Chara; Balsam, Peter D

    2007-07-18

    The striatum receives prominent dopaminergic innervation that is integral to appetitive learning, performance, and motivation. Signaling through the dopamine D2 receptor is critical for all of these processes. For instance, drugs with high affinity for the D2 receptor potently alter timing of operant responses and modulate motivation. Recently, in an attempt to model a genetic abnormality encountered in schizophrenia, mice were generated that reversibly overexpress D2 receptors specifically in the striatum (Kellendonk et al., 2006). These mice have impairments in working memory and behavioral flexibility, components of the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, that are not rescued when D2 overexpression is reversed in the adult. Here we report that overexpression of striatal D2 receptors also profoundly affects operant performance, a potential index of negative symptoms. Mice overexpressing D2 exhibited impairments in the ability to time food rewards in an operant interval timing task and reduced motivation to lever press for food reward in both the operant timing task and a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. The motivational deficit, but not the timing deficit, was rescued in adult mice by reversing D2 overexpression with doxycycline. These results suggest that early D2 overexpression alters the organization of interval timing circuits and confirms that striatal D2 signaling in the adult regulates motivational process. Moreover, overexpression of D2 under pathological conditions such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease could give rise to motivational and timing deficits.

  17. High intensity interval training in a real world setting: a randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lunt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. METHODS: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg, before and after the 12 week interventions. RESULTS: On ITT (intention to treat analyses, baseline (N = 49 and exit (N = 39 [Formula: see text]O2 was 25.3±4.5 and 25.3±3.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N =  16, 24.2±4.8/25.6±4.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.0±2.8/25.2±3.4; walking N = 17, 26.5±5.3/25.2±3.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, -0.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and -1.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03. The actual (observed, rather than prescribed time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p =  0.001. On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a

  18. Properties of Asymmetric Detrended Fluctuation Analysis in the time series of RR intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorski, J.; Kosmider, M.; Mieszkowski, D.; Krauze, T.; Wykretowicz, A.; Guzik, P.

    2018-02-01

    Heart rate asymmetry is a phenomenon by which the accelerations and decelerations of heart rate behave differently, and this difference is consistent and unidirectional, i.e. in most of the analyzed recordings the inequalities have the same directions. So far, it has been established for variance and runs based types of descriptors of RR intervals time series. In this paper we apply the newly developed method of Asymmetric Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, which so far has mainly been used with economic time series, to the set of 420 stationary 30 min time series of RR intervals from young, healthy individuals aged between 20 and 40. This asymmetric approach introduces separate scaling exponents for rising and falling trends. We systematically study the presence of asymmetry in both global and local versions of this method. In this study global means ;applying to the whole time series; and local means ;applying to windows jumping along the recording;. It is found that the correlation structure of the fluctuations left over after detrending in physiological time series shows strong asymmetric features in both magnitude, with α+ <α-, where α+ is related to heart rate decelerations and α- to heart rate accelerations, and the proportion of the signal in which the above inequality holds. A very similar effect is observed if asymmetric noise is added to a symmetric self-affine function. No such phenomena are observed in the same physiological data after shuffling or with a group of symmetric synthetic time series.

  19. Generalized Mittag-Leffler relaxation: clustering-jump continuous-time random walk approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurlewicz, Agnieszka; Weron, Karina; Teuerle, Marek

    2008-07-01

    A stochastic generalization of renormalization-group transformation for continuous-time random walk processes is proposed. The renormalization consists in replacing the jump events from a randomly sized cluster by a single renormalized (i.e., overall) jump. The clustering of the jumps, followed by the corresponding transformation of the interjump time intervals, yields a new class of coupled continuous-time random walks which, applied to modeling of relaxation, lead to the general power-law properties usually fitted with the empirical Havriliak-Negami function.

  20. Growth Estimators and Confidence Intervals for the Mean of Negative Binomial Random Variables with Unknown Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shilane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative binomial distribution becomes highly skewed under extreme dispersion. Even at moderately large sample sizes, the sample mean exhibits a heavy right tail. The standard normal approximation often does not provide adequate inferences about the data's expected value in this setting. In previous work, we have examined alternative methods of generating confidence intervals for the expected value. These methods were based upon Gamma and Chi Square approximations or tail probability bounds such as Bernstein's inequality. We now propose growth estimators of the negative binomial mean. Under high dispersion, zero values are likely to be overrepresented in the data. A growth estimator constructs a normal-style confidence interval by effectively removing a small, predetermined number of zeros from the data. We propose growth estimators based upon multiplicative adjustments of the sample mean and direct removal of zeros from the sample. These methods do not require estimating the nuisance dispersion parameter. We will demonstrate that the growth estimators' confidence intervals provide improved coverage over a wide range of parameter values and asymptotically converge to the sample mean. Interestingly, the proposed methods succeed despite adding both bias and variance to the normal approximation.

  1. Robust L2-L∞ Filtering of Time-Delay Jump Systems with Respect to the Finite-Time Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the problem of stochastic finite-time boundedness and disturbance attenuation for a class of linear time-delayed systems with Markov jumping parameters. Sufficient conditions are provided to solve this problem. The L2-L∞ filters are, respectively, designed for time-delayed Markov jump linear systems with/without uncertain parameters such that the resulting filtering error dynamic system is stochastically finite-time bounded and has the finite-time interval disturbance attenuation γ for all admissible uncertainties, time delays, and unknown disturbances. By using stochastic Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach, it is shown that the filter designing problem is in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled linear matrix inequalities. Simulation examples are included to demonstrate the potential of the proposed results.

  2. Effects of varied doses of psilocybin on time interval reproduction in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Jirí; Wittmann, Marc; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-04-11

    Action of a hallucinogenic substance, psilocybin, on internal time representation was investigated in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies: Experiment 1 with 12 subjects and graded doses, and Experiment 2 with 9 subjects and a very low dose. The task consisted in repeated reproductions of time intervals in the range from 1.5 to 5s. The effects were assessed by parameter kappa of the 'dual klepsydra' model of internal time representation, fitted to individual response data and intra-individually normalized with respect to initial values. The estimates kappa were in the same order of magnitude as in earlier studies. In both experiments, kappa was significantly increased by psilocybin at 90 min from the drug intake, indicating a higher loss rate of the internal duration representation. These findings are tentatively linked to qualitative alterations of subjective time in altered states of consciousness.

  3. Estimates by bootstrap interval for time series forecasts obtained by theta model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, are developed an experimental computer program in Matlab language version 7.1 from the univariate method for time series forecasting called Theta, and implementation of resampling technique known as computer intensive "bootstrap" to estimate the prediction for the point forecast obtained by this method by confidence interval. To solve this problem built up an algorithm that uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the interval estimation for forecasts. The Theta model presented in this work was very efficient in M3 Makridakis competition, where tested 3003 series. It is based on the concept of modifying the local curvature of the time series obtained by a coefficient theta (Θ. In it's simplest approach the time series is decomposed into two lines theta representing terms of long term and short term. The prediction is made by combining the forecast obtained by fitting lines obtained with the theta decomposition. The results of Mape's error obtained for the estimates confirm the favorable results to the method of M3 competition being a good alternative for time series forecast.

  4. Assessing cardiac preload by the Initial Systolic Time Interval obtained from impedance cardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H Meijer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI, obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG and impedance cardiogram (ICG, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and reflects an early active period of the cardiac cycle. The clinical relevance of this time interval is subject of study. This paper presents preliminary results of a pilot study investigating the use of ISTI in evaluating and predicting the circulatory response to fluid administration in patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery, by comparing ISTI with cardiac output (CO responsiveness. Also the use of the pulse transit time (PTT, earlier recommended for this purpose, is investigated. The results show an inverse relationship between ISTI and CO at all moments of fluid administration and also an inverse relationship between the changes ΔISTI and ΔCO before and after full fluid administration. No relationships between PTT and CO or ΔPTT and ΔCO were found. It is concluded that ISTI is dependent upon preload, and that ISTI has the potential to be used as a clinical parameter assessing preload.

  5. Sampled fiber grating for WDM signal queuing with picosecond time interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiqian; Liu, Shuai; Qi, Haifeng; Peng, Gangding; Shen, Mingya

    2017-12-01

    A new sampled fiber grating scheme is investigated for WDM signal queuing in time domain. The queuing is aimed at achieving very short constant time intervals down to picoseconds (ps) for many wavelength channels by a single fiber device. Theory and modeling predict that a consistence of linear spectral profiles exists between reflectivity or transmission spectrum and time delay spectrum. A sampled fiber grating based on Gaussian beam writing is proposed to offer a large number of wavelength channels and time delays within an approximate linear profile. Results for simulating a Gaussian sampled fiber grating show that the time delay minima of 8 channels within a section of the spectral profile have an average time delay step of 2.83 ps and standard deviation of 7.4% from linearity. Fiber gratings were successfully written by Gaussian laser beam in fabrication. A Gaussian sampled fiber grating was measured for time delay spectrum of 4 wavelength channels. An average time delay step of 9.67 ps is obtained. Some issues and related analysis and discussion are given. Our preliminary experiment suggests that the sampled fiber grating scheme can achieve ps-time steps for WDM signal queuing such as high-resolution time delay lines.

  6. Treatment of acne scars with fractional CO2 laser at 1-month versus 3-month intervals: an intra-individual randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørn, Marie; Stausbøl-Grøn, Birgitte; Braae Olesen, Anne; Hedelund, Lene

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of acne scars with ablative fractional CO2 laser appears to be an effective and well-tolerated treatment. However, so far the influence of treatment interval has not been evaluated. To evaluate whether treatment of acne scars with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 1-month interval achieves better results with no difference in the occurrence of adverse effects, than treatment given at 3-months interval. Patients (n = 13) with symmetrical atrophic acne scars on right and left sides of the mid-face and lower-face were randomized to two fractional CO2 laser treatments at 1-month versus 3-month intervals. Blinded on-site evaluations were performed 1 and 6 months after the last treatment on 10-point scales. Endpoints were scar atrophy, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects. Pre-operatively, acne scars were moderately atrophic (5.86 ± 1.87). After treatment acne scars appeared with less atrophy on both treated sides 1 month postoperatively (1-month interval 1.96 ± 1.23, P scar atrophy at any time postoperatively (P = 0.81). Patients were moderately and equally satisfied with the treatment result on facial sides (P = 0.93). Postoperative adverse effects were minor and not influenced by the treatment interval. Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing improves atrophic acne scars and a treatment interval of either 1-month or 3-months does not seem to influence the improvement of scar atrophy nor the occurrence of postoperative adverse effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The impact of different sampling rates and calculation time intervals on ROTI values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Knut Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ROTI (Rate of TEC index is a commonly used measure of ionospheric irregularities level. The algorithm to calculate ROTI is easily implemented, and is the same from paper to paper. However, the sample rate of the GNSS data used, and the time interval over which a value of ROTI is calculated, varies from paper to paper. When comparing ROTI values from different studies, this must be taken into account. This paper aims to show what these differences are, to increase the awareness of this issue. We have investigated the effect of different parameters for the calculation of ROTI values, using one year of data from 8 receivers at latitudes ranging from 59° N to 79° N. We have found that the ROTI values calculated using different parameter choices are strongly positively correlated. However, the ROTI values are quite different. The effect of a lower sample rate is to lower the ROTI value, due to the loss of high-frequency parts of the ROT spectrum, while the effect of a longer calculation time interval is to remove or reduce short-lived peaks due to the inherent smoothing effect. The ratio of ROTI values based on data of different sampling rate is examined in relation to the ROT power spectrum. Of relevance to statistical studies, we find that the median level of ROTI depends strongly on sample rate, strongly on latitude at auroral latitudes, and weakly on time interval. Thus, a baseline “quiet” or “noisy” level for one location or choice or parameters may not be valid for another location or choice of parameters.

  8. Conducting an acute intense interval exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month: what is the optimal time of the day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Chia, Michael Yong Hwa; Low, Chee Yong; Slater, Gary John; Png, Weileen; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the effects of Ramadan fasting on performance during an intense exercise session performed at three different times of the day, i.e., 08:00, 18:00, and 21:00 h. The purpose was to determine the optimal time of the day to perform an acute high-intensity interval exercise during the Ramadan fasting month. After familiarization, nine trained athletes performed six 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) cycle bouts followed by a time-to-exhaustion (T(exh)) cycle on six separate randomized and counterbalanced occasions. The three time-of-day nonfasting (control, CON) exercise sessions were performed before the Ramadan month, and the three corresponding time-of-day Ramadan fasting (RAM) exercise sessions were performed during the Ramadan month. Note that the 21:00 h session during Ramadan month was conducted in the nonfasted state after the breaking of the day's fast. Total work (TW) completed during the six WAnT bouts was significantly lower during RAM compared to CON for the 08:00 and 18:00 h (p exercise session, particularly during the period of the daytime fast. The optimal time to conduct an acute high-intensity exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month is in the evening, after the breaking of the day's fast.

  9. Improved exponential convergence result for generalized neural networks including interval time-varying delayed signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchakit, G; Saravanakumar, R; Ahn, Choon Ki; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-01

    This article examines the exponential stability analysis problem of generalized neural networks (GNNs) including interval time-varying delayed states. A new improved exponential stability criterion is presented by establishing a proper Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) and employing new analysis theory. The improved reciprocally convex combination (RCC) and weighted integral inequality (WII) techniques are utilized to obtain new sufficient conditions to ascertain the exponential stability result of such delayed GNNs. The superiority of the obtained results is clearly demonstrated by numerical examples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of systolic time intervals measured by impedance cardiography and carotid pulse tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Bonde, J; Rehling, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the systolic time intervals (STI) obtained by impedance cardiography and by the conventional carotid technique. This comparison was done with respect to: 1) correlations between variables obtained by the two methods, 2) ability to reflect drug-induced chan......The purpose of this study was to compare the systolic time intervals (STI) obtained by impedance cardiography and by the conventional carotid technique. This comparison was done with respect to: 1) correlations between variables obtained by the two methods, 2) ability to reflect drug.......001) and found that left ventricular ejection times were longer when determined by the carotid technique (p less than 0.01). We found a significant correlation between drug-induced changes in STI-variables measured by the two methods (p less than 0.001). Both methods had a high degree of reproducibility...... and this parameter was significantly better within the same day, when impedance cardiography was used (p less than 0.01). The error due to the reading of STI-tracings obtained by impedance cardiography was very small when performed by the same observer. We found the pre-ejection period to be independent upon heart...

  11. Recursive Approach for Evaluation of Time Intervals between Transactions in Polling Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ergodic semi-Markov process with the structure represented by the full graph with loops, which simulates a digital control algorithm that generated transactions onto an object, is investigated. Elementary simplifications for reduction of semi-Markov processes are defined. Recursive procedure for reduction of initial semi-Markov process structure till the model, which includes selected states with its links only, is proposed. Formulae for recalculation of probabilities, weighted densities and expectations of time of switching to linked states are obtained. It is shown that recursive procedure may be used also for calculation of time expectation of return the process to one of selected states that simplified the task of evaluation of time intervals between transactions in polling procedure.

  12. Managing different time granularities of clinical information by an interval-based temporal data model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, C; Pinciroli, F; Pozzi, G

    1995-12-01

    In the field of databases, time management at different levels of granularity has been an issue for several years, for instance when dealing with clinical information from different databases using different time units, dealing with natural language expressions, or when dealing with temporal uncertainty. A temporal data model is proposed to manage the temporal aspect of data, presented at various and mixed levels of granularity. The concept of temporal assertions shapes the entire temporal information. The model provides a temporal dimension to the data by using intervals that can be specified at different granularities. The model supports a three-valued logic, where True, False and Undefined are the truth values. The temporal data model allows to manage some degrees of uncertainty when establishing temporal relationships between intervals or between temporal assertions, expressed at different granularities. The logical connectives and quantifiers can manage each of the three truth-values. We applied the temporal data model by implementing an object-oriented database system for managing follow-up clinical data from patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

  13. Receiver operating characteristic curve estimation for time to event with semicompeting risks and interval censoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Blanche, Paul; Chary, Emilie; Touraine, Célia; Dartigues, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Semicompeting risks and interval censoring are frequent in medical studies, for instance when a disease may be diagnosed only at times of visit and disease onset is in competition with death. To evaluate the ability of markers to predict disease onset in this context, estimators of discrimination measures must account for these two issues. In recent years, methods for estimating the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curve and the associated area under the ROC curve have been extended to account for right censored data and competing risks. In this paper, we show how an approximation allows to use the inverse probability of censoring weighting estimator for semicompeting events with interval censored data. Then, using an illness-death model, we propose two model-based estimators allowing to rigorously handle these issues. The first estimator is fully model based whereas the second one only uses the model to impute missing observations due to censoring. A simulation study shows that the bias for inverse probability of censoring weighting remains modest and may be less than the one of the two parametric estimators when the model is misspecified. We finally recommend the nonparametric inverse probability of censoring weighting estimator as main analysis and the imputation estimator based on the illness-death model as sensitivity analysis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Detection of Abnormal Item Based on Time Intervals for Recommender Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of e-business, personalized recommendation has become core competence for enterprises to gain profits and improve customer satisfaction. Although collaborative filtering is the most successful approach for building a recommender system, it suffers from “shilling” attacks. In recent years, the research on shilling attacks has been greatly improved. However, the approaches suffer from serious problem in attack model dependency and high computational cost. To solve the problem, an approach for the detection of abnormal item is proposed in this paper. In the paper, two common features of all attack models are analyzed at first. A revised bottom-up discretized approach is then proposed based on time intervals and the features for the detection. The distributions of ratings in different time intervals are compared to detect anomaly based on the calculation of chi square distribution (χ2. We evaluated our approach on four types of items which are defined according to the life cycles of these items. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves a high detection rate with low computational cost when the number of attack profiles is more than 15. It improves the efficiency in shilling attacks detection by narrowing down the suspicious users.

  15. Detection of abnormal item based on time intervals for recommender systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Yuan, Quan; Ling, Bin; Xiong, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of e-business, personalized recommendation has become core competence for enterprises to gain profits and improve customer satisfaction. Although collaborative filtering is the most successful approach for building a recommender system, it suffers from "shilling" attacks. In recent years, the research on shilling attacks has been greatly improved. However, the approaches suffer from serious problem in attack model dependency and high computational cost. To solve the problem, an approach for the detection of abnormal item is proposed in this paper. In the paper, two common features of all attack models are analyzed at first. A revised bottom-up discretized approach is then proposed based on time intervals and the features for the detection. The distributions of ratings in different time intervals are compared to detect anomaly based on the calculation of chi square distribution (χ(2)). We evaluated our approach on four types of items which are defined according to the life cycles of these items. The experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves a high detection rate with low computational cost when the number of attack profiles is more than 15. It improves the efficiency in shilling attacks detection by narrowing down the suspicious users.

  16. Measurement of the ecological flow of the Acaponeta river, Nayarit, comparing different time intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe de la Lanza Espino

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The diverse management of river water in Mexico has been unequal due to the different anthropological activities, and it is associated with inter-annual changes in the climate and runoff patterns, leading to a loss of the ecosystem integrity. However, nowadays there are different methods to assess the water volume that is necessary to conserve the environment, among which are hydrological methods, such as those applied here, that are based on information on water volumes recorded over decades, which are not always available in the country. For this reason, this study compares runoff records for different time ranges: minimum of 10 years, medium of 20 years, and more than 50 years, to quantify the environmental flow. These time intervals provided similar results, which mean that not only for the Acaponeta river, but possibly for others lotic systems as well, a 10-year interval may be used satisfactorily. In this river, the runoff water that must be kept for environmental purposes is: for 10 years 70.1%, for 20 years 78.1% and for >50 years 68.8%, with an average of 72.3% of the total water volume or of the average annual runoff.

  17. Measuring the EMS patient access time interval and the impact of responding to high-rise buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Laurie J; Angelini, Mark P; Vermeulen, Marian J; Schwartz, Brian

    2005-01-01

    To measure the patient access time interval and characterize its contribution to the total emergency medical services (EMS) response time interval; to compare the patient access time intervals for patients located three or more floors above ground with those less than three floors above or below ground, and specifically in the apartment subgroup; and to identify barriers that significantly impede EMS access to patients in high-rise apartments. An observational study of all patients treated by an emergency medical technician paramedics (EMT-P) crew was conducted using a trained independent observer to collect time intervals and identify potential barriers to access. Of 118 observed calls, 25 (21%) originated from patients three or more floors above ground. The overall median and 90th percentile (95% confidence interval) patient access time intervals were 1.61 (1.27, 1.91) and 3.47 (3.08, 4.05) minutes, respectively. The median interval was 2.73 (2.22, 3.03) minutes among calls from patients located three or more stories above ground compared with 1.25 (1.07, 1.55) minutes among those at lower levels. The patient access time interval represented 23.5% of the total EMS response time interval among calls originating less than three floors above or below ground and 32.2% of those located three or more stories above ground. The most frequently encountered barriers to access included security code entry requirements, lack of directional signs, and inability to fit the stretcher into the elevator. The patient access time interval is significantly long and represents a substantial component of the total EMS response time interval, especially among ambulance calls originating three or more floors above ground. A number of barriers appear to contribute to delayed paramedic access.

  18. Assessment of time interval between tramadol intake and seizure and second drug-induced attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abbasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol is a synthetic drug which is prescribed in moderate and severe pain. Tramadol overdose can induce severe complications such as consciousness impairment and convulsions. This study was done to determine the convulsions incidence after tramadol use until one week after hospital discharge. Methods: This prospective study was done in tramadol overdose patients without uncontrolled epilepsy and head injury history. All cases admitted in Loghman and Rasol Akram Hospitals, Tehran, Iran from 1, April 2011 to 1, April 2012 were included and observed for at least 12 hours. Time interval between tramadol intake and first seizure were record. Then, patients with second drug-induced seizure were recognized and log time between the first and second seizure was analyzed. The patients were transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU if clinical worsening status observed. One week after hospital discharge, telephone follow-up was conducted. Results: A total of 150 patients with a history of tramadol induced seizures (141 men, 9 women, age: 23.23±5.94 years were enrolled in this study. Convulsion was seen in 104 patients (69.3%. In 8 out of 104 patients (7.6% two or more convulsion was seen. Time interval between tramadol use and the onset of the first and second seizure were 0.93±0.17 and 2.5±0.75 hours, respectively. Tramadol induced seizures are more likely to occur in males and patients with a history of drug abuse. Finally, one hundred forty nine patients (99.3% were discharged with good condition and the only one patient died from tramadol overdose. Conclusion: The results of the study showed tramadol induced seizure most frequently occurred within the first 4 hours of tramadol intake. The chance of experiencing a second seizure exists in the susceptible population. Thus, 4 hours after drug intake is the best time for patients to be hospital discharged.

  19. Robust Exponential Stability for Uncertain Discrete-Time Switched Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay through a Switching Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Der Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the switching signal design to robust exponential stability for uncertain discrete-time switched systems with interval time-varying delay. The lower and upper bounds of the time-varying delay are assumed to be known. By construction of a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing linear matrix inequality, some novel sufficient conditions are proposed to guarantee the global exponential stability for such system with parametric perturbations by using a switching signal. In addition, some nonnegative inequalities are used to provide additional degrees of freedom and reduce the conservativeness of systems. Finally, some numerical examples are given to illustrate performance of the proposed design methods.

  20. Measuring sequences of keystrokes with jsPsych: Reliability of response times and interkeystroke intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet, S; Zielinski, C; Mathôt, S; Dufau, S; Alario, F-X; Longcamp, M

    2017-06-01

    Although the precision and reliability of response time (RT) measurements performed via Web-based interfaces have been evaluated, sequences of keystrokes have never been investigated in detail. Keystrokes often occur in much more rapid succession than RTs, and operating systems may interpret successive or concomitant keyboard events according to both automatic and user-based settings. Sequence keystroke timing could thus be more sensitive than single RTs to noise in online measurements. Here, we quantified the precision and reliability of timing measures performed during sequences of keystrokes. We used the JavaScript jsPsych library to create an experiment involving finger-movement sequences, and ran it online with 633 participants. We manipulated the structure of three keystroke motor sequences, targeting a replication of previous findings regarding both RTs and interkeystroke intervals (IKIs). Our online data accurately reproduced the original results and allowed for a novel assessment of demographic variables such as age and gender. In parallel, we also measured the objective timing accuracy of the jsPsych interface by using specialized hardware and software, showing a constant 60-ms delay for RTs and a 0-ms delay for IKIs across the sequences. The distribution of IKIs revealed quantizing for a majority of participants, most likely due to the sampling frequency of their USB keyboards. Overall, these findings indicate that JsPsych provides good reliability and accuracy in sequence keystroke timings for mental chronometry purposes, through online recordings.

  1. Cumulative Instructional Time and Relative Effectiveness Conclusions: Extending Research on Response Intervals, Learning, and Measurement Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Michelle P; Skinner, Christopher H; Forbes, Bethany E; McCurdy, Merilee; Coleman, Mari Beth; Davis, Kristie; Gettelfinger, Maripat

    2016-03-01

    Adapted alternating treatments designs were used to evaluate three computer-based flashcard reading interventions (1-s, 3-s, or 5-s response intervals) across two students with disabilities. When learning was plotted with cumulative instructional sessions on the horizontal axis, the session-series graphs suggest that the interventions were similarly effective. When the same data were plotted as a function of cumulative instructional seconds, time-series graphs suggest that the 1-s intervention caused the most rapid learning for one student. Discussion focuses on applied implications of comparative effectiveness studies and why measures of cumulative instructional time are needed to identify the most effective intervention(s).Comparative effectiveness studies may not identify the intervention which causes the most rapid learning.Session-series repeated measures are not the same as time-series repeated measures.Measuring the time students spend in each intervention (i.e., cumulative instructional seconds) allows practitioners to identify interventions that enhance learning most rapidly.Student time spent working under interventions is critical for drawing applied conclusions.

  2. Mean square stability of uncertain stochastic BAM neural networks with interval time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haixia; Liao, Xiaofeng; Feng, Wei; Guo, Songtao

    2012-10-01

    The robust asymptotic stability analysis for uncertain BAM neural networks with both interval time-varying delays and stochastic disturbances is considered. By using the stochastic analysis approach, employing some free-weighting matrices and introducing an appropriate type of Lyapunov functional which takes into account the ranges for delays, some new stability criteria are established to guarantee the delayed BAM neural networks to be robustly asymptotically stable in the mean square. Unlike the most existing mean square stability conditions for BAM neural networks, the supplementary requirements that the time derivatives of time-varying delays must be smaller than 1 are released and the lower bounds of time varying delays are not restricted to be 0. Furthermore, in the proposed scheme, the stability conditions are delay-range-dependent and rate-dependent/independent. As a result, the new criteria are applicable to both fast and slow time-varying delays. Three numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria.

  3. Summarizing the incidence of adverse events using volcano plots and time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Richard C; Wolfinger, Russell D; Mann, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Adverse event incidence analyses are a critical component for describing the safety profile of any new intervention. The results typically are presented in lengthy summary tables. For therapeutic areas where patients have frequent adverse events, analysis and interpretation are made more difficult by the sheer number and variety of events that occur. Understanding the risk in these instances becomes even more crucial. We describe a space-saving graphical summary that overcomes the limitations of traditional presentations of adverse events and improves interpretability of the safety profile. We present incidence analyses of adverse events graphically using volcano plots to highlight treatment differences. Data from a clinical trial of patients experiencing an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are used for illustration. Adjustments for multiplicity are illustrated. Color is used to indicate the treatment with higher incidence; bubble size represents the total number of events that occur in the treatment arms combined. Adjustments for multiple comparisons are displayed in a manner to indicate clearly those events for which the difference between treatment arms is statistically significant. Furthermore, adverse events can be displayed by time intervals, with multiple volcano plots or animation to appreciate changes in adverse event risk over time. Such presentations can emphasize early differences across treatments that may resolve later or highlight events for which treatment differences may become more substantial with longer follow-up. Treatment arms are compared in a pairwise fashion. Volcano plots are space-saving tools that emphasize important differences between the adverse event profiles of two treatment arms. They can incorporate multiplicity adjustments in a manner that is straightforward to interpret and, by using time intervals, can illustrate how adverse event risk changes over the course of a clinical trial.

  4. Longer time interval between semen processing and intrauterine insemination does not affect pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Charlotte H J R; Elisen, Marc G L M; Leenstra, Cor W; Kaaijk, Eugenie M; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Verhoeve, Harold R

    2017-11-01

    To study whether the pregnancy outcome of intrauterine insemination (IUI) is affected by a longer time interval between semen processing and insemination. Retrospective cohort. Teaching hospital. Couples with subfertility and an indication for IUI over a 10-year period. Insemination performed the day after but within 24 hours of semen collection and processing (delayed insemination) compared with insemination performed immediately after sperm collection and processing (immediate insemination). Ongoing pregnancy rate, defined as a pregnancy confirmed by ultrasound at 10 to 12 weeks of gestation. In total, 1,136 cycles were analyzed. In 77 of 547 couples (14%) an ongoing pregnancy occurred after delayed insemination, and in 77 of 589 couples (13%) an ongoing pregnancy occurred after immediate insemination. Both groups had similar baseline characteristics. After adjustment for confounders, there was no difference in the ongoing pregnancy rate between delayed as compared with immediate insemination (odds ratio 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.25). There is no negative effect on pregnancy rate when IUI of processed sperm is delayed until the next day. This approach allows additional flexibility for couples when the male partner is not available on the day of ovulation, and it allows for a spread of workload in the laboratory. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The significance of the time interval between antecedent pregnancy and diagnosis of high-risk gestational trophoblastic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles, T; Young, A; Sammit, A; Stebbing, J; Short, D; Bower, M; Savage, P M; Seckl, M J; Schmid, P

    2006-01-01

    It is thought that the time interval between the antecedent pregnancy and diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTTs) may influence the outcome of these patients. In this study, we investigate the significance of this time interval. Multivariate analysis was used to investigate if the time interval was of prognostic significance from our cohort of 241 high-risk patients with GTT. Subsequent cutpoint analysis was used to determine an optimal cutpoint for the interval covariate. The outcome of these patients was plotted according to the Kaplan–Meier method. The time interval was of prognostic significance on multivariate analysis. A period of greater than 2.8 years after pregnancy was found to be of most significance. The 5-year overall survival was 62.0% (95% CI: 47–76%) for greater than 2.8 years vs 94% (95% CI: 91–97%) for less than 2.8 years (Pdisease. PMID:17031399

  6. Variable interval time/temperature (VITT) defrost-control-system evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-12

    Two variable-interval-time/temperature (VITT) heat pump defrost control systems are analyzed to determine if systems manufactured by Honeywell and Ranco qualify for credit for heat pumps with demand defrost control. The operation of the systems is described. VITT controls are not demand defrost control systems but utilize demand defrost control as backup systems in most Ranco models and all Honeywell models. The evaluations and results, intended to provide DOE information in making its determinations regarding credits for the control systems are discussed. The evaluation methodology utilizes a modified version of the Heat Pump Seasonal Performance Model (HPSPM) and the important modifications are discussed in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a detailed listing and discussion of the HPSPM output. (MCW)

  7. Mice plan decision strategies based on previously learned time intervals, locations, and probabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Tuğçe; Gür, Ezgi; Balcı, Fuat

    2016-01-19

    Animals can shape their timed behaviors based on experienced probabilistic relations in a nearly optimal fashion. On the other hand, it is not clear if they adopt these timed decisions by making computations based on previously learnt task parameters (time intervals, locations, and probabilities) or if they gradually develop their decisions based on trial and error. To address this question, we tested mice in the timed-switching task, which required them to anticipate when (after a short or long delay) and at which of the two delay locations a reward would be presented. The probability of short trials differed between test groups in two experiments. Critically, we first trained mice on relevant task parameters by signaling the active trial with a discriminative stimulus and delivered the corresponding reward after the associated delay without any response requirement (without inducing switching behavior). During the test phase, both options were presented simultaneously to characterize the emergence and temporal characteristics of the switching behavior. Mice exhibited timed-switching behavior starting from the first few test trials, and their performance remained stable throughout testing in the majority of the conditions. Furthermore, as the probability of the short trial increased, mice waited longer before switching from the short to long location (experiment 1). These behavioral adjustments were in directions predicted by reward maximization. These results suggest that rather than gradually adjusting their time-dependent choice behavior, mice abruptly adopted temporal decision strategies by directly integrating their previous knowledge of task parameters into their timed behavior, supporting the model-based representational account of temporal risk assessment.

  8. Poststimulation time interval-dependent effects of motor cortex anodal tDCS on reaction-time task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero-Chamizo, Andrés; Alameda Bailén, José R; Garrido Béjar, Tamara; García López, Macarena; Jaén Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez Lérida, Carolina; Pérez Panal, Silvia; González Ángel, Gloria; Lemus Corchero, Laura; Ruiz Vega, María J; Nitsche, Michael A; Rivera-Urbina, Guadalupe N

    2018-01-12

    Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induces long-term potentiation-like plasticity, which is associated with long-lasting effects on different cognitive, emotional, and motor performances. Specifically, tDCS applied over the motor cortex is considered to improve reaction time in simple and complex tasks. The timing of tDCS relative to task performance could determine the efficacy of tDCS to modulate performance. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single session of anodal tDCS (1.5 mA, for 15 min) applied over the left primary motor cortex (M1) versus sham stimulation on performance of a go/no-go simple reaction-time task carried out at three different time points after tDCS-namely, 0, 30, or 60 min after stimulation. Performance zero min after anodal tDCS was improved during the whole course of the task. Performance 30 min after anodal tDCS was improved only in the last block of the reaction-time task. Performance 60 min after anodal tDCS was not significantly different throughout the entire task. These findings suggest that the motor cortex excitability changes induced by tDCS can improve motor responses, and these effects critically depend on the time interval between stimulation and task performance.

  9. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Chan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events. These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file and roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage. The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.

  10. Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) as a Predictor of Intradialytic Hypotension (IDH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesheuvel, J. D.; Vervloet, M. G.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Meijer, J. H.

    2013-04-01

    In haemodialysis treatment the clearance and volume control by the kidneys of a patient are partially replaced by intermittent haemodialysis. Because this artificial process is performed on a limited time scale, unphysiological imbalances in the fluid compartments of the body occur, that can lead to intradialytic hypotensions (IDH). An IDH endangers the efficacy of the haemodialysis session and is associated with dismal clinical endpoints, including mortality. A diagnostic method that predicts the occurrence of these drops in blood pressure could facilitate timely measures for the prevention of IDH. The present study investigates whether the Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) can provide such a diagnostic method. The ISTI is defined as the time difference between the R-peak in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the C-wave in the impedance cardiogram (ICG) and is considered to be a non-invasive assessment of the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay has previously been found to depend on autonomic nervous function as well as preload of the heart. Therefore, it can be expected that ISTI may predict an imminent IDH caused by a low circulating blood volume. This ongoing observational clinical study investigates the relationship between changes in ISTI and subsequent drops in blood pressure during haemodialysis. A registration of a complicated dialysis showed a significant correlation between a drop in blood pressure, a decrease in relative blood volume and a substantial increase in ISTI. An uncomplicated dialysis, in which also a considerable amount of fluid was removed, showed no correlations. Both, blood pressure and ISTI remained stable. In conclusion, the preliminary results of the present study show a substantial response of ISTI to haemodynamic instability, indicating an application in optimization and individualisation of the dialysis process.

  11. Hybrid neuro-heuristic methodology for simulation and control of dynamic systems over time interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Marcin; Połap, Dawid

    2017-09-01

    Simulation and positioning are very important aspects of computer aided engineering. To process these two, we can apply traditional methods or intelligent techniques. The difference between them is in the way they process information. In the first case, to simulate an object in a particular state of action, we need to perform an entire process to read values of parameters. It is not very convenient for objects for which simulation takes a long time, i.e. when mathematical calculations are complicated. In the second case, an intelligent solution can efficiently help on devoted way of simulation, which enables us to simulate the object only in a situation that is necessary for a development process. We would like to present research results on developed intelligent simulation and control model of electric drive engine vehicle. For a dedicated simulation method based on intelligent computation, where evolutionary strategy is simulating the states of the dynamic model, an intelligent system based on devoted neural network is introduced to control co-working modules while motion is in time interval. Presented experimental results show implemented solution in situation when a vehicle transports things over area with many obstacles, what provokes sudden changes in stability that may lead to destruction of load. Therefore, applied neural network controller prevents the load from destruction by positioning characteristics like pressure, acceleration, and stiffness voltage to absorb the adverse changes of the ground. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short interval between two Pap smears: effect on the result of the second smear? A prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolben, Theresa M; Bergauer, Florian; Moeckel, Jochen; Boettcher, Berit; Thaler, Christian J; Kolben, Thomas; Crispin, Alexander; Dannecker, Christian; Mahner, Sven; Gallwas, Julia

    2017-06-01

    A repeat Pap smear is sometimes necessary after a short time interval or even immediately, when patients seek for a second opinion or due to study participation. Only limited information is available on the possible impact of a short interval between two Pap smears. Most institutions therefore practice a minimum time span of 6-8 weeks before obtaining a second smear since a short interval is commonly believed to be associated with an increase of false negative results in the second smear. Two consecutive Pap smears were obtained from 81 women. 41 smears were processed using the conventional technique, whereas liquid-based cytology was used in the remaining 40 women. Smears were independently evaluated by four different cytopathologists. We analyzed the effect of time interval, both processing techniques and inter-observer variance in cytological evaluation. While the result of the second smear shows a tendency towards a more benign outcome (odds ratio (OR) 1.436, 95% CI 0.972-2.121), this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07). No significant differences were observed between conservative and liquid-based cytology (OR 1.554, 95% CI 0.659-3.667, p = 0.31). There was considerable inter-observer variability, and the observer was a strong predictor of the cytological result (OR 0.632-5.083, 95% CI 0.355-8.975, p smear. Inter-observer variability of different cytopathologists is high and should be kept in mind when evaluating cytology results.

  13. Infant rats can learn time intervals before the maturation of the striatum: evidence from odor fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eBoulanger Bertolus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interval timing refers to the ability to perceive, estimate and discriminate durations in the range of seconds to minutes. Very little is currently known about the ontogeny of interval timing throughout development. On the other hand, even though the neural circuit sustaining interval timing is a matter of debate, the striatum has been suggested to be an important component of the system and its maturation occurs around the third post-natal week in rats. The global aim of the present study was to investigate interval timing abilities at an age for which striatum is not yet mature. We used odor fear conditioning, as it can be applied to very young animals. In odor fear conditioning, an odor is presented to the animal and a mild footshock is delivered after a fixed interval. Adult rats have been shown to learn the temporal relationships between the odor and the shock after a few associations. The first aim of the present study was to assess the activity of the striatum during odor fear conditioning using 2-Deoxyglucose autoradiography during development in rats. The data showed that although fear learning was displayed at all tested ages, activation of the striatum was observed in adults but not in juvenile animals. Next, we assessed the presence of evidence of interval timing in ages before and after the inclusion of the striatum into the fear conditioning circuit. We used an experimental setup allowing the simultaneous recording of freezing and respiration that have been demonstrated to be sensitive to interval timing in adult rats. This enabled the detection of duration-related temporal patterns for freezing and/or respiration curves in infants as young as 12 days post-natal during odor-fear conditioning. This suggests that infants are able to encode time durations as well as and as quickly as adults while their striatum is not yet functional. Alternative networks possibly sustaining interval timing in infant rats are discussed.

  14. Average time spent by Lévy flights and walks on an interval with absorbing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, S V; Havlin, S; Kazakov, A Y; da Luz, M G; Raposo, E P; Stanley, H E; Viswanathan, G M

    2001-10-01

    We consider a Lévy flyer of order alpha that starts from a point x(0) on an interval [O,L] with absorbing boundaries. We find a closed-form expression for the average number of flights the flyer takes and the total length of the flights it travels before it is absorbed. These two quantities are equivalent to the mean first passage times for Lévy flights and Lévy walks, respectively. Using fractional differential equations with a Riesz kernel, we find exact analytical expressions for both quantities in the continuous limit. We show that numerical solutions for the discrete Lévy processes converge to the continuous approximations in all cases except the case of alpha-->2, and the cases of x(0)-->0 and x(0)-->L. For alpha>2, when the second moment of the flight length distribution exists, our result is replaced by known results of classical diffusion. We show that if x(0) is placed in the vicinity of absorbing boundaries, the average total length has a minimum at alpha=1, corresponding to the Cauchy distribution. We discuss the relevance of this result to the problem of foraging, which has received recent attention in the statistical physics literature.

  15. Risk-Based Allowed Outage Time and Surveillance Test Interval Extensions for Angra 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Orlando Gibelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA is used to evaluate Allowed Outage Times (AOT and Surveillance Test Intervals (STI extensions for three Angra 1 nuclear power plant safety systems. The interest in such an analysis lies on the fact that PSA comprises a risk-based tool for safety evaluation and has been increasingly applied to support both the regulatory and the operational decision-making processes. Regarding Angra 1, among other applications, PSA is meant to be an additional method that can be used by the utility to justify Technical Specification relaxation to the Brazilian regulatory body. The risk measure used in this work is the Core Damage Frequency, obtained from the Angra 1 Level 1 PSA study. AOT and STI extensions are evaluated for the Safety Injection, Service Water and Auxiliary Feedwater Systems using the SAPHIRE code. In order to compensate for the risk increase caused by the extensions, compensatory measures as (1 test of redundant train prior to entering maintenance and (2 staggered test strategy are proposed. Results have shown that the proposed AOT extensions are acceptable for two of the systems with the implementation of compensatory measures whereas STI extensions are acceptable for all three systems.

  16. Neglected time: impaired temporal perception of multisecond intervals in unilateral neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danckert, James; Ferber, Susanne; Pun, Carson; Broderick, Carol; Striemer, Christopher; Rock, Sherry; Stewart, Dwight

    2007-10-01

    Recent neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies have suggested that the right hemisphere, particularly frontal regions, is important for the perception of the passage of time. We examined the ability to estimate durations of up to 60 sec in a group of eight patients with unilateral neglect. When estimating multisecond intervals, neglect patients grossly underestimated all durations. On average, healthy controls (HC) demonstrated reasonably accurate estimates of all durations tested. Although the right hemisphere lesioned control patients without neglect also tended to underestimate durations, these underestimations were significantly better than the performance of the neglect group. These findings suggest a pivotal role for a right hemisphere fronto-parietal network in the accurate perception of multisecond durations. Furthermore, these findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting that neglect cannot be understood simply in terms of a bias in orienting attention to one side of space. Additional deficits of the kind demonstrated here are likely to be crucial in determining the nature and extent of the loss of conscious awareness for contralesional events.

  17. The effects of four weeks of creatine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Joel T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-intensity interval training has been shown to be a time-efficient way to induce physiological adaptations similar to those of traditional endurance training. Creatine supplementation may enhance high-intensity interval training, leading to even greater physiological adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT and creatine supplementation on cardiorespiratory fitness and endurance performance (maximal oxygen consumption (VO2PEAK, time-to-exhaustion (VO2PEAKTTE, ventilatory threshold (VT, and total work done (TWD in college-aged men. Methods Forty-three recreationally active men completed a graded exercise test to determine VO2PEAK, VO2PEAKTTE, and VT. In addition, participants completed a time to exhaustion (TTE ride at 110% of the maximum workload reached during the graded exercise test to determine TWD (TTE (sec × W = J. Following testing, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: creatine (creatine citrate (Cr; n = 16, placebo (PL; n = 17, or control (n = 10 groups. The Cr and PL groups completed four weeks of HIIT prior to post-testing. Results Significant improvements in VO2PEAK and VO2PEAKTTE occurred in both training groups. Only the Cr group significantly improved VT (16% vs. 10% improvement in PL. No changes occurred in TWD in any group. Conclusion In conclusion, HIIT is an effective and time-efficient way to improve maximal endurance performance. The addition of Cr improved VT, but did not increase TWD. Therefore, 10 g of Cr per day for five days per week for four weeks does not seem to further augment maximal oxygen consumption, greater than HIIT alone; however, Cr supplementation may improve submaximal exercise performance.

  18. Hemodynamic effects of nebivolol in men: comparison of radionuclide angiocardiography with systolic time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crée, J; Franken, P; Vandevivere, J; Geukens, H; Verhaegen, H

    1988-06-01

    In a subacute experiment the authors studied the effects of a fourteen -day treatment with nebivolol, 5 mg once a day, in 10 healthy male volunteers with a mean age of thirty-one, twenty-five to thirty-nine years, by comparing the results of the resting ratio of the preejection period (PEP) to the left ventricular ejection time (LVET), as measured by systolic time intervals (STI), with the results obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA), using technetium 99m-labeled autologous red blood cells as a marker. A submaximal treadmill exercise test performed before and during treatment demonstrated that nebivolol significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced peak exercise heart rate and systolic blood pressure from a mean value of 158 +/- 5.4 bpm to 131 +/- 4.3 bpm and from 171 +/- 4.9 mmHg to 144 +/- 4.5 mmHg respectively. The data from the STI and ERNA were calculated and analyzed independently by two observers. A highly significant (r = 0.8182, p = 0.0038) correlation was found between the changes of stroke volume (SV) and PEPc/LVETc during treatment with nebivolol. Furthermore end-diastolic volume significantly(p = 0.03) increased from a mean value of 177 +/- 10.1 ml to 198 +/- 6 ml and stroke volume significantly (p = 0.01) increased from 120 +/- 6.8 ml to 136 +/- 6.3 ml. Systemic vascular resistance tended to decrease from a mean value of 11.4 +/- 1.28 units to 10.6 +/- 1.10 units. No changes could be observed either in ejection fraction or in cardiac output.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weston M, et al. Effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) on fitness in adults: A meta-analysis ... 2014;44:1005. Gillen JB, et al. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health ...

  20. Effect of the VO2 time-averaging interval on the reproducibility of VO2max in healthy athletic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Adrian W; McNaughton, Lars R; Carroll, Sean

    2007-03-01

    Limited research has investigated the most appropriate oxygen uptake (VO2) data averaging method to obtain reliable and valid maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) values. This study investigated the effect of the VO2 time-averaging interval on the reproducibility of VO2max. Twenty-two competitive distance runners (six female) performed two identical incremental treadmill tests to their limit of exercise tolerance separated by at least 48 h. Commencing at 7 km h(-1), running speed was increased by 1 km h(-1) per minute for five stages and 0.5 km h(-1) thereafter. Breath-by-breath VO2 data collected during each incremental test were time-averaged over 10-, 15-, 20-, 30- and 60-s and the highest averaged VO2 value was regarded as VO2max for each time-averaging interval. The VO2max values derived from different VO2 time-averaging intervals were significantly different for the first (F = 39.6; PVO2max to significantly increase as the time-averaging interval became shorter. The reproducibility of VO2max was similar for all five VO2 time-averages, with no significant differences between the within-subject variance (F = 0.4; P = 0.6). The results of this study suggests that the reproducibility of VO2max is not affected by the length of the VO2 time-average interval. However, VO2max was significantly altered by changing the VO2 time-averaging interval between 10 and 60 s. Consistency in the VO2 time-averaging interval is therefore an important methodological consideration for repeated determinations of VO2max.

  1. Shared timing variability in eye and finger movements increases with interval duration: Support for a distributed timing system below and above one second.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampela, Olympia; Holm, Linus; Madison, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the ability to produce action at will at the hundreds of millisecond to second range remain poorly understood. A central issue is whether such timing is governed by one mechanism or by several different mechanisms, possibly invoked by different effectors used to perform the timing task. If two effectors invoke similar timing mechanisms, then they should both produce similar variability increase with interval duration (interonset interval) and thus adhere to Weber's law (increasing linearly with the duration of the interval to be timed). Additionally, if both effectors invoke the same timing mechanism, the variability of the effectors should be highly correlated across participants. To test these possibilities, we assessed the behavioural characteristics across fingers and eyes as effectors and compared the timing variability between and within them as a function of the interval to be produced (interresponse interval). Sixty participants produced isochronous intervals from 524 to 1431 ms with their fingers and their eyes. High correlations within each effector indicated consistent performance within participants. Consistent with a single mechanism, temporal variability in both fingers and eyes followed Weber's law, and significant correlations between eye and finger variability were found for several intervals. These results can support neither the single clock nor the multiple clock hypotheses but instead suggest a partially overlapping distributed timing system.

  2. Changes in QTc interval in the citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (CitAD randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea T Drye

    Full Text Available A Food and Drug Administration (FDA safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group.CitAD was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Participants were assigned to citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day or placebo in a 1 ∶ 1 ratio. 186 people, 181 of whom were over the age of 60, having probable AD with clinically significant agitation were recruited from September 2009 to January 2013. After the FDA safety communication about citalopram, ECG was added to the required study procedures before enrollment and repeated at week 3 to monitor change in QTc interval. Forty-eight participants were enrolled after enhanced monitoring began.Citalopram treatment was associated with a larger increase in QTc interval than placebo (difference in week 3 QTc adjusting for baseline QTc: 18.1 ms [95% CI: 6.1, 30.1]; p = 0.004. More participants in the citalopram group had an increase ≥ 30 ms from baseline to week 3 (7 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo; Fisher's exact p = 0.046, but only slightly more in the citalopram group met a gender-specific threshold for prolonged QTc (450 ms for males; 470 ms for females at any point during follow-up (3 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo, Fisher's exact p = 0.611. One of the citalopram participants who developed prolonged QTc also displayed ventricular bigeminy. No participants in either group had a cardiovascular-related death.Citalopram at 30 mg/day was associated with improvement in agitation in patients with AD but was also associated with QT prolongation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00898807.

  3. Home-based versus hospital-based high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamot, Inger-Lise; Forbord, Siv Hege; Gustad, Kjersti; Løckra, Vibeke; Stensen, Andreas; Berg, Astrid Tarlebø; Dalen, Håvard; Karlsen, Trine; Støylen, Asbjørn

    2014-09-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIT) as exercise therapy is gradually implemented in cardiac rehabilitation as the cardiovascular benefits from exercise is intensity dependent. However, in previous studies, HIT has been performed with strict supervision. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of different modes of HIT in cardiac rehabilitation. a randomized clinical study. Ninety participants with coronary artery disease (80 men/10 women, mean age 57 ± 8 years) were randomly assigned to one of three exercise modes: group exercise (GE), treadmill exercise (TE), or home-based exercise (HE). HIT was performed twice a week for 12 weeks with an exercise intensity of 85-95% of peak heart rate. The primary outcome measure was change in peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2). Eighty-three participants (92%) completed the intervention without any severe adverse events. Peak VO2 increased from 34.7 ± 7.3 to 39.0 ± 8.0 ml/kg/min, 32.7 ± 6.5 to 36.0 ± 6.2 ml/kg/min, and 34.4 ± 4.8 to 37.2 ± 5.2 ml/kg/min in TE, GE, and HE, respectively. Mean group difference for TE vs. HE was 1.6 ml/kg/min (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.7 to 3.1, p = 0.02), TE vs. GE 1.1 ml/kg/min (95% CI-0.5 to 2.5, p = 0.27), and GE vs. HE 0.6 ml/kg/min (95% CI -1.0 to 2.1, p = 1). However, on-treatment analysis showed no significant difference between groups. HIT was efficiently performed in three settings of cardiac rehabilitation, with respect to target exercise intensity, exercise attendance, and increase in peak VO2. Exercise mode was not essential for exercise capacity. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Continuous time persistent random walk: a review and some generalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Lindenberg, Katja

    2017-06-01

    We review some extensions of the continuous time random walk first introduced by Elliott Montroll and George Weiss more than 50 years ago [E.W. Montroll, G.H. Weiss, J. Math. Phys. 6, 167 (1965)], extensions that embrace multistate walks and, in particular, the persistent random walk. We generalize these extensions to include fractional random walks and derive the associated master equation, namely, the fractional telegrapher's equation. We dedicate this review to our joint work with George H. Weiss (1930-2017). It saddens us greatly to report the recent death of George Weiss, a scientific giant and at the same time a lovely and humble man.

  5. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Costigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6 years were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP (n = 21, resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP (n = 22 and control (n = 22. The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8–10 min/session, delivered during physical education (PE lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run, muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests, body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI, BMI-z scores, waist circumference and physical activity motivation (questionnaire, by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024, BMI-z (p = 0.037 and BMI (not significant in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  6. Corticostriatal field potentials are modulated at delta and theta frequencies during interval-timing task in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric B Emmons

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organizing movements in time is a critical and highly conserved feature of mammalian behavior. Temporal control of action requires corticostriatal networks. We investigate these networks in rodents using a two-interval timing task while recording local field potentials in medial frontal cortex or dorsomedial striatum. Consistent with prior work, we found cue-triggered delta (1-4 Hz and theta activity (4-8 Hz primarily in rodent medial frontal cortex. We observed delta activity across temporal intervals in medial frontal cortex and dorsomedial striatum. Rewarded responses were associated with increased delta activity in medial frontal cortex. Activity in theta bands in medial frontal cortex and delta bands in the striatum was linked with the timing of responses. These data suggest both delta and theta activity in frontostriatal networks are modulated during interval timing and that activity in these bands may be involved in the temporal control of action.

  7. [Processing acoustically presented time intervals of seconds duration: an expression of the phonological loop of the working memory?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, D

    1996-01-01

    Working memory has been proposed to contribute to the processing of time, rhythm and music; the question which component of working memory is involved is under discussion. The present study tests the hypothesis that the phonological loop component (Baddeley, 1986) is involved in the processing of auditorily presented time intervals of a few seconds' duration. Typical effects well known with short-term retention of verbal material could be replicated with short-term retention of temporal intervals: The immediate reproduction of time intervals was impaired under conditions of background music and articulatory suppression. Neither the accuracy nor the speed of responses in a (non-phonological) mental rotation task were diminished under these conditions. Processing of auditorily presented time intervals seems to be constrained by the capacity of the phonological loop: The immediate serial recall of sequences of time intervals was shown to be related to the immediate serial recall of words (memory span). The results confirm the notion that working memory resources, and especially the phonological loop component, underlie the processing of auditorily presented temporal information with a duration of a few seconds.

  8. Non-linear continuous time random walk models★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Helena; Fedotov, Sergei

    2017-11-01

    A standard assumption of continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes is that there are no interactions between the random walkers, such that we obtain the celebrated linear fractional equation either for the probability density function of the walker at a certain position and time, or the mean number of walkers. The question arises how one can extend this equation to the non-linear case, where the random walkers interact. The aim of this work is to take into account this interaction under a mean-field approximation where the statistical properties of the random walker depend on the mean number of walkers. The implementation of these non-linear effects within the CTRW integral equations or fractional equations poses difficulties, leading to the alternative methodology we present in this work. We are concerned with non-linear effects which may either inhibit anomalous effects or induce them where they otherwise would not arise. Inhibition of these effects corresponds to a decrease in the waiting times of the random walkers, be this due to overcrowding, competition between walkers or an inherent carrying capacity of the system. Conversely, induced anomalous effects present longer waiting times and are consistent with symbiotic, collaborative or social walkers, or indirect pinpointing of favourable regions by their attractiveness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  9. Using random response input in Ibrahim Time Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter; Brincker, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the time domain technique Ibrahim Time Domain (ITD) is used to analyze random time data. ITD is known to be a technique for identification of output only systems. The traditional formulation of ITD is claimed to be limited, when identifying closely spaced modes, because of the techn....... In this article it is showed that when using the modified ITD random time data can be analyzed. The application of the technique is displayed by a case study, with simulations and experimental data....

  10. Application of continuous-time random walk to statistical arbitrage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Osmekhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical statistical arbitrage strategy is proposed, where the distribution of the spread is modelled as a continuous-time random walk. Optimal boundaries, computed as a function of the mean and variance of the firstpassage time ofthe spread,maximises an objective function. The predictability of the trading strategy is analysed and contrasted for two forms of continuous-time random walk processes. We found that the waiting-time distribution has a significant impact on the prediction of the expected profit for intraday trading

  11. Clustered continuous-time random walks: diffusion and relaxation consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weron, Karina; Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Jurlewicz, Agnieszka; Meerschaert, Mark M; Scheffler, Hans-Peter

    2012-06-08

    We present a class of continuous-time random walks (CTRWs), in which random jumps are separated by random waiting times. The novel feature of these CTRWs is that the jumps are clustered. This introduces a coupled effect, with longer waiting times separating larger jump clusters. We show that the CTRW scaling limits are time-changed processes. Their densities solve two different fractional diffusion equations, depending on whether the waiting time is coupled to the preceding jump, or the following one. These fractional diffusion equations can be used to model all types of experimentally observed two power-law relaxation patterns. The parameters of the scaling limit process determine the power-law exponents and loss peak frequencies.

  12. Page 1 "T- A real-time interval logic and its decision procedure 157 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theorem 2. Alur & Dill (1990) It is decidable whether the language of a TBA is empty. 3.2 Subformulae, reductions and extensions. The concept of subformula closure set, reductor set and reductions on interval formulae for FIL were introduced in Ramakrishna et al (1992). The first is well-known in automata- theoretic ...

  13. A partial backlogging inventory model for deteriorating items with time-varying demand and holding cost: An interval number approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a differential equation inventory model that incorporates partial backlogging and deterioration. Holding cost and demand rate are time dependent. Shortages are allowed and assumed to be partially backlogged. Two versions are presented, the first one with deterministic values of the parameters and the second one taking into the account the interval uncertainty of the parameters. In the crisp case, Taylor’s series expansion is used, and graphically shown that the cost function is convex. While, in the case of intervals, the interval arithmetic is used and then the problem is transformed into a multi-objective non-linear optimization problem and an interval objective function. To solve this problem, the weighted-sum method is used. The proposed procedure is validated with the help of a numerical example. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters has also been carried out.

  14. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    beams. A random array with Gaussian distribution of transmitters and uniform distribution of receivers was found to have better resolution and depth-of-field than both a Mills cross array and a random array with uniform distribution of both transmit and receive elements. The Gaussian random array......Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  15. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica): an analysis of individual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David Philip Arthur; Varnon, Christopher A; Sokolowski, Michel B C; Wells, Harrington; Abramson, Charles I

    2014-01-01

    Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward). Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI) 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules.

  16. An assessment of fixed interval timing in free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica: an analysis of individual performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Philip Arthur Craig

    Full Text Available Interval timing is a key element of foraging theory, models of predator avoidance, and competitive interactions. Although interval timing is well documented in vertebrate species, it is virtually unstudied in invertebrates. In the present experiment, we used free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera ligustica as a model for timing behaviors. Subjects were trained to enter a hole in an automated artificial flower to receive a nectar reinforcer (i.e. reward. Responses were continuously reinforced prior to exposure to either a fixed interval (FI 15-sec, FI 30-sec, FI 60-sec, or FI 120-sec reinforcement schedule. We measured response rate and post-reinforcement pause within each fixed interval trial between reinforcers. Honey bees responded at higher frequencies earlier in the fixed interval suggesting subject responding did not come under traditional forms of temporal control. Response rates were lower during FI conditions compared to performance on continuous reinforcement schedules, and responding was more resistant to extinction when previously reinforced on FI schedules. However, no "scalloped" or "break-and-run" patterns of group or individual responses reinforced on FI schedules were observed; no traditional evidence of temporal control was found. Finally, longer FI schedules eventually caused all subjects to cease returning to the operant chamber indicating subjects did not tolerate the longer FI schedules.

  17. Interval Entropy and Informative Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhroddin Misagh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Shannon interval entropy function as a useful dynamic measure of uncertainty for two sided truncated random variables has been proposed in the literature of reliability. In this paper, we show that interval entropy can uniquely determine the distribution function. Furthermore, we propose a measure of discrepancy between two lifetime distributions at the interval of time in base of Kullback-Leibler discrimination information. We study various properties of this measure, including its connection with residual and past measures of discrepancy and interval entropy, and we obtain its upper and lower bounds.

  18. Radiological and pathological findings of interval cancers in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-41 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.J. [Breast Institute, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.evans@nuh.nhs.uk; Kutt, E. [Avon Breast Cancer Screening Unit, Central Health Clinic, Tower Hill, Bristol, Avon (United Kingdom); Record, C. [Breast Screening Service, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury (United Kingdom); Waller, M. [Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Bobrow, L. [Histopathology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Moss, S. [Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the radiographic findings of the screening mammograms of women with interval cancer who participated in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-48 years. Materials and methods: The screening and diagnostic mammograms of 208 women with interval cancers were reviewed. Abnormalities were classified as malignant, subtle and non-specific. Results: Eighty-seven (42%) of women had true, 66 (32%) occult and 55 (26%) false-negative interval cancers. The features most frequently missed or misinterpreted were granular microcalcification (38%), asymmetric density (27%) and distortion (22%). Thirty-seven percent of abnormal previous screens were classified as malignant, 39% subtle change and 21% as non-specific. Granular calcifications were significantly more common on the diagnostic mammograms of false-negative interval cancers than those of true interval cancers (28 versus 14%, p = 0.04). Occult interval cancers were more likely to be <10 mm and <15 mm in invasive pathological size than other interval cancers (p = 0.03 and 0.005, respectively). True interval cancers were more likely to be histologically grade 3 than other interval cancers (p = 0.04). Women who developed true and false-negative interval cancers had similar background patterns, but women with occult cancers had a higher proportion of dense patterns (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Interval cancers in a young screening population have a high proportion of occult lesions that are small and occur in dense background patterns. The proportion of interval cancers that are false negative is similar that seen in older populations and granular microcalcification is the commonest missed mammographic feature.

  19. 12 min/week of high-intensity interval training reduces aortic reservoir pressure in individuals with metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Joyce S; Dalleck, Lance C; Ramos, Maximiano V; Borrani, Fabio; Roberts, Llion; Gomersall, Sjaan; Beetham, Kassia S; Dias, Katrin A; Keating, Shelley E; Fassett, Robert G; Sharman, James E; Coombes, Jeff S

    2016-10-01

    Decreased aortic reservoir function leads to a rise in aortic reservoir pressure that is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Although there is evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would be useful to improve aortic reservoir pressure, the optimal dose of high-intensity exercise to improve aortic reservoir function has yet to be investigated. Therefore, this study compared the effect of different volumes of HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on aortic reservoir pressure in participants with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Fifty individuals with MetS were randomized into one of the following 16-week training programs: MICT [n = 17, 30 min at 60-70% peak heart rate (HRpeak), five times/week]; 4 × 4-min high-intensity interval training (4HIIT) (n = 15, 4 × 4 min bouts at 85-95% HRpeak, interspersed with 3 min of active recovery at 50-70% HRpeak, three times/week); and 1 × 4-min high-intensity interval training (1HIIT) (n = 18, 1 × 4 min bout at 85-95% HRpeak, three times/week). Aortic reservoir pressure was calculated from radial applanation tonometry. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for a small-to-medium group × time interaction effect on aortic reservoir pressure, indicating a positive adaptation following 1HIIT compared with 4HIIT and MICT [F (2,46) = 2.9, P = 0.07, η = 0.06]. This is supported by our within-group analysis wherein only 1HIIT significantly decreased aortic reservoir pressure from pre to postintervention (pre-post: 1HIIT 33 ± 16 to 31 ± 13, P = 0.03; MICT 29 ± 9-28 ± 8, P = 0.78; 4HIIT 28 ± 10-30 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.10). Three sessions of 4 min of high-intensity exercise per week (12 min/week) was sufficient to improve aortic reservoir pressure, and thus may be a time-efficient exercise modality for reducing cardiovascular risk in individuals with MetS.

  20. Methods for calculating confidence and credible intervals for the residual between-study variance in random effects meta-regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Meta-regression is becoming increasingly used to model study level covariate effects. However this type of statistical analysis presents many difficulties and challenges. Here two methods for calculating confidence intervals for the magnitude of the residual between-study variance in random effects meta-regression models are developed. A further suggestion for calculating credible intervals using informative prior distributions for the residual between-study variance is presented. Methods Two recently proposed and, under the assumptions of the random effects model, exact methods for constructing confidence intervals for the between-study variance in random effects meta-analyses are extended to the meta-regression setting. The use of Generalised Cochran heterogeneity statistics is extended to the meta-regression setting and a Newton-Raphson procedure is developed to implement the Q profile method for meta-analysis and meta-regression. WinBUGS is used to implement informative priors for the residual between-study variance in the context of Bayesian meta-regressions. Results Results are obtained for two contrasting examples, where the first example involves a binary covariate and the second involves a continuous covariate. Intervals for the residual between-study variance are wide for both examples. Conclusions Statistical methods, and R computer software, are available to compute exact confidence intervals for the residual between-study variance under the random effects model for meta-regression. These frequentist methods are almost as easily implemented as their established counterparts for meta-analysis. Bayesian meta-regressions are also easily performed by analysts who are comfortable using WinBUGS. Estimates of the residual between-study variance in random effects meta-regressions should be routinely reported and accompanied by some measure of their uncertainty. Confidence and/or credible intervals are well-suited to this purpose. PMID:25196829

  1. Simple parametric survival analysis with anonymized register data: A cohort study with truncated and interval censored event and censoring times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Ivar S

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To preserve patient anonymity, health register data may be provided as binned data only. Here we consider as example, how to estimate mean survival time after a diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer from Norwegian register data on time to death or censoring binned into 30 day intervals. All events occurring in the first three months (90 days after diagnosis were removed to achieve comparability with a clinical trial. The aim of the paper is to develop and implement a simple, and yet flexible method for analyzing such interval censored and truncated data. Methods Considering interval censoring a missing data problem, we implement a simple multiple imputation strategy that allows flexible sensitivity analyses with respect to the shape of the censoring distribution. To allow identification of appropriate parametric models, a χ2-goodness-of-fit test--also imputation based--is derived and supplemented with diagnostic plots. Uncertainty estimates for mean survival times are obtained via a simulation strategy. The validity and statistical efficiency of the proposed method for varying interval lengths is investigated in a simulation study and compared with simpler alternatives. Results Mean survival times estimated from the register data ranged from 1.2 (SE = 0.09 to 3.2 (0.31 years depending on period of diagnosis and choice of parametric model. The shape of the censoring distribution within intervals did generally not influence results, whereas the choice of parametric model did, even when different models fit the data equally well. In simulation studies both simple midpoint imputation and multiple imputation yielded nearly unbiased analyses (relative biases of -0.6% to 9.4% and confidence intervals with near-nominal coverage probabilities (93.4% to 95.7% for censoring intervals shorter than six months. For 12 month censoring intervals, multiple imputation provided better protection against bias, and coverage probabilities

  2. Do we have a common mechanism for measuring time in the hundreds of millisecond range? Evidence from multiple-interval timing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Zarco, Wilbert; Prado, Luis

    2008-02-01

    In the present study we examined the performance variability of a group of 13 subjects in eight different tasks that involved the processing of temporal intervals in the subsecond range. These tasks differed in their sensorimotor processing (S; perception vs. production), the modality of the stimuli used to define the intervals (M; auditory vs. visual), and the number of intervals (N; one or four). Different analytical techniques were used to determine the existence of a central or distributed timing mechanism across tasks. The results showed a linear increase in performance variability as a function of the interval duration in all tasks. However, this compliance of the scalar property of interval timing was accompanied by a strong effect of S, N, and M and the interaction between these variables on the subjects' temporal accuracy. Thus the performance variability was larger not only in perceptual tasks than that in motor-timing tasks, but also using visual rather than auditory stimuli, and decreased as a function of the number of intervals. These results suggest the existence of a partially overlapping distributed mechanism underlying the ability to quantify time in different contexts.

  3. Effect of collection-maturation interval time and pregnancy status of donor mares on oocyte developmental competence in horse cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, A; Andrés, G; Jarazo, J; Javier, J; Karlanian, F; Florencia, K; De Stéfano, A; Salamone, D F

    2014-02-01

    The current limitations for obtaining ovaries from slaughterhouses and the low efficiency of in vivo follicular aspiration necessitate a complete understanding of the variables that affect oocyte developmental competence in the equine. For this reason, we assessed the effect on equine oocyte meiotic competence and the subsequent in vitro cloned embryo development of 1) the time interval between ovary collection and the onset of oocyte in vitro maturation (collection-maturation interval time) and 2) the pregnancy status of the donor mares. To define the collection-maturation interval time, collected oocytes were classified according to the slaughtering time and the pregnancy status of the mare. Maturation rate was recorded and some matured oocytes of each group were used to reconstruct zona free cloned embryos. Nuclear maturation rates were lower when the collection-maturation interval time exceeded 10 h as compared to 4 h (32/83 vs. 76/136, respectively; P = 0.0128) and when the donor mare was pregnant as compared to nonpregnant (53/146 vs. 177/329, respectively; P = 0.0004). Low rates of cleaved embryos were observed when the collection-maturation interval time exceeded 10 h as compared to 6 to 10 h (11/27 vs. 33/44, respectively; P = 0.0056), but the pregnancy status of donor mares did not affect cloned equine blastocyst development (3/49 vs. 1/27 for blastocyst rates of nonpregnant and pregnant groups, respectively; P = 1.00). These results indicate that, to apply assisted reproductive technologies in horses, oocytes should be harvested within approximately 10 h after ovary collection. Also, even though ovaries from pregnant mares are a potential source of oocytes, they should be processed at the end of the collection routine due to the lower collection and maturation rate in this group.

  4. A Comparison of Momentary Time Sampling and Partial-Interval Recording for Assessment of Effects of Social Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Keith C.; O'Handley, Roderick D.; Labrot, Zachary C.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment in social skills training often utilizes procedures such as partial-interval recording (PIR) and momentary time sampling (MTS) to estimate changes in duration in social engagements due to intervention. Although previous research suggests PIR to be more inaccurate than MTS in estimating levels of behavior, treatment analysis decisions…

  5. Dynamical continuous time random Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-03-01

    The Lévy flights' diffusive behavior is studied within the framework of the dynamical continuous time random walk (DCTRW) method, while the nonlinear friction is introduced in each step. Through the DCTRW method, Lévy random walker in each step flies by obeying the Newton's Second Law while the nonlinear friction f(v) = - γ0v - γ2v3 being considered instead of Stokes friction. It is shown that after introducing the nonlinear friction, the superdiffusive Lévy flights converges, behaves localization phenomenon with long time limit, but for the Lévy index μ = 2 case, it is still Brownian motion.

  6. An experimental evaluation of electrical skin conductivity changes in postmortem interval and its assessment for time of death estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantürk, İsmail; Karabiber, Fethullah; Çelik, Safa; Şahin, M Feyzi; Yağmur, Fatih; Kara, Sadık

    2016-02-01

    In forensic medicine, estimation of the time of death (ToD) is one of the most important and challenging medico-legal problems. Despite the partial accomplishments in ToD estimations to date, the error margin of ToD estimation is still too large. In this study, electrical conductivity changes were experimentally investigated in the postmortem interval in human cases. Electrical conductivity measurements give some promising clues about the postmortem interval. A living human has a natural electrical conductivity; in the postmortem interval, intracellular fluids gradually leak out of cells. These leaked fluids combine with extra-cellular fluids in tissues and since both fluids are electrolytic, intracellular fluids help increase conductivity. Thus, the level of electrical conductivity is expected to increase with increased time after death. In this study, electrical conductivity tests were applied for six hours. The electrical conductivity of the cases exponentially increased during the tested time period, indicating a positive relationship between electrical conductivity and the postmortem interval. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contrasting Perspectives of Anesthesiologists and Gastroenterologists on the Optimal Time Interval between Bowel Preparation and Endoscopic Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal time interval between the last ingestion of bowel prep and sedation for colonoscopy remains controversial, despite guidelines that sedation can be administered 2 hours after consumption of clear liquids. Objective. To determine current practice patterns among anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists regarding the optimal time interval for sedation after last ingestion of bowel prep and to understand the rationale underlying their beliefs. Design. Questionnaire survey of anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists in the USA. The questions were focused on the preferred time interval of endoscopy after a polyethylene glycol based preparation in routine cases and select conditions. Results. Responses were received from 109 anesthesiologists and 112 gastroenterologists. 96% of anesthesiologists recommended waiting longer than 2 hours until sedation, in contrast to only 26% of gastroenterologists. The main reason for waiting >2 hours was that PEG was not considered a clear liquid. Most anesthesiologists, but not gastroenterologists, waited longer in patients with history of diabetes or reflux. Conclusions. Anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists do not agree on the optimal interval for sedation after last drink of bowel prep. Most anesthesiologists prefer to wait longer than the recommended 2 hours for clear liquids. The data suggest a need for clearer guidelines on this issue.

  8. Eruptions in space and time: durations, intervals, and comparison of world's active volcanic belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkin, T.; McClelland, L.

    1986-07-01

    A computerized data bank, compiled over the last 12 years at the Smithsonian Institution, allows summaries to be made of Holocene volcanism. The Scientific Event Alert Network tracks current volcanic activity. However, the record of most volcanoes is poor before the last 100 years, and some eruptions still pass unreported. The time interval since the previous eruption can be calculated for 4835 of the 5564 compiled eruptions. The median interval is 5.0 years, but much longer intervals commonly precede unusually violent eruptions. For the 25 most violent eruptions in the file (with known preceding interval), the medium interval is 865 years. Of the historic eruptions in this group, 50% resulted in fatalities. The interval between an eruption's start and its most violent paroxysm may be measured in months or years, but it is usually short. Of the 205 larger eruptions for which data are available, 92 had the paroxysmal event within the first day of the eruption, allowing little time for emergency preparations after the eruption's opening phase. To compare the recent vigor of different volcanic belts, they calculated the number of years in which each volcano was active in the last 100 years, summed these for each belt, and divided by belt length. Another index of recent vigor is the number of recognized Holocene volcanoes divided by belt length. A third index is the number of large explosive eruptions (volcanic explosive index greater than or equal to 3) of the last 100 years, again normalized by belt length. These three measures correlate reasonably well, serving to contrast vigorous belts such as Kamchatka, Central America, and Java with relatively quiet belts such as the Cascades, South Sandwich Islands, Greece, and southern Chile.

  9. Expectancy in humans in multisecond peak-interval timing with gaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fortin, Claudette; Fairhurst, Steve; Malapani, Chara; Morin, Caroline; Towey, James; Meck, Warren H

    2009-01-01

    .... In Experiment 1, peak times of response distributions were shorter when the gap occurred later during the encoding of the criterion time to be reproduced, suggesting that gap expectancy shortened perceived durations...

  10. Time interval measurement between to emission: a systematics; Mesure de l`intervalle de temps entre deux emissions: une systematique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Mahi, M.; Meslin, C.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Wieloch, A. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France); LPC (Caen) - CRN (Strasbourg) Collaboration

    1998-04-01

    A systematic study of the evolution of intervals of fragment emission times as a function of the energy deposited in the compound system was performed. Several measurements, Ne at 60 MeV/u, Ar at 30 and 60 MeV/u and two measurements for Kr at 60 MeV/u (central and semi-peripheral collisions) are presented. In all the experiments the target was Au and the mass of the compounds system was around A = 200. The excitation energies per nucleon reached in the case of these heavy systems cover the range of 3 to 5.5 MeV/u. The method used to determine the emission time intervals is based on the correlation functions associated to the relative angle distributions. The gaps between the data and simulations allow to evaluate the emission times. A rapid decrease of these time intervals was observed when the excitation energy increased. This variation starts at 500 fm/c which corresponds to a sequential emission. This relatively long time which indicates a weak interaction between fragments, corresponds practically to the measurement threshold. The shortest intervals (about 50 fm/c) are associated to a spontaneous multifragmentation and were observed in the case of central collisions at Ar+Au and Kr+Au at 60 MeV/u. Two interpretations are possible. The multifragmentation process might be viewed as a sequential process of very short time-separation or else, one can separate two zones heaving in mind that the multifragmentation is predominant from 4,5 MeV/u excitation energy upwards. This question is still open and its study is under way at LPC. An answer could come from the study of the rupture process of an excited nucleus, notably by the determination of its life-time

  11. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Drift analysis is one of the state-of-the-art techniques for the runtime analysis of randomized search heuristics (RSHs) such as evolutionary algorithms (EAs), simulated annealing etc. The vast majority of existing drift theorems yield bounds on the expected value of the hitting time for a target...

  12. High Intensity Interval- vs Moderate Intensity- Training for Improving Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight or Obese Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gordon; Brown, Andrew W.; Bohan Brown, Michelle M.; Alcorn, Amy; Noles, Corey; Winwood, Leah; Resuehr, Holly; George, Brandon; Jeansonne, Madeline M.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of six weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT) vs continuous moderate intensity training (MIT) for improving body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), blood pressure, blood lipids, and cardiovascular fitness in a cohort of sedentary overweight or obese young men. We hypothesized that HIIT would result in similar improvements in body composition, cardiovascular fitness, blood lipids, and SI as compared to the MIT group, despite requiring only one hour of activity per week compared to five hours per week for the MIT group. Methods 28 sedentary overweight or obese men (age, 20 ± 1.5 years, body mass index 29.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2) participated in a six week exercise treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to HIIT or MIT and evaluated at baseline and post-training. DXA was used to assess body composition, graded treadmill exercise test to measure cardiovascular fitness, oral glucose tolerance to measure SI, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess lipoprotein particles, and automatic auscultation to measure blood pressure. Results A greater improvement in VO2peak was observed in MIT compared to HIIT (11.1% vs 2.83%, P = 0.0185) in the complete-case analysis. No differences were seen in the intention to treat analysis, and no other group differences were observed. Both exercise conditions were associated with temporal improvements in % body fat, total cholesterol, medium VLDL, medium HDL, triglycerides, SI, and VO2peak (P HIIT or MIT exercise training displayed: 1) improved SI, 2) reduced blood lipids, 3) decreased % body fat, and 4) improved cardiovascular fitness. While both exercise groups led to similar improvements for most cardiometabolic risk factors assessed, MIT led to a greater improvement in overall cardiovascular fitness. Overall, these observations suggest that a relatively short duration of either HIIT or MIT training may improve cardiometabolic risk factors in previously sedentary overweight or obese

  13. High Intensity Interval- vs Moderate Intensity- Training for Improving Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight or Obese Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Fisher

    Full Text Available To compare the effects of six weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT vs continuous moderate intensity training (MIT for improving body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI, blood pressure, blood lipids, and cardiovascular fitness in a cohort of sedentary overweight or obese young men. We hypothesized that HIIT would result in similar improvements in body composition, cardiovascular fitness, blood lipids, and SI as compared to the MIT group, despite requiring only one hour of activity per week compared to five hours per week for the MIT group.28 sedentary overweight or obese men (age, 20 ± 1.5 years, body mass index 29.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2 participated in a six week exercise treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to HIIT or MIT and evaluated at baseline and post-training. DXA was used to assess body composition, graded treadmill exercise test to measure cardiovascular fitness, oral glucose tolerance to measure SI, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess lipoprotein particles, and automatic auscultation to measure blood pressure.A greater improvement in VO2peak was observed in MIT compared to HIIT (11.1% vs 2.83%, P = 0.0185 in the complete-case analysis. No differences were seen in the intention to treat analysis, and no other group differences were observed. Both exercise conditions were associated with temporal improvements in % body fat, total cholesterol, medium VLDL, medium HDL, triglycerides, SI, and VO2peak (P < 0.05.Participation in HIIT or MIT exercise training displayed: 1 improved SI, 2 reduced blood lipids, 3 decreased % body fat, and 4 improved cardiovascular fitness. While both exercise groups led to similar improvements for most cardiometabolic risk factors assessed, MIT led to a greater improvement in overall cardiovascular fitness. Overall, these observations suggest that a relatively short duration of either HIIT or MIT training may improve cardiometabolic risk factors in previously sedentary overweight or

  14. Long-term Exercise Adherence After High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamot, Inger-Lise; Karlsen, Trine; Dalen, Håvard; Støylen, Asbjørn

    2016-03-01

    Exercise adherence in general is reported to be problematic after cardiac rehabilitation. Additionally, vigorous exercise is associated with impaired exercise adherence. As high-intensity interval training (HIT) is frequently used as a therapy to patients with coronary artery disease in cardiac rehabilitation, the objective was to assess long-term exercise adherence following an HIT cardiac rehabilitation programme. A multicentre randomized study was carried out. Eligible participants were adults who had previously attended a 12-week HIT cardiac rehabilitation programme, as either a home-based or hospital-based HIT (treadmill exercise or group exercise). The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake; secondary outcomes were self-reported and objectively measured physical activity. Out of 83 eligible participants, 76 were available for assessment (68 men/8 women, mean age 59 (8) years) at a one-year follow-up. Peak oxygen uptake was significantly elevated above baseline values, (treadmill exercise: 35.8 (6.4) vs. 37.4 (7.4) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) , group exercise: 32.7 (6.5) vs. 34.1 (5.8) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) and home-based exercise: 34.5 (4.9) vs. 36.7 (5.8) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) at baseline and follow-up, respectively), with no significant differences between groups. The majority of the participants (>90%) met the recommended daily level of 30 minutes of moderate physical activity. The home-based group showed a strong trend towards increased physical activity compared with the hospital-based groups. The results from this study have shown that both home-based and hospital-based HIT in cardiac rehabilitation induce promising long-term exercise adherence, with maintenance of peak oxygen uptake significantly above baseline values at a one-year follow-up. The implication for physiotherapy practice is that HIT in cardiac rehabilitation induces satisfactory long-term exercise adherence. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Continuous Time Random Walks with memory and financial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Miquel; Masoliver, Jaume

    2017-11-01

    We study financial distributions from the perspective of Continuous Time Random Walks with memory. We review some of our previous developments and apply them to financial problems. We also present some new models with memory that can be useful in characterizing tendency effects which are inherent in most markets. We also briefly study the effect on return distributions of fractional behaviors in the distribution of pausing times between successive transactions.

  16. The effect of the time interval between exposures on the susceptibility of chickens to superinfection with Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John R; Witter, Richard L; Silva, Robert F; Lee, Lucy F; Finlay, James; Marker, Bryan A; Kaneene, John B; Fulton, Richard M; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2010-09-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is ubiquitous within commercial poultry flocks because current vaccines do not prevent MDV infection or transmission. In order for newly-evolved MDV strains to become established within a flock, it seems inevitable that any new strain would need to infect and replicate in chickens previously infected with resident MDV strains. This phenomenon is difficult to detect and there is no clear evidence that it is even possible. Four experiments were performed to demonstrate superinfection and evaluate the effect of time between challenges on the effect of superinfection with the use of two pairs of fully virulent MDV strains that could be discriminated by novel technology: 1) JM/102W and rMd5//38CVI, and 2) rMd5 and rMd5//38CVI. Feather follicle epithelium (FFE), spleen, and tumor samples were collected at single or multiple time points from the same bird to determine the frequency and distribution of each virus present following superinfection, with the use of pyrosequencing and immunohistochemistry. Superinfection was observed in 82 of 149 (55%) FFE samples following short-interval challenge (24 hr) compared to only 6 of 121 (5%) samples following long-interval challenge (13 days), indicating a strong influence of challenge interval. In cases where the first inoculated virus was weak or delayed, the second inoculated virus was detected in 42 of 95 (44%) birds. In tumors from dually challenged birds, the second virus was again present much more often following short-interval challenge (68%) compared to long-interval challenge (11%). Virus mixtures in tumors were less common compared to those in FFE samples. Vaccination with turkey herpesvirus had no significant effect on the virus frequency for either virus pair or challenge time interval, suggesting these conclusions may be applicable to vaccinated chickens in the field. These studies demonstrated superinfection for the first time with two fully virulent MDV strains and suggest that short-interval

  17. Studies in astronomical time series analysis: Modeling random processes in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Random process models phased in the time domain are used to analyze astrophysical time series data produced by random processes. A moving average (MA) model represents the data as a sequence of pulses occurring randomly in time, with random amplitudes. An autoregressive (AR) model represents the correlations in the process in terms of a linear function of past values. The best AR model is determined from sampled data and transformed to an MA for interpretation. The randomness of the pulse amplitudes is maximized by a FORTRAN algorithm which is relatively stable numerically. Results of test cases are given to study the effects of adding noise and of different distributions for the pulse amplitudes. A preliminary analysis of the optical light curve of the quasar 3C 273 is given.

  18. Perceptual inequality between two neighboring time intervals defined by sound markers: correspondence between neurophysiological and psychological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako eMitsudo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain activity related to time estimation processes in humans was analyzed using a perceptual phenomenon called auditory temporal assimilation. In a typical stimulus condition, two neighboring time intervals (T1 and T2 in this order are perceived as equal even when the physical lengths of these time intervals are considerably different. Our previous event-related potential (ERP study demonstrated that a slow negative component (SNCt appears in the right-frontal brain area (around the F8 electrode after T2, which is associated with judgment of the equality/inequality of T1 and T2. In the present study, we conducted two ERP experiments to further confirm the robustness of the SNCt. The stimulus patterns consisted of two neighboring time intervals marked by three successive tone bursts. Thirteen participants only listened to the patterns in the first session, and judged the equality/inequality of T1 and T2 in the next session. Behavioral data showed typical temporal assimilation. The ERP data revealed that three components (N1; contingent negative variation, CNV; and SNCt emerged related to the temporal judgment. The N1 appeared in the central area, and its peak latencies corresponded to the physical timing of each marker onset. The CNV component appeared in the frontal area during T2 presentation, and its amplitude increased as a function of T1. The SNCt appeared in the right-frontal area after the presentation of T1 and T2, and its magnitude was larger for the temporal patterns causing perceptual inequality. The SNCt was also correlated with the perceptual equality/inequality of the same stimulus pattern, and continued up to about 400 ms after the end of T2. These results suggest that the SNCt can be a signature of equality/inequality judgment, which derives from the comparison of the two neighboring time intervals.

  19. INTERVAL ADDITIVE PIECEWISE POLYNOMIAL TIME OPERATION MODEL OF HUMAN-OPERATOR IN A QUASI-FUNCTIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Serzhantova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the modeling problem for the human-operator functional activity. Productivity is selected as the main indicator of his function during the working shift. The problem is solved in the class of additive interval piecewise polynomial time views. Real labor productivity of human-operator is suggested to be formed by three interrelated processes: warming-up, tiredness and functionality restoration. Recreational interval for restoration during the first half of the working shift after cumulative tiredness over the first half-shift is considered by the authors as a system-related factor. The model takes into account: interval character of the human-operator individual properties. This gives the possibility to describe more fully and adequately the functional activity of the human-operator. Piecewise polynomial representation made it possible to describe adequately his performance, without complex approximation representations that accumulate errors of final grades for the human-operator performance. Obtained interval additive piecewise polynomial time operation model of human operator activity in the quasi-static environment has given the possibility to analyze and predict functional measures for performance management of human-operator functional activity in manufacturing static environment.

  20. Evaluation of 12-month interval methods for estimating animal-times at risk in a traditional African livestock farming system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnoff, Matthieu

    2008-06-15

    Demographic parameters are useful for assessing productivity and dynamics of tropical livestock populations. Common parameters are the annual instantaneous hazard rates, which can be estimated by m/T (where m represents the number of the considered demographic events occurred during the year and T the cumulated animal-time at risk). Different approaches are encountered in the literature for computing T from on-farm survey data. One crude approach ("the 12-month interval approach") only uses estimations of herds' sizes at beginning and end of the year and aggregated counts of demographic events over the year. I evaluated the potential biases in using four 12-month interval methods (M1-M4) to estimate T. Biases were evaluated by comparing the 12-month estimates to gold-standard values of T. Data came from long-term herd monitoring on cattle and small ruminants in extensive agro-pastoral systems. Animal-times at risks were correctly estimated in average by methods M1, M2 and M4 (average relative biasesinterval methods showed highly variable biases. This variability results from interactions between the dates delimiting the 12-month interval and the distributions of the demographic events over time. This phenomenon is particularly important for the adult-male small ruminants. Based on the bias variability observed in the study, the user of 12-month interval methods has to remember that they only provide approximate results and that they cannot completely replace the gold-standard approaches.

  1. A comparison of confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient in community-based cluster randomization trials with a binary outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braschel, Melissa C; Svec, Ivana; Darlington, Gerarda A; Donner, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Many investigators rely on previously published point estimates of the intraclass correlation coefficient rather than on their associated confidence intervals to determine the required size of a newly planned cluster randomized trial. Although confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient that can be applied to community-based trials have been developed for a continuous outcome variable, fewer methods exist for a binary outcome variable. The aim of this study is to evaluate confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient applied to binary outcomes in community intervention trials enrolling a small number of large clusters. Existing methods for confidence interval construction are examined and compared to a new ad hoc approach based on dividing clusters into a large number of smaller sub-clusters and subsequently applying existing methods to the resulting data. Monte Carlo simulation is used to assess the width and coverage of confidence intervals for the intraclass correlation coefficient based on Smith's large sample approximation of the standard error of the one-way analysis of variance estimator, an inverted modified Wald test for the Fleiss-Cuzick estimator, and intervals constructed using a bootstrap-t applied to a variance-stabilizing transformation of the intraclass correlation coefficient estimate. In addition, a new approach is applied in which clusters are randomly divided into a large number of smaller sub-clusters with the same methods applied to these data (with the exception of the bootstrap-t interval, which assumes large cluster sizes). These methods are also applied to a cluster randomized trial on adolescent tobacco use for illustration. When applied to a binary outcome variable in a small number of large clusters, existing confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient provide poor coverage. However, confidence intervals constructed using the new approach combined with Smith

  2. Atomic clocks and the continuous-time random-walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichella, Valerio; Camparo, James; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-11-01

    Atomic clocks play a fundamental role in many fields, most notably they generate Universal Coordinated Time and are at the heart of all global navigation satellite systems. Notwithstanding their excellent timekeeping performance, their output frequency does vary: it can display deterministic frequency drift; diverse continuous noise processes result in nonstationary clock noise (e.g., random-walk frequency noise, modelled as a Wiener process), and the clock frequency may display sudden changes (i.e., "jumps"). Typically, the clock's frequency instability is evaluated by the Allan or Hadamard variances, whose functional forms can identify the different operative noise processes. Here, we show that the Allan and Hadamard variances of a particular continuous-time random-walk, the compound Poisson process, have the same functional form as for a Wiener process with drift. The compound Poisson process, introduced as a model for observed frequency jumps, is an alternative to the Wiener process for modelling random walk frequency noise. This alternate model fits well the behavior of the rubidium clocks flying on GPS Block-IIR satellites. Further, starting from jump statistics, the model can be improved by considering a more general form of continuous-time random-walk, and this could bring new insights into the physics of atomic clocks.

  3. Emergency dispatcher assistance decreases time to defibrillation in a public venue: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyapan, Sattha; Lubin, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    We attempted to determine the effect of prearrival instructions that included the specific location of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in a public venue on the time to defibrillation in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario using untrained bystanders. The study was a randomized controlled trial at an urban shopping mall. Participants were asked to retrieve an AED and come back to defibrillate a mannequin. Only the experimental group received the location of the AED. We measured the percentage of shocks that were delivered in less than 3 minutes from the start of the scenario and also recorded several other time intervals. Thirty-nine participants completed the study, with 20 participants in the experimental group. The median time to defibrillation in the experimental group was 2.6 minutes (interquartile range, 2.4-2.8) which was significantly less than the control group's median time of 5.9 minutes (interquartile range, 4.38-7.65). Ninety percent (95% confidence interval, 68.3%-98.8%) of the participants in the experimental group defibrillated within 3 minutes, which was significantly different from the control group (10.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.3%-33.1%). In this study, a prearrival protocol providing participants with the location of the nearest AED in a public building resulted in a significant decrease in the time required to deliver a simulated shock. Further investigations in various types of public settings are needed to confirm the results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MetaLonDA: a flexible R package for identifying time intervals of differentially abundant features in metagenomic longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Ahmed A; Yang, Jie; Ascoli, Christian; Dai, Yang; Finn, Patricia W; Perkins, David L

    2018-02-13

    Microbial longitudinal studies are powerful experimental designs utilized to classify diseases, determine prognosis, and analyze microbial systems dynamics. In longitudinal studies, only identifying differential features between two phenotypes does not provide sufficient information to determine whether a change in the relative abundance is short-term or continuous. Furthermore, sample collection in longitudinal studies suffers from all forms of variability such as a different number of subjects per phenotypic group, a different number of samples per subject, and samples not collected at consistent time points. These inconsistencies are common in studies that collect samples from human subjects. We present MetaLonDA, an R package that is capable of identifying significant time intervals of differentially abundant microbial features. MetaLonDA is flexible such that it can perform differential abundance tests despite inconsistencies associated with sample collection. Extensive experiments on simulated datasets quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of MetaLonDA with significant improvement over alternative methods. We applied MetaLonDA to the DIABIMMUNE cohort ( https://pubs.broadinstitute.org/diabimmune ) substantiating significant early lifetime intervals of exposure to Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium in Finnish and Russian infants. Additionally, we established significant time intervals during which novel differentially relative abundant microbial genera may contribute to aberrant immunogenicity and development of autoimmune disease. MetaLonDA is computationally efficient and can be run on desktop machines. The identified differentially abundant features and their time intervals have the potential to distinguish microbial biomarkers that may be used for microbial reconstitution through bacteriotherapy, probiotics, or antibiotics. Moreover, MetaLonDA can be applied to any longitudinal count data such as metagenomic sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, or

  5. Anomalous diffusion in correlated continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, Vincent; Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.d [Physics Department T30 g, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-26

    We demonstrate that continuous time random walks in which successive waiting times are correlated by Gaussian statistics lead to anomalous diffusion with the mean squared displacement (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup 2/3}. Long-ranged correlations of the waiting times with a power-law exponent alpha (0 < alpha <= 2) give rise to subdiffusion of the form (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup {alpha}/(1+{alpha})}. In contrast, correlations in the jump lengths are shown to produce superdiffusion. We show that in both cases weak ergodicity breaking occurs. Our results are in excellent agreement with simulations. (fast track communication)

  6. Fatigue Behavior and Modeling of Additively Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V Including Interlayer Time Interval Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torries, Brian; Shamsaei, Nima

    2017-12-01

    The effects of different cooling rates, as achieved by varying the interlayer time interval, on the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured Ti-6Al-4V specimens were investigated and modeled via a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model. Comparisons are made between two sets of specimens fabricated via Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), with variance in interlayer time interval accomplished by depositing either one or two specimens per print operation. Fully reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted, with fractography following specimen failure. A microstructure-sensitive fatigue model was calibrated to model the fatigue behavior of both sets of specimens and was found to be capable of correctly predicting the longer fatigue lives of the single-built specimens and the reduced scatter of the double-built specimens; all data points fell within the predicted upper and lower bounds of fatigue life. The time interval effects and the ability to be modeled are important to consider when producing test specimens that are smaller than the production part (i.e., property-performance relationships).

  7. Fatigue Behavior and Modeling of Additively Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V Including Interlayer Time Interval Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torries, Brian; Shamsaei, Nima

    2017-10-01

    The effects of different cooling rates, as achieved by varying the interlayer time interval, on the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured Ti-6Al-4V specimens were investigated and modeled via a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model. Comparisons are made between two sets of specimens fabricated via Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), with variance in interlayer time interval accomplished by depositing either one or two specimens per print operation. Fully reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted, with fractography following specimen failure. A microstructure-sensitive fatigue model was calibrated to model the fatigue behavior of both sets of specimens and was found to be capable of correctly predicting the longer fatigue lives of the single-built specimens and the reduced scatter of the double-built specimens; all data points fell within the predicted upper and lower bounds of fatigue life. The time interval effects and the ability to be modeled are important to consider when producing test specimens that are smaller than the production part (i.e., property-performance relationships).

  8. Integrodifferential diffusion equation for continuous-time random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau; Wang, K G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an integrodifferential diffusion equation for continuous-time random walk that is valid for a generic waiting time probability density function. Using this equation, we also study diffusion behaviors for a couple of specific waiting time probability density functions such as exponential and a combination of power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler function. We show that for the case of the exponential waiting time probability density function, a normal diffusion is generated and the probability density function is Gaussian distribution. In the case of the combination of a power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler waiting probability density function, we obtain the subdiffusive behavior for all the time regions from small to large times and probability density function is non-Gaussian distribution.

  9. Comparison of High-Intensity Interval Training and Moderate-to-Vigorous Continuous Training for Cardiometabolic Health and Exercise Enjoyment in Obese Young Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowei Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 5-week high-intensity interval training (HIIT and moderate-to-vigorous intensity continuous training (MVCT on cardiometabolic health outcomes and enjoyment of exercise in obese young women.A randomized controlled experiment was conducted that involved thirty-one obese females (age range of 18-30 randomly assigned to either HIIT or MVCT five-week training programs. Participants in HIIT condition performed 20 min of repeated 8 s cycling interspersed with 12 s rest intervals, and those in MVCT condition cycled continuously for 40 min at 60-80% of peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2peak, both for four days in a week. Outcomes such as [Formula: see text]O2peak, body composition estimated by bioimpedance analysis, blood lipids, and serum sexual hormones were measured at pre-and post-training. The scores of Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PAES were collected during the intervention.After training, [Formula: see text]O2peak increased significantly for both training programs (9.1% in HIIT and 10.3% in MVCT (p = 0.010, η2 = 0.41. Although MVCT group had a significant reduction in total body weight (TBW, -1.8%, p = 0.034, fat mass (FM, - 4.7%, p = 0.002 and percentage body fat (PBF, -2.9%, p = 0.016, there were no significant between-group differences in the change of the pre- and post-measures of these variables. The HIIT group had a higher score on PAES than the MVCT group during the intervention. For both conditions, exercise training led to a decline in resting testosterone and estradiol levels, but had no significant effect on blood lipids.Both HIIT and MVCT are effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness and in reducing sexual hormones in obese young women; however, HIIT is a more enjoyable and time-efficient strategy. The mild-HIIT protocol seems to be useful for at least maintaining the body weight among sedentary individuals.

  10. Comparison of High-Intensity Interval Training and Moderate-to-Vigorous Continuous Training for Cardiometabolic Health and Exercise Enjoyment in Obese Young Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengyan; Song, Lili; Shi, Qingde

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 5-week high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-to-vigorous intensity continuous training (MVCT) on cardiometabolic health outcomes and enjoyment of exercise in obese young women. Methods A randomized controlled experiment was conducted that involved thirty-one obese females (age range of 18–30) randomly assigned to either HIIT or MVCT five-week training programs. Participants in HIIT condition performed 20 min of repeated 8 s cycling interspersed with 12 s rest intervals, and those in MVCT condition cycled continuously for 40 min at 60–80% of peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak), both for four days in a week. Outcomes such as V˙O2peak, body composition estimated by bioimpedance analysis, blood lipids, and serum sexual hormones were measured at pre-and post-training. The scores of Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PAES) were collected during the intervention. Results After training, V˙O2peak increased significantly for both training programs (9.1% in HIIT and 10.3% in MVCT) (p = 0.010, η2 = 0.41). Although MVCT group had a significant reduction in total body weight (TBW, −1.8%, p = 0.034), fat mass (FM, - 4.7%, p = 0.002) and percentage body fat (PBF, −2.9%, p = 0.016), there were no significant between-group differences in the change of the pre- and post-measures of these variables. The HIIT group had a higher score on PAES than the MVCT group during the intervention. For both conditions, exercise training led to a decline in resting testosterone and estradiol levels, but had no significant effect on blood lipids. Conclusion Both HIIT and MVCT are effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness and in reducing sexual hormones in obese young women; however, HIIT is a more enjoyable and time-efficient strategy. The mild-HIIT protocol seems to be useful for at least maintaining the body weight among sedentary individuals. PMID:27368057

  11. A Further Assessment of Momentary Time-Sampling across Extended Interval Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvero, Alicia M.; Rappaport, Eva; Taylor, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    The current study compared the estimation of momentary time-sampling (MTS) to actual safety performance of three ergonomic responses: back, shoulder, and feet. Actual safety performance was established for the five participants by measuring the target responses with a continuous procedure. MTS 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165, 180, 195, 210, 240, and…

  12. Subordinated diffusion and continuous time random walk asymptotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2010-12-01

    Anomalous transport is usually described either by models of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) or, otherwise, by fractional Fokker-Planck equations (FFPEs). The asymptotic relation between properly scaled CTRW and fractional diffusion process has been worked out via various approaches widely discussed in literature. Here, we focus on a correspondence between CTRWs and time and space fractional diffusion equation stemming from two different methods aimed to accurately approximate anomalous diffusion processes. One of them is the Monte Carlo simulation of uncoupled CTRW with a Lévy α-stable distribution of jumps in space and a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution of waiting times. The other is based on a discretized form of a subordinated Langevin equation in which the physical time defined via the number of subsequent steps of motion is itself a random variable. Both approaches are tested for their numerical performance and verified with known analytical solutions for the Green function of a space-time fractional diffusion equation. The comparison demonstrates a trade off between precision of constructed solutions and computational costs. The method based on the subordinated Langevin equation leads to a higher accuracy of results, while the CTRW framework with a Mittag-Leffler distribution of waiting times provides efficiently an approximate fundamental solution to the FFPE and converges to the probability density function of the subordinated process in a long-time limit. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Associations of reproductive time events and intervals with breast cancer risk: a report from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhezhou; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dai, Qi; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2014-07-01

    While there is clear evidence for an association between later age at first live birth and increased breast cancer risk, associations with the timing of other reproductive events are less clear. As breast tissues undergo major structural and cellular changes during pregnancy, we examined associations between reproductive time events and intervals with breast cancer risk among parous women from the population-based Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS). Unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate associations with breast cancer risk for 3,269 cases and 3,341 controls. In addition to later age at first live birth, later ages at first pregnancy and last pregnancy were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (p-trend = 0.002, 0.015, 0.008, respectively); longer intervals from menarche to first or last live birth were also associated with increased risk (p-trend associations for later age at first pregnancy or live birth and longer intervals from menarche to first or last live birth occurred among premenopausal women and ER+/PR+ breast cancers, whereas the association for later age at last pregnancy occurred among postmenopausal women and women with ER+/PR- or ER-/PR+ breast cancers. Because of the high correlation with other reproductive variables, models did not include adjustment for age at first live birth; when included, the significance of all associations was attenuated. These findings suggest that while reproductive time events and intervals play an important role in breast cancer etiology, contributions may differ by menopausal status and hormone receptor status of breast cancers. © 2013 UICC.

  14. Interval Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Forced Functional Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order forced functional dynamic equations of the form (r(t(xΔ(tγΔ+∑i=0n‍qi(t|x(δi(t|αisgn  x(δi(t=e(t on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  15. On properties of continuous-time random walks with non-Poissonian jump-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, Javier [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca. Plaza Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: javier@usal.es; Montero, Miquel [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: miquel.montero@ub.edu

    2009-10-15

    The usual development of the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) proceeds by assuming that the present is one of the jumping times. Under this restrictive assumption integral equations for the propagator and mean escape times have been derived. We generalize these results to the case when the present is an arbitrary time by recourse to renewal theory. The case of Erlang distributed times is analyzed in detail. Several concrete examples are considered.

  16. Robust Moving Horizon H∞ Control of Discrete Time-Delayed Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yıldız Tascikaraoglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, design of a delay-dependent type moving horizon state-feedback control (MHHC is considered for a class of linear discrete-time system subject to time-varying state delays, norm-bounded uncertainties, and disturbances with bounded energies. The closed-loop robust stability and robust performance problems are considered to overcome the instability and poor disturbance rejection performance due to the existence of parametric uncertainties and time-delay appeared in the system dynamics. Utilizing a discrete-time Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, some delay-dependent linear matrix inequality (LMI based conditions are provided. It is shown that if one can find a feasible solution set for these LMI conditions iteratively at each step of run-time, then we can construct a control law which guarantees the closed-loop asymptotic stability, maximum disturbance rejection performance, and closed-loop dissipativity in view of the actuator limitations. Two numerical examples with simulations on a nominal and uncertain discrete-time, time-delayed systems, are presented at the end, in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Interval Abstraction Refinement for Model Checking of Timed-Arc Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viesmose, Sine Lyhne; Jacobsen, Thomas Stig; Jensen, Jacob Jon

    2014-01-01

    -space exploration techniques. We suggest an approximation method for reducing the size of constants present in the model. The proposed method is developed for Timed-Arc Petri Nets and creates an under-approximation or an over-approximation of the model behaviour. The verification of approximated Petri net models...... can be considerably faster but it does not in general guarantee conclusive answers. We implement the algorithms within the open-source model checker TAPAAL and demonstrate on a number of experiments that our approximation techniques often result in a significant speed-up of the verification....

  18. Asymmetric time interval between evening and morning milking and its effect on the total daily milk yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Chládek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of milk obtained in the course of evening and morning milking performed in variable time intervals of either 11 and 13 hours (n = 1.282 or 10 and 14 hours (n = 370 were collected with the aim to quantify the effect of the length of a variable (asymmetric time interval between evening and morning milking on the total amount and composition of daily milk production of dairy cows. Milk samples were analysed in an accredited (EN ISO 17025 laboratory in Brno-Tuřany (Czech Republic and the following contents of individual milk components were estimated: fat (F; g.100g−1, total protein (TP; g.100g−1, lactose (L; lactose monohydrate; g.100g−1, and somatic cell counts (SCC; ­103.ml−1 were estimated in. It was found out that with the increasing total daily milk production the shares of evening and morning milk yield increased as well; however, the percentages of evening and/or morning yields in the total yield remained practically unchanged and represented 43.5 % and 56.5% or 40.4 % and 59.6 % in variants with intervals of 11 and 13 hours and/or 10 and 14 hours, respectively. In the variant with the milking interval of 11 and 13 hours, values of correlation coefficients between the above parameters (i.e. F, TP, L, SCC, and log SCC of evening and morning milk yields on the one hand and the total milk performance on the other ranged from the minimum r = 0.896 (F to the maximum r = 0.980 (TP. In the variant with the interval of 10 and 14 hours, the corresponding values of correlation coefficients were r = 0.848 (F and r = 0.983 (TP. These correlations were statistically highly significant in all cases (P ≤ 0.001. Further, linear regression equations enabling the estimation of milk parameters of the total milk yield on the base of results obtained in evening and morning milking was calculated as well. Values of coefficients of determination (R2 of these equations ranged from 0.803 (F to 0.960 (TP and from 0.718 (F to 0.966 (TP for

  19. Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training is effective for improving cardiometabolic health and physical fitness in inactive adults. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. We investigate the effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function and physical fitness in physically inactive adults. Twenty inactive adults were randomly allocated to receive either moderate intensity training (MCT group) or high intens...

  20. The Duration of Uncertain Times: Audiovisual Information about Intervals Is Integrated in a Statistically Optimal Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jess; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    Often multisensory information is integrated in a statistically optimal fashion where each sensory source is weighted according to its precision. This integration scheme is statistically optimal because it theoretically results in unbiased perceptual estimates with the highest precision possible. There is a current lack of consensus about how the nervous system processes multiple sensory cues to elapsed time. In order to shed light upon this, we adopt a computational approach to pinpoint the integration strategy underlying duration estimation of audio/visual stimuli. One of the assumptions of our computational approach is that the multisensory signals redundantly specify the same stimulus property. Our results clearly show that despite claims to the contrary, perceived duration is the result of an optimal weighting process, similar to that adopted for estimates of space. That is, participants weight the audio and visual information to arrive at the most precise, single duration estimate possible. The work also disentangles how different integration strategies – i.e. considering the time of onset/offset of signals - might alter the final estimate. As such we provide the first concrete evidence of an optimal integration strategy in human duration estimates. PMID:24594578

  1. The duration of uncertain times: audiovisual information about intervals is integrated in a statistically optimal fashion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jess Hartcher-O'Brien

    Full Text Available Often multisensory information is integrated in a statistically optimal fashion where each sensory source is weighted according to its precision. This integration scheme isstatistically optimal because it theoretically results in unbiased perceptual estimates with the highest precisionpossible.There is a current lack of consensus about how the nervous system processes multiple sensory cues to elapsed time.In order to shed light upon this, we adopt a computational approach to pinpoint the integration strategy underlying duration estimationof audio/visual stimuli. One of the assumptions of our computational approach is that the multisensory signals redundantly specify the same stimulus property. Our results clearly show that despite claims to the contrary, perceived duration is the result of an optimal weighting process, similar to that adopted for estimates of space. That is, participants weight the audio and visual information to arrive at the most precise, single duration estimate possible. The work also disentangles how different integration strategies - i.e. consideringthe time of onset/offset ofsignals - might alter the final estimate. As such we provide the first concrete evidence of an optimal integration strategy in human duration estimates.

  2. Reliability and Analysis of Changes in Bite Marks at Different Time Intervals and Temperature Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Khare Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess time-dependent changes in the morphology of bitemarks and to investigate the utility of matching bitemarks on both perishable and non-perishable objects with the passage of time at different temperatures. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted at Maharana Pratap College of Dentistry and Research Centre, Gwalior, India. 20 volunteers were asked to bite 6 items each. These included perishable and nonperishable items. Perishable items were apple, banana and Burfi, (a milk-based popular sweet confectionary while non-perishable items included wax, clay, and rubber. Photographs were taken with a digital camera at 0-hours and 24-hours after biting these objects at temperature ranges of 24 ºC to 28 ºC and 36 ºC to 40 ºC, respectively. Life-size photographs of these bitten objects were printed on transparent overlays and compared to hand drawn transparencies prepared from suspect dentition using an X-ray viewer. The comparison of all the 960 transparencies was done by two researchers, independently. Results: All objects gave a positive identification of the biter on matching just after biting. After24-hours, all items also showed positive matching except banana and apples. Conclusion: This proposed method is simple, reliable and less technique sensitive. It narrows down the subjectivity of interpretation. It highlights that due to decomposition changes occur in perishable food items and more so in apples and bananas, making bitemarks less reliable evidence.

  3. Effect of different post-feeding intervals on the total time of development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Madeleine; Amendt, Jens

    2012-09-10

    By estimating the age of the immature stages of flies developing on a corpse, forensic entomologists are able to establish the minimum post-mortem interval. Blowflies, which are the first and most important colonizers, usually leave the cadaver at the end of the last larval stage searching for a pupation site. This period of development is referred as the post-feeding or wandering stage. The characteristics of the ground where the corpse was placed might be of notable importance for the post-feeding dispersal time: For pupariation the larvae prefer an environment protected from light and predators and may have a longer dispersal time in order to reach an appropriate pupation site. Hence, the dispersal time can vary and may influence the total time of development which may lead to an erroneous calculation of the post-mortem interval. This study investigates the effect of various post-feeding time intervals on the development of the blowfly Lucilia sericata at a temperature of 25°C. As larvae reached the post-feeding stage a pupariation substrate was offered at 0 and after 12, 24 and 48h. Only the larvae with a dispersal time of 24h (total time of development 325.2h; median) and 48h (total time of development 347.7h; median) showed a significantly longer total development time compared to the control group (total time of development 318.4h; median). The mortality rate did not differ between groups; however the flies that emerged from the group with a dispersal of 48h were significantly smaller indicating increased energy consumption during dispersal. The results of this study indicate that a prolonged post-feeding stage could increase the total developmental time of L. sericata which should be taken into consideration when interpreting entomological findings. The need for a serious examination of current rearing practices in forensic entomology laboratories is indicated because reference data sets for the time of development are usually produced by offering the post

  4. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  5. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health and fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Jenna B; Gibala, Martin J

    2014-03-01

    Growing research suggests that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve cardiorespiratory and metabolic health. "All out" HIIT models such as Wingate-type exercise are particularly effective, but this type of training may not be safe, tolerable or practical for many individuals. Recent studies, however, have revealed the potential for other models of HIIT, which may be more feasible but are still time-efficient, to stimulate adaptations similar to more demanding low-volume HIIT models and high-volume endurance-type training. As little as 3 HIIT sessions per week, involving ≤10 min of intense exercise within a time commitment of ≤30 min per session, including warm-up, recovery between intervals and cool down, has been shown to improve aerobic capacity, skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, exercise tolerance and markers of disease risk after only a few weeks in both healthy individuals and people with cardiometabolic disorders. Additional research is warranted, as studies conducted have been relatively short-term, with a limited number of measurements performed on small groups of subjects. However, given that "lack of time" remains one of the most commonly cited barriers to regular exercise participation, low-volume HIIT is a time-efficient exercise strategy that warrants consideration by health practitioners and fitness professionals.

  6. Distinguishing Synchronous and Time Varying Synergies using Point Process Interval Statistics: Motor Primitives in Frog and Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey B Hart

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present and apply a method that uses point process statistics to discriminate the forms of synergies in motor pattern data, prior to explicit synergy extraction. The method uses electromyogram (EMG pulse peak timing or onset timing. Peak timing is preferable in complex patterns where pulse onsets may be overlapping. An interval statistic derived from the point processes of EMG peak timings distinguishes time-varying synergies from synchronous synergies. Model data shows that the statistic is robust for most conditions. Its application to both frog hindlimb EMG and rat locomotion hindlimb EMG show data from these preparations is clearly most consistent with synchronous synergy models (p<0.001. Additional direct tests of pulse and interval relations in frog data further bolster the support for synchronous synergy mechanisms in these data. Our method and analyses support separated control of rhythm and pattern of motor primitives, with the low level execution primitives comprising pulsed synchronous synergies in both frog and rat, and both episodic and rhythmic behaviors.

  7. Spectral Efficiency of Random Time-Hopping CDMA

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, Guido Carlo; Di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally paired with impulsive communications, Time-Hopping CDMA (TH-CDMA) is a multiple access technique that separates users in time by coding their transmissions into pulses occupying a subset of $N_\\mathsf{s}$ chips out of the total $N$ included in a symbol period, in contrast with traditional Direct-Sequence CDMA (DS-CDMA) where $N_\\mathsf{s}=N$. This work analyzes TH-CDMA with random spreading, by determining whether peculiar theoretical limits are identifiable, with both optimal a...

  8. Renal Toxicity of Mercuric Chloride at Different Time Intervals in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Al-Madani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to study the renal toxicity of mercuric chloride in rats at different periods of time. The following groups of rats were studied: i control, ii placebo, iii rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto- 1-propanesulfonic acid, iv rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS followed by a single dose ip of 2.0 mg HgCl2/kg body weight one hour after DMPS injection v rats injected with a single ip dose of 2.0 mg HgCl2/kg body weight. Results indicate that mercuric chloride was more toxic after 48 hours of its administration when compared to 24 hours. Mercuric chloride administration caused an impairment of renal function which was evident from a significant decrease in urine volume, urinary excretion of urea, creatinine and glomerular filteration rate (P < 0.001 when compared to other treated groups. There was an increased excretion of protein, albumin and γ—glutamyltransferase in the urine of mercuric chloride treated rats. Administration of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid before mercuric chloride treatment caused the altered indices to return to near normal levels.

  9. A study on assessment methodology of surveillance test interval and allowed outage time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; You, Young Woo; Cho, Jae Seon; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Do Hyoung; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Yoon Ik; Yang, Hui Chang; Park, Kang Min [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    The objectives of this study is the development of methodology by which assesses the optimization of Surveillance Test Internal(STI) and Allowed Outage Time(AOT) using PSA method that can supplement the current deterministic methods and the improvement of Korean nuclear power plant safety. In this study, the survey about the assessment methodologies, modelings and results performed by domestic and international researches are performed as the basic step before developing the assessment methodology of this study. The assessment methodology that supplement the revealed problems in many other studies is presented and the application of new methodology into the example system assures the feasibility of this method. The sensitivity analyses about the failure factors of the components are performed in the bases of the and AOT is quantified. And the reliability assessment methodology about the diesel generator is reviewed and applied to the PSA code. The qualitative assessment for the STI/AOR of RPS/ESFAS assured safety the most important system in the nuclear power plant are performed.

  10. First Passage Time for Random Walks in Heterogeneous Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2012-08-01

    The first passage time (FPT) for random walks is a key indicator of how fast information diffuses in a given system. Despite the role of FPT as a fundamental feature in transport phenomena, its behavior, particularly in heterogeneous networks, is not yet fully understood. Here, we study, both analytically and numerically, the scaling behavior of the FPT distribution to a given target node, averaged over all starting nodes. We find that random walks arrive quickly at a local hub, and therefore, the FPT distribution shows a crossover with respect to time from fast decay behavior (induced from the attractive effect to the hub) to slow decay behavior (caused by the exploring of the entire system). Moreover, the mean FPT is independent of the degree of the target node in the case of compact exploration. These theoretical results justify the necessity of using a random jump protocol (empirically used in search engines) and provide guidelines for designing an effective network to make information quickly accessible.

  11. Sequential time interleaved random equivalent sampling for repetitive signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yijiu; Liu, Jingjing

    2016-12-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based sampling techniques exhibit many advantages over other existing approaches for sparse signal spectrum sensing; they are also incorporated into non-uniform sampling signal reconstruction to improve the efficiency, such as random equivalent sampling (RES). However, in CS based RES, only one sample of each acquisition is considered in the signal reconstruction stage, and it will result in more acquisition runs and longer sampling time. In this paper, a sampling sequence is taken in each RES acquisition run, and the corresponding block measurement matrix is constructed using a Whittaker-Shannon interpolation formula. All the block matrices are combined into an equivalent measurement matrix with respect to all sampling sequences. We implemented the proposed approach with a multi-cores analog-to-digital converter (ADC), whose ADC cores are time interleaved. A prototype realization of this proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling method has been developed. It is able to capture an analog waveform at an equivalent sampling rate of 40 GHz while sampled at 1 GHz physically. Experiments indicate that, for a sparse signal, the proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling exhibits high efficiency.

  12. OPTIMASI OLSR ROUTING PROTOCOL PADA JARINGAN WIRELESS MESH DENGAN ADAPTIVE REFRESHING TIME INTERVAL DAN ENHANCE MULTI POINT RELAY SELECTING ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faosan Mapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Wireless Mesh Network (WMN adalah suatu konektivitas jaringan yang self-organized, self-configured dan multi-hop. Tujuan dari WMN adalah menawarkan pengguna suatu bentuk jaringan nirkabel yang dapat dengan mudah berkomunikasi dengan jaringan konvensional dengan kecepatan tinggi dan dengan cakupan yang lebih luas serta biaya awal yang minimal. Diperlukan suatu desain protokol routing yang efisien untuk WMN yang secara adaptif dapat mendukung mesh routers dan mesh clients. Dalam tulisan ini, diusulkan untuk mengoptimalkan protokol OLSR, yang merupakan protokol routing proaktif. Digunakan heuristik yang meningkatkan protokol OLSR melalui adaptive refreshing time interval dan memperbaiki metode MPR selecting algorithm. Suatu analisa dalam meningkatkan protokol OLSR melalui adaptive refreshing time interval dan memperbaiki algoritma pemilihan MPR menunjukkan kinerja yang signifikan dalam hal throughput jika dibandingkan dengan protokol OLSR yang asli. Akan tetapi, terdapat kenaikan dalam hal delay. Pada simulasi yang dilakukan dapat disimpulkan bahwa OLSR dapat dioptimalkan dengan memodifikasi pemilihan node MPR berdasarkan cost effective dan penyesuaian waktu interval refreshing hello message sesuai dengan keadaan

  13. Exponential Admissibility and Dynamic Output Feedback Control of Switched Singular Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problems of exponential admissibility and dynamic output feedback (DOF control for a class of continuous-time switched singular systems with interval time-varying delay. A full-order, dynamic, synchronously switched DOF controller is considered. First, by using the average dwell time approach, a delay-range-dependent exponential admissibility criterion for the unforced switched singular time-delay system is established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Then, based on this criterion, a sufficient condition on the existence of a desired DOF controller, which guarantees that the closed-loop system is regular, impulse free and exponentially stable, is proposed by employing the LMI technique. Finally, some illustrative examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Effects of Cracking Test Conditions on Estimation Uncertainty for Weibull Parameters Considering Time-Dependent Censoring Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Phil Park

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely difficult to predict the initiation time of cracking due to a large time spread in most cracking experiments. Thus, probabilistic models, such as the Weibull distribution, are usually employed to model the initiation time of cracking. Therefore, the parameters of the Weibull distribution are estimated from data collected from a cracking test. However, although the development of a reliable cracking model under ideal experimental conditions (e.g., a large number of specimens and narrow censoring intervals could be achieved in principle, it is not straightforward to quantitatively assess the effects of the ideal experimental conditions on model estimation uncertainty. The present study investigated the effects of key experimental conditions, including the time-dependent effect of the censoring interval length, on the estimation uncertainties of the Weibull parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results provided quantified estimation uncertainties of Weibull parameters in various cracking test conditions. Hence, it is expected that the results of this study can offer some insight for experimenters developing a probabilistic crack initiation model by performing experiments.

  15. Effects of Cracking Test Conditions on Estimation Uncertainty for Weibull Parameters Considering Time-Dependent Censoring Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Phil; Park, Chanseok; Cho, Jongweon; Bahn, Chi Bum

    2016-12-23

    It is extremely difficult to predict the initiation time of cracking due to a large time spread in most cracking experiments. Thus, probabilistic models, such as the Weibull distribution, are usually employed to model the initiation time of cracking. Therefore, the parameters of the Weibull distribution are estimated from data collected from a cracking test. However, although the development of a reliable cracking model under ideal experimental conditions (e.g., a large number of specimens and narrow censoring intervals) could be achieved in principle, it is not straightforward to quantitatively assess the effects of the ideal experimental conditions on model estimation uncertainty. The present study investigated the effects of key experimental conditions, including the time-dependent effect of the censoring interval length, on the estimation uncertainties of the Weibull parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results provided quantified estimation uncertainties of Weibull parameters in various cracking test conditions. Hence, it is expected that the results of this study can offer some insight for experimenters developing a probabilistic crack initiation model by performing experiments.

  16. Effects of bilastine on T-wave morphology and the QTc interval: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, thorough QTc study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Claus; Struijk, Johannes J; Kanters, Jørgen K; Andersen, Mads P; Toft, Egon; Tyl, Benoît

    2012-05-01

    The International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH) E14 guideline for thorough QT studies requires assessing the propensity of new non-antiarrhythmic drugs to affect cardiac repolarization. The present study investigates whether a composite ECG measure of T-wave morphology (Morphology Combination Score [MCS]) can be used together with the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) in a fully ICH E14-compliant thorough QT study to exclude clinically relevant repolarization effects of bilastine, a novel antihistamine. Thirty participants in this crossover study were randomly assigned to receive placebo, moxifloxacin 400 mg, bilastine at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses (20 and 100 mg) and bilastine 20 mg co-administered with ketoconazole 400 mg. Resting ECGs recorded at 12 nominal time points before and after treatments were used to determine Fridericia corrected QTc (QTcF) and MCS from the T-wave characteristics: asymmetry, flatness and notching. There were no effects of bilastine monotherapy (20 and 100 mg) on MCS or QTcF at those study times where the bilastine plasma concentrations were highest. MCS changes for bilastine monotherapy did not exceed the normal intrasubject variance of T-wave shapes for triplicate ECG recordings. Maximum QTcF prolongation for bilastine monotherapy was 5 ms or less: 3.8 ms (90% CI 0.3, 7.3 ms) for bilastine 20 mg and 5.0 ms (90% CI 2.0, 8.0 ms) for bilastine 100 mg. There were no indications of bilastine inducing larger repolarization effects on T-wave morphology as compared with the QTcF interval, as evidenced by the similarity of z-score equivalents for placebo-corrected changes in MCS and QTcF values. This study shows that bilastine, at therapeutic and supratherapeutic dosages, does not induce any effects on T-wave morphology or QTcF. These results confirm the absence of an effect for bilastine on cardiac repolarization.

  17. Effects and prevalence of nonresponders after 12 weeks of high-intensity interval or resistance training in women with insulin resistance: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects and prevalence of nonresponders (NR) to high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and resistance training (RT) in women with insulin resistance on cardiometabolic health parameters. Sedentary overweight/obese insulin-resistant women (age = 33.5 ± 6.5 yr; body mass index = 29.9 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) were randomly assigned to a triweekly HIIT program (HIIT; n = 18) or resistance training (RT; n = 17). Anthropometry (body mass, fat mass, muscle mass, waist circumference, and skinfold thickness), cardiovascular (blood pressure), metabolic [fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], as well as muscle strength, and endurance performance covariables were measured before and after 12 wk in both intervention groups. The interindividual variability to exercise training of the subjects was categorized as responders and NR using as cut points two times the typical error of measurement in mean outcomes. After intervention, significant reduction in waist circumference, skinfold thicknesses, fat mass, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR ( P HIIT and RT group, respectively. Both HIIT and RT groups exhibited a significant decrease in the endurance performance, whereas only RT exhibited increased muscle strength. Significant differences in the NR prevalence between the HIIT and RT groups were identified for a decrease in fat mass (HIIT 33.3% vs. RT 70.5%; P = 0.028), muscle mass (HIIT 100% vs. RT 52.9%; P = 0.001), and tricipital skinfold (HIIT 5.5% vs. RT 29.4%; P HIIT and RT groups (55.5% vs. 94.1; P = 0.009). However, there were no differences in the NR prevalence between HIIT and RT for decreasing fasting glucose. Twelve weeks of HIIT and RT have similar effects and NR prevalence to improve glucose control variables; however, there is different NR prevalence in other anthropometric, cardiovascular, strength, and endurance performance measurements in insulin-resistant women. These

  18. Static probabilistic timing analysis for real-time systems using random replacement caches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altmeyer, S.; Cucu-Grosjean, L.; Davis, R.I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate static probabilistic timing analysis (SPTA) for single processor real-time systems that use a cache with an evict-on-miss random replacement policy. We show that previously published formulae for the probability of a cache hit can produce results that are optimistic and

  19. Time interval measurement between two emissions: Kr + Au; Mesure de l`intervalle de temps entre deux emissions: Kr + Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboufirassi, M; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Mahi, M.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France); LPC (Caen) - CRN (Strasbourg) - GANIL Collaboration

    1998-04-01

    To indicate the method allowing the determination of the emission intervals, the results obtained with the Kr + Au system at 43 and 60 A.MeV are presented. The experiments were performed with the NAUTILUS exclusive detectors. Central collisions were selected by means of a relative velocity criterion to reject the events containing a forward emitted fragment. For the two bombardment energies the data analysis shows that the formation of a compound of mass around A = 200. By comparing the fragment dynamical variables with simulations one can conclude about the simultaneity of the compound deexcitation processes. It was found that a 5 MeV/A is able to reproduce the characteristics of the detected fragments. Also, it was found that to reproduce the dynamical characteristics of the fragments issued from central collisions it was not necessary to superimpose a radial collective energy upon the Coulomb and thermal motion. The distribution of the relative angles between detected fragments is used here as a chronometer. For simultaneous ruptures the small relative angles are forbidden by the Coulomb repulsion, while for sequential processes this interdiction is the more lifted the longer the interval between the two emissions is. For the system discussed here the comparison between simulation and data has been carried out for the extreme cases, i.e. for a vanishing and infinite time interval between the two emissions, respectively. More sophisticated simulations to describe angular distributions between the emitted fragments were also developed 2 refs.

  20. A novel interval type-2 fractional order fuzzy PID controller: Design, performance evaluation, and its optimal time domain tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anupam; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a novel concept of an interval type-2 fractional order fuzzy PID (IT2FO-FPID) controller, which requires fractional order integrator and fractional order differentiator, is proposed. The incorporation of Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) type interval type-2 fuzzy logic controller (IT2FLC) with fractional controller of PID-type is investigated for time response measure due to both unit step response and unit load disturbance. The resulting IT2FO-FPID controller is examined on different delayed linear and nonlinear benchmark plants followed by robustness analysis. In order to design this controller, fractional order integrator-differentiator operators are considered as design variables including input-output scaling factors. A new hybridized algorithm named as artificial bee colony-genetic algorithm (ABC-GA) is used to optimize the parameters of the controller while minimizing weighted sum of integral of time absolute error (ITAE) and integral of square of control output (ISCO). To assess the comparative performance of the IT2FO-FPID, authors compared it against existing controllers, i.e., interval type-2 fuzzy PID (IT2-FPID), type-1 fractional order fuzzy PID (T1FO-FPID), type-1 fuzzy PID (T1-FPID), and conventional PID controllers. Furthermore, to show the effectiveness of the proposed controller, the perturbed processes along with the larger dead time are tested. Moreover, the proposed controllers are also implemented on multi input multi output (MIMO), coupled, and highly complex nonlinear two-link robot manipulator system in presence of un-modeled dynamics. Finally, the simulation results explicitly indicate that the performance of the proposed IT2FO-FPID controller is superior to its conventional counterparts in most of the cases. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesai Ouyang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS. Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

  2. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-27

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

  3. A Novel Approach to Extract Significant Patterns of Travel Time Intervals of Vehicles from Freeway Gantry Timestamp Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Doo Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It is attractive to extract and determine the key features of traffic patterns for mitigating road congestion and predicting travel time of vehicles in traffic analysis. Based on the previous work that is a scalable approach via a Hadoop MapReduce programming model, this paper aims to extract significant patterns of travel time intervals of vehicles from freeway traffic in Taiwan, and meanwhile to compute the statistics of these patterns from the point of view one may concern. Experimental resources are the records of timestamp gantry sequences of vehicles passed in five months from 2016/11 to 2017/3 that were downloaded from the Traffic Data Collection System, one of Taiwan government open data platforms. To select one specific gantry sequence for demonstration, the longest sequence on the trip within the Taiwan National Freeway No. 5 is selected. Experimental results show that some statistics of vehicle travel time intervals according to 24 h per day are computed for illustration. These statistics can not only provide clues to experts to analyze traffic congestions, but also help drivers how to avoid rush hours. Furthermore, this work is able to handle a larger amount of real data and be promising for further traffic and transportation research in the future.

  4. Environmental time series interpolation based on Spartan random processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, Milan; Hristopulos, D. T.

    In many environmental applications, time series are either incomplete or irregularly spaced. We investigate the application of the Spartan random process to missing data prediction. We employ a novel modified method of moments (MMoM) and the established method of maximum likelihood (ML) for parameter inference. The CPU time of MMoM is shown to be much faster than that of ML estimation and almost independent of the data size. We formulate an explicit Spartan interpolator for estimating missing data. The model validation is performed on both synthetic data and real time series of atmospheric aerosol concentrations. The prediction performance is shown to be comparable with that attained by means of the best linear unbiased (Kolmogorov-Wiener) predictor at reduced computational cost.

  5. Preliminary reference intervals and the impact of citrate storage time for thrombelastography in cats including delta and the velocity curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Carolin; Moritz, Andreas; Barthel, Franziska; Bauer, Natali

    2017-11-29

    Thrombelastography is a useful tool in assessment of hemostasis. Beside the traditional variables, the velocity curve and the variable delta have lately earned attention. The velocity curve provides knowledge about the speed of clot formation including information about thrombin generation. Delta, which only reflects enzymatic coagulation, allows the determination of the origin of hypercoagulability when compared to clot rigidity, a variable that reflects both platelet and enzymatic activity. The aim was to establish preliminary reference intervals for feline thrombelastography including the velocity curve variables and delta obtained after 60 min of storage including the assessment of coefficients of variation. Furthermore, the effect of citrate storage time (30 versus 60 min) on feline thrombelastography will be determined. Prolonged storage times significantly reduced reaction (R) (P = 0.019) and clotting (K) (P = 0.008) times, split point (SP) (P = 0.019) and time to maximum rate of thrombus generation (TMRTG) (P = 0.023) values whereas maximum rate of thrombus generation (MRTG) significantly increased (P = 0.040). Preliminary reference intervals: R (min): 2.7-18.1; K (min): 0.8-3.9; alpha (°): 27.6-75.2; maximum amplitude (mm): 18.5-62.5; clot rigidity (dyn/cm2): 1.2-8.2; coagulation index: -4.6 - 2.6; SP (min): 2.4-15.4; delta (min): 0.3-3.1; thrombus generation (mm/min): 255.3-751.2; MRTG (mm/min): 4.0-19.3; TMRTG (min): 3.5-22.0; maximum rate of lysis (mm/min): 0.0-4.7 and time to maximum rate of lysis (min): 0.4-55.8. Storage for 60 versus 30 min induces hypercoagulable tracings including the velocity curve, some of which variables (MRTG, TMRTG) might function as sensitive markers for changes in the coagulation activity. Because of the impact of citrate storage time on thrombelastography, reference intervals have to be established using a specific and constant storage time in each laboratory.

  6. Statistics of resonances and delay times in random media: beyond random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottos, Tsampikos [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0155 (United States); Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-12-09

    We review recent developments in quantum scattering from mesoscopic systems. Various spatial geometries whose closed analogues show diffusive, localized or critical behaviour are considered. These are the features that cannot be described by the universal random matrix theory results. Instead, one has to go beyond this approximation and incorporate them in a non-perturbative way. Here, we pay particular attention to the traces of these non-universal characteristics, in the distribution of the Wigner delay times and resonance widths. The former quantity captures time-dependent aspects of quantum scattering while the latter is associated with the poles of the scattering matrix.

  7. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system (CNS) continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a) subtract or integrate sensory inputs; (b) move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa; and (c) adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1–2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift) in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training devices

  8. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis eHoneine

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a subtract or integrate sensory inputs, (b move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa, and (c adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1-2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training

  9. From quenched disorder to continuous time random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Stanislav

    2017-11-01

    This work focuses on quantitative representation of transport in systems with quenched disorder. Explicit mapping of the quenched trap model to continuous time random walk is presented. Linear temporal transformation, t →t /Λ1 /α , for a transient process in the subdiffusive regime is sufficient for asymptotic mapping. An exact form of the constant Λ1 /α is established. A disorder averaged position probability density function for a quenched trap model is obtained, and analytic expressions for the diffusion coefficient and drift are provided.

  10. Behavior of ultrasounds crossing perfluorocarbon liquids and random propagation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Random propagation times are able to model waves attenuation and velocity. It is true for electromagnetic waves (light, radar, guided propagation) and also for acoustics and ultrasounds (acoustics for high frequencies). About the latter, it can be shown that stable probability laws are well-fitted for frequencies up to dozens of megahertz in numerous cases. Nowadays, medical applications are performed using propagation through perfluorocarbon (PFC). Experiments were done to measure attenuations and phase changes. Using these results, this paper addresses the question to know if stable probability laws can be used to characterize the propagation of ultrasounds through PFC liquids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A trivial observation on time reversal in random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, L [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States); Leyvraz, F [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Pineda, C [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Seligman, T H [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-12-07

    It is commonly thought that a state-dependent quantity, after being averaged over a classical ensemble of random Hamiltonians, will always become independent of the state. We point out that this is in general incorrect: if the ensemble of Hamiltonians is time-reversal invariant, and the quantity involves the state in higher than bilinear order, then we show that the quantity is only a constant over the orbits of the invariance group on the Hilbert space. Examples include fidelity and decoherence in appropriate models. (fast track communication)

  12. Return times at periodic points in random dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, Nicolai; Todd, Mike

    2017-01-01

    We prove a quenched limiting law for random measures on subshifts at periodic points. We consider a family of measures {≤ft\\{{{μω}\\right\\}}ω \\in Ω } , where the ‘driving space’ Ω is equipped with a probability measure which is invariant under a transformation θ. We assume that the fibred measures {μω} satisfy a generalised invariance property and are ψ-mixing. We then show that for almost every ω the return times to cylinders A n at periodic points are in the limit compound Poisson distributed for a parameter ϑ which is given by the escape rate at the periodic point.

  13. Monte Carlo Random-Walk Experiments as a Test of Chaotic Orbits of Maps of the Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Sornette, D.

    1984-05-01

    We have performed Monte Carlo random-walk experiments on a one-dimensional periodic lattice with a trapping site using the logistic map as a generator of pseudorandom numbers. Comparison with analytical results indicates that, when it has sensitive dependence to the initial conditions, this map provides a true pseudorandom generator.

  14. Systolic peak foot-to-apex time interval, a novel oscillometric technique for systolic blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmira, Amir M; Perez-Martin, Antonia; Coudray, Sarah; Schuster, Iris; Aichoun, Isabelle; Laurent, Jérémy; Bereski-Reguig, Fethi; Dauzat, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement is essential for the study of human physiology but automatic oscillometric devices only estimate SBP and DBP using various, undisclosed algorithms, precluding standardization and interchangeability. We propose a novel approach by tracking, during pneumatic cuff deflation, the time interval from the foot to the apex of the systolic peak of the oscillometric signal, which reaches a maximum concomitant with the first Korotkoff sound. In 145 study participants and patients (group 1), we measured the systolic brachial artery blood pressure by Korotkoff sound recording, conventional oscillometry, and our fully automated systolic peak foot-to-apex time interval (SFATI) technique. In 35 other patients (group 2), we compared SFATI with intra-arterial measurement. In group 1, the concordance correlation coefficient was 0.989 and 0.984 between SFATI and Korotkoff sounds, 0.884 and 0.917 between oscillometry and Korotkoff sounds, and 0.882 and 0.919 between SFATI and oscillometry, respectively, on the left and right arm. In group 2, it was 0.72 between SFATI and intra-arterial measurement, 0.67 between oscillometry and intra-arterial measurement, and 0.92 between SFATI and Korotkoff sounds. In 40 study participants, the reproducibility study yielded a concordance coefficient of 0.95 for SFATI and 0.94 for Korotkoff sounds. SFATI BP measurement shows an excellent concordance with the auscultatory technique, offering a major improvement over current oscillometric techniques and allowing standardization.

  15. Blind synchronization of the OFDM signals in multipath channels on the basis of the time and frequency protection intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, G. N.; Gorokhov, K. V.; Kolobkov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    New methods of symbol-timing and carrier-frequency blind synchronization of an OFDM-signal receiver are developed and studied. They generalize the well-known methods which use either the protection interval in time in the cyclic prefix form or the protection interval with respect to frequency in the form of virtual subcarriers, and are based on their joint application. To reduce the computational complexity, approximate algorithms which are based on the approximation of the optimal rules, but, according to the study results, have almost the same characteristics of parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance are proposed. It is shown that in terms of the parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance, the proposed methods are superior to the well-known methods of synchronization by the cyclic prefix and the virtual subcarriers in the two-path Rayleigh-fading channel. For incoherent systems with the differential phase shift keying variants, using such methods makes it possible to rule out the necessity of accurate synchronization and, due to insignificant redundancy of the system band and the cyclic prefix length, closely approach the reception bit-error-rate performance for perfect synchronization.

  16. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  17. Long-term effects of high-intensity interval training in heart transplant recipients: A 5-year follow-up study of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Marianne; Gullestad, Lars; Bendz, Bjørn; Bjørkelund, Elisabeth; Rolid, Katrine; Arora, Satish; Nytrøen, Kari

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high-intensity interval training (HIT) is superior to moderate-continuous exercise in general and in cardiovascular diseases. Recently, we also found HIT safe and efficient after heart transplantation (HTx). This study reports the 5-year long-term effects. Forty-one HTx patients who had completed the previous 12-month randomized controlled trial, comparing HIT intervention with usual care, were eligible. In particular, we measured VO2peak , muscular capacity, intravascular ultrasound, and questionnaires measuring physical and mental health. The baseline mean±SD values were as follows: age; 49.1±16.5 years, men; 68%, time since HTx: 4.1±2.2 years. Within the HIT group, initial VO2peak increased significantly from 27.7±5.7 to 31.2±5.3 mL/kg/min. However, during the next 4 years, VO2peak decreased to 26.0±6.2 mL/kg/min. The control group showed slightly decreasing VO2peak values during the entire 5-year period. The HIT group reported significantly less anxiety symptoms, but there were no long-term differences in VO2peak , muscular capacity, or cardiac allograft vasculopathy between the groups. The similar VO2peak values correspond to our findings of similar everyday activity. Our findings suggest that intermittent periods of HIT may be necessary to maintain the initial benefits gained from the intervention. However, HIT probably reduces the burden of anxiety, which is a frequent health issue following HTx. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A mixed-interval multi-pulse position modulation scheme for real-time visible light communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Luhong; Li, Cheng; Li, Honglei; Chen, Xiongbin; Mao, Xurui; Chen, Hongda

    2017-11-01

    In the paper, a mixed-interval multi-pulse position modulation (MI-MPPM) scheme for visible light communication (VLC) system is theoretical proposed and implemented on field programmable gate array (FPGA). It has better bandwidth efficiency than PPM and MPPM. And it has better anti-jamming than MPPM. A real-time VLC link based on phosphorescent white LED is also built to measure the performance of the proposed MI-MPPM scheme. The data rate of 104 Mbps in our VLC system under the distance of 60 cm could be achieved, and bit error rate is 3 . 81 × 10-5. As far as we know, it is the highest data rate that can be achieved in continuous real-time VLC system with phosphorescent white LED based on PPM and its derivative modulation. The performance of VLC system under different distances, advantages and the possible application scenarios of MI-MPPM are also discussed.

  19. Correlated continuous time random walk and option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Longjin; Xiao, Jianbin; Fan, Liangzhong; Ren, Fuyao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a correlated continuous time random walk (CCTRW) with averaged waiting time, whose probability density function (PDF) is proved to follow stretched Gaussian distribution. Then, we apply this process into option pricing problem. Supposing the price of the underlying is driven by this CCTRW, we find this model captures the subdiffusive characteristic of financial markets. By using the mean self-financing hedging strategy, we obtain the closed-form pricing formulas for a European option with and without transaction costs, respectively. At last, comparing the obtained model with the classical Black-Scholes model, we find the price obtained in this paper is higher than that obtained from the Black-Scholes model. A empirical analysis is also introduced to confirm the obtained results can fit the real data well.

  20. When one's sense of agency goes wrong: Absent modulation of time perception by voluntary actions and reduction of perceived length of intervals in passivity symptoms in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Schmidt, Kyran T; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T; Holmes, Nicholas P; Waters, Flavie A V

    2016-10-01

    Passivity symptoms in schizophrenia are characterised by an absence of agency for actions, thoughts and other somatic experiences. Time perception and intentional binding have both been linked to agency and schizophrenia but have not been examined in passivity symptoms. Time perception and intentional binding were assessed in people with schizophrenia (n=15 with, n=24 without passivity symptoms) and 43 healthy controls using an interval estimation procedure (200, 400 and 600ms intervals) with active, passive and observed movements. People with passivity symptoms did not display action-modulation of time perception, while those without passivity symptoms estimated intervals to be the same after active and observed movements. Additionally, both clinical samples reported intervals to be shorter with increasing interval length. We propose that impaired predictive processes may produce an overreliance on external cues and, together with shorter perceived intervals, lead to the subjective loss of agency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Left ventricular vascular and metabolic adaptations to high-intensity interval and moderate intensity continuous training: a randomized trial in healthy middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Heinonen, Ilkka; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Hakala, Juuso; Heiskanen, Marja A; Motiani, Kumail K; Virtanen, Kirsi; Pärkkä, Jussi P; Knuuti, Juhani; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2016-12-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has become popular, time-sparing alternative to moderate intensity continuous training (MICT), although the cardiac vascular and metabolic effects of HIIT are incompletely known. We compared the effects of 2-week interventions with HIIT and MICT on myocardial perfusion and free fatty acid and glucose uptake. Insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose uptake was decreased by training without any significantly different response between the groups, whereas free fatty acid uptake remained unchanged. Adenosine-stimulated myocardial perfusion responded differently to the training modes (change in mean HIIT: -19%; MICT: +9%; P = 0.03 for interaction) and was correlated with myocardial glucose uptake for the entire dataset and especially after HIIT training. HIIT and MICT induce similar metabolic and functional changes in the heart, although myocardial vascular hyperaemic reactivity is impaired after HIIT, and this should be considered when prescribing very intense HIIT for previously untrained subjects. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of obtaining the health benefits of exercise, although the cardiac effects of this training mode are incompletely known. We compared the effects of short-term HIIT and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) interventions on myocardial perfusion and metabolism and cardiac function in healthy, sedentary, middle-aged men. Twenty-eight healthy, middle-aged men were randomized to either HIIT or MICT groups (n = 14 in both) and underwent six cycle ergometer training sessions within 2 weeks (HIIT session: 4-6 × 30 s all-out cycling/4 min recovery, MICT session 40-60 min at 60% V̇O2 peak ). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) was performed to measure cardiac structure and function and positron emission tomography was used to measure myocardial perfusion at baseline and during adenosine stimulation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (MGU) and fasting free

  2. Endocardial acceleration (sonR) vs. ultrasound-derived time intervals in recipients of cardiac resynchronization therapy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donal, Erwan; Giorgis, Lionel; Cazeau, Serge; Leclercq, Christophe; Senhadji, Lotfi; Amblard, Amel; Jauvert, Gael; Burban, Marc; Hernández, Alfredo; Mabo, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) requires the gathering of cardiac functional information. An accurate timing of the phases of the cardiac cycle is key in the optimization process. We compared Doppler echocardiography to an automated system, based on the recording of sonR (formerly endocardial acceleration), in the detection of mitral and aortic valves closures and measurements of the duration of systole and diastole. We prospectively studied, under various conditions of cardiac stimulation, 75 recipients of CRT systems (69% men), whose mean age was 72 ± 9.2 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 35 ± 11%, baseline QRS duration 154 ± 29 ms, and New York Heart Association functional class 3.0 ± 0.7. We simultaneously recorded (i) sonR, detected by a non-invasive piezoelectric micro-accelerometer sensor clipped onto an electrode located in the parasternal region, (b) electrocardiogram, and (c) Doppler audio signals, using a multichannel data acquisition and analysis system. The correlation between timing of mitral and aortic valve closure by sonR vs. Doppler signals was examined by linear regression analysis. Correlation coefficients and the average absolute error were calculated. A concordance in the timing of the mitral (r = 0.86, error = 9.7 ms) and aortic (r = 0.93, error = 9.7 ms) valves closure was observed between the two methods in 94% of patients. Similarly, sonR and the Doppler-derived measurements of systolic (r = 0.85, error = 13.4 ms) and diastolic (r = 0.99, error = 12 ms) interval durations were concordant in 80% of patients. A high concordance was found between sonR and the cardiac ultrasound in the timings of aortic and mitral valve closures and in the estimation of systolic and diastolic intervals durations. These observations suggest that sonR could be used to monitor cardiac function and adaptively optimize CRT systems.

  3. Effect of postmortem time interval on in vitro culture potential of goat skin tissues stored at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahipal; Ma, Xiaoling; Sharma, Anil

    2012-09-01

    Animal cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has renewed the interest in postmortem tissue storage, since these tissues can be used to reintroduce the lost genes back into the breeding pool in animal agriculture, preserve the genetic diversity, and revive the endangered species. However, for successful cloning of animals, integrity of nuclear DNA is essential. Cell viability and their potential to in vitro culture ensure nuclear integrity. The aim of this study was to determine the limits of postmortem time interval within which live cells can be recovered from goat skin tissues. To test the postmortem tissue storage limits, we cultured 2-3 mm(2) skin pieces (n = 70) from the ears of three breeds of goats (n = 7) after 0, 2, 4, and 6 days of postmortem storage at 24°C. After 10 days of culture, outgrowth of fibroblast-like cells (>50 cells) around the explants was scored. All the explants irrespective of breed displayed outgrowth of cells on the dish containing fresh tissues (i.e., day 0 of storage). However, the number of explants exhibiting outgrowth reduced with increasing time interval. Only 53.85 % explants displayed outgrowth after 2 days of tissue storage. The number of explants displaying outgrowth was much smaller after 4 (16.67 %) and 6 days (13.3 %) of storage. In general, the number of outgrowing cells per explant, on a given day, also decreased with increasing postmortem storage time interval. To test the differences between cell cultures, we established secondary cultures from one of the goats exhibiting outgrowth of cells after 6 days of tissue storage and compared them to similar cells from fresh tissues. Comparison of both the cell lines revealed similar cell morphology and growth curves and had doubling times of 23.04 and 22.56 h, respectively. These results suggest that live cells can be recovered from goat (and perhaps other animal) tissues stored at room temperature even after 6 days of their death with comparable growth

  4. Space-time model for repeating earthquakes and analysis of recurrence intervals on the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shunichi; Ogata, Yosihiko; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a stochastic model for characteristically repeating earthquake sequences to estimate the spatiotemporal change in static stress loading rate. These earthquakes recur by a cyclic mechanism where stress at a hypocenter is accumulated by tectonic forces until an earthquake occurs that releases the accumulated stress to a basal level. Renewal processes are frequently used to describe this repeating earthquake mechanism. Variations in the rate of tectonic loading due to large earthquakes and aseismic slip transients, however, introduce nonstationary effects into the repeating mechanism that result in nonstationary trends in interevent times, particularly for smaller-magnitude repeating events which have shorter interevent times. These trends are also similar among repeating earthquake sites having similar hypocenters. Therefore, we incorporate space-time structure represented by cubic B-spline functions into the renewal model and estimate their coefficient parameters by maximizing the integrated likelihood in a Bayesian framework. We apply our model to 31 repeating earthquake sequences including 824 events on the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault and estimate the spatiotemporal transition of the loading rate on this segment. The result gives us details of the change in tectonic loading caused by an aseismic slip transient in 1993, the 2004 Parkfield M6 earthquake, and other nearby or remote seismic activities. The degree of periodicity of repeating event recurrence intervals also shows spatial trends that are preserved in time even after the 2004 Parkfield earthquake when time scales are normalized with respect to the estimated loading rate.

  5. Substrates and time intervals of renewal of wastewater in production and post-harvest of the ornamental sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Amilton Santos Júnior

    Full Text Available Flower production in semi-hydroponic systems is a profitable alternative for generating income in communities of small farmers in the semiarid region of Brazil. This is because such a system of cultivation relates aspects of the climate, water and soil of the region, favoring the production of crops. In this work, the use of wastewater as a source of water and nutrients was studied, renewed at four time intervals (daily and every two, three and four days, and of three growth substrates (coconut fiber, sand and sugarcane bagasse, in the production and post-harvest period of sunflowers. These treatments were distributed in a completely randomised design and analysed in a 4 x 3 factorial with three replications, giving a total of 36 experimental units. It was found that plants under the wastewater renewal of every four days demonstrated characteristics compatible with commercial standards for sunflowers, if grown in sand or coconut fiber.

  6. Modular 125 ps resolution time interval digitizer for 10 MHz stop burst rates and 33 ms range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turko, B.

    1978-01-01

    A high resolution multiple stop time interval digitizer is described. It is capable of resolving stop burst rates of up to 10 MHz with an incremental resolution of 125 ps within a range of 33 ms. The digitizer consists of five CAMAC modules and uses a standard CAMAC crate and controller. All the functions and ranges are completely computer controlled. Any two subsequent stop pulses in a burst can be resolved within 100 ns due to a new dual interpolation technique employed. The accuracy is maintained by a high stability 125 MHz reference clock. Up to 131 stop events can be stored in a 48-bit, 10 MHz derandomizing storage register before the digitizer overflows. The experimental data are also given.

  7. Random times and enlargements of filtrations in a Brownian setting

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuy, Roger

    2006-01-01

    In November 2004, M. Yor and R. Mansuy jointly gave six lectures at Columbia University, New York. These notes follow the contents of that course, covering expansion of filtration formulae; BDG inequalities up to any random time; martingales that vanish on the zero set of Brownian motion; the Azéma-Emery martingales and chaos representation; the filtration of truncated Brownian motion; attempts to characterize the Brownian filtration. The book accordingly sets out to acquaint its readers with the theory and main examples of enlargements of filtrations, of either the initial or the progressive kind. It is accessible to researchers and graduate students working in stochastic calculus and excursion theory, and more broadly to mathematicians acquainted with the basics of Brownian motion.

  8. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program - Time intervals between treatments of patients with low back pain: how close and who decides?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of chiropractic patients with acute and chronic/persistent conditions probably differs. However, little is known on this subject. There is, for example, a dearth of information on maintenance care (MC. Thus it is not known if patients on MC are coerced to partake in a program of frequent treatments over a long period of time, or if they are actively involved in designing their own individualized treatment program. Objectives It was the purpose of this study to investigate how chiropractic patients with low back pain were scheduled for treatment, with special emphasis on MC. The specific research questions were: 1. How many patients are on maintenance care? 2 Are there specific patterns of intervals between treatments for patients and, if so, do they differ between MC patients and non-MC patients? 3. Who decides on the next treatment, the patient, the chiropractor or both, and are there any differences between MC patients and non-MC patients? Methods Chiropractic students, who during their summer holidays were observers in chiropractic clinics in Norway and Denmark, recorded whether patients were classified by the treating chiropractor as a MC-patient or not, dates for last and subsequent visits, and made a judgement on whether the patient or the chiropractor decided on the next appointment. Results Observers in the study were 16 out of 30 available students. They collected data on 868 patients from 15 Danish and 13 Norwegian chiropractors. Twenty-two percent and 26%, respectively, were classified as MC patients. Non-MC patients were most frequently seen within 1 week. For MC patients, the previous visit was most often 2-4 weeks prior to the actual visit, and the next appointment between 1 and 3 months. This indicates a gradual increase in intervals. The decision of the next visit was mainly made by the chiropractor, also for MC patients. However, the study samples of chiropractors appear not to be

  9. Stochastic calculus for uncoupled continuous-time random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Guido; Politi, Mauro; Scalas, Enrico; Schilling, René L

    2009-06-01

    The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) is a pure-jump stochastic process with several applications not only in physics but also in insurance, finance, and economics. A definition is given for a class of stochastic integrals driven by a CTRW, which includes the Itō and Stratonovich cases. An uncoupled CTRW with zero-mean jumps is a martingale. It is proved that, as a consequence of the martingale transform theorem, if the CTRW is a martingale, the Itō integral is a martingale too. It is shown how the definition of the stochastic integrals can be used to easily compute them by Monte Carlo simulation. The relations between a CTRW, its quadratic variation, its Stratonovich integral, and its Itō integral are highlighted by numerical calculations when the jumps in space of the CTRW have a symmetric Lévy alpha -stable distribution and its waiting times have a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution. Remarkably, these distributions have fat tails and an unbounded quadratic variation. In the diffusive limit of vanishing scale parameters, the probability density of this kind of CTRW satisfies the space-time fractional diffusion equation (FDE) or more in general the fractional Fokker-Planck equation, which generalizes the standard diffusion equation, solved by the probability density of the Wiener process, and thus provides a phenomenologic model of anomalous diffusion. We also provide an analytic expression for the quadratic variation of the stochastic process described by the FDE and check it by Monte Carlo.

  10. Continuous time random walk with generic waiting time and external force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau; Wang, K G

    2010-05-01

    We derive an integrodifferential diffusion equation for decoupled continuous time random walk that is valid for a generic waiting time probability density function and external force. Using this equation we also study diffusion behaviors for a couple of specific waiting time probability density functions such as exponential, a combination of power law and generalized Mittag-Leffler function and a sum of exponentials under the influence of a harmonic trap. We show that first two waiting time probability density functions can reproduce the results of the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations for all the time regions from small to large times. But the third one shows a much more complicated pattern. Furthermore, from the integrodifferential diffusion equation we show that the second Einstein relation can hold for any waiting time probability density function.

  11. Effect of Different Obturation Materials on Residual Antimicrobial Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine in Dentin at Different Time Intervals: An Ex Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Bolhari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE on residual antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (CHX in human root dentin and suggest the best filling material when CHX is used as final irrigant.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty-four single-rooted human teeth were selected for this study. Canals were instrumented to the apical size #35. Smear layer was removed using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA and then 108 teeth were irrigated with 2% CHX and randomly divided into three groups of gutta percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. Each group was divided into three subgroups for different time intervals (one, three and six weeks. Thirty-six teeth, as negative controls, were irrigated with saline and obturated with gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE. Dentin powder was prepared at the afore-mentioned intervals. After exposure to Enterococcus faecalis for 24 hours, colony forming units (CFUs were counted and residual antimicrobial activity was calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: The antimicrobial activity of CHX gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner but it maintained over 95% of its antimicrobial activity after six weeks. Moreover, Resilon/RealSeal SE significantly decreased the antimicrobial activity of CHX in comparison with gutta-percha/AH26 (P<0.05.Conclusion: After a final irrigation with CHX, gutta-percha/AH26 is a better choice for root canal obturation.Key words: Chlorhexidine; Gutta-Percha; Epoxy resin AH-26; Resilon sealer. 

  12. Effect of Different Obturation Materials on Residual Antimicrobial Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine in Dentin at Different Time Intervals: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhari, Behnam; Dehghan, Somayyeh; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Bahador, Abbas; Pirmoazen, Salma

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE on residual antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (CHX) in human root dentin and suggest the best filling material when CHX is used as final irrigant. One-hundred and forty-four single-rooted human teeth were selected for this study. Canals were instrumented to the apical size #35. Smear layer was removed using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA and then 108 teeth were irrigated with 2% CHX and randomly divided into three groups of gutta percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. Each group was divided into three subgroups for different time intervals (one, three and six weeks). Thirty-six teeth, as negative controls, were irrigated with saline and obturated with gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE. Dentin powder was prepared at the afore-mentioned intervals. After exposure to Enterococcus faecalis for 24 hours, colony forming units (CFUs) were counted and residual antimicrobial activity was calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level was set at P<0.05. The antimicrobial activity of CHX gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner but it maintained over 95% of its antimicrobial activity after six weeks. Moreover, Resilon/RealSeal SE significantly decreased the antimicrobial activity of CHX in comparison with gutta-percha/AH26 (P<0.05). After a final irrigation with CHX, gutta-percha/AH26 is a better choice for root canal obturation.

  13. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Vance

    1994-01-01

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

  14. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  15. Multimodal Therapy Involving High-Intensity Interval Training Improves the Physical Fitness, Motor Skills, Social Behavior, and Quality of Life of Boys With ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meßler, Carolin Friederike; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2016-03-24

    To compare the effects of multimodal therapy including supervised high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with those of standard multimodal therapy (TRAD) concerning key variables of physical fitness (peak power and oxygen uptake), motor skills, social behavior, and quality of life in boys with ADHD. A single-center, two-arm randomized, controlled design was used, with 28 boys (8-13 years of age, IQ = 83-136) being randomly assigned to multimodal HIIT (three sessions/week, 4 × 4-min intervals at 95% of peak heart rate) or TRAD. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children II evaluated motor skills and the German version of the hyperkinetic disorder questionnaire for external evaluation by the guardians (FBB-HKS) or German version of the hyperkinetic disorder questionnaire for self-assessment by the children (SBB-HKS) and the KINDL-R questionnaires mental health and health-related quality of life. Both interventions enhanced peak power, and HIIT also reduced submaximal oxygen uptake. HIIT was more effective than TRAD in improving the total score for motor skills (including manual dexterity and ball skills;pskills, certain aspects of quality of life, competence, and attention in boys with ADHD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. A Randomized Trial of Time-Limited Antiretroviral Therapy in Acute/Early HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B Margolick

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART very soon after establishment of HIV infection may be beneficial by improving host control of HIV replication and delaying disease progression.People with documented HIV infection of less than 12 months' duration in Baltimore MD and seven Canadian sites were randomized to either a observation and deferred ART, or b immediate treatment with ART for 12 months. All subjects not receiving ART were followed quarterly and permanent ART was initiated according to contemporaneous treatment guidelines. The endpoint of the trial was total ART-free time from study entry until initiation of permanent ART.One hundred thirteen people were randomized, 56 to the observation arm and 57 to the immediate treatment arm. Twenty-three had acute (<2 months infection and 90 early (2-12 months infection. Of those randomized to the immediate treatment arm, 37 completed 12 months of ART according to protocol, 9 declined to stop ART after 12 months, and 11 were nonadherent to the protocol or lost to follow-up. Comparing those in the observation arm to either those who completed 12 months of ART or all 56 who were randomized to immediate ART, there was no significant difference between the arms in treatment-free interval after study entry, which was about 18 months in both arms.This study did not find a benefit from administration of a brief, time-limited (12-month course of ART in acute or early HIV infection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00106171.

  17. Effect of the time interval between fusion and activation on epigenetic reprogramming and development of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Wang, Lijun; Li, Ruizhe; Li, Qian; Wu, Yongyan; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the time interval between fusion and activation (FA interval) play an important role in nuclear remodeling and in vitro development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. However, the effects of FA interval on the epigenetic reprogramming and in vivo developmental competence of SCNT embryos remain unknown. In the present study, the effects of different FA intervals (0 h, 2 h, and 4 h) on the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were assessed. The results demonstrated that H3 lysine 9 (H3K9ac) levels decreased rapidly after fusion in all three groups. H3K9ac was practically undetectable 2 h after fusion in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups. However, H3K9ac was still evidently detectable in the 0-h FA interval group. The H3K9ac levels increased 10 h after fusion in all three groups, but were higher in the 2-h and 4-h FA interval groups than that in the 0-h FA interval group. The methylation levels of the satellite I region in day-7 blastocysts derived from the 2-h or 4-h FA interval groups was similar to that of in vitro fertilization blastocysts and is significantly lower than that of the 0-h FA interval group. SCNT embryos derived from 2-h FA interval group showed higher developmental competence than those from the 0-h and 4-h FA interval groups in terms of cleavage rate, blastocyst formation rate, apoptosis index, and pregnancy and calving rates. Hence, the FA interval is an important factor influencing the epigenetic reprogramming and developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos.

  18. A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourad, Waleed F., E-mail: Waleed246@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Packianathan, Satyaseelan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Shourbaji, Rania A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS (United States); Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Khan, Majid A. [Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Baird, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Russell, George [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

  19. Impact of Image-Derived Input Function and Fit Time Intervals on Patlak Quantification of Myocardial Glucose Uptake in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Bankstahl, Jens P; Bengel, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Limited blood volume in mice precludes repeated sampling, rendering a reliable image-derived input function (IDIF) desirable for quantification of glucose uptake. We aimed to compare different IDIF volumes and to evaluate the effects of changing fit time interval on Patlak uptake kinetics in hearts of healthy mice. C57BL/6 mice (n=27) were studied under a range of metabolic conditions: no intervention (ctl), overnight fasting, insulin and glucose (6 mU/g, 1 mg/g) under isoflurane, and under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia to suppress glucose uptake. Dynamic PET imaging with 18F-FDG (7.7±0.9 MBq) was conducted. Images were analyzed using left ventricle cavity, left atrial cavity, or inferior vena cava as the IDIF. Patlak analysis was conducted using variable fit time intervals: automated fit, fit from 10 to 60 min (late), fit from 2 to 30 min (early), or fit from 2 to 10 min (very early). Both the ventricle and the atrial cavities displayed spill-in from the myocardium in late frames as compared with the vena cava (percentage injected dose per gram, ctl: 21.4±6.1 vs. 10.0±3.9 vs. 2.5±0.3, P<0.001). Higher and more rapid passage of peak activity was observed in the vena cava, but the area under the curve over 2 min was similar. The Patlak slope was significantly higher for the vena cava than atrial IDIF (mL/g/min, ctl: 0.11±0.02 vs. 0.07±0.01; fasting: 0.09±0.03 vs. 0.06±0.02; insulin: 0.52±0.09 vs. 0.23±0.12; ketamine-xylazine: 0.001±0.001 vs. 0.002±0.002; P<0.01). The rate of glucose uptake was similarly elevated depending on the IDIF (P<0.01). The various IDIF Patlak values were significantly correlated (r=0.867, P<0.001). Automated fit performed reliably in untreated, fasted, and ketamine-xylazine-treated mice, with no statistical difference compared with late, early, or very early fits. The Patlak composite rate constant (Ki) was markedly underestimated with automated and late fit after acute insulin treatment, reflecting the rapid early 18F-FDG uptake

  20. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. I - Modeling random processes in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Several random process models in the time domain are defined and discussed. Attention is given to the moving average model, the autoregressive model, and relationships between and combinations of these models. Consideration is then given to methods for investigating pulse structure, procedures of model construction, computational methods, and numerical experiments. A FORTRAN algorithm of time series analysis has been developed which is relatively stable numerically. Results of test cases are given to study the effect of adding noise and of different distributions for the pulse amplitudes. A preliminary analysis of the light curve of the quasar 3C 272 is considered as an example.

  1. Real-time random safety audits: A transforming tool adapted to new times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, M; Oliva, I; Martín, M C; Sirgo, G

    Real-time random safety audits constitute a tool designed to transfer knowledge from the sources of scientific evidence to the patient bedside. It has proven useful in critically ill patients, improving safety in the process of critical patient care, turning unsafe situations into safe ones in daily practice, and ensuring adherence to scientific evidence. In parallel, the design and methodology involved affords process indicators that will make it possible to know how we provide care for our patients, evolution over time (with regular feedback for professionals), the impact of our interventions, and benchmarking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Data tables of well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient...

  3. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Garg, Sandeep; Bansal, Sanjay; Dang, Rajat Harvinder

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners.

  4. Intervención para reducir riesgo en conductas sexuales de adolescentes: un ensayo aleatorizado y controlado Intervention to reduce adolescents’ sexual risk behaviors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther C Gallegos

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la eficacia de una intervención conductual-educativa diseñada para disminuir las conductas sexuales de riesgo de VIH/SIDA y embarazos no planeados de adolescentes mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Ensayo controlado aleatorizado con cuatro seguimientos en un año; 832 adolescentes reclutados de escuelas preparatorias, entre 14 y 17 años, se asignaron aleatoriamente al grupo experimental o al control. La intervención, de seis hrs. de duración, aplicó estrategias de aprendizaje activo. El estudio se realizó en Monterrey, México, de 2002 a 2005. RESULTADOS: De acuerdo al análisis GEE, no hubo diferencia en las intenciones de tener relaciones sexuales, pero sí mayor nivel de intenciones de usar condón y anticonceptivos (diferencia de medias 0.15 y 0.16, IC 95% en el grupo experimental comparado con el control. Variables teoréticas como creencias sobre control fueron mediadoras de la intervención. CONCLUSIONES: La intervención conductual representa un importante esfuerzo en la promoción de conductas sexuales seguras en adolescentes mexicanos.OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of a behavioral intervention designed to decrease risk sexual behaviors for HIV/AIDS and unplanned pregnancies in Mexican adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial with four follow ups; 832 adolescents recruited from high schools, age 14-17, were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. The six hour intervention used active learning strategies, and was delivered in two sessions on two consecutive Saturdays. The study was carried out in Monterrey, Mexico, 2002-2005. RESULTS: GEE analysis indicated no differences in sexual relationships’ intentions between the two conditions, however, the experimental group had higher intentions to use condoms and contraceptives (mean differences 0.15 and 0.16, CI 95% in the next three months, as compared with the control group. Theoretical variables, such as control beliefs, were

  5. Estimating mean first passage time of biased random walks with short relaxation time on complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Qi Lee

    Full Text Available Biased random walk has been studied extensively over the past decade especially in the transport and communication networks communities. The mean first passage time (MFPT of a biased random walk is an important performance indicator in those domains. While the fundamental matrix approach gives precise solution to MFPT, the computation is expensive and the solution lacks interpretability. Other approaches based on the Mean Field Theory relate MFPT to the node degree alone. However, nodes with the same degree may have very different local weight distribution, which may result in vastly different MFPT. We derive an approximate bound to the MFPT of biased random walk with short relaxation time on complex network where the biases are controlled by arbitrarily assigned node weights. We show that the MFPT of a node in this general case is closely related to not only its node degree, but also its local weight distribution. The MFPTs obtained from computer simulations also agree with the new theoretical analysis. Our result enables fast estimation of MFPT, which is useful especially to differentiate between nodes that have very different local node weight distribution even though they share the same node degrees.

  6. Identification of areas and time intervals for inservice inspections; Auswahl der Pruefbereiche und -intervalle fuer wiederkehrende Pruefungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzner, K.J. [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Herter, K.H. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Schoeckle, F. [Amtec Messtechnischer Service, Lauffen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Inservice inspections are an important, redundant part of the overall concept for ensuring component integrity during NPP operation. Their efficiency however has to be considered in the context of measures creating required component quality (design and manufacture), and inspection and monitoring measures maintaining the quality of components. If an available system for inservice monitoring yields comprehensive information about real inservice loads (monitoring of the causes of degradation), inservice inspections can be designed to purposefully check the possibly resulting damaging modes and defects. If there is no or only low-level monitoring, the possible consequences of possibly damaging mechanisms that may be unknown should be checked by expanded inservice inspections plus, if necessary, unspecific, random inspections. For selection of inspection areas and determination of inspection intervals, use of design-based analyses which take into account conservative, specified loads and load frequencies (for operating modes and incidents) is not recommendable. The recommended approach is to take as a basis information on measured, real inservice loads together with information about the real quality status of components, derived from manufacturing data and service histories. The available information has to be scanned and processed so as to give a basis for new appraisal of hitherto applied NDE methods. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wiederkehrende Pruefungen sind ein wichtiger redundanter Teil der Gesamtmassnahmen zur Gewaehrleistung der Komponentenintegritaet waehrend des Betriebes von Kernkraftwerken. Ihre Wirksamkeit muss jedoch in enger Verbindung mit den die Komponentenqualitaet erzeugenden Massnahmen (Auslegung und Herstellung) und den die Komponentenqualitaet erhaltenden Ueberwachungmassnahmen waehrend des Betriebes gesehen werden. Wenn die vorhandene Betriebsueberwachung eine umfassende Kenntnis der bisherigen Betriebsbelastungen ermoeglicht (Ueberwachung der Ursachen

  7. Decision-to-Delivery Time Intervals in Emergency Caesarean Section Cases; Repeated cross-sectional study from Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaukab Tashfeen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In cases of fetal intolerance to labour, meeting the standard decision-to-delivery time interval (DDI of ≤30 minutes is challenging. This study aimed to assess DDIs in emergency Caesarean section (CS cases to identify factors causing DDI delays and the impact of a delayed DDI on perinatal outcomes. Methods: This repeated cross-sectional study included all emergency CS procedures performed due to acute fetal distress, antepartum haemorrhage or umbilical cord prolapse at the Nizwa Hospital, Nizwa, Oman. Three audit cycles of three months each were conducted between April 2011 and June 2013, including an initial retrospective cycle and two prospective cycles following the implementation of improvement strategies to address factors causing DDI delays. Poor perinatal outcomes were defined as Apgar scores of 60 minutes was significantly associated with poor neonatal outcomes in terms of increased SCBU admissions and low Apgar scores (P <0.001 each. Factors causing DDI delays included obtaining consent for the CS procedure, a lack of operating theatre availability and moving patients to the operating theatre. Conclusion: The identification of factors causing DDI delays may provide opportunities to improve perinatal outcomes.

  8. Decision-to-Delivery Time Intervals in Emergency Caesarean Section Cases: Repeated cross-sectional study from Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashfeen, Kaukab; Patel, Malini; Hamdi, Ilham M; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim H A; Al-Yarubi, Mansour N

    2017-02-01

    In cases of fetal intolerance to labour, meeting the standard decision-to-delivery time interval (DDI) of ≤30 minutes is challenging. This study aimed to assess DDIs in emergency Caesarean section (CS) cases to identify factors causing DDI delays and the impact of a delayed DDI on perinatal outcomes. This repeated cross-sectional study included all emergency CS procedures performed due to acute fetal distress, antepartum haemorrhage or umbilical cord prolapse at the Nizwa Hospital, Nizwa, Oman. Three audit cycles of three months each were conducted between April 2011 and June 2013, including an initial retrospective cycle and two prospective cycles following the implementation of improvement strategies to address factors causing DDI delays. Poor perinatal outcomes were defined as Apgar scores of 60 minutes was significantly associated with poor neonatal outcomes in terms of increased SCBU admissions and low Apgar scores (P <0.001 each). Factors causing DDI delays included obtaining consent for the CS procedure, a lack of operating theatre availability and moving patients to the operating theatre. The identification of factors causing DDI delays may provide opportunities to improve perinatal outcomes.

  9. Use of time interval histographic output from echo-Doppler to detect left-to-right atrial shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, S J; Areias, J C; Spitaels, S E; de Villeneuve, V H

    1978-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to attempt to select, by examination of the time interval histogram (TIH) output of a range gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD), all children with left-to-right shunt at the atrial level from a pool of 57 children. Fifty-four of the children had various forms of acyanostic cardiac disease. A secondary purpose was to identify any associated lesions in those children with atrial defects. Examiners were unfamiliar with the children and their diagnoses. Results were interpreted independently by two examiners. Detection of diastolic TIH dispersion was used when studying the right atrial outflow tract to separate children with atrial left-to-right shunts from control children. All controls were judged negative by this technique, and 13 of 14 children with atrial shunts were detected by both examiners; the 14th was detected by one examiner. Of a total of 308 TIH decisions on the atrial shunt group, 298 were made identically by both examiners for a 97.7% agreement, demonstrating the objectivity of the method. This study demonstrated the usefulness of the TIH evaluation, indicating that continued investigation and equipment improvements are warranted.

  10. Effects of a 6-Week Upper Extremity Low-Volume, High Intensity Interval Training on Oxygen Uptake, Peak Power Output and Total Exercise Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nicole; Salassi, James W; Donlin, Ayla; Schroeder, Jan; Rozenek, Ralph

    2017-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of upper extremity (UE) high intensity interval training (HIIT) to UE continuous training (CT) when training at a similar intensity. 20 participants (mean age = 23 ± 3 yrs) were randomly assigned to either a HIIT (n = 10) or CT (n = 10) group. Participants completed a graded exercise test utilizing arm cranking prior to and following 6 wks (2 sessions · wk-1) of UE training. During sessions, HIIT performed 10 repetitions of 60 s of work at 92.3 ± 1.0% of the arm HRpeak (%aHRpeak) and 60 s of passive recovery (%aHRpeak = 73.0 ± 4.0%) yielding an average training intensity of 82.6 ± 1.5 %aHRpeak. CT exercised for 20 min. at an average intensity of 81.9 ± 2.2 %aHRpeak. Following training HIIT showed greater improvement in V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak compared to CT (Δ = 4.1 ml · min-¹ · kg-¹, 95%CI: 1.3 - 6.9 ml · min-¹ · kg-¹, p = .007). Total exercise time during the post-test GXT was also improved as a result of HIIT (Δ = 1.4 min, 95%CI: 0.4 - 2.3 min, p = .008). Both groups improved peak power output, but no difference was observed between them (Δ = 3.3 W, 95%CI: -3.3 - 9.9 W, p = .305). For a similar time investment, HIIT appeared to improve cardiopulmonary capacity and exercise time to a greater extent than CT and may be a time-efficient alternative for those who incorporate UE aerobic activity into a training program.

  11. Random matrix theory for heavy-tailed time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiny, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a review of recent results for large random matrices with heavy-tailed entries. First, we outline the development of and some classical results in random matrix theory. We focus on large sample covariance matrices, their limiting spectral distributions, the asymptotic behavior...... of their largest and smallest eigenvalues and their eigenvectors. The limits significantly depend on the finite or infiniteness of the fourth moment of the entries of the random matrix. We compare the results for these two regimes which give rise to completely different asymptotic theories. Finally, the limits...

  12. Effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training on cardiovascular disease risk in testicular cancer survivors: A phase 2 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott C; DeLorey, Darren S; Davenport, Margie H; Stickland, Michael K; Fairey, Adrian S; North, Scott; Szczotka, Alexander; Courneya, Kerry S

    2017-10-15

    Testicular cancer survivors (TCS) have an increased risk of treatment-related cardiovascular disease (CVD), which may limit their overall survival. We evaluated the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training (HIIT) on traditional and novel CVD risk factors and surrogate markers of mortality in a population-based sample of TCS. This phase 2 trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02459132) randomly assigned 63 TCS to usual care (UC) or 12 weeks of supervised HIIT (ie, alternating periods of vigorous-intensity and light-intensity aerobic exercise). The primary outcome was peak aerobic fitness (VO2peak ) assessed via a treadmill-based maximal cardiorespiratory exercise test. Secondary endpoints included CVD risk (eg, Framingham Risk Score), arterial health, parasympathetic nervous system function, and blood-based biomarkers. Postintervention VO2peak data were obtained for 61 participants (97%). HIIT participants attended 99% of the exercise sessions and achieved 98% of the target exercise intensity. Analysis of covariance demonstrated that HIIT was superior to UC for improving VO2peak (adjusted between-group mean difference, 3.7 mL O2 /kg/min; 95% confidence interval, 2.4-5.1 [P<.001]) and multiple secondary outcomes including CVD risk (P = .011), arterial thickness (P<.001), arterial stiffness (P<.001), postexercise parasympathetic reactivation (P = .001), inflammation (P = .045), and low-density lipoprotein (P = .014). Overall, HIIT reduced the prevalence of modifiable CVD risk factors by 20% compared with UC. This randomized trial provides the first evidence that HIIT improves cardiorespiratory fitness, multiple pathways of CVD risk, and surrogate markers of mortality in TCS. These findings have important implications for the management of TCS. Further research concerning the long-term effects of HIIT on CVD morbidity and mortality in TCS is warranted. Cancer 2017;123:4057-65. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer

  13. Record statistics of financial time series and geometric random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Behlool; Santhanam, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    The study of record statistics of correlated series in physics, such as random walks, is gaining momentum, and several analytical results have been obtained in the past few years. In this work, we study the record statistics of correlated empirical data for which random walk models have relevance. We obtain results for the records statistics of select stock market data and the geometric random walk, primarily through simulations. We show that the distribution of the age of records is a power law with the exponent α lying in the range 1.5≤α≤1.8. Further, the longest record ages follow the Fréchet distribution of extreme value theory. The records statistics of geometric random walk series is in good agreement with that obtained from empirical stock data.

  14. Signal processing in a randomly time varying system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomian, G.

    1972-01-01

    Stochastic operators are applied to an analysis of some deterministic systems of signal transformation. The distribution of a random process at the output of a system is given through its distribution at the input and through a stochastic Green's function. A two-point correlation function is derived to obtain a solution to differential equations which contain coefficients, boundary conditions, or right-hand terms representing random processes.

  15. Uncoupled continuous-time random walk model: analytical and numerical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-05-01

    Solutions for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model are known in few cases. In this work, the uncoupled CTRW model is investigated analytically and numerically. In particular, the probability density function (PDF) and n-moment are obtained and analyzed. Exponential and Gaussian functions are used for the jump length PDF, whereas the Mittag-Leffler function and a combination of exponential and power-laws function is used for the waiting time PDF. The exponential and Gaussian jump length PDFs have finite jump length variances and they give the same second moment; however, their distribution functions present different behaviors near the origin. The combination of exponential and power-law function for the waiting time PDF can generate a crossover from anomalous regime to normal regime. Moreover, the parameter of the exponential jump length PDF does not change the behavior of the n-moment for all time intervals, and for the Gaussian jump length PDF the n-moment also indicates a similar behavior.

  16. Uncoupled continuous-time random walk model: Analytical and numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-05-01

    Solutions for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model are known in few cases. In this work, the uncoupled CTRW model is investigated analytically and numerically. In particular, the probability density function (PDF) and n-moment are obtained and analyzed. Exponential and Gaussian functions are used for the jump length PDF, whereas the Mittag-Leffler function and a combination of exponential and power-laws function is used for the waiting time PDF. The exponential and Gaussian jump length PDFs have finite jump length variances and they give the same second moment; however, their distribution functions present different behaviors near the origin. The combination of exponential and power-law function for the waiting time PDF can generate a crossover from anomalous regime to normal regime. Moreover, the parameter of the exponential jump length PDF does not change the behavior of the n-moment for all time intervals, and for the Gaussian jump length PDF the n-moment also indicates a similar behavior.

  17. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  18. Adding high-intensity interval training to conventional training modalities: optimizing health-related outcomes during chemotherapy for breast cancer: the OptiTrain randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijwel, Sara; Backman, Malin; Bolam, Kate A; Jervaeus, Anna; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Margolin, Sara; Browall, Maria; Rundqvist, Helene; Wengström, Yvonne

    2018-02-01

    Exercise training is an effective and safe way to counteract cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL). High-intensity interval training has proven beneficial for the health of clinical populations. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of resistance and high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT), and moderate-intensity aerobic and high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) to usual care (UC) in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was CRF and the secondary endpoints were HRQoL and cancer treatment-related symptoms. Two hundred and forty women planned to undergo chemotherapy were randomized to supervised RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC. Measurements were performed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Questionnaires included Piper Fatigue Scale, EORTC-QLQ-C30, and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. The RT-HIIT group was superior to UC for CRF: total CRF (p = 0.02), behavior/daily life (p = 0.01), and sensory/physical (p = 0.03) CRF. Role functioning significantly improved while cognitive functioning was unchanged for RT-HIIT compared to declines shown in the UC group (p = 0.04). AT-HIIT significantly improved emotional functioning versus UC (p = 0.01) and was superior to UC for pain symptoms (p = 0.03). RT-HIIT reported a reduced symptom burden, while AT-HIIT remained stable compared to deteriorations shown by UC (p HIIT was superior to UC for total symptoms (p HIIT was effective in preventing increases in CRF and in reducing symptom burden for patients during chemotherapy for breast cancer. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting the inclusion of structured exercise prescriptions, including HIIT, as a vital component of cancer rehabilitation. Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02522260.

  19. Transfer patterns of integron-associated and antibiotic resistance genes in S. flexneri during different time intervals in Tianjin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shigella is one of the common genera of pathogens responsible for bacterial diarrhoea in humans. According to World Health Organisation (WHO, 800,000-1,700,000 patients in China were infected with Shigella spp. in 2000, and Shigella flexneri is the most common serotype (86%. Objectives: We investigated the transfer patterns of integron-associated and antibiotic resistance genes in S. flexneri during different time intervals in the city of Tianjin in the People′s Republic of China. Materials and Methods: The integrase-encoding and variable regions of the integrons of the bacterial strains were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, followed by gene sequencing. Fifty-six S. flexneri strains, 32 of which were stored in our laboratory and the other 24 were isolated from tertiary hospitals in Tianjin during different time intervals, were tested for their sensitivity to 12 antibiotics by using the Kirby-Bauer antibiotic testing method (K-B method. Results and Conclusion: Of the 32 strains of S. flexneri isolated from 1981 to 1983 and stored in our laboratory, class 1 integron was detected in 28 strains (87.50%, while 27 strains (84.37% harboured an aminoglycoside resistance gene, aadA, in the variable region of their integrons. Class 1 integron was identified in 22 (91.67% of the 24 S. flexneri strains isolated from 2009 to 2010, whereas the variable region and 3′-end amplification were not present in any of the strains. Class 2 integron was not found in the 1981-1983 group (group A of strains; although 19 (79.17% of the 24 strains in the 2009-2010 group (group B possessed class 2 integron, and the variable region of the integron harboured dfrA1 + sat1 + aadA1 genes, which, respectively, mediate antibiotic resistance to trimethoprim, streptothricin and streptomycin. Seventeen strains of the total 56 possessed both class 1 and 2 integrons. Strains belonging to group A were highly resistant to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and a

  20. One session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) every 5 days, improves muscle power but not static balance in lifelong sedentary ageing men: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculthorpe, Nicholas F; Herbert, Peter; Grace, Fergal

    2017-02-01

    Declining muscle power during advancing age predicts falls and loss of independence. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may improve muscle power, but remains largely unstudied in ageing participants. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigated the efficacy of a low-frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) intervention on peak muscle power (peak power output [PPO]), body composition, and balance in lifelong sedentary but otherwise healthy males. Thirty-three lifelong sedentary ageing men were randomly assigned to either intervention (INT; n = 22, age 62.3 ± 4.1 years) or control (n = 11, age 61.6 ± 5.0 years) who were both assessed at 3 distinct measurement points (phase A), after 6 weeks of conditioning exercise (phase B), and after 6 weeks of HIIT once every 5 days in INT (phase C), where control remained inactive throughout the study. Static balance remained unaffected, and both absolute and relative PPO were not different between groups at phases A or B, but increased significantly in INT after LfHIIT (P < 0.01). Lean body mass displayed a significant interaction (P < 0.01) due to an increase in INT between phases B and C (P < 0.05). 6 weeks of LfHIIT exercise feasible and effective method to induce clinically relevant improvements in absolute and relative PPO, but does not improve static balance in sedentary ageing men.

  1. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  2. Exact two-time correlation and response functions in the one-dimensional coagulation-diffusion process by the empty-interval-particle method

    OpenAIRE

    Durang, Xavier; Fortin, Jean-Yves; Henkel, Malte

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional coagulation-diffusion process describes the strongly fluctuating dynamics of particles, freely hopping between the nearest-neighbour sites of a chain such that one of them disappears with probability 1 if two particles meet. The exact two-time correlation and response function in the one-dimensional coagulation-diffusion process are derived from the empty-interval-particle method. The main quantity is the conditional probability of finding an empty interval of n consecutiv...

  3. Transition Fronts in Time Heterogeneous and Random Media of Ignition Type

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wenxian; Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    The current paper is devoted to the investigation of wave propagation phenomenon in reaction-diffusion equations with ignition type nonlinearity in time heterogeneous and random media. It is proven that such equations in time heterogeneous media admit transition fronts or generalized traveling wave solutions with time dependent profiles and that such equations in time random media admit generalized traveling wave solutions with random profiles. Important properties of generalized traveling wa...

  4. High-speed quantum-random number generation by continuous measurement of arrival time of photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Hua, Zhang; Liao, Qinghong; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel high speed and multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring arrival time of photons with a common starting point. To obtain the unbiased and post-processing free random bits, the measured photon arrival time is converted into the sum of integral multiple of a fixed period and a phase time. Theoretical and experimental results show that the phase time is an independent and uniform random variable. A random bit extraction method by encoding the phase time is proposed. An experimental setup has been built and the unbiased random bit generation rate could reach 128 Mb/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 8 bits per detected photon. The random numbers passed all tests in the statistical test suite.

  5. Randomized controlled trial: impact of glycerin suppositories on time to full feeds in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadr, Sophie N; Ibhanesebhor, Samuel E; Rennix, Connie; Fisher, Hazel E; Manjunatha, Chikkanayakanahalli M; Young, David; Abara, Rosemary C

    2011-01-01

    Feed intolerance delays achievement of enteral feeding in preterm infants. Parenteral nutrition is associated with cholestasis and increased risk of sepsis. Glycerin suppositories have been used to promote gastrointestinal motility and feed tolerance. To investigate whether daily glycerin suppositories (a) reduce the time to full enteral feeding in infants born at glycerin suppository for 10 days from 24 h of age, 250 mg (24-27(+6) weeks subgroup) or 500 mg (two 250-mg suppositories; 28-31(+6) weeks subgroup); controls - no intervention. The same feeding protocol and departmental guidelines for other aspects of neonatal intensive care were used in all subjects. Analysis was by intention to treat. 54 babies were recruited (31 males), 29 randomized to receive suppositories; 48 achieved full enteral feeds. The median (range) time to full feeds was 1.6 days shorter in intervention group babies than controls, but not statistically significant: 7.4 (4.6-30.9) days versus 9.0 (4.4-13.3) days (p = 0.780; 95% confidence interval: -1.917, 2.166). No significant differences were observed in secondary outcomes. Intervention group babies passed their first stool earlier than controls (median: day 2 vs. day 4; p = 0.016). Regular glycerin suppositories did not reduce the time to full enteral feeds in infants born at <32 weeks' gestation in our setting. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Influence of work-interval intensity and duration on time spent at a high percentage of VO2max during intermittent supramaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Benjamin R; Glaister, Mark

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of work-interval duration (WID) and intensity on the time spent at, or above, 95% VO2max (T95 VO2max) during intermittent bouts of supramaximal exercise. Over a 5-week period, 7 physically active men with a mean (+/-SD) age, height, body mass, and VO2max of 22 +/- 5 years, 181.5 +/- 5.6 cm, 86.4 +/- 11.4 kg, and 51.5 +/- 1.5 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively, attended 7 testing sessions. After completing a submaximal incremental test on a treadmill to identify individual oxygen uptake/running velocity relationships, subjects completed a maximal incremental test to exhaustion to VO2max and subsequently (from the aforementioned relationship) the minimum velocity required to elicit VO2max (vVO2max). In a random order, subjects then carried out 3 intermittent runs to exhaustion at both 105% and 115% vVO2max. Each test used a different WID (20 s, 25 s, or 30 s) interspersed with 20-second passive recovery periods. Results revealed no significant difference in T95 vVO2max for intermittent runs at 105% versus 115% vVO2max (p = 0.142). There was, however, a significant effect (p VO2max, with WIDs of 30 seconds enabling more time relative to WIDs of 20 seconds (p = 0.018) and 25 seconds (p = 0.009). Moreover, there was an interaction between intensity and duration such that the effect of WID was magnified at the lower exercise intensity (p = 0.046). In conclusion, despite a number of limitations, the results of this investigation suggest that exercise intensities of approximately 105% vVO2max combined with WIDs greater than 25 seconds provide the best way of optimizing T95 VO2max when using fixed 20-second stationary rest periods.

  7. The impact of the time interval between two successive deliveries in an obstetric unit in terms of the mode of each delivery and the rate of perinatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Werner; Hawighorst, Thomas; Wenzlaff, Paul; Emons, Günter

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the relationship of the time interval between two deliveries, done by one obstetric team, on the delivery mode of the subsequent birth; to define the length of this interval; and to evaluate this time interval as a risk factor for increased perinatal mortality in a population-based cohort. All singleton deliveries at ≥ 24 weeks' gestation in Lower Saxony, Germany, between 2001 and 2005 (a total of 317,663 deliveries including 402 cases of perinatal mortality) were analyzed. The mode of the previous and the subsequent delivery, the time interval between the two deliveries, the time of birth, the hospital volume, and the existence of an affiliated neonatal ward were investigated. When the first vaginal delivery was <45 min, there was a reduced probability that the subsequent birth would be a cesarean section. In case of a previous cesarean section, the cesarean rate of the following birth was influenced up to 165 min. In a multivariate analysis, vaginal deliveries following an earlier vaginal birth and occurring within <45 min were associated with increased perinatal mortality. Repeated cesarean sections within <165 min were associated with increased perinatal mortality when occurring at night or on weekends. A short time interval between two deliveries in an obstetric unit constitutes an independent risk factor for perinatal mortality.

  8. To study the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression material at various time intervals after mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katna, Vishal; Suresh, S; Vivek, Sharma; Meenakshi, Khandelwal; Ankita, Gaur

    2014-12-01

    Aims and objective of the study was to evaluate the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression materials at various time intervals, after mixing 49 samples (seven groups) were fabricated for flow property of the material. The sample were fabricated as equal length of base and accelerator paste of the test materials was taken on the glass slab and mixed with a rigid stainless steel spatula as per manufacturers recommendation till the homogenous mix was obtained. The mix material was loaded in glass syringe and 0.5 ml material was injected on a cellophane sheet placed on marked glass plate. A cellophane sheet and glass plate 70 and 500 g weight was carefully placed on freshly dispensed zinc oxide eugenol impression paste sequentially. The diameter of the mix was noted after 30 s and 1 min of load application and also after the final set of material. The diameter gives the flow of material. The samples were stored at the room temperature. The data of the flow property was analyzed with analysis of variance, Post hoc test and t test. The flow of the zinc oxide eugenol impression paste after 30 s, 1 min and final set of load application for Group A to Group G was noted. Maximum flow was seen for Group G zinc oxide eugenol impression material followed by Group F, D, E, B, C and A in descending order respectively after 30 s, where as the flow property changed after 1 min in the sequence of maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, B, A, C, and F. Lastly after final set of the impression material the flow maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, C, F, A and B in descending order. Based on statistical analysis of the results and within in the limitations of this in-vitro study, the following conclusions were drawn that; the flow of zinc oxide eugenol impression material after 30 s, 1 min and that after the final set was maximum for P.S.P. (Group G) and the flow for PYREX (Group A) was minimum.

  9. Importance of time interval between repeated measurements of total or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol when estimating individual's baseline concentrations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotterdam, E.P.; Katan, M.B.; Knuiman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    We studied intra-individual variation in total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in healthy volunteers (22 men and 19 women, ages 19 to 62 years) on controlled natural diets. The within- person coefficient of variation (CV) depended on the interval between blood samples, increasing from

  10. Methylphenidate, Interstimulus Interval, and Reaction Time Performance of Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meere, J. J.; Shalev, R. S.; Borger, N.; Wiersema, J.R

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD: DSM-IV-TR) participated in the pilot study. They carried out a Go/No-Go test with a short (2 seconds) and long (6 seconds) interstimulus interval (ISI) when on placebo and a therapeutic dose of methylphenidate (MPH). For the

  11. Time intervals from first symptom to treatment of cancer: a cohort study of 2,212 newly diagnosed cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke P; Vedsted, Peter; Sokolowski, Ineta

    2011-01-01

    Delay in diagnosis of cancer may worsen prognosis. The aim of this study is to explore patient-, general practitioner (GP)- and system-related delay in the interval from first cancer symptom to diagnosis and treatment, and to analyse the extent to which delays differ by cancer type....

  12. RISMA: A Rule-based Interval State Machine Algorithm for Alerts Generation, Performance Analysis and Monitoring Real-Time Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Shaban; El-Desouky, Aly

    2013-04-01

    The monitoring of real-time systems is a challenging and complicated process. So, there is a continuous need to improve the monitoring process through the use of new intelligent techniques and algorithms for detecting exceptions, anomalous behaviours and generating the necessary alerts during the workflow monitoring of such systems. The interval-based or period-based theorems have been discussed, analysed, and used by many researches in Artificial Intelligence (AI), philosophy, and linguistics. As explained by Allen, there are 13 relations between any two intervals. Also, there have also been many studies of interval-based temporal reasoning and logics over the past decades. Interval-based theorems can be used for monitoring real-time interval-based data processing. However, increasing the number of processed intervals makes the implementation of such theorems a complex and time consuming process as the relationships between such intervals are increasing exponentially. To overcome the previous problem, this paper presents a Rule-based Interval State Machine Algorithm (RISMA) for processing, monitoring, and analysing the behaviour of interval-based data, received from real-time sensors. The proposed intelligent algorithm uses the Interval State Machine (ISM) approach to model any number of interval-based data into well-defined states as well as inferring them. An interval-based state transition model and methodology are presented to identify the relationships between the different states of the proposed algorithm. By using such model, the unlimited number of relationships between similar large numbers of intervals can be reduced to only 18 direct relationships using the proposed well-defined states. For testing the proposed algorithm, necessary inference rules and code have been designed and applied to the continuous data received in near real-time from the stations of International Monitoring System (IMS) by the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Preparatory

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Appropriate Time to Initiate Peritoneal Dialysis after Insertion of Catheter (Timely PD Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan; John, George T; Yeoh, Edward; Williams, Nicola; O'Loughlin, Barry; Han, Thin; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Ramanathan, Kavitha; Healy, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The optimal time for the commencement of peritoneal dialysis (PD) after PD catheter insertion is unclear. If dialysis is started too soon after insertion, dialysate leaks and infection could occur. However, by starting PD earlier, morbidity and costs can be reduced through lesser hemodialysis requirements. This is the first randomized controlled trial to determine the safest and shortest interval to commence PD after catheter insertion. All consecutive patients undergoing PD catheter insertion at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital and Rockhampton Hospital from 1 March 2008 to 31 May 2013 who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were invited to participate in the trial. Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 (G1) commenced PD at 1 week, group 2 (G2) at 2 weeks and group 3 (G3) at 4 weeks after PD catheter insertion. These groups were stratified by hospital and the presence of diabetes. Primary outcomes were the incidence of peritoneal fluid leaks or PD-related infection during the 4 weeks after commencement of PD. In total 122 participants were recruited, 39, 42, and 41 randomized to G1, G2, and G3, respectively. The primary outcome catheter leak was significantly higher in G1 (28.2%) compared with G3 (2.4%, p = 0.001) but not compared with G2 (9.5%, p = 0.044), based on intention to treat analysis. These differences were even more marked when analyzed with per protocol method: G1 had a significantly higher percentage (32.4 %) compared with G3 (3.3%, p = 0.003) but not compared with G2 (10.5%, p = 0.040). Event percentages of leak were statistically higher in G1 and occurred significantly earlier compared with other groups ( p = 0.002). Amongst diabetics, technique failure was significantly higher (28.6%) in G3 compared with 0% in G1 and 7.1% in G2 ( p = 0.036) and earlier in G3 at 163.2 days vs 176.8 and 175.8 ( p = 0.037) for G1 and G2, respectively. Leaks were higher in participants commencing PD at 1 week after catheter insertion

  14. Multiple-step fault estimation for interval type-II T-S fuzzy system of hypersonic vehicle with time-varying elevator faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a multiple-step fault estimation algorithm for hypersonic flight vehicles that uses an interval type-II Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy model. An interval type-II Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy model is developed to approximate the nonlinear dynamic system and handle the parameter uncertainties of hypersonic firstly. Then, a multiple-step time-varying additive fault estimation algorithm is designed to estimate time-varying additive elevator fault of hypersonic flight vehicles. Finally, the simulation is conducted in both aspects of modeling and fault estimation; the validity and availability of such method are verified by a series of the comparison of numerical simulation results.

  15. The importance of the time interval between insulin injection and breakfast in determining postprandial glycaemic control--a comparison between human and porcine insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, A W; Collier, A; Matthews, D M; Macintyre, C C; Clarke, B F

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of the time interval between insulin injection and breakfast in determining subsequent postprandial glycaemic control and also whether this differed between highly purified porcine insulin and human insulin (crb) in six diabetic patients (age range 24-36 years, duration of diabetes greater than 10 years) usually treated with twice daily Actrapid MC and Monotard MC and with stable insulin requirements and diabetic control. On separate mornings each patient was given, after an overnight fast, their usual dose of either Actrapid MC and Monotard MC or Humulin S and Humulin Zn injected 5, 20, or 40 min before a standard breakfast. The postprandial glycaemic profile was not significantly different at any of the three time intervals with Actrapid MC and Monotard MC. However, with the human insulin the profile was significantly better at the 40 min interval than at the 5 min interval (p less than 0.05) and this was also better than any of the profiles with the porcine insulin, there being a significant difference between the two types of insulin (p less than 0.05). These findings suggest that the time interval between insulin injection and breakfast may be more important with human insulin than with porcine insulin.

  16. Prevalence and Factors Associated With Second Eye Cataract Surgery and the Trend in the Time Interval Between the Two Eye Surgeries Based on the Malaysian National Eye Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shu Fen; Adnan, Tassha Hilda Bin; Goh, Pik Pin

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence of second eye cataract surgery (SECS), trend in time interval between subsequent surgeries over the years, and factors associated with SECS utilization among patients who underwent cataract surgeries in the Ministry of Health (MOH), Malaysia. Secondary cross-sectional analysis of the Malaysian National Eye Database (NED) data. The Malaysian Cataract Surgery Registry collected data on patients who had cataract surgery from 2002-2004 and 2007-2012. Data collected included demography, operative events, time interval between 2 surgeries, and postoperative visual outcomes. Descriptive analysis was performed. Total surgeries increased from 11,954 in 2002 to 30,265 in 2012 with a proportionate increase in SECS (30.7% in 2002 to 34.3% in 2012). Poor vision (<6/12) was reduced from 81.1% to 14.2% after surgery. With improved data capturing, missing data reduced from 29.22% to 1.05%. The time interval between surgeries was 10.58 months in 2002 and 14.49 months in 2012. Malays (40.2%) and those aged 61-70 years (38.1%) had the highest number of SECS. Those aged 40-50 years (10.96 months) and with poorer vision (9.97 months) had the shortest time interval between the 2 surgeries. The commonest surgical method was phacoemulsification (72.3%). Negeri Sembilan State had the highest SECS rate (35.91%) and Melaka had the shortest interval between surgeries (10.15 months). Despite an increase in the number of SECS, the time interval is still long. Poor presenting second eye vision and disparity among different states warrants the health authority's attention and intervention. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  17. Random time averaged diffusivities for Lévy walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemberg, D.; Barkai, E.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Lévy walk alternating between velocities ±v0 with opposite sign. The sojourn time probability distribution at large times is a power law lacking its mean or second moment. The first case corresponds to a ballistic regime where the ensemble averaged mean squared displacement (MSD) at large times is ⟨x2⟩ ∝ t2, the latter to enhanced diffusion with ⟨x2⟩ ∝ tν, 1 function and the time averaged MSD are calculated. In the ballistic case, the deviations of the time averaged MSD from a purely ballistic behavior are shown to be distributed according to a Mittag-Leffler density function. In the enhanced diffusion regime, the fluctuations of the time averages MSD vanish at large times, yet very slowly. In both cases we quantify the discrepancy between the time averaged and ensemble averaged MSDs.

  18. Design and rationale of the HITTS randomized controlled trial: Effect of High-intensity Interval Training in de novo Heart Transplant Recipients in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nytrøen, Kari; Yardley, Marianne; Rolid, Katrine; Bjørkelund, Elisabeth; Karason, Kristjan; Wigh, Julia Philip; Dall, Christian Have; Arora, Satish; Aakhus, Svend; Lunde, Ketil; Solberg, Ole Geir; Gustafsson, Finn; Prescott, Eva Irene Bossano; Gullestad, Lars

    2016-02-01

    There is no consensus on how, when, and at what intensity exercise should be performed and organized after heart transplantation (HTx). Most rehabilitation programs are conducted in HTx centers, which might be impractical and costly. We have recently shown that high-intensity interval training (HIT) is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious in maintenance HTx recipients, but there are no studies among de novo patients, and whether HIT is feasible and superior to moderate training in HTx recipients is unclear. A total of 120 clinically stable HTx recipients older than 18 years will be recruited from 3 Scandinavian HTx centers. Participants are randomized to HIT or moderate training, shortly after surgery. All exercises are supervised in the patients' local communities. Testing at baseline and follow-up includes the following: VO2peak (primary end point), muscle strength, body composition, quality of life, myocardial performance, endothelial function, biomarkers, and progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. A subgroup (n = 90) will also be tested at 3-year follow-up to assess long-term effects of exercise. So far, the HIT intervention is well tolerated, without any serious adverse events. We aim to test whether decentralized HIT is feasible, safe, and superior to moderate training, and whether it will lead to significant improvement in exercise capacity and less long-term complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Indwell times, complications and costs of open vs closed safety peripheral intravenous catheters: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González López, J L; Arribi Vilela, A; Fernández del Palacio, E; Olivares Corral, J; Benedicto Martí, C; Herrera Portal, P

    2014-02-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) caused by peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are an increasingly common iatrogenic complication. To prevent this, recommended timelines for routine replacement of PIVCs have increased from 48 h to 72 h and subsequently to 96 h, despite a lack of supporting scientific evidence. To compare closed-system (COS) PIVCs with open-system (MOS) PIVCs. This prospective, randomized controlled trial compared the indwell time of COS PIVCs without complications with that of MOS PIVCs, removed only by clinical indication. In total, 1199 PIVCs (642 inpatients) were randomized and 283 PIVCs were cultured. Sixteen catheters (11 patients) were lost to the study after randomization. In total, 104,469 catheter-hours (54,173 h in 584 COS and 50,296 h in 599 MOS) were recorded. The median dwell time was 137.1h for COS PIVCs and 96 h for MOS PIVCs (P = 0.001). Among PIVCs in place for ≥ 24 h, the median dwell time was 144.5h for COS PIVCs [95% confidence interval (CI) 123.4-165.6] and 99 h for MOS PIVCs (95% CI 87.2-110.8). Use of COS PIVCs reduced phlebitis rates by 29% (31 vs 45 cases/1000 catheter-days; P = 0.004). The probability that a MOS PIVC would last for 96 h was 79.9%, and the probability that a COS PIVC would last for 144 h was 80.4%. There were no significant differences in rates of bacterial colonization per 1000 catheter-days (51.1 COS vs 54.1 MOS) or CRI (5.76 COS vs 6.65 MOS). Nevertheless, there was a 20% relative risk reduction in CRI. Use of COS PIVCs reduced episodes of phlebitis and risk of infection at a cost of only € 0.09/day. When PIVCs are replaced based on clinical indication, COS PIVCs last for up to 144 h and MOS PIVCs last for up to 96 h without increased risk and with significant cost savings (€ 786,257/year/1000 beds). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of a high-intensity interval training program versus a moderate-intensity continuous training program on maximal oxygen uptake and blood pressure in healthy adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda Serna, Víctor Hugo; Arango Vélez, Elkin Fernando; Gómez Arias, Rubén Darío; Feito, Yuri

    2016-08-18

    Participation in aerobic exercise generates increased cardiorespiratory fitness, which results in a protective factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. High-intensity interval training might cause higher increases in cardiorespiratory fitness in comparison with moderate-intensity continuous training; nevertheless, current evidence is not conclusive. To our knowledge, this is the first study to test the effect of high-intensity interval training with total load duration of 7.5 min per session. A randomized controlled trial will be performed on two groups of healthy, sedentary male volunteers (n = 44). The study protocol will include 24 exercise sessions, three times a week, including aerobic training on a treadmill and strength training exercises. The intervention group will perform 15 bouts of 30 s, each at an intensity between 90 % and 95 % of maximal heart rate. The control group will complete 40 min of continuous exercise, ranging between 65 % and 75 % of maximal heart rate. The primary outcome measure to be evaluated will be maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure will be evaluated as secondary outcome measures. Waist circumference, body mass index, and body composition will also be evaluated. Epidemiological evidence shows the link between VO2max and its association with chronic conditions that trigger CVD. Therefore, finding ways to improve VO2max and reduce blood pressure it is of vital importance to public health. NCT02288403 . Registered on 4 November 2014.

  1. Driver decision-making in the dilemma zone - Examining the influences of clearance intervals, enforcement cameras and the provision of advance warning through a panel data random parameters probit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Peter T; Sharma, Anuj; Gates, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of innovations in the field of vehicle detection at intersection approaches. Modern radar-based smart sensors make it possible to track individual vehicles in close proximity to an intersection. These advancements in technology potentially enable the provision of vehicle- and site-specific decision dilemma zone protection at the onset of the yellow indication at signalized intersections. To exploit this opportunity, it is critical to develop an in-depth understanding of those factors influencing a driver's decision to stop or go at the onset of yellow. This study investigates how signal timing strategies such as yellow interval durations, all-red clearance intervals, advance warning flashers, and automated camera enforcement affect driver decision-making. Data from 87 intersection approaches across five regions of the United States are used to develop a series of decision (i.e., probability of stopping) curves using vehicle trajectory and signal phasing data. A panel data random parameters probit model is used to account for heterogeneity across locations, as well as correlation in driver decision-making, due to unobserved factors that are unique to each signalized intersection. The results demonstrate drivers are more likely to stop at locations where enforcement cameras or flashers are present. Stopping was also more prevalent at intersections with lower speed limits, longer crossing distances, and where pedestrian crosswalks were present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer: does the time interval between biopsy and MRI influence MRI-pathology discordance in lesion sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Simone; Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Baccini, Paola; Secondini, Lucia; Barbagallo, Stella; Friedman, Daniele; Garlaschi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Background Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more accurate than ultrasound and mammography in estimating local extension of both invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and it is part of a breast cancer patient's preoperative management. Purpose To verify if time interval between breast biopsy and preoperative MRI, lesion margins, and biopsy technique can influence tumor sizing on MRI. Material and Methods By a database search, we retrospectively identified all women with a newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven, primary breast cancer who underwent MRI before surgery. The time interval between biopsy and MRI, the type of biopsy procedure, and various pathological features of tumors were collected. We defined the concordance between MRI and pathology measurements as a difference of biopsy and MRI showed only a weak correlation with the absolute MRI-pathology difference (r = 0.236). Stratifying the whole cohort of patients using a cutoff value of 30 days, we found that the MRI-pathology discordance was significantly higher in patients with a biopsy-MRI time interval >30 days ( P biopsy procedure and the time interval between biopsy and preoperative MRI are not independently associated to MRI-pathology discordance.

  3. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  4. Research Article : Optimal Spray Time, Interval and Number of Preventive Fungicides for the Control of Fruit Rots of Green and Gold Kiwifruit Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyoung Hee Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimal spray time, interval and number of preventive fungicides against fruit rots of kiwifruit were investigated at the orchard which both green kiwifruit cultivar ‘Hayward’ and gold kiwifruit cultivar ‘Hort16A’ are cultivating side by side during 2009 and 2010 growing seasons in Jeju island, Korea. The highest control efficiency was obtained from benomyl WP and followed by thiophanate-methyl WP and carbendazim+diethofencarb WP. The control efficacies of the fungicides were much higher when applied onto the kiwifruit canopy after the flowering time than before the flowering time but thereafter their control efficiencies were decreased drastically according to delays of spray timing. With increasing spray numbers of the fungicides, the control efficacy increased. However, optimal spray time, interval and number of the preventive fungicides for the effective control of fruit rots of kiwifruit were determined as 4 time-spray schedule with 2-week-interval just after the flowering time on both ‘Hayward’ and ‘Hort16A’ cultivars.

  5. Statistical Stability and Time-Reversal Imgaing in Random Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J; Borcea, L; Papanicolaou, G; Tsogka, C

    2002-02-05

    Localization of targets imbedded in a heterogeneous background medium is a common problem in seismic, ultrasonic, and electromagnetic imaging problems. The best imaging techniques make direct use of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the array response matrix, as recent work on time-reversal acoustics has shown. Of the various imaging functionals studied, one that is representative of a preferred class is a time-domain generalization of MUSIC (MUltiple Signal Classification), which is a well-known linear subspace method normally applied only in the frequency domain. Since statistical stability is not characteristic of the frequency domain, a transform back to the time domain after first diagonalizing the array data in the frequency domain takes optimum advantage of both the time-domain stability and the frequency-domain orthogonality of the relevant eigenfunctions.

  6. Superior Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training vs. Moderate Continuous Training on Arterial Stiffness in Episodic Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Hanssen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular dysfunction. Since aerobic exercise can reduce cardiovascular risk, the present randomized controlled trail aimed at investigating the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT vs. moderate continuous exercise training (MCT on arterial stiffness in migraine patients.Methods: Forty-eight episodic migraineurs were initially enrolled in the study. 37 patients [female: 30; age: 37 (SD: 10; BMI: 23.1 (5.2; Migraine days per month: 3.7 (2.5] completed the intervention. Central blood pressure, pulse wave reflection, and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV were obtained by an oscillometric monitor. Incremental treadmill exercise testing yielded maximal and submaximal fitness parameters. Participants were randomly assigned to either HIT, MCT, or a control group (CON. The intervention groups trained twice a week over a 12-week intervention period.Results: After adjustment for between-group baseline differences, a moderate meaningful overall reduction of the augmentation index at 75 min−1 heart rate (AIx@75 was observed [partial eta squared (ηp2 = 0.16; p = 0.06]. With 91% likely beneficial effects, HIT was more effective in reducing AIx@75 than MCT [HIT: pre 22.0 (9.7, post 14.9 (13.0, standardized mean difference (SMD = 0.62; MCT: pre 16.6 (8.5, post 21.3 (10.4, SMD −0.49]. HIT induced a relevant reduction in central systolic blood pressure [cSBP: pre 118 (23 mmHg, post 110 (16 mmHg, SMD = 0.42] with a 59% possibly beneficial effect compared to CON, while MCT showed larger effects in lowering central diastolic blood pressure [pre 78 (7 mmHg, post 74 (7 mmHg, SMD = 0.61], presenting 60% possibly beneficial effects compared to CON. Central aortic PWV showed no changes in any of the three groups. Migraine days were reduced more successfully by HIT than MCT (HIT: SMD = 1.05; MCT: SMD = 0.43.Conclusion: HIT but not MCT reduces AIx@75 as a measure of pulse wave

  7. Yield and quality of milk and udder health in Martina Franca ass: effects of daily interval and time of machine milking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Martemucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty asses of Martina Franca breed, machine milked twice a day, were used to assess the influence of milking interval (3-h, 5-h, and 8-h; N=5 and time (700, 1200 and 1900 on milk yield and udder health. Individual milk samples were taken to determine fat, protein and lactose con- tent. Sensory analysis profile was also assessed. Milk’s total bacterial count (TBC, somatic cell con- tent (SCC and udder’s skin temperature were considered to assess udder health. Milk yield increases by 28.4% (P<0.01 with a milking interval from 3-h to 8-h and is higher (P<0.01 at morning milking. The maximum milk yield per milking corresponds to 700 milking (1416.9 mL thus indicating a circa- dian rhythm in milk secretion processes. Milking intervals of 5 and 8 hours cause a decrease (P<0.01 in milk fat and lactose content. The 8-h interval leads to an increase (P<0.01 in SCC but without any significance for the health udder. No alterations about CBT, clinical evaluation and temperature of ud- der were observed. Milk organoleptic characteristics were better in the 3-h interval milking.

  8. Effects of home-based interval walking training on thigh muscle strength and aerobic capacity in female total hip arthroplasty patients: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Morishima

    Full Text Available Due to the reduced physical activity of patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA, there are no home-based exercise training regimens for preventing muscle atrophy and aerobic capacity impairment in these patients. We examined whether interval walking training (IWT could prevented these issues. Twenty-eight female patients (∼60 years of age who had undergone THA more than 2 months prior were randomly divided into IWT (n = 14 and control (CNT, n = 14 groups. The IWT subjects trained at a target of 60 min of fast walking at >70% peak aerobic capacity for walking (VO₂peak per wk for 12 wk, while those in the CNT maintained their previous sedentary life during the same period. We measured the energy expenditure of the daily physical activity, except during sleeping and bathing, every minute and every day during the intervention. We also measured the isometric knee extension (FEXT and flexion (FFLX forces, VO₂peak, and anaerobic threshold during the graded cycling exercise (VO₂AT before and after the intervention. All subjects, except for one in IWT, completed the protocol. FFLX increased by 23% on the operated side (P = 0.003 and 14% on the non-operated side of IWT (P = 0.006, while it only increased on the operated side of CNT (P = 0.03. The VO₂peak and VO₂AT in IWT increased by 8% (P = 0.08 and 13% (P = 0.002, respectively, and these changes were significantly higher in the IWT than in CNT group (both, P<0.05. In conclusion, IWT might be an effective home-based training regimen for preventing the muscle atrophy from reduced daily physical activity in THA patients.UMIN-CTR UMIN000013172.

  9. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Elman Recurrent Random Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen; Niu, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, financial market dynamics forecasting has been a focus of economic research. To predict the price indices of stock markets, we developed an architecture which combined Elman recurrent neural networks with stochastic time effective function. By analyzing the proposed model with the linear regression, complexity invariant distance (CID), and multiscale CID (MCID) analysis methods and taking the model compared with different models such as the backpropagation neural network (BPNN), the stochastic time effective neural network (STNN), and the Elman recurrent neural network (ERNN), the empirical results show that the proposed neural network displays the best performance among these neural networks in financial time series forecasting. Further, the empirical research is performed in testing the predictive effects of SSE, TWSE, KOSPI, and Nikkei225 with the established model, and the corresponding statistical comparisons of the above market indices are also exhibited. The experimental results show that this approach gives good performance in predicting the values from the stock market indices. PMID:27293423

  10. Defibrillation time intervals and outcomes of cardiac arrest in hospital: retrospective cohort study from Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhui; Chan, Paul S; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Grunwald, Gary K; Self, Alyssa; Sasson, Comilla; Varosy, Paul D; Anderson, Monique L; Schneider, Preston M; Ho, P Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe temporal trends in the time interval between first and second attempts at defibrillation and the association between this time interval and outcomes in patients with persistent ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) arrest in hospital. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting 172 hospitals in the United States participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, 2004-12. Participants Adults who received a second defibrillation attempt for persistent VT/VF arrest within three minutes of a first attempt. Interventions Second defibrillation attempts categorized as early (time interval of up to and including one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts) or deferred (time interval of more than one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts). Main outcome measure Survival to hospital discharge. Results Among 2733 patients with persistent VT/VF after the first defibrillation attempt, 1121 (41%) received a deferred second attempt. Deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF increased from 26% in 2004 to 57% in 2012 (Pdefibrillation, unadjusted patient outcomes were significantly worse with deferred second defibrillation (57.4% v 62.5% for return of spontaneous circulation, 38.4% v 43.6% for survival to 24 hours, and 24.7% v 30.8% for survival to hospital discharge; Pdefibrillation was not associated with survival to hospital discharge (propensity weighting adjusted risk ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.01; P=0.08; hierarchical regression adjusted 0.92, 0.83 to 1.02; P=0.1). Conclusions Since 2004, the use of deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF in hospital has doubled. Deferred second defibrillation was not associated with improved survival. PMID:27052620

  11. Defibrillation time intervals and outcomes of cardiac arrest in hospital: retrospective cohort study from Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; Liu, Wenhui; Chan, Paul S; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Grunwald, Gary K; Self, Alyssa; Sasson, Comilla; Varosy, Paul D; Anderson, Monique L; Schneider, Preston M; Ho, P Michael

    2016-04-06

    To describe temporal trends in the time interval between first and second attempts at defibrillation and the association between this time interval and outcomes in patients with persistent ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) arrest in hospital. Retrospective cohort study 172 hospitals in the United States participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, 2004-12. Adults who received a second defibrillation attempt for persistent VT/VF arrest within three minutes of a first attempt. Second defibrillation attempts categorized as early (time interval of up to and including one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts) or deferred (time interval of more than one minute between first and second defibrillation attempts). Survival to hospital discharge. Among 2733 patients with persistent VT/VF after the first defibrillation attempt, 1121 (41%) received a deferred second attempt. Deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF increased from 26% in 2004 to 57% in 2012 (Pdefibrillation, unadjusted patient outcomes were significantly worse with deferred second defibrillation (57.4% v 62.5% for return of spontaneous circulation, 38.4% v 43.6% for survival to 24 hours, and 24.7% v 30.8% for survival to hospital discharge; Pdefibrillation was not associated with survival to hospital discharge (propensity weighting adjusted risk ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.01; P=0.08; hierarchical regression adjusted 0.92, 0.83 to 1.02; P=0.1). Since 2004, the use of deferred second defibrillation for persistent VT/VF in hospital has doubled. Deferred second defibrillation was not associated with improved survival. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Time-varying output performances of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting under nonstationary random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Kim, Miso; Park, Choon-Su; Youn, Byeng D.

    2018-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) has received much attention as a potential solution that could ultimately realize self-powered wireless sensor networks. Since most ambient vibrations in nature are inherently random and nonstationary, the output performances of PVEH devices also randomly change with time. However, little attention has been paid to investigating the randomly time-varying electroelastic behaviors of PVEH systems both analytically and experimentally. The objective of this study is thus to make a step forward towards a deep understanding of the time-varying performances of PVEH devices under nonstationary random vibrations. Two typical cases of nonstationary random vibration signals are considered: (1) randomly-varying amplitude (amplitude modulation; AM) and (2) randomly-varying amplitude with randomly-varying instantaneous frequency (amplitude and frequency modulation; AM-FM). In both cases, this study pursues well-balanced correlations of analytical predictions and experimental observations to deduce the relationships between the time-varying output performances of the PVEH device and two primary input parameters, such as a central frequency and an external electrical resistance. We introduce three correlation metrics to quantitatively compare analytical prediction and experimental observation, including the normalized root mean square error, the correlation coefficient, and the weighted integrated factor. Analytical predictions are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations both mechanically and electrically. This study provides insightful guidelines for designing PVEH devices to reliably generate electric power under nonstationary random vibrations.

  13. Effects of aerobic interval training on measures of anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: A prospective non-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Kjetil; Munk, Peter Scott; Giske, Rune; Larsen, Alf Inge

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of aerobic interval training on quality of life and on symptoms of anxiety and depression among patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Prospective, non-randomized controlled study. Patients with ischaemic heart failure and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, willing to undergo an aerobic interval training programme. A total of 31 patients were enrolled (19 were assigned to the aerobic interval training group and 12 to the control group). The aerobic interval training group performed a 12-week exercise training programme. All patients were evaluated with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at baseline, after 12 weeks and at 2 years. The aerobic interval training group showed significant improvements in several SF-36 subscores at 12 weeks. There was an unadjusted significant reduction in the HADS depression (HADS-D) score. At follow-up, results in the aero-bic interval training group moved towards baseline or remained stable, whereas in the control group HADS-D scores and some SF-36 subscores deteriorated. Participation in a 12-week aerobic interval training programme resulted in significant improvements in several measures of quality of life and the unadjusted HADS-D score in patients with ischaemic heart failure with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. At follow-up there was significantly less sedentary activity in the aerobic interval training group, while psychometric measures were no longer significantly different from baseline.

  14. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Elman Recurrent Random Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2016-01-01

    (ERNN, the empirical results show that the proposed neural network displays the best performance among these neural networks in financial time series forecasting. Further, the empirical research is performed in testing the predictive effects of SSE, TWSE, KOSPI, and Nikkei225 with the established model, and the corresponding statistical comparisons of the above market indices are also exhibited. The experimental results show that this approach gives good performance in predicting the values from the stock market indices.

  15. Dynamics on Multilayered Hyperbranched Fractals Through Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Antonio; Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel; Gallo, Tommaso; Gualandri, Luciano

    We introduce a new method to generate three-dimensional structures, with mixed topologies. We focus on Multilayered Regular Hyperbranched Fractals (MRHF), three-dimensional networks constructed as a set of identical generalized Vicsek fractals, known as Regular Hyperbranched Fractals (RHF), layered on top of each other. Every node of any layer is directly connected only to copies of itself from nearest-neighbor layers. We found out that also for MRHF the eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix is determined through a semi-analytical method, which gives the opportunity to analyze very large structures. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover effects of two basic topologies: linear, corresponding to the way we connect the layers and fractal due to the layers' topology. From the wealth of applications which depends on the eigenvalue spectrum we choose the return-to-the-origin probability. The results show the expected short-time and long-time behaviors. In the intermediate time domain we obtained two different power-law exponents: the first one is given by the combination linear-RHF, while the second one is peculiar either of a single RHF or of a single linear chain.

  16. Multitarget search on complex networks: A logarithmic growth of global mean random cover time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Small, Michael; Yang, Ji; Bijarbooneh, Farshid Hassani; Hui, Pan

    2017-09-01

    We investigate multitarget search on complex networks and derive an exact expression for the mean random cover time that quantifies the expected time a walker needs to visit multiple targets. Based on this, we recover and extend some interesting results of multitarget search on networks. Specifically, we observe the logarithmic increase of the global mean random cover time with the target number for a broad range of random search processes, including generic random walks, biased random walks, and maximal entropy random walks. We show that the logarithmic growth pattern is a universal feature of multi-target search on networks by using the annealed network approach and the Sherman-Morrison formula. Moreover, we find that for biased random walks, the global mean random cover time can be minimized, and that the corresponding optimal parameter also minimizes the global mean first passage time, pointing towards its robustness. Our findings further confirm that the logarithmic growth pattern is a universal law governing multitarget search in confined media.

  17. Decoupling Interval Timing and Climbing Neural Activity : A Dissociation between CNV and N1P2 Amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kononowicz, Tadeusz W.; van Rijn, Hedderik

    2014-01-01

    It is often argued that climbing neural activity, as for example reflected by the contingent negative variation (CNV) in the electroencephalogram, is the signature of the subjective experience of time. According to this view, the resolution of the CNV coincides with termination of subjective timing

  18. A Practical and Time-Efficient High-Intensity Interval Training Program Modifies Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethan E. Phillips

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRegular physical activity (PA can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but adherence to time-orientated (150 min week−1 or more PA guidelines is very poor. A practical and time-efficient PA regime that was equally efficacious at controlling risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease is one solution to this problem. Herein, we evaluate a new time-efficient and genuinely practical high-intensity interval training (HIT protocol in men and women with pre-existing risk factors for type 2 diabetes.Materials and methodsOne hundred eighty-nine sedentary women (n = 101 and men (n = 88 with impaired glucose tolerance and/or a body mass index >27 kg m−2 [mean (range age: 36 (18–53 years] participated in this multi-center study. Each completed a fully supervised 6-week HIT protocol at work-loads equivalent to ~100 or ~125% V˙O2 max. Change in V˙O2 max was used to monitor protocol efficacy, while Actiheart™ monitors were used to determine PA during four, weeklong, periods. Mean arterial (blood pressure (MAP and fasting insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR] represent key health biomarker outcomes.ResultsThe higher intensity bouts (~125% V˙O2 max used during a 5-by-1 min HIT protocol resulted in a robust increase in V˙O2 max (136 participants, +10.0%, p < 0.001; large size effect. 5-by-1 HIT reduced MAP (~3%; p < 0.001 and HOMA-IR (~16%; p < 0.01. Physiological responses were similar in men and women while a sizeable proportion of the training-induced changes in V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR was retained 3 weeks after cessation of training. The supervised HIT sessions accounted for the entire quantifiable increase in PA, and this equated to 400 metabolic equivalent (MET min week−1. Meta-analysis indicated that 5-by-1 HIT matched the efficacy and variability of a time-consuming 30-week PA program on V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR.ConclusionWith a total time-commitment of

  19. H∞ Control of Four-Wheel-Independent-Drive Electric Vehicles with Random Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The random time-varying delays would reduce control performance and even deteriorate the EV system. To deal with random time-varying delays and achieve a real-time steady-state response, considering randomness of delay and a rapid response, an H∞-based delay-tolerant linear quadratic regulator (LQR control method based on Taylor series expansion is proposed in this paper. The results of cosimulations with Simulink and CarSim demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller through the control performance of yaw rate, sideslip angle, and the running track. Moreover, the results of comparison with the other controller illustrate the strength of explicitly.

  20. On the time arrows, and randomness in cosmological signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurzadyan V.G.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arrows of time - thermodynamical, cosmological, electromagnetic, quantum mechanical, psychological - are basic properties of Nature. For a quantum system-bath closed system the de-correlated initial conditions and no-memory (Markovian dynamics are outlined as necessary conditions for the appearance of the thermodynamical arrow. The emergence of the arrow for the system evolving according to non-unitary dynamics due to the presence of the bath, then, is a result of limited observability, and we conjecture the arrow in the observable Universe as determined by the dark sector acting as a bath. The voids in the large scale matter distribution induce hyperbolicity of the null geodesics, with possible observational consequences.

  1. Instability in time-delayed switched systems induced by fast and random switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yuming; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a switched system comprising finitely or infinitely many subsystems described by linear time-delayed differential equations and a rule that orchestrates the system switching randomly among these subsystems, where the switching times are also randomly chosen. We first construct a counterintuitive example where even though all the time-delayed subsystems are exponentially stable, the behaviors of the randomly switched system change from stable dynamics to unstable dynamics with a decrease of the dwell time. Then by using the theories of stochastic processes and delay differential equations, we present a general result on when this fast and random switching induced instability should occur and we extend this to the case of nonlinear time-delayed switched systems as well.

  2. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health and fitness?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillen, Jenna B; Gibala, Martin J

    .... Recent studies, however, have revealed the potential for other models of HIIT, which may be more feasible but are still time-efficient, to stimulate adaptations similar to more demanding low-volume...

  3. Bifurcation from Interval and Positive Solutions of a Nonlinear Second-Order Dynamic Boundary Value Problem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a time scale with 0,T∈. We give a global description of the branches of positive solutions to the nonlinear boundary value problem of second-order dynamic equation on a time scale , uΔΔ(t+f(t,uσ(t=0,  t∈[0,T],  u(0=u(σ2(T=0, which is not necessarily linearizable. Our approaches are based on topological degree theory and global bifurcation techniques.

  4. On-line registration of femtosecond time intervals based on polarization properties of femtosecond stimulated photon echo generated on exciton states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhodurov, A. U.; Vashourin, N. S.; Vinogradov, E. A.; Gazizov, K. Sh.; Kompanets, V. O.; Popov, I. I.; Putilin, S. E.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    This paper reflects the results of the research on the character of the dependence of the non-Faraday rotation of the femtosecond stimulated photon echo polarization plane on the time interval between the second and third exciting pulses, discretely varying from 180 to 900 fs in increments 180 fs. The time interval between the first and second pulses was equal to zero. The echo signal was formed at room temperature on exciton states localized on the surface defects of a thin three-layer textured ZnO/Si(P)/Si(B) film in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field of 0.25 mT applied longitudinally to the optical excitation axis. The qualitative coincidence of the investigated dependence with the theoretical prediction of the investigated effect for gaseous medium is shown.

  5. Withdrawal of life-support in paediatric intensive care - a study of time intervals between discussion, decision and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibballs James

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scant information exists about the time-course of events during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. We investigated the time required for end-of-life decisions, subsequent withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and the time to death. Methods Prospective, observational study in the ICU of a tertiary paediatric hospital. Results Data on 38 cases of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment were recorded over a 12-month period (75% of PICU deaths. The time from the first discussion between medical staff and parents of the subject of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment to parents and medical staff making the decision varied widely from immediate to 457 hours (19 days with a median time of 67.8 hours (2.8 days. Large variations were subsequently also observed from the time of decision to actual commencement of the process ranging from 30 minutes to 47.3 hrs (2 days with a median requirement of 4.7 hours. Death was apparent to staff at a median time of 10 minutes following withdrawal of life support varying from immediate to a maximum of 6.4 hours. Twenty-one per cent of children died more than 1 hour after withdrawal of treatment. Medical confirmation of death occurred at 0 to 35 minutes thereafter with the physician having left the bedside during withdrawal in 18 cases (48% to attend other patients or to allow privacy for the family. Conclusions Wide case-by-case variation in timeframes occurs at every step of the process of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment until death. This knowledge may facilitate medical management, clinical leadership, guidance of parents and inform organ procurement after cardiac death.

  6. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  7. Influence of intertrial interval on basal and drug-induced impulsive action in the 5-choice serial reaction time task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzpatrick, Ciaràn M; Maric, Vojislav S; Bate, Simon T

    2018-01-01

    Impulsivity is a characteristic of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a rodent paradigm extensively used to assess attention and impulsivity. Notably, 5-CSRTT studies do not typically account...

  8. Measures to reduce glyphosate runoff from hard surfaces, 2: effect of time interval between application and first precipitation event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, C.D.; Beltman, W.H.J.; Smidt, R.A.; Pas, van der L.J.T.; Kempenaar, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this research the effect of moisture conditions of hard surfaces on emission of herbicides from hard surfaces was quantified. In addition the dissipation of glyphosate applied on brick-pavement is determined in time. The outdoor experiment was carried out on 3 and 17 June 2003. In previous

  9. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  10. Timing of tracheotomy in ICU patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, Koji; Nishimura, Masaji; Egi, Moritoki; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The optimal timing of tracheotomy in critically ill patients remains a topic of debate. We performed a systematic review to clarify the potential benefits of early versus late tracheotomy. Methods We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials that compared outcomes in patients managed with early and late tracheotomy. A random-effects meta-analysis, combining data from three a priori-defined categories of timing of tracheotomy (within 4 versus after 10?days, with...

  11. Non-uniqueness of the first passage time density of Levy random processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor M [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Metzler, Ralf [NORDITA-Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark)

    2004-11-19

    We obtain the first passage time density for Levy random processes (LRPs) from a subordination scheme, demonstrating that the first passage time density cannot be inferred uniquely from the probability density function P(x, t) governing the random process. This is due to the fact that P(x, t) does not contain all information on the trajectory of the underlying LRP. (letter to the editor)

  12. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode: Normal Values and Association with Established Echocardiographic and Invasive Measures of Systolic and Diastolic Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Biering-Sørensen

    Full Text Available To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI M-mode through the mitral valve (MV. Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI and the conventional method of obtaining MPI (MPIConv, with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function.In a large community based population study (n = 974, where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT, isovolumic contraction time (IVCT, and ejection time (ET were obtained by TDI M-mode through the MV. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the MPI ((IVRT+IVCT/ET were calculated. We also included a validation population (n = 44 of patients who underwent left heart catheterization and had the MPITDI and MPIConv measured.IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (p<0.001 for all. IVCT, ET, IVRT/ET, and MPI differed significantly between males and females, displaying that women, in general exhibit better cardiac function. MPITDI was significantly associated with invasive (dP/dt max and echocardiographic measures of systolic (LVEF, global longitudinal strain and global strainrate s and diastolic function (e', global strainrate e(p<0.05 for all, whereas MPIConv was significantly associated with LVEF, e' and global strainrate e (p<0.05 for all.Normal values of cardiac time intervals differed between genders and deteriorated with increasing age. The MPITDI (but not MPIConv is associated with most invasive and established echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function.

  13. Dissolving efficacy of different organic solvents on gutta-percha and resilon root canal obturating materials at different immersion time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mubashir; Farooq, Riyaz; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Khan, Fayiza Yaqoob

    2012-01-01

    Background Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the dissolving capability of various endodontic solvents used during endodontic retreatment on resilon and gutta-percha at different immersion time intervals. Materials and Methods: 160 ISO no. 40 cones (0.06 taper), 80 each of resilon and gutta-percha were taken as samples for the study. Both resilon and gutta-percha were divided into eight experimental groups of 20 cones (four groups each of resilon and gutta-percha) for immersion in xylene, tetrachloroethylene, refined orange oil and distilled water. Each group was further divided into two equal subgroups (n=10) for 2- and 5-minute immersion time intervals at room temperature to investigate the potential of these solvents for clinical use in dissolving resilon and gutta-percha. Each sample was weighed initially before immersing in the solvent on a digital analytical scale. Distilled water served as a control. Samples were removed from the respective solvents after the specified immersion period and washed in 100 ml of distilled water and allowed to dry for 24 h at 37°C in a humidifier. The samples were then again weighed after immersion in the specific solvent on a digital analytical scale. The extent of gutta-percha or resilon removed from the specimen was calculated from the difference between the original weight of gutta-percha or resilon sample and its final weight. Means and standard deviations of percentage loss of weight were calculated at each time interval for each group of specimens. The values were compared by statistical parametric tests using SPSS 16.0 Software. The data was subjected to paired ‘t‘ test, independent ‘t’ test, one-way ANOVA test and multiple comparisons with Scheffe's test. Results: There was no significance in the amount of gutta-percha dissolved at 2- and 5-minute immersion time intervals in all groups (P>0.05) except the tetrachloroethylene group (P=0.00). There was a very high significance in the

  14. The Geomagnetic Field Recorded in Sediments of the Tuzla Section (the Krasnodar Territory, Russia) over the Time Interval 120-70 ka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilipenko, Olga; Abrahamsen, N.; Trubikhin, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    Petro- and paleomagnetic methods are applied to the study of the lower part of the Early Pleistocene Tuzla section on the Black Sea coast of the Taman Peninsula. This part of the section is composed of marine and lagoonal sediments deposited over the time interval 120-70 ka. The measured curves...... of the variation in the geomagnetic field inclination reveal an anomalous direction dated at ~110 ka which coincides with a similar anomalous direction in the Eltigen section (Ukraine) correlating with the Blake paleomagnetic event. The significant correlation between the time series NRM0.015/SIRM0.015 (Tuzla...

  15. Timing the Random and Anomalous Arrival of Particles in a Geiger Counter with GPS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, F.; La Rocca, P.; Riggi, F.; Riggi, S.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of the arrival time distribution of particles in a detector have been studied by the use of a small Geiger counter, with a GPS device to tag the event time. The experiment is intended to check the basic properties of the random arrival time distribution between successive events and to simulate the investigations carried out by…

  16. Product interval automata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    in both logical and language theoretic terms. We also show that product interval automata are expressive enough to model the timed behaviour of asynchronous digital circuits. Keywords. Timed automata; distributed systems; logic. 1. Introduction. Timed automata as formulated by Alur & Dill (1994) have become a canonical ...

  17. Return to work after early part-time sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Kausto, Johanna; Shiri, Rahman; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Karppinen, Jaro; Miranda, Helena; Luukkonen, Ritva; Martimo, Kari-Pekka

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of early part-time sick leave on return to work (RTW) and sickness absence among patients with musculoskeletal disorders. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in six occupational health units of medium- and large-size enterprises. Patients aged 18-60 years with musculoskeletal disorders (N=63) unable to perform their regular work were randomly allocated to part- or full-time sick leave. In the former group, workload was reduced by restricting work time by about a half. Remaining work tasks were modified when necessary, as specified in a "fit note" from the physician. The main outcomes were time to return to regular work activities and sickness absence during 12-month follow-up. Time to RTW sustained for ≥4 weeks was shorter in the intervention group (median 12 versus 20 days, P=0.10). Hazard ratio of RTW adjusted for age was 1.60 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.98-2.63] and 1.76 (95% CI 1.21-2.56) after further adjustment for pain interference with sleep and previous sickness absence at baseline. Total sickness absence during the 12-month follow-up was about 20% lower in the intervention than the control group. Compliance with the intervention was high with no discontinuations of part-time sick leave due to musculoskeletal reasons. Early part-time sick leave may provide a faster and more sustainable return to regular duties than full-time sick leave among patients with musculoskeletal disorders. This is the first study to show that work participation can be safely increased with early part-time sick leave.

  18. Effects of Sprint versus High-Intensity Aerobic Interval Training on Cross-Country Mountain Biking Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Allan; Impellizzeri, Franco M.; Pires, Flávio O.; Pompeu, Fernando A. M. S.; Deslandes, Andrea C.; Santos, Tony M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The current study compared the effects of high-intensity aerobic training (HIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) on mountain biking (MTB) race simulation performance and physiological variables, including peak power output (PPO), lactate threshold (LT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). Methods Sixteen mountain bikers (mean ± SD: age 32.1 ± 6.4 yr, body mass 69.2 ± 5.3 kg and VO2max 63.4 ± 4.5 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) completed graded exercise and MTB performance tests before and after six weeks of training. The HIT (7–10 x [4–6 min—highest sustainable intensity / 4–6 min—CR100 10–15]) and SIT (8–12 x [30 s—all-out intensity / 4 min—CR100 10–15]) protocols were included in the participants’ regular training programs three times per week. Results Post-training analysis showed no significant differences between training modalities (HIT vs. SIT) in body mass, PPO, LT or OBLA (p = 0.30 to 0.94). The Cohen’s d effect size (ES) showed trivial to small effects on group factor (p = 0.00 to 0.56). The interaction between MTB race time and training modality was almost significant (p = 0.08), with a smaller ES in HIT vs. SIT training (ES = -0.43). A time main effect (pre- vs. post-phases) was observed in MTB race performance and in several physiological variables (p = 0.001 to 0.046). Co-variance analysis revealed that the HIT (p = 0.043) group had significantly better MTB race performance measures than the SIT group. Furthermore, magnitude-based inferences showed HIT to be of likely greater benefit (83.5%) with a lower probability of harmful effects (0.8%) compared to SIT. Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that six weeks of either HIT or SIT may be effective at increasing MTB race performance; however, HIT may be a preferable strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01944865 PMID:26789124

  19. Comparing entropy with tests for randomness as a measure of complexity in time series

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Chee Chun

    2015-01-01

    Entropy measures have become increasingly popular as an evaluation metric for complexity in the analysis of time series data, especially in physiology and medicine. Entropy measures the rate of information gain, or degree of regularity in a time series e.g. heartbeat. Ideally, entropy should be able to quantify the complexity of any underlying structure in the series, as well as determine if the variation arises from a random process. Unfortunately current entropy measures mostly are unable to perform the latter differentiation. Thus, a high entropy score indicates a random or chaotic series, whereas a low score indicates a high degree of regularity. This leads to the observation that current entropy measures are equivalent to evaluating how random a series is, or conversely the degree of regularity in a time series. This raises the possibility that existing tests for randomness, such as the runs test or permutation test, may have similar utility in diagnosing certain conditions. This paper compares various t...

  20. Spectra of large time-lagged correlation matrices from random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Maciej A.; Tarnowski, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the spectral properties of large, time-lagged correlation matrices using the tools of random matrix theory. We compare predictions of the one-dimensional spectra, based on approaches already proposed in the literature. Employing the methods of free random variables and diagrammatic techniques, we solve a general random matrix problem, namely the spectrum of a matrix \\frac{1}{T}XA{{X}\\dagger} , where X is an N× T Gaussian random matrix and A is any T× T , not necessarily symmetric (Hermitian) matrix. Using this result, we study the spectral features of the large lagged correlation matrices as a function of the depth of the time-lag. We also analyze the properties of left and right eigenvector correlations for the time-lagged matrices. We positively verify our results by the numerical simulations.

  1. Note: Fully integrated 3.2 Gbps quantum random number generator with real-time extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Nie, You-Qi; Liang, Hao; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@ustc.edu.cn; Pan, Jian-Wei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhou, Hongyi; Ma, Xiongfeng [Center for Quantum Information, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-07-15

    We present a real-time and fully integrated quantum random number generator (QRNG) by measuring laser phase fluctuations. The QRNG scheme based on laser phase fluctuations is featured for its capability of generating ultra-high-speed random numbers. However, the speed bottleneck of a practical QRNG lies on the limited speed of randomness extraction. To close the gap between the fast randomness generation and the slow post-processing, we propose a pipeline extraction algorithm based on Toeplitz matrix hashing and implement it in a high-speed field-programmable gate array. Further, all the QRNG components are integrated into a module, including a compact and actively stabilized interferometer, high-speed data acquisition, and real-time data post-processing and transmission. The final generation rate of the QRNG module with real-time extraction can reach 3.2 Gbps.

  2. Effect of 24 sessions of high-intensity aerobic interval training carried out at either high or moderate frequency, a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håvard Hatle

    Full Text Available The training response of an intensified period of high-intensity exercise is not clear. Therefore, we compared the cardiovascular adaptations of completing 24 high-intensity aerobic interval training sessions carried out for either three or eight weeks, respectively.Twenty-one healthy subjects (23.0±2.1 years, 10 females completed 24 high-intensity training sessions throughout a time-period of either eight weeks (moderate frequency, MF or three weeks (high frequency, HF followed by a detraining period of nine weeks without any training. In both groups, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was evaluated before training, at the 9(th and 17(th session and four days after the final 24(th training session. In the detraining phase VO2max was evaluated after 12 days and thereafter every second week for eight weeks. Left ventricular echocardiography, carbon monoxide lung diffusion transfer factor, brachial artery flow mediated dilatation and vastus lateralis citrate maximal synthase activity was tested before and after training.The cardiovascular adaptation after HF training was delayed compared to training with MF. Four days after ending training the HF group showed no improvement (+3.0%, p = 0.126, whereas the MF group reached their highest VO2max with a 10.7% improvement (p<0.001: group difference p = 0.035. The HF group reached their highest VO2max (6.1% increase, p = 0.026 twelve days into the detraining period, compared to a concomitant reduction to 7.9% of VO2max (p<0.001 above baseline in the MF group (group difference p = 0.609.Both HF and MF training of high-intensity aerobic exercise improves VO2max. The cardiovascular adaptation following a HF programme of high-intensity exercise is however delayed compared to MF training.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00733941.

  3. Effect of 24 Sessions of High-Intensity Aerobic Interval Training Carried out at Either High or Moderate Frequency, a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatle, Håvard; Støbakk, Per Kristian; Mølmen, Harald Edvard; Brønstad, Eivind; Tjønna, Arnt Erik; Steinshamn, Sigurd; Skogvoll, Eirik; Wisløff, Ulrik; Ingul, Charlotte Björk; Rognmo, Øivind

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The training response of an intensified period of high-intensity exercise is not clear. Therefore, we compared the cardiovascular adaptations of completing 24 high-intensity aerobic interval training sessions carried out for either three or eight weeks, respectively. Methods Twenty-one healthy subjects (23.0±2.1 years, 10 females) completed 24 high-intensity training sessions throughout a time-period of either eight weeks (moderate frequency, MF) or three weeks (high frequency, HF) followed by a detraining period of nine weeks without any training. In both groups, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was evaluated before training, at the 9th and 17th session and four days after the final 24th training session. In the detraining phase VO2max was evaluated after 12 days and thereafter every second week for eight weeks. Left ventricular echocardiography, carbon monoxide lung diffusion transfer factor, brachial artery flow mediated dilatation and vastus lateralis citrate maximal synthase activity was tested before and after training. Results The cardiovascular adaptation after HF training was delayed compared to training with MF. Four days after ending training the HF group showed no improvement (+3.0%, p = 0.126), whereas the MF group reached their highest VO2max with a 10.7% improvement (pperiod, compared to a concomitant reduction to 7.9% of VO2max (ptraining of high-intensity aerobic exercise improves VO2max. The cardiovascular adaptation following a HF programme of high-intensity exercise is however delayed compared to MF training. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00733941. PMID:24516645

  4. Study on the Business Cycle Model with Fractional-Order Time Delay under Random Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifei Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Time delay of economic policy and memory property in a real economy system is omnipresent and inevitable. In this paper, a business cycle model with fractional-order time delay which describes the delay and memory property of economic control is investigated. Stochastic averaging method is applied to obtain the approximate analytical solution. Numerical simulations are done to verify the method. The effects of the fractional order, time delay, economic control and random excitation on the amplitude of the economy system are investigated. The results show that time delay, fractional order and intensity of random excitation can all magnify the amplitude and increase the volatility of the economy system.

  5. Signal preserving and seismic random noise attenuation by Hurst exponent based time-frequency peak filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Yue; Lin, Hongbo; Yang, Baojun

    2015-11-01

    Attenuating random noise is of great significance in seismic data processing. In recent years, time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) has been successfully applied to seismic random noise attenuation field. However, a fixed window length (WL) is used in the conventional TFPF. Since a short WL in the TFPF is used to preserve signals while a long WL can eliminate random noise effectively, signal preserving and noise attenuation cannot be balanced by a fixed WL especially when the signal-to-noise ratio of the noisy seismic record is low. Thus, we need to divide a noisy signal into signal and noise segments before the filtering. Then a short WL is used to the signal segments to preserve signals and a long WL is chosen for noise segments to eliminate random noise. In this paper, we test the smoothness of signals and random noise in time using the Hurst exponent which is a statistic for representing smoothness characteristics of signals. The time-series of signals with higher smoothness which lead to larger Hurst exponent values, however random noise is a random series in time without fixed waveforms and thus its smoothness is low, so the signal and noise segments can be divided by the Hurst exponent values. After the segmentation, we can adopt different filtering WLs in the TFPF for different segments to make a trade-off between signal preserving and random noise attenuation. Synthetic and real data experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can remove random noise from seismic record and preserve reflection events effectively.

  6. Field application. Selective stimulation of reservoirs or perforated intervals with use of coiled tubing equipped with real-time data communication system in combination with straddle packer assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberascher, R.; Breimer, G. [GDF SUEZ E and P Deutschland GmbH, Lingen (Germany); Jonge, R.M. de [Baker Hughes (Netherlands)

    2013-08-01

    In two German gas wells a decline in production and wellhead pressures had been observed. Production logging data obtained by PLT surveys were evaluated, which showed that certain intervals within the reservoir section did not contribute, or showed a restricted contribution to the overall gas production. The restricted contribution was suspected to be caused by near-wellbore damage. To restore or enhance the production of the perforated intervals an acid treatment was considered in these wells in order to remove skin damage. To restore or enhance the production of the wells, an acid treatment of the perforated intervals was designed. For obtaining the required selective placement of the acid across the zones of interest, the use of coiled tubing (CT) in combination with a resettable straddle packer assembly was selected. The accuracy of the setting depth of the straddle packer was a critical issue for the execution of the well intervention operations. In order to obtain the required depth accuracy, the CT string was equipped with an intelligent CT communication system, which transfers real-time downhole data to surface. For the first time, a reservoir stimulation project was executed by combining CT equipped with a real-time data communication system (TeleCoil) and the Inflatable Straddle Acidizing Packer (ISAP) assembly. Inside the CT an encapsulated monoconductor cable was installed to transmit real-time data from the CT Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) to surface. The BHA consists of a Casing Collar Locator (CCL) and downhole pressure and temperature gauges. Due to the protective jacket of the monoconductor cable, there are no restrictions in the use of different fluids in combination with the system. Information provided by the CCL monitoring tool ensures accurate depth correlations, whereas differential pressure measurements from the down-hole pressure gauges provide positive information about the setting and sealing conditions of the straddle packer assembly. The

  7. Effect of time interval between core preparation and post cementation on pushout bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakan, Mahsa; Mosharraf, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of timing of coronal preparation on the pushout bond strength of fiber postluted with resin cement in the root canal. In this experimental study, 48 mandibular human premolars were selected in a 3-week range. After root canal treatment and postspace preparation, a post #2(Angelus, Brazil) was cemented into the canal by a resin-based cement (Bifix SE, VOCO, Germany). Cylindrical resin composite cores were built on the posts. Then, the specimens were divided into 4 groups of 12 specimens each: one control group without core preparation and 3 experimental groups with core preparation that was done 15 min, 1 h, and 24 h after postcementation. One day after postcementation, each root was sectioned into 3 segments. Each slice was connected to universal testing machine. The load was applied at the speed of 0.5 mm/min till failure happened. The collected data were analyzed (SPSS/PC 20.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test at P 0.05). Nevertheless, there were significant differences among root regions (P fiber post and bond strength is higher in the cervical segment.

  8. Exit times for a class of random walks: exact distribution results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    the exit possible has a Laplace transform which is a rational function. The expected exit time is also determined and the paper concludes with exact distribution results concerning exits from bounded intervals. The proofs use simple martingale techniques together with some classical expansions...

  9. Bayesian phase II adaptive randomization by jointly modeling time-to-event efficacy and binary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiudong; Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-01-01

    In oncology, toxicity is typically observable shortly after a chemotherapy treatment, whereas efficacy, often characterized by tumor shrinkage, is observable after a relatively long period of time. In a phase II clinical trial design, we propose a Bayesian adaptive randomization procedure that accounts for both efficacy and toxicity outcomes. We model efficacy as a time-to-event endpoint and toxicity as a binary endpoint, sharing common random effects in order to induce dependence between the bivariate outcomes. More generally, we allow the randomization probability to depend on patients' specific covariates, such as prognostic factors. Early stopping boundaries are constructed for toxicity and futility, and a superior treatment arm is recommended at the end of the trial. Following the setup of a recent renal cancer clinical trial at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, we conduct extensive simulation studies under various scenarios to investigate the performance of the proposed method, and compare it with available Bayesian adaptive randomization procedures.

  10. Continuous-Time Random Walk with multi-step memory: an application to market dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard

    2017-11-01

    An extended version of the Continuous-Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with memory is herein developed. This memory involves the dependence between arbitrary number of successive jumps of the process while waiting times between jumps are considered as i.i.d. random variables. This dependence was established analyzing empirical histograms for the stochastic process of a single share price on a market within the high frequency time scale. Then, it was justified theoretically by considering bid-ask bounce mechanism containing some delay characteristic for any double-auction market. Our model appeared exactly analytically solvable. Therefore, it enables a direct comparison of its predictions with their empirical counterparts, for instance, with empirical velocity autocorrelation function. Thus, the present research significantly extends capabilities of the CTRW formalism. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  11. Statistics of time delay and scattering correlation functions in chaotic systems. I. Random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    We consider the statistics of time delay in a chaotic cavity having M open channels, in the absence of time-reversal invariance. In the random matrix theory approach, we compute the average value of polynomial functions of the time delay matrix Q = - iħS†dS/dE, where S is the scattering matrix. Our results do not assume M to be large. In a companion paper, we develop a semiclassical approximation to S-matrix correlation functions, from which the statistics of Q can also be derived. Together, these papers contribute to establishing the conjectured equivalence between the random matrix and the semiclassical approaches.

  12. Statistics of time delay and scattering correlation functions in chaotic systems. I. Random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Marcel [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Ave. João Naves de Ávila, 2121, Uberlândia, MG 38408-100 (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    We consider the statistics of time delay in a chaotic cavity having M open channels, in the absence of time-reversal invariance. In the random matrix theory approach, we compute the average value of polynomial functions of the time delay matrix Q = − iħS{sup †}dS/dE, where S is the scattering matrix. Our results do not assume M to be large. In a companion paper, we develop a semiclassical approximation to S-matrix correlation functions, from which the statistics of Q can also be derived. Together, these papers contribute to establishing the conjectured equivalence between the random matrix and the semiclassical approaches.

  13. Sleep quality and high intensity interval training at two different times of day: A crossover study on the influence of the chronotype in male collegiate soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo A; Bonato, Matteo; Galasso, Letizia; La Torre, Antonio; Merati, Giampiero; Montaruli, Angela; Roveda, Eliana; Carandente, Franca

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the chronotype on the sleep quality in male collegiate soccer players in response to acute high intensity interval training (HIIT) performed at two different times of day was evaluated. The sleep quality was poorer in the morning-type than in the evening-type players after the evening HIIT session, whereas no significant changes in the sleep quality of the two chronotypes after the morning HIIT session was observed. The results suggest that an athlete's chronotype should be taken into account when scheduling training sessions and to promote faster recovery processes.

  14. Assessment of the Degree of Cure of the Composite Adhesive at Different Time Intervals after Initiating the Curing: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Vadgaonkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study was carried out on 25 extracted maxillary first bicuspids with the objective of estimating the degree of polymerization of adhesive beneath the base of the metal bracket at various time intervals after initiating light curing. The degree of polymerization was calculated by estimating the degree of absorbance exhibited by the adhesive under infrared spectroscopy (IRS. The percentage of polymerization increased steadily over a period of 1 hour after light curing. This may be attributed to the chain propagation reaction.

  15. A mathematical theory of stochastic microlensing. I. Random time delay functions and lensing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petters, A. O.; Rider, B.; Teguia, A. M.

    2009-07-01

    Stochastic microlensing is a central tool in probing dark matter on galactic scales. From first principles, we initiate the development of a mathematical theory of stochastic microlensing. Beginning with the random time delay function and associated lensing map, we determine exact expressions for the mean and variance of these transformations. In addition, we derive the probability density function (pdf) of a random point-mass potential, which form the constituent of a stochastic microlens potential. We characterize the exact pdf of a normalized random time delay function at the origin, showing that it is a shifted gamma distribution, which also holds at leading order in the limit of a large number of point masses if the normalized time delay function was at a general point of the lens plane. For the large number of point-mass limit, we also prove that the asymptotic pdf of the random lensing map under a specified scaling converges to a bivariate normal distribution. We show analytically that the pdf of the random scaled lensing map at leading order depends on the magnitude of the scaled bending angle due purely to point masses as well as demonstrate explicitly how this radial symmetry is broken at the next order. Interestingly, we found at leading order a formula linking the expectation and variance of the normalized random time delay function to the first Betti number of its domain. We also determine an asymptotic pdf for the random bending angle vector and find an integral expression for the probability of a lens plane point being near a fixed point. Lastly, we show explicitly how the results are affected by location in the lens plane. The results of this paper are relevant to the theory of random fields and provide a platform for further generalizations as well as analytical limits for checking astrophysical studies of stochastic microlensing.

  16. A Mixture Proportional Hazards Model with Random Effects for Response Times in Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new model for test response times is proposed that combines latent class analysis and the proportional hazards model with random effects in a similar vein as the mixture factor model. The model assumes the existence of different latent classes. In each latent class, the response times are distributed according to a…

  17. Subgeometric Ergodicity under Random-Time State-Dependent Drift Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokaedi V. Lekgari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by possible applications of Lyapunov techniques in the stability of stochastic networks, subgeometric ergodicity of Markov chains is investigated. In a nutshell, in this study we take a look at f-ergodic general Markov chains, subgeometrically ergodic at rate r, when the random-time Foster-Lyapunov drift conditions on a set of stopping times are satisfied.

  18. Influence of Inter-Training Intervals on Intermanual Transfer Effects in Upper-Limb Prosthesis Training : A Randomized Pre-Posttest Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkema, Sietske; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in prosthetic training using intermanual transfer (the transfer of motor skills from the trained, "unaffected" hand to the untrained, "affected" hand) has been shown in previous studies. The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the inter-training interval on the magnitude

  19. Random-effects regression analysis of correlated grouped-time survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedeker, D; Siddiqui, O; Hu, F B

    2000-04-01

    Random-effects regression modelling is proposed for analysis of correlated grouped-time survival data. Two analysis approaches are considered. The first treats survival time as an ordinal outcome, which is either right-censored or not. The second approach treats survival time as a set of dichotomous indicators of whether the event occurred for time periods up to the period of the event or censor. For either approach both proportional hazards and proportional odds versions of the random-effects model are developed, while partial proportional hazards and odds generalizations are described for the latter approach. For estimation, a full-information maximum marginal likelihood solution is implemented using numerical quadrature to integrate over the distribution of multiple random effects. The quadrature solution allows some flexibility in the choice of distributions for the random effects; both normal and rectangular distributions are considered in this article. An analysis of a dataset where students are clustered within schools is used to illustrate features of random-effects analysis of clustered grouped-time survival data.

  20. Randomized Caches Can Be Pretty Useful to Hard Real-Time Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Mezzetti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cache randomization per se, and its viability for probabilistic timing analysis (PTA of critical real-time systems, are receiving increasingly close attention from the scientific community and the industrial practitioners. In fact, the very notion of introducing randomness and probabilities in time-critical systems has caused strenuous debates owing to the apparent clash that this idea has with the strictly deterministic view traditionally held for those systems. A paper recently appeared in LITES (Reineke, J. (2014. Randomized Caches Considered Harmful in Hard Real-Time Systems. LITES, 1(1, 03:1-03:13. provides a critical analysis of the weaknesses and risks entailed in using randomized caches in hard real-time systems. In order to provide the interested reader with a fuller, balanced appreciation of the subject matter, a critical analysis of the benefits brought about by that innovation should be provided also. This short paper addresses that need by revisiting the array of issues addressed in the cited work, in the light of the latest advances to the relevant state of the art. Accordingly, we show that the potential benefits of randomized caches do offset their limitations, causing them to be - when used in conjunction with PTA - a serious competitor to conventional designs.

  1. Product interval automata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We identify a subclass of timed automata called product interval automata and develop its theory. These automata consist of a network of timed agents with the key restriction being that there is just one clock for each agent and the way the clocks are read and reset is determined by the distribution of shared actions across ...

  2. Extended time-interval analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall; Riisager, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Several extensions of the halflife analysis method recently suggested by Horvat and Hardy are put forward. Goodness-of-fit testing is included, and the method is extended to cases where more information is available for each decay event which allows applications also for e.g. γ decay data. The re...

  3. Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting (24th) Held in McLean, VA on December 1-3, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Premoli, Dip. di Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica Universita di Trieste and Patrizia Tavella, Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale G. Ferraris Time...to banking manoeuvers. l FIAT CIEI S.p.A., I)iv. SEPA - Corso Giulio Cesare 300 - 10154 Torino fitalyl 2 Time & Frequency Ltd., TFL - 14, Habanai...Amedeo Premoli Dip. di Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica UniversitA di Trieste, Via A. Valerio 10, 34127, Trieste, Italy Patrizia Tavella

  4. Exact distributions of cover times for N independent random walkers in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2016-12-01

    We study the probability density function (PDF) of the cover time tc of a finite interval of size L by N independent one-dimensional Brownian motions, each with diffusion constant D . The cover time tc is the minimum time needed such that each point of the entire interval is visited by at least one of the N walkers. We derive exact results for the full PDF of tc for arbitrary N ≥1 for both reflecting and periodic boundary conditions. The PDFs depend explicitly on N and on the boundary conditions. In the limit of large N , we show that tc approaches its average value of ≈L2/(16 D lnN ) with fluctuations vanishing as 1 /(lnN) 2 . We also compute the centered and scaled limiting distributions for large N for both boundary conditions and show that they are given by nontrivial N independent scaling functions.

  5. The effect of spatial randomness on the average fixation time of mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang-Sardroodi, Suzan; Darooneh, Amir H.; Nikbakht, Moladad; Kohandel, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The mean conditional fixation time of a mutant is an important measure of stochastic population dynamics, widely studied in ecology and evolution. Here, we investigate the effect of spatial randomness on the mean conditional fixation time of mutants in a constant population of cells, N. Specifically, we assume that fitness values of wild type cells and mutants at different locations come from given probability distributions and do not change in time. We study spatial arrangements of cells on regular graphs with different degrees, from the circle to the complete graph, and vary assumptions on the fitness probability distributions. Some examples include: identical probability distributions for wild types and mutants; cases when only one of the cell types has random fitness values while the other has deterministic fitness; and cases where the mutants are advantaged or disadvantaged. Using analytical calculations and stochastic numerical simulations, we find that randomness has a strong impact on fixation time. In the case of complete graphs, randomness accelerates mutant fixation for all population sizes, and in the case of circular graphs, randomness delays mutant fixation for N larger than a threshold value (for small values of N, different behaviors are observed depending on the fitness distribution functions). These results emphasize fundamental differences in population dynamics under different assumptions on cell connectedness. They are explained by the existence of randomly occurring “dead zones” that can significantly delay fixation on networks with low connectivity; and by the existence of randomly occurring “lucky zones” that can facilitate fixation on networks of high connectivity. Results for death-birth and birth-death formulations of the Moran process, as well as for the (haploid) Wright Fisher model are presented. PMID:29176825

  6. An Improved Semisoft Threshold Algorithm and Its Evaluation for Denoising Random Walk in GNSS Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Hao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The differences in the satellite orbit and signal quality of global navigation satellite positioning system, resulting in the complexity of random walk noise in GNSS time series, has become a bottleneck problem in applying GNSS technology to the high precision deformation monitoring industry. For the complex characteristics of random walk noise, small magnitude, low frequency and low sensitivity, an improved semisoft threshold algorithm is presented. Then it forms a unified system of semisoft threshold function, so as to improve the adaptability of conventional semisoft threshold for random walk noise. In order to verify and evaluate the effect of improved semisoft threshold algorithm, MATLAB platform is used to generate a linear trend, periodic and random walk noise of the GNSS time series, a total of 1700 epochs. The results show that the improved semisoft threshold method is better than the classical method, and has better performance in the SNR and root mean square error. The evaluation results show that the morphological character has been performanced high consistency between the noise reduced by improved method with random walk noise. Further from the view of quantitative point, the evaluation results of spectral index analysis verify the applicability of the improved method for random walk noise.

  7. A queueing system with a fixed accumulation level, random server capacity and capacity dependent service time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewgeni H. Dshalalow

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a bulk queueing system with a single server processing groups of customers of a variable size. If upon completion of service the queueing level is at least r the server takes a batch of size r and processes it a random time arbitrarily distributed. If the queueing level is less than r the server idles until the queue accumulates r customers in total. Then the server capacity is generated by a random number equals the batch size taken for service which lasts an arbitrarily distributed time dependent on the batch size.

  8. From Pseudorandom Walk to Pseudo-Brownian Motion: First Exit Time from a One-Sided or a Two-Sided Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Lachal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let N be a positive integer, c a positive constant and (ξnn≥1 be a sequence of independent identically distributed pseudorandom variables. We assume that the ξn’s take their values in the discrete set {-N,-N+1,…,N-1,N} and that their common pseudodistribution is characterized by the (positive or negative real numbers ℙ{ξn=k}=δk0+(-1k-1c(2Nk+N for any k∈{-N,-N+1,…,N-1,N}. Let us finally introduce (Snn≥0 the associated pseudorandom walk defined on ℤ by S0=0 and Sn=∑j=1n‍ξj for n≥1. In this paper, we exhibit some properties of (Snn≥0. In particular, we explicitly determine the pseudodistribution of the first overshooting time of a given threshold for (Snn≥0 as well as that of the first exit time from a bounded interval. Next, with an appropriate normalization, we pass from the pseudorandom walk to the pseudo-Brownian motion driven by the high-order heat-type equation ∂/∂t=(-1N-1c∂2N/∂x2N. We retrieve the corresponding pseudodistribution of the first overshooting time of a threshold for the pseudo-Brownian motion (Lachal, 2007. In the same way, we get the pseudodistribution of the first exit time from a bounded interval for the pseudo-Brownian motion which is a new result for this pseudoprocess.

  9. Does Time-to-Chemotherapy Impact the Outcomes of Resected Ovarian Cancer? Meta-analysis of Randomized and Observational Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; França, Monique Sedlmaier; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Taranto, Patricia; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Del Giglio, Auro

    2017-02-01

    This study is a meta-analysis of prior publications evaluating the impact of time-to-chemotherapy (TTC) on disease recurrence and survival 3 years after the original surgery. We performed a meta-analysis of studies published in PubMed (1950-2016) as of April 2016. Inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trials and prospective or retrospective cohorts that included patients with ovarian cancer who had undergone surgery with curative intent and use of adjuvant chemotherapy. We compared rates of disease recurrence and death according to the TTC ("early" vs "delayed") using a random-effects model and performed a metaregression to evaluate the impact of covariates on these outcomes. Of 239 abstracts in the original search, 12 were considered eligible. The cutoffs used for TTC were between 20 and 40 days. All studies used a platinum-based chemotherapy, and the rates of patients with suboptimal resection varied from 33% to 70%. A longer TTC was not associated with higher rates of disease recurrence (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.24) or death at 3 years (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.24). There was no evidence of significant publication bias (Egger test P = 0.472), but data were heterogeneous (I = 64.3%). Metaregression showed that the percentage of patients with suboptimal surgery and values used as cutoff to define "delayed" chemotherapy combined were a significant source of bias (residual I = 0%). In our analysis, TTC after surgery for ovarian cancer with curative intent was not associated with higher risk of disease recurrence or death. However, this association was influenced by the rate of optimal debulking and definition of "late" initiation of chemotherapy, so we must be careful when applying these data to patients with complete resection.

  10. The effect of a multidisciplinary obstetric emergency team training program, the In Time course, on diagnosis to delivery interval following umbilical cord prolapse - A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copson, Sean; Calvert, Katrina; Raman, Puvaneswary; Nathan, Elizabeth; Epee, Mathias

    2017-06-01

    Cord prolapse is an uncommon obstetric emergency, with potentially fatal consequences for the baby if prompt action is not taken. Simulation training provides a means by which uncommon emergencies can be practised, with the aim of improving teamwork and clinical outcomes. This study aimed to determine if the introduction of a simulation-based training course was associated with an improvement in the management of cord prolapse, in particular the diagnosis to delivery interval. We also aimed to investigate if an improvement in perinatal outcomes could be demonstrated. A retrospective cohort study was performed. All cases of cord prolapse in the designated time period were identified and reviewed and a comparison of outcome measures pre- and post-training was undertaken. Thirty-one cases were identified in the pre-training period, and compared to 64 cases post-training. Documentation improved significantly post-training. There were non-significant improvements in use of spinal anaesthetic, and in the length of stay in the special care neonatal unit. There was a significant increase in the number of babies with Apgar scores less than seven at 5 min. There were no differences in the diagnosis to delivery interval, or in perinatal mortality rates. Obstetric emergency training was associated with improved teamwork, as evidenced by the improved documentation post-training in this study, but not with improved diagnosis to delivery interval. Long-term follow-up studies are required to ascertain whether training has an impact on longer-term paediatric outcomes, such as cerebral palsy rates. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Establishing maintenance intervals based on measurement reliability of engineering endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P J

    2000-01-01

    Methods developed by the metrological community and principles used by the research community were integrated to provide a basis for a periodic maintenance interval analysis system. Engineering endpoints are used as measurement attributes on which to base two primary quality indicators: accuracy and reliability. Also key to establishing appropriate maintenance intervals is the ability to recognize two primary failure modes: random failure and time-related failure. The primary objective of the maintenance program is to avert predictable and preventable device failure, and understanding time-related failures enables service personnel to set intervals accordingly.

  12. Proceedings of Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting (23rd) held in Pasadena, California on December 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-05

    Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica Universita’ di Trieste Via A. Valerio, 10 34127, Trieste, Italy Abstract The popular 3-cornered hat method used for...3500 cer reekRoadCorso Giulio Cesare, 294-300 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0867 USA Corso 1iu5io Ceae9Torino 10154, ITAIlY Kevin Daly 39 11 2682 523 Odetics G... Corso Abruzzi TrueTime, Incorporated Torino 10123 ITALY 3243 Santa Rosa Avenue 38 1156 44 035 Santa Rosa, CA 95407 USA Martin W. Levine 707/528-1230

  13. Socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis, and in time intervals on the lung cancer pathway from first symptom to treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lynne F; Sowden, Sarah; Rubin, Greg; White, Martin; Adams, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Cancer diagnosis at an early stage increases the chance of curative treatment and of survival. It has been suggested that delays on the pathway from first symptom to diagnosis and treatment may be socio-economically patterned, and contribute to socio-economic differences in receipt of treatment and in cancer survival. This review aimed to assess the published evidence for socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis of lung cancer, and in the length of time spent on the lung cancer pathway. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases were searched to locate cohort studies of adults with a primary diagnosis of lung cancer, where the outcome was stage at diagnosis or the length of time spent within an interval on the care pathway, or a suitable proxy measure, analysed according to a measure of socio-economic position. Meta-analysis was undertaken when there were studies available with suitable data. Of the 461 records screened, 39 papers were included in the review (20 from the UK) and seven in a final meta-analysis for stage at diagnosis. There was no evidence of socio-economic inequalities in late stage at diagnosis in the most, compared with the least, deprived group (OR=1.04, 95% CI=0.92 to 1.19). No socio-economic inequalities in the patient interval or in time from diagnosis to treatment were found. Socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis are thought to be an important explanatory factor for survival inequalities in cancer. However, socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis were not found in a meta-analysis for lung cancer. CRD42014007145. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. The time interval between the onset of tricuspid E wave and annular Ea wave (TE-Ea) can predict right atrial pressure in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Nasim; Amin, Ahmad; Haghighi, Zahra Ojaghi; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Taghavi, Sepideh; Maleki, Majid

    2014-11-01

    There is conflicting data regarding the tricuspid annular velocities and their relation to right ventricular filling pressures. We aimed to assess if the time interval between the onset of tricuspid E wave and annular Ea wave has any correlation with right sided filling pressure in patients with heart failure. Thirty heart failure patients (left ventricular ejection fraction≤35%) were enrolled. Echocardiography was performed to obtain tricuspid inflow and tissue Doppler annular velocities just before a standard right heart catheterization. The right atrial pressure was obtained from right heart catheterization. The E/Ea [the ratio of peak velocity of early tricuspid inflow wave (E) to peak velocity of early diastolic wave of the lateral tricuspid annulus (Ea)] and the time intervals between the beginning of R wave of electrocardiogram and onset of E (TE) as well as between the beginning of R wave and onset of Et (TEa) were measured, TE-Ea was calculated as TE-TEa. The mean right atrial pressure (RAP) was 8.8 (SD=4.7) mm Hg. The mean TE-Ea was + 8.61 milliseconds. There was no significant correlation between RAP and E/Ea (r=0.08, p>0.05) but the correlation between TE-Ea and RAP was significant (r=0.5, p=0.01). According to our results and in contrary to some prior studies, we showed for the first time that right side TE-Ea stands as a better surrogate of right atrial pressure than E/Ea in heart failure patients. This finding needs more accurate studies and could present TE-Ea as a feasible tool to look into hemodynamics of heart failure patients.

  15. Operating Room Time Savings with the Use of Splint Packs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most expensive variable in the operating room (OR is time. Lean Process Management is being used in the medical field to improve efficiency in the OR. Streamlining individual processes within the OR is crucial to a comprehensive time saving and cost-cutting health care strategy. At our institution, one hour of OR time costs approximately $500, exclusive of supply and personnel costs. Commercially prepared splint packs (SP contain all components necessary for plaster-of-Paris short-leg splint application and have the potential to decrease splint application time and overall costs by making it a more lean process. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing OR time savings between SP use and bulk supply (BS splint application. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult operative patients on whom post-operative short-leg splint immobilization was indicated were randomized to either a control group using BS or an experimental group using SP. One orthopaedic surgeon (EMB prepared and applied all of the splints in a standardized fashion. Retrieval time, preparation time, splint application time, and total splinting time for both groups were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The retrieval time, preparation time and total splinting time were significantly less (p

  16. Fractal Time Random Walk and Subrecoil Laser Cooling Considered as Renewal Processes with Infinite Mean Waiting Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardou, F.

    There exist important stochastic physical processes involving infinite mean waiting times. The mean divergence has dramatic consequences on the process dynamics. Fractal time random walks, a diffusion process, and subrecoil laser cooling, a concentration process, are two such processes that look qualitatively dissimilar. Yet, a unifying treatment of these two processes, which is the topic of this pedagogic paper, can be developed by combining renewal theory with the generalized central limit theorem. This approach enables to derive without technical difficulties the key physical properties and it emphasizes the role of the behaviour of sums with infinite means.

  17. An online spaced-education game among clinicians improves their patients' time to blood pressure control: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Turchin, Alexander; Breydo, Eugene; Gagnon, David; Conlin, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Many patients with high blood pressure (BP) do not have antihypertensive medications appropriately intensified at clinician visits. We investigated whether an online spaced-education (SE) game among primary care clinicians can decrease time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. A 2-arm randomized trial was conducted over 52 weeks among primary care clinicians at 8 hospitals. Educational content consisted of 32 validated multiple-choice questions with explanations on hypertension management. Providers were randomized into 2 groups: SE clinicians were enrolled in the game, whereas control clinicians received identical educational content in an online posting. SE game clinicians were e-mailed 1 question every 3 days. Adaptive game mechanics resent questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly or correctly, respectively. Clinicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice consecutively. Posting of relative performance among peers fostered competition. Primary outcome measure was time to BP target (game was completed by 87% of clinicians (48/55), whereas 84% of control clinicians (47/56) read the online posting. In multivariable analysis of 17 866 hypertensive periods among 14 336 patients, the hazard ratio for time to BP target in the SE game cohort was 1.043 (95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.081; P=0.018). The number of hypertensive episodes needed to treat to normalize one additional patient's BP was 67.8. The number of clinicians needed to teach to achieve this was 0.43. An online SE game among clinicians generated a modest but significant reduction in the time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00904007. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Tight Bounds on the Optimization Time of a Randomized Search Heuristic on Linear Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of randomized search heuristics on classes of functions is fundamental to the understanding of the underlying stochastic process and the development of suitable proof techniques. Recently, remarkable progress has been made in bounding the expected optimization time of a simple...

  19. Transistor-Level Statistical Timing Analysis : Solving Random Differential Equations Directly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this Ph.D. thesis, a novel non-MC Random differential Equation based Statistical Timing Analysis (RESTA) method is proposed, which considers both process variations and electrical circuit effects, such as multiple input simultaneous switching and crosstalk effects. To make the approach practical

  20. Inversion-based data-driven time-space domain random noise attenuation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Min; Li, Guo-Fa; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Zhen-Xiao; Tang, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Wen-Bo

    2017-12-01

    Conventional time-space domain and frequency-space domain prediction filtering methods assume that seismic data consists of two parts, signal and random noise. That is, the so-called additive noise model. However, when estimating random noise, it is assumed that random noise can be predicted from the seismic data by convolving with a prediction error filter. That is, the source-noise model. Model inconsistencies, before and after denoising, compromise the noise attenuation and signal-preservation performances of prediction filtering methods. Therefore, this study presents an inversion-based time-space domain random noise attenuation method to overcome the model inconsistencies. In this method, a prediction error filter (PEF), is first estimated from seismic data; the filter characterizes the predictability of the seismic data and adaptively describes the seismic data's space structure. After calculating PEF, it can be applied as a regularized constraint in the inversion process for seismic signal from noisy data. Unlike conventional random noise attenuation methods, the proposed method solves a seismic data inversion problem using regularization constraint; this overcomes the model inconsistency of the prediction filtering method. The proposed method was tested on both synthetic and real seismic data, and results from the prediction filtering method and the proposed method are compared. The testing demonstrated that the proposed method suppresses noise effectively and provides better signal-preservation performance.

  1. On the Discrete-Time Geo/G/1 Queue with Vacations in Random Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete-time Geo/G/1 queue with vacations in random environment is analyzed. Using the method of supplementary variable, we give the probability generating function (PGF of the stationary queue length distribution at arbitrary epoch. The PGF of the stationary sojourn time distribution is also derived. And we present the various performance measures such as mean number of customers in the system, mean length of the type-i cycle, and mean time that the system resides in phase 0. In addition, we show that the M/G/1 queue with vacations in random environment can be approximated by its discrete-time counterpart. Finally, we present some special cases of the model and numerical examples.

  2. Effect of High-Intensity Interval Versus Continuous Exercise Training on Functional Capacity and Quality of Life in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaureguizar, Koldobika Villelabeitia; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Bautista, Lorena Ruiz; de la Peña, Cesar Hernández; Gómez, María José Arriaza; Rueda, María José Calero; Fernández Mahillo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that exercise training has beneficial health effects in patients with cardiovascular disease. Most studies have focused on moderate continuous training (MCT); however, a body of evidence has begun to emerge demonstrating that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has significantly better results in terms of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MCT versus HIIT on functional capacity and quality of life and to assess safety. Seventy-two patients with ischemic heart disease were assigned to either HIIT or MCT for 8 weeks. We analyzed cardiopulmonary exercise test data, quality of life, and adverse events. High-intensity interval training resulted in a significantly greater increase in (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak (4.5 ± 4.7 mL·kg·min) compared with MCT (2.5 ± 3.6 mL·kg·min) (P training protocols improved quality of life. No adverse events were reported in either of the groups. On the basis of the results of this study, HIIT should be considered for use in cardiac rehabilitation as it resulted in a greater increase in functional capacity compared with MCT. We also observed greater improvement in quality of life without any increase in cardiovascular risk.

  3. Escape probability and mean residence time in random flows with unsteady drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannan James R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate fluid transport in random velocity fields with unsteady drift. First, we propose to quantify fluid transport between flow regimes of different characteristic motion, by escape probability and mean residence time. We then develop numerical algorithms to solve for escape probability and mean residence time, which are described by backward Fokker-Planck type partial differential equations. A few computational issues are also discussed. Finally, we apply these ideas and numerical algorithms to a tidal flow model.

  4. Typical solution time for a vertex-covering algorithm on finite-connectivity random graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Weigt, Martin; Hartmann, Alexander K.

    2000-01-01

    In this letter, we analytically describe the typical solution time needed by a backtracking algorithm to solve the vertex-cover problem on finite-connectivity random graphs. We find two different transitions: The first one is algorithm-dependent and marks the dynamical transition from linear to exponential solution times. The second one gives the maximum computational complexity, and is found exactly at the threshold where the system undergoes an algorithm-independent phase transition in its ...

  5. Methods of Reverberation Mapping. I. Time-lag Determination by Measures of Randomness

    OpenAIRE

    Chelouche, Doron; Nuñez, Francisco Pozo; Zucker, Shay

    2017-01-01

    A class of methods for measuring time delays between astronomical time series is introduced in the context of quasar reverberation mapping, which is based on measures of randomness or complexity of the data. Several distinct statistical estimators are considered that do not rely on polynomial interpolations of the light curves nor on their stochastic modeling, and do not require binning in correlation space. Methods based on von Neumann's mean-square successive-difference estimator are found ...

  6. Seismic random noise attenuation by time-frequency peak filtering based on joint time-frequency distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Lin, Hong-bo; Li, Yue; Yang, Bao-jun

    2013-09-01

    Time-Frequency Peak Filtering (TFPF) is an effective method to eliminate pervasive random noise when seismic signals are analyzed. In conventional TFPF, the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD) is used for estimating instantaneous frequency (IF), but is sensitive to noise interferences that mask the borderline between signal and noise and detract the energy concentration on the IF curve. This leads to the deviation of the peaks of the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution from the instantaneous frequency, which is the cause of undesirable lateral oscillations as well as of amplitude attenuation of the highly varying seismic signal, and ultimately of the biased seismic signal. With the purpose to overcome greatly these drawbacks and increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we propose in this paper a TFPF refinement that is based upon the joint time-frequency distribution (JTFD). The joint time-frequency distribution is obtained by the combination of the PWVD and smooth PWVD (SPWVD). First we use SPWVD to generate a broad time-frequency area of the signal. Then this area is filtered with a step function to remove some divergent time-frequency points. Finally, the joint time-frequency distribution JTFD is obtained from PWVD weighted by this filtered distribution. The objective pursued with all these operations is to reduce the effects of the interferences and enhance the energy concentration around the IF of the signal in the time-frequency domain. Experiments with synthetic and real seismic data demonstrate that TFPF based on the joint time-frequency distribution can effectively suppress strong random noise and preserve events of interest.

  7. Continuous-time random walk: exact solutions for the probability density function and first two moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok Sau Fa [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa-PR (Brazil); Joni Fat, E-mail: kwok@dfi.uem.br [Jurusan Teknik Elektro-Fakultas Teknik, Universitas Tarumanagara, Jl. Let. Jend. S. Parman 1, Blok L, Lantai 3 Grogol, Jakarta 11440 (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    We consider the decoupled continuous-time random walk model with a finite characteristic waiting time and approximate jump length variance. We take the waiting time probability density function (PDF) given by a combination of the exponential and the Mittag-Leffler function. Using this waiting time PDF, we investigate the diffusion behavior for all times. We obtain exact solutions for the first two moments and the PDF for the force-free and linear force cases. Due to the finite characteristic waiting time and jump length variance, the model presents, for the force-free case, normal diffusive behavior in the long-time limit. Further, the model can describe anomalous behavior at intermediate times.

  8. Richly parameterized linear models additive, time series, and spatial models using random effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, James S

    2013-01-01

    A First Step toward a Unified Theory of Richly Parameterized Linear ModelsUsing mixed linear models to analyze data often leads to results that are mysterious, inconvenient, or wrong. Further compounding the problem, statisticians lack a cohesive resource to acquire a systematic, theory-based understanding of models with random effects.Richly Parameterized Linear Models: Additive, Time Series, and Spatial Models Using Random Effects takes a first step in developing a full theory of richly parameterized models, which would allow statisticians to better understand their analysis results. The aut

  9. What Is the Optimal Time to Retest Patients With a Urogenital Chlamydia Infection? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Jannie J; Koekenbier, Rik H; van Rooijen, Martijn S; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; de Vries, Henry J C

    2018-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a common, often recurring sexually transmitted infection, with serious adverse outcomes in women. Current guidelines recommend retesting after a chlamydia infection, but the optimum timing is unknown. We assessed the optimal retest interval after urogenital chlamydia treatment. A randomized controlled trial among urogenital chlamydia nucleic acid amplification test positive heterosexual clients of the Amsterdam sexually transmitted infection clinic. After treatment, patients were randomly assigned for retesting 8, 16, or 26 weeks later. Patients could choose to do this at home (and send a self-collected sample by mail) or at the clinic. Retest uptake and chlamydia positivity at follow-up were calculated. Between May 2012 and March 2013, 2253 patients were included (45% men; median age, 23 years; interquartile range, 21-26). The overall uptake proportion within 35 weeks after the initial visit was significantly higher in the 8-week group (77%) compared with the 16- and 26-week groups (67% and 64%, respectively, P < 0.001), and the positivity proportions among those retested were comparable (P = 0.169). The proportion of people with a diagnosed recurrent chlamydia infection among all randomized was similar between the groups (n = 69 [8.6%], n = 52 [7.4%], and n = 69 [9.3%]; P = 0.4). Patients with a recent urogenital chlamydia are at high risk of recurrence of chlamydia and retesting them is an effective way of detecting chlamydia cases. We recommend inviting patients for a re-test 8 weeks after the initial diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Interference Cancellation Using Replica Signal for HTRCI-MIMO/OFDM in Time-Variant Large Delay Spread Longer Than Guard Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Ida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO are generally known as the effective techniques for high data rate services. In MIMO/OFDM systems, the channel estimation (CE is very important to obtain an accurate channel state information (CSI. However, since the orthogonal pilot-based CE requires the large number of pilot symbols, the total transmission rate is degraded. To mitigate this problem, a high time resolution carrier interferometry (HTRCI for MIMO/OFDM has been proposed. In wireless communication systems, if the maximum delay spread is longer than the guard interval (GI, the system performance is significantly degraded due to the intersymbol interference (ISI and intercarrier interference (ICI. However, the conventional HTRCI-MIMO/OFDM does not consider the case with the time-variant large delay spread longer than the GI. In this paper, we propose the ISI and ICI compensation methods for a HTRCI-MIMO/OFDM in the time-variant large delay spread longer than the GI.

  11. Internet based gripper teleoperation with random time delay by using haptic feedback and SEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaonong; Song, Aiguo; Zhang, Huatao; Ji, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Random time delay may cause instability in the internet based teleoperation system. Transparency and intuitiveness are also very important for operator to control the system to accurately perform the desired action, especially for the gripper teleoperation system. This paper presents a new grip force control method of gripper teleoperation system with haptic feedback. The system employs the SEMG signal as the control parameter in order to enhance the intuitive control experience for operator. In order to eliminate the impacts on the system stability caused by random time delay, a non-time based teleoperation method is applied to the control process. Besides, neural network and designed fuzzy logic controller is also utilized to improve this control method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by experiment results.

  12. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida

    2014-01-01

    intravenous administration of the same drug, resulting in bias favouring the control intervention, RHR 1.33 (0.98 to 1.82). Seven trials of cytomegalovirus retinitis, tibial fracture and multiple sclerosis compared experimental interventions with standard control interventions, e.g. placebo, no-treatment......BACKGROUND: We wanted to evaluate the impact of nonblinded outcome assessors on estimated treatment effects in time-to-event trials. METHODS: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessors of the same time-to-event outcome. Two authors agreed on inclusion...... or active control, resulting in bias favouring the experimental intervention, RHR 0.73 (0.57 to 0.93), indicating an average exaggeration of nonblinded hazard ratios by 27% (7% to 43%). CONCLUSIONS: Lack of blinded outcome assessors in randomized trials with subjective time-to-event outcomes causes high...

  13. Chronological bias in randomized clinical trials arising from different types of unobserved time trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, M; Hilgers, R-D

    2014-01-01

    In clinical trials patients are commonly recruited sequentially over time incurring the risk of chronological bias due to (unobserved) time trends. To minimize the risk of chronological bias, a suitable randomization procedure should be chosen. Considering different time trend scenarios, we aim at a detailed evaluation of the extent of chronological bias under permuted block randomization in order to provide recommendations regarding the choice of randomization at the design stage of a clinical trial and to assess the maximum extent of bias for a realized sequence in the analysis stage. For the assessment of chronological bias we consider linear, logarithmic and stepwise trends illustrating typical changes during recruitment in clinical practice. Bias and variance of the treatment effect estimator as well as the empirical type I error rate when applying the t-test are investigated. Different sample sizes, block sizes and strengths of time trends are considered. Using large block sizes, a notable bias exists in the estimate of the treatment effect for specific sequences. This results in a heavily inflated type I error for realized worst-case sequences and an enlarged mean squared error of the treatment effect estimator. Decreasing the block size restricts these effects of time trends. Already applying permuted block randomization with two blocks instead of the random allocation rule achieves a good reduction of the mean squared error and of the inflated type I error. Averaged over all sequences, the type I error of the t-test is far below the nominal significance level due to an overestimated variance. Unobserved time trends can induce a strong bias in the treatment effect estimate and in the test decision. Therefore, already in the design stage of a clinical trial a suitable randomization procedure should be chosen. According to our results, small block sizes should be preferred, but also medium block sizes are sufficient to restrict chronological bias to an

  14. Intervalo entre o Nascimento de Gêmeos: Morbidade e Mortalidade do Segundo Gemelar Time Interval between Twin Delivery: Morbidity and Mortality in the Second Twin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Luiz Fava

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: avaliar o efeito do intervalo de tempo entre o nascimento de gêmeos sobre a morbidade e a mortalidade neonatal do segundo gemelar. Métodos: realizamos um estudo retrospectivo em 50 gemelíparas atendidas na Maternidade Pró-Matre de Vitória que pariram 100 recém-natos vivos, por via vaginal, com peso superior a 500 g e sem malformações maiores. Separamos os recém-natos em G1 (primeiro gêmeo e G2 (segundo gêmeo. Foram considerados como indicativos de morbidade neonatal: asfixia ao nascimento, caracterizada pelo índice de Apgar inferior a 7, no 1º minuto de vida; síndrome do desconforto respiratório, apurada à luz de dados clínicos e radiológicos, e tempo de internação hospitalar superior a 4 dias. Foi analisada também a mortalidade intra-hospitalar. Quanto ao estudo do intervalo de tempo de parturição entre os gêmeos (deltat, realizamos pontos de corte de 5 em 5 minutos, até 35 minutos. Fizemos, também, análise por faixas de tempo: deltat até 5 minutos, de 6 a 10, de 11 a 15, de 16 a 20 e de 21 a 150 minutos. Resultados: não houve diferença estatisticamente significante (pPurpose: to evaluate the impact of birth time interval between twins in relation to the morbidity and mortality of the second newborn twin. Methods: this is a retrospective study of 50 women with twin pregnancy at the `Maternidade Pró-Matre de Vitória' who gave birth to 100 alive newborns through the vaginal canal, weighing each over 500 g and not having any major malformations. The newborns were separated into two groups: G1 (first twin and G2 (second twin. The following criteria were considered to be indicative of newborn morbidity: asphyxia at birth, characterized by Apgar index lower than 7 in the first minute of life; respiratory distress syndrome detected by clinical and radiological findings, and hospitalization period longer than 4 days. In-hospital mortality was analyzed as well. Cut off was at every 5 minutes, up to 35 minutes

  15. Mean First Passage Time of Preferential Random Walks on Complex Networks with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongtuan Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates, both theoretically and numerically, preferential random walks (PRW on weighted complex networks. By using two different analytical methods, two exact expressions are derived for the mean first passage time (MFPT between two nodes. On one hand, the MFPT is got explicitly in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix associated with the transition matrix of PRW. On the other hand, the center-product-degree (CPD is introduced as one measure of node strength and it plays a main role in determining the scaling of the MFPT for the PRW. Comparative studies are also performed on PRW and simple random walks (SRW. Numerical simulations of random walks on paradigmatic network models confirm analytical predictions and deepen discussions in different aspects. The work may provide a comprehensive approach for exploring random walks on complex networks, especially biased random walks, which may also help to better understand and tackle some practical problems such as search and routing on networks.

  16. Seasonal cycles of the TBE and Lyme borreliosis vector Ixodes ricinus modelled with time-lagged and interval-averaged predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Katharina; Walter, Melanie; Chitimia-Dobler, Lidia; Dobler, Gerhard; Rubel, Franz

    2017-12-01

    Ticks of the species Ixodes ricinus (L.) are the major vectors for tick-borne diseases in Europe. The aim of this study was to quantify the influence of environmental variables on the seasonal cycle of questing I. ricinus. Therefore, an 8-year time series of nymphal I. ricinus flagged at monthly intervals in Haselmühl (Germany) was compiled. For the first time, cross correlation maps were applied to identify optimal associations between observed nymphal I. ricinus densities and time-lagged as well as temporal averaged explanatory variables. To prove the explanatory power of these associations, two Poisson regression models were generated. The first model simulates the ticks of the entire time series flagged per 100 m[Formula: see text], the second model the mean seasonal cycle. Explanatory variables comprise the temperature of the flagging month, the relative humidity averaged from the flagging month and 1 month prior to flagging, the temperature averaged over 4-6 months prior to the flagging event and the hunting statistics of the European hare from the preceding year. The first model explains 65% of the monthly tick variance and results in a root mean square error (RMSE) of 17 ticks per 100 m[Formula: see text]. The second model explains 96% of the tick variance. Again, the accuracy is expressed by the RMSE, which is 5 ticks per 100 m[Formula: see text]. As a major result, this study demonstrates that tick densities are higher correlated with time-lagged and temporal averaged variables than with contemporaneous explanatory variables, resulting in a better model performance.

  17. Influência do intervalo de tempo entre as sessões de alongamento no ganho de flexibilidade dos isquiotibiais Influence of the time interval between stretching sessions on increased hamstring flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenewton André da Silva Gama

    2009-04-01

    .8 years, were randomly distributed into three groups. Group 0X was the control and performed no stretching. Group 3X (n = 10 took part in three sessions per week (interval = 48 hours and group 5X (n = 10 in five times (interval = 24 hours. Ten stretching sessions were applied (hold-relax to the right hamstring. The measurement of active knee extension was performed using photometric analyses on AutoCAD® 2000 software. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc test for a significance level of p < 0.05. RESULTS: After 10 sessions, increased flexibility was identified in the experimental groups (p < 0.01, but with no difference between them. Group 3X significantly increased flexibility from the tenth day of the program (fifth session and group 5X from the third day (third session. CONCLUSIONS: Stretching increases hamstring flexibility, regardless of the time between sessions (24 or 48 hours. Moreover, the interval between the sessions does not influence total flexibility gain. However, with five weekly stretching sessions, flexibility increases more rapidly than it does with three, suggesting that flexibility gain is session-dependent.

  18. Twelve Weeks of Sprint Interval Training Improves Indices of Cardiometabolic Health Similar to Traditional Endurance Training despite a Five-Fold Lower Exercise Volume and Time Commitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna B Gillen

    Full Text Available We investigated whether sprint interval training (SIT was a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve insulin sensitivity and other indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT. SIT involved 1 minute of intense exercise within a 10-minute time commitment, whereas MICT involved 50 minutes of continuous exercise per session.Sedentary men (27±8y; BMI = 26±6kg/m2 performed three weekly sessions of SIT (n = 9 or MICT (n = 10 for 12 weeks or served as non-training controls (n = 6. SIT involved 3x20-second 'all-out' cycle sprints (~500W interspersed with 2 minutes of cycling at 50W, whereas MICT involved 45 minutes of continuous cycling at ~70% maximal heart rate (~110W. Both protocols involved a 2-minute warm-up and 3-minute cool-down at 50W.Peak oxygen uptake increased after training by 19% in both groups (SIT: 32±7 to 38±8; MICT: 34±6 to 40±8ml/kg/min; p<0.001 for both. Insulin sensitivity index (CSI, determined by intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed before and 72 hours after training, increased similarly after SIT (4.9±2.5 to 7.5±4.7, p = 0.002 and MICT (5.0±3.3 to 6.7±5.0 x 10-4 min-1 [μU/mL]-1, p = 0.013 (p<0.05. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content also increased similarly after SIT and MICT, as primarily reflected by the maximal activity of citrate synthase (CS; P<0.001. The corresponding changes in the control group were small for VO2peak (p = 0.99, CSI (p = 0.63 and CS (p = 0.97.Twelve weeks of brief intense interval exercise improved indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional endurance training in sedentary men, despite a five-fold lower exercise volume and time commitment.

  19. Timing of Etonogestrel-Releasing Implants and Growth of Breastfed Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Lilian Sheila de Melo Pereira; Braga, Giordana Campos; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Vieira, Carolina Sales

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the growth of breastfed infants whose mothers had inserted an etonogestrel-releasing implant in the immediate postpartum period. An open, randomized controlled, and parallel trial of postpartum women who were block-randomized to early (up to 48 hours postpartum before discharge) or conventional (at 6 weeks postpartum) insertion of an etonogestrel implant. The primary outcome was average infant weight at 12 months (360 days) and a difference of equal to or greater than 10% between groups was considered clinically significant. The secondary outcomes were infant's height and head and arm circumferences. These variables were measured at baseline and at 14, 40, 90, 180, 270, and 360 days postpartum. The mixed-effects linear regression model was used to evaluate the outcomes with a power of 80% and a significance level of 1% for the primary outcome and 0.3% for secondary outcomes as a result of correction for multiple hypothesis testing. From June to August 2015, a total of 100 women were randomized: 50 to early and 50 to conventional postpartum etonogestrel insertion. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar between the groups, except for educational attainment. The conventional insertion group included a higher proportion of women with 8 or more years of formal education than the early insertion group (88% [44/50] compared with 70% [35/50], P=.02). There was no difference in infant weight at 360 days between the groups (early [mean±standard deviation] 10.1±1.2 kg compared with conventional 9.8±1.3 kg, mean difference estimate 0.3 kg, 95% confidence interval 0-0.7 kg). Growth curves, height, and head and arm circumferences did not differ between the groups. There is no difference in growth at 12 months among breastfed infants whose mothers underwent early compared with conventional postpartum insertion of the etonogestrel implant. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02469454.

  20. Multiple random walks on complex networks: A harmonic law predicts search time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Small, Michael; Hui, Pan

    2017-05-01

    We investigate multiple random walks traversing independently and concurrently on complex networks and introduce the concept of mean first parallel passage time (MFPPT) to quantify their search efficiency. The mean first parallel passage time represents the expected time required to find a given target by one or some of the multiple walkers. We develop a general theory that allows us to calculate the MFPPT analytically. Interestingly, we find that the global MFPPT follows a harmonic law with respect to the global mean first passage times of the associated walkers. Remarkably, when the properties of multiple walkers are identical, the global MFPPT decays in a power law manner with an exponent of unity, irrespective of network structure. These findings are confirmed by numerical and theoretical results on various synthetic and real networks. The harmonic law reveals a universal principle governing multiple random walks on networks that uncovers the contribution and role of the combined walkers in a target search. Our paradigm is also applicable to a broad range of random search processes.

  1. Improved VO2max and time trial performance with more high aerobic intensity interval training and reduced training volume: a case study on an elite national cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støren, Øyvind; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Haave, Marius; Helgerud, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated to what extent more high aerobic intensity interval training (HAIT) and reduced training volume would influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and time trial (TT) performance in an elite national cyclist in the preseason period. The cyclist was tested for VO2max, cycling economy (C(c)), and TT performance on an ergometer cycle during 1 year. Training was continuously logged using heart rate monitor during the entire period. Total monthly training volume was reduced in the 2011 preseason compared with the 2010 preseason, and 2 HAIT blocks (14 sessions in 9 days and 15 sessions in 10 days) were performed as running. Between the HAIT blocks, 3 HAIT sessions per week were performed as cycling. From November 2010 to February 2011, the cyclist reduced total average monthly training volume by 18% and cycling training volume by 60%. The amount of training at 90-95% HRpeak increased by 41%. VO2max increased by 10.3% on ergometer cycle. TT performance improved by 14.9%. C(c) did not change. In conclusion, preseason reduced total training volume but increased amount of HAIT improved VO2max and TT performance without any changes in C(c). These improvements on cycling appeared despite that the HAIT blocks were performed as running. Reduced training time, and training transfer from running into improved cycling form, may be beneficial for cyclists living in cold climate areas.

  2. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.99; P = 0.043). Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients.

  3. The episodic random utility model unifies time trade-off and discrete choice approaches in health state valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Benjamin M; Busschbach, Jan Jv

    2009-01-13

    To present an episodic random utility model that unifies time trade-off and discrete choice approaches in health state valuation. First, we introduce two alternative random utility models (RUMs) for health preferences: the episodic RUM and the more common instant RUM. For the interpretation of time trade-off (TTO) responses, we show that the episodic model implies a coefficient estimator, and the instant model implies a mean slope estimator. Secondly, we demonstrate these estimators and the differences between the estimates for 42 health states using TTO responses from the seminal Measurement and Valuation in Health (MVH) study conducted in the United Kingdom. Mean slopes are estimates with and without Dolan's transformation of worse-than-death (WTD) responses. Finally, we demonstrate an exploded probit estimator, an extension of the coefficient estimator for discrete choice data that accommodates both TTO and rank responses. By construction, mean slopes are less than or equal to coefficients, because slopes are fractions and, therefore, magnify downward errors in WTD responses. The Dolan transformation of WTD responses causes mean slopes to increase in similarity to coefficient estimates, yet they are not equivalent (i.e., absolute mean difference = 0.179). Unlike mean slopes, coefficient estimates demonstrate strong concordance with rank-based predictions (Lin's rho = 0.91). Combining TTO and rank responses under the exploded probit model improves the identification of health state values, decreasing the average width of confidence intervals from 0.057 to 0.041 compared to TTO only results. The episodic RUM expands upon the theoretical framework underlying health state valuation and contributes to health econometrics by motivating the selection of coefficient and exploded probit estimators for the analysis of TTO and rank responses. In future MVH surveys, sample size requirements may be reduced through the incorporation of multiple responses under a single

  4. Parsimonious Continuous Time Random Walk Models and Kurtosis for Diffusion in Magnetic Resonance of Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson eIngo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide a context for the modeling approaches that have been developed to describe non-Gaussian diffusion behavior, which is ubiquitous in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of water in biological tissue. Subsequently, we focus on the formalism of the continuous time random walk theory to extract properties of subdiffusion and superdiffusionthrough novel simplifications of the Mittag-Leffler function. For the case of time-fractional subdiffusion, we compute the kurtosis for the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides both a connection and physical context to the much-used approach of diffusional kurtosis imaging. We provide Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate the concepts of anomalous diffusion as stochastic processes of the random walk. Finally, we demonstrate the clinical utility of the Mittag-Leffler function as a model to describe tissue microstructure through estimations of subdiffusion and kurtosis with diffusion MRI measurements in the brain of a chronic ischemic stroke patient.

  5. An inversion method based on random sampling for real-time MEG neuroimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pascarella, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    The MagnetoEncephaloGraphy (MEG) has gained great interest in neurorehabilitation training due to its high temporal resolution. The challenge is to localize the active regions of the brain in a fast and accurate way. In this paper we use an inversion method based on random spatial sampling to solve the real-time MEG inverse problem. Several numerical tests on synthetic but realistic data show that the method takes just a few hundredths of a second on a laptop to produce an accurate map of the electric activity inside the brain. Moreover, it requires very little memory storage. For this reasons the random sampling method is particularly attractive in real-time MEG applications.

  6. Parsimonious continuous time random walk models and kurtosis for diffusion in magnetic resonance of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, Carson; Sui, Yi; Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd B; Webb, Andrew G; Ronen, Itamar

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we provide a context for the modeling approaches that have been developed to describe non-Gaussian diffusion behavior, which is ubiquitous in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of water in biological tissue. Subsequently, we focus on the formalism of the continuous time random walk theory to extract properties of subdiffusion and superdiffusion through novel simplifications of the Mittag-Leffler function. For the case of time-fractional subdiffusion, we compute the kurtosis for the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides both a connection and physical context to the much-used approach of diffusional kurtosis imaging. We provide Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate the concepts of anomalous diffusion as stochastic processes of the random walk. Finally, we demonstrate the clinical utility of the Mittag-Leffler function as a model to describe tissue microstructure through estimations of subdiffusion and kurtosis with diffusion MRI measurements in the brain of a chronic ischemic stroke patient.

  7. Parsimonious Continuous Time Random Walk Models and Kurtosis for Diffusion in Magnetic Resonance of Biological Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, Carson; Sui, Yi; Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd; Webb, Andrew; Ronen, Itamar

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we provide a context for the modeling approaches that have been developed to describe non-Gaussian diffusion behavior, which is ubiquitous in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of water in biological tissue. Subsequently, we focus on the formalism of the continuous time random walk theory to extract properties of subdiffusion and superdiffusion through novel simplifications of the Mittag-Leffler function. For the case of time-fractional subdiffusion, we compute the kurtosis for the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides both a connection and physical context to the much-used approach of diffusional kurtosis imaging. We provide Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate the concepts of anomalous diffusion as stochastic processes of the random walk. Finally, we demonstrate the clinical utility of the Mittag-Leffler function as a model to describe tissue microstructure through estimations of subdiffusion and kurtosis with diffusion MRI measurements in the brain of a chronic ischemic stroke patient.

  8. Stabilization of Continuous-Time Random Switching Systems via a Fault-Tolerant Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the stabilization problem of continuous-time random switching systems via exploiting a fault-tolerant controller, where the dwell time of each subsystem consists of a fixed part and random part. It is known from the traditional design methods that the computational complexity of LMIs related to the quantity of fault combination is very large; particularly system dimension or amount of subsystems is large. In order to reduce the number of the used fault combinations, new sufficient LMI conditions for designing such a controller are established by a robust approach, which are fault-free and could be solved directly. Moreover, the fault-tolerant stabilization realized by a mode-independent controller is considered and suitably applied to a practical case without mode information. Finally, a numerical example is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed methods.

  9. Structure and Randomness of Continuous-Time, Discrete-Event Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Sarah E.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-10-01

    Loosely speaking, the Shannon entropy rate is used to gauge a stochastic process' intrinsic randomness; the statistical complexity gives the cost of predicting the process. We calculate, for the first time, the entropy rate and statistical complexity of stochastic processes generated by finite unifilar hidden semi-Markov models—memoryful, state-dependent versions of renewal processes. Calculating these quantities requires introducing novel mathematical objects (ɛ -machines of hidden semi-Markov processes) and new information-theoretic methods to stochastic processes.

  10. Stress and Fatigue Management Using Balneotherapy in a Short-Time Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lolita Rapolienė; Artūras Razbadauskas; Jonas Sąlyga; Arvydas Martinkėnas

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of high-salinity geothermal mineral water on stress and fatigue. Method. 180 seamen were randomized into three groups: geothermal (65), music (50), and control (65). The geothermal group was administered 108 g/L salinity geothermal water bath for 2 weeks five times a week. Primary outcome was effect on stress and fatigue. Secondary outcomes were the effect on cognitive function, mood, and pain. Results. The improvements after balneotherapy were a reduct...

  11. Price Formation Modelling by Continuous-Time Random Walk: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Délèze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Markovian and non-Markovian\tmodels are presented to\tmodel the futures\tmarket price formation.\tWe show that\tthe\twaiting-time\tand\tthe\tsurvival\tprobabilities\thave\ta\tsignificant\timpact\ton\tthe\tprice\tdynamics.\tThis\tstudy tests\tanalytical\tsolutions\tand\tpresent\tnumerical\tresults for the\tprobability\tdensity function\tof the\tcontinuoustime random\twalk\tusing\ttick-by-tick\tquotes\tprices\tfor\tthe\tDAX\t30\tindex\tfutures.

  12. An Efficient Randomized Algorithm for Real-Time Process Scheduling in PicOS Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy*, Tarek; Fatai, Anifowose; Sallam, El-Sayed

    PicOS is an event-driven operating environment designed for use with embedded networked sensors. More specifically, it is designed to support the concurrency in intensive operations required by networked sensors with minimal hardware requirements. Existing process scheduling algorithms of PicOS; a commercial tiny, low-footprint, real-time operating system; have their associated drawbacks. An efficient, alternative algorithm, based on a randomized selection policy, has been proposed, demonstrated, confirmed for efficiency and fairness, on the average, and has been recommended for implementation in PicOS. Simulations were carried out and performance measures such as Average Waiting Time (AWT) and Average Turn-around Time (ATT) were used to assess the efficiency of the proposed randomized version over the existing ones. The results prove that Randomized algorithm is the best and most attractive for implementation in PicOS, since it is most fair and has the least AWT and ATT on average over the other non-preemptive scheduling algorithms implemented in this paper.

  13. Stochastic modeling for starting-time of phase evolution of random seismic ground motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbo Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to the challenge inherent in classical high-dimensional models of random ground motions, a family of simulation methods for non-stationary seismic ground motions was developed previously through employing a wave-group propagation formulation with phase spectrum model built up on the frequency components' starting-time of phase evolution. The present paper aims at extending the formulation to the simulation of non-stationary random seismic ground motions. The ground motion records associated with N—S component of Northridge Earthquake at the type-II site are investigated. The frequency components' starting-time of phase evolution of is identified from the ground motion records, and is proved to admit the Gamma distribution through data fitting. Numerical results indicate that the simulated random ground motion features zero-mean, non-stationary, and non-Gaussian behaviors, and the phase spectrum model with only a few starting-times of phase evolution could come up with a sound contribution to the simulation.

  14. The effects of short interactive animation video information on preanesthetic anxiety, knowledge, and interview time: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Akihito; Nagatani, Hirokazu; Otake, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Ju; Nakata, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    We designed an interactive animated video that provides a basic explanation-including the risks, benefits, and alternatives-of anesthetic procedures. We hypothesized that this video would improve patient understanding of anesthesia, reduce anxiety, and shorten the interview time. Two hundred eleven patients scheduled for cancer surgery under general anesthesia or combined general and epidural anesthesia, who were admitted at least 1 day before the surgery, were randomly assigned to the video group (n = 106) or the no-video group (n = 105). The patients in the video group were asked to watch a short interactive animation video in the ward. After watching the video, the patients were visited by an anesthesiologist who performed a preanesthetic interview and routine risk assessment. The patients in the no-video group were also visited by an anesthesiologist, but were not asked to watch the video. In both groups, the patients were asked to complete the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a 14-point scale of knowledge test before the anesthesiologist's visit and on the day of surgery. We also measured interview time. There was no demographic difference between the 2 groups. The interview time was 34.4% shorter (video group, 12.2 ± 5.3 minutes, vs. no-video group, 18.6 ± 6.4 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI] for the percentage reduction in time: 32.7%- 44.3%), and knowledge of anesthesia was 11.6% better in the video group (score 12.5 ± 1.4 vs. no-video group score 11.2 ± 1.7; 95% CI for the percentage increase in knowledge: 8.5%-13.9%). However, there was no difference in preanesthetic anxiety between the 2 groups. Our short interactive animation video helped patients' understanding of anesthesia and reduced anesthesiologists' interview time.

  15. Random Deterioration Process of Conveyor Belt Evaluated by Statistical Analysis of Core Failures Detected Along Belt Axis and Elapsed Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazej, Ryszard; Jurdziak, Leszek; Kirjanów, Agata; Kozlowski, Tomasz

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic diagnostic methods are used for steel cord belt condition evaluation since the beginning of 1970s. Initially they generated an analogue signal for several tens of centimetres of conveyor belts scanned sequentially with one measuring head in several cycles or the whole width of the belt at one time thanks to the installation of many measuring heads across the entire cross section. This did not allow identification of single centimetre failures, but rather an aggregate assessment of the state of quite wide waist. Modern diagnostic devices, thanks to miniaturization, allow up to 200 heads per belt width to identify damage of individual cords. Instead of analogue signals, they generate a zero-one digital signal corresponding to a change in the magnetic field sign, which can illustrate damage on 2D images. This makes it easier to identify the location and size of the damage in the belt image. Statistical analysis of digital signals summed up for consecutive sections along the belt axis allows to present both the source signal and its aggregation for band of a given width to form aggregate measures of belt damage such as the damage density per 1 meter of belt. Observation of changes in these measurements at different times allows on evaluation of its rate of change over time, which can be used to forecast future belt condition and to select the proper moment of preventive belt replacement to another one to avoid emergency downtimes (egg in underground mines) or to recondition of belts (egg. in lignite surface mines). The paper presents the results of investigations of the damage condition of a core of a single belt segment working in one of the copper ore underground mines. Scanning of the belt condition was performed few times at intervals of several months. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the changes in core condition, showing the random character of the damage process along the axis and its change over time.

  16. Reflection principles for biased random walks and application to escape time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantha, M.; Balakrishnan, V.

    1985-12-01

    We present a reflection principle for an arbitrary biased continuous time random walk (comprising both Markovian and non-Markovian processes) in the presence of a reflecting barrier on semi-infinite and finite chains. For biased walks in the presence of a reflecting barrier this principle (which cannot be derived from combinatorics) is completely different from its familiar form in the presence of an absorbing barrier. The result enables us to obtain closed-form solutions for the Laplace transform of the conditional probability for biased walks on finite chains for all three combinations of absorbing and reflecting barriers at the two ends. An important application of these solutions is the calculation of various first-passage-time and escape-time distributions. We obtain exact results for the characteristic functions of various kinds of escape time distributions for biased random walks on finite chains. For processes governed by a long-tailed event-time distribution we show that the mean time of escape from bounded regions diverges even in the presence of a bias—suggesting, in a sense, the absence of true long-range diffusion in such "frozen" processes.

  17. Quasi-Random Algorithms for Real-Time Spacecraft Motion Planning and Formation Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoli, E.

    Many applications of current interest, including on-orbit servicing of large space structures, space-based interferometry, and distributed radar systems, involve several spacecraft maneuvering in close proximity of one another. Often, the mission requires that the spacecraft be able to react quickly to changes in the environment, for example to reconfigure the formation to investigate a target of opportunity, or to prevent damage from a failure. In these cases, the spacecraft need to solve in real time complex motion planning problems, minimizing meaningful cost functions, such as time or fuel consumption, and taking into account constraints such as collision and plume impingement avoidance. Such problems are provably hard from a computational point of view, in the sense that any deterministic, complete algorithm will require exponential time to find a feasible solution. Recent advances in the robotics field have provided a new class of algorithms based on randomization, which provides computational tractability, by relaxing the completeness requirement to probabilistic completeness (i.e. the solution will be found by such algorithms with arbitrarily high probability in polynomial time). Randomized algorithms have been developed and successfully applied by the author and other researchers to real-time motion planning problems involving autonomous air vehicles and spacecraft attitude motion. In this paper we present a new class of quasi- random algorithms, which, combining optimal orbital maneuvers and deterministic sampling strategies, are able to provide extremely fast and efficient planners. Moreover, these planners are able to guarantee the safety of the space system, that is the satisfaction of collision and plume impingement avoidance constraints, even in the face of finite computation times (i.e., when the planner has to be pre-empted). Formation reconfiguration examples will illustrate the effectiveness of the methods, and a discussion of the results will

  18. Modified high-intensity interval training reduces liver fat and improves cardiac function in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallsworth, Kate; Thoma, Christian; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Cassidy, Sophie; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P; Trenell, Michael I

    2015-12-01

    Although lifestyle changes encompassing weight loss and exercise remain the cornerstone of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) management, the effect of different types of exercise on NAFLD is unknown. This study defines the effect of modified high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on liver fat, cardiac function and metabolic control in adults with NAFLD. Twenty-three patients with NAFLD [age 54±10 years, body mass index (BMI) 31±4 kg/m(2), intra-hepatic lipid >5%) were assigned to either 12 weeks HIIT or standard care (controls). HIIT involved thrice weekly cycle ergometry for 30-40 min. MRI and spectroscopy were used to assess liver fat, abdominal fat and cardiac structure/function/energetics. Glucose control was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test and body composition by air displacement plethysmography. Relative to control, HIIT decreased liver fat (11±5% to 8±2% compared with 10±4% to 10±4% P=0.019), whole-body fat mass (35±7 kg to 33±8 kg compared with 31±9 kg to 32±9 kg, P=0.013), alanine (52±29 units/l to 42±20 units/l compared with 47±22 units/l to 51±24 units/l, P=0.016) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; 36±18 units/l to 33±15 units/l compared with 31±8 units/l to 35±8 units/l, P=0.017) and increased early diastolic filling rate (244±84 ml/s to 302±107 ml/s compared with 255±82 ml/s to 251±82 ml/s, P=0.018). There were no between groups differences in glucose control. Modified HIIT reduces liver fat and improves body composition alongside benefits to cardiac function in patients with NAFLD and should be considered as part of the broader treatment regimen by clinical care teams. ISRCTN trial ID: ISRCTN78698481. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. Continuous-time random-walk model of transport in variably saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoia, Andrea; Néel, Marie-Christine; Cortis, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    We propose a unified physical framework for transport in variably saturated porous media. This approach allows fluid flow and solute migration to be treated as ensemble averages of fluid and solute particles, respectively. We consider the cases of homogeneous and heterogeneous porous materials. Within a fractal mobile-immobile continuous time random-walk framework, the heterogeneity will be characterized by algebraically decaying particle retention times. We derive the corresponding (nonlinear) continuum-limit partial differential equations and we compare their solutions to Monte Carlo simulation results. The proposed methodology is fairly general and can be used to track fluid and solutes particles trajectories for a variety of initial and boundary conditions.

  20. Effect of Desensitization Using Bioactive Glass, Hydroxyapatite, and Diode Laser on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin Composites Measured at Different Time Intervals: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Timsi; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Mathew, Sylvia; Narayana, Indiresha H; Madhu, K S; Dinesh, K

    2017-01-01

    Dentin desensitizers may change the properties of smear layer and have adverse effects on the bonding performance of adhesive systems. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of bioactive glass (BG), hydroxyapatite, and diode laser desensitization on shear bond strength of resin composites to dentin at different time intervals. Seventy-two caries-free maxillary premolars were selected. Buccal surfaces were flattened to expose dentin. Teeth were divided into four groups (Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4) according to treatment modality (control with no pretreatment, Sensodyne Repair and Protect, Teethmate Desensitizer, diode laser). Bonding was performed using self-etch adhesive followed by composite buildup. Universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strengths immediately after bonding, after 3 months, and 5 months storage in artificial saliva. Pretreatment with BG and hydroxyapatite desensitizers increased, whereas diode laser decreased mean shear bond strength of composite to dentin as compared to control group. No statistical significant difference in shear bond strength values was seen in groups after storage. Desensitizing toothpastes incorporating remineralizing agents not only occluded open dentinal tubules but also increased shear bond strength of composite to dentin.

  1. Effect of desensitization using bioactive glass, hydroxyapatite, and diode laser on the shear bond strength of resin composites measured at different time intervals: An In vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsi Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin desensitizers may change the properties of smear layer and have adverse effects on the bonding performance of adhesive systems. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of bioactive glass (BG, hydroxyapatite, and diode laser desensitization on shear bond strength of resin composites to dentin at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two caries-free maxillary premolars were selected. Buccal surfaces were flattened to expose dentin. Teeth were divided into four groups (Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 according to treatment modality (control with no pretreatment, Sensodyne Repair and Protect, Teethmate Desensitizer, diode laser. Bonding was performed using self-etch adhesive followed by composite buildup. Universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strengths immediately after bonding, after 3 months, and 5 months storage in artificial saliva. Results: Pretreatment with BG and hydroxyapatite desensitizers increased, whereas diode laser decreased mean shear bond strength of composite to dentin as compared to control group. No statistical significant difference in shear bond strength values was seen in groups after storage. Conclusion: Desensitizing toothpastes incorporating remineralizing agents not only occluded open dentinal tubules but also increased shear bond strength of composite to dentin.

  2. Irrigation Water Sources and Time Intervals as Variables on the Presence of Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes on Romaine Lettuce Grown in Muck Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévremont, Evelyne; Lamoureux, Lisyanne; Généreux, Mylène; Côté, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Irrigation water has been identified as a possible source of vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens. Risk management for pathogens such as Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in fields can be influenced by the source of the irrigation water and the time interval between last irrigation and harvest. Plots of romaine lettuce were irrigated with manure-contaminated water or aerated pond water 21, 7, or 3 days prior to harvesting, and water and muck soil samples were collected at each irrigation treatment. Lettuce samples were collected at the end of the trials. The samples were tested for the presence of Campylobacter spp. and L. monocytogenes. Campylobacter coli was isolated from 33% of hog manure samples (n = 9) and from 11% of the contaminated water samples (n = 27), but no lettuce samples were positive (n = 288). L. monocytogenes was not found in manure, and only one sample of manure-contaminated irrigation water (n = 27) and one lettuce sample (n = 288) were positive. No Campylobacter or L. monocytogenes was recovered from the soil samples (n = 288). Because of the low incidence of pathogens, it was not possible to link the contamination of either soil or lettuce with the type of irrigation water. Nevertheless, experimental field trials mimicking real conditions provide new insights into the survival of two significant foodborne pathogens on romaine lettuce.

  3. Evaluation of the color durability of acrylic resin veneer materials after immersion in common beverages at different time intervals: A spectrophotometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kohli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proper function, esthetics, and cost are the prime factors to be considered while selecting bridge veneering materials. The purpose of the study is to evaluate color durability of acrylic veneer materials after immersion in common beverages at different time intervals. Methods: Spectrophotometer was used for taking color measurements based on the transmission of light through the specimens made of the selected materials which were Tooth moulding powder (DPI and Acrylux (Ruthinium. Thirty specimens of standardized dimensions were prepared from each material. The specimens were divided into three groups of 10 each. One group of each material was immersed in tea (TajMahal and another group of each material in cola (Pepsi as the staining solutions. The remaining group of 10 from each material served as control and was stored in distilled water. Color measurements were obtained pre-immersion, and after 1, 15, and 30 days of immersion. Results: Tooth moulding powder displayed better color durability than Acrylux over the 1 month immersion period in both staining solutions. Tea resulted in more discoloration compared to cola (Pepsi. Conclusion: The difference in the color durability of Acrylux and Tooth moulding powder may be attributed to the differences in the composition of tested resin veneering materials, i.e. their polar properties, which contribute to the absorption of staining solution, and the different brands and the strengths of the solutions.

  4. Band-phase-randomized Surrogates to assess nonlinearity in non-stationary time series

    CERN Document Server

    Guarin, Diego; Orozco, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Testing for nonlinearity is one of the most important preprocessing steps in nonlinear time series analysis. Typically, this is done by means of the linear surrogate data methods. But it is a known fact that the validity of the results heavily depends on the stationarity of the time series. Since most physiological signals are non-stationary, it is easy to falsely detect nonlinearity using the linear surrogate data methods. In this document, we propose a methodology to extend the procedure for generating constrained surrogate time series in order to assess nonlinearity in non-stationary data. The method is based on the band-phase-randomized surrogates, which consists (contrary to the linear surrogate data methods) in randomizing only a portion of the Fourier phases in the high frequency band. Analysis of simulated time series showed that in comparison to the linear surrogate data method, our method is able to discriminate between linear stationarity, linear non-stationary and nonlinear time series. When apply...

  5. An intervention to preschool children for reducing screen time: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, G; Demirli Caylan, N; Karacan, C D

    2015-05-01

    Screen time, defined as time spent watching television, DVDs, or videos or playing computer or video games, has been related to serious health consequences in children, such as impaired language acquisition, violent behaviour, tobacco smoking and obesity. Our aim was to determine if a simple intervention aimed at preschool-aged children, applied at the health maintenance visits, in the primary care setting, would be effective in reducing screen time. We used a two group randomized controlled trial design. Two- to 6-year-old children and their parents were randomly assigned to receive an intervention to reduce their screen time, BMI and parental report of aggressive behaviour. At the end of the intervention we made home visits at 2, 6 and 9 months and the parents completed questionnaire. Parents in the intervention group reported less screen time and less aggressive behaviour than those in the control group but there were no differences in BMI z scores. This study shows that a preschool-based intervention can lead to reductions in young children's television/video viewing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Analysis of therapeutic benefits of antivenin at different time intervals after experimental envenomation in rabbits by venom of the brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Isolete; Minozzo, João Carlos; da Silva, Paulo Henrique; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2009-05-01

    Bites by the brown spider (Loxosceles spp.) are an important health problem in South America, where three species predominate (Loxosceles laeta, Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles intermedia). Brown spider bites (loxoscelism) induce a block of cutaneous necrosis and, less commonly, may cause fatal systemic poisoning. A variety of controversial protocols are used to treat loxoscelism, while treatment with antivenin is the only venom specific treatment. Here we studied the action of the venom as well as the response to the antivenin for Loxosceles through an experimental study that simulates bites of L. intermedia (bites of this species are the most common in Brazil). Beneficial effects are known for antivenin applied quickly (within 4 h) after envenomation. Here we wished to examine the temporal development of the brown spider bite as well as the temporal patterns of the action of the antivenin to determine the time limits for beneficial use of the antivenin after envenomation. This information is important since most patients only appear for treatment several hours after being bitten. New Zealand rabbits were experimentally exposed to the venom from brown spiders by the injection of venom from L. intermedia (2x minimum necrotic dose), followed at regular time intervals by antivenin. The use of the loxoscelic antivenin--CPPI (4 mL per animal)--minimized the effects of envenomation when applied for up to 12 h after the injection of the venom, as evaluated by cutaneous (erythrema, edema, ecchymosis and necrosis) and systemic (blood cell and platelet counts, hematimetrics and fibrinogen dosage) criteria. Also, antivenin reduced the size of the necrotic area when applied up to 48 h after envenomation. Thus, therapy with loxoscelic antivenin, CPPI, may provide beneficial results by interfering with envenomation well after the bite occurred and therefore may become an important tool for medical treatment of brown spider bites.

  7. Randomized gradient-free method for multiagent optimization over time-varying networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Deming; Ho, Daniel W C

    2015-06-01

    In this brief, we consider the multiagent optimization over a network where multiple agents try to minimize a sum of nonsmooth but Lipschitz continuous functions, subject to a convex state constraint set. The underlying network topology is modeled as time varying. We propose a randomized derivative-free method, where in each update, the random gradient-free oracles are utilized instead of the subgradients (SGs). In contrast to the existing work, we do not require that agents are able to compute the SGs of their objective functions. We establish the convergence of the method to an approximate solution of the multiagent optimization problem within the error level depending on the smoothing parameter and the Lipschitz constant of each agent's objective function. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  8. Comparison of survival time of Hawley and Vacuum-formed retainers in orthhodontic patients– a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Moslemzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintaining the results of orthodontic treatment and keeping the teeth in the corrected position is a great challenge in orthodontics. This study aimed to compare the survival time of three types of retainers including Hawley, 1-mm Vacuum-Formed (VF, and 1.5-mm VF within 6-month period. Methods: In this randomized clinical study, 152 patients were allocated into three groups to receive one type of the retainers. They were visited 1, 3, and 6 months after retainer delivery and checked for breakage, loss, local perforation, and discoloration from the patient's and clinician's point of view as indicators of failure. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used as appropriated. Result: The results revealed that breakage was among the main reasons of failure of retainers within 6 months, which was statistically significantly different between Hawley and VF retainers, as well as between 1-mm and 1.5-mm VF retainers in the three intervals (p0.05. Assessing the discoloration from the patient's point of view revealed statistically significant differences between Hawley and VF retainers within the first month; however, the difference was not significant at the third and sixth months (p0.05. By the end of the sixth month, some of the VF retainers had perforation; while, perforation was not observed in Hawley retainers. Conclusion: Considering the higher breakage rate of 1-mm VF, 1.5-mm VF seems the retainer if choice.

  9. Using Sit-Stand Workstations to Decrease Sedentary Time in Office Workers: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirjhar Dutta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether installation of sit-stand desks (SSDs could lead to decreased sitting time during the workday among sedentary office workers. Methods: A randomized cross-over trial was conducted from January to April, 2012 at a business in Minneapolis. 28 (nine men, 26 full-time sedentary office workers took part in a 4 week intervention period which included the use of SSDs to gradually replace 50% of sitting time with standing during the workday. Physical activity was the primary outcome. Mood, energy level, fatigue, appetite, dietary intake, and productivity were explored as secondary outcomes. Results: The intervention reduced sitting time at work by 21% (95% CI 18%–25% and sedentary time by 4.8 min/work-hr (95% CI 4.1–5.4 min/work-hr. For a 40 h work-week, this translates into replacement of 8 h of sitting time with standing and sedentary time being reduced by 3.2 h. Activity level during non-work hours did not change. The intervention also increased overall sense of well-being, energy, decreased fatigue, had no impact on productivity, and reduced appetite and dietary intake. The workstations were popular with the participants. Conclusion: The SSD intervention was successful in increasing work-time activity level, without changing activity level during non-work hours.

  10. Effect of fish oil, arginine, and doxorubicin chemotherapy on remission and survival time for dogs with lymphoma: a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, G K; Fettman, M J; Mallinckrodt, C H; Walton, J A; Hansen, R A; Davenport, D J; Gross, K L; Richardson, K L; Rogers, Q; Hand, M S

    2000-04-15

    Polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids have been shown to inhibit the growth and metastasis of tumors. This double-blind, randomized study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids can improve metabolic parameters, decrease chemical indices of inflammation, enhance quality of life, and extend disease free interval and survival time for dogs treated for lymphoblastic lymphoma with doxorubicin chemotherapy. Thirty-two dogs with lymphoma were randomized to receive one of two diets supplemented with menhaden fish oil and arginine (experimental diet) or an otherwise identical diet supplemented with soybean oil (control diet). Diets were fed before and after remission was attained with up to five dosages of doxorubicin. Parameters examined included blood concentrations of glucose, lactic acid, and insulin in response to glucose and diet tolerance tests; alpha-1 acid glycoprotein; tumor necrosis factor; interleukin-6; body weight; amino acid profiles; resting energy expenditure; disease free interval (DFI); survival time (ST); and clinical performance scores. Dogs fed the experimental diet had significantly (P diet tolerance testing. Increasing C22:6 levels were significantly (P dogs with Stage III lymphoma fed the experimental diet. Fatty acids of the n-3 series normalize elevated blood lactic acid in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in an increase in DFI and ST for dogs with lymphoma. Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.

  11. The Mucosal Immune Function Is Not Compromised during a Period of High-Intensity Interval Training. Is It Time to Reconsider an Old Assumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Dennis-Peter; Zinner, Christoph; Sperlich, Billy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the mucosal immune function and circadian variation of salivary cortisol, Immunoglobin-A (sIgA) secretion rate and mood during a period of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) compared to long-slow distance training (LSD). Methods: Recreational male runners ( n = 28) completed nine sessions of either HIIT or LSD within 3 weeks. The HIIT involved 4 × 4 min of running at 90-95% of maximum heart rate interspersed with 3 min of active recovery while the LSD comprised of continuous running at 70-75% of maximum heart rate for 60-80 min. The psycho-immunological stress-response was investigated with a full daily profile of salivary cortisol and immunoglobin-A (sIgA) secretion rate along with the mood state on a baseline day, the first and last day of training and at follow-up 4 days after the last day of training. Before and after the training period, each athlete's running performance and peak oxygen uptake (V · O 2peak ) was determined with an incremental exercise test. Results: The HIIT resulted in a longer time-to-exhaustion ( P = 0.02) and increased V · O 2peak compared to LSD ( P = 0.01). The circadian variation of sIgA secretion rate showed highest values in the morning immediately after waking up followed by a decrease throughout the day in both groups ( P HIIT, the wake-up response of sIgA secretion rate was higher on the last day of training ( P HIIT and LSD ( P HIIT indicates no compromised mucosal immune function compared to LSD and shows the functional adaptation of the mucosal immune system in response to the increased stress and training load of nine sessions of HIIT.

  12. Interval estimates and their precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Luboš; Vrabec, Michal

    2015-06-01

    A task very often met in in practice is computation of confidence interval bounds for the relative frequency within sampling without replacement. A typical situation includes preelection estimates and similar tasks. In other words, we build the confidence interval for the parameter value M in the parent population of size N on the basis of a random sample of size n. There are many ways to build this interval. We can use a normal or binomial approximation. More accurate values can be looked up in tables. We consider one more method, based on MS Excel calculations. In our paper we compare these different methods for specific values of M and we discuss when the considered methods are suitable. The aim of the article is not a publication of new theoretical methods. This article aims to show that there is a very simple way how to compute the confidence interval bounds without approximations, without tables and without other software costs.

  13. A continuous-time model of centrally coordinated motion with random switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallon, J C; Despain, Lynnae C; Evans, Emily J; Grant, Christopher P; Smith, W V

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers differential problems with random switching, with specific applications to the motion of cells and centrally coordinated motion. Starting with a differential-equation model of cell motion that was proposed previously, we set the relaxation time to zero and consider the simpler model that results. We prove that this model is well-posed, in the sense that it corresponds to a pure jump-type continuous-time Markov process (without explosion). We then describe the model's long-time behavior, first by specifying an attracting steady-state distribution for a projection of the model, then by examining the expected location of the cell center when the initial data is compatible with that steady-state. Under such conditions, we present a formula for the expected velocity and give a rigorous proof of that formula's validity. We conclude the paper with a comparison between these theoretical results and the results of numerical simulations.

  14. The sequencing of adverbial clauses of time in academic English: Random forest modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rezaee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverbial clauses of time are positioned either before or after their associated main clauses. This study aims to assess the importance of discourse-pragmatics and processing-related constraints on the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in research articles of applied linguistics written by authors for whom English is considered a native language. Previous research has revealed that the ordering is co-determined by various factors from the domains of semantics and discourse-pragmatics (bridging, iconicity, and subordinator and language processing (deranking, length, and complexity. This research conducts a multifactorial analysis on the motivators of the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in 100 research articles of applied linguistics. The study will use a random forest of conditional inference trees as the statistical technique to measure the weights of the aforementioned variables. It was found that iconicity and bridging, which are factors associated with discourse and semantics, are the two most salient predictors of clause ordering.

  15. Analytic expression for the mean time to absorption for a random walker on the Sierpinski gasket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, John J.; Balakrishnan, V.

    2002-02-01

    The exact analytic expression for the mean time to absorption (or mean walk length) for a particle performing a random walk on a finite Sierpinski gasket with a trap at one vertex is found to be T(n)=[3n5n+1+4(5n)- 3n]/(3n+1+1) where n denotes the generation index of the gasket, and the mean is over a set of starting points of the walk distributed uniformly over all the other sites of the gasket. In terms of the number Nn of sites on the gasket and the spectral dimension d~ of the gasket, the precise asymptotic behavior for large Nn is T(n)-->1/3(2Nn)2/d~~N1.464. This serves as a partial check on our result, as it is (a) intermediate between the known results T~N2 (d=1) and T~N ln N (d=2) for random walks on d-dimensional Euclidean lattices and (b) consistent with the known result for the asymptotic behavior of the mean number of distinct sites visited in a random walk on a fractal lattice.

  16. Continuous time random walks in periodic systems: fluid limit and fractional differential equations on the circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, I [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B A [BACV Solutions Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sanchez, R [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Milligen, B Ph van [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-11-09

    In this paper, the continuous time random walk on the circle is studied. We derive the corresponding generalized master equation and discuss the effects of topology, especially important when Levy flights are allowed. Then, we work out the fluid limit equation, formulated in terms of the periodic version of the fractional Riemann-Liouville operators, for which we provide explicit expressions. Finally, we compute the propagator in some simple cases. The analysis presented herein should be relevant when investigating anomalous transport phenomena in systems with periodic dimensions.

  17. Continuous Time Random Walks in periodic systems: fluid limit and fractional differential equations on the circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Ivan [CIEMAT, Madrid; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; van Milligen, B. Ph. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the continuous time random walk on the circle is studied. We derive the corresponding generalized master equation and discuss the effects of topology, especially important when Levy flights are allowed. Then, we work out the fluid limit equation, formulated in terms of the periodic version of the fractional Riemann-Liouville operators, for which we provide explicit expressions. Finally, we compute the propagator in some simple cases. The analysis presented herein should be relevant when investigating anomalous transport phenomena in systems with periodic dimensions.

  18. Continuous Time Random Walk and Migration-Proliferation Dichotomy of Brain Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iomin, A.

    A theory of fractional kinetics of glial cancer cells is presented. A role of the migration-proliferation dichotomy in the fractional cancer cell dynamics in the outer-invasive zone is discussed and explained in the framework of a continuous time random walk. The main suggested model is based on a construction of a 3D comb model, where the migration-proliferation dichotomy becomes naturally apparent and the outer-invasive zone of glioma cancer is considered as a fractal composite with a fractal dimension Dfr < 3.

  19. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense Stefan A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy, and uncomplicated biliary colics occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early

  20. Moments of the transmission eigenvalues, proper delay times and random matrix theory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzadri, F.; Simm, N. J.

    2012-05-01

    We systematically study the first three terms in the asymptotic expansions of the moments of the transmission eigenvalues and proper delay times as the number of quantum channels n in the leads goes to infinity. The computations are based on the assumption that the Landauer-Büttiker scattering matrix for chaotic ballistic cavities can be modelled by the circular ensembles of random matrix theory. The starting points are the finite-n formulae that we recently discovered [F. Mezzadri and N. J. Simm, "Moments of the transmission eigenvalues, proper delay times and random matrix theory," J. Math. Phys. 52, 103511 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3644378. Our analysis includes all the symmetry classes β ∈ {1, 2, 4}; in addition, it applies to the transmission eigenvalues of Andreev billiards, whose symmetry classes were classified by Zirnbauer ["Riemannian symmetric superspaces and their origin in random-matrix theory," J. Math. Phys. 37(10), 4986 (1996)], 10.1063/1.531675 and Altland and Zirnbauer ["Random matrix theory of a chaotic Andreev quantum dot," Phys. Rev. Lett. 76(18), 3420 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.76.3420; Altland and Zirnbauer "Nonstandard symmetry classes in mesoscopic normal-superconducting hybrid structures," Phys. Rev. B 55(2), 1142 (1997)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.55.1142. Where applicable, our results are in complete agreement with the semiclassical theory of mesoscopic systems developed by Berkolaiko et al. ["Full counting statistics of chaotic cavities from classical action correlations," J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41(36), 365102 (2008)], 10.1088/1751-8113/41/36/365102 and Berkolaiko and Kuipers ["Moments of the Wigner delay times," J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43(3), 035101 (2010), 10.1088/1751-8113/43/3/035101; Berkolaiko and Kuipers "Transport moments beyond the leading order," New J. Phys. 13(6), 063020 (2011)], 10.1088/1367-2630/13/6/063020. Our approach also applies to the Selberg-like integrals. We calculate the first two terms in their asymptotic expansion

  1. Statistics of the longest interval in renewal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2015-03-01

    We consider renewal processes where events, which can for instance be the zero crossings of a stochastic process, occur at random epochs of time. The intervals of time between events, τ1, τ2, …, are independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables with a common density ρ(τ). Fixing the total observation time to t induces a global constraint on the sum of these random intervals, which accordingly become interdependent. Here we focus on the largest interval among such a sequence on the fixed time interval (0, t). Depending on how the last interval is treated, we consider three different situations, indexed by α = I, II and III. We investigate the distribution of the longest interval \\ell^α\\max(t) and the probability Qα(t) that the last interval is the longest one. We show that if ρ(τ) admits a well defined first moment, i.e. if it decays faster than 1/τ2 for large τ, then the full statistics of \\ell^α\\max(t) is given, in the large t limit, by the standard theory of extreme value statistics for i.i.d. random variables, showing in particular that the global constraint on the intervals τi does not play any role at large times in this case. However, if ρ(τ) exhibits heavy tails, ρ(τ) ˜ τ-1-θ for large τ, with index 0 < θ < 1 (like the zero-crossings of random walks corresponding to θ = 1/2), we show that the fluctuations of \\ell^α\\max(t)/t are governed, in the large t limit, by a stationary non-trivial universal distribution (different from a Fréchet law) which depends on both θ and α, which we compute exactly. On the other hand, Qα(t) is generically different from its counterpart for i.i.d. variables (both for narrow or heavy tailed distributions ρ(τ)). In particular, in the case 0 < θ < 1, the large t behaviour of Qα(t) gives rise to universal non-trivial constants (depending also on both θ and α) which we compute exactly.

  2. Timing of tracheotomy in ICU patients: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Koji; Nishimura, Masaji; Egi, Moritoki; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-04

    The optimal timing of tracheotomy in critically ill patients remains a topic of debate. We performed a systematic review to clarify the potential benefits of early versus late tracheotomy. We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials that compared outcomes in patients managed with early and late tracheotomy. A random-effects meta-analysis, combining data from three a priori-defined categories of timing of tracheotomy (within 4 versus after 10 days, within 4 versus after 5 days, within 10 versus after 10 days), was performed to estimate the weighted mean difference (WMD) or odds ratio (OR). Of the 142 studies identified in the search, 12, including a total of 2,689 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The tracheotomy rate was significantly higher with early than with late tracheotomy (87 % versus 53 %, OR 16.1 (5.7-45.7); p tracheotomy was associated with more ventilator-free days (WMD 2.12 (0.94, 3.30), p tracheotomy. This updated meta-analysis reveals that early tracheotomy is associated with higher tracheotomy rates and better outcomes, including more ventilator-free days, shorter ICU stays, less sedation, and reduced long-term mortality, compared to late tracheotomy.

  3. Diffusion in time-dependent random media and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-07-01

    Although time-dependent random media with short-range correlations lead to (possibly biased) normal tracer diffusion, anomalous fluctuations occur away from the most probable direction. This was pointed out recently in one-dimensional (1D) lattice random walks, where statistics related to the 1D Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class, i.e., the Gaussian unitary ensemble Tracy-Widom distribution, were shown to arise. Here, we provide a simple picture for this correspondence, directly in the continuum, which allows one to study arbitrary space dimensions and to predict a variety of universal distributions. In d =1 , we predict and verify numerically the emergence of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble Tracy-Widom distribution for fluctuations of the transition probability. In d =3 , we predict a phase transition from Gaussian fluctuations to three-dimensional KPZ-type fluctuations as the bias is increased. We predict KPZ universal distributions for the arrival time of a first particle from a cloud diffusing in such media.

  4. The Parity of Set Systems under Random Restrictions with Applications to Exponential Time Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björklund, Andreas; Dell, Holger; Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    and Husfeldt (FOCS 2013) that computes the parity of the number of Hamiltonian cycles in time 1.619^n. 2. A new result in the framework of Cygan et al. (CCC 2012) for analyzing the complexity of NP-hard problems under the Strong Exponential Time Hypothesis: If the parity of the number of Set Covers can......We reduce the problem of detecting the existence of an object to the problem of computing the parity of the number of objects in question. In particular, when given any non-empty set system, we prove that randomly restricting elements of its ground set makes the size of the restricted set system...... an odd number with significant probability. When compared to previously known reductions of this type, ours excel in their simplicity: For graph problems, restricting elements of the ground set usually corresponds to simple deletion and contraction operations, which can be encoded efficiently in most...

  5. Expected Time for Random Genetic Drift of a Population between Stable Phenotypic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Russell

    1985-11-01

    Natural selection and random genetic drift are modeled by using diffusion equations for the mean phenotype of a quantitative (polygenic) character in a finite population with two available adaptive zones or ecological niches. When there is appreciable selection, the population is likely to spend a very long time drifting around the peak in its original adaptive zone. With the mean phenotype initially anywhere near the local optimum, the expected time until a shift between phenotypic adaptive peaks increases approximately exponentially with the effective population size. In comparison, the expected duration of intermediate forms in the actual transition between adaptive peaks is extremely short, generally below the level of resolution in the fossil record, and increases approximately logarithmically with the effective population size. The evolutionary dynamics of this model conform to the pattern of current paleontological concepts of morphological ``stasis'' and ``punctuated equilibria.''

  6. Count-to-count time interval distribution analysis in a fast reactor; Estudio de la distribucion de intervalos de tiempo entre detecciones consecutivas de neutrones en un reactor rapido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.

    1973-07-01

    The most important kinetic parameters have been measured at the zero power fast reactor CORAL-I by means of the reactor noise analysis in the time domain, using measurements of the count-to-count time intervals. (Author) 69 refs.

  7. The Mucosal Immune Function Is Not Compromised during a Period of High-Intensity Interval Training. Is It Time to Reconsider an Old Assumption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis-Peter Born

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the mucosal immune function and circadian variation of salivary cortisol, Immunoglobin-A (sIgA secretion rate and mood during a period of high-intensity interval training (HIIT compared to long-slow distance training (LSD.Methods: Recreational male runners (n = 28 completed nine sessions of either HIIT or LSD within 3 weeks. The HIIT involved 4 × 4 min of running at 90–95% of maximum heart rate interspersed with 3 min of active recovery while the LSD comprised of continuous running at 70–75% of maximum heart rate for 60–80 min. The psycho-immunological stress-response was investigated with a full daily profile of salivary cortisol and immunoglobin-A (sIgA secretion rate along with the mood state on a baseline day, the first and last day of training and at follow-up 4 days after the last day of training. Before and after the training period, each athlete's running performance and peak oxygen uptake (V·O2peak was determined with an incremental exercise test.Results: The HIIT resulted in a longer time-to-exhaustion (P = 0.02 and increased V·O2peak compared to LSD (P = 0.01. The circadian variation of sIgA secretion rate showed highest values in the morning immediately after waking up followed by a decrease throughout the day in both groups (P < 0.05. With HIIT, the wake-up response of sIgA secretion rate was higher on the last day of training (P < 0.01 as well as the area under the curve (AUCG higher on the first and last day of training and follow-up compared to the LSD (P = 0.01. Also the AUCG for the sIgA secretion rate correlated with the increase in V·O2peak and running performance. The AUCG for cortisol remained unaffected on the first and last day of training but increased on the follow-up day with both, HIIT and LSD (P < 0.01.Conclusion: The increased sIgA secretion rate with the HIIT indicates no compromised mucosal immune function compared to LSD and shows the functional adaptation

  8. Randomized controlled pilot of an intervention to reduce and break-up overweight/obese adults' overall sitting-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdice, Pedro B; Hamilton, Marc T; Sardinha, Luís B; Silva, Analiza M

    2015-11-02

    Too much prolonged sitting is a prevalent health risk among adults. Interventions have focused mainly on the workplace, with limited attention to non-work settings. The effectiveness of a short-term intervention to reduce and break-up sitting-time in overweight/obese adults was examined. This pilot study sought to determine the feasibility of interrupting sitting to stand/ambulate objectively with ActivPAL devices which provide a valid measurement of sit/stand transitions. This is a cross-over randomized controlled pilot that included 10 participants (aged 37-65 years) and although a small and short-term intervention (1-week intervention; no washout) further informs on the feasibility of interventions on a larger scale. At the workplace, screen-delivered hourly alerts prompted participants to break-up sitting-time through adopting walking behaviors (approximately 30-60 minutes day(-1)). During transportation/home/leisure-time individual goals for steps day(-1) were set and sitting-reduction strategies (including behavioral self-monitoring) were delivered through daily text messages. Change in inclinometer-derived sitting-time is the main outcome. Standing, stepping, number of sit/stand transitions and participant satisfaction were also examined. For the intervention compared to the control-week (mean difference (95 % confidence interval); p value), participants had less sitting-time (1.85 hours (0.96-2.75); p = 0.001), more standing (0.77 hours (0.06-1.48); p = 0.036), and more stepping (1.09 hours (0.79- 1.38); p change in the total number of sit/stand transitions (3.28 (-2.33-8.89); p = 0.218) despite successfully reducing sitting-time and increasing time spent standing and walking. Sitting-time in overweight/obese adults can be reduced following a brief multi-component intervention based on prompts, telephone support, goal setting and behavioral self-monitoring. However, the results from this pilot study provide new insight that when overweight

  9. The effect of chorionicity and twin-to-twin delivery time interval on short-term outcome of the second twin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Sofie; Nickelsen, Carsten; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    University Hospitals (2001-09). The association between delivery interval and adverse outcome parameters were compared for monochorionic (MC) and dichorionic (DC) twins by multiple linear regression. Predictors were studied by logistic regression. Results: There were 554 twin pairs: 57 MC and 485 DC. We...

  10. A centralized mailed program with stepped increases of support increases time in compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines over 5 years: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Beverly B; Anderson, Melissa L; Cook, Andrea J; Chubak, Jessica; Fuller, Sharon; Meenan, Richard T; Vernon, Sally W

    2017-11-15

    Screening over many years is required to optimize reductions in colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality. However, no prior trials have compared strategies for obtaining long-term adherence. Systems of Support to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening and Follow-Up was implemented in an integrated health care organization in Washington State. Between 2008 and 2009, 4675 individuals aged 50 to 74 years were randomized to receive the usual care (UC), which included clinic-based strategies to increase CRC screening (arm 1), or, in years 1 and 2, mailings with a call-in number for colonoscopy and mailed fecal tests (arm 2), mailings plus brief telephone assistance (arm 3), or mailings and assistance plus nurse navigation (arm 4). Active-intervention subjects (those in arms 2, 3, and 4 combined) who were still eligible for CRC screening were randomized to mailings being stopped or continued in years 3 and 5. The time in compliance with CRC screening over 5 years was compared for persons assigned to any intervention and persons assigned to UC. Screening tests contributed time on the basis of national guidelines for screening intervals (fecal tests annually, sigmoidoscopy every 5 years, and colonoscopy every 10 years). All participants contributed data, but they were censored at disenrollment, death, the age of 76 years, or a diagnosis of CRC. Compared with UC participants, intervention participants had 31% more adjusted covered time over 5 years (incidence rate ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.37; covered time, 47.5% vs 62.1%). Fecal testing accounted for almost all additional covered time. In a health care organization with clinic-based activities to increase CRC screening, a centralized program led to increased CRC screening adherence over 5 years. Longer term data on screening adherence and its impact on CRC outcomes are needed. Cancer 2017;123:4472-80. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. The episodic random utility model unifies time trade-off and discrete choice approaches in health state valuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Craig (Benjamin); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To present an episodic random utility model that unifies time trade-off and discrete choice approaches in health state valuation. METHODS: First, we introduce two alternative random utility models (RUMs) for health preferences: the episodic RUM and the more common

  12. A continuous-time random-walk approach to the Cole-Davidson dielectric response of dipolar liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabat, B.; Langner, K. M.; Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2004-01-01

    We show how the Cole-Davidson relaxation response, characteristic of alcoholic systems, can be derived within the framework of the continuous-time random walk (CTRW). Using the random-variable formalism, we indicate that the high-frequency power law of dielectric spectra is determined by the heavy...

  13. A continuous-time random-walk approach to the Cole-Davidson dielectric response of dipolar liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabat, Bozena; Langner, Karol M.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    2005-01-01

    We show how the Cole-Davidson relaxation response, characteristic of alcoholic systems, can be derived within the framework of the continuous-time random walk 4CTRW). Using the random-variable formalism, we indicate that the high-frequency power law of dielectric spectra is determined by the heavy...

  14. Role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed A; Abdelmohsen, Aly M; Hassouna, Hadir M

    2017-09-03

    To evaluate the role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock. A prospective study conducted in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital from September 2013 to May 2016. Ninety septic shock patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio for comparing the serial echocardiography-guided therapy in the study group with the standard therapy in the control group regarding clinical course, timely treatment, and outcomes. Shock reversal was significantly higher in the study group (89% vs. 67%), with significantly reduced shock reversal time (3.3 vs. 4.5 days). Pediatric intensive care unit stay in the study group was significantly shorter (8±3 vs. 14±10 days). Mortality due to unresolved shock was significantly lower in the study group. Fluid overload was significantly lower in the study group (11% vs. 44%). In the study group, inotropes were used more frequently (89% vs. 67%) and initiated earlier (12[0.5-24] vs. 24[6-72]h) with lower maximum vasopressor inotrope score (120[30-325] vs. 170[80-395]), revealing predominant use of milrinone (62% vs. 22%). Serial echocardiography provided crucial data for early recognition of septic myocardial dysfunction and hypovolemia that was not apparent on clinical assessment, allowing a timely management and resulting in shock reversal time reduction among children with septic shock. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Interventions to reduce postpartum stress in first-time mothers: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hibah; Saliba, Matilda; Chaaya, Monique; Naasan, Georges

    2014-10-15

    The postpartum period can be a challenging time particularly for first-time mothers. This study aimed to assess two different interventions designed to reduce stress in the postpartum among first-time mothers. Healthy first-time mothers with healthy newborns were recruited from hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon after delivery. The two interventions were a 20-minute film addressing common stressors in the postpartum period and a 24-hour telephone support hotline. Participants were randomized to one of four study arms to receive either the postpartum support film, the hotline service, both interventions, or a music CD (control). Participants were interviewed at eight to twelve weeks postpartum for assessment of levels of stress as measured by the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10). Of the 632 eligible women, 552 (88%) agreed to participate in the study. Of those, 452 (82%) completed the study. Mean PSS-10 scores of mothers who received the film alone (15.76) or the film with the hotline service (15.86) were significantly lower than that of the control group (18.93) (p-value reduced stress in the postpartum period in first-time mothers. These simple interventions can be easily implemented and could have an important impact on the mental wellbeing of new mothers. The trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (identifier # NCT00857051) on March 5, 2009.

  16. Methods of Reverberation Mapping. I. Time-lag Determination by Measures of Randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelouche, Doron; Pozo-Nuñez, Francisco [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838 (Israel); Zucker, Shay, E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il, E-mail: francisco.pozon@gmail.com, E-mail: shayz@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Geosciences, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel)

    2017-08-01

    A class of methods for measuring time delays between astronomical time series is introduced in the context of quasar reverberation mapping, which is based on measures of randomness or complexity of the data. Several distinct statistical estimators are considered that do not rely on polynomial interpolations of the light curves nor on their stochastic modeling, and do not require binning in correlation space. Methods based on von Neumann’s mean-square successive-difference estimator are found to be superior to those using other estimators. An optimized von Neumann scheme is formulated, which better handles sparsely sampled data and outperforms current implementations of discrete correlation function methods. This scheme is applied to existing reverberation data of varying quality, and consistency with previously reported time delays is found. In particular, the size–luminosity relation of the broad-line region in quasars is recovered with a scatter comparable to that obtained by other works, yet with fewer assumptions made concerning the process underlying the variability. The proposed method for time-lag determination is particularly relevant for irregularly sampled time series, and in cases where the process underlying the variability cannot be adequately modeled.

  17. Statistical inference of selection and divergence from a time-dependent Poisson random field model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amei Amei

    Full Text Available We apply a recently developed time-dependent Poisson random field model to aligned DNA sequences from two related biological species to estimate selection coefficients and divergence time. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate species divergence time and selection coefficients for each locus. The model assumes that the selective effects of non-synonymous mutations are normally distributed across genetic loci but constant within loci, and synonymous mutations are selectively neutral. In contrast with previous models, we do not assume that the individual species are at population equilibrium after divergence. Using a data set of 91 genes in two Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans, we estimate the species divergence time t(div = 2.16 N(e (or 1.68 million years, assuming the haploid effective population size N(e = 6.45 x 10(5 years and a mean selection coefficient per generation μ(γ = 1.98/N(e. Although the average selection coefficient is positive, the magnitude of the selection is quite small. Results from numerical simulations are also presented as an accuracy check for the time-dependent model.

  18. Methods of Reverberation Mapping. I. Time-lag Determination by Measures of Randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelouche, Doron; Pozo-Nuñez, Francisco; Zucker, Shay

    2017-08-01

    A class of methods for measuring time delays between astronomical time series is introduced in the context of quasar reverberation mapping, which is based on measures of randomness or complexity of the data. Several distinct statistical estimators are considered that do not rely on polynomial interpolations of the light curves nor on their stochastic modeling, and do not require binning in correlation space. Methods based on von Neumann’s mean-square successive-difference estimator are found to be superior to those using other estimators. An optimized von Neumann scheme is formulated, which better handles sparsely sampled data and outperforms current implementations of discrete correlation function methods. This scheme is applied to existing reverberation data of varying quality, and consistency with previously reported time delays is found. In particular, the size-luminosity relation of the broad-line region in quasars is recovered with a scatter comparable to that obtained by other works, yet with fewer assumptions made concerning the process underlying the variability. The proposed method for time-lag determination is particularly relevant for irregularly sampled time series, and in cases where the process underlying the variability cannot be adequately modeled.

  19. Alpha and beta changes in cortical oscillatory activity in a go/no go randomly-delayed-response choice reaction time paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, M; Imirizaldu, L; Valencia, M; Iriarte, J; Arcocha, J; Artieda, J

    2006-01-01

    Predictable movements induce oscillatory changes over the contralateral motor cortex that begin before the movement, but their significance has not been fully established. We studied non-phase-locked changes in cortical oscillatory activity in a S1-centred double-stimulus go/no go paradigm with random interstimulus interval. About 58 reference-free EEG channels were analyzed by means of Gabor transforms in a group of 10 healthy subjects. A 2000 Hz tone (S1go, 84% probability) indicated the subject to make a brisk wrist extension after a second 2000 Hz tone (S2go). The S1-S2 interval was either 1.5, 3 or 4.5 s. A 1000 Hz tone (S1 no go, 16% probability) indicated the subject not to move (and wait for another S1 tone). A frontal 15 Hz synchronization was observed after S1 in all conditions. No further significant changes were observed in the no go condition. A small pre-S2 alpha and beta desynchronization could be observed only in the 3 and 4.5s-interval go conditions, being larger in the latter. These results suggest that the predictability of the timing of a movement influences the appearance of the pre-movement oscillatory changes; not only motor planning (the 'go' decision) is necessary, but also an estimation of when to move. Our findings provide new insight on the relationship between the decision-making process, movement, and cortical oscillatory activity.

  20. Appropriate Recall Interval for Periodontal Maintenance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Owais A; Wehler, Carolyn J; Gibson, Gretchen; Jurasic, M Marianne; Jones, Judith A

    2015-12-01

    A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to assess the evidence to support a specific time interval between periodontal maintenance (PM) visits. Relevant articles were identified through searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed using specific search terms, until April, 2014, resulting in 1095 abstracts and/or titles with possible relevance. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) guidelines were used to evaluate the strength of studies and synthesize findings. If mean recall interval was not reported for study groups, authors were contacted to attempt to retrieve this information. Eight cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. No randomized control trials were found. All included studies assessed the effect of PM recall intervals in terms of compliance with a recommended regimen (3-6 months) as a primary outcome. Shorter PM intervals (3-6 months) favored more teeth retention but also statistically insignificant differences between RC and IC/EC, or converse findings are also found. In the 2 studies reporting mean recall interval in groups, significant tooth loss differences were noted as the interval neared the 12 month limit. Evidence for a specific recall interval (e.g. every 3 months) for all patients following periodontal therapy is weak. Further studies, such as RCTs or large electronic database evaluations would be appropriate. The merits of risk-based recommendations over fixed recall interval regimens should be explored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Continuous-time random-walk model for anomalous diffusion in expanding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vot, F.; Abad, E.; Yuste, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Expanding media are typical in many different fields, e.g., in biology and cosmology. In general, a medium expansion (contraction) brings about dramatic changes in the behavior of diffusive transport properties such as the set of positional moments and the Green's function. Here, we focus on the characterization of such effects when the diffusion process is described by the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) model. As is well known, when the medium is static this model yields anomalous diffusion for a proper choice of the probability density function (pdf) for the jump length and the waiting time, but the behavior may change drastically if a medium expansion is superimposed on the intrinsic random motion of the diffusing particle. For the case where the jump length and the waiting time pdfs are long-tailed, we derive a general bifractional diffusion equation which reduces to a normal diffusion equation in the appropriate limit. We then study some particular cases of interest, including Lévy flights and subdiffusive CTRWs. In the former case, we find an analytical exact solution for the Green's function (propagator). When the expansion is sufficiently fast, the contribution of the diffusive transport becomes irrelevant at long times and the propagator tends to a stationary profile in the comoving reference frame. In contrast, for a contracting medium a competition between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentrating effect of contraction arises. In the specific case of a subdiffusive CTRW in an exponentially contracting medium, the latter effect prevails for sufficiently long times, and all the particles are eventually localized at a single point in physical space. This "big crunch" effect, totally absent in the case of normal diffusion, stems from inefficient particle spreading due to subdiffusion. We also derive a hierarchy of differential equations for the moments of the transport process described by the subdiffusive CTRW model in an expanding medium

  2. Mean-field theory for a passive scalar advected by a turbulent velocity field with a random renewal time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sokoloff, D

    2001-08-01

    Mean-field theory for turbulent transport of a passive scalar (e.g., particles and gases) is discussed. Equations for the mean number density of particles advected by a random velocity field, with a finite correlation time, are derived. Mean-field equations for a passive scalar comprise spatial derivatives of high orders due to the nonlocal nature of passive scalar transport in a random velocity field with a finite correlation time. A turbulent velocity field with a random renewal time is considered. This model is more realistic than that with a constant renewal time used by Elperin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 61, 2617 (2000)], and employs two characteristic times: the correlation time of a random velocity field tau(c), and a mean renewal time tau. It is demonstrated that the turbulent diffusion coefficient is determined by the minimum of the times tau(c) and tau. The mean-field equation for a passive scalar was derived for different ratios of tau/tau(c). The important role of the statistics of the field of Lagrangian trajectories in turbulent transport of a passive scalar, in a random velocity field with a finite correlation time, is demonstrated. It is shown that in the case tau(c)time of variations of a mean passive scalar field.

  3. Starting with ultrasonography decreases popliteal block performance time in inexperienced hands: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Rita; Carassiti, Massimiliano; Costa, Fabio; Martuscelli, Matteo; Benedetto, Maria; Cancilleri, Francesco; Marinozzi, Andrea; Martinelli, Nicolò

    2012-12-19

    The widespread of hallux valgus surgery in a day care setting enhanced the role of regional anaesthesia in the last few years. Sciatic nerve block at popliteal fossa has been shown to provide safe and effective analgesia. Our purpose was to compare the success rate and performance time of popliteal block during resident's training for regional anaesthesia by using nerve stimulation (NS) or combined nerve stimulation and ultrasound (NS + US). 70 adult patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery were randomly assigned to receive sciatic nerve block at popliteal fossa with US+NS or NS alone with a double injection technique for peroneal and tibial branches, respectively. Two residents experienced with nerve stimulator performed the procedures after a learning phase concerning ultrasonography. A local anaesthetic solution, containing 10 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine and 10 mL of 2% lidocaine was used: 12 mL were infiltrated close the tibial nerve, and 8mL were infiltrated close the common peroneal nerve. Block success rate, sensory block onset time, block performance time were evaluated. Recourse to general anaesthesia was considered as failure. No differences were detected in success rate and onset time of sensory block between the two groups (P > 0.05). The time to block tibial nerve and the overall block time were significantly faster in US+NS group (P < 0.05). Ultrasound guidance for popliteal nerve block resulted in similar success rate with a faster procedure time when compared with nerve stimulator, thus providing a possible effect on resident education and operating room efficiency.

  4. Starting with ultrasonography decreases popliteal block performance time in inexperienced hands: a prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldo Rita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The widespread of hallux valgus surgery in a day care setting enhanced the role of regional anaesthesia in the last few years. Sciatic nerve block at popliteal fossa has been shown to provide safe and effective analgesia. Our purpose was to compare the success rate and performance time of popliteal block during resident’s training for regional anaesthesia by using nerve stimulation (NS or combined nerve stimulation and ultrasound (NS + US. Methods 70 adult patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery were randomly assigned to receive sciatic nerve block at popliteal fossa with US+NS or NS alone with a double injection technique for peroneal and tibial branches, respectively. Two residents experienced with nerve stimulator performed the procedures after a learning phase concerning ultrasonography. A local anaesthetic solution, containing 10 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine and 10 mL of 2% lidocaine was used: 12 mL were infiltrated close the tibial nerve, and 8mL were infiltrated close the common peroneal nerve. Block success rate, sensory block onset time, block performance time were evaluated. Recourse to general anaesthesia was considered as failure. Results No differences were detected in success rate and onset time of sensory block between the two groups (P > 0.05. The time to block tibial nerve and the overall block time were significantly faster in US+NS group (P Conclusions Ultrasound guidance for popliteal nerve block resulted in similar success rate with a faster procedure time when compared with nerve stimulator, thus providing a possible effect on resident education and operating room efficiency.

  5. Generating Variable and Random Schedules of Reinforcement Using Microsoft Excel Macros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Stacie L; Bourret, Jason C

    2008-01-01

    Variable reinforcement schedules are used to arrange the availability of reinforcement following varying response ratios or intervals of time. Random reinforcement schedules are subtypes of variable reinforcement schedules that can be used to arrange the availability of reinforcement at a constant probability across number of responses or time. Generating schedule values for variable and random reinforcement schedules can be difficult. The present article describes the steps necessary to write macros in Microsoft Excel that will generate variable-ratio, variable-interval, variable-time, random-ratio, random-interval, and random-time reinforcement schedule values. PMID:18595286

  6. A continuous time random walk (CTRW) integro-differential equation with chemical interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Rami; Nissan, Alon; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2018-01-01

    A nonlocal-in-time integro-differential equation is introduced that accounts for close coupling between transport and chemical reaction terms. The structure of the equation contains these terms in a single convolution with a memory function M ( t), which includes the source of non-Fickian (anomalous) behavior, within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). The interaction is non-linear and second-order, relevant for a bimolecular reaction A + B → C. The interaction term ΓP A ( s, t) P B ( s, t) is symmetric in the concentrations of A and B (i.e. P A and P B ); thus the source terms in the equations for A, B and C are similar, but with a change in sign for that of C. Here, the chemical rate coefficient, Γ, is constant. The fully coupled equations are solved numerically using a finite element method (FEM) with a judicious representation of M ( t) that eschews the need for the entire time history, instead using only values at the former time step. To begin to validate the equations, the FEM solution is compared, in lieu of experimental data, to a particle tracking method (CTRW-PT); the results from the two approaches, particularly for the C profiles, are in agreement. The FEM solution, for a range of initial and boundary conditions, can provide a good model for reactive transport in disordered media.

  7. Knowledge Translation Interventions to Improve the Timing of Dialysis Initiation: Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Elaine M T; Manns, Braden J; Garg, Amit X; Sood, Manish M; Kim, S Joseph; Naimark, David; Nesrallah, Gihad E; Soroka, Steven D; Beaulieu, Monica; Dixon, Stephanie; Alam, Ahsan; Tangri, Navdeep

    2016-01-01

    Early initiation of chronic dialysis (starting dialysis with higher vs lower kidney function) has risen rapidly in the past 2 decades in Canada and internationally, despite absence of established health benefits and higher costs. In 2014, a Canadian guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation, recommending an intent-to-defer approach, was published. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a knowledge translation intervention to promote the intent-to-defer approach in clinical practice. This study is a multicenter, 2-arm parallel, cluster randomized trial. The study involves 55 advanced chronic kidney disease clinics across Canada. Patients older than 18 years who are managed by nephrologists for more than 3 months, and initiate dialysis in the follow-up period are included in the study. Outcomes will be measured at the patient-level and enumerated within a cluster. Data on characteristics of each dialysis start will be determined by linkages with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. Primary outcomes include the proportion of patients who start dialysis early with an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 10.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 and start dialysis in hospital as inpatients or in an emergency room setting. Secondary outcomes include the rate of change in early dialysis starts; rates of hospitalizations, deaths, and cost of predialysis care (wherever available); quarterly proportion of new starts; and acceptability of the knowledge translation materials. We randomized 55 multidisciplinary chronic disease clinics (clusters) in Canada to receive either an active knowledge translation intervention or no intervention for the uptake of the guideline on the timing of dialysis initiation. The active knowledge translation intervention consists of audit and feedback as well as patient- and provider-directed educational tools delivered at a comprehensive in-person medical detailing visit. Control clinics are only exposed to guideline

  8. Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Marsh, Samantha; Foley, Louise; Epstein, Leonard H; Olds, Timothy; Dewes, Ofa; Heke, Ihirangi; Carter, Karen; Jiang, Yannan; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni

    2014-09-10

    Screen-based activities, such as watching television (TV), playing video games, and using computers, are common sedentary behaviors among young people and have been linked with increased energy intake and overweight. Previous home-based sedentary behaviour interventions have been limited by focusing primarily on the child, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods. The SWITCH (Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home) study aimed to determine the effect of a home-based, family-delivered intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour on body composition, sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet over 24 weeks in overweight and obese children. A two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Children and their primary caregiver living in Auckland, New Zealand were recruited via schools, community centres, and word of mouth. The intervention, delivered over 20 weeks, consisted of a face-to-face meeting with the parent/caregiver and the child to deliver intervention content, which focused on training and educating them to use a wide range of strategies designed to reduce their child's screen time. Families were given Time Machine TV monitoring devices to assist with allocating screen time, activity packages to promote alternative activities, online support via a website, and monthly newsletters. Control participants were given the intervention material on completion of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in children's BMI z-score from baseline to 24 weeks. Children (n = 251) aged 9-12 years and their primary caregiver were randomized to receive the SWITCH intervention (n = 127) or no intervention (controls; n = 124). There was no significant difference in change of zBMI between the intervention and control groups, although a favorable trend was observed (-0.016; 95% CI: -0.084, 0.051; p = 0.64). There were also no significant differences on secondary outcomes, except for a trend towards

  9. Smartphone mobile application delivering personalized, real-time sun protection advice: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile smartphones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications (apps), they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. A smartphone mobile app providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Data were collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. A sample of 604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel 18 years or older who owned an Android smartphone were enrolled. The mobile app provided advice on sun protection (ie, protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply or reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, the phone's time and location, and user input. Percentage of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use (mean days staying in the shade, 41.0% vs 33.7%; P = .03) but less sunscreen use (mean days, 28.6% vs 34.5%; P = .048) than controls. There was no significant difference in number of sunburns in the past 3 months (mean, 0.60 in the treatment group vs 0.62 for controls; P = .87). Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun (mean days keeping time in the sun to a minimum, 60.4% for app users vs 49.3% for nonusers; P = .04) and using all protection behaviors combined more (mean days, 39.4% vs 33.8%; P = .04). The mobile app improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile app was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure.

  10. Single-Use Energy Sources and Operating Room Time for Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloran-Schwartz, M Brigid; Gavard, Jeffrey A; Martin, Jared C; Blaskiewicz, Robert J; Yeung, Patrick P

    2016-01-01

    To compare the intraoperative direct costs of a single-use energy device with reusable energy devices during laparoscopic hysterectomy. A randomized controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). An academic hospital. Forty-six women who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy from Ma