WorldWideScience

Sample records for random soil properties

  1. Mapping Soil Properties of Africa at 250 m Resolution: Random Forests Significantly Improve Current Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Kempen, Bas; Leenaars, Johan G. B.; Walsh, Markus G.; Shepherd, Keith D.; Sila, Andrew; MacMillan, Robert A.; Mendes de Jesus, Jorge; Tamene, Lulseged; Tondoh, Jérôme E.

    2015-01-01

    80% of arable land in Africa has low soil fertility and suffers from physical soil problems. Additionally, significant amounts of nutrients are lost every year due to unsustainable soil management practices. This is partially the result of insufficient use of soil management knowledge. To help bridge the soil information gap in Africa, the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) project was established in 2008. Over the period 2008–2014, the AfSIS project compiled two point data sets: the Africa Soil Profiles (legacy) database and the AfSIS Sentinel Site database. These data sets contain over 28 thousand sampling locations and represent the most comprehensive soil sample data sets of the African continent to date. Utilizing these point data sets in combination with a large number of covariates, we have generated a series of spatial predictions of soil properties relevant to the agricultural management—organic carbon, pH, sand, silt and clay fractions, bulk density, cation-exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchangeable acidity, Al content and exchangeable bases (Ca, K, Mg, Na). We specifically investigate differences between two predictive approaches: random forests and linear regression. Results of 5-fold cross-validation demonstrate that the random forests algorithm consistently outperforms the linear regression algorithm, with average decreases of 15–75% in Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) across soil properties and depths. Fitting and running random forests models takes an order of magnitude more time and the modelling success is sensitive to artifacts in the input data, but as long as quality-controlled point data are provided, an increase in soil mapping accuracy can be expected. Results also indicate that globally predicted soil classes (USDA Soil Taxonomy, especially Alfisols and Mollisols) help improve continental scale soil property mapping, and are among the most important predictors. This indicates a promising potential for transferring pedological

  2. Soil properties and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; McBratney, A.B.; White, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This four-volume set, edited by leading experts in soil science, brings together in one collection a series of papers that have been fundamental to the development of soil science as a defined discipline. Tis volume 2 on Soil Properties and Processes covers: - Soil physics - Soil (bio)chemistry -

  3. Soil properties, soil functions and soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Soil plays a crucial role in the ecosystem functioning such as food production, capture and storage of water, carbon and nutrients and in the realisation of a number of UN Sustainable Developments Goals. In this work we present an approach to spatially and jointly assess the multiple contributions of soil to the delivery of ecosystem services within multiple land-use system. We focussed on the modelling of the impact of soil on sediment retention, carbon storage, storing and filtering of nutrients, habitat for soil organisms and water regulation, taking into account examples of land use and climate scenarios. Simplified models were used for the single components. Spatialised Bayesian Belief networks were used for the jointly assessment and mapping of soil contribution to multiple land use and ecosystem services. We integrated continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping approaches covering the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Uncertainty was accounted for and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils and provides an example of integrated study assessing the contributions of soil. The results show the importance of the multi-functional analysis of the contribution of soils to the ecosystem service delivery and UN SDGs.

  4. Soil Properties and Yam Performance in Differently Tilled Soils in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil Properties and Yam Performance in Differently Tilled Soils in Auchi Area, Edo State of Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Soil Science ... is to investigate soil properties and tillage requirement for yam on silty loam soils of derived savanna zone of Edo State, Nigeria and determine soil properties influencing yam performance ...

  5. Thermal Properties of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    plagio - clase feldspar and pyroxene. The tine fraction may Surface area and its effects contain the clay "sheet" minerals (i.e. kaolinite. illite...Pyroxene, Kaoliniwe Unified By By Ortho. Plagio . amphibole, Basic clay min. Hematite Soil Soil soil petrogr. X.ray clase clase and Igneous and clay and no

  6. Thermal Properties of Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-23

    box at the ground surface. A manhole with cover was installed around the junction box and both structures were sealed with concrete. A schematic...nirm) No. 200 175-,m) Dry Preparation of Soil Samples for Partice- No S (2 36-mim) Size Analisis and Determination of Soil Con- 2.7 Water Both or...151 It: CALCULATIONS ANI) REPORT P - ((tO.fXtO/ W) x GI(G - G)] (R - Not I 13-The bracketed portion of the equation I. Sieve Analisis Values for the

  7. Physicochemical properties of soil under two different depths in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variations in the physicochemical properties of soil at two different depths in a tropical secondary forest of International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria was investigated. Soil samples were collected at three random points each from twenty-four sampling plots at predetermined depths of 0-15cm and ...

  8. Combination of soil classification and some selected soil properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantage in the combined use of soil classification and top soil analysis for explaining crop yield variation was examined. Soil properties and yields of maize (Zea mays L) on different soil types were measured on farmers' fields for 2 years. Yield prediction improved from 2 per cent at the Order and Association levels to ...

  9. Some Properties of Soils Formed Over Three Parent Materials in Imo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated properties of soils derived from different parent, materials, Random soil survey technique was used in siting profile pits. Soil profile pits were described according to FAO guidelines. Soil samples were air-dried and sieved with 2-mm aperture before routine determination of properties. Percentage ...

  10. Predicting soil properties in the tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; Hartemink, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    It is practically impossible to measure soil properties continuously at each location across the globe. Therefore, it is necessary to have robust systems that can predict soil properties at a given location. That is needed in many tropical countries where the dearth of soil property measurements is

  11. Using random forests to explore the effects of site attributes and soil properties on near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, Helena; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of the near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil is fundamental for understanding important processes like groundwater contamination risks or runoff and soil erosion. Hydraulic conductivities are however difficult and time-consuming to determine by direct measurements, especially at the field scale or larger. So far, pedotransfer functions do not offer an especially reliable alternative since published approaches exhibit poor prediction performances. In our study we aimed at building pedotransfer functions by growing random forests (a statistical learning approach) on 486 datasets from the meta-database on tension-disk infiltrometer measurements collected from peer-reviewed literature and recently presented by Jarvis et al. (2013, Influence of soil, land use and climatic factors on the hydraulic conductivity of soil. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 17(12), 5185-5195). When some data from a specific source publication were allowed to enter the training set whereas others were used for validation, the results of a 10-fold cross-validation showed reasonable coefficients of determination of 0.53 for hydraulic conductivity at 10 cm tension, K10, and 0.41 for saturated conductivity, Ks. The estimated average annual temperature and precipitation at the site were the most important predictors for K10, while bulk density and estimated average annual temperature were most important for Ks prediction. The soil organic carbon content and the diameter of the disk infiltrometer were also important for the prediction of both K10 and Ks. However, coefficients of determination were around zero when all datasets of a specific source publication were excluded from the training set and exclusively used for validation. This may indicate experimenter bias, or that better predictors have to be found or that a larger dataset has to be used to infer meaningful pedotransfer functions for saturated and near-saturated hydraulic conductivities. More research is in progress

  12. Monitoring forest soil properties with electrical resistivity

    OpenAIRE

    Paillet, Y.; Cassagne, N.; Brun, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance and monitoring of soil fertility is a key issue for sustainable forest management. Vital ecosystem processes may be affected by management practices which change the physical, chemical and biological properties of the soil. This study is the first in Europe to use electrical resistivity as a non-invasive method to determine forest soil properties rapidly in the field in a monitoring purpose. We explored the correlations between electrical resistivity and forest soil properties on ...

  13. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity using soil morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Karahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been conducted to predict soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks by parametric soil properties such as bulk density and particle-size distribution. Although soil morphological properties have a strong effect on Ks, studies predicting Ks by soil morphological properties such as type, size, and strength of soil structure; type, orientation and quantity of soil pores and roots and consistency are rare. This study aimed at evaluating soil morphological properties to predict Ks. Undisturbed soil samples (15 cm length and 8.0 cm id. were collected from topsoil (0-15 cm and subsoil (15-30 cm (120 samples with a tractor operated soil sampler at sixty randomly selected sampling sites on a paddy field and an adjecent grassland in Central Anatolia (Cankırı, Turkey. Synchronized disturbed soil samples were taken from the same sampling sites and sampling depths for basic soil analyses. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured on the soil columns using a constant-head permeameter. Following the Ks measurements, the upper part of soil columns were covered to prevent evaporation and colums were left to drain in the laboratory. When the water flow through the column was stopped, a subsample were taken for bulk density and then soil columns were disturbed for describing the soil morphological properties. In addition, soil texture, bulk density, pH, field capacity, wilting point, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, aggregate stability, organic matter, and calcium carbonate were measured on the synchronized disturbed soil samples. The data were divided into training (80 data values and validation (40 data values sets. Measured values of Ks ranged from 0.0036 to 2.14 cmh-1 with a mean of 0.86 cmh-1. The Ks was predicted from the soil morphological and parametric properties by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Soil structure class, stickiness, pore-size, root-size, and pore-quantity contributed to the Ks prediction

  14. Predicting Soil-Air and Soil-Water Transport Properties During Soil Vapor Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe

    Increased application of in-situ technology for control and removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the subsurface has made the understanding of soil physical properties and their impact upon contaminant transport even more important. Knowledge of contaminant transport is important when...... properties of undisturbed soil from more easily measurable soil properties are developed. The importance of soil properties with respect to contaminant migration during remediation by soil vapor extraction (SVE) in the unsaturated zone was investigated using numerical simulations....

  15. Assessment the effect of homogenized soil on soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohawesh, O.; Janssen, M.; Maaitah, O.; Lennartz, B.

    2017-09-01

    Soil hydraulic properties play a crucial role in simulating water flow and contaminant transport. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly measured using homogenized soil samples. However, soil structure has a significant effect on the soil ability to retain and to conduct water, particularly in aggregated soils. In order to determine the effect of soil homogenization on soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport, undisturbed soil samples were carefully collected. Five different soil structures were identified: Angular-blocky, Crumble, Angular-blocky (different soil texture), Granular, and subangular-blocky. The soil hydraulic properties were determined for undisturbed and homogenized soil samples for each soil structure. The soil hydraulic properties were used to model soil water transport using HYDRUS-1D.The homogenized soil samples showed a significant increase in wide pores (wCP) and a decrease in narrow pores (nCP). The wCP increased by 95.6, 141.2, 391.6, 3.9, 261.3%, and nCP decreased by 69.5, 10.5, 33.8, 72.7, and 39.3% for homogenized soil samples compared to undisturbed soil samples. The soil water retention curves exhibited a significant decrease in water holding capacity for homogenized soil samples compared with the undisturbed soil samples. The homogenized soil samples showed also a decrease in soil hydraulic conductivity. The simulated results showed that water movement and distribution were affected by soil homogenizing. Moreover, soil homogenizing affected soil hydraulic properties and soil water transport. However, field studies are being needed to find the effect of these differences on water, chemical, and pollutant transport under several scenarios.

  16. The effect of intrinsic soil properties on soil quality assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of soil quality is based on indicators and indices derived from soil properties. However, intrinsic soil properties may interfere with other soil properties that vary under different land uses and are used to calculate the indices. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which intrinsic soil properties (clay and iron oxide contents explain variable soil properties (sum of bases, potential acidity, organic carbon, total porosity, and bulk density under different land uses (native forest, no-tillage and conventional agriculture on small family farms in Southern Brazil. The results showed that the five properties evaluated can be included in soil quality assessments and are not influenced by the clay and iron oxide contents. It was concluded that for little weathered 1:1 and 2:1 phyllosilicate rich-soils, if the difference between the maximum and the minimum clay content under the different land uses is less than about 200 g kg-1 and the iron oxide content less than about 15 g kg-1, the physico-chemical soil properties in the surface layer are determined mostly by the land use.

  17. Soil Physical Properties and Production of Upland Ultisol Soil

    OpenAIRE

    soelaeman, yoyo; Haryati, Umi

    2012-01-01

    Acid upland soil in Indonesia has a great potential for agricultural development but the soil physical properties have been degraded. The use of manure and direct application of Gresik phosphate rock (PR) was an alternative to improve land productivity and crop yields. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of manure and P sources on soil physical properties and yield of foods crop that was arranged on intensive cropping systems of upland rice + maize -/- cassava- mungbean. T...

  18. Modeling cation exchange capacity and soil water holding capacity from basic soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idowu Olorunfemi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cation exchange capacity (CEC is a good indicator of soil productivity and is useful for making recommendations of phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium for soils of different textures. Soil water holding capacity (SWHC defines the ability of a soil to hold water at a particular time of the season. This research predicted CEC and SWHC of soils using pedotransfer models developed (using Minitab 17 statistical software from basic soil properties (Sand(S, Clay(C, soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC and verify the model by comparing the relationship between measured and estimated (obtained by PTFs CEC and SWHC in the Forest Vegetative Zone of Nigeria. For this study, a total of 105 sampling points in 35 different locations were sampled in the study areas. Three sampling points were randomly selected per location and three undisturbed samples were collected at each sampling point. The results showed success in predicting CEC and SWHC from basic soil properties. In this study, five linear regression models for predicting soil CEC and seven linear regression models for predicting SWHC from some soil physical and chemical properties were suggested. Model 5 [CEC = -13.93+2.645 pH +0.0446 C (%+2.267 SOC (%] was best for predicting CEC while model 12 [SWHC (%=36.0- 0.215 S (%+0.113 C (%+10.36 SOC (%] is the most acceptable model for predicting SWHC.

  19. Tillage system affects microbiological properties of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; Avilés, M.; Perea, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil tillage significantly affects organic carbon accumulation, microbial biomass, and subsequently enzymatic activity in surface soil. Microbial activity in soil is a crucial parameter contributing to soil functioning, and thus a basic quality factor for soil. Since enzymes remain soil after excretion by living or disintegrating cells, shifts in their activities reflect long-term fluctuations in microbial biomass. In order to study the effects of no-till on biochemical and microbiological properties in comparison to conventional tillage in a representative soil from South Spain, an experiment was conducted since 1982 on the experimental farm of the Institute of Agriculture and Fisheries Research of Andalusia (IFAPA) in Carmona, SW Spain (37o24'07''N, 5o35'10''W). The soil at the experimental site was a very fine, montomorillonitic, thermic Chromic Haploxerert (Soil Survey Staff, 2010). A randomized complete block design involving three replications and the following two tillage treatments was performed: (i) Conventional tillage, which involved mouldboard plowing to a depth of 50 cm in the summer (once every three years), followed by field cultivation to a depth of 15 cm before sowing; crop residues being burnt, (ii) No tillage, which involved controlling weeds before sowing by spraying glyphosate and sowing directly into the crop residue from the previous year by using a planter with double-disk openers. For all tillage treatments, the crop rotation (annual crops) consisted of winter wheat, sunflower, and legumes (pea, chickpea, or faba bean, depending on the year), which were grown under rainfed conditions. Enzymatic activities (ß-glucosidase, dehydrogenase, aryl-sulphatase, acid phosphatase, and urease), soil microbial biomass by total viable cells number by acridine orange direct count, the density of cultivable groups of bacteria and fungi by dilution plating on semi-selective media, the physiological profiles of the microbial communities by BiologR, and the

  20. Soil properties from seismic intrinsic dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies in the past have shown the sensitivity of seismic waves to soil/rock properties, such as composition, porosity, pore fluid, and permeability. However, quantitative characterization of these properties has remained challenging. In case of unconsolidated soils, the

  1. Influence of vermicompost on soil chemical and physical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the effects of vermicompost on soil chemical and physical properties was evaluated in tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var Super Beta) field. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Different amounts of vermicompost (0, 5, 10, 15 t ha-1) were incorporated ...

  2. Prediction of soil hydraulic characteristics from basic soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) prove to be powerful tools for predicting soil hydraulic characteristics from basic soil properties. PTFs have the advantage over direct measurement techniques that they are inexpensive and easy to use. Accuracy of predictions for many applications on regional and

  3. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between Soil Properties and Plant Diversity in Semiarid Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Dölarslan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In ecological studies, soil-plant interaction is an important environmental factor. Soil chemical and physical properties affect plant richness and diversity. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between soil physical and chemical properties, and plant diversity indexes (Shannon-Weiner and Simpson in semiarid grassland. Plant diversity indexes and soil properties were determined using 34 quadrats (5x5m on different parent materials (chrome, marble, serpentine, red chalk and red chalk mostra in semiarid grasslands in the Central Anatolia Region in Turkey. Plant samples were collected and recorded periodically from April to September (the vegetation period in 2014 for each quadrat. In order to determine the plant richness and diversity indexes, 3 sub-quadrats (1x1m were randomly added into each of 34 (5x5 m quadrats. To evaluate the relationship between plant diversity indexes and soil properties, composite soil samples were collected from the four corners, and the center of each quadrat 0-30 cm in depth, and which was mixing of those subsamples. Soil sand-silt-clay contents, soil reaction (pH, bulk density (BD, electrical conductivity (EC, CaCO3 and soil organic matter (SOM contents were measured. Relationship between plant diversity indexes measured in different months during vegetation period and soil properties of different parent material was statistically analysed using correlation analysis in SPSS 20.0. Modest correlation coefficient was found between the Simpson diversity index and SOM content, sand-silt-clay content, pH and EC for different months in vegetation period.

  5. Pedotransfer functions estimating soil hydraulic properties using different soil parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions (PTF) are useful in many studies such as hydrochemical modelling and soil mapping. The objective of this study was to calibrate and test parametric PTFs that predict soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity...... conductivity parameters. A larger data set (1618 horizons) with a broader textural range was used in the development of PTFs to predict the van Genuchten parameters. The PTFs using either three or seven textural classes combined with soil organic mater and bulk density gave the most reliable predictions...... of the hydraulic properties of the studied soils. We found that introducing measured water content as a predictor generally gave lower errors for water retention predictions and higher errors for conductivity predictions. The best of the developed PTFs for predicting hydraulic conductivity was tested against PTFs...

  6. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mossadeghi-Björklund Mona; Arvidsson Johan; Keller Thomas; Koestel John; Lamandé Mathieu; Larsbo Mats; Jarvis Nick

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites in the following...

  7. Rheological properties of soil: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangli; Zhu, Long; Yu, Chao

    2017-05-01

    Recently rheological methods have been applied to investigate the mechanical properties of soil micro-structure. Rheological techniques have a number of quantitative physically based measurements and offer a better understanding of how soil micro-structure behaves when subject to stress. Rheological material is refers to deformation properties similar to the solid and flow properties similar to the liquid of bound water and colloidal substances under stress. Soil rheology is divided into fluid rheology and plasticity rheology. Fluid rheology is produced by rheological material. Plasticity rheology mainly refers to the sliding and peristaltic between soil solid particles under shear stress. It is generally believed that the soft soil rheology mainly belongs to fluid rheology, while the rheology of sand and other coarse grained soil mainly belongs to plasticity rheology. Thus, rheology mechanisms of soft soil and sand are different. This paper introduces the methods of the research progress on the rheology of soil, in the soil rheological mechanism, rheological model and rheological numerical aspects of the research at home and abroad were summarized and analysed, discussed the problems existed in related research, and puts forward some suggestions for the future study on the rheology of soil.

  8. Determination of soil properties from earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lopez, Carlos Isidro

    2002-08-01

    Soil damping and site (system) dominant vibration frequency estimations were obtained by means of the Random Decrement Method (RDM) using numerically simulated time series of soil model responses upon random excitations and real earthquake records. Highly reliable estimations were obtained when the system response was dominated by a distinctive or preferential vibration mode. Different damping mechanisms did not play a significant role in the variability of damping estimations; however, the excitation type did. The damping estimations were highly dependent on how well the Randomdec signature was defined. The alternate methods to measure the decay of the Randomdec signature may produce large variability in the damping estimations. The most consistent and reliable estimations were obtained using the average of the decay every half-cycle of the Randomdec signature. Hurley's method consistently underestimated the damping values by an average of 50%. The frequency estimations were highly consistent when the Randomdec signature is well defined. Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratios were used to characterize local sediment response, and 1-D wave propagation modeling was used to estimate soil properties and theoretical amplification factors of shallow marine sediment layers in an experimental site in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Relative to the vertical spectral amplitude, the horizontal spectral amplitudes increased by an order of magnitude at 0.35 Hz, and by at least two orders of magnitude at 1.9 Hz. A 50-m-thick soil system parameterized as three solid layers resting over a half-space with a water layer at the top produced theoretical H/V spectral ratios largely consistent with the observed H/V spectral ratios. The modeling results were consistent with both earthquake and background noise records. The use of background noise offers the advantage of better defining the spectral characteristics of the signal when, during the averaging process, a large ensemble is

  9. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  10. A harmonized vocabulary for soil observed properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Bruce; Wilson, Peter; Cox, Simon; Vleeshouer, Jamie

    2014-05-01

    Interoperability of soil data depends on agreements concerning models, schemas and vocabularies. However, observed property terms are often defined during different activities and projects in isolation of one another, resulting in data that has the same scope being represented with different terms, using different formats and formalisms, and published in various access methods. Significantly, many soil property vocabularies conflate multiple concepts in a single term, e.g. quantity kind, units of measure, substance being observed, and procedure. Effectively, this bundles separate information elements into a single slot. We have developed a vocabulary for observed soil properties by adopting and extending a previously defined water quality vocabulary. The observed property model separates the information elements, based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Observations & Measurements model and extending the NASA/TopQuadrant 'Quantities, Units, Dimensions and Types' (QUDT) ontology. The imported water quality vocabulary is formalized using the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Key elements are defined as sub-classes or sub-properties of standard Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) elements, allowing use of standard vocabulary interfaces. For the soil observed property vocabulary, terms from QUDT and water quality are used where possible. These are supplemented with additional unit of measure (Unit), observed property (ScaledQuantityKind) and substance being observed (SubstanceOrTaxon) vocabulary entries required for the soil properties. The vocabulary terms have been extracted from the Australian Soil and Land Survey Field Handbook and Australian Soil Information Transfer and Evaluation System (SITES) vocabularies. The vocabulary links any chemical substances to items from the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) ontology. By formalizing the model for observable properties, and clearly labelling the separate elements, soil property observations may

  11. Critical Properties of Pure and Random Antiferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, R. A.; Carneiro, K.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the critical properties of CoF2 and the randomly mixed systems: Co/ZnF2 and KMn/NiF3. The results for CoF2 are in excellent accord with the critical properties of the three-dimensional Ising model. In all of the random crystals studied the tra...

  12. Mapping specific soil functions based on digital soil property maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Fodor, Nándor; Farkas-Iványi, Kinga; Szabó, József; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil functions and services is a great challenge in itself even if the spatial relevance is supposed to be identified and regionalized. Proxies and indicators are widely used in ecosystem service mapping. Soil services could also be approximated by elementary soil features. One solution is the association of soil types with services as basic principle. Soil property maps however provide quantified spatial information, which could be utilized more versatilely for the spatial inference of soil functions and services. In the frame of the activities referred as "Digital, Optimized, Soil Related Maps and Information in Hungary" (DOSoReMI.hu) numerous soil property maps have been compiled so far with proper DSM techniques partly according to GSM.net specifications, partly by slightly or more strictly changing some of its predefined parameters (depth intervals, pixel size, property etc.). The elaborated maps have been further utilized, since even DOSoReMI.hu was intended to take steps toward the regionalization of higher level soil information (secondary properties, functions, services). In the meantime the recently started AGRAGIS project requested spatial soil related information in order to estimate agri-environmental related impacts of climate change and support the associated vulnerability assessment. One of the most vulnerable services of soils in the context of climate change is their provisioning service. In our work it was approximated by productivity, which was estimated by a sequential scenario based crop modelling. It took into consideration long term (50 years) time series of both measured and predicted climatic parameters as well as accounted for the potential differences in agricultural practice and crop production. The flexible parametrization and multiple results of modelling was then applied for the spatial assessment of sensitivity, vulnerability, exposure and adaptive capacity of soils in the context of the forecasted changes in

  13. Geotechnical properties of Egyptian collapsible soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled E. Gaaver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of constructing structures on collapsible soils presents significant challenges to geotechnical engineers due to sudden reduction in volume upon wetting. Identifying collapsible soils when encountered in the field and taking the needed precautions should substantially reduce the risk of such problems usually reported in buildings and highways. Collapsible soils are those unsaturated soils that can withstand relatively high pressure without showing significant change in volume, however upon wetting; they are susceptible to a large and sudden reduction in volume. Collapsible soils cover significant areas around the world. In Egypt, collapsible soils were observed within the northern portion of the western desert including Borg El-Arab region, and around the city of Cairo in Six-of-October plateau, and Tenth-of-Ramadan city. Settlements associated with development on untreated collapsible soils usually lead to expensive repairs. One method for treating collapsible soils is to densify their structure by compaction. The ongoing study presents the effect of compaction on the geotechnical properties of the collapsible soils. Undisturbed block samples were recovered from test pits at four sites in Borg El-Arab district, located at about 20 km west of the city of Alexandria, Egypt. The samples were tested in both unsoaked and soaked conditions. Influence of water inundation on the geotechnical properties of collapsible soils was demonstrated. A comparative study between natural undisturbed and compacted samples of collapsible soils was performed. An attempt was made to relate the collapse potential to the initial moisture content. An empirical correlation between California Bearing Ratio of the compacted collapsible soils and liquid limit was adopted. The presented simple relationships should enable the geotechnical engineers to estimate the complex parameters of collapsible soils using simple laboratory tests with a reasonable accuracy.

  14. Spatial variation of soil physical properties in adjacent alluvial and colluvial soils under Ustic moisture regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, M.; Öztürk, H. S.; Erşahin, S.; Özkan, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    Soils vary spatially due to differences in soil management and soil formation factors. The soil spatial variability is an important determinant of efficiency of farm inputs and yield. This study was carried out to identify and compare spatial variation of some soil physical properties by geostatistics in alluvial and adjacent colluvial soils formed under ustic moisture regime at Gökhöyük State Farm (1750 ha), Amasya, Turkey. Seventy four soil samples were collected on a regular grid (500 × 500-m) and additional 224 samples were collected on 28 500-m fine-transects, randomly superimposed between the nodes of grids. Semivariograms and corresponding kriging maps for soil texture, soil organic matter (SOM), bulk density (BD), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and available water content (AWC) were prepared. Statistical analyses were conducted separately for colluvial and alluvial sites as well as whole area. The soils in alluvial site is rich in clay with high BD and SOM, and low in Ks and AWC; and the soils in colluvial site was designated as low in Ks, SOM, and AWC and high in BD. All variables, except SOM, showed a strong spatial dependency. In general, nugget, sill and range values of most of the studied soil variables decreased from alluvial site to colluvial site. When local (alluvial and colluvial sites separately) and global (alluvial + colluvial) kriged maps for BD, AWC, and soil textural separates, use of global semivariograms (one semivariogram for entire study area) resulted in lost of some details in colluvial sites, suggesting that local semivariograms for alluvial and colluvial soils should be used in kriging predictions at the farm. The results had significant implications for water management as AWC was spatially associated to clay content in alluvial site and to clay and sand contents in colluvial site.

  15. Calibrating Nonlinear Soil Material Properties for Seismic Analysis Using Soil Material Properties Intended for Linear Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, Robert Edward [Idaho National Laboratory; Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    Seismic analysis of nuclear structures is routinely performed using guidance provided in “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary (ASCE 4, 1998).” This document, which is currently under revision, provides detailed guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear structures. To accommodate the linear analysis, soil material properties are typically developed as shear modulus and damping ratio versus cyclic shear strain amplitude. A new Appendix in ASCE 4-2014 (draft) is being added to provide guidance for nonlinear time domain SSI analysis. To accommodate the nonlinear analysis, a more appropriate form of the soil material properties includes shear stress and energy absorbed per cycle versus shear strain. Ideally, nonlinear soil model material properties would be established with soil testing appropriate for the nonlinear constitutive model being used. However, much of the soil testing done for SSI analysis is performed for use with linear analysis techniques. Consequently, a method is described in this paper that uses soil test data intended for linear analysis to develop nonlinear soil material properties. To produce nonlinear material properties that are equivalent to the linear material properties, the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops are considered. For equivalent material properties, the shear stress at peak shear strain and energy absorbed per cycle should match when comparing the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops. Consequently, nonlinear material properties are selected based on these criteria.

  16. Soil cultivation in vineyards alters interactions between soil biota and soil physical and hydrological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Buchholz, Jacob; Querner, Pascal; Winter, Silvia; Kratschmer, Sophie; Pachinger, Bärbel; Strauss, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Stiper, Katrin; Potthoff, Martin; Guernion, Muriel; Scimia, Jennifer; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Several ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from interactions between soil organisms and soil parameters. However, to what extent different soil cultivation intensities in vineyards compromise soil organisms and their interactions between soil physical and hydrological properties is not well understood. In this study we examined (i) to what extent different soil management intensities affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (earthworms, Collembola, litter decomposition), and (ii) how soil physical and hydrological properties influence these interactions, or vice versa. Investigating 16 vineyards in Austria, earthworms were assessed by hand sorting, Collembola via pitfall trapping and soil coring, litter decomposition by using the tea bag method. Additionally, soil physical (water infiltration, aggregate stability, porosity, bulk density, soil texture) and chemical (pH, soil carbon content, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorus) parameters were assessed. Results showed complex ecological interactions between soil biota and various soil characteristics altered by management intensity. These investigations are part of the transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project VineDivers and will ultimately lead into management recommendations for various stakeholders.

  17. Soil physical properties of high mountain fields under bauxite mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalmo Arantes de Barros

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mining contributes to the life quality of contemporary society, but can generate significant impacts, these being mitigated due to environmental controls adopted. This study aimed to characterize soil physical properties in high-altitude areas affected by bauxite mining, and to edaphic factors responses to restoration techniques used to recover mined areas in Poços de Caldas plateau, MG, Brazil. The experiment used 3 randomized block design involving within 2 treatments (before mining intervention and after environmental recovery, and 4 replicates (N=24. In each treatment, soil samples with deformed structures were determined: granulometry, water-dispersible clay content, flocculation index, particle density, stoniness level, water aggregate stability, and organic matter contend. Soil samples with preserved structures were used to determine soil density and the total volume of pores, macropores, and micropores. Homogenization of stoniness between soil layers as a result of soil mobilization was observed after the mined area recovery. Stoniness decreased in 0.10-0.20 m layer after recovery, but was similar in the 0-0.10 m layer in before and after samples. The recovery techniques restored organic matter levels to pre-mining levels. However, changes in soil, including an increase in soil flocculation degree and a decrease in water-dispersible clays, were still apparent post-recovery. Furthermore, mining operations caused structural changes to the superficial layer of soil, as demonstrated by an increase in soil density and a decrease in total porosity and macroporosity. Decreases in the water stability of aggregates were observed after mining operations.

  18. Soil friability - Concept, Assessment and Effects of Soil Properties and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    Soil friability is a key soil physical property yielding valuable information on the ease of productin a favorable seed- and root beds during tillage operations. Therefore, soil friability is acrucial soil property in relation to the ability of soil to support plant growth and to minimzethe energy...

  19. Soil organic carbon dynamics jointly controlled by climate, carbon inputs, soil properties and soil carbon fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongkui; Feng, Wenting; Luo, Yiqi; Baldock, Jeff; Wang, Enli

    2017-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics are regulated by the complex interplay of climatic, edaphic and biotic conditions. However, the interrelation of SOC and these drivers and their potential connection networks are rarely assessed quantitatively. Using observations of SOC dynamics with detailed soil properties from 90 field trials at 28 sites under different agroecosystems across the Australian cropping regions, we investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate, soil properties, carbon (C) inputs and soil C pools (a total of 17 variables) on SOC change rate (r C , Mg C ha -1  yr -1 ). Among these variables, we found that the most influential variables on r C were the average C input amount and annual precipitation, and the total SOC stock at the beginning of the trials. Overall, C inputs (including C input amount and pasture frequency in the crop rotation system) accounted for 27% of the relative influence on r C , followed by climate 25% (including precipitation and temperature), soil C pools 24% (including pool size and composition) and soil properties (such as cation exchange capacity, clay content, bulk density) 24%. Path analysis identified a network of intercorrelations of climate, soil properties, C inputs and soil C pools in determining r C . The direct correlation of r C with climate was significantly weakened if removing the effects of soil properties and C pools, and vice versa. These results reveal the relative importance of climate, soil properties, C inputs and C pools and their complex interconnections in regulating SOC dynamics. Ignorance of the impact of changes in soil properties, C pool composition and C input (quantity and quality) on SOC dynamics is likely one of the main sources of uncertainty in SOC predictions from the process-based SOC models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of Soil Washing for Lead and Zinc Removal on Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Gerhard; Zupanc, Vesna; Gluhar, Simon; Lestan, Domen

    2017-04-01

    Soil washing as a metal pollution remediation process, especially part with intensive mixing of the soil slurry and soil compression after de-watering, significantly deteriorates physical properties of soil compared to those of non-remediated soil. Furthermore, changed physical characteristics of remediated soil influence interaction of plant roots with soil system and affect soil water regime. Remediated soils showed significant differences to their original state in water retention properties and changed structure due to the influence of artificial structure created during remediation process. Disturbed and undisturbed soil samples of remediated and original soils were analyzed. We evaluated soil hydraulic properties as a possible constraint for re-establishing soil structure and soil fertility after the remediation procedure.

  1. Application of organic amendments to restore degraded soil: effects on soil microbial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jennifer; Saxena, Jyotisna; Basta, Nicholas; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Busalacchi, Dawn; Dick, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Topsoil removal, compaction, and other practices in urban and industrial landscapes can degrade soil and soil ecosystem services. There is growing interest to remediate these for recreational and residential purposes, and urban waste materials offers potential to improve degraded soils. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of urban waste products on microbial properties of a degraded industrial soil. The soil amendments were vegetative yard waste compost (VC), biosolids (BioS), and a designer mix (DM) containing BioS, biochar (BC), and drinking water treatment residual (WTR). The experiment had a completely randomized design with following treatments initiated in 2009: control soil, VC, BioS-1 (202 Mg ha(-1)), BioS-2 (403 Mg ha(-1)), and DM (202 Mg BioS ha(-1) plus BC and WTR). Soils (0-15-cm depth) were sampled in 2009, 2010, and 2011 and analyzed for enzyme activities (arylsulfatase, β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate, and urease) and soil microbial community structure using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). In general, all organic amendments increased enzyme activities in 2009 with BioS treatments having the highest activity. However, this was followed by a decline in enzyme activities by 2011 that were still significantly higher than control. The fungal PLFA biomarkers were highest in the BioS treatments, whereas the control soil had the highest levels of the PLFA stress markers (P < 0.10). In conclusion, one-time addition of VC or BioS was most effective on enzyme activities; the BioS treatment significantly increased fungal biomass over the other treatments; addition of BioS to soils decreased microbial stress levels; and microbial measures showed no statistical differences between BioS and VC treatments after 3 years of treatment.

  2. Effect of organic inputs on soil properties, heavy metal content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of soil resources and productivity are important indices for agricultural enterprise. A randomized complete block design (RCBD) experiment was set up to evaluate the effects of organic wastes on the chemical properties, heavy metal content and root dry matter yield of spent engine oil (EO) contaminated soil in ...

  3. The Effect of Rubber Effluent on some Chemical Properties of Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary pot trial was conducted in a greenhouse to determine the effects of rubber effluent on some soil chemical properties as well as early growth and nutrient uptake by maize plant. The levels of rubber effluent used were 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 ml per 2 kg soil. The trial was arranged in a completely randomized ...

  4. Inverse estimation of soil hydraulic properties under oil palm trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, Nor Suhada Abd; Askari, Muhamad; Tanaka, Tadashi; Simunek, Jirka; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    Canopies of forested and agricultural ecosystems can significantly alter rainfall patterns into separate stemflow and throughfall areas. These two areas often have also different organic matter contents and soil compaction properties, and hence also soil hydraulic properties, thus causing further

  5. Design and Fabrication of a Soil Moisture Meter Using Thermal Conductivity Properties of Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subir Das; Biplab Bag; T S Sarkar; Nisher Ahmed; B Chakrabrty

    2011-01-01

    ... of soil moisture modeling. In this present work design of a soil moisture measurement meter using thermal conductivity properties of soil has been proposed and experimental results are reported...

  6. Effects of environmental factors and soil properties on topographic variations of soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tamai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration rates were measured along different parts of a slope in (a an evergreen forest with common brown forest soil and (b a deciduous forest with immature soil. The effects of soil temperature, soil moisture and soil properties were estimated individually, and the magnitudes of these effects in the deciduous and evergreen forests were compared. In the evergreen forest with common brown forest soil, soil properties had the greatest effect on soil respiration rates, followed by soil moisture and soil temperature. These results may be explained by the fact that different soil properties matured within different environments. It can be argued that the low soil respiration rates in the low parts of the slope in the evergreen forest resulted from soil properties and not from wet soil conditions. In the deciduous forest, soil respiration rates were more strongly affected by soil moisture and soil temperature than by soil properties. These effects were likely due to the immaturity of the forest soil.

  7. Soil friability - Concept, Assessment and Effects of Soil Properties and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    Soil friability is a key soil physical property yielding valuable information on the ease of productin a favorable seed- and root beds during tillage operations. Therefore, soil friability is acrucial soil property in relation to the ability of soil to support plant growth and to minimzethe energy...... required for tillage. The topic has interested farmers and soil scientiest for centuries, but is was the paper by Utomo and Dexter (1981) that significantly put the topic on the soil science agenda. The awareness of soil friability is growing, both in practiceand in soil science. This must be viewed...

  8. Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties in the University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria. IS Eneji, R Sha'Ato, SE Ejembi. Abstract. Variations in the properties of termitaria and their surrounding soil properties within the University of Agriculture Makurdi were investigated using routine soil analysis ...

  9. Biochar and Tillage Systems Influenced on Soil Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Darusman, Darusman; Syahruddin, Syahruddin; Syakur, Syakur; Manfarizah, Manfarizah

    2017-01-01

    Biochar is known as huge carbon storage in the soil. In the soil, biochar absorbs CO2 from air and keep them for hundred years. In addition to prevention, reducing emission and green house effects, Biochar also contributes to soil productivity such as physical and chemical property improvement of the soil. How biochar amends soil physical properties combined with some tillage systems are imperative to find out. This study aimed to determine the influence of biochar and tillage systems on s...

  10. Temporal variability in soil hydraulic properties under drip irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarak, I.; Mailhol, J.C.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Ruelle, P.; P. Boivin; M. R. Khaledian

    2009-01-01

    Predicting soil hydraulic properties and understanding their temporal variability during the irrigated cropping season are required to mitigate agro-environmental risks. This paper reports field measurements of soil hydraulic properties under two drip irrigation treatments, full (FT) and limited (LT). The objective was to identify the temporal variability of the hydraulic properties of field soil under high-frequency water application during a maize cropping season. Soil hydraulics were chara...

  11. Using 137 Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2011-05-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide (137)Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). (137)Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for

  12. Statistical properties of random matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; de Oliveira, Thiago R.; Haas, Stephan; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    We study the set of random matrix product states (RMPS) introduced by Garnerone, de Oliveira, and Zanardi [S. Garnerone, T. R. de Oliveira, and P. Zanardi, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.032336 81, 032336 (2010)] as a tool to explore foundational aspects of quantum statistical mechanics. In the present work, we provide an accurate numerical and analytical investigation of the properties of RMPS. We calculate the average state of the ensemble in the nonhomogeneous case, and numerically check the validity of this result. We also suggest using RMPS as a tool to approximate properties of general quantum random states. The numerical simulations presented here support the accuracy and efficiency of this approximation. These results suggest that any generalized canonical state can be approximated with high probability by the reduced density matrix of a RMPS, if the average matrix product states coincide with the associated microcanonical ensemble.

  13. Statistical properties of random clique networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi-Min; Meng, Jun; Fan, Jing-Fang; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a random clique network model to mimic the large clustering coefficient and the modular structure that exist in many real complex networks, such as social networks, artificial networks, and protein interaction networks, is introduced by combining the random selection rule of the Erdös and Rényi (ER) model and the concept of cliques. We find that random clique networks having a small average degree differ from the ER network in that they have a large clustering coefficient and a power law clustering spectrum, while networks having a high average degree have similar properties as the ER model. In addition, we find that the relation between the clustering coefficient and the average degree shows a non-monotonic behavior and that the degree distributions can be fit by multiple Poisson curves; we explain the origin of such novel behaviors and degree distributions.

  14. VARIABILITY OF ARABLE AND FOREST SOILS PROPERTIES ON ERODED SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Wiśniewski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic method of reducing soil and land erosion is a change of land use, for example, from arable to forest. Particularly effective as a protective role – according to the Polish law – soil-protecting forests. The thesis presents differences in the deformation of the basic soil properties on moraine slopes, depending on land use. There has been presented the function and the efficiency of the soil-protecting forests in erosion control. The soil cross section transects and soil analysis displayed that soil-protecting forests are making an essential soil cover protection from degradation, inter alia, limiting the decrease of humus content, reduction of upper soil horizons and soil pedons layer. On the afforested slopes it was stated some clear changes of grain size and chemical properties of soils in relation to adjacent slopes agriculturally used.

  15. Effects of soil properties on maize growth under increasing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant growth response to phosphorus (P) fertilizer in acid soils is affected by several soil properties. We conducted pot experiments with P using three contrasting acid soils from southern Cameroon (i) to study the main soil factors causing differences in growth responses of maize (Zea mays L.) to applied P, and (ii) to ...

  16. Changes of Soil Chemical Properties during Rice Straw Decomposition in Different Types of Acid Sulphate Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Hairani; Ani Susilawati

    2013-01-01

    Organic residues often exhibit different physico-chemical properties and affect the soil ecosystem in different ways. Hence, the study of their impact on soil is essential to benefit from their potential as amendments and to avoid adverse environmental effects. It is required to study the role of rice straw in the changes of soil properties during decomposition processes in the rice field. The research was conducted on potential acid sulphate soil (PASS) and actual acid sulphate soil (AASS) i...

  17. Cotton Production Practices Change Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, D.; Singh, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Historically, indigenous Asiatic cottons (Gossypium arboreum) were cultivated with minimal inputs in India. The introduction of the Upland cottons (G. hirsutum) and later the hybrid (H-4) triggered a whole set of intensified agronomic management with reliance on high doses of fertilisers and pesticide usage. In 2002, the transgenic Bt cotton hybrids were introduced and released for commercial cultivation. Presently, more than 95% of the nearly 12.2 million hectares of cotton area is under the Bt transgenic hybrids. These hybrids are not only high yielding but have reduced the dependence on pesticide because of an effective control of the lepidopteran pests. Thus, a change in the management practices is evident over the years. In this paper, we discuss the impact of two major agronomic management practices namely, nutrient management and tillage besides organic cotton cultivation in the rainfed cotton growing regions of central India characterized by sub-humid to semi-arid climate and dominated by Vertisols. Long-term studies at Nagpur, Maharashtra indicated the importance of integrated nutrient management (INM) wherein a part of the nutrient needs through fertiliser was substituted with organic manures such as farmyard manure (FYM). With the application of mineral fertilisers alone, soils became deficient in micronutrients. This was not observed with the FYM amended plots. Further, the manure amended plots had a better soil physical properties and the water holding capacity of the soil improved due to improvements in soil organic matter (SOM). Similarly, in a separate experiment, an improvement in SOM was observed in the organically managed fields because of continuous addition of organic residues. Further, it resulted in greater biological activity compared to the conventionally managed fields. Conservation tillage systems such as reduced tillage (RT) are a means to improve soil health and crop productivity. Long-term studies on tillage practices such as

  18. Relationship between the standing vegetation, soil properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our result revealed a shift between seed-bank and vegetation composition which could be a consequence of the soil chemical properties and also as a result of different level of disturbance occurring due to the citing of industry in the area. Keywords: Emergence, nutrient cycling, regeneration, soil properties, soil seed bank, ...

  19. Influence of salinity on soil chemical properties and surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akomolafe Gbenga

    2013-11-14

    Nov 14, 2013 ... samples were collected randomly from the salt mining site and 10 m away from the site (control) at 5, ... Salt-affected soils, as they are called, are either saline or sodic. Saline soils refer to soils with electrical conductivity above 4. dS/m and usually ... Brock, 2001; USDA, Natural Resources Conservation.

  20. Soil properties mapping with the DIGISOIL multi-sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, G.

    2012-04-01

    The multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project aimed to integrate and improve in situ and proximal measurement technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going from the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in (digital) soil mapping (DSM). In order to assess and prevent soil degradation and to benefit from the different ecological, economical and historical functions of the soil in a sustainable way, high resolution and quantitative maps of soil properties are needed. The core objective of the project is to explore and exploit new capabilities of advanced geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues covering technological, soil science and economic aspects: (i) the validation of geophysical (in situ, proximal and airborne) technologies and integrated pedo-geophysical inversion techniques (mechanistic data fusion) (ii) the relation between the geophysical parameters and the soil properties, (iii) the integration of the derived soil properties for mapping soil functions and soil threats, (iv) the pre-evaluation, standardisation and sub-industrialization of the proposed methodologies, including technical and economical studies related to the societal demand. With respect to these issues, the DIGISOIL project allows to develop, test and validate the most relevant geophysical technologies for mapping soil properties. The system was tested on different field tests, and validated the proposed technologies and solutions for each of the identified methods: geoelectric, GPR, EMI, seismics, magnetic and hyperspectral. After data acquisition systems, sensor geometry, and advanced data processing techniques have been developed and validated, we present now the solutions for going from geophysical data to soil properties maps. For two test sites, located respectively in Luxembourg (LU) and Mugello (IT) a set of soil properties maps have been produced. They give

  1. Maize growth responses to soil microbes and soil properties after fertilization with different green manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiemeng; Liu, Xueduan; Liang, Yili; Niu, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Yunhua; Gu, Yabing; Ma, Liyuan; Meng, Delong; Zhang, Yuguang; Huang, Wenkun; Peng, Deliang; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-02-01

    The use of green manures in agriculture can provide nutrients, affect soil microbial communities, and be a more sustainable management practice. The activities of soil microbes can effect crop growth, but the extent of this effect on yield remains unclear. We investigated soil bacterial communities and soil properties under four different green manure fertilization regimes (Vicia villosa, common vetch, milk vetch, and radish) and determined the effects of these regimes on maize growth. Milk vetch showed the greatest potential for improving crop productivity and increased maize yield by 31.3 %. This change might be related to changes in soil microbes and soil properties. The entire soil bacterial community and physicochemical properties differed significantly among treatments, and there were significant correlations between soil bacteria, soil properties, and maize yield. In particular, abundance of the phyla Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia was positively correlated with maize yield, while Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were negatively correlated with yield. These data suggest that the variation of maize yield was related to differences in soil bacteria. The results also indicate that soil pH, alkali solution nitrogen, and available potassium were the key environmental factors shaping soil bacterial communities and determining maize yields. Both soil properties and soil microbes might be useful as indicators of soil quality and potential crop yield.

  2. Interactions of Soil Order and Land Use Management on Soil Properties in the Kukart Watershed, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surveys of soil properties related to soil functioning for many regions of Kyrgyzstan are limited. This study established ranges of selected chemical [soil organic matter (SOM), pH and total N (TN)], physical (soil texture), and biochemical (six enzyme activities of C, N, P and S cycling) character...

  3. Site-Specific Compaction, Soil Physical Property, and Crop Yield Relationships for Claypan Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil compaction is a concern in crop production and environmental protection. Compaction is most often quantified in the field, albeit indirectly, using cone penetrometer measurements of soil strength. The objective of this research was to relate soil compaction to soil physical properties and crop ...

  4. Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Properties and Soil Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Zhu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar addition to soils potentially affects various soil properties and soil carbon sequestration, and these effects are dependent on biochars derived from different feedstock materials and pyrolysis processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of amendment of different biochars on soil physical and biological properties as well as soil carbon sequestration. Biochars were produced with dairy manure and woodchip at temperatures of 300, 500, and 700°C, respectively. Each biochar was mixed at 5% (w/w) with a forest soil and the mixture was incubated for 180 days, during which soil physical and biological properties, and soil respiration rates were measured. Results showed that the biochar addition significantly enhanced the formation of soil macroaggregates at the early incubation time. The biochar application significantly reduced soil bulk density, increased the amount of soil organic matter, and stimulated microbial activity and soil respiration rates at the early incubation stage. Biochar applications improved water retention capacity, with stronger effects by biochars produced at higher pyrolysis temperatures. At the same suction, the soil with woodchip biochars possessed higher water content than with the dairy manure biochars. Biochar addition significantly affected the soil physical and biological properties, which resulted in different soil carbon mineralization rates and the amount of soil carbon storage.

  5. Grey water impact on soil physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel L. Murcia-Sarmiento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing demand for food produced by the increase in population, water as an indispensable element in the growth cycle of plants every day becomes a fundamental aspect of production. The demand for the use of this resource is necessary to search for alternatives that should be evaluated to avoid potential negative impacts. In this paper, the changes in some physical properties of soil irrigated with synthetic gray water were evaluated. The experimental design involved: one factor: home water and two treatments; without treated water (T1 and treated water (T2. The variables to consider in the soil were: electrical conductivity (EC, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, average weighted diameter (MWD and soil moisture retention (RHS. The water used in drip irrigation high frequency was monitored by tensiometer for producing a bean crop (Phaseolous vulgaris L. As filtration system used was employed a unit composed of a sand filter (FLA and a subsurface flow wetland artificial (HFSS. The treatments showed significant differences in the PSI and the RHS. The FLA+HFSS system is an alternative to the gray water treatment due to increased sodium retention.

  6. Soil thermal diffusivity estimated from data of soil temperature and single soil component properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirijn de Jong van Lier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Under field conditions, thermal diffusivity can be estimated from soil temperature data but also from the properties of soil components together with their spatial organization. We aimed to determine soil thermal diffusivity from half-hourly temperature measurements in a Rhodic Kanhapludalf, using three calculation procedures (the amplitude ratio, phase lag and Seemann procedures, as well as from soil component properties, for a comparison of procedures and methods. To determine thermal conductivity for short wave periods (one day, the phase lag method was more reliable than the amplitude ratio or the Seemann method, especially in deeper layers, where temperature variations are small. The phase lag method resulted in coherent values of thermal diffusivity. The method using properties of single soil components with the values of thermal conductivity for sandstone and kaolinite resulted in thermal diffusivity values of the same order. In the observed water content range (0.26-0.34 m³ m-3, the average thermal diffusivity was 0.034 m² d-1 in the top layer (0.05-0.15 m and 0.027 m² d-1 in the subsurface layer (0.15-0.30 m.

  7. Field and Laboratory Evaluation of Dynamics in Soil Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dynamics in properties of soils of three land use types (Fallow, Pineapple and Cassava) in Owerri, Southeastern Nigeria were evaluated under field and laboratory incubation conditions. Soil properties varied with time within land use types, with chemical more significantly than physical properties under both conditions.

  8. Vital soil; function, value and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, P.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Healthy soil, with active soil life, deters long-term soil degradation and ensures that geo-physical processes are undisturbed. Is the vitality of soil under threat due to human civilization? Or is it due to contamination, intensification, and deforestation? Vital Soil aims to look at the effects

  9. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  10. Electrical Resistivity Based Empirical Model For Delineating Some Selected Soil Properties On Sandy-Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Resistivity ER survey was conducted on a Sandy-loam soil with a view to evaluate some selected soil properties. Electrical Resistivity was measured from the soil surface at 0 0.3 m ER30 and 0 0.9 m ER90 soil depths using multi-electrode Wenner array and Miller 400D resistance meter. Soil samples were collected to a depth 0.3 m at points where ER was measured and analyzed for properties such as Organic Matter OM Cation Exchange Capacity CEC Soil Water Content SWC Sand Silt and Clay contents using standard methods. The results indicated that lower ER areas exhibit higher content of soil properties than higher ER areas. The ER90 correlates insignificantly to the soil properties while ER30 correlates significantly to the soil properties except clay r 0.63 - 0.75. The relationship between ER30 and soil properties were best fitted to multiple linear regression R2 0.90 and Boltzmann distribution R2 0.80 - 0.84. The study indicates the ability of ER to delineate some soil properties influencing yield on sandy-loam soil. This will help farmers take decisions that can improve yields.

  11. Comparing the performance of various digital soil mapping approaches to map physical soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    Spatial information on physical soil properties is intensely expected, in order to support environmental related and land use management decisions. One of the most widely used properties to characterize soils physically is particle size distribution (PSD), which determines soil water management and cultivability. According to their size, different particles can be categorized as clay, silt, or sand. The size intervals are defined by national or international textural classification systems. The relative percentage of sand, silt, and clay in the soil constitutes textural classes, which are also specified miscellaneously in various national and/or specialty systems. The most commonly used is the classification system of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Soil texture information is essential input data in meteorological, hydrological and agricultural prediction modelling. Although Hungary has a great deal of legacy soil maps and other relevant soil information, it often occurs, that maps do not exist on a certain characteristic with the required thematic and/or spatial representation. The recent developments in digital soil mapping (DSM), however, provide wide opportunities for the elaboration of object specific soil maps (OSSM) with predefined parameters (resolution, accuracy, reliability etc.). Due to the simultaneous richness of available Hungarian legacy soil data, spatial inference methods and auxiliary environmental information, there is a high versatility of possible approaches for the compilation of a given soil map. This suggests the opportunity of optimization. For the creation of an OSSM one might intend to identify the optimum set of soil data, method and auxiliary co-variables optimized for the resources (data costs, computation requirements etc.). We started comprehensive analysis of the effects of the various DSM components on the accuracy of the output maps on pilot areas. The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate different

  12. Soil friability - Concept, Assessment and Effects of Soil Properties and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    Soil friability is a key soil physical property yielding valuable information on the ease of productin a favorable seed- and root beds during tillage operations. Therefore, soil friability is acrucial soil property in relation to the ability of soil to support plant growth and to minimzethe energy...... required for tillage. The topic has interested farmers and soil scientiest for centuries, but is was the paper by Utomo and Dexter (1981) that significantly put the topic on the soil science agenda. The awareness of soil friability is growing, both in practiceand in soil science. This must be viewed...... in the light of the present renewed focus on global food security together with a focus on fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in crop production. Certainly, the demand for well-functioning, arable soils is rising to meet the global challenges....

  13. Soil friability - Concept, Assessment and Effects of Soil Properties and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    Soil friability is a key soil physical property yielding valuable information on the ease of productin a favorable seed- and root beds during tillage operations. Therefore, soil friability is acrucial soil property in relation to the ability of soil to support plant growth and to minimzethe energ...... in the light of the present renewed focus on global food security together with a focus on fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in crop production. Certainly, the demand for well-functioning, arable soils is rising to meet the global challenges....

  14. Quantifying the heterogeneity of soil compaction, physical soil properties and soil moisture across multiple spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2016-04-01

    England's rural landscape is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Since the Second World War the intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction, associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Locally compaction has led to loss of soil storage and an increased in levels of ponding in fields. At the catchment scale soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a 40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. However, at the catchment scale there is likely to be a significant amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields, due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on one specific type of land use (permanent pasture with cattle grazing) and areas of activity within the field (feeding area, field gate, tree shelter, open field area). The aim was to determine if the soil characteristics and soil compaction levels are homogeneous in the four areas of the field. Also, to determine if these levels stayed the same over the course of the year, or if there were differences at the end of the dry (October) and wet (April) periods. Field experiments were conducted in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 120km2. The dynamic cone penetrometer was used to determine the structural properties of the soil, soil samples were collected to assess the bulk density, organic matter content and permeability in the laboratory and the Hydrosense II was used to determine the soil moisture content in the topsoil. Penetration results show that the tree shelter is the most compacted and the open field area

  15. Transport properties on a random comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, V.; Van den Broeck, C.

    1995-02-01

    We study the random walk of a particle in a random comb structure, both in the presence of a biasing field and an the field-free case. We show that the mean-field treatment of the quenched disorder can be exactly mapped on to a continuous time random walk (CTRW) on the backbone of the comb, with a definite waiting time density. We find an exact expression for this central quantity. The Green function for the CTRW is then obtained. Its first and second moments determine the drift and diffusion at all times. We show that the drift velocity v vanishes asymptotically for power-law and stretched-exponential distributions of branch lengths on the comb, whatever be the biasing field strength. For an exponential branch-length distribution, v is a nonmonotonic function of the bias, increasing initially to a maximum and then decreasing to zero at a critical value. In the field-free case, anomalous diffusion occurs for a range of power-law distributions of the branch length. The corresponding exponent for the mean square displacement is obtained, as is the asymptotic form of the positional probability distribution for the random walk. We show that normal diffusion occurs whenever the mean branch length is finite, and present a simple formula for the effective diffusion constant; these results are extended to regular (nonrandom) combs as well. The physical reason for anomalous drift or diffusion is traced to the properties of the distribution of a first passage time (on a finite chain) that controls the effective waiting time density of the CTRW.

  16. Spectral Estimation of Soil Properties in Siberian Tundra Soils and Relations with Plant Species Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicted global warming will be most pronounced in the Arctic and will severely affect permafrost environments. Due to its large spatial extent and large stocks of soil organic carbon, changes to organic matter decomposition rates and associated carbon fluxes in Arctic permafrost soils will significantly impact the global carbon cycle. We explore the potential of soil spectroscopy to estimate soil carbon properties and investigate the relation between soil properties and vegetation composition. Soil samples are collected in Siberia, and vegetation descriptions are made at each sample point. First, laboratory-determined soil properties are related to the spectral reflectance of wet and dried samples using partial least squares regression (PLSR and stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR. SMLR, using selected wavelengths related with C and N, yields high calibration accuracies for C and N. PLSR yields a good prediction model for K and a moderate model for pH. Using these models, soil properties are determined for a larger number of samples, and soil properties are related to plant species composition. This analysis shows that variation of soil properties is large within vegetation classes, but vegetation composition can be used for qualitative estimation of soil properties.

  17. Soil profile property estimation with field and laboratory VNIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) soil sensors have the potential to provide rapid, high-resolution estimation of multiple soil properties. Although many studies have focused on laboratory-based visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy of dried soil samples, previous work has demonstrated ...

  18. The influence of soil properties on the development of Cephalcia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different soil samples collected from three different cedars forests in Lebanon were incubated with prepupae of C. tannourinensis under laboratory conditions. The effect of soil origins and properties on prepupal mortality, annual diapause and multiple years diapause cycles were analyzed. The influence of soil moisture and ...

  19. IMPACT OF OIL ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL SUBSIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Алексеевич Бурцев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the effect of oil content on the mechanical properties of soil subsidence - Ek modulus and compressibility factor m0, obtained in the laboratory with the help of artificial impregnation oil soil samples. A comparison of the above parameters with samples of the same soil in the natural and water-saturated conditions has been perfomed.

  20. Soil physical and hydraulic properties modification under Arachis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation of soil moisture is one of the major limiting factors to crop production. Improvement of soil physical properties could enhance soil moisture conservation, improve crop productivity and reduce food insecurity in sub Saharan Africa. A field study was carried out to determine the effects of 3 plant densities (33333, ...

  1. Predicting Soluble Nickel in Soils Using Soil Properties and Total Nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Bo; Ma, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Soil soluble nickel (Ni) concentration is very important for determining soil Ni toxicity. In the present study, the relationships between soil properties, total and soluble Ni concentrations in soils were developed in a wide range of soils with different properties and climate characteristics. The multiple regressions showed that soil pH and total soil Ni concentrations were the most significant parameters in predicting soluble Ni concentrations with the adjusted determination coefficients (Radj2) values of 0.75 and 0.68 for soils spiked with soluble Ni salt and the spiked soils leached with artificial rainwater to mimic field conditions, respectively. However, when the soils were divided into three categories (pH 8), they obtained better predictions with Radj2 values of 0.78-0.90 and 0.79-0.94 for leached and unleached soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the other soil properties, such as amorphous Fe and Al oxides and clay, were also found to be important for determining soluble Ni concentrations, indicating that they were also presented as active adsorbent surfaces. Additionally, the whole soil speciation including bulk soil properties and total soils Ni concentrations were analyzed by mechanistic speciation models WHAM VI and Visual MINTEQ3.0. It was found that WHAM VI provided the best predictions for the soils with pH 8. The Visual MINTEQ3.0 could provide better estimation for pH 8. These results indicated the possibility and applicability of these models to predict soil soluble Ni concentration by soil properties.

  2. Predicting Soluble Nickel in Soils Using Soil Properties and Total Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Bo; Ma, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Soil soluble nickel (Ni) concentration is very important for determining soil Ni toxicity. In the present study, the relationships between soil properties, total and soluble Ni concentrations in soils were developed in a wide range of soils with different properties and climate characteristics. The multiple regressions showed that soil pH and total soil Ni concentrations were the most significant parameters in predicting soluble Ni concentrations with the adjusted determination coefficients (Radj2) values of 0.75 and 0.68 for soils spiked with soluble Ni salt and the spiked soils leached with artificial rainwater to mimic field conditions, respectively. However, when the soils were divided into three categories (pH 8), they obtained better predictions with Radj2 values of 0.78–0.90 and 0.79–0.94 for leached and unleached soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the other soil properties, such as amorphous Fe and Al oxides and clay, were also found to be important for determining soluble Ni concentrations, indicating that they were also presented as active adsorbent surfaces. Additionally, the whole soil speciation including bulk soil properties and total soils Ni concentrations were analyzed by mechanistic speciation models WHAM VI and Visual MINTEQ3.0. It was found that WHAM VI provided the best predictions for the soils with pH 8. The Visual MINTEQ3.0 could provide better estimation for pH 8. These results indicated the possibility and applicability of these models to predict soil soluble Ni concentration by soil properties. PMID:26217951

  3. Design and Fabrication of a Soil Moisture Meter Using Thermal Conductivity Properties of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir DAS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Study of soil for agricultural purposes is one of the main focuses of research since the beginning of civilization as food related requirements is closely linked with the soil. The study of soil has generated an interest among the researchers for very similar other reasons including understanding of soil water dynamics, evolution of agricultural water stress and validation of soil moisture modeling. In this present work design of a soil moisture measurement meter using thermal conductivity properties of soil has been proposed and experimental results are reported.

  4. Optical Properties of Airborne Soil Organic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veghte, Daniel P. [William; China, Swarup [William; Weis, Johannes [Chemical; Department; Kovarik, Libor [William; Gilles, Mary K. [Chemical; Laskin, Alexander [Department

    2017-09-27

    Recently, airborne soil organic particles (ASOP) were reported as a type of solid organic particles emitted after water droplets impacted wet soils. Chemical constituents of ASOP are macromolecules such as polysaccharides, tannins, and lignin (derived from degradation of plants and biological organisms). Optical properties of ASOP were inferred from the quantitative analysis of the electron energy-loss spectra acquired over individual particles in the transmission electron microscope. The optical constants of ASOP are further compared with those measured for laboratory generated particles composed of Suwanee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) reference material, which was used as a laboratory surrogate of ASOP. The particle chemical compositions were analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. ASOP and SRFA exhibit similar carbon composition, but SRFA has minor contributions of S and Na. When ASOP are heated to 350 °C their absorption increases as a result of their pyrolysis and partial volatilization of semi-volatile organic constituents. The retrieved refractive index (RI) at 532 nm of SRFA particles, ASOP, and heated ASOP were 1.22-62 0.07i, 1.29-0.07i, and 1.90-0.38i, respectively. Compared to RISRFA, RIASOP has a higher real part but similar imaginary part. These measurements of ASOP optical constants suggest that they have properties characteristic of atmospheric brown carbon and therefore their potential effects on the radiative forcing of climate need to be assessed in atmospheric models.

  5. Impacts of Evaporation from Saline Soils on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Water Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, V.; Hernandez, M. F.; Braud, I.; Cristi Matte, F.; Hausner, M. B.; Suarez, F. I.; Munoz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Saline soils are common in arid zones, where evaporation from shallow groundwater is generally the major component of the water balance. Thus, accurate quantification of soil water evaporation is crucial to improve water resource management in these regions. Evaporation from saline soils is a complex process that couples the movement of salts, heat, liquid water and water vapor. Precipitation/dissolution reactions can alter the soil structure and modify flow paths. The impact of evaporation from shallow groundwater on soil properties and water fluxes poses a major hydrologic challenge that remains to be answered. As a preliminary approach to consider these effects, we used the SiSPAT model (Simple Soil Plant Atmospheric Transfer) to represent the movement of liquid water and water vapor in a saline soil column subjected to two groundwater levels under nonisothermal conditions. To parameterize the model, we determined the hydraulic properties of the soil before performing the soil column experiments. When the SiSPAT model was run using uniform and constant hydraulic properties, it was unable to predict the moisture and thermal profiles, or the cumulative evaporation. This inability to reproduce the observed data is most likely due to alterations of the soil structure as a result of precipitation/dissolution reactions. When the soil hydraulic properties were allowed to vary in space, the model reproduced the experimental data successfully, suggesting that the structure of the initially homogeneous soil column was modified. It is thus necessary to incorporate salt precipitation to correctly simulate evaporation in saline soils.

  6. Soil Catena Properties of Daher Al- Jabal in South Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam H. M. Husein

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil catena concept is a sequence of soils extends across relief positions and is developed from similar parent material. This study highlighted on the important aspects and properties of soil catena of Daher El-Jabal in Jabal Al-Arab mountainous area South eastern of Syria, by implementing pedologic study in 2010-2012. Six soil profiles have been studied along pedo-genetic transect in order to highlight the soil catena prevailing properties. The results reveal that the soil has formed from igneous basaltic parent casts, related to Neogen era, where reliefs had the key role in the developing of soil solum. Consequently, Entisols were dominated on eroded summits, Inceptisols on back slops and mountain flanks, Mollisols on depressions. Both water erosion of soil surface and leaching inside soil solum processes were responsible for variation of soil texture, as such soils showed evident of changing in particles size distribution as well as in clay content. Cation exchange capacity (CEC was less than moderate with domination of Magnesium cation. Soil trace elements were poor to somewhat poor. Soil pH values in general were low; which reflect the pedo-genic character of igneous parent material in which soil drifted from. In some cases, where soil body subjected to continuous leaching of soil bases, in particular calcium cation; soil profiles became totally freed from calcium carbonates. Accordingly soil problems related to downing of soil reaction (pH are more expected to be increasing by time. This is main reason for some physical diseases, which beginning arise on pomes fruits, particularly bitter pit.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENT Volume-6, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2016/17, page: 87-107

  7. Effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil hydraulic properties of an artificial sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar, a product of the pyrolysis of biomass, has become an increasingly studied subject of interest as an agricultural soil amendment to address issues of carbon emission, population density, and food scarcity. Biochar has been reported to increase content and retention of nutrients, pH, cation-exchange capacity, vegetative growth, microbial community, and carbon sequestration. A number of studies addressing the usefulness of biochar as a soil amendment have focused on chemical and biological properties, disregarding the effects on soil physical properties of amended soil. Aside from biochar, lime (calcium carbonate) addition to soils has also been utilized in agricultural practices, typically to raise the pH value of acidic soils, increase microbial activity, and enhance soil stability and productivity as a result. Both biochar and lime amendments may be beneficial in increasing the soil physical properties, particularly through the formation of aggregates. In previous studies an increase in soil particle aggregates resulted in higher rates of biological activity, infiltration rates, pore space, and aeration, all of which are a measure of soil quality. While the effectiveness of biochar and lime as soil amendments has been independently documented, their combined effectiveness on soil physical properties is less understood. This study aims to provide a further understanding on the effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil particle aggregation and hydraulic properties of a low reactive pre-limed artificial sandy soil with and without microbial communities. Microbial communities are known to increase soil aggregates by acting as cementing agents. Understanding the impact of biochar addition on soil physical properties will have implications in the development of sustainable agricultural practices, especially in systems undergoing climate stress and intensive agriculture.

  8. Study of desiccation cracking and fracture properties of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Warnakulasuriya D. Susanga M.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the development of shrinkage cracking in clay soils upon drying and the determination of fracture properties of clay soils as applicable to analysis of desiccation cracking phenomenon. The results and conclusions were drawn from comprehensive experimental work analysed drawing from Classical Soil Mechanics, Fracture Mechanics, Unsaturated Soil Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials with the aid of powerful image analysis techniques. Attempts were made to fill the gaps in t...

  9. Evaluation Of Management Properties Of Wetland Soils Of Akwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management properties of soils of three wetland types in Akwa Ibom State were investigated. The wetland types are Inland Valley, Flood plain and Mangrove. The soils had silt/clay ratios above 0.15 and 0.25 indicating that they are of young soils. The pH of the wet soils was very slightly acidic (>6.4) while that of the ...

  10. Properties of Low Activity Clay Soils From South Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    PRASETYO, BAMBANG HENDRO; Suharta, Nata

    2004-01-01

    Soils with low activity clay is one of the problem soils in Indonesia. These soils consisted of Ultisols, Oxisols, Alfisols, and some Inceptisols, occupied about 34.5% of total Indonesian land, distributed in almost all Indonesian islands, and derived from various parent materials. To evaluate the properties of low activity clay soils, 6 pedons of Oxisols and Inceptisols, derived from clay stone, andesitic rock, ultra mafic rock and lime stone,from South Kalimantan were studied both in the fi...

  11. Random Whole Metagenomic Sequencing for Forensic Discrimination of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Smith, Renee J.; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations. PMID:25111003

  12. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia S Khodakova

    Full Text Available Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER; similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF; non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS; and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  13. Permeant Properties of Foundation Soils in the Basement Complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous investigations on foundation soils of the Basement Complex Terrain of Southwestern Nigeria revealed a wide range variation in coefficient of permeability (K) due to grain sizes. Compared to findings on geotechnical properties of foundation soils in general, permeant properties due to grain-size distribution in ...

  14. Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils under Contrasting Land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The soil chemical properties studied were soil pH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available P, exchangeable base (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) and exchangeable acidity (H+ and Al3+). The physical properties were aggregate stability, mean weight diameter, water dispersible clay and clay flocculation index. Two fractions of ...

  15. Estimation of Korean paddy field soil properties using optical reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    An optical sensing approach based on diffuse reflectance has shown potential for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. Important sensing ranges and the resulting regression models useful for soil property estimation have been reported. In this study, a similar approach was applie...

  16. Understanding the combined effect of soil properties on gully ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is also known that various interactions between these properties exist, which creates the need for unique investigations into how soil properties influence soil ... Quantile regression showed that a combination of effective cation exchange capacity (CEC), total carbon, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) and free iron ...

  17. Effects of Chromolaena and Tithonia Mulches on Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Chromolaena and Tithonia mulches applied at 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties, leaf nutrient composition ... Chromolaena mulch produced higher values of soil chemical properties, leaf nutrient concentrations, growth and yield of yam. ..... organic matter was added through litter fall. The findings ...

  18. Linking soil hydraulic properties to structure indicators : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Weynants, Mélanie

    2011-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties are needed for modelling below-ground water flow and solute movements. They are very variable in space and time and across scales and their characterisation is tedious. Pedotransfer functions (PTF) are tools developed to predict hydraulic properties from more readily available information. This thesis provides PTF predicting the parameters of a closed-form model of the soil hydraulic conductivity and moisture retention curves based on the soil texture, bulk density a...

  19. Modelling soil properties in a crop field located in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Millan, Mesic; Percin, Aleksandra; Zgorelec, Zeljka

    2016-04-01

    negative loading in coarse silt. Finally, the factor 3 had a positive loading in penetration resistance. The loadings of these three factors were mapped using ordinary kriging method. The analysis of incremental spatial correlation identified that the highest spatial correlation in the factor 1 was identified at 41.87 m, in factor 2 at 75.61 m and factor 3 at 143.9 m. In the case of factor 2, the maximum peak of spatial autocorrelation was significant at a p<0.05. This showed that the variable has a random distribution, as confirmed with the Moran's I spatial correlation analysis. In relation to the other factors the maximum peaks were significantly clustered at a p<0.001. These results suggested that the each factor has a different spatial pattern and the studied soil properties explained by each factor had a different spatial distribution. References Breivik, E., Baumgarten, A., Calzolari, C., Miller, B., Pereira, P., Kabala, C., Jordán, A. Soil mapping, classification, and modelling: history and future directions. Geoderma, 264, Part B, 256-274. Galiati, A., Gristina, L., Crescimanno, Barone, E., Novara, A. (2016) Towards more efficient incentives for agri-environment measures in degraded and eroded vineyards. Land Degradation and Development, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2389 Pereira, P., Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. (2015) Modelling the impacts of wildfire on ash thickness in a short-term period, Land Degradation and Development, 26, 180-192.

  20. Soil properties of selected marginal lands in Europe - hazard indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, Werner; Repmann, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Soils of marginal lands are characterized by a variety of different soil conditions depending on substrate properties, climate influences, the availability or even the excess of water. However, a number of soil properties can be found frequently at marginal sites which can be regarded as main restrictions of marginal lands and which clearly limit the potential of such sites with regard to land use potentials. The Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating Index (SQR) considers the most important soil related factors responsible for these restrictions. Examples are acidification processes, soil compaction and water saturation or salinization. These soil properties are assessed as "soil hazard indicators" and have crucial impact on the overall soil score provided by the SQR concept for soils of marginal sites. This paper gives an overview of the importance of different soil hazard indicators found at case study sites of the H2020 project SEEMLA. These sites are located in Greece, Ukraine and Germany and represent a large variety of different climatic and geological conditions within Europe. Even if the occurrence of the single site limitations depends on regional conditions some generalizations are possible. Based on the respective dominating soil related restrictions a classification of types of marginality and of marginal lands can be derived.

  1. Probability, random processes, and ergodic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Robert M

    1988-01-01

    This book has been written for several reasons, not all of which are academic. This material was for many years the first half of a book in progress on information and ergodic theory. The intent was and is to provide a reasonably self-contained advanced treatment of measure theory, prob ability theory, and the theory of discrete time random processes with an emphasis on general alphabets and on ergodic and stationary properties of random processes that might be neither ergodic nor stationary. The intended audience was mathematically inc1ined engineering graduate students and visiting scholars who had not had formal courses in measure theoretic probability . Much of the material is familiar stuff for mathematicians, but many of the topics and results have not previously appeared in books. The original project grew too large and the first part contained much that would likely bore mathematicians and dis courage them from the second part. Hence I finally followed the suggestion to separate the material and split...

  2. Plant species diversity affects infiltration capacity in an experimental grassland through changes in soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.; Tischer, J.; Roscher, C.; Eisenhauer, N.; Ravenek, J.; Gleixner, G.; Attinger, S.; Jensen, B.; Kroon, de H.; Mommer, L.; Scheu, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Soil hydraulic properties drive water distribution and availability in soil. There exists limited knowledge of how plant species diversity might influence soil hydraulic properties. Methods We quantified the change in infiltration capacity affected by soil structural variables

  3. Changes in some soil physical properties and yield of maize Grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Abstract. The declining productivity of the soils in the Abakaliki agro-ecological zone of the South. East Nigeria led to the conduct of a study on the physical properties of an Ultisol amended with pruning acting in alley cropping system. The study was established in a randomized complete block design with five treatments ...

  4. Impacts of land use conversion on soil properties and soil erodibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkanc, Selma Yasar; Ozyuvaci, Necdet; Hizal, Ahmet

    2008-05-01

    Land use conversion can affect natural ecological processes such as surface runoff and erosion. Therefore, it has potential to change soil stability To investigate this process in depth, Iskalan creek catchment in the Black sea region, where excessive land use applications and erosion events have often occured, was selected as the study area. The objective was to determine the effects of land use conversion on soil properties, soil erodibility and the relationships among soil properties and some erodibility indices. Duplicate topsoil samples were taken by using steel cylinders at 100 different sampling points from three different land use types; 34 of them are in farmlands, 34 in rangelands and 32 in forestlands. Soil particle size distribution, loss of ignition, pH, electrical conductivity skeleton percentage and three erodibility indices were determined. Data were analysed by using Pearson correlation analysis (at 95% and 99% significance level), ANOVA and Tukey's test at 95 % significance level. According to study results, land use conversion affects some properties of soils significantly Loss of ignition of soils in forests was significantly higher than soils in farmlands and rangelands. Soil skeleton percentage in rangelands and farmlands were significantly different. The study results showed that there was significant difference between pH of soils in forests and farmlands (p properties such as clay and sand fraction of soils (p Topsoils of the study area were sensitive to erosion according to all three erodibility indices. The most sensitive soils were in farmlands.

  5. Selected soil properties as indicators of soil water regime in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphological features and physicochemical properties of 14 soil profiles, representing the major soil types, were studied in the Cathedral Peak VI catchment of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The soils are characterised by a high organic carbon content in the topsoil, red and yellow freely drained subsoils, and some ...

  6. Inversion of soil electrical conductivity data to estimate layered soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    CBulk apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) sensors respond to multiple soil properties, including clay content, water content, and salt content (i.e., salinity). They provide a single sensor value for an entire soil profile down to a sensor-dependent measurement depth, weighted by a nonlinear...

  7. Soil physical property estimation from soil strength and apparent electrical conductivity sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantification of soil physical properties through soil sampling and laboratory analyses is time-, cost-, and labor-consuming, making it difficult to obtain the spatially-dense data required for precision agriculture. Proximal soil sensing is an attractive alternative, but many currently available s...

  8. Soil heating in chaparral fires: effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard F. DeBano; Raymond M. Rice; Conrad C. Eugene

    1979-01-01

    This state-of-the-art report summarizes what is known about the effects of heat on soil during chaparral fires. It reviews the literature on the effects of such fires on soil properties, availabilty and loss of plant nutrients, soil wettability, erosion, and surface runoff. And it reports new data collected during recent prescribed burns and a wildfire in southern...

  9. Key soil functional properties affected by soil organic matter - evidence from published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian

    2015-07-01

    The effect of varying the amount of soil organic matter on a range of individual soil properties was investigated using a literature search of published information largely from Australia, but also included relevant information from overseas. Based on published pedotransfer functions, soil organic matter was shown to increase plant available water by 2 to 3 mm per 10 cm for each 1% increase in soil organic carbon, with the largest increases being associated with sandy soils. Aggregate stability increased with increasing soil organic carbon, with aggregate stability decreasing rapidly when soil organic carbon fell below 1.2 to 1.5 5%. Soil compactibility, friability and soil erodibility were favourably improved by increasing the levels of soil organic carbon. Nutrient cycling was a major function of soil organic matter. Substantial amounts of N, P and S become available to plants when the soil organic matter is mineralised. Soil organic matter also provides a food source for the microorganisms involved in the nutrient cycling of N, P, S and K. In soils with lower clay contents, and less active clays such as kaolinites, soil organic matter can supply a significant amount of the cation exchange capacity and buffering capacity against acidification. Soil organic matter can have a cation exchange capacity of 172 to 297 cmol(+)/kg. As the cation exchange capacity of soil organic matter varies with pH, the effectiveness of soil organic matter to contribute to cation exchange capacity below pH 5.5 is often minimal. Overall soil organic matter has the potential to affect a range of functional soil properties.

  10. Predicting radiocaesium sorption characteristics with soil chemical properties for Japanese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Shinichiro; Smolders, Erik; Sweeck, Lieve; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2015-08-15

    The high variability of the soil-to-plant transfer factor of radiocaesium (RCs) compels a detailed analysis of the radiocaesium interception potential (RIP) of soil, which is one of the specific factors ruling the RCs transfer. The range of the RIP values for agricultural soils in the Fukushima accident affected area has not yet been fully surveyed. Here, the RIP and other major soil chemical properties were characterised for 51 representative topsoils collected in the vicinity of the Fukushima contaminated area. The RIP ranged a factor of 50 among the soils and RIP values were lower for Andosols compared to other soils, suggesting a role of soil mineralogy. Correlation analysis revealed that the RIP was most strongly and negatively correlated to soil organic matter content and oxalate extractable aluminium. The RIP correlated weakly but positively to soil clay content. The slope of the correlation between RIP and clay content showed that the RIP per unit clay was only 4.8 mmol g(-1) clay, about threefold lower than that for clays of European soils, suggesting more amorphous minerals and less micaceous minerals in the clay fraction of Japanese soils. The negative correlation between RIP and soil organic matter may indicate that organic matter can mask highly selective sorption sites to RCs. Multiple regression analysis with soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity explained the soil RIP (R(2)=0.64), allowing us to map soil RIP based on existing soil map information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Soil chemical properties affect the reaction of forest soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodak, Marcin; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Morawska-Płoskonka, Justyna; Kuduk, Katarzyna; Niklińska, Maria

    Reaction of soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress may depend on soil chemical properties. The objectives of this study were to test the reaction of different bacterial phyla to drought and rewetting stress and to assess the influence of different soil chemical properties on the reaction of soil bacteria to this kind of stress. The soil samples were taken at ten forest sites and measured for pH and the contents of organic C (Corg) and total N (Nt), Zn, Cu, and Pb. The samples were kept without water addition at 20 - 30 °C for 8 weeks and subsequently rewetted to achieve moisture equal to 50 - 60 % of their maximum water-holding capacity. Prior to the drought period and 24 h after the rewetting, the structure of soil bacterial communities was determined using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The drought and rewetting stress altered bacterial community structure. Gram-positive bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, increased in relative proportion after the stress, whereas the Gram-negative bacteria in most cases decreased. The largest decrease in relative abundance was for Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. For several phyla the reaction to drought and rewetting stress depended on the chemical properties of soils. Soil pH was the most important soil property influencing the reaction of a number of soil bacterial groups (including all classes of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, and others) to drought and rewetting stress. For several bacterial phyla the reaction to the stress depended also on the contents of Nt and Corg in soil. The effect of heavy metal pollution was also noticeable, although weaker compared to other chemical soil properties. We conclude that soil chemical properties should be considered when assessing the effect of stressing factors on soil bacterial communities.

  12. Soil physical properties and grape yield influenced by cover crops and management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Dalla Rosa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in vineyards is a conservation practice with the purpose of reducing soil erosion and improving the soil physical quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate cover crop species and management systems on soil physical properties and grape yield. The experiment was carried out in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Southern Brazil, on a Haplic Cambisol, in a vineyard established in 1989, using White and Rose Niagara grape (Vitis labrusca L. in a horizontal, overhead trellis system. The treatments were established in 2002, consisting of three cover crops: spontaneous species (SS, black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb (BO, and a mixture of white clover (Trifolium repens L., red clover (Trifolium pratense L. and annual rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum L. (MC. Two management systems were applied: desiccation with herbicide (D and mechanical mowing (M. Soil under a native forest (NF area was collected as a reference. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized blocks, with three replications. The soil physical properties in the vine rows were not influenced by cover crops and were similar to the native forest, with good quality of the soil structure. In the inter-rows, however, there was a reduction in biopores, macroporosity, total porosity and an increase in soil density, related to the compaction of the surface soil layer. The M system increased soil aggregate stability compared to the D system. The treatments affected grapevine yield only in years with excess or irregular rainfall.

  13. [Effects of sulfur on chemical properties of calcareous soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-Ai; Zhang, Min; Zeng, Yue-Chun

    2007-07-01

    A pot trial with two continuous crops of rape was conducted to study the effects of sulfur on the chemical properties of calcareous soil. The results indicated that sulfur could decrease soil pH, while increase the electrical conductivity of soil solution markedly. Applying sulfur could enhance the contents of soil exchangeable Na+ and K+ and the accumulation of soil water-soluble anions, but had less effect on soil exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+, CEC, and alkalization degree. Comparing with urea, sulfur-coated urea (SCU) had less effect on soil pH and electrical conductivity, but markedly affected soil exchangeable cations and water-soluble anions. Sulfur application had no obvious yield-increasing effect, and higher application rate of sulfur could decrease the rape yield significantly.

  14. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, F E; Vasilyeva, N; Bouckaert, L

    2012-01-01

    the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4% in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving the representation of this relationship in models has been highlighted in recent studies. Here we present a data......-driven analysis of soil moisture-respiration relations based on 90 soils. With the use of linear models we show how the relationship between soil heterotrophic respiration and different measures of soil moisture is consistently affected by soil properties. The empirical models derived include main effects...... predictions of the response of soil carbon to future climate scenarios will require the integration of soil-dependent moisture-respiration functions coupled with realistic representations of soil water dynamics....

  15. Comparison of spatial interpolation techniques to predict soil properties in the colombian piedmont eastern plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Castro Franco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Interpolating soil properties at field-scale in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains is challenging due to: the highly and complex variable nature of some processes; the effects of the soil; the land use; and the management. While interpolation techniques are being adapted to include auxiliary information of these effects, the soil data are often difficult to predict using conventional techniques of spatial interpolation. Method: In this paper, we evaluated and compared six spatial interpolation techniques: Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW, Spline, Ordinary Kriging (KO, Universal Kriging (UK, Cokriging (Ckg, and Residual Maximum Likelihood-Empirical Best Linear Unbiased Predictor (REML-EBLUP, from conditioned Latin Hypercube as a sampling strategy. The ancillary information used in Ckg and REML-EBLUP was indexes calculated from a digital elevation model (MDE. The “Random forest” algorithm was used for selecting the most important terrain index for each soil properties. Error metrics were used to validate interpolations against cross validation. Results: The results support the underlying assumption that HCLc captured adequately the full distribution of variables of ancillary information in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains conditions. They also suggest that Ckg and REML-EBLUP perform best in the prediction in most of the evaluated soil properties. Conclusions: Mixed interpolation techniques having auxiliary soil information and terrain indexes, provided a significant improvement in the prediction of soil properties, in comparison with other techniques.

  16. Effects of soil properties on copper toxicity to earthworm Eisenia fetida in 15 Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiongwei; Xu, Meng; Zhou, Youya; Yan, Zengguang; Du, Yanli; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Chaoyan; Bai, Liping; Nie, Jing; Chen, Guikui; Li, Fasheng

    2016-02-01

    The bioavailability and toxicity of metals in soil are influenced by a variety of soil properties, and this principle should be recognized in establishing soil environmental quality criteria. In the present study, the uptake and toxicity of Cu to the earthworm Eisenia fetida in 15 Chinese soils with various soil properties were investigated, and regression models for predicting Cu toxicity across soils were developed. The results showed that earthworm survival and body weight change were less sensitive to Cu than earthworm cocoon production. The soil Cu-based median effective concentrations (EC50s) for earthworm cocoon production varied from 27.7 to 383.7 mg kg(-1) among 15 Chinese soils, representing approximately 14-fold variation. Soil cation exchange capacity and organic carbon content were identified as key factors controlling Cu toxicity to earthworm cocoon production, and simple and multiple regression models were developed for predicting Cu toxicity across soils. Tissue Cu-based EC50s for earthworm cocoon production were also calculated and varied from 15.5 to 62.5 mg kg(-1) (4-fold variation). Compared to the soil Cu-based EC50s for cocoon production, the tissue Cu-based EC50s had less variation among soils, indicating that metals in tissue were more relevant to toxicity than metals in soil and hence represented better measurements of bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period: influence on soil chemical and physical properties and on sugarcane productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roniram Pereira da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The planting of diversified crops during the sugarcane fallow period can improve the chemical and physical properties and increase the production potential of the soil for the next sugarcane cycle. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period on soil chemical and physical properties and productivity after the first sugarcane harvest. The experiment was conducted in two areas located in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º 14' 05'' S, 48º 17' 09'' W with two different soil types, namely: an eutroferric Red Latosol (RLe with high-clay texture (clay content = 680 g kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol (RLa with clayey texture (clay content = 440 g kg-1. A randomized block design with five replications and four treatments (crop sequences was used. The crop sequences during the sugarcane fallow period were soybean/millet/soybean, soybean/sunn hemp/soybean, soybean/fallow/soybean, and soybean. Soil use was found not to affect chemical properties and sugarcane productivity of RLe or RLa. The soybean/millet/soybean sequence improved aggregation in the acric Latosol.

  18. Hygrothermal Simulation of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. A computational approach for heat transfer through the ground has been well defined (EN ISO 13370:2007, 2007), and simplified methods have been developed (Staszczuk, Radon, and Holm 2010). However, these approaches generally ignore the transfer of soil moisture, which is not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, and Hens 2004). This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first part is to gather, comprehend and adapt soil properties from Soil Science. The obtained information must be applicable to related tasks in Building Science and validated with hygrothermal calculation tools. Future parts of this study will focus on the validation aspect of the soil properties to be implemented. Basic changes in the software code may be requested at this time. Different types of basement construction will be created with a hygrothermal calculation tool, WUFI. Simulations from WUFI will be compared with existing or ongoing measurements. The intentions of the first part of this study have been fulfilled. The soil properties of interest in Building Science have been defined for 12 different soil textures. These properties will serve as input parameters when performing hygrothermal calculations of building constructions coupled to soil materials. The reliability of the soil parameters will be further evaluated with measurements in Part 2.

  19. Influence of physical and chemical properties of different soil types on optimal soil moisture for tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zebec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil plasticity is the area of soil consistency, i.e. it represents a change in soil condition due to different soil moisture influenced by external forces activity. Consistency determines soil resistance in tillage, therefore, the aim of the research was to determine the optimum soil moisture condition for tillage and the influence of the chemical and physical properties of the arable land horizons on the soil plasticity on three different types of soil (fluvisol, luvisol and humic glaysol. Statistically significant differences were found between all examined soil types, such as the content of clay particles, the density of packaging and the actual and substitution acidity, the cation exchange capacity and the content of calcium. There were also statistically significant differences between the examined types of soil for the plasticity limit, liquid limit and the plasticity index. The average established value of plasticity limit as an important element for determining the optimal moment of soil tillage was 18.9% mass on fluvisol, 24.0% mass on luvisol and 28.6% mass on humic glaysol. Very significant positive direction correlation with plasticity limits was shown by organic matter, clay, fine silt, magnesium, sodium and calcium, while very significant negative direction correlation was shown by hydrolytic acidity, coarse sand, fine sand and coarse silt. Created regression models can estimate the optimal soil moisture condition for soil cultivation based on the basic soil properties. The model precision is significantly increased by introducing a greater number of agrochemical and agrophysical soil properties, and the additional precision of the model can be increased by soil type data.

  20. Hygrothermal Material Properties for Soils in Building Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehrer, Manfred [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is complicated because of the dearth of information on soil properties. However they are important when numerical simulation of coupled heat and moisture transport for below-grade building components are performed as their temperature and moisture content has an influence on the durability of the below-grade building component. Soils can be classified by soil texture. According to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCA), 12 different soils can be defined on the basis of three soil components: clay, sand, and silt. This study shows how existing material properties for typical American soils can be transferred and used for the calculation of the coupled heat and moisture transport of building components in contact with soil. Furthermore a thermal validation with field measurements under known boundary conditions is part of this study, too. Field measurements for soil temperature and moisture content for two specified soils are carried out right now under known boundary conditions. As these field measurements are not finished yet, the full hygrothermal validation is still missing

  1. Synthesis of soil-hydraulic properties and infiltration timescales in wildfire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    We collected soil-hydraulic property data from the literature for wildfire-affected soils, ash, and unburned soils. These data were used to calculate metrics and timescales of hydrologic response related to infiltration and surface runoff generation. Sorptivity (S) and wetting front potential (Ψf) were significantly different (lower) in burned soils compared with unburned soils, whereas field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) was not significantly different. The magnitude and duration of the influence of capillarity during infiltration was greatly reduced in burned soils, causing faster ponding times in response to rainfall. Ash had large values of S and Kfs but moderate values of Ψf, compared with unburned and burned soils, indicating ash has long ponding times in response to rainfall. The ratio of S2/Kfs was nearly constant (~100 mm) for unburned soils but more variable in burned soils, suggesting that unburned soils have a balance between gravity and capillarity contributions to infiltration that may depend on soil organic matter, whereas in burned soils the gravity contribution to infiltration is greater. Changes in S and Kfs in burned soils act synergistically to reduce infiltration and accelerate and amplify surface runoff generation. Synthesis of these findings identifies three key areas for future research. First, short timescales of capillary influences on infiltration indicate the need for better measurements of infiltration at times less than 1 min to accurately characterize S in burned soils. Second, using parameter values, such as Ψf, from unburned areas could produce substantial errors in hydrologic modeling when used without adjustment for wildfire effects, causing parameter compensation and resulting underestimation of Kfs. Third, more thorough measurement campaigns that capture soil-structural changes, organic matter impacts, quantitative water repellency trends, and soil-water content along with soil-hydraulic properties could drive the

  2. CHANGES IN SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC PADDY FIELD WITH AZOLLA APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhari Syamsiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic fertilizer is a way to improve soil fertility. Azolla can be used as organic fertilizer. This study aims to determine the effect of Azolla (Azolla mycrophylla. L on some soil chemical properties on organic paddy field. The field experiments used factorial complete randomized block design of three factors, namely Azolla (0 and 2 tons/ha, Manure (0 and 10 tons/ha and Rice Varieties (Mira1, Mentik Wangi and Merah Putih, with three times replication. Using Azolla on an organic paddy field does not significantly increase the levels of soil N, organic C, Cation Exchange Capacity and soil pH. However Azolla’s influence on soil available P is significant.

  3. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and its Impact on Simulated Surface Soil Moisture Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Bothe, T.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties (particle size distribution, PSD, and bulk density, BD) has large effects on the spatial variability of soil moisture and therefore on plant growth and surface exchange processes. In model studies, soil properties from soil maps are considered homogeneous over mapping units, which neglects the small scale variability of soil properties and leads to underestimated small scale variability of simulated soil moisture. This study focuses on the validation of spatial variability of simulated surface soil moisture (SSM) in a winter wheat field in Western Germany using the eco-hydrological simulation system DANUBIA. SSM measurements were conducted at 20 different sampling points and nine different dates in 2008. Frequency distributions of BD and PSD were derived from an independent dataset (n = 486) of soil physical properties from Germany and the USA. In the simulations, BD and PSD were parameterized according to these frequency distributions. Mean values, coefficients of variation and frequency distributions of simulated SSM were compared to the field measurements. Using the heterogeneous model parameterization, up to 76 % of the frequency distribution of the measured SSM can be explained. Furthermore, the results show that BD has a larger impact on the variability of SSM than PSD. The introduced approach can be used for simulating mean SSM and SSM variability more accurately and can form the basis for a spatially heterogeneous parameterization of soil properties in mesoscale models.

  4. Influence of soil properties on copper toxicity for two soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criel, Peggy; Lock, Koen; Eeckhout, Hilde Van; Oorts, Koen; Smolders, Erik; Janssen, Colin R

    2008-08-01

    Although a large body of evidence indicates that metal toxicity to soil organisms is affected by physicochemical soil properties, use of this knowledge in ecological risk assessments is limited because of the lack of a model applicable to a wide range of soils. To study the effect of soil characteristics on the toxicity of copper to terrestrial invertebrates, chronic toxicity tests with Eisenia fetida and Folsomia candida were performed in 19 European field soils. These soils were carefully selected to cover the range of toxicity-influencing parameters encountered in the European Union. Toxicity values varied greatly among soils, with 28-d median effect concentrations ranging from 72.0 to 781 mg Cu/kg dry weight for E. fetida and from 45.4 to 2,270 mg Cu/kg dry weight for F. candida. For both species, variation in copper toxicity values was best explained by differences in the actual cation-exchange capacity (CEC) at soil pH. Using the obtained regression algorithms, the observed toxicity could, in most cases, be predicted within a factor of two for E. fetida and within a factor of three for F. candida. The developed models were validated in three additional European field soils, a standard artificial soil and a standard field soil. The presented regression equations, based on the actual CEC, offer an easy-to-apply method for taking the influence of soil properties on metal toxicity into account.

  5. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg-1.K-1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg-1.K-1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of specific heat

  6. Microbiology and Physicochemical Properties of soil polluted with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbiological and physicochemical properties of waste lubricating oil polluted soil were studied for 35 days. The results show that bacteria and fungi population in oil free soil (OFS) were higher than that of oil polluted soil. The bacteria counts ranged from 0.24 x106 to 140 x 106 cfu/g for OFS and 0.24 x106 to 40 x106 ...

  7. Effect of land use change on soil properties and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Kõlli, Raimo; Köster, Tiina; Rannik, Kaire; Szajdak, Lech; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    For good base of sustainable land management and ecologically sound protection of soils are researches on soil properties and functioning. Ecosystem approach to soil properties and functioning is equally important in both natural and cultivated land use conditions. Comparative analysis of natural and agro-ecosystems formed on similar soil types enables to elucidate principal changes caused by land use change (LUC) and to elaborate the best land use practices for local pedo-ecological conditions. Taken for actual analysis mineral soils' catena - rendzina → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols - represent ca 1/3 of total area of Estonian normal mineral soils. All soils of this catena differ substantially each from other by calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, fabric and humus cover type. This catena (representative to Estonian pedo-ecological conditions) starts with drought-prone calcareous soils. Brown (distributed in northern and central Estonia) and pseudopodzolic soils (in southern Estonia) are the most broadly acknowledged for agricultural use medium-textured high-quality automorphic soils. Dispersedly distributed gley-podzols are permanently wet and strongly acid, low-productivity sandy soils. In presentation four complex functions of soils are treated: (1) being a suitable soil environment for plant cover productivity (expressed by annual increment, Mg ha-1 yr-1); (2) forming adequate conditions for decomposition, transformation and conversion of fresh falling litter (characterized by humus cover type); (3) deposition of humus, individual organic compounds, plant nutrition elements, air and water, and (4) forming (bio)chemically variegated active space for soil type specific edaphon. Capacity of soil cover as depositor (3) depends on it thickness, texture, calcareousness and moisture conditions. Biological activity of soil (4) is determined by fresh organic matter influx, quality and quantity of biochemical substances and humus

  8. [Effects of long-term fertilization on soil enzyme activities and soil physicochemical properties of facility vegetable field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning-ning; Li, Tian-lai; Wu, Chun-cheng; Zhang, En-ping

    2010-07-01

    An investigation was made on a long-term fertilization facility vegetable field at Shenyang Agricultural University to study the effects of long-term fertilization on the soil enzyme activities and soil physicochemical properties. Long term application of organic manure combined with or without nitrogen fertilizer increased the contents of soil organic matter, N, P, and K, and improved the soil physical properties and soil invertase, urease, and neutral phosphatase activities. However, long-term application of nitrogen fertilizer alone decreased soil pH and soil enzymes activities. Significant positive correlations were observed between soil invertase activity and soil organic matter and total P, between soil urease activity and soil organic matter, alkali-hydrolyzable N, total and available P, and available K, and between soil neutral phosphatase activity and soil organic matter, total P, and available K, but less correlation was found between soil dehydrogenase activity and soil nutrients.

  9. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Influence of soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, S.P., E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.u [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Mico, C. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Curdy, R. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology (LBE), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) Station 6 CH, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Zhao, F.J. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of Mo in different soils, explaining > 65% of the variance in ED{sub 50} for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations. - Amorphous iron oxides or organic carbon were found to be the best predictors of the toxicity threshold values of Mo to higher plants on different soils.

  10. Soil Properties Control Glyphosate Sorption in Soils Amended with Birch Wood Biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    such as pesticides. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark (sandy loam soils at Risoe and Kalundborg), we investigated the influence of birch wood biochar with respect to application rate, aging (7–19 months), and physicochemical soil properties on the sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg−1......, the results show that biochar, despite initially being a poor sorbent for glyphosate, can increase glyphosate sorption in soil. However, the effect of biochar on glyphosate sorption is depends on prevailing soil physicochemical properties....

  11. Characterization of soil chemical properties of strawberry fields using principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Oliveira Islabão

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the largest strawberry-producing municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul (RS is Turuçu, in the South of the State. The strawberry production system adopted by farmers is similar to that used in other regions in Brazil and in the world. The main difference is related to the soil management, which can change the soil chemical properties during the strawberry cycle. This study had the objective of assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of soil fertility parameters using principal component analysis (PCA. Soil sampling was based on topography, dividing the field in three thirds: upper, middle and lower. From each of these thirds, five soil samples were randomly collected in the 0-0.20 m layer, to form a composite sample for each third. Four samples were taken during the strawberry cycle and the following properties were determined: soil organic matter (OM, soil total nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P and potassium (K, exchangeable calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg, soil pH (pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7.0, soil base (V% and soil aluminum saturation(m%. No spatial variation was observed for any of the studied soil fertility parameters in the strawberry fields and temporal variation was only detected for available K. Phosphorus and K contents were always high or very high from the beginning of the strawberry cycle, while pH values ranged from very low to very high. Principal component analysis allowed the clustering of all strawberry fields based on variables related to soil acidity and organic matter content.

  12. Biochar Impacts on Soil Physical Properties and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan Lal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochar, a co-product of a controlled pyrolysis process, can be used as a tool for sequestering C in soil to offset greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, and as a soil amendment. Whereas the impacts of biochar application on soil chemical properties are widely known, the research information on soil physical properties is scarce. The objectives of this review are to (i synthesize available data on soil physical properties and GHG emissions, (ii offer possible mechanisms related to the biochar-amended soil processes, and (iii identify researchable priorities. Application rates of 1%–2% (w/w of biochar can significantly improve soil physical quality in terms of bulk density (BD, and water holding capacity (WHC. However, little data are available on surface area (SA, aggregation stability, and penetration resistance (PR of biochar-amended soil. While biochar amendment can initially accentuate the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2, the emission of GHGs may be suppressed over time. A 2-phase complexation hypothesis is proposed regarding the mechanisms of the interaction between soil and biochar.

  13. Infiltrationn characteristics and soil physico-chemical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infiltrationn characteristics and soil physico-chemical properties of wetland in Akwa Ibom state, Southeastern Nigeria. PI Ogban, TO Ibia. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Soil Science Vol. 16 (1) 2006: pp73-76. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Effect of animal manures on selected soil properties: II. Nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of animal manures on selected soil properties: II. Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus. AO Ano, JA Agwu. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Soil Science Vol. 16 (1) 2006: pp. 145-150. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  15. Conservation and conventional tillage effects on soil properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four conservation tillage practices and two conventional tillage practices were evaluated for two years to determine their effects on soil properties (moisture content, bulk density, porosity, shear strength, cone index), weed control, germination, growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L) Merril). The soil was sandy loam ...

  16. characterization of geotechnical properties of lateritic soil-bentonite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Abstract. The purpose of this study was to characterize lateritic soil bentonite mixtures intended for use as low-permeability barrier in municipal waste disposal landfill. Characterization of the soil mix- tures included measurement of Atterberg limits, compaction properties, hydraulic conductivity,.

  17. Effect of Cassava Processing Effluent on Soil Properties, Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study, comprising a survey, greenhouse and field experiments was conducted to examine the effect of Cassava Processing Effluent (CPE) on soil chemical properties, maize growth performances and grain yield. In the survey, soil samples were taken (0-15 and 15 – 30cm) of CPE contaminated and non contaminated ...

  18. Sensor data fusion to predict multiple soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, H.S.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Henten, van E.J.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of a single sensor is often low because all proximal soil sensors respond to more than one soil property of interest. Sensor data fusion can potentially overcome this inability of a single sensor and can best extract useful and complementary information from multiple sensors or sources.

  19. Evaluation of some engineering properties of lateritic soils around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... -35° with an average of 33°. The geotechnical analyses results show that the soils cart be used as construction materials. Thus, the soil could support shallow foundation, homogeneous embankments, slope· stability and sub-grade materials in road constructions. Key words: Engineering properties, Grain size, Liquid limit, ...

  20. Studies on the relationship between some soil properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies on the relationship between some soil properties and sugarcane yield was carried out in the production fields of the Nigerian Sugar Company, Bacita, Kwara State, Nigeria. The soils were found to be strongly acidic with medium organic matter while values obtained for total nitrogen and cation exchange ...

  1. Spatial variability of expansive soil properties at different scales ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper applies statistical and geostatistical procedures to analyse the spatial distribution of several soil properties and use the contribution of ge ostatistics to plan optimal soil sampling and management schemes in. Kibaha, Tanzania. Particle-size distribution, Atterberg limits and potential swell were analysed.

  2. Mechanical properties of millet husk ash bitumen stabilized soil block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents an investigation into the improvement of strength and durability properties of lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA) and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples were selected and treated with 0%, ...

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF SOME SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES ON THEIR ERODABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. C. Stanga

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Soils from de hills and tableland regions, as well as those from subcarpathian area are characterized through higher erodability. The soils from mountain area present the lowest erodability, especially districambosol, due to the upper horizons properties. The erodabilidydepends on the ratio of historical geological erosion and surface erosion.

  4. Soil physicochemical properties after 10 years of animal waste applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of animal waste to cropland provides a method of waste disposal and benefits both soil and crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of land application of animal waste and inorganic fertilizer on selected soil chemical and physical properties. The animal w...

  5. Organic and Nitrogen Fertilization of Soil under ‘Syrah’ Grapevine: Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Nitrate Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi José Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Viticulture is an activity of great social and economic importance in the lower-middle region of the São Francisco River valley in northeastern Brazil. In this region, the fertility of soils under vineyards is generally poor. To assess the effects of organic and nitrogen fertilization on chemical properties and nitrate concentrations in an Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo (Typic Plinthustalf, a field experiment was carried out in Petrolina, Pernambuco, on Syrah grapevines. Treatments consisted of two rates of organic fertilizer (0 and 30 m3 ha-1 and five N rates (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg ha-1, in a randomized block design arranged in split plots, with five replications. The organic fertilizer levels represented the main plots and the N levels, the subplots. The source of N was urea and the source of organic fertilizer was goat manure. Irrigation was applied through a drip system and N by fertigation. At the end of the third growing season, soil chemical properties were determined and nitrate concentration in the soil solution (extracted by porous cups was determined. Organic fertilization increased organic matter, pH, EC, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, sum of bases, base saturation, and CEC, but decreased exchangeable Cu concentration in the soil by complexation of Cu in the organic matter. Organic fertilization raised the nitrate concentration in the 0.20-0.40 m soil layer, making it leachable. Nitrate concentration in the soil increased as N rates increased, up to more than 300 mg kg-1 in soil and nearly 800 mg L-1 in the soil solution, becoming prone to leaching losses.

  6. Landform affects on profile distribution of soil properties in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Landform affects on profile distribution of soil properties in black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia ) land in loessial gully region of the Chinese Loess Plateau and its implications for vegetation restoration.

  7. Relations between soil hydraulic properties and burn severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moody, J.A.; Ebel, B.A.; Stoof, C.R.; Nyman, P.; Martin, D.A.; McKinley, R.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire can affect soil hydraulic properties, often resulting in reduced infiltration. The magnitude of change in infiltration varies depending on the burn severity. Quantitative approaches to link burn severity with changes in infiltration are lacking. This study uses controlled laboratory

  8. EFFECT OF ALTERNATIVE MULTINUTRIENT SOURCES ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martins, Vanessa; Silva, Douglas Ramos Guelfi; Marchi, Giuliano; Leite, Maurício Cunha Almeida; Martins, Éder de Souza; Gonçalves, Ana Stella Freire; Guilherme, Luiz Roberto Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of silicate rock powder and a manganese mining by-product, and secondary materials originated from these two materials, on soil chemical properties...

  9. chemical properties of soil in rivers state, nigeria *ch

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    production increases the level of most soil chemical properties and that such increase diminish with an ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management Vol. 6 No.3 2013 ..... kiln sites affects C and N dynamics and associated.

  10. An Improved Technique for dry Soil Moisture Release Curves to Determine Soil Mineralogical and Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G. S.; Campbell, C. S.; Cobos, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil moisture release curves (MRC) or moisture sorption isotherms, which relate the amount of water in soil to its water potential or water activity, have many applications in soil physics and geotechnical engineering including determining soil water flow, specific surface area, swelling potential, and clay mineralogy and activity. Although research showing MRC for various soils dates back more than 50 years, limitations with the measurement technique have made developing MRC time consuming and inaccurate, especially in dry soils. Recently, an instrument was developed to create moisture sorption isotherms for various food and pharmaceutical products. The objective of this research was to investigate its use in soils for obtaining MRC in dry soils simply and accurately. Several different soil types were tested in the instrument from pure sand to bentonite and smectite clays. From the MRC of these soils, we were able to develop good correlations between actual and derived clay activity, surface area, and swelling potential. In addition, we were able to see hysteresis in dry soil water uptake for all soils, including sand. According to our tests, this new instrument will provide a powerful tool to investigate several soil physical properties simply and accurately.

  11. Soil properties and cowpea yield after six years of consecutive amendment of composted tannery sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Sérgio Ferreira de Araújo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated soil properties and cowpea yield after six years of consecutive amendment of composted tannery sludge. The compost was applied annually at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Mg ha-1 and at the end of the sixth year, the chemical and physical properties of the soil were evaluated using a randomized block design. The Cr, P, K, Ca, Na and organic C contents and the pH and cation exchange capacity increased linearly after six years of compost amendment. The soil bulk density decreased linearly while the aggregate stability index increased after compost amendment. As a consequence of the changes in the chemical and physical properties of the soil, cowpea yield showed a quadratic response to the tannery rates, with an estimated maximum cowpea yield at 8.3 Mg ha-1. In conclusion, the soil chemical and physical properties improved after six years of composted tannery sludge amendment. However, the soil pH and the Cr and Na contents increased with composted tannery sludge amendment, which influenced the cowpea yield and resulted in a quadratic response to the compost.

  12. Using soil properties to predict in vivo bioavailability of lead in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayawardena, M A Ayanka; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Lamb, Dane; Thavamani, Palanisami; Kuchel, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Soil plays a significant role in controlling the potential bioavailability of contaminants in the environment. In this study, eleven soils were used to investigate the relationship between soil properties and relative bioavailability (RB) of lead (Pb). To minimise the effect of source of Pb on in vivo bioavailability, uncontaminated study soils were spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg soil and aged for 10-12 months prior to investigating the relationships between soil properties and in vivo RB of Pb using swine model. The biological responses to oral administration of Pb in aqueous phase or as spiked soils were compared by applying a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model to blood Pb concentration. The study revealed that RB of Pb from aged soils ranged from 30±9% to 83±7%. The very different RB of Pb in these soils was attributed to variations in the soils' physico-chemical properties. This was established using sorption studies showing: firstly, Freundlich partition coefficients that ranged from 21 to 234; and secondly, a strongly significant (R(2)=0.94, Psoils. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such model derived using sorption partition coefficient to predict the relative bioavailability of Pb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Soil biochemical properties in brown and gray mine soils with and without hydroseeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Sexstone, A.; Skousen, J.

    2015-09-01

    Surface coal mining in the eastern USA disturbs hundreds of hectares of land every year and removes valuable and ecologically diverse eastern deciduous forests. Reclamation involves restoring the landscape to approximate original contour, replacing the topsoil, and revegetating the site with trees and herbaceous species to a designated post-mining land use. Re-establishing an ecosystem of ecological and economic value as well as restoring soil quality on disturbed sites are the goals of land reclamation, and microbial properties of mine soils can be indicators of restoration success. Reforestation plots were constructed in 2007 using weathered brown sandstone or unweathered gray sandstone as topsoil substitutes to evaluate tree growth and soil properties at Arch Coal's Birch River mine in West Virginia, USA. All plots were planted with 12 hardwood tree species and subplots were hydroseeded with a herbaceous seed mix and fertilizer. After 6 years, the average tree volume index was nearly 10 times greater for trees grown in brown (3853 cm3) compared to gray mine soils (407 cm3). Average pH of brown mine soils increased from 4.7 to 5.0, while gray mine soils declined from 7.9 to 7.0. Hydroseeding doubled tree volume index and ground cover on both mine soils. Hydroseeding doubled microbial biomass carbon (MBC) on brown mine soils (8.7 vs. 17.5 mg kg-1), but showed no effect on gray mine soils (13.3 vs. 12.8 mg kg-1). Hydroseeding also increased the ratio of MBC to soil organic C in both soils and more than tripled the ratio for potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) to total N. Brown mine soils were a better growth medium than gray mine soils and hydroseeding was an important component of reclamation due to improved biochemical properties and microbial activity in mine soils.

  14. Estimating Soil Cation Exchange Capacity from Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, S. M.; Emamgholizadeh, S.; Shahsavani, D.

    2014-12-01

    The soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) is an important soil characteristic that has many applications in soil science and environmental studies. For example, CEC influences soil fertility by controlling the exchange of ions in the soil. Measurement of CEC is costly and difficult. Consequently, several studies attempted to obtain CEC from readily measurable soil physical and chemical properties such as soil pH, organic matter, soil texture, bulk density, and particle size distribution. These studies have often used multiple regression or artificial neural network models. Regression-based models cannot capture the intricate relationship between CEC and soil physical and chemical attributes and provide inaccurate CEC estimates. Although neural network models perform better than regression methods, they act like a black-box and cannot generate an explicit expression for retrieval of CEC from soil properties. In a departure with regression and neural network models, this study uses Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) to estimate CEC from easily measurable soil variables such as clay, pH, and OM. CEC estimates from GEP and MARS are compared with measurements at two field sites in Iran. Results show that GEP and MARS can estimate CEC accurately. Also, the MARS model performs slightly better than GEP. Finally, a sensitivity test indicates that organic matter and pH have respectively the least and the most significant impact on CEC.

  15. Effects of prescribed fires on soil properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcañiz, M; Outeiro, L; Francos, M; Úbeda, X

    2018-02-01

    Soils constitute one of the most valuable resources on earth, especially because soil is renewable on human time scales. During the 20th century, a period marked by a widespread rural exodus and land abandonment, fire suppression policies were adopted facilitating the accumulation of fuel in forested areas, exacerbating the effects of wildfires, leading to severe degradation of soils. Prescribed fires emerged as an option for protecting forests and their soils from wildfires through the reduction of fuels levels. However such fires can serve other objectives, including stimulating the regeneration of a particular plant species, maintaining biological diversity or as a tool for recovering grasslands in encroached lands. This paper reviews studies examining the short- and long- term impacts of prescribed fires on the physical, chemical and biological soil properties; in so doing, it provides a summary of the benefits and drawbacks of this technique, to help determine if prescribed fires can be useful for managing the landscape. From the study conducted, we can affirm that prescribed fires affects soil properties but differ greatly depending on soil initial characteristics, vegetation or type of fire. Also, it is possible to see that soil's physical and biological properties are more strongly affected by prescribed fires than are its chemical properties. Finally, we conclude that prescribed fires clearly constitute a disturbance on the environment (positive, neutral or negative depending on the soil property studied), but most of the studies reviewed report a good recovery and their effects could be less pronounced than those of wildfires because of the limited soil heating and lower fire intensity and severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Impacts of Salinity on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Evaporation Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, V.; Cristi Matte, F.; Suarez, F. I.; Munoz, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Saline soils are common in arid zones, where evaporation from shallow groundwater is generally the main component of the water balance. Thus, to correctly manage water resources in these zones, it is important to quantify the evaporation fluxes. Evaporation from saline soils is a complex process that couples the movement of salts, heat, liquid water and water vapor, and strongly depends on the soil water content. Precipitation/dissolution reactions can change the soil structure and alter flow paths, modifying evaporation fluxes. We utilized the HYDRUS-1D model to investigate the effects of salinity on soil hydraulic properties and evaporation fluxes. HYDRUS-1D simulates the transport of liquid water, water vapor, and heat, and can incorporate precipitation/dissolution reactions of the major ions. To run the model, we determined the water retention curve for a soil with different salinities; and we used meteorological forcing from an experimental site from the Atacama Desert. It was found that higher sodium adsorption ratios in the soil increase the soil water retention capacity. Also, it was found that evaporation fluxes increase salts concentration near the soil surface, changing the soil's water retention capacity in that zone. Finally, movement of salts causes differences in evaporation fluxes. It is thus necessary to incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution reactions and its effects on the water retention curve to correctly simulate evaporation in saline soils

  17. Geochemistry Of Lead In Contaminated Soils: Effects Of Soil Physico-Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, S.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Andra, S. P.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental contaminant with proven human health effects. When assessing human health risks associated with Pb, one of the most common exposure pathways typically evaluated is soil ingestion by children. However, bioaccessibility of Pb primarily depends on the solubility and hence, the geochemical form of Pb, which in turn is a function of site specific soil chemistry. Certain fractions of ingested soil-Pb may not dissociate during digestion in the gastro-intestinal tract, and hence, may not be available for transport across the intestinal membrane. Therefore, this study is being currently performed to assess the geochemical forms and bioaccessibility of Pb in soils with varying physico-chemical properties. In order to elucidate the level of Pb that can be ingested and assimilated by humans, an in-vitro model that simulates the physiological conditions of the human digestive system has been developed and is being used in this study. Four different types of soils from the Immokalee (an acid sandy soil with minimal Pb retention potential), Millhopper (a sandy loam with high Fe/Al content), Pahokee (a muck soil with more than 80% soil organic matter), and Tobosa series (an alkaline soil with high clay content) were artificially contaminated with Pb as lead nitrate at the rate equivalent to 0, 400, 800, and 1200 mg/kg dry soil. Analysis of soils by a sequential extraction method at time zero (immediately after spiking) showed that Immokalee and Millhopper soils had the highest amount of Pb in exchangeable form, whereas Pahokee and Tobosa soils had higher percentages of carbonate-bound and Fe/Al-bound Pb. The results of in-vitro experiment at time zero showed that majority of Pb was dissolved in the acidic stomach environment in Immokalee, Millhopper, and Tobosa, whereas it was in the intestinal phase in Pahokee soils. Because the soil system is not in equilibrium at time zero, the effect of soil properties on Pb geochemistry is not clear as yet. The

  18. Effects of biochars on hydraulic properties of clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jingbo; Palladino, Mario; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has gained popularity as an amendment to improve soil hydraulic properties. Since biochar properties depend on feedstocks and pyrolysis temperatures used for its production, proper selection of biochar type as soil amendment is of great importance for soil hydraulic properties improvement. This study investigated the effects of eight types of biochar on physical and hydraulic properties of clayey soil. Biochars were derived from four different feedstocks (Alfalfa hay, municipal organic waste, corn residues and wood chip) pyrolyzed at two different temperatures (300 and 550 °C). Clayey soil samples were taken from Leone farm (40° 26' 15.31" N, 14° 59' 45.54" E), Italy, and were oven-dried at 105 °C to determine dry bulk density. Biochars were mixed with the clayey soil at 5% by mass. Bulk densities of the mixtures were also determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the original clayey soil and corresponding mixtures were measured by means of falling-head method. Soil water retention measurements were conducted for clayey soil and mixtures using suction table apparatus and Richards' plate with the pressure head (h) up to 12000 cm. van Genuchten retention function was selected to evaluate the retention characteristics of clayey soil and mixtures. Available water content (AWC) was calculated by field capacity (h = - 500 cm) minus wilting pointing (h = -12000 cm). The results showed that biochar addition decreased the bulk density of clayey soil. The Ks of clayey soil increased due to the incorporation of biochars except for waste and corn biochars pyrolyzed at 550 °C. AWC of soils mixed with corn biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and wood biochar pyrolyzed at 550 °C, increased by 31% and 7%, respectively. Further analysis will be conducted in combination of biochar properties such as specific surface area and total pore volume. Better understanding of biochar impact on clayey soil will be helpful in biochar selection for soil amendment and

  19. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wireless networks in which the node locations are random are best modelled as random geometric graphs (RGGs). In addition to their extensive application in the modelling of wireless networks, RGGs find many new applications and are being studied in their own right. In this paper we first provide a brief introduction to the ...

  20. Contribution of raindrop impact to the change of soil physical properties and water erosion under semi-arid rainfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Ali Reza; Ahmadi, Morvarid; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is a three-phase process that consists of detachment of soil particles from the soil mass, transportation of detached particles either by raindrop impact or surface water flow, and sedimentation. Detachment by raindrops is a key component of the soil erosion process. However, little information is available on the role of raindrop impact on soil losses in the semi-arid regions where vegetation cover is often poor and does not protect the soil from rainfall. The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of raindrop impact to changes in soil physical properties and soil losses in a semiarid weakly-aggregated agricultural soil. Soil losses were measured under simulated rainfalls of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70mmh-1, and under two conditions: i) with raindrop impact; and, ii) without raindrop impact. Three replications at each rainfall intensity and condition resulted in a total of 42 microplots of 1m×1.4m installed on a 10% slope according to a randomized complete block design. The contribution of raindrop impact to soil loss was computed using the difference between soil loss with raindrop impact and without raindrop impact at each rainfall intensity. Soil physical properties (aggregate size, bulk density and infiltration rate) were strongly damaged by raindrop impact as rainfall intensity increased. Soil loss was significantly affected by rainfall intensity under both soil surface conditions. The contribution of raindrop impact to soil loss decreased steadily with increasing rainfall intensity. At the lower rainfall intensities (20-30mmh-1), raindrop impact was the dominant factor controlling soil loss from the plots (68%) while at the higher rainfall intensities (40-70mmh-1) soil loss was mostly affected by increasing runoff discharge. At higher rainfall intensities the sheet flow protected the soil from raindrop impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of Soil Quality Index Based on Soil Chemical Properties in The Upstream of Bengawan Solo River Basin Wonogiri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Machfiroh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Land conversion extended to the upper of the watershed for residential and agricultural so soil’s ability is decreased to support the soil quality. To solve these problems, in the region upstream of Bengawan Solo, enforced by Agroforestry plantings. Research carried out at the upstream of Bengawan Solo Wonogiri and Laboratory of Chemistry and Fertility of Soil Faculty of Agriculture, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, in June 2013 until March 2014. Research used a survey method by descriptive and exploratory. Determination of the location of the site sample is done by a stratified random sampling based onland map unit. Sampling was done by a purposive sampling method. The soil quality index is determined by summing the scores for each variable which has selected from Principal Component Analysis (PCA, and then it multiplied by the weight index. The result of the study show that the soil quality of Agroforestry in the upstream of Bengawan Solo Wonogiri based on the chemical properties of the soil is low. The value of soil quality index in the secondary forest is 2.6. While in the Agrosilvopastoral is 2.3 and in the Agrisilviculture is 2.1, which are lower than the secondary forest. Whereas in the Silvopastoral is 3.0, which is higher than the secondary forest.

  2. Effect of some soil amendments on soil properties and plant growth in Southern Thailand acid upland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onthong, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors limiting plant growth is acid soil. In general lime is used for soil amendment in acid soil. However, It has been reported that gypsum or phosphogypsum can be used for ameliorating soilacidity. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of lime, phosphogypsum and kieserite on soil properties and plant growth in Kho Hong soil series (coarse loamy, kaolinitic,isohyperthermic, TypicKandiudults which was considered as acid upland soil (pH 5.07. Sweet corn variety INSEE 2 was used as the test crop. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 4 replications and 19 treatments asfollow : unamended, application of hydrated lime and dolomite to raise soil pH at 5.5, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with phosphogypsum at the rate that can supply calcium 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 time of both limes, application of hydrated lime and dolomite combined with kieserite at the rate 0.25, 0.50,0.75 and 1 times of sulfur requirement for corn (40 kg S ha-1. The result showed that shoot and root dry weights of corn were increased when lime materials, phosphogypsum and kieserite were applied and the drymatter weights were increased according to the increasing of phosphogypsum and kieserite. The maximum shoot dry weight (18.98 g pot-1 was obtained when 1 times of kieserite was supplied with dolomite and wassignificantly (P<0.01 higher than those of the unamended treatment, only hydrated lime and dolomite treatments, which had dry weights of 12.64, 15.18 and 15.67 g pot-1 respectively. Phosphorus and K uptakewere not significantly different in all treatments and the lowest uptake of N, Ca, Mg and S was obtained in the unamended treatment. The maximum uptake of N (512.10 mg pot-1 was found when 0.5 times ofphosphogypsum was applied together with dolomite. Calcium and Mg uptake was likely to increase according to the increasing rate of soil amendment application. Highest uptake of Ca (42.51 mg pot-1 was obtainedwhen

  3. Effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on chemical soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvan, M.; Danesh, S.; Alizadeh, A.

    2009-04-01

    The use of treated wastewater, as a marginal quality water, in agriculture is a justified practice, yet care should be taken to minimize adverse environmental impacts and to prevent soil deterioration. The objective of this research was to investigate the long-term effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on soil properties. The investigation was carried out by comparison of soil properties in two different fields; one irrigated with the effluent from Parkand Abad Wastewater Treatment Plant over a period of six years and the other one irrigated with water over the same period of time. Soil samples were taken from different depths of 0-25, 25-50, 50-100, 100-150 and 150-200 cm in both fields, and analyzed for various chemical properties. The results indicated that EC, TDS and Chlorine were increased significantly, in all depths, in the soil irrigated with the treated wastewater. The use of treated wastewater increased exchangeable potassium, magnesium and phosphorous significantly in the top soil layer (0-25), while the increase in calcium was occurred up to depth of 50 cm. Irrigation with the treated wastewater increased soil sodium content in all depths except for the depth of 100-150 cm. Irrigation with the treated wastewater did not affect the soil pH and nitrogen content significantly.

  4. Soil biochemical properties after six years in amended brown and gray mine soils in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Sexstone, A.; Skousen, J.

    2015-06-01

    Surface coal mining in the eastern USA disturbs hundreds of hectares of land every year and removes valuable and ecologically diverse eastern deciduous forests. Reclamation involves restoring the landscape to approximate original contour, replacing the topsoil, and revegetating the site with trees and herbaceous species to a designated post-mining land use. Re-establishing an ecosystem of ecological and economic value as well as restoring soil quality on disturbed sites are the goals of land reclamation, and microbial properties of mine soils can be indicators of restoration success. Reforestation plots were constructed in 2007 using weathered brown sandstone or unweathered gray sandstone as topsoil substitutes to evaluate tree growth and soil properties at Arch Coal's Birch River Mine in West Virginia, USA. All plots were planted with 12 hardwood tree species and subplots were hydroseeded with an herbaceous seed mix and fertilizer. After six years, average tree volume index was nearly ten times greater for trees grown in brown (3853 cm3) compared to gray mine soils (407 cm3). Average pH of brown mine soils increased from 4.7 to 5.0, while gray mine soils declined from 7.9 to 7.0. Hydroseeding doubled tree volume index and ground cover on both mine soils. Hydroseeding doubled microbial biomass carbon (MBC) on brown mine soils (8.7 vs. 17.5 mg kg-1), but showed no effect on gray (13.3 vs. 12.8 mg kg-1). Hydroseeding also increased the ratio of MBC to soil organic C in both soils and more than tripled the ratio for potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) to total N. Brown mine soils were a better growth medium than gray mine soils and hydroseeding was an important component of reclamation due to improved biochemical properties and microbial activity in mine soils.

  5. Effects of Soil Compaction on Carbon and Nitrogen Sequestration in Soil and Wheat, Soil Physical Properties and Aggregates Stability (Case study: Northern of Aq Qala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Saieedifar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil compaction has become a widespread problem in the world and it is considered as one of the main factors affecting land degradation in arid and semi-arid agricultural land. Compaction in arable soils is a gradual phenomenon that appearing over time and most important factors that influence it include: soil properties, high clay content, low organic matter, and frequency of wet-dry in the soil, impervious layer of soil, load heavy agricultural implements and soil and water mismanagement. Compaction induced soil degradation affects about 68 million hectares of land globally. The vast majority of compaction in modern agriculture is caused by vehicular traffic. Carbon sequestration by long-term management operation of the plant and soil, not only increase the soil carbon storage but also lead to reduce the carbon exchange and greenhouse gases emissions like CO2 from the soil profile. The aim of this study was evaluating the effect of soil compaction on carbon and nitrogen sequestration of wheat and soil and some soil physical properties such as: aggregate stability, saturated soil moisture content, bulk density and soil porosity. Materials and Methods: This experiment was accomplished in which is located near Aq Qala in a randomized completely block design (with 4 treatments and 3 replications. Soil compaction was artificially created by using a 5/7 ton heavy tractor. The treatments arrangements were: 1 T1: control, 2 T2: twice passing of tractor, 3 T3: four time of passing tractor, and 4 T4: six time of passing heavy tractor. Utilize of all agricultural inputs (fertilizers, herbicides, etc. has been identical for all treatments. Since rain-fed farming is the common method to cultivation of cereals in the study area, so no complementary irrigation was carried out in this period. In this study, after the measurement of the parameters, the data were analyzed by using SPSS 16.0 Software. LSD test was used for comparison of means

  6. Combining mid infrared and total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for prediction of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towett, Erick; Shepherd, Keith; Sila, Andrew; Aynekulu, Ermias; Cadisch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (MIR) can predict many soil properties but extractable nutrients are often predicted poorly. We evaluated the potential of MIR and total elemental analysis using total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF), both individually and combined, to predict results of conventional soil tests. Total multi-elemental analysis provides a fingerprint of soil mineralogy and could predict some soil properties and help improve MIR predictions. A set of 700 georeferenced soil samples associated with the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) (www.africasoils.net) from 44 stratified randomly-located 100-km2 sentinel sites distributed across sub-Saharan Africa were analysed for physico-chemical composition using conventional reference methods, and compared to MIR and TXRF spectra using the Random Forests regression algorithm and an internal out-of-bag validation. MIR spectra resulted in good prediction models (R2 >0.80) for organic C and total N, Mehlich-3 Ca and Al, and pH. To test the combined spectroscopic approach, TXRF element concentration data was included as a property predictor along with the first derivative of MIR spectral data using the RF algorithm. Including TXRF did not improve prediction of these properties. TXRF was poorer (R2 0.86) as these elements are not directly determined with TXRF, however the variance explained is still quite high and may be attributable to TXRF signatures relating to mineralogy correlated with protection of soil organic matter. TXRF model for Mehlich-3 Al had excellent prediction capability explaining 81% of the observed variation in extractable Al content and was comparable to that of MIR (R2 = 0.86). However, models for pH and Mehlich-3 exchangeable Ca exhibited R2 values of 0.74 and 0.79 respectively and thus had moderate predictive accuracy, compared to MIR alone with R2 values of 0.82 and 0.84 respectively. Both MIR and TXRF methods predicted soil properties that relate to nutrient

  7. Incorporation of satellite remote sensing pan-sharpened imagery into digital soil prediction and mapping models to characterize soil property variability in small agricultural fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiming; Smith, Scot E.; Grunwald, Sabine; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Wani, Suhas P.

    2017-01-01

    Soil prediction models based on spectral indices from some multispectral images are too coarse to characterize spatial pattern of soil properties in small and heterogeneous agricultural lands. Image pan-sharpening has seldom been utilized in Digital Soil Mapping research before. This research aimed to analyze the effects of pan-sharpened (PAN) remote sensing spectral indices on soil prediction models in smallholder farm settings. This research fused the panchromatic band and multispectral (MS) bands of WorldView-2, GeoEye-1, and Landsat 8 images in a village in Southern India by Brovey, Gram-Schmidt and Intensity-Hue-Saturation methods. Random Forest was utilized to develop soil total nitrogen (TN) and soil exchangeable potassium (Kex) prediction models by incorporating multiple spectral indices from the PAN and MS images. Overall, our results showed that PAN remote sensing spectral indices have similar spectral characteristics with soil TN and Kex as MS remote sensing spectral indices. There is no soil prediction model incorporating the specific type of pan-sharpened spectral indices always had the strongest prediction capability of soil TN and Kex. The incorporation of pan-sharpened remote sensing spectral data not only increased the spatial resolution of the soil prediction maps, but also enhanced the prediction accuracy of soil prediction models. Small farms with limited footprint, fragmented ownership and diverse crop cycle should benefit greatly from the pan-sharpened high spatial resolution imagery for soil property mapping. Our results show that multiple high and medium resolution images can be used to map soil properties suggesting the possibility of an improvement in the maps' update frequency. Additionally, the results should benefit the large agricultural community through the reduction of routine soil sampling cost and improved prediction accuracy.

  8. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain); Roquero, C.; Magister, M. [UPM. Madrid (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid. (Author) 39 refs.

  9. Soil carbon and soil physical properties response to incorporating mulched forest slash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe G. Sanchez; Emily A. Carter; John. F. Klepac

    2000-01-01

    A study was installed in the Lower Coastal Plain near Washington, NC, to test the hypothesis that incorporating organic matter in the form of comminuted forest slash would increase soil carbon and nutrient pools, and alter soil physical properties to favor pine growth. Two sites were selected, an organic and a mineral site, to compare the treatment effects on...

  10. Impact of soil types and management practices on soil microbiological properties - a case study in salt affected area of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Ravi Kumar; Makádi, Marianna; Michéli, Erika; Weldmichael, Tsedekech G.; Szegi, Tamás

    2017-04-01

    The impact of different land use systems on soil microbiological properties in salt affected soils were investigated in the Nádudvar region of Hajdu-Bihar County, Hungary. The study area is characterized by associations of Solonetz and Chernozem soils. Soils were collected from both arable (cultivated) and pasture (non-cultivated) land from the upper 15 cm, in May, 2016. Besides soil physical and chemical properties (SOM, pH, CaCO3, EC, E4/E6, available macro, meso and micro nutrients and moisture content), soil microbiological properties were also investigated, phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities of the samples were measured, as well as soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbiological respiration. The results were statistically compared on the different soil types and land uses. It was concluded that land management has greater impact on soil microbiology than inherent properties or soil types.

  11. Effects of poultry manure on soil biochemical properties in phthalic acid esters contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Xiaojian; Ren, Xuqin; Zhou, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of poultry manure (PM) on soil biological properties in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils. An indoor incubation experiment was conducted. Soil microbial biomass C (Cmic), soil enzymatic activities, and microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were measured during incubation period. The results indicated that except alkaline phosphatase activity, DBP and DEHP had negative effects on Cmic, dehydrogenase, urease, protease activities, and contents of total PLFA. However, 5 % PM treatment alleviated the negative effects of PAEs on the above biochemical parameters. In DBP-contaminated soil, 5 % PM amendment even resulted in dehydroenase activity and Cmic content increasing by 17.8 and 11.8 % on the day 15 of incubation, respectively. During the incubation periods, the total PLFA contents decreased maximumly by 17.2 and 11.6 % in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils without PM amendments, respectively. Compared with those in uncontaminated soil, the total PLFA contents increased slightly and the value of bacPLFA/fugalPLFA increased significantly in PAE-contaminated soils with 5 % PM amendment. Nevertheless, in both contaminated soils, the effects of 5 % PM amendment on the biochemical parameters were not observed with 10 % PM amendment. In 10 % PM-amended soils, DBP and DEHP had little effect on Cmic, soil enzymatic activities, and microbial community composition. At the end of incubation, the effects of PAEs on these parameters disappeared, irrespective of PM amendment. The application of PM ameliorated the negative effect of PAEs on soil biological environment. However, further work is needed to study the effect of PM on soil microbial gene expression in order to explain the change mechanisms of soil biological properties.

  12. A multisite and multi-model analysis of random errors in soil CO2 efflux across soil water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, A.; Bahn, M.; Pumpanen, J.; Vargas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is suggested to influence patterns of precipitation and water availability around the world and these changes are likely to alter ecosystem carbon fluxes. An important component of the ecosystem carbon balance is the efflux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere, which is strongly influenced by soil moisture and temperature. The increasing application of automated systems is resulting in growing datasets of continuous measurements, which offer the possibility of a consistent uncertainty analysis. Recently, soil CO2 efflux has been frequently estimated from soil CO2 profiling by using the gradient flux method, which is based on the Fick's first law of diffusion, reporting only the measure value, without taking in account systematic and random errors. Improvements in technology and constant equipment calibration can minimize systematic errors; therefore we focused on random errors whose characteristics are generally unknown for soil CO2 efflux. Here, we characterized random errors in soil CO2 effluxes determined with two approaches based on the gradient flux method to calculate soil CO2 efflux in three different types of ecosystems across different soil water conditions. Results showed that random errors tend to differ between approaches. While the two tested models have a similar representation of physical process and input parameters, random errors are distributed differently across the different ranges of soil water content. Differences between random errors are likely to be larger in extreme conditions of soil water content (i.e., dry and wet) suggesting the need for improvement in understanding the biophysical process driving soil CO2 efflux under these conditions.

  13. A review of the impacts of degradation threats on soil properties in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, A S; Ritz, K; McGrath, S P; Quinton, J N; Goulding, K W T; Jones, R J A; Harris, J A; Bol, R; Wallace, P; Pilgrim, E S; Whitmore, A P

    2015-10-01

    National governments are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of their soil resources and are shaping strategies accordingly. Implicit in any such strategy is that degradation threats and their potential effect on important soil properties and functions are defined and understood. In this paper, we aimed to review the principal degradation threats on important soil properties in the UK, seeking quantitative data where possible. Soil erosion results in the removal of important topsoil and, with it, nutrients, C and porosity. A decline in soil organic matter principally affects soil biological and microbiological properties, but also impacts on soil physical properties because of the link with soil structure. Soil contamination affects soil chemical properties, affecting nutrient availability and degrading microbial properties, whilst soil compaction degrades the soil pore network. Soil sealing removes the link between the soil and most of the 'spheres', significantly affecting hydrological and microbial functions, and soils on re-developed brownfield sites are typically degraded in most soil properties. Having synthesized the literature on the impact on soil properties, we discuss potential subsequent impacts on the important soil functions, including food and fibre production, storage of water and C, support for biodiversity, and protection of cultural and archaeological heritage. Looking forward, we suggest a twin approach of field-based monitoring supported by controlled laboratory experimentation to improve our mechanistic understanding of soils. This would enable us to better predict future impacts of degradation processes, including climate change, on soil properties and functions so that we may manage soil resources sustainably.

  14. Relationships between some soil physical and chemical properties with magnetic properties in different soil moisture regimes in Golestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valaee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil moisture regime refers to the presence or absence either of ground water or of water held at a tension of less than 1500 kPa in the soil or in specific horizons during periods of the year. It is the most important factor in soil formation, soil evolution and fertility affecting on crop production and management. Also, it widely is practical in soil classification and soil mapping. The soil moisture regime depends on the soil properties, climatic and weather conditions, characteristics of natural plant formations and, in cultivated soils, is affected by the characteristics of crops grown, as well as the cultivation practices. Determination of soil moisture regime within a landscape scale requires high information and data about moisture balance of soil profile during some years according to Soil Survey Manual (2010. This approach is very expensive, labor, time and cost consuming. Therefore, achievement to an alternative approach is seems essential to overcome these problems. The main hypothesis of this study was to use capability of magnetic susceptibility as a cheap and rapid technique could determine the soil moisture regimes. Magnetic properties of soils reflect the impacts of soil mineral composition, particularly the quantity of ferrimagnetic minerals such as maghemite and magnetite. Magnetic susceptibility measurements can serve a variety of applications including the changes in soil forming processes and ecological services, understanding of lithological effects, insight of sedimentation processes and soil drainage. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in an area located between 36°46َ 10˝ and 37° 2’ 28˝ N latitudes, and 54° 29’ 31˝ and 55° 12’ 47˝ E longitudes in Golestan province, northern Iran. In the study region mean annual temperature varies from 12.4 to 19.4 °C. The average annual rainfall and evapotranspiration varies from 230 mm and 2335 mm in Inchebrun district (Aridic regime, to 732

  15. Interactions of Soil Order and Land Use Management on Soil Properties in the Kukart Watershed, Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiia Sakbaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of soil properties related to soil functioning for many regions of Kyrgyzstan are limited. This study established ranges of chemical (soil organic matter (SOM, pH and total N (TN, physical (soil texture, and biochemical (six enzyme activities of C, N, P, and S cycling characteristics for nine profiles from the Kukart watershed of Jalal-Abad region in Kyrgyzstan. These profiles represent different soil orders (Inceptisols, Alfisols, and Mollisols and land uses (cultivated, nut-fruit forests, and pasture. The Sierozem (Inceptisols soils had the highest pH and contained the lowest SOM and TN contents compared to the Brown, Black-brown, and Meadow-steppe soils (Alfisols and Mollisols. Enzymatic activities within surface horizons (0–18 cm typically decreased in the following order: forest > pasture > cultivated. Enzyme activity trends due to land use were present regardless of elevation, climate, and soil types although subtle differences among soil types within land use were observed. The significant reductions in measured soil enzyme activities involved in C, N, P, and S nutrient transformations under cultivation compared to pasture and forest ecosystems and lower values under Inceptisols can serve as soil quality indicators for land use decisions in the watershed.

  16. Linking soil and sediment properties for research on biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional perspectives on soil erosion include the on-site damage to soil and reductions in crop yield, as well as the resulting off-site effects on water quality, runoff and sediment loads in rivers. Our evolving understanding of the Earth System has added a new dimension to the role of soil erosion within the global geochemical cycles. First, the relevance of soil as a nutrient and Carbon (C) pool was recognized. Initially, the role of soils in the global C cycle was largely considered to be limited to a vertical exchange of greenhouse house gases (GHG) between vegetation, soil and atmosphere and thus mostly studied by soil scientists, plant ecologists and climatologists. Even Critical Zone research focused mostly on weathering and regolith properties and ignored lateral fluxes of dissolved or particulate organic matter. Since the late 1990s, a wider role of soils in biogeochemical cycles has emerged. Recent estimates place the lateral movement of C between soil and sediment pools in terrestrial ecosystems (including rivers and lakes) at approximately 0.6 to 1.5 Gt per year. Some of the eroded C is replaced by photosynthesis from the atmosphere, but at a cost of additional emissions, for example due to fertilizer production. The long-term fate of the eroded and deposited soil organic matter is subject to an open debate and suffers from a lack of reliable spatial information on lateral C fluxes and its subsequent fate in terrestrial ecosystems. The connection between soil C pool, GHG emissions and erosion illustrates the relevance of surface processes for the C fluxes between Earth's spheres. Accordingly, soil is now considered as mobile system to make accurate predictions about the consequences of global change for terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. This expanded perspective on soils as dynamic pool of weathering regolith, sediment, nutrients and C at the interface between the geospheres requires the analysis of relevant soil properties

  17. Electrodialytic Remediation of Pb Contaminated Soil - Effects of Soil Properties and Pb Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of soil properties and Pb distribution on the electrodialytic remediation of Pb contaminated soil. Two naturally Pb contaminated soils were compared with respect to total Pb content, Pb distribution, pH, carbonate content, clay content and organ...... a small amount of the initial Pb was mobilised at similar experimental conditions. A high buffering capacity of one of the soils, which was partly due to a high carbonate content, led to a bad remediation result....

  18. Thermal properties of soils: effect of biochar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Thermal properties (thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) have a significant effect on the soil surface energy partitioning and resulting in the temperature distribution. Thermal properties of soil depend on water content, bulk density and organic matter content. An important source of organic matter is biochar. Biochar as a material is defined as: "charcoal for application as a soil conditioner". Biochar is generally associated with co-produced end products of pyrolysis. Many different materials are used as biomass feedstock for biochar, including wood, crop residues and manures. Additional predictions were done for terra preta soil (also known as "Amazonian dark earth"), high in charcoal content, due to adding a mixture of charcoal, bone, and manure for thousands of years i.e. approximately 10-1,000 times longer than residence times of most soil organic matter. The effect of biochar obtained from the wood biomass and other organic amendments (peat, compost) on soil thermal properties is presented in this paper. The results were compared with wetland soils of different organic matter content. The measurements of the thermal properties at various water contents were performed after incubation, under laboratory conditions using KD2Pro, Decagon Devices. The measured data were compared with predictions made using Usowicz statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2006) for biochar, mineral soil and soil with addition of biochar at various water contents and bulk densities. The model operates statistically by probability of occurrence of contacts between particular fractional compounds. It combines physical properties, specific to particular compounds, into one apparent conductance specific to the mixture. The results revealed that addition of the biochar and other organic amendments into the soil caused considerable reduction of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The mineral soil showed the highest thermal conductivity and diffusivity

  19. Effect of nanoclay particles on some physical and mechanical properties of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sharifnasab

    2016-04-01

    compression and shear parameters of soil were investigated. Materials and Methods: The study was done for 2 years at the Research Institute of Agricultural Engineering Soil Dynamics Laboratory in a completely randomized design with three replications. Soil samples were used for different soil textures. Three types of soil texture, light, medium and heavy were considered. Nanoclay has a mineral base and can improve the properties of the soil. Two levels of the nanoclay containing zero and one percent of the nanoclay, 3 to 6 treatments in different physical and mechanical tests were repeated. The test specimens were prepared in triplicate test and physical, mechanical and chemical testing was performed according to ASTM standard on all models. Mesh test samples were performed by sieve and hydrometer methods according to standard ASTM-D422-98. Plastic soil properties were expressed by the Atterberg Limits, measure the ability to absorb water, soil and to a fine particle adhesion amount and type of fine particles in the soil. Psychological testing was performed to determine the extent and the paste according to ASTM-D4318-98 standard. The maximum dry density and optimum moisture content of the soil compaction characteristics are the most important soil properties such as soil density development projects are in operation. In agricultural applications, in particular for tillage, these two factors are of particular importance. In this study, Praktor standard density testing was performed on the different treatments. In this research, not consolidate Undrained (UU testing methods were used. The stress tests were done at three levels 100, 200 and 300 kPa respectively. Results and Discussion: Adding nanoparticles of clay significant impact on the size of the samples did not curve. As well as to determine the impact of nano-clay soil Plastic characteristics as psychological tests and the paste was treated on the results of these tests for different treatments and repeated ANOVA

  20. Effects of soil management systems on soil microbial activity, bulk density and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valpassos Maria Alexandra Reis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of soil management systems on the bulk density, chemical soil properties, and on the soil microbial activity on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Oxisol. Soil samples were collected from plots under the following management conditions: a natural dense "cerrado" vegetation (savanna; b degraded Brachiaria decumbens pasture, 20 years old; c no-tillage treatment with annual crop sequence (bean, corn, soybean and dark-oat in continuous rotation, 8 years old; d conventional tillage treatment with crop residues added to the soil, and annual crop sequence, 10 years old. The continuous use of no-tillage system resulted in an increase in microbial biomass and decrease in soil basal respiration, therefore displaying evident long-term effects on the increase of soil C content. The no-tillage system also provided an improvement in bulk density and chemical properties of the soil. Hence, the no-tillage management system could be an alternative for the conservation and maintenance of physical and chemical conditions and the productive potential of "cerrado" soils.

  1. Spatial autocorrelation of denitrification and associated soil properties in a restored and a natural floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; Predick, K. I.; Stanley, E. H.

    2009-12-01

    Floodplain wetlands have the potential to act as significant nitrogen (N) sinks, but restoration of these ecosystems does not necessarily increase in situ denitrification rates. We compared spatial heterogeneity of soil denitrification and its potential drivers (moisture, total N, nitrate and organic matter) in neighboring natural and restored floodplain systems of the Wisconsin and Baraboo Rivers in Wisconsin, USA. Specific hypotheses we evaluated were that restoration created soil conditions that were: (1) more uniform, (2) random, or (3) similar relative to the natural floodplain at two spatial scales (large 81 m2 plot, and small 5 m2 plot). At the larger scale, the range of autocorrelation was shorter at the restored site for 4 of the 5 soil parameters including denitrification (range = 9 m, vs. 21 m at the natural site). At the smaller spatial scale, significant autocorrelation was detected for 4 of the 5 variables at the natural site, but only 1 variable (NO3-N) at the restored site. Restoration was associated with fine-scale randomization of soil properties. We suggest that conversions in land cover, particularly if they are recent or rapid (such as restoration) may produce randomized distributions of soil resources or processes during a transition period following the conversion.

  2. Using {sup 137}Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, P. [School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom); Walling, D.E., E-mail: d.e.walling@exeter.ac.u [Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide {sup 137}Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using {sup 137}Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). {sup 137}Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil

  3. The relationship between soil properties, enzyme activity and land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błońska Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different types of land use (forest, tillage and pasture on soil properties, especially enzyme activity. Our investigation was carried out on 53 research plots with 11 plots in broadleaved forest stands, 12 plots in mixed broadleaved stands, 10 plots in mixed coniferous stands, 9 plots on tillage and 11 plots on pasture. The soil samples were collected from a depth of 0–15 cm after removing the organic horizon. Contents of organic carbon and nitrogen, pH and soil texture were investigated. Furthermore, dehydrogenase and urease activity were determined. Significant differences in the enzyme activity between forest and agricultural soils were observed, thus demonstrating that enzyme activity is influenced by the organic matter content of the soil. The highest enzyme activity was recorded in the forest soil within broadleaved stands, whilst the lowest activity was found in tillage soil, because tillage soil contained significantly less organic matter. High enzymatic activity of pasture soils is the combined result of vegetation type and the lack of plowing.

  4. Constitutive Soil Properties for Unwashed Sand and Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.; Gildea, Martin L.; T'Kindt, Casey M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. This report provides constitutive material models for one soil, unwashed sand, from NASA Langley's gantry drop test facility and three soils from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The four soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LS-DYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The four soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions discussed in the report. The unwashed sand model represents clayey sand at high density. The KSC models represent three distinct coastal sand conditions: low density dry sand, high density in-situ moisture sand, and high density flooded sand. It is possible to approximate other sands with these models, but the results would be unverified without geotechnical tests to confirm similar soil behavior.

  5. Influence of Tillage and Mulch on Soil Physical Properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. Zero tillage along with application of mulch is an important strategy for soil conservation which maintains sustainability of agricultural system. A randomized complete block design in a split plot arrangement was used with four tillage methods [conventional tillage, (CT); deep tillage, (DT); zero tillage with zone disc ...

  6. Properties, classification and agricultural potentials of the soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Properties, classification and agricultural potentials of the soils of lower Oshin river floodplains in Kwara State, Nigeria. ... Also, organic C content for topsoil was 27.5, 35.5 and 28.0 g kg-1 for OSH-1, OSH-2 and OSH-3 and its distribution within the profiles was irregular except in OSH-1 where it decreased regularly with soil ...

  7. Asymptotic Properties of Multistate Random Walks. I. Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Shuler, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A calculation is presented of the long-time behavior of various random walk properties (moments, probability of return to the origin, expected number of distinct sites visited) for multistate random walks on periodic lattices. In particular, we consider inhomogeneous periodic lattices, consisting of

  8. Micronutrient Availability in Relation to Selected Soil Properties and landscape Position in Calcareous Soils of Golpayegan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Fathi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Variety of soil reactions govern the distribution of metal micronutrients that includes complexation with organic and inorganic ligands, ion exchange, adsorption and desorption processes, precipitation and dissolution of solids and acid-based equilibria. The relative importance of these reactions depends on many factors such as soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties and the nature of metal ions. Environmental factors such as climate, physiographic position, and soil development may affect variability of some soil properties and thereby nutrient availability. The present research was conducted to find relationships between Iron, manganese, zinc, and copper availability and some major soil properties, physiographic condition and soil development. Materials and Methods: Golpayegan region is located in northwest of Isfahan province in central Iran. The mean elevation of the studied area is 1790 above sea level. Annual precipitation was about 244mm and mean monthly temperature ranges from -6 in January to 34°C in August. The soils were developed on different physiographic conditions including piedmont plains, alluvial-fan, plateaus, and flood plains belonging to Entisols and Aridisols. Soil samples (0–60 cm were collected from 98 grid points with 2000m distance in the agricultural area of Golpayegan. Particle size distribution, calcium carbonate, organic carbon, available potassium and phosphorus of the soils were measured by SWRI standard methods. Available Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe were determined by addition of 10 g soil to 20mL 0.005M diethylentriaminepentacetic‏. The solutions were shaken for 2 h at 25°C, centrifuged, filtered, and Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu concentrations were measured by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Discussion: Studied soils were developed on calcareous material and about 60% of samples have more than 20% of calcium carbonate. Available Fe ranged from 1.4 to 6.5 mg kg-1 (mean 15.8 mg kg-1

  9. Relationships between soil physicochemical, microbiological properties, and nutrient release in buffer soils compared to field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc I; Richards, Samia

    2012-01-01

    The retention of nutrients in narrow, vegetated riparian buffer strips (VBS) is uncertain and underlying processes are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that buffer soils are poor at retaining dissolved nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), necessitating management actions if P retention is not to be compromised. We sampled 19 buffer strips and adjacent arable field soils. Differences in nutrient retention between buffer and field soils were determined using a combined assay for release of dissolved P, N, and C forms and particulate P. We then explored these differences in relation to changes in soil bulk density (BD), moisture, organic matter by loss on ignition (OM), and altered microbial diversity using molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [TRFLP]). Buffer soils had significantly greater soil OM (89% of sites), moisture content (95%), and water-soluble nutrient concentrations for dissolved organic C (80%), dissolved organic N (80%), dissolved organic P (55%), and soluble reactive P (70%). Buffer soils had consistently smaller bulk densities than field soils. Soil fine particle release was generally greater for field than buffer soils. Significantly smaller soil bulk density in buffer soils than in adjacent fields indicated increased porosity and infiltration in buffers. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities showed altered diversity between the buffer and field soils, with significant relationships with soil BD, moisture, OM, and increased solubility of buffer nutrients. Current soil conditions in VBS appear to be leading to potentially enhanced nutrient leaching via increasing solubility of C, N, and P. Manipulating soil microbial conditions (by management of soil moisture, vegetation type, and cover) may provide options for increasing the buffer storage for key nutrients such as P without increasing leaching to adjacent streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and

  10. Retention of silver nano-particles and silver ions in calcareous soils: Influence of soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatpour, Samaneh; Shirvani, Mehran; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad R; Bazarganipour, Mehdi

    2017-05-15

    The rapid production and application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have led to significant release of AgNPs into the terrestrial environments. Once released into the soil, AgNPs could enter into different interactions with soil particles which play key roles in controlling the fate and transport of these nanoparticles. In spite of that, experimental studies on the retention of AgNPs in soils are very scarce. Hence, the key objective of this research was to find out the retention behavior of AgNPs and Ag(I) ions in a range of calcareous soils. A second objective was to determine the extent to which the physico-chemical properties of the soils influence the Ag retention parameters. To this end, isothermal batch experiments were used to determine the retention of Poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-capped AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and Ag(I) ions by nine calcareous soils with a diversity of physico-chemical properties. The results revealed that the retention data for both PVP-AgNPs and Ag(I) ions were well described by the classical Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal equations. The retention of PVP-AgNPs and Ag(I) ions was positively correlated to clay and organic carbon (OC) contents as well as electrical conductivity (EC), pH, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soils. Due to multicolinearity among the soil properties, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to group the soil properties which affect the retention of PVP-AgNPs and Ag(I) ions. Accordingly, we identified two groups of soil properties controlling retention of PVP-AgNPs and Ag(I) ions in the calcareous soils. The first group comprised soil solid phase parameters like clay, OC, and CEC, which generally control hetero-aggregation and adsorption reactions and the second group included soil solution variables such as EC and pH as well as Cl - and Ca 2+ concentrations, which are supposed to mainly affect homo-aggregation and precipitation reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The impact of ants on mineral soil properties and processes at different spatial scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammeraat, E.L.H.; Risch, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil dwelling ants are important soil engineers that have a large impact on the soil ecosystem. This is reflected in the alteration of soil properties by ants due to burrowing activities, the accumulation of organic matter and other nutrients in the soil, which, in turn, alters soil physical,

  12. Soil properties, nutrient dynamics, and soil enzyme activities associated with garlic stalk decomposition under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5:100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5:100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks.

  13. Soil properties, nutrient dynamics, and soil enzyme activities associated with garlic stalk decomposition under various conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Han

    Full Text Available The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5:100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C, highest concentration (5:100, and shortest duration (10 or 20 days. The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks.

  14. Influence of Different Slope Aspects on Some Soil Properties and Forest Soils Evolution (Case Study: Rostam Abad Region, Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zarinibahador

    2016-02-01

    and 1359 mm, respectively. Thus, the soil moisture and temperature regimes are udic and thermic, respectively. The physical and chemical analysis were carried out on soil samples including particle size distribution, bulk density, pH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphor and cation exchange capacity. This study was done in a completely randomized design several observational with five replications. The total of 34 soil samples were collected in the two slope aspect of the profile and all samples were tested and statistical analyzed. For the micromorphological study, thin sections were prepared from undisturbed samples. The samples were impregnated with polyester resin and later sectioned. The thin sections were prepared and analyzed in petrographic microscope equipped with polarized light. Results and Discussion: The results of multivariable analysis of variance (MANOVA and Hotteling's T2 showed that there is significant different in soil properties between two hill slopes(p≤0.01. Also, the results of t-test showed the values of pH, content of sand, sand to clay ratio and available phosphorous significantly was higher in Southern hill slope in comparison with Northern hill slope(p≤0.01. Whereas, clay content and cation exchange capacity significantly were higher in Northern hill slope in comparison with Southern hill slope(p≤0.05. Also observed micromorphological studies showed biological activity was stronger in Northern hill slope in comparison with Southern hill slope. Properties observed in thin sections of Northern slope aspect include fungal hyphae, spherical and ellipsoid excrement of microorganisms in root residual (related to oribatid mites which indicated stronger biology in Northern slope aspect soils as compare to Southern slope aspect soils. Also, more accumulates* of clay inside voids, nodules, fragmented of coating of well-oriented, micro laminated, reddish-brown clay, chamber voids in Northern slope soils toward Southern slope soils

  15. EFFECT OF SOIL PROPERTIES ON LEAD BIOAVAILABILITY AND TOXCITY TO EARTHWORMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil properties are important factors modifying metal bioavailability to ecological receptors. Twenty-one soils with a wide range of soil properties were amended with a single concentration of Pb (2000 mg/kg) to determine the effects of soil properties on Pb bioavailability and ...

  16. Soil Properties Affecting the Reductive Capacity of Volcanic Ash Soils in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, C.; Ahn, J.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic ash soils or Andisols have distinct chemical and mineralogical properties. The unique chemical properties of Andisols are due to their Al-rich elemental composition, the highly reactive nature of their colloidal fractions, and their large surface area. The soils that developed from volcanic ash on Jeju Island, Korea, were classified as typical Andisols. The soils had an acidic pH, high water content, high organic matter, and clay-silty texture. The crystalline minerals in the samples were mainly ferromagnesian minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, and iron oxides, such as magnetite and hematite derived from basaltic materials. A large amount of gibbsite was found in the subsurface horizon as a secondary product of the migration of excess Al. In addition, we found that considerable amounts of poorly ordered minerals like allophane and ferrihydrite were present in the Jeju soils. The SiO2 contents were lower than those of other soil orders, while the Al2O3 and Fe2O3 contents were higher. These results reflect some of the important chemical properties of Andisols. The chromium (VI/III) redox couple was used in the reductive capacity measurement. The mean reductive capacity of the Jeju soils was 6.53 mg/L reduced Cr(VI), which is 5.1 times higher than that of non-volcanic ash soils from inland Korea. The reductive capacity of the inland soils was correlated with the total carbon content. Such a high capacity for the reduction of soluble Cr(VI) must also be due to the relatively high carbon contents of the Jeju soils. Nevertheless, despite having 20 times higher total carbon contents, there was no correlation between the reductive capacity of the Jeju soils and the carbon content. These results imply that the reductive capacity of Jeju soils is not only controlled by the carbon content, but is also affected by other soil properties. Correlations of the reductive capacity with major elements showed that Al and Fe were closely connected to the reductive

  17. Protocol for the assessment of unsaturated soil properties in geotechnical engineering practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Houston, Sandra L; Fredlund, Delwyn G

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of unsaturated soil mechanics into routine geotechnical engineering practice requires an evaluation of methodologies that may be used for the assessment of "unsaturated soil property functions...

  18. Soil map disaggregation improved by soil-landscape relationships, area-proportional sampling and random forest implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders Bjørn; Malone, Brendan P.; Odgers, Nathan

    algorithm were evaluated. The resulting maps were validated on 777 soil profiles situated in a grid covering Denmark. The experiments showed that the results obtained with Jacobsen’s map were more accurate than the results obtained with the CEC map, despite a nominally coarser scale of 1:2,000,000 vs. 1...... of European Communities (CEC, 1985) respectively, both using the FAO 1974 classification. Furthermore, the effects of implementing soil-landscape relationships, using area proportional sampling instead of per polygon sampling, and replacing the default C5.0 classification tree algorithm with a random forest......:1,000,000. This finding is probably related to the fact that Jacobsen’s map was more detailed with a larger number of polygons, soil map units and soil types, despite its coarser scale. The results showed that the implementation of soil-landscape relationships, area-proportional sampling and the random forest...

  19. Influence of green manure fertilization on soil enzyme activities and other soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Dora SAMUEL

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural practices that improve agricultural sustainability are needed particularly for brown luvic soil. Soil enzyme activities can provide information on how soil management is affecting the processes in soil such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. Soil enzyme activities (actual and potential dehydrogenase, catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatase were determined in the 0–10, 10–20, and 20–30 cm layers of a brown luvic soil submitted to a complex fertilization experiment with different types of green manure. It was found that each activity decreased with increasing sampling depth. It should be emphasized that green-manuring of maize led to a significant increase in each of the five enzymatic activities determined. The enzymatic indicators of soil quality calculated from the values of enzymatic activities showed the order: lupinus + rape + oat > lupinus > vetch + oat + ryegrass > lupinus + oat + vetch > unfertilized plot. This order means that by determination of enzymatic activities valuable information can be obtained regarding fertility status of soils. There were significant correlations of soil enzyme activities with physical properties.

  20. Assessment of Soil Health in Urban Agriculture: Soil Enzymes and Microbial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanthi Deshani Igalavithana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban agriculture has been recently highlighted with the increased importance for recreation in modern society; however, soil quality and public health may not be guaranteed because of continuous exposure to various pollutants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the soil quality of urban agriculture by soil microbial assessments. Two independent variables, organic and inorganic fertilizers, were considered. The activities of soil enzymes including dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, arylsulfatase, urease, alkaline and acid phosphatases were used as indicators of important microbial mediated functions and the soil chemical properties were measured in the soils applied with organic or inorganic fertilizer for 10 years. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis was applied to determine the soil microbial community composition. Relatively higher microbial community richness and enzyme activities were found in the organic fertilizers applied soils as compared to the inorganic fertilizers applied soils. Principal component analysis explained the positive influence of organic fertilizers on the microbial community. The application of organic fertilizers can be a better alternative compared to inorganic fertilizers for the long-term health and security of urban agriculture.

  1. Spectral properties of random triangular matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Riddhipratim; Bose, Arup; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Hazra, Rajat Subhra

    2011-01-01

    We prove the existence of the limiting spectral distribution (LSD) of symmetric triangular patterned matrices and also establish the joint convergence of sequences of such matrices. For the particular case of the symmetric triangular Wigner matrix, we derive expression for the moments of the LSD using properties of Catalan words. The problem of deriving explicit formulae for the moments of the LSD does not seem to be easy to solve for other patterned matrices. The LSD of the non-symmetric tri...

  2. Predictive mapping of soil properties at high resolution by component wise gradient boosting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Madlene; Papritz, Andreas; Fraefel, Marielle; Baltensweiler, Andri; Keller, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Accurate spatial information on soils is crucial for sustainable usage of the resource soil. Spatial planning, agriculture, forestry or natural hazards management need high resolution maps of potentials of soils for particular functions (e. g. water storage, nutrient supply). Soil functions are derived from basic soil properties like soil organic carbon or soil texture. For many regions precise maps of basic soil properties are missing. Hence, as a prerequisite for digital soil function mapping, maps of soil properties must be created with the desired resolution. A wide range of statistical approaches (linear and additive models, external drift kriging, Random Forest) were used for this in the past. When numerous environmental covariates (e. g. hyper-spectral remote sensing data) are available the selection of the model with best predictive power is challenging. Besides the issue of covariate selection, one should allow for non-linear effects of covariates on soil properties. To handle these difficulties we used a gradient boosting approach that included besides categorical covariates linear and smooth non-linear terms of continuous covariates as base learners. Residual auto-correlation and non-stationary relationships were modeled by smooth spatial surfaces. Gradient boosting of this flavor selects relevant covariates in a slow learning procedure and inherently models non-linear dependencies on covariates during the fitting process. The restriction to linear and smoothing spline base learners retains the interpretability of the fitted predictive models. The number of boosting iterations is the main tuning parameter and was determined by tenfold cross validation. To explore the feasibility of the gradient boosting approach we mapped pH of forest topsoils in Canton of Zurich, Switzerland, at high (50 m) spatial resolution. Legacy pH measurements were available from 1200 sites in the in the forests of Canton of Zurich. Gradient boosting selected a sparse model with

  3. Influence of the Soil Genesis on Physical and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Marschalko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the influence of soil genesis on the physical-mechanical properties. The presented case study was conducted in the region of the Ostrava Basin where there is a varied genetic composition of the Quaternary geological structure on the underlying Neogeneous sediments which are sediments of analogous granulometry but different genesis. In this study, 7827 soil samples of an eolian, fluvial, glacial, and deluvial origin and their laboratory analyses results were used. The study identified different values in certain cases, mostly in coarser-grained foundation soils, such as sandy loam S4 (MS and clayey sand F4 (CS. The soils of the fluvial origin manifest different values than other genetic types. Next, based on regression analyses, dependence was proved neither on the deposition depth (depth of samples nor from the point of view of the individual foundation soil classes or the genetic types. The contribution of the paper is to point at the influence of genesis on the foundation soil properties so that engineering geologists and geotechnicians pay more attention to the genesis during engineering-geological and geotechnical investigations.

  4. The number comb for a soil physical properties dynamic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olechko, K.; Patiño, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose the prime numbers distribution extracted from the soil digital multiscale images and some physical properties time series as the precise indicator of the spatial and temporal dynamics under soil management changes. With this new indicator the soil dynamics can be studied as a critical phenomenon where each phase transition is estimated and modeled by the graph partitioning induced phase transition. The critical point of prime numbers distribution was correlated with the beginning of Andosols, Vertisols and saline soils physical degradation under the unsustainable soil management in Michoacan, Guanajuato and Veracruz States of Mexico. The data banks corresponding to the long time periods (between 10 and 28 years) were statistically compared by RISK 5.0 software and our own algorithms. Our approach makes us able to distill free-form natural laws of soils physical properties dynamics directly from the experimental data. The Richter (1987) and Schmidt and Lipson (2009) original approaches were very useful to design the algorithms to identify Hamiltonians, Lagrangians and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation especially for erosion case.

  5. Evaluation of soil conservation technologies from the perspective of selected physical soil properties and infiltration capacity of the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Dumbrovský

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates different technologies of soil cultivation (conventional and minimization in terms of physical properties and water regime of soils, where infiltration of surface water is a major component of subsurface water. Soil physical properties (the current humidity, reduced bulk density, porosity, water retention capacity of soil, pore distribution and soil aeration is determined from soil samples taken from the organic horizon according to standard methodology. To observe the infiltration characteristics of surface layers of topsoil, the drench method (double ring infiltrometers was used. For the evaluation of field measurements of infiltration, empirical and physically derived equations by Kostiakov and Philip and the three-parameter Philip-type equation were used. The Philip three-parameter equation provides physical based parameters near the theoretical values, a good estimation of saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and sorptivity C1. The parameter S of Philip’s equation describes the real value of the sorptivity of the soil. Experimental research work on the experimental plots H. Meziříčko proceeded in the years 2005–2008.

  6. Effects of Soil Compaction on Carbon and Nitrogen Sequestration in Soil and Wheat, Soil Physical Properties and Aggregates Stability (Case study: Northern of Aq Qala)

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Saieedifar; H; F. Akram ghaderi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Soil compaction has become a widespread problem in the world and it is considered as one of the main factors affecting land degradation in arid and semi-arid agricultural land. Compaction in arable soils is a gradual phenomenon that appearing over time and most important factors that influence it include: soil properties, high clay content, low organic matter, and frequency of wet-dry in the soil, impervious layer of soil, load heavy agricultural implements and soil and water mi...

  7. Physical and chemical properties of long-term salinized soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestino Ruggiero

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In some areas, particularly in the Mediterranean regions, saline water is a source of water for crop irrigation. Consequently during the time, the use of this water may cause significant modifications of the soil physic-chemical properties and plant toxicity. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the variation of soil stability index and of ECe, ESP, pH, exchangeable potassium, bulk density, soil hydraulic conductivity and water retention curve (h(θ, for a clay sandy soil, which was irrigated over 12 years with saline water. The soil stability index was evaluated by 2 methods: after wetting the sample (Water Stability Index = WSI and without the pre-wetting step (Water Stability Dry Index = WSDI. The measures have been taken at three depths along the soil profile: 0-0.30, 0.30-0.60 and 0.60-0.90 m. The saline water was obtained by adding commercial sea salt to the irrigation water with the result of a final concentrations of 0.25 (2.5 g l-1, 0.5 (5 g l-1 and 1% (10 g l-1. A non-salinized control was also included. The increasing salinity of the irrigation water increased at all the depths ECe, ESP and pH, while exchangeable potassium decreased. Assessment of soil aggregates stability without samples pre-wetting (WSDI allowed us to better discriminate among the different samples examined. Aggregate stability for each of the soil layers decreased at increasing salinity of the irrigation water. Long term salinization affected the aggregate stability of the deepest layers. The soil hydraulic conductivity decreased also, while bulk density increased. The shape of the soil water retention curve was also affected by salinity. In the salinized plots less water is relaxed within -150 ÷ -12 cm ψ range. The available water was reduced at increasing salinity. Irrigation with saline water on clay-sandy soils increases ECe, pH and ESP, all of which negatively affect the soil aggregate stability. Damage to the soil structure remarkably reduces the

  8. Physical and chemical properties of long-term salinized soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestino Ruggiero

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In some areas, particularly in the Mediterranean regions, saline water is a source of water for crop irrigation. Consequently during the time, the use of this water may cause significant modifications of the soil physic-chemical properties and plant toxicity. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the variation of soil stability index and of ECe, ESP, pH, exchangeable potassium, bulk density, soil hydraulic conductivity and water retention curve (h(θ, for a clay sandy soil, which was irrigated over 12 years with saline water. The soil stability index was evaluated by 2 methods: after wetting the sample (Water Stability Index = WSI and without the pre-wetting step (Water Stability Dry Index = WSDI. The measures have been taken at three depths along the soil profile: 0-0.30, 0.30-0.60 and 0.60-0.90 m. The saline water was obtained by adding commercial sea salt to the irrigation water with the result of a final concentrations of 0.25 (2.5 g l-1, 0.5 (5 g l-1 and 1% (10 g l-1. A non-salinized control was also included. The increasing salinity of the irrigation water increased at all the depths ECe, ESP and pH, while exchangeable potassium decreased. Assessment of soil aggregates stability without samples pre-wetting (WSDI allowed us to better discriminate among the different samples examined. Aggregate stability for each of the soil layers decreased at increasing salinity of the irrigation water. Long term salinization affected the aggregate stability of the deepest layers. The soil hydraulic conductivity decreased also, while bulk density increased. The shape of the soil water retention curve was also affected by salinity. In the salinized plots less water is relaxed within -150 ÷ -12 cm ψ range. The available water was reduced at increasing salinity. Irrigation with saline water on clay-sandy soils increases ECe, pH and ESP, all of which negatively affect the soil aggregate stability. Damage to the soil structure remarkably reduces the

  9. The effectiveness of digital soil mapping to predict soil properties over low-relief areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Zohreh; Salehi, Mohammad Hassan; Jafari, Azam; Borujeni, Isa Esfandiarpoor; Mehnatkesh, Abdolmohammad

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the ability of different digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches to predict some of physical and chemical topsoil properties in the Shahrekord plain of Chaharmahal-Va-Bakhtiari province, Iran. According to a semi-detailed soil survey, 120 soil samples were collected from 0 to 30 cm depth with approximate distance of 750 m. Particle size distribution, coarse fragments (CFs), electrical conductivity (EC), pH, organic carbon (OC), and calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE) were determined. Four machine learning techniques, namely, artificial neural networks (ANNs), boosted regression tree (BRT), generalized linear model (GLM), and multiple linear regression (MLR), were used to identify the relationship between soil properties and auxiliary information (terrain attributes, remote sensing indices, geology map, existing soil map, and geomorphology map). Root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean error (ME) were considered to determine the performance of the models. Among the studied models, GLM showed the highest performance to predict pH, EC, clay, silt, sand, and CCE, whereas the best model is not necessarily able to make accurate estimation. According to RMSE%, DSM has a good efficiency to predict soil properties with low and moderate variabilities. Terrain attributes were the main predictors among different studied auxiliary information. The accuracy of the estimations with more observations is recommended to give a better understanding about the performance of DSM approach over low-relief areas.

  10. General relationships between abiotic soil properties and soil biota across spatial scales and different land-use types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider

  11. General relationships between abiotic soil properties and soil biota across spatial scales and different land-use types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Birkhofer

    Full Text Available Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future

  12. Impact of land management on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodesova, Radka; Jirku, Veronika; Nikodem, Antonin; Muhlhanselova, Marcela; Zigova, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Study is focused on a comparison of a soil structure and soil hydraulic properties within soil profiles of a same soil type under different land management. Study was performed in Haplic Luvisol in Hnevceves the Czech Republic. Two soil profiles, which were in close distance from each other, were chosen: 1. under the conventional tillage, 2. under the permanent (30 years) grass cover. Soil sampling and field experiments were carried out immediately after the harvest of winter barley in 2008. The micromorphological images were used to evaluate the soil structure of all Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C diagnostic horizons. The hydraulic properties of the diagnostic horizons were studied in the laboratory using multistep outflow experiments performed on the undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples. A tension disc infiltrometer (with a disc radius of 10 cm) and minidisc tension infiltrometers (with a disc radius of 2.2 cm) were used to measure cumulative water infiltration under unsaturated conditions created using a pressure head of -2 cm. Measurements were performed at a depths of 5, 45, 75 and 110 cm, which corresponded to the Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C horizons of studied Haplic Luvisol at both locations. The Guelph permeameter was used to measure cumulative water flux under surface ponding conditions. The depth of the drilled well was 10, 50, 80 and 115 cm, the well radius was 3 cm, and the well ponding depth was 5 cm. Both tests were used to evaluate hydraulic conductivity (K for h=-2cm, and Ks) values. Results showed, that while properties in the Bt2 and C horizons of both soil profiles were relatively similar, properties in the Ap and Bt1 horizons were different. The fraction of gravitational pores (which may cause preferential flow) in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the convectional tillage was large than those in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the permanent grass. This influenced for instance the Ks values measured using the Guelph permeametr. The Ks

  13. Soil hydraulic properties near saturation, an improved conductivity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye; Hansen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The hydraulic properties near saturation can change dramatically due to the presence of macropores that are usually difficult to handle in traditional pore size models. The purpose of this study is to establish a data set on hydraulic conductivity near saturation, test the predictive capability...... of commonly used hydraulic conductivity models and give suggestions for improved models. Water retention and near saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured for a variety of 81 top and subsoils. The hydraulic conductivity models by van Genuchten [van Genuchten, 1980. A closed-form equation...... for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892–898.] (vGM) and Brooks and Corey, modified by Jarvis [Jarvis, 1991. MACRO—A Model of Water Movement and Solute Transport in Macroporous Soils. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Soil Sciences...

  14. Constitutive Soil Properties for Mason Sand and Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). This report provides constitutive material models for two soil conditions at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and four conditions of Mason Sand. The Mason Sand is the test sand for LaRC s drop tests and swing tests of the Orion. The soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LSDYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions they were tested at. The two KSC models represent two conditions at KSC: low density dry sand and high density in-situ moisture sand. The Mason Sand model was tested at four conditions which encompass measured conditions at LaRC s drop test site.

  15. Disentangling above- and below-ground facilitation drivers in arid environments: the role of soil microorganisms, soil properties and microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Yudi M; Armas, Cristina; Hortal, Sara; Casanoves, Fernando; Pugnaire, Francisco I

    2017-12-01

    Nurse plants promote establishment of other plant species by buffering climate extremes and improving soil properties. Soil biota plays an important role, but an analysis to disentangle the effects of soil microorganisms, soil properties and microclimate on facilitation is lacking. In three microhabitats (gaps, small and large Retama shrubs), we placed six microcosms with sterilized soil, two per soil origin (i.e. from each microhabitat). One in every pair received an alive, and the other a sterile, inoculum from its own soil. Seeds of annual plants were sown into the microcosms. Germination, survival and biomass were monitored. Soil bacterial communities were characterized by pyrosequencing. Germination in living Retama inoculum was nearly double that of germination in sterile inoculum. Germination was greater under Retama canopies than in gaps. Biomass was up to three times higher in nurse than in gap soils. Soil microorganisms, soil properties and microclimate showed a range of positive to negative effects on understory plants depending on species identity and life stage. Nurse soil microorganisms promoted germination, but the effect was smaller than the positive effects of soil properties and microclimate under nurses. Nurse below-ground environment (soil properties and microorganisms) promoted plant growth and survival more than nurse microhabitat. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Solution Methods for Structures with Random Properties Subject to Random Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    This paper deals with the lower order statistical moments of the response of structures with random stiffness and random damping properties subject to random excitation. The arising stochastic differential equations (SDE) with random coefficients are solved by two methods, a second order...... perturbation approach and a Markovian method. The second order perturbation approach is grounded on the total probability theorem and can be compactly written. Moreover, the problem to be solved is independent of the dimension of the random variables involved. The Markovian approach suggests transforming...... the SDE with random coefficients with deterministic initial conditions to an equivalent nonlinear SDE with deterministic coefficient and random initial conditions. In both methods, the statistical moment equations are used. Hierarchy of statistical moments in the markovian approach is closed...

  17. Streptococcus suis sorption on agricultural soils: role of soil physico-chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Liu, Xing; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathogen sorption on natural soil particles is crucial to protect public health from soilborne and waterborne diseases. Sorption of pathogen Streptococcus suis on 10 agricultural soils was examined, and its correlations with soil physico-chemical properties were also elucidated. S. suis sorption isotherms conformed to the linear equation, with partition coefficients (Ks) ranging from 12.7 mL g(-1) to 100.1 mL g(-1). Bacteria were observed to sorb on the external surfaces of soil aggregates by scanning electron microscopy. Using Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis, solution pH was found to have significant negative correlations with Ks. Stepwise multiple regression and path analysis revealed that pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC) were the main factors influencing sorption behaviors. The obtained overall model (Ks=389.6-45.9×pH-1.3×CEC, R(2)=0.943, Psoil organic matter, specific surface area, soil texture and zeta potential, probably due to the internal-surface shielding phenomenon of soil aggregates. Additionally, the sorption trends cannot be interpreted by interaction energy barriers calculated using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, suggesting the limits of DLVO theory in describing pathogen sorption on natural soils. Our results also indicated soil pH and CEC should be preferentially considered when modeling S. suis sorption process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of surface and subsurface tillage on soil physical properties and soil/plant relationships of planted loblolly pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Kelting; H. L. Allen

    2000-05-01

    Soil tillage can improve tree survival and growth by reducing competing vegetation, increasing nutrient availability, improving planting quality, and improving soil physical properties. The authors conducted a tillage study with competition control and nutrient amendments to isolate the physical effects of tillage on tree growth. The objectives of this study were to understand: (1) how tillage affects soil physical properties; (2) the relationships between these properties and root growth; (3) linkages between root growth response and aboveground growth; and (4) tillage effects on aboveground growth. Four replicates of a 2x2 factorial combination of surface (disking) and subsurface (subsoiling) were installed on a well-drained, clay-textured subsoil, soil located on the Piedmont of North Carolina. Disking improved soil physical properties (reduced bulk density and increased aeration porosity) in the surface 20-cm of soil. Subsoiling improved soil physical properties at all depths in the planting row, with improvements still noted at 60-cm from the planting row in the surface 10-cm of soil. Rooting patterns followed the changes in soil physical properties. Despite improvements in soil physical properties and changes in rooting patterns, aboveground tree growth was not affected by tillage. The results of this study point to the need for better diagnostics for identifying sites were tillage is appropriate in situations where fertilization and vegetation control are planned. Potential factors to consider are presence and abundance of old root channels, soil shrink/swell capacity, soil structure, presence and depth to root restricting layers, and historical precipitation records.

  19. chemical properties of soil in rivers state, nigeria *ch

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    Institute of. Agricultural Research, A.B.U. Zaria, 140pp. Allison, L.E. (1965), Organic matter. pp. 1367 -. 1378. In: C. A. Black (ed.). Methods of Soil. Analysis Part 2. Chemical and Microbial. Properties, Agronomy 9. American Society of. Agronomy ...

  20. Effect Of Tillage And Mulching Practices On Soil Properties And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the field evaluation of the effect of tillage [tilled (MT) and untilled, (NT)], mulching material [Panicum maximum (p) and Chromolaena odorata (c)] and mulching method [incorporated (b), surface (s) and no mulch (o)] on soil properties and growth and yield of cowpea (Vigna unquiculata) in 2000 and 2001 ...

  1. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to study the effects of tillage and liquid manure applications on some physical and chemical properties and also on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization potential from a meadow soil. Our results indicated that tillage and manure applications had no effect on the concentration of Cu, Mn, total ...

  2. Effect of Tillage and Mulch Combination on Soil Physical Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tillage method and mulching on selected soil physical properties and performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) was studied in rainforest zone of South West Nigeria. Treatments were 4 x 2 factorial combination of tillage methods (zero tillage, manual clearing, heap, ridge), 12t/ha dry plant residue mulch, and ...

  3. Tillage effects on soil. Physical properties and sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil physical properties and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) yield under convectional tillage (CT) and zero-tillage (Z,TJ. was monitored for 3 consecutive years in Ilorin, Southern Guinea Savannah zone of Nigeria (SGSZN). While bulk density of CT increased slightly over the years, significant decrease of 12 and 8% were ...

  4. Modification of strength properties of soil-aggregate system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    varying doses of cement is checked by conducting wetting and drying test. 2. Material and Methods. Stabilization in a broad sense includes various methods incorporated for modifying the properties of a soil to enhance its performance. It is being used for a variety of engineering works, the most common application being in ...

  5. Effects of Chromolaena and Tithonia Mulches on Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted on an Oxic Tropuldalf of southwestern Nigeria at Owo to study the effect of Chromolaena and Tithonia mulches applied at 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties, leaf nutrient composition, growth and tuber yield of white yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir). Both Chromolaena ...

  6. Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic dune soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Lafeber, P.; Janse, J.H.; Spit, B.E.; Woldendorp, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic soil bacteria may enable them to compete successfully for chitin with fungi. Additionally, the production of chitinase may be part of a lytic system that enables the bacteria to use living hyphae rather than chitin as the actual growth substrate, since chitin

  7. physicochemical properties of soil under two different depths

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR SEGUN

    PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL UNDER TWO DIFFERENT DEPTHS. IN A TROPICAL FOREST OF INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TROPICAL. AGRICULTURE, ABEOKUTA, IBADAN , NIGERIA. Oladoye A.O.. Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Agriculture, P.M.B. 2240,. Abeokuta ...

  8. Geotechnical Properties of Clayey Soil Stabilized with Cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    Dec 31, 2017 ... https://www.ajol.info/index.php/jasem and www.bioline.org.br/ja. Geotechnical Properties of Clayey Soil Stabilized with Cement-Sawdust Ash for Highway. Construction. *1. OWAMAH, HI;. 2. ATIKPO, E;. 3. OLUWATUYI, O;. 4. OLUWATOMISIN, AM. 1&2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, ...

  9. Soil Properties And Pavement Performance In The Nigerian Rainforest

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geotechnical properties of the sub-structure of the Shagamu-Ore-Benin pavement were studied in an attempt to identifying the quality of construction materials and the pavement performance. The sub-structure soil materials were collected from the field and were taken to the laboratory for particle size analysis, Atterberg ...

  10. Relevance Vector Machine for Prediction of Soil Properties | Samui ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the first, most important steps in geotechnical engineering is site characterization. The ultimate goal of site characterization is to predict the in-situ soil properties at any half-space point for a site based on limited number of tests and data. In the present study, relevance vector machine (RVM) has been used to develop ...

  11. IMPACT OF MARBLE MINING ON SOIL PROPERTIES IN A PART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    The effects of marble mining activities on the properties of soils of Igbeti marble area, Oke-Ogun,. Southwestern Nigeria were investigated. Sample plots of 10 x 10 m2 were established at 150 m intervals from the factory site up to a distance of 600 m and with a sample plot at 10 km to serve as control in four cardinal ...

  12. Assessment of Index Properties and Bearing Capacities of Soils for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Owoyemi

    determining the suitability of this soil as infrastructure foundation. Bulk samples taken from two selected locations at varrying depths of trial pits were tested for their index and shear strength properties using standard methods. Cone penetration resistance, California bearing ratio, compaction, consolidation and permeability ...

  13. Comparative study of soil physico-chemical properties under Acacia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite its relatively wide distribution in Nigeria, there has not been exhaustive evaluation on the effects of the tree/shrub on soil physicochemical properties under its canopy forsustainable utilization of the tree. Accordingly, three sitesin the semi-arid regionof Nigeria representing three plantation ages of 7, 27and 37 years ...

  14. Catenary Variation of Soil Properties under Oil Palm Plantation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catenary Variation of Soil Properties under Oil Palm Plantation in South Western Nigeria. ... There were no significant variations in the levels of extractable manganese, copper and zinc between the upper, middle and lower slopes but extractable iron was significantly higher in the lower slope due to the occurrence of more ...

  15. Weed Mapping with Co-Kriging Using Soil Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, Torben; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Andreasen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Our aim is to build reliable weed maps to control weeds in patches. Weed sampling is time consuming but there are some shortcuts. If an intensively sampled variable (e.g. soil property) can be used to improve estimation of a sparsely sampled variable (e.g. weed distribution), one can reduce weed...

  16. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties. © 2016 Her Majesty

  17. Large variation in glyphosate mineralization in 21 different agricultural soils explained by soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nghia Khoi; Dörfler, Ulrike; Welzl, Gerhard; Munch, Jean Charles; Schroll, Reiner; Suhadolc, Marjetka

    2018-01-30

    Glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) have frequently been detected in surface water and groundwaters. Since adequate glyphosate mineralization in soil may reduce its losses to environment, improved understanding of site specific factors underlying pesticide mineralization in soils is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil properties and glyphosate mineralization. To establish a sound basis for resilient correlations, the study was conducted with a large number of 21 agricultural soils, differing in a variety of soil parameters, such as soil texture, soil organic matter content, pH, exchangeable ions etc. The mineralization experiments were carried out with 14 C labelled glyphosate at a soil water tension of -15 kPa and at a soil density of 1.3 g cm -3 at 20 ± 1 °C for an incubation period of 32 days. The results showed that the mineralization of glyphosate in different agricultural soils varied to a great extent, from 7 to 70% of the amount initially applied. Glyphosate mineralization started immediately after application, the highest mineralization rates were observed within the first 4 days in most of the 21 soils. Multiple regression analysis revealed exchangeable acidity (H + and Al 3+ ), exchangeable Ca 2+ ions and ammonium lactate extractable K to be the key soil parameters governing glyphosate mineralization in the examined soils. A highly significant negative correlation between mineralized glyphosate and NaOH-extractable residues (NaOH-ER) in soils strongly suggests that NaOH-ER could be used as a simple and reliable parameter for evaluating the glyphosate mineralization capacity. The NaOH-ER were composed of glyphosate, unknown 14 C-residues, and AMPA (12%-65%, 3%-34%, 0%-11% of applied 14 C, respectively). Our results highlighted the influential role of soil exchangeable acidity, which should therefore be considered in pesticide risk assessments and management to

  18. Influence of Different Slope Aspects on Some Soil Properties and Forest Soils Evolution (Case Study: Rostam Abad Region, Guilan Province)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zarinibahador; - K. Nabiollahi; M. Norouzi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spatial variation of soil properties is significantly influenced by numerous environmental factors such as landscape features, including position, topography, slope gradient and aspect, parent material, climate and vegetation. Soil properties vary spatially in south- and north-facing hill slopes. This factor (different slope aspects) can affect the distribution of soil organic matter, the presence or absence of a layer, pH, nutrient levels, soil mineralogical and micromorphologi...

  19. A multisite analysis of temporal random errors in soil CO2 efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Alejandro; Bahn, Michael; Litvak, Marcy; Pumpanen, Jukka; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    An important component of the terrestrial carbon balance is the efflux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere, which is strongly influenced by changes in soil moisture and temperature. Continuous measurements of soil CO2 efflux are available around the world, and there is a need to develop and improve analyses to better quantify the precision of the measurements. We focused on random errors in measurements, which are caused by unknown and unpredictable changes such as fluctuating environmental conditions. We used the CO2 gradient flux method with two different algorithms to study the temporal variation of soil CO2 efflux and associated random errors at four different ecosystems with wide ranges in mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and soil CO2 efflux. Our results show that random errors were better explained by a double-exponential distribution, had a mean value close to zero, were nonheteroscedastic, and were independent of soil moisture conditions. Random errors increased with the magnitude of soil CO2 efflux and scale isometrically (scaling exponent ≈ 1) within and across all sites, with a single relation common to all data. This isometric scaling is unaffected by ecosystem type, soil moisture conditions, and soil CO2 efflux range (maximum and minimum values within an ecosystem). These results suggest larger uncertainty under extreme events that increase soil CO2 efflux rates. The accumulated annual uncertainty due to random errors varied between ±0.38 and ±2.39%. These results provide insights on the scalability of the sensitivity of soil CO2 efflux to changing weather conditions across ecosystems.

  20. [Dynamics of soil properties in forests of Rhizophora mangle L. (Rhizophoraceae) in Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arias, Luz Esther; Paolini, Jorge; Rodríguez, Jon Paul

    2010-06-01

    Biochemical and microbiological properties of soils can provide information related to ecosystems environmental status. With the aim to determine the response of microbial biomass, and enzymatic and microbial activity in hypersaline (IS > or = 55 ups) and saline (ISMargarita Island, Venezuela). During three seasons (dry, wet and transition), a total of 120 soil samples were collected from ten (5 hypersaline and 5 saline) randomly-selected sites of 1000 m2 each. Four soil samples (400-500 g) per plot were randomly collected with a corer at a depth of 10 cm using a 1 m2 quadrat; each sample consisted in the combination of 8 sub-samples (50-60 g ea.). Physical, chemical, enzymatic, biochemical and microbiological properties of soil samples were determined using standard laboratory protocols. The response of microbial biomass and microbial and enzymatic activity was analyzed taking into account spatial and climatic factors and interstitial salinity. Microbial biomass was linked to each locality conditions, and was not sensitive to seasonal or salinity differences. Microbial activity remained functionally active during the study period and presented variable responses. Dehydrogenase activity proved to be a good indicator for flooded and anoxic environments, and arginine ammonification resulted to be the more sensitive microbial activity to changes in salinity. Regarding enzyme activities, spatial variability was the most widespread response. We did not find a unique general pattern between enzymatic activities and spatio-temporal variation; and only the enzyme phosphatase was negatively affected by salinity. We conclude that microbial populations of mangrove soils and their activities have functional adaptations to flooded and highly-saline environments typical of a negative estuary, subjected to drastic changes due to weather and water dynamics. Future studies are needed to determine the relation between the "health" of mangrove forest and microbial populations, and

  1. Effects of Biochar and Lime on Soil Physicochemical Properties and Tobacco Seedling Growth in Red Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Pan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Red soil, mainly found in the southern China, is developed in a warm, moist climate. The main property of the soils is strong acidity, aluminum toxicity, and low available nutrients. In this study, different effects of biochar and lime on soil physicochemical properties and tobacco growth were determined in red soil, so as to provide a scientific foundation for soil improvement tobacco field. A pot experiment was designed and conducted at four biochar levels(0, 0.5%, 1%, 2% and normal lime level (0.3% to study effects of two different soil amendments on red soil pH, exchangeable aluminum(Exc-Al and exchangeable manganese(Exc-Mn, available nutrients and organic carbon (SOC. Meanwhile, agronomic traits, biomass and leaves elements of tobacco were also tested. Results showed that the agronomic characters and biomass of tobacco seedling had changed effectively after biochar or lime was added. Under 0.5%, 1% biochar treatment, the content of nitrogen(N, phosphorus(P, potassium(K, calcium(Ca and magnesium(Mg in tobacco leaves substantially raised. However, when 2% biochar was applied, leaves N content declined by 9.3%. Compared with the control, leaves N, P and Ca content increased observably in the lime treatment. However, its K and Mg content decreased by 9.0% and 13.3% respectively. Alkaline nitrogen(SAN, available phosphorus (SAP, available potassium (SAK, and exchangeable calcium (Exc-Ca and exchangeable magnesium (Exc-Mg were improved obviously in soil applied with biochar. Only the content of Exc-Ca was significantly increased in lime treatment. In addition, it was beneficial to improve soil pH and reduce soil Exc-Al when biochar or lime had been used. Thus, both biochar and lime are propitious to increase soil pH value, lessen soil Exc-Al content, and improve the growth of tobacco seedling. Furthermore, biochar application also can raise the content of available nutrient and SOC in red soil.

  2. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention properties across a soil-slope transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak P.; Mousli, Zak

    2000-11-01

    The hydraulic properties of soil and their spatial structures are important for understanding soil moisture dynamics, land surface and subsurface hydrology, and contaminant transport. We investigated whether landscape features, including relative position on a slope, contribute to the variability of soil hydraulic properties in a complex terrain of a glacial till material. Using 396 undisturbed soil cores collected along two orthogonal transects, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and soil water retention functions at two (15 and 30 cm) depths across a glacial till landscape in central Iowa that encompassed two soil types (Nicollet loam with 1-3% slope on the hilltop position and Clarion loam with 2-5% slope on the shoulder position). The van Genuchten-Mualem model was fitted to the experimental data using the RETC optimization computer code. At the 15 cm depth a statistical comparison indicated significant differences in Ksat, saturated water content (θs), water content at permanent wilting point (θ15,000) and van Genuchten fitting parameters (α and n) between soil types and landscape positions. At the 30 cm depth, θs, θ15,000, and residual water content (θr) were found to be significantly different across the soil-slope transition. Available water content (θ333-15,000) did not show any significant difference across the soil-slope transition for either depth. No clear directional trend was observed, with some exceptions for Ksat, θs, and α on specific transect limbs and depths. Drifts in the soil hydraulic parameters due to soil-slope transition were removed using a mean-polishing approach. Geostatistical analyses of these parameters showed several important characteristics including the following: (1) The spatial correlation lengths and semivariogram patterns of the independently measured (or estimated) loge Ksat and θs at 30-cm depth matched extremely well; (2) better spatial structures with large correlation lengths were observed for

  3. Effect of sewage sludge hydrochar on soil properties and Cd immobilization in a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Wang, Fenghua; Zhai, Yunbo; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate hydrochar as a soil amendment for the immobilization of Cd, the characteristics of hydrochars (HCs) under three temperatures and residence times, were studied, with a particular interest in soil properties, as well as the speciation, availability and plant uptake of Cd. HCs were obtained by a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) reaction of sewage sludge (SS). Based on the study of HC properties, we found that HCs present weak acidity with relatively high ash content and low electrical conductivity (EC) values. The addition of HCs to soil decreased soil pH and EC values but increased the abundance of soil microorganism. HCs also promoted the transformation of Cd from unstable to stable speciation and can decrease the content of phyto-available Cd (optimum condition and efficiency: A13,2 15.38%), which restrained cabbage from assimilating Cd from soil both the aboveground (optimum condition and efficiency: A35, 52.29%) and underground (optimum condition and efficiency: C15, 57.53%) parts of it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Millet Husk Ash Bitumen Stabilized Soil Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Abdulwahab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an investigation into the improvement of strength and durability properties of lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples were selected and treated with 0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of MHA by weight of laterite. The lateritic soil-MHA mixture was later admixed with 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 14% cut-back bitumen solution by weight of laterite. Both the natural lateritic soil, lateritic and MHA, and the blend of Soil, MHA and Bitumen were first subjected to physical and chemical analysis using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF and Scanning Electromagnetic Machine (SEM to determine their engineering properties followed by the performance test on bricks cast with varying quantities of the additives. A total of one hundred and ninety two (192 cubes were tested for moisture absorption, erodability and compressive strength tests. The result of the test showed that MHA and Bitumen acted as pozzolana in performance test on the soil blocks. Up to 30% MHA – laterite and 20% MHA admixed with 8% laterite were found to give optimum compressive strength of 10.8N/mm2 and 10.9N/mm2 for the bricks produced. The result also showed that about 50% MHA blended with 14% Bitumen solution ensured water tight bricks. Thus the use of MHA as partial replacement of cement will provide an economic use of by-product and consequently produce a cheaper soil block construction without comprising its strength.

  5. Profile soil property estimation using a VIS-NIR-EC-force probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combining data collected in-field from multiple soil sensors has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of soil property estimates. Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate many important soil properties, such as soil carbon, water content, and texture. ...

  6. Estimation of soil profile physical and chemical properties using a VIS-NIR-EC-force probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combining data collected in-field from multiple soil sensors has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of soil property estimates. Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate many important soil properties, such as soil carbon, water content, and texture. ...

  7. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes-Abellan, J.; Jiménez-Martínez, J.; Candela, L.; Tamoh, K.

    2015-07-01

    Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i) non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii) automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic). Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm). Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher. (Author)

  8. Comparison among monitoring strategies to assess water flow dynamic and soil hydraulic properties in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Valdes-Abellan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Irrigated agriculture is usually performed in semi-arid regions despite scarcity of water resources. Therefore, optimal irrigation management by monitoring the soil is essential, and assessing soil hydraulic properties and water flow dynamics is presented as a first measure. For this purpose, the control of volumetric water content, θ, and pressure head, h, is required. This study adopted two types of monitoring strategies in the same experimental plot to control θ and h in the vadose zone: i non-automatic and more time-consuming; ii automatic connected to a datalogger. Water flux was modelled with Hydrus-1D using the data collected from both acquisition strategies independently (3820 daily values for the automatic; less than 1000 for the non-automatic. Goodness-of-fit results reported a better adjustment in case of automatic sensors. Both model outputs adequately predicted the general trend of θ and h, but with slight differences in computed annual drainage (711 mm and 774 mm. Soil hydraulic properties were inversely estimated from both data acquisition systems. Major differences were obtained in the saturated volumetric water content, θs, and the n and α van Genuchten model shape parameters. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, shown lower variability with a coefficient of variation range from 0.13 to 0.24 for the soil layers defined. Soil hydraulic properties were better assessed through automatic data acquisition as data variability was lower and accuracy was higher.

  9. Zinc movement in sewage-sludge-treated soils as influenced by soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, J.E.; Lund, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A soil column study was conducted to assess the movement of Zn in sewage-sludge-amended soils. Varables investigated were soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level. Bulk samples of the surface layer of six soil series were packed into columns, 10.2 cm in diameter and 110 cm in length. An anaerobically digested municipal sewage sludge was incorporated into the top 20 cm of each column at a rate of 300 mg ha-1. The columns were maintained at moisture levels of saturation and unsaturation and were leached with two waters of different quality. At the termination of leaching, the columns were cut open and the soil was sectioned and analyzed. Zinc movement was evaluated by mass balance accounting and correlation and regression analysis. Zinc movement in the unsaturated columns ranged from 3 to 30 cm, with a mean of 10 cm. The difference in irrigation water quality did not have an effect on Zn movement. Most of the Zn applied to the unsaturated columns remained in the sludge-amended soil layer (96.1 to 99.6%, with a mean of 98.1%). The major portion of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer accumulated in the 0- to 3-cm depth (35.7 to 100%, with a mean of 73.6%). The mean final soil pH values decreased in the order: saturated columns = sludge-amended soil layer > untreated soils > unsaturated columns. Total Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.85). Depth of Zn movement was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.91). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the final pH accounted for 72% of the variation in the total amounts of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer of the unsaturated columns and accounted for 82% of the variation in the depth of Zn movement among the unsaturated columns. A significant correlation was not found between Zn and organic carbon in soil solutions, but a negative correlation significant at P = 0.001 was found

  10. The physical properties of some soil profiles and management of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical properties of some soil profiles and management of an erosion prone soil in southwestern Nigeria. ... Minimum tillage will offer great advantage when combined with surface mulch. Strip cropping, use of fertilizer of organic origin and cover crops will improve organic matter of the soil, soil stable aggregates, soil ...

  11. Effect of biochar on soil properties and lead (Pb) availability in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of biochar to soil can improve numerous physicochemical and biological properties of the soil. The method for lead metal (Pb) remediation in soil is a challenge worldwide. The excessive Pb accumulation in the soil can radically reduce the soil quality and fertility. This study was conducted to find out the efficiency ...

  12. Influence of long-term fertilization on soil physicochemical properties in a brown soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Luo, Peiyu; Han, Xiaori; Yang, Jinfeng

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to explore the influence on soil physicochemical properties under a 38-y long-term fertilization in a brown soil. Soil samples (0-20 cm)were taken from the six treatments of the long-term fertilization trial in October 2016:no fertilizer (CK), N1(mineral nitrogen fertilizer), N1P (mineral nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer), N1PK (mineral nitrogen, phosphate and potassic fertilizer), pig manure (M2), M2N1P (pig manure, mineral nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer).The results showed thatthe long-term application of chemical fertilizers reduced soil pH value, while the application of organic fertilizers increased pH value. Fertilization significantly increased the content of AHN, TN and SOM. Compared with the CK treatment and chemical fertilizer treatments, organic fertilizer treatments significantly increased the content of AP and TP. The content of AK and TK were no significant difference in different treatment.

  13. Quicklime-induced changes of soil properties: Implications for enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated soils via mechanical soil aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Dong, Binbin; He, Xiaosong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Mingyue; He, Xuwen; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Fasheng

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is used for soil remediation at sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, the effectiveness of the method is limited by low soil temperature, high soil moisture, and high soil viscosity. Combined with mechanical soil aeration, quicklime has a practical application value related to reinforcement remediation and to its action in the remediation of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. In this study, the target pollutant was trichloroethylene, which is a volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutant commonly found in contaminated soils. A restoration experiment was carried out, using a set of mechanical soil-aeration simulation tests, by adding quicklime (mass ratios of 3, 10, and 20%) to the contaminated soil. The results clearly indicate that quicklime changed the physical properties of the soil, which affected the environmental behaviour of trichloroethylene in the soil. The addition of CaO increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture to improve the mass transfer of trichloroethylene. In addition, it improved the macroporous cumulative pore volume and average pore size, which increased soil permeability. As soil pH increased, the clay mineral content in the soils decreased, the cation exchange capacity and the redox potential decreased, and the removal of trichloroethylene from the soil was enhanced to a certain extent. After the addition of quicklime, the functional group COO of soil organic matter could interact with calcium ions, which increased soil polarity and promoted the removal of trichloroethylene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy metals content in degraded agricultural soils of a mountain region related to soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Pedreño, José; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Gómez, Ignacio; Jordán, Manuel M.; Bech, Jaume; Zorpas, Antonis

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture has been practiced for long time in Mediterranean regions. Intensive agriculture and irrigation have developed mainly in the valleys and coastal areas. In the mountainous areas, dry farming has been practiced for centuries. Soils have been fertilized using mainly organic amendments. Plants extracted nutrients and other elements like heavy metals presented in soils and agricultural practices modified soil properties that could favor the presence of heavy metals. In this work, it has been checked the content of heavy metals in 100 agricultural soils samples of the NorthWest area of the province of Alicante (Spain) which has been long cultivated with cereals and olive trees, and now soils are abandoned and degraded because of the low agricultural yields. European policy has the aim to improve the sustainable agriculture and recover landscapes of mountain regions. So that, it is important to check the state of the soils (Marques et al. 2007). Soils samples (arable layer) were analyzed determining: pH (1:5, w/v, water extract), equivalent calcium carbonate content, organic matter by Walkley-Black method (Nelson and Sommers 1996), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn) extracted with DTPA (Lindsay and Norvell, 1978) and measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, and total content of metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb) measured in soil samples after microwave acid digestion (Moral et al. 1996), quantifying the content of metals by ICP analysis. The correlation between soil properties and metals. The results indicated that pH and carbonates are the most important properties of these soils correlated with the metals (both micronutrients and heavy metals). The available micronutrients (all of them) are close correlated with the pH and carbonates in soils. Moreover, heavy metals like Pb and Ni are related to available Mn and Zn. Keywords: pH, carbonates, heavy metals, abandoned soils. References: Lindsay,W.L., andW.A. Norvell. 1978. "Development of a DTPA Soil Test for Zinc, Iron

  15. Biological residues define the ice nucleation properties of soil dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conen, F.; Morris, C. E.; Leifeld, J.; Yakutin, M. V.; Alewell, C.

    2011-09-01

    Soil dust is a major driver of ice nucleation in clouds leading to precipitation. It consists largely of mineral particles with a small fraction of organic matter constituted mainly of remains of micro-organisms that participated in degrading plant debris before their own decay. Some micro-organisms have been shown to be much better ice nuclei than the most efficient soil mineral. Yet, current aerosol schemes in global climate models do not consider a difference between soil dust and mineral dust in terms of ice nucleation activity. Here, we show that particles from the clay and silt size fraction of four different soils naturally associated with 0.7 to 11.8 % organic carbon (w/w) can have up to four orders of magnitude more ice nucleation sites per unit mass active in the immersion freezing mode at -12 °C than montmorillonite, the nucleation properties of which are often used to represent those of mineral dusts in modelling studies. Most of this activity was lost after heat treatment. Removal of biological residues reduced ice nucleation activity to, or below that of montmorillonite. Desert soils, inherently low in organic content, are a large natural source of dust in the atmosphere. In contrast, agricultural land use is concentrated on fertile soils with much larger organic matter contents than found in deserts. It is currently estimated that the contribution of agricultural soils to the global dust burden is less than 20 %. Yet, these disturbed soils can contribute ice nuclei to the atmosphere of a very different and much more potent kind than mineral dusts.

  16. Soil hydraulic properties of sphagnum moss and peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The moisture state of the vadose zone (acrotelm) of ombrotrophic peatlands decisively determines whether carbon is contained in soil organic matter or released to the atmosphere. As the pore space is variably saturated with water throughout the year, oxygen diffusion, heat, and solute transport and thus the redox state are a function of water content over time. For prediction purposes, the hydrological processes must be epitomised in computer models which establish a link between the terrestrial water cycle and the carbon cycle. This requires a proper representation of effective soil hydraulic properties which are a mandatory input to the Richards equation, the standard model for variably-saturated flow processes in porous media. By applying the Richards equation to peatlands, one assumes that the acrotelm can be conceptualised as a rigid porous material. To test this approximation and select the most adequate set of soil hydraulic property functions, we conducted a series of specifically designed laboratory evaporation experiments on sphagnum moss and decomposed sphagnum peat. Sampling was carried out in five centimeter depth increments of an ombrotrophic bog profile in the Harz mountains. We selected sphagnum moss as it is a predominant plant species colonising bogs of the Boreal. Inverse modelling was used to test the adequacy of different parameterizations of soil hydraulic property functions. We used pressure head data measured by two tensiometers in the objective function to identify soil hydraulic properties. The Richards equation was used as process model. We critically assess the applicability of the van Genuchten/Mualem model, which finds frequent application in peatland hydrology, and discuss alternatives which account for (1) multimodal pore size distributions, (2) physical plausibility towards the dry end, (3) capillary and non-capillary storage and flow, and (4) isothermal flow of water vapour. Finally, our results indicate that applying the Richards

  17. Soil health: an emergent set of soil properties that result from synergy among agricultural management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The responses of a selected soil microbial property to a single agricultural management practice are often inconsistent among field studies, possibly reflecting the site-specific nature of field studies. An equally compelling explanation is that in complex systems where outcomes are the result of n...

  18. Response of the soil physical properties to restoration techniques in limestone quarries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Vignozzi, Nadia; Solé-Benet, Albert

    2016-04-01

    The devastating effects of soil erosion in mining areas from arid/semiarid environments have prompted efforts geared toward an improvement of the soil physical conditions for a fast establishment of vegetal cover. Restoration practices that increase soil moisture content are essential in drylands where rainfall is irregular or insufficient in order to accelerate ecological restoration. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of organic amendments and mulches on the soil porosity as well as their impact on infiltration, five years after the beginning of an experimental restoration from limestone quarries in Sierra de Gádor (Almería, SE Spain). Nine plots 15 x 5 m were prepared at the site in a completely randomized 2 x 3 factorial design. The first factor, organic amendment, had three levels: sewage sludge (SA), compost from domestic organic residues (CA) and no amendment (NA). The second factor, mulches, also had three levels: gravel (GM), woodchip (WM) and no mulch (NM). In each experimental plot 75 native plants (Macrochloa tenacissima, Anthyllis terniflora and Anthyllis cytisoides) were planted. Infiltration was determined from rainfall simulations and soil porosity was assessed by image analysis of soil thin sections. Total porosity and pores distribution were measured according to pore shape (regular, irregular and elongated) and size (transmission pores [50-500 μm] and fissures [>500 μm]). Natural undisturbed soils around the mine area were used as a reference soil (RS). Restoration treatments showed higher total porosity, fissures and elongated pores than RS and we observed the highest values in treatments with WM. This fact is due to the disruption caused by the application of treatments rather that a good soil structure. Each combination exhibited different values of transmission pores, being greater in the combinations of NA-GM, SA-NM and CA-WM. Infiltration increased with the increase of the total porosity, fissures and elongated pores

  19. Pedotransfer functions to estimate bulk density from soil properties and environmental covariates: Rio Doce basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil bulk density (ρb data are needed for a wide range of environmental studies. However, ρb is rarely reported in soil surveys. An alternative to obtain ρb for data-scarce regions, such as the Rio Doce basin in southeastern Brazil, is indirect estimation from less costly covariates using pedotransfer functions (PTF. This study primarily aims to develop region-specific PTFs for ρb using multiple linear regressions (MLR and random forests (RF. Secondly, it assessed the accuracy of PTFs for data grouped into soil horizons and soil classes. For that purpose, we compared the performance of PTFs compiled from the literature with those developed here. Two groups of data were evaluated as covariates: 1 readily available soil properties and 2 maps derived from a digital elevation model and MODIS satellite imagery, jointly with lithological and pedological maps. The MLR model was applied step-wise to select significant predictors and its accuracy assessed by means of cross-validation. The PTFs developed using all data estimated ρb from soil properties by MLR and RF, with R2 of 0.41 and 0.51, respectively. Alternatively, using environmental covariates, RF predicted ρb with R2 of 0.41. Grouping criteria did not lead to a significant increase in the estimates of ρb. The accuracy of the ‘regional’ PTFs developed for this study was greater than that found with the ‘compiled’ PTFs. The best PTF will be firstly used to assess soil carbon stocks and changes in the Rio Doce basin.

  20. Evaluating lysimeter drainage against soil deep percolation modeled with profile soil moisture, field tracer propagation, and lab measured soil hydraulic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Vicente; Thomsen, Anton Gårde; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    them have been reported. To compare among methods, one year of four large-scale lysimeters drainage (D) was evaluated against modeled soil deep percolation using either profile soil moisture, bromide breakthrough curves from suction cups, or measured soil hydraulic properties in the laboratory...... model using field q, and 572 mm with the laboratory measured soil hydraulic properties. In conclusion, lysimeters presented the lowest D and can be considered as a lower bound for D; whereas either laboratory measured soil hydraulic properties or models calibrated with profile soil moisture yielded....... Measured volumetric soil water content (q) was 3-4% higher inside lysimeters than in the field probably due to a zero tension lower boundary condition inside lysimeters. D from soil hydraulic properties measured in the laboratory resulted in a 15% higher evapotranspiration and 12% lower drainage...

  1. [Effect of long-term fertilizing regime on soil microbial diversity and soil property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenhua; Zhang, Caixia; Tang, Lisong; Xiong, Zhengqin; Wang, Baozhan; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Yan

    2014-03-04

    To evaluate the effect of long-term fertilization on soil microbial community and soil chemical and physical properties. Using a high-throughput pyrosequencing technique, we studied microbial community in the 0-300 cm soil samples covering a 20-year field-experiment with different fertilization applications including inorganic fertilizer alone (N 300 kg/hm2, P2O5 150 kg/hm2 and K2O 60 kg/hm2) and inorganic fertilizer combined with straw (same application rate of N and P fertilizer combined with 5.4 t straw). Actinobacteria and alpha-proteobacteria were the predominant groups in the topsoil (0-20 cm). As the soil depth increased, the relative abundance of actinobacteria decreased whereas that of proteobacteria, especially gamma-proteobacteria and beta-proteobacteria increased and gradually became the dominant groups in the subsoil (20-300 cm). Long-term fertilizing applications significantly affected soil microbial communities throughout the soil profile, and increased the relative abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea at 0-40 cm depth. In addition, agriculture management, e. g. irrigation may be an important driving factor for the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in soil profile. Total nitrogen and organic carbon contents were the most influential factors on microbial community in the topsoil and in the subsoil, respectively. Long-term fertilizer applications altered soil nutrient availability within the soil profile, which was likely to result in the different microbial community structure between the fertilizer treatments, especially for the subsoil.

  2. Novel evaporation experiment to determine soil hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel experimental approach to determine soil hydraulic material properties for the dry and very dry range is presented. Evaporation from the surface of a soil column is controlled by a constant flux of preconditioned air and the resulting vapour flux is measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The data are inverted under the assumptions that (i the simultaneous movement of water in the liquid and vapour is represented by Richards' equation with an effective hydraulic conductivity and that (ii the coupling between the soil and the well-mixed atmosphere can be modelled by a boundary layer with a constant transfer resistance. The optimised model fits the data exceptionally well. Remaining deviations during the initial phase of an experiment are thought to be well-understood and are attributed to the onset of the heat flow through the column which compensates the latent heat of evaporation.

  3. Composted municipal waste effect on chosen properties of calcareous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidpour, M.; Afyuni, M.; Khadivi, E.; Zorpas, A.; Inglezakis, V.

    2012-10-01

    A 3-year field study was conducted to assess effects of composted municipal waste on some properties, distribution of Zn, Cu in a calcareous soil and uptake of these metals by wheat. The treatments were 0, 25, 50 and 100 Mg ha-1 of municipal solidwastewhichwas applied in three consecutive years. The application of composted municipal waste increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity, the aggregate stability,the organic carbon content and electrical conductivity, whereas it slightly decreased the soil pH and bulk density. A significant increase in the concentration of Zn and Cu were observed with increasing number and rate of compost application. The distribution of Zn and Cu between the different fractions in untreated and treated soils showed that the majority of Zn and Cu were in the residual form. Finally, the levels of Zn and Cu were higher in grains of wheat grown in composttreated plots compared to that grown in the control plots.

  4. SOILS AGROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES VARIATION UNDER MEDICINAL HERBS ECOLOGICAL CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Lungu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out with medicinal herbs in the frame of a National project financed by CNCSIS through the Partnership Program. Ecologic and conventional technologies were applied. The project aimed to implement a standardization system of the vegetal raw materials which can be used in the cosmetic industry. Sage, basilicum, and savory were subject of the experiments, at Jucu, Cluj County, Ungureni – Butimanu, Dâmboviţa County, and Secuieni, Neamţ County. The dominant soils in these areas are Fluvisols and Haplic Chernozems in the Jucu area, Chromic Luvisol in the Ungureni – Butimanu area, and Calcic Chernozem in the Secuieni area. The agrochemical analysis of the soils from the experimental fields highlighted soil fertility properties conservation both under ecologic and conventional growing technologies.

  5. Effect of polyacrylamide on soil physical and hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalasmeh, Ammar; Gharaibeh, Mamoun; Hamdan, Enas

    2017-04-01

    The effect of polyacrylamide (PAM), as a soil conditioner, on selected soil physical and hydraulic properties (infiltration rate (f(t)), hydraulic conductivity (HC), soil moisture content, aggregate stability (AS), and soil aggregation) was studied. Two types of anionic PAM were used: Low molecular weight (LPAM) (1×105 g/mol) with medium charge density (33-43) and high molecular weight (HPAM) (1-6×106 g/mol) with medium charge density (33-43). Sandy loam soil was packed into plastic columns; PAM solutions at different concentrations (100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg L-1) were used every two weeks in four wetting and drying cycles. The highest infiltration rate value was 0.16 mm s-1 at 1000 mg/L low molecular weight PAM while the highest value of infiltration rate in high PAM molecular weight was 0.11 mm s-1 compared to the control (0.01 mm s-1). Soil HC was about 3.00 cm h-1 for LPAM at 1000 mg L-1 PAM, while the highest value for HPAM was about 2 cm h-1 for the same concentration, compared to the control. The amount of water that can be held by soil increased with the addition of PAM compared to the control. Differences in water content were more pronounced in LPAM compared to HPAM. The addition of LPAM increased aggregate stability proportional to PAM concentration. Moreover, 1000 mg L-1 produced the highest aggregate stability (19{%}) compared to HPAM and control (7{%} and 5{%}), respectively. As PAM concentration increased, the geometric mean diameter (GMD) increased for both PAM molecular weights compared to control (0.4 mm). At 1000 mg L-1 the GMD values were 0.88 mm and 0.79 mm for LPAM and HPAM, respectively. The addition of PAM improved soil physical and hydraulic properties, with an advantage to LPAM owing that to its ability to penetrate soil aggregates and therefore stabilizing them.

  6. EFFECT OF ALTERNATIVE MULTINUTRIENT SOURCES ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Martins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current high price of potassium chloride and the dependence of Brazil on imported materials to supply the domestic demand call for studies evaluating the efficiency of alternative sources of nutrients. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of silicate rock powder and a manganese mining by-product, and secondary materials originated from these two materials, on soil chemical properties and on brachiaria production. This greenhouse experiment was conducted in pots with 5 kg of soil (Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico - Oxisol. The alternative nutrient sources were: verdete, verdete treated with NH4OH, phonolite, ultramafic rock, mining waste and the proportion of 75 % of these K fertilizers and 25 % lime. Mixtures containing 25 % of lime were heated at 800 ºC for 1 h. These sources were applied at rates of 0, 150, 300, 450 and 600 kg ha-1 K2O, and incubated for 45 days. The mixtures of heated silicate rocks with lime promoted higher increases in soil pH in decreasing order: ultramafic rock>verdete>phonolite>mining waste. Applying the mining waste-lime mixture increased soil exchangeable K, and available P when ultramafic rock was incorporated. When ultramafic rock was applied, the release of Ca2+ increased significantly. Mining subproduct released the highest amount of Zn2+ and Mn2+ to the soil. The application of alternative sources of K, with variable chemical composition, altered the nutrient availability and soil chemical properties, improving mainly plant development and K plant uptake, and are important nutrient sources.

  7. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

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    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  8. Biological Soil Properties in Integrated Crop-Livestock-Forest Systems

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    Paula Camylla Ramos Assis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Currently, agricultural productivity and sustainable development are the desired bases for the creation of production systems. Farming for greater production and the efficient use of soil resources are at the core of modern systems. However, the way in which agricultural management and practices can change soil quality has become increasingly important. The aim of this study was to detect changes in soil biological properties caused by implementation of the integrated crop-livestock-forest system (iCLF and to identify the properties suitable for detecting changes in soil biological quality. Soil samples were collected from the 0.00-0.10 m layer in Nova Canaã do Norte, MT, Brazil, and Cachoeira Dourada, GO, Brazil, in areas of the iCLF with 1 (iCLF1 or 3 (iCLF3 eucalyptus rows and in areas of recovered and degraded pasture. In Cachoeira Dourada, in the iCLF1, samples were taken in the tree row and at 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 m from this row. In Nova Canaã in the iCLF3, samples were taken in the center row and at 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, and 12.0 m from this row. In Cachoeira Dourada, samples were taken in the center row and at 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 9.0 m from this row. All samples had five replicates. In Nova Canaã, the iCLF1 caused less disturbance in the microbial population than the degraded pasture, which was evidenced by the lower metabolic quotient and basal respiration. The sampling position in relation to the tree row had little effect on comparison of the iCLF with the degraded pasture in regard to soil biological properties. Carbon and N of the microbial biomass and the microbial quotient were the best properties for differentiating the iCLF from the degraded pasture. ICLFs have not yet led to improvements in soil biological quality in relation to the degraded pasture.

  9. Recovery of soil physical properties by green manure, liming, gypsum and pasture and spontaneous native species¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina dos Santos Batista Bonini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate usage can degrade natural resources, particularly soils. More attention has been paid to practices aiming at the recovery of degraded soils in the last years, e.g, the use of organic fertilizers, liming and introduction of species adapted to adverse conditions. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the recovery of physical properties of a Red Latosol (Oxisol degraded by the construction of a hydroelectric power station. In the study area, a soil layer about 8m thick had been withdrawn by heavy machines leading not only to soil compaction, but resulting in high-degree degradation. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with nine treatments and four replications. The treatments consisted of: 1- soil mobilization by tilling (to ensure the effect of mechanical mobilization in all treatments without planting, but growth of spontaneous vegetation; 2- Black velvet bean (Stizolobium aterrimum Piper & Tracy; 3- Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. DC; 4- Liming + black velvet bean; 5-Liming + pigeonpea until 1994, when replaced by jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis; 6- Liming + gypsum + black velvet bean; 7- Liming + gypsum + pigeonpea until 1994, when replaced by jack bean; and two controls as reference: 8- Native Cerrado vegetation and 9- bare soil (no tilling and no planting, left under natural conditions and in this situation, without spontaneous vegetation. In treatments 1 through 7, the soil was tilled. Treatments were installed in 1992 and left unmanaged for seven years, until brachiaria (Brachiaria decumbens was planted in all plots in 1999. Seventeen years after implantation, the properties soil macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity, bulk density and aggregate stability were assessed in the previously described treatments in the soil layers 0.00-0.10; 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m, and soil Penetration Resistance and soil moisture in 0.00-0.15 and 0.15-0.30 m. The plants were evaluated for: brachiaria

  10. Infrared optical properties of Mars soil analog materials: Palagonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.

    1992-01-01

    The globally distributed bright soils on Mars represent products of chemical alteration of primary igneous materials. As such, understanding the chemistry and mineralogy of these soils provides clues about the nature of the parent materials and the type, duration, and extent of the chemical weathering environments on Mars. Such clues are key in developing an understanding of the interior and surficial processes that have operated throughout Mars' history to yield the surface as it is currently observed. The generally homogeneous nature of these soils is illustrated by a variety of observational data. These data include (1) direct determination of elemental abundances by the X-ray fluorescence instruments on both Viking Landers, (2) Earth-based telescopic observations, and (3) space-based observations. Based on their spectral properties in the visible and near-infrared, terrestrial palagonitic soils have been suggested as analogs for the bright regions on Mars. Palagonites represent the weathering products of basaltic glass and as such are composed of a variety of minerals/materials. In order to gain an understanding regarding the chemical, mineralogical, and spectral properties of a broad suite of palagonites, several samples were collected from the eastern and central regions of the island of Hawaii.

  11. Chemical, Mineralogical, and Physical Properties of Martian Dust and Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Global and regional dust storms on Mars have been observed from Earth-based telescopes, Mars orbiters, and surface rovers and landers. Dust storms can be global and regional. Dust is material that is suspended into the atmosphere by winds and has a particle size of 1-3 micrometer. Planetary scientist refer to loose unconsolidated materials at the surface as "soil." The term ''soil'' is used here to denote any loose, unconsolidated material that can be distinguished from rocks, bedrock, or strongly cohesive sediments. No implication for the presence or absence of organic materials or living matter is intended. Soil contains local and regional materials mixed with the globally distributed dust by aeolian processes. Loose, unconsolidated surface materials (dust and soil) may pose challenges for human exploration on Mars. Dust will no doubt adhere to spacesuits, vehicles, habitats, and other surface systems. What will be the impacts on human activity? The objective of this paper is to review the chemical, mineralogical, and physical properties of the martian dust and soil.

  12. Changes in soil hydrological and chemical properties of vineyard soils after composted cattle manure application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes soil chemical and physical properties (organic matter content, nitrogen and phosphorus, water retention capacity and infiltration) when composted organic waste were applied in vineyard soils. The effect on soil properties after two repeated applications at a rate of 10t/ha compared with the control (without treatment) were evaluated. The analysis was carried out in vineyard soils, located in the Penedès area (NE Spain). In this area, vines are the main agricultural land use and during the last decades, important land levelling operations have been carried out to facilitate the mechanizations of the labours. After levelling, the application of organic matter is a common practice in order to increase the organic matter levels. According to SSS (1998), the soils are classified as Typic Calcixerepts, with slopes between 5 and 15%. Organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus content were evaluated in one control plot and in another plot in which successive applications of compost were done, separated between them 2 years. The changes in infiltration were evaluated using simulated rainfall, applied at 60 mm/h. The simulated rainfall consisted of 2.5 mm diameter drops of deionised water freely falling from droppers positioned 2.5 m above the soil surface. Each simulation lasted for 40 min. Runoff generated was collected at 5 minute intervals. Differences between treatments were analysed using the Duncan test. The results confirmed the beneficial effect of compost application to improve organic matter and nutrients in the treated soils. The organic matter content increased from 1 to 2.9%; Nitrogen increased from compost application. The effect on water retention capacity was significantly different after the second application. Keywords: compost, infiltration, nutrients, organic matter, water retention capacity

  13. Intelligent estimation of spatially distributed soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, F.; Friedel, M.J.; Ribeiro, G.F.; Fraser, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial analysis of soil samples is often times not possible when measurements are limited in number or clustered. To obviate potential problems, we propose a new approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM) technique. This approach exploits underlying nonlinear relation of the steady-state geomorphic concave-convex nature of hillslopes (from hilltop to bottom of the valley) to spatially limited soil textural data. The topographic features are extracted from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission elevation data; whereas soil textural (clay, silt, and sand) and hydraulic data were collected in 29 spatially random locations (50 to 75. cm depth). In contrast to traditional principal component analysis, the SOM identifies relations among relief features, such as, slope, horizontal curvature and vertical curvature. Stochastic cross-validation indicates that the SOM is unbiased and provides a way to measure the magnitude of prediction uncertainty for all variables. The SOM cross-component plots of the soil texture reveals higher clay proportions at concave areas with convergent hydrological flux and lower proportions for convex areas with divergent flux. The sand ratio has an opposite pattern with higher values near the ridge and lower values near the valley. Silt has a trend similar to sand, although less pronounced. The relation between soil texture and concave-convex hillslope features reveals that subsurface weathering and transport is an important process that changed from loss-to-gain at the rectilinear hillslope point. These results illustrate that the SOM can be used to capture and predict nonlinear hillslope relations among relief, soil texture, and hydraulic conductivity data. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Determinants of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities - soil properties or land use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansa, J.; Erb, A.; Oberholzer, H.-R.; Šmilauer, P.; Egli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi accompanied terrestrial plants since some 500 million years of their evolution and are now widespread in all continents and virtually all soils of the world. They establish symbiotic interactions with a majority of extant higher plant species including most economically important plants. They are heavily implicated in plant nutrition, plant-soil carbon cycling, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Under field conditions, AM fungi usually form multispecies communities both in the soils and in plant roots, and it is becoming well established that various human interventions like cropping, crop rotation, tillage, and fertilization may all drive changes in the community composition of these fungi and, consequently, in the symbiotic benefits to the plants. Most of current evidence is stemming from individual short and long-term field trials, and the different studies usually employed diverse approaches, limiting the comparability of results across sites. Large scale sampling designs using unified research methods across different soil types and land use systems have hardly been employed so far. However, this would be imperative to allow direct comparisons of the effects of various environmental conditions (soil type, climate) and human land use practices on the indigenous soil-borne symbiotic microbes in general and the AM fungi in particular. To contribute to filling this gap, we conducted molecular profiling of AM communities in more than 150 Swiss agricultural soils, developed on a range of parent materials, covering a wide range of soil properties such as pH value, texture, carbon content and altitude, and including highly productive fields through alpine pastures. This study indicated strong correlations between AM fungal community patterns and features like soil pH and texture, as well as some consistent shifts in fungal communities due to specific aspects of land use like tillage or fertilization. These results thus appear to

  15. Mulching as a strategy to improve soil properties and reduce soil erodibility in coffee farming systems of Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nzeyimana, I.; Hartemink, A.E.; Ritsema, C.J.; Stroosnijder, L.; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Geissen, V.

    2017-01-01

    In Rwanda, mulch is applied in coffee fields to control soil erosion. The objective of this paper is to quantify the effects of different types of mulch on soil properties and soil erodibility in coffee farming systems in three different agro-ecological zones of the highlands of Rwanda. The

  16. Influence of soil chemical properties on relative abundance of arbuscular mycorrhiza in forested soils in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    ONG, Kian Huat; CHUBO, John Keen; KING, Jie Hung; LEE, Chia Shing; SU, Dennis Shan An; SIPEN, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The effect of soil chemical properties on the diversity and colonization of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) varies among ecosystems. This study was conducted to assess and compare the abundance of AM in a rehabilitated forest and a logged-over forest soil using the most probable number and spore number methods. Glomus (71.7%-82.1%) and Acaulospora (17.4%-19.5%) were found to be abundant in both sites, while Gigaspora was found only in the logged-over forest. The abundance of AM in the rehabilitate...

  17. Heavy Metals and Physicochemical Properties of Soils in Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy Metals and Physicochemical Properties of Soils in Kano Urban Agricultural Lands. ... The mean ranges of total Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd were 4.95 – 5.99, 5.85 – 165.66, 54.03 – 57.77, 55.07 – 255.52, 42.84 – 68.12 and 0.59 – 11.81mg/kg respectively. All the values were lower than the maximum allowable ...

  18. Response of soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities to long-term reclamation of coastal saline soil, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuefeng; Pu, Lijie; Wang, Qiqi; Zhu, Ming; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Meng

    2017-12-31

    Soil enzyme activity during different years of reclamation and land use patterns could indicate changes in soil quality. The objective of this research is to explore the dynamics of 5 soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, amylase, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) involved in C, N, and P cycling and their responses to changes in soil physicochemical properties resulting from long-term reclamation of coastal saline soil. Soil samples from a total of 55 sites were collected from a coastal reclamation area with different years of reclamation (0, 7, 32, 40, 63a) in this study. The results showed that both long-term reclamation and land use patterns have significant effects on soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities. Compared with the bare flat, soil water content, soil bulk density, pH and electrical conductivity showed a decreasing trend after reclamation, whereas soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus tended to increase. Dehydrogenase, amylase and acid phosphatase activities initially increased and then decreased with increasing years of reclamation, whereas urease and alkaline phosphatase activities were characterized by an increase-decrease-increase trend. Moreover, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities exhibited significant differences between coastal saline soil with 63years of reclamation and bare flat, whereas dehydrogenase and amylase activities remained unchanged. Aquaculture ponds showed higher soil water content, pH and EC but lower soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus than rapeseed, broad bean and wheat fields. Rapeseed, broad bean and wheat fields displayed higher urease and alkaline phosphatase activities and lower dehydrogenase, amylase and acid phosphatase activities compared with aquaculture ponds. Redundancy analysis revealed that the soil physicochemical properties explained 74.5% of the variation in soil enzyme activities and that an obvious relationship

  19. Integrated Nutrient Management on Soil Properties and Nutrient Uptake by Red Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Kwada Kwaghe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were carried out during the dry seasons in (2012-2013 and 2013-2014 to study the impact of Integrated Nutrient Management on some soil properties and nutrients uptake by red onion (Allium cepa L. in Moda, Michika, Adamawa state, Nigeria. Soil samples were randomly collected and analysed for pH, EC, organic carbon, organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus before and at the completion of the experiment. Total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents of the onion bulbs were determined. There was an improvement in the fertility status of the soil as a consequence of integrated nutrient management. Combined organic and inorganic fertilizer application influenced the uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium by red onion. The highest nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium uptake by onions of 0.76, 43.82 and 2.42kgha-1 occurred when all treatments were combined. Uptake of N and K increased as treatment level increased. The P uptake was highest at lower treatment levels and could be linked to sufficiency of indigenous soil P for plant growth resulting in high P uptake with minimal addition of nutrient inputs. Integrated Nutrient Management could be adopted to improve soil fertility status and N, P and K uptake by red onions.

  20. Effect of soil type and soil management on soil physical, chemical and biological properties in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Auxiliadora Soriano, Maria; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Navas, Juan Antonio; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-05-01

    One of the objectives of organic agriculture is to maintain and improve soil quality, while simultaneously producing an adequate yield. A key element in organic olive production is soil management, which properly implemented can optimize the use of rainfall water enhancing infiltration rates and controlling competition for soil water by weeds. There are different soil management strategies: eg. weed mowing (M), green manure with surface tillage in spring (T), or combination with animal grazing among the trees (G). That variability in soil management combined with the large variability in soil types on which organic olive trees are grown in Southern Spain, difficult the evaluation of the impact of different soil management on soil properties, and yield as well as its interpretation in terms of improvement of soil quality. This communications presents the results and analysis of soil physical, chemical and biological properties on 58 soils in Southern Spain during 2005 and 2006, and analyzed and evaluated in different studies since them. Those 58 soils were sampled in 46 certified commercial organic olive orchards with four soil types as well as 12 undisturbed areas with natural vegetation near the olive orchards. The four soil types considered were Eutric Regosol (RGeu, n= 16), Eutric Cambisol (CMeu, n=16), Calcaric Regosol (RGca, n=13 soils sampled) and Calcic Cambisol (CMcc), and the soil management systems (SMS) include were 10 light tillage (LT), 16 sheep grazing (G), 10 tillage (T), 10 mechanical mowing (M), and 12 undisturbed areas covered by natural vegetation (NV-C and NV-S). Our results indicate that soil management had a significant effect on olive yield as well as on key soil properties. Among these soil properties are physical ones, such as infiltration rate or bulk density, chemical ones, especially organic carbon concentration, and biological ones such as soil microbial respiration and bacterial community composition. Superimpose to that soil

  1. The Electrochemical Properties of Biochars and How They Affect Soil Redox Properties and Processes

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    Stephen Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biochars are complex heterogeneous materials that consist of mineral phases, amorphous C, graphitic C, and labile organic molecules, many of which can be either electron donors or acceptors when placed in soil. Biochar is a reductant, but its electrical and electrochemical properties are a function of both the temperature of production and the concentration and composition of the various redox active mineral and organic phases present. When biochars are added to soils, they interact with plant roots and root hairs, micro-organisms, soil organic matter, proteins and the nutrient-rich water to form complex organo-mineral-biochar complexes Redox reactions can play an important role in the development of these complexes, and can also result in significant changes in the original C matrix. This paper reviews the redox processes that take place in soil and how they may be affected by the addition of biochar. It reviews the available literature on the redox properties of different biochars. It also reviews how biochar redox properties have been measured and presents new methods and data for determining redox properties of fresh biochars and for biochar/soil systems.

  2. Soil distribution and soil properties in the subalpine region of Kazbegi; Greater Caucasus; Georgia: Soil quality rating of agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hanauer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soils of the alpine ecosystem of Kazbegi region were investigated according to the Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating (M-SQR. Most limiting factors are climate as well as steepness, while the low nutrient supply and soil acidity can be tackled by adequate fertilization and liming practice. Inorganic or organic pollution were not detected. Soils on sediment fans as well as glacial sediments, mostly Cambisols (Humic, are characterized by a low to moderate yield potential while high-yield soils, mostly Cambic Umbrisols, can be found on volcanic plateaus. A common element of all soils is the high humus content. Actually, most of them are used only for pasture, due to poor accessibility. Soils on fluvial deposits, mostly Fluvisols, show a very high range of M-SQR-scores. Altogether, the soils of the study area have the actually untapped potential to optimize the basic supply of the local population as well as tourism also by cultivation of cereals. Nevertheless, variety trials on different soil forming substrates as well as erosion control are major preconditions for successful implementation of new cropping systems in the Kazbegi region. Furthermore, particularly rare soils, e.g. Cambisols on Tephra, should be protected.

  3. Cover Crops Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Onion Yield

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    Rodolfo Assis de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops contribute to nutrient cycling and may improve soil chemical properties and, consequently, increase crop yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate cover crop residue decomposition and nutrient release, and the effects of these plants on soil chemical properties and on onion (Allium cepa L. yield in a no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in an Inceptisol in southern Brazil, where cover crops were sown in April 2012 and 2013. In July 2013, shoots of weeds (WD, black oats (BO, rye (RY, oilseed radish (RD, oilseed radish + black oats (RD + BO, and oilseed radish + rye (RD + RY were cut at ground level and part of these material from each treatment was placed in litter bags. The litter bags were distributed on the soil surface and were collected at 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 days after distribution (DAD. The residues in the litter bags were dried, weighed, and ground, and then analyzed to quantify lignin, cellulose, non-structural biomass, total organic carbon (TOC, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg. In November 2012 and 2013, onion crops were harvested to quantify yield, and bulbs were classified according to diameter, and the number of rotted and flowering bulbs was determined. Soil in the 0.00-0.10 m layer was collected for chemical analysis before transplanting and after harvesting onion in December 2012 and 2013. The rye plant residues presented the highest half-life and they released less nutrients until 90 DAD. The great permanence of rye residue was considered a protection to soil surface, the opposite was observed with spontaneous vegetation. The cultivation and addition of dry residue of cover crops increased the onion yield at 2.5 Mg ha-1.

  4. Changes in soil properties and soil cover structure due to intensive erosion and accumulation processes in loess soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorova, Tereza; Penizek, Vit; Jaksik, Ondrej; Kodesova, Radka; Jirku, Veronika; Fer, Miroslav

    2010-05-01

    Intensive water and tillage erosion and consequent accumulation are the most important processes affecting the agroecosystems in loess regions and changing soil properties, e.g. organic carbon content, carbonate content or structure stability, and general distribution of soil units in the landscape. South Moravian loess belt, formerly covered mostly by Haplic Chernozem, is now formed by a highly diversified soil mosaic. At a morphologically heterogenous study plot (6 ha), a study on relationship between soil properties and terrain characteristics was held. DTM analysis, detailed terrain survey and laboratory analysis were the main methods adopted in the study. Three main soil units were identified: Haplic Chernozem, calcareous Regosol and Colluvial soil. The distribution of each soil unit correlates with different terrain attributes. Regosols are significatly connected to the steep slope, while their correlation with the curvature or hydrological indexes is lower. On the contrary, the Colluvial soils distribution depends mainly on values of curvature and topographical wetness index and is independent on the slope. Chernozem is related to a specific terrain position more than to any of the terrain attributes. Soil depth and humus horizon thickness vary extremelly - from 0.2 m at the erosionally exposed slopes to more than 2.5 m at the concave parts and the toeslope. Soil depth is significantly correlated with all of the tested terrain attributes except of the slope - the strongest correlation was proved in case of mean curvature, topographical wetness index and catchment area. Different degree of changes in particular soil properties results from the specificity of both erosion process and parent material character. Organic carbon content in the topsoil varies significantly. Humus is practically absent in the steepest parts of the slope where the loess is exposed. High amounts of Corg were identified in the undisturbed A horizons of the Chernozem unit. In the

  5. Impact of vetch cover crop on runoff, soil loss, soil chemical properties and yield of chickpea in North Gondar, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelash, Nigus; Klik, Andreas; Holzmann, Hubert; Ziadat, Feras; Strohmeier, Stefan; Bayu, Wondimu; Zucca, Claudio; Abera, Atikilt

    2016-04-01

    Cover crops improve the sustainability and quality of both natural system and agro ecosystem. In Gumara-Maksegnit watershed which is located in Lake Tana basin, farmers usually use fallow during the rainy season for the preceding chickpea production system. The fallowing period can lead to soil erosion and nutrient losses. A field experiment was conducted during growing seasons 2014 and 2015 to evaluate the effect of cover crops on runoff, soil loss, soil chemical properties and yield of chickpea in North Gondar, Ethiopia. The plot experiment contained four treatments arranged in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications: 1) Control plot (Farmers' practice: fallowing- without cover crop), 2) Chickpea planted with Di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) fertilizer with 46 k ha-1 P2O5 and 23 k ha-1 nitrogen after harvesting vetch cover crop, 3) Chick pea planted with vetch cover crop incorporated with the soil as green manure without fertilizer, 4) Chick pea planted with vetch cover crop and incorporated with the soil as green manure and with 23 k ha-1 P2O5 and 12.5 k ha-1 nitrogen. Each plot with an area of 36 m² was equipped with a runoff monitoring system. Vetch (Vicia sativa L.) was planted as cover crop at the onset of the rain in June and used as green manure. The results of the experiment showed statistically significant (P 0.05) on average plant height, average number of branches and hundred seed weight. Similarly, the results indicated that cover crop has a clear impact on runoff volume and sediment loss. Plots with vetch cover crop reduce the average runoff by 65% and the average soil loss decreased from 15.7 in the bare land plot to 8.6 t ha-1 with plots covered by vetch. In general, this result reveales that the cover crops, especially vetch, can be used to improve chickpea grain yield in addition to reduce soil erosion in the watershed.

  6. Effects of biogas digestate on soil properties and plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Miklós; Füleky, György

    2013-04-01

    Farming methods and food industries generate large amounts manure and other useful raw materials that need safe disposal. Following the international trends great numbers of biogas plants were opened during the last few years in Hungary. However this issue presents a number of new questions, including the subsequent use of anaerobic fermentation residues. So far we have only limited information about it's agricultural applications. Farmers and authorities are very skeptic because feedstocks are very different so the endproduct will be different, too. However, this endproduct can be applied as fertilizer. The aim of our work is to determine the effects of this product in plant-soil system. Digestate contains high amount of nitrogen which is present mainly ammonium form and this form can cause root depression and lower germination rates. Pot experiments were established with different rates of nitrogen content (80 kg ha-1N, 120 kg ha-1N, 170 kg ha-1N, and control). Maximum rates were determine by the Nitrate Directive. Soil moisture was 60% of maximum of water capacity. Digestate and distilled water were homogenized and added to 200g loamy soil. Rye-grass (Lolium perenne) was applied as a test plant. Treatments were randomized design and 10 replications. Three pot from each treatment were used to observe the germination and progress of plants. We investigated the effect of the digestate on nitrate- and ammonium-ion content of soil. The amount of nitrate- and ammonium-N of soil was determine with distillation. The ammonium-N levels increased with the doses on the first day but on the sixth-seventh day this amount totally falled down, because NH4-N transformed to NO3-N. Nitrate level increased continuously untill the tenth day, later decreased as the result of the plant and microbes consumption. The increasing doses inhibited the germination and root development of the plants. We experienced fewer roots, which were different form control.

  7. Soil Application of Tannery Land Plaster: Effects on Nitrogen Mineralization and Soil Biochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giacometti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tannery land plaster (TLP is a byproduct of lime hydrolysis of leather shavings. Its use in agriculture (organic C ≈ 17%, N ≈ 6% dm could represent an alternative to landfill or incineration, but the high Cr(III content (≈5% dm makes it necessary to evaluate the effect on soil biochemical properties. TLP was therefore added at the rates of 220 and 440 kg of N ha−1 to 2 agricultural soils and incubated for 56 days under controlled conditions. Extractable NH4 +-N and NO3 −-N, CO2-C evolution, microbial biomass-N, protease activity, and extractable Cr were monitored. The organic N was readily mineralized (>50% in the first week and a significant increase in microbial activity was measured, regardless of soil type and addition rate. Extractable Cr(III quickly decreased during the incubation. The absence of a negative impact on soil biochemical properties seems to support the use of TLP in agriculture, although further investigations in long-term field experiments are suggested.

  8. Soil properties in high-elevation ski slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippa, Gianluca; Freppaz, Michele; Letey, Stéphanie; Corti, Giuseppe; Cocco, Stefania; Zanini, Ermanno

    2010-05-01

    The development of winter sports determines an increasing impact on the high altitude ecosystems, as a consequence of increased participation and an increasing demand of high quality standards for skiable areas. The construction of a ski slope is associated with a certain impact on soil, which varies as a function of the degree of human-induced disturbance to the native substrata. In this work, we provide a description of the characteristics of alpine tundra ski-slope soils and their nutrient status, contrasted with undisturbed areas. The study site is located in the Monterosaski Resort, Aosta Valley, NW Italy (45°51' N; 7°48' E). We chose 5 sites along an altitudinal gradient between 2700 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Per each site, one plot was established on the ski slope, while a control plot was chosen under comparable topographic conditions a few meters apart. Soils were described and samples were collected and analysed for main chemical-physical properties. In addition an evaluation of N forms, organic matter fractionation and microbial biomass was carried out. Soil depth ranged between 10 to more than 70 cm, both on the ski slope and in the undisturbed areas. A true organo-mineral (A) horizon was firstly identified at 2500 m a.s.l., while a weathering horizon (Bw) was detected at 2400 m a.s.l.. However, a Bw horizon thick enough to be recognised as diagnostic for shifting soil classification order from Entisols to Inceptisols (USDA-Soil Taxonomy) was detected only below 2400 m a.s.l.. Lithic Cryorthents were predominant in the upper part of the sequence (above 2500 m a.s.l.), both in the ski slope and the undisturbed areas; Typic Cryorthents were identified between 2500 and 2400 m a.s.l., while Inceptisols were predominant between 2400 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Chemical-physical properties will be discussed focusing on the main differences between ski slope and undisturbed soils, as determined by the ski slope construction. Pedogenetic processes at high altitude are

  9. Mechanisms of inorganic nitrous oxide production in soils during nitrification and their dependence on soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    the nitrification intermediate NH2OH. N2O emissions during nitrification could then be explained as a function of nitrification rate and a combination of soil properties. However, further research is necessary to consolidate this relationship.

  10. Development of soil properties and nitrogen cycling in created wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K.L.; Ahn, C.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitigation wetlands are expected to compensate for the loss of structure and function of natural wetlands within 5–10 years of creation; however, the age-based trajectory of development in wetlands is unclear. This study investigates the development of coupled structural (soil properties) and functional (nitrogen cycling) attributes of created non-tidal freshwater wetlands of varying ages and natural reference wetlands to determine if created wetlands attain the water quality ecosystem service of nitrogen (N) cycling over time. Soil condition component and its constituents, gravimetric soil moisture, total organic carbon, and total N, generally increased and bulk density decreased with age of the created wetland. Nitrogen flux rates demonstrated age-related patterns, with younger created wetlands having lower rates of ammonification, nitrification, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification potential than older created wetlands and natural reference wetlands. Results show a clear age-related trajectory in coupled soil condition and N cycle development, which is essential for water quality improvement. These findings can be used to enhance N processing in created wetlands and inform the regulatory evaluation of mitigation wetlands by identifying structural indicators of N processing performance.

  11. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  12. Estimation of Soil Electrical Properties in a Multilayer Earth Model with Boundary Element Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Islam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient model for estimation of soil electric resistivity with depth and layer thickness in a multilayer earth structure. This model is the improvement of conventional two-layer earth model including Wenner resistivity formulations with boundary conditions. Two-layer soil model shows the limitations in specific soil characterizations of different layers with the interrelationships between soil apparent electrical resistivity (ρ and several soil physical or chemical properties. In the multilayer soil model, the soil resistivity and electric potential at any points in multilayer anisotropic soil medium are expressed according to the variation of electric field intensity for geotechnical investigations. For most soils with varying layers, multilayer soil resistivity profile is therefore more suitable to get soil type, bulk density of compacted soil and to detect anomalous materials in soil. A boundary element formulation is implemented to show the multilayer soil model with boundary conditions in soil resistivity estimations. Numerical results of soil resistivity ratio and potential differences for different layers are presented to illustrate the application, accuracy, and efficiency of the proposed model. The nobility of the research is obtaining multilayer soil characterizations through soil electric properties in near surface soil profile.

  13. The influence of stony soil properties on water dynamics modeled by the HYDRUS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváčiková Hana

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Stony soils are composed of two fractions (rock fragments and fine soil with different hydrophysical characteristics. Although stony soils are abundant in many catchments, their properties are still not well understood. This manuscript presents an application of the simple methodology for deriving water retention properties of stony soils, taking into account a correction for the soil stoniness. Variations in the water retention of the fine soil fraction and its impact on both the soil water storage and the bottom boundary fluxes are studied as well. The deterministic water flow model HYDRUS-1D is used in the study. The results indicate that the presence of rock fragments in a moderate-to-high stony soil can decrease the soil water storage by 23% or more and affect the soil water dynamics. Simulated bottom fluxes increased or decreased faster, and their maxima during the wet period were larger in the stony soil compared to the non-stony one.

  14. Integrating soil physical and biological properties in contrasting tillage systems in organic and conventional farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crittenden, S.J.; Goede, de R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Though soil physical and soil biological properties are intrinsically linked in the soil environment they are often studied separately. This work adds value to analyses of soil biophysical quality of tillage systems under organic and conventional farming systems by correlating physical and

  15. The impact of cement kiln dust on soil Physico-chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cement kiln dust on selected soil physico-chemical properties after 25 years of cement production by the Benue cement factory in Gboko, Nigeria were evaluated by comparing the cement-dust affected soils with non-affected soils. The study showed that at both soil depths of 0-20 and 20-40 cm exchangeable ...

  16. Statistical analyses of variability in properties of soils in gully erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study involved the statistical analyses of variability of soil with depth and its influence on gully development. The soil data were obtained from field study and laboratory analyses. The statistical analyses of soil data were performed on soil index properties using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results of the ...

  17. Plasmonic modes and extinction properties of a random nanocomposite cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We study the properties of surface plasmon-polariton waves of a random metal-dielectric nanocomposite cylinder, consisting of bulk metal embedded with dielectric nanoparticles. We use the Maxwell-Garnett formulation to model the effective dielectric function of the composite medium and show that there exist two surface mode bands. We investigate the extinction properties of the system, and obtain the dependence of the extinction spectrum on the nanoparticles’ shape and concentration as well as the cylinder radius and the incidence angle for both TE and TM polarization.

  18. Physical, chemical and biological properties of the soil of four crops systems in a farm at Guamuhaya Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo N. González Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the physical, chemical and biological soil properties of the soil in four crops systems in a typical agroecosystem mountain conditions,on a farm in conversion to ecological production in the Massif Guamuhaya, Cuba, where predominant redferrous soil leachate. We worked with a completely randomized design of four replicates and four treatments consisting Coffee Systems crops, pine, various crops (grains, tubers and vegetables and vegetation transition to natural forest. The following variables were valued: Factor structure, stable aggregates in water, pH, phosphorus, potassium, organic matter, mesofauna and macrofauna. The soil devoted to coffee showed the best physical properties no difference with the transition to natural forest; although it had low levels of phosphorus, potassium and organic matter. , demonstrating a relatively high level in the indicators of biodiversity of the macro and mesofauna, while that of transition toward the natural forest manifested the best properties. The soil devoted to various crops, said intermediate properties relative to the rest while the pine, the highest level of organic matter but with deterioration of other properties.

  19. Soil Properties of USSR Strategic Areas. Volume I. Soil Property Comparisons for Selected USSR and U.S. Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    8 - Kazakh ; Volume 1 - Far East; Volume 12 - Central Siberia; Volume 13 - Northwest and Central Regions of Non-Chernozem Zones of the RSFSR; Volume 14...CONTINUED) Fedorin, Y. V., Soils of Kazakh SSR: The North-Kazakhstan Region, Academy of Sciences of the Kazakh SSR - Institute of Soil Science, 1960...17 Loess & loess-like loam 0.0040 0.0017-0.0059 6 Blanket loam & clay 0.0030 0.0027-0.0034 2 Chernozem 0.0062 0.0024-0.0090 4 Tundra 0.0060 0.0053

  20. Influence of microbiological soil-treatment preparations on selected properties of soil and its enzymatic activity in the conditions of replantation

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Zydlik; Zofia Zydlik

    2016-01-01

    The research covered the influence of three microbiological preparations on the change of soil physico-chemical and biological parameters (activity of soil enzymes), as well as the contents of macro-components (N, P, K, Mg) in the conditions of a replant disease occurrence. Two types of soil were used in the experiment: soil used for 30 years in horticulture (replanted soil) and soil of optimum properties ready for horticultural planting (virgin soil). Both types of soil were treated with mic...

  1. Effect of tree species and soil properties on nutrient immobilization in the forest floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Vejre, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tree species and soil properties on organic matter accumulation and associated nutrients, an area-based sampling of the forest floor was carried out in a 28 years old species trial including Norway spruce, Douglas fir, beech, and common oak at two sites, a poor...... IMMOBILIZATION; SOIL PROPERTIES; SOIL SOLUTION; TREE SPECIES...

  2. Effects of pine sawdust, hardwood sawdust, and peat on bareroot soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Koll; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of three organic amendments on soil properties and seedling growth at the USDA Forest Service JW Toumey Nursery in Watersmeet, MI. Pine sawdust (red pine, Pinus resinosa), hardwood sawdust (maple [Acer spp.] and aspen [Populus spp.]), and peat were individually incorporated into a loamy sand nursery soil in August 2006, and soil properties...

  3. Relative effects of slow adsorption or fixation and changing soil properties on the immobilisation of {sup 137}Cs in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, S.; Wang, G. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiose 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2004-07-01

    It is generally accepted that {sup 137}Cs undergoes an initial rapid adsorption reaction with soil, followed by a slower long term reaction. With time adsorption increases and the reversibility of adsorption decreases, a phenomenon known as fixation or aging. However most experimental studies do not distinguish between ongoing reaction of {sup 137}Cs with soil and changing soil properties that may influence soil affinity for caesium. We have incubated soil at two moisture contents (flooded, to induce anaerobic conditions or moist) for up to 4 months. During this period changes in pH and Eh have been monitored and samples destructively sampled to follow the disappearance of {sup 137}Cs from soil solution and the extractability of adsorbed {sup 137}Cs. The evolution of exchangeable and solution phase potassium and ammonium and the Cs adsorption properties of initially non contaminated soil, incubated under the same conditions is also reported. Flooded soils became rapidly reducing, with little change in pH and an increase in ammonium content. The{sup 137}Cs activity concentration in flooded soils remained larger than in aerated soils. There was good general agreement between Kd values calculated from soil solution extracted by centrifugation and by extracting {sup 137}Cs in CaCl{sub 2} solution, indicating that adsorption is largely reversible. There was no marked change in reversibility over time. Kd calculated from soil solution data was underestimated at short incubation times (<1 week) probably due to slow access of {sup 137}Cs to adsorption sites within soil aggregates. The Kd values of {sup 137}Cs on soil incubated prior to contamination then air-dried also increased with time, particularly for flooded soils, indicating increasing affinity of the soil for {sup 137}Cs. Decreasing {sup 137}Cs activity concentration in soil solution cannot therefore be attributed to ongoing adsorption alone. (author)

  4. Influence of relief and vegetation on soil properties in a disturbed chernozem soil landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Thomas; Hirsch, Florian; Vasserman, Oleksandr; Raab, Alexandra; Naeth, Anne

    2017-04-01

    In central and southeastern Alberta, chernozems dominate the soil landscape and are divided into several groups that follow the climate gradient from Northwest to Southeast: Dark Grey Chernozems, Black Chernozems, Dark Brown Chernozems; Brown Chernozems. Principles controlling development and distribution of these chernozem subtypes along the ecotone transect are quite well known. However, intensive land use over the last century has affected soils that originally have formed under natural conditions during the Holocene in more than 10,000 years. There is a lack of knowledge regarding soil development in these landscapes on the decadal to centennial time scale. Within this time frame the most important factor of soil formation may be relief, although this has not been properly studied. This study aims to compare soil properties in a typical chernozem landscape where soils have been highly disturbed and parent materials have been re-arranged by surface coal mining. We hypothesize that within 50 years, soils develop with significant differences based on vegetation type and slope aspect. Our study site is the former Diplomat Mine near Forestburg, Alberta where spoils form a small scale ridge and graben topography. The south facing slopes of the piles are covered by grassland, whereas on the north exposition has trees and shrubs. Samples were taken from six sites with differences in topography and vegetation type. Diplomate T1 is at the top of the ridge with grassland, Diplomate S1 is on the southern slope with grassland, Diplomate N1 is on the northern slope with trees, and Diplomate N2 is on the northern slope with shrubs. For comparison we took samples from two sites without slope aspect. One site was an undisturbed grassland (Diplomate Z1) and the other sites were reclaimed piles (Diplomate R1). At each site, five soil profiles were examined and volumetrically sampled (250 cm3 steel ring) in steps of five centimeters to a depth of 30 centimeters. We present first

  5. Sorption of samarium in soils: influence of soil properties and Sm concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    sorption assays. Univariate and multivariate regressions between K{sub d} ({sup 151}Sm) values and the aforementioned soil properties were performed in order to identify the soil properties affecting Sm sorption and to propose models for the estimation of K{sub d} (Sm) values. To determine the influence of Sm concentration in the sorption capacity of soils, sorption isotherms were constructed by applying the above explained sorption test to several soil samples, but labelling with different initial concentrations of stable Sm. Structural analyses (XRD and SEM-EDX) of residues resulting from sorption assays were also done to obtain information to elucidate the sorption mechanisms. The sorption data were fitted to Freundlich and/or Langmuir equations and the corresponding parameters were derived. Finally, K{sub d} values obtained for stable Sm at initial low concentrations (Sm ≅ 10{sup -5} M) and for {sup 151}Sm (Sm ≅ 10{sup -10} M) were compared in order to check the suitability of using the stable Sm isotope instead of Sm radioisotopes in sorption studies. (authors)

  6. Soil properties evolution after irrigation with reclaimed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, M.; González-Naranjo, V.; de Miguel, A.; Martínez-Hernández, V.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many arid and semi-arid countries are forced to look for new and alternative water sources. The availability of suitable quality water for agriculture in these regions often is threatened. In this context of water scarcity, the reuse of treated wastewater for crop irrigation could represent a feasible solution. Through rigorous planning and management, irrigation with reclaimed water presents some advantages such as saving freshwater, reducing wastewater discharges into freshwater bodies and decreasing the amount of added fertilizers due to the extra supply of nutrients by reclaimed water. The current study, which involves wastewater reuse in agriculture, has been carried out in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Sevile, Spain). Here, two survey parcels equally designed have been cultivated with Jatropha curcas L, a bioenergetic plant and a non-interfering food security crop. The only difference between the two parcels lies on the irrigation water quality: one is irrigated with groundwater and another one with reclaimed water. The main aim of this study focuses on analysing the outstanding differences in soil properties derived from irrigation with two water qualities, due to their implications for plant growth. To control and monitor the soil variables, soil samples were collected before and after irrigation in the two parcels. pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+), kjeldahl nitrogen, organic matter content and nutrients (boron, phosphorus, nitrogen, potassium) were measured. Data were statistically analyzed using the R package. To evaluate the variance ANOVA test was used and to obtain the relations between water quality and soil parameters, Pearson correlation coefficient was computed. According to other authors, a decrease in the organic matter content and an increase of parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity and some exchangeable cations were expected. To date and after

  7. Soil Chemical Properties and Soybean Yield Due to Application of Biochar and Compost of Plant Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junita Barus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance to return organic matter to the soil has been widely recognized, especially to agricultural lands that are low in organic matter and nutrients contents that will decrease the productivity of food crops. This study aimed to study the effect of biochar (rice husk and corn cob biochar and straw compost on soil chemical properties and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. The experiments were done in the laboratory and the field experiment at February–July 2015. The first study was laboratory test using a randomized block designwith three replicates. Soil samples were ground and sieved to obtain the less than 4 mm fraction for the incubation experiment. A five kg soil was mixtured with amandement treatments (A: control; B: Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 ; C: corn cob 10 Mg ha-1; D: straw compost 10 Mg ha-1; and E. Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 ; F. corn cob biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 were filled into plastic pots. The treatments were incubated for 1 and 2 months. Soil samples measured were pH, Organic-C, Total-N, P2O5 (Bray-1, K2O (Morgan, Na, Ca, Mg, S, and CEC. The field experiment was conducted at Sukaraja Nuban Village, Batanghari Nuban sub district, East Lampung Regency. The treatments (similar too laboratory experiment were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Plot size was 10 m× 20 m, and soybean as crop indicators. The parameters observed were plant heigh, number of branches , number of pods per plant , number of seeds per plant, grain weight, and stover. The results of laboratory experiment showed that application of biochar and compost improve soil fertility due to the increase in soil pH and nutrient availability for plant especially P2O5 and K2O available. The treatment of a rice husk biochar and compost mixture was better than single application to improve soil fertility and soybean yield. Apllication mixture husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1and straw compost 10

  8. Soil Chemical Properties and Soybean Yield Due to Application Biochar and Compost of Plant Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junita Barus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available he importance to return organic matter to the soil has been widely recognized, especially to agricultural lands that are low in organic matter and nutrients contents that will decrease the productivity of food crops. This study aimed to study the effect of biochar (rice husk and corn cob biochar and straw compost on soil chemical properties and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. The experiments were done in the laboratory and the field experiment at February–July 2015. The first study was laboratory test using a randomized block design with three replicates. Soil samples were ground and sieved to obtain the less than 4 mm fraction for the incubation experiment. A five kg soil was mixtured with amandement treatments (A: control; B: Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 ; C: corn cob 10 Mg ha-1; D: straw compost 10 Mg ha-1; and E. Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 ; F. corn cob biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 were filled into plastic pots. The treatments were incubated for 1 and 2 months. Soil samples measured were pH, Organic-C, Total-N, P2O5 (Bray-1, K2O (Morgan, Na, Ca, Mg, S, and CEC. The field experiment was conducted at Sukaraja Nuban Village, Batanghari Nuban sub district, East Lampung Regency. The treatments (similar too laboratory experiment were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Plot size was 10 m × 20 m, and soybean as crop indicators. The parameters observed were plant heigh, number of branches , number of pods per plant , number of seeds per plant, grain weight, and stover. The results of laboratory experiment showed that application of biochar and compost improve soil fertility due to the increase in soil pH and nutrient availability for plant especially P2O5 and K2O available. The treatment of a rice husk biochar and compost mixture was better than single application to improve soil fertility and soybean yield. Apllication mixture husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1and straw compost

  9. Effect of land management on soil properties in flood irrigated citrus orchards in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morugán-Coronado, A.; García-Orenes, F.; Cerdà, A.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land management greatly affects soil properties. Microbial soil communities are the most sensitive and rapid indicators of perturbations in land use and soil enzyme activities are sensitive biological indicators of the effects of soil management practices. Citrus orchards frequently have degraded soils and this paper evaluates how land management in citrus orchards can improve soil quality. A field experiment was performed in an orchard of orange trees (Citrus Sinensis) in the Alcoleja Experimental Station (Eastern Spain) with clay-loam agricultural soils to assess the long-term effects of herbicides with inorganic fertilizers (H), intensive ploughing and inorganic fertilizers (P) and organic farming (O) on the soil microbial properties, and to study the relationship between them. Nine soil samples were taken from each agricultural management plot. In all the samples the basal soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, available potassium, aggregate stability, cation exchange capacity, pH, texture, macronutrients (Na, Ca and Mg), micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu), calcium carbonate equivalent, calcium carbonate content of limestone and enzimatic activities (urease, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase) were determined. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial properties, which were highly associated with soil organic matter content. The management practices including herbicides and intensive ploughing had similar results on microbial soil properties. O management contributed to an increase in the soil biology quality, aggregate stability and organic matter content.

  10. Biophysical properties as determinants for soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in grassland salinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengchen; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Han, Huibang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Grassland salinization causes considerable changes to soil and vegetation, which can lead to changes in soil organic carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N). These changes have complex causal relationships. A significant correlation between soil organic C and total N and any soil or vegetation property does not necessarily imply a significant direct effect of the property on soil organic C and total N. In this study, a field survey was conducted to investigate the changes in soil organic C and total N in grassland along a salinity gradient in Hexi corridor, China, and the direct and indirect effects of soil and vegetation properties on both stocks were quantified using a path analysis approach. Significant decrease in soil organic C and total N contents were observed with increasing salinity. Both had significant positive correlations with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), soil water, and fine particles (silt+clay) content (psoil EC, and sand content (pNDVI, fine particles content and soil water content had positive direct effects on soil organic C and total N stocks. Soil EC affected soil organic C and total N stocks mainly through its indirect negative effect on NDVI, soil texture, and water content. NDVI, soil texture, and moisture also indirectly affected soil organic C and total N stocks via changes in each other. These indirect effects augmented each other, although in some cases indirect effects worked in opposing directions.

  11. Measurement of thermal properties of soil and concrete samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagola, Maria Alberdi; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Madsen, Søren

    Centrum Pæle A/S, Aalborg University, VIA University College and INSERO Horsens are partners in an industrial PhD project within the field of shallow geothermal energy systems based on pile heat exchangers. Pile heat exchangers, also known as energy piles, are thermally active building foundation...... elements with embedded geothermal pipes fixed to the steel reinforcement in which a circulating fluid exchanges heat with the pile and the surrounding soil. As such, the foundation of the building both serves as a structural component and a heating/cooling supply element. The thermal properties of the pile...

  12. In Situ Geophysical Investigation to Evaluate Dynamic Soil Properties at Success Dam, California

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liopis, Jose

    1997-01-01

    ...) velocities of the dam and foundation. The S-wave values are used in conjunction with conventional field and laboratory soil testing methods to provide soil property values for an earthquake analysis of the dam and foundation...

  13. Global Data Set of Derived Soil Properties, 0.5-Degree Grid (ISRIC-WISE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Inventory of Soil Emission Potentials (WISE) database was used to generate a series of uniform data sets of derived soil properties for each of the 106...

  14. SAFARI 2000 Derived Soil Properties, 0.5-Deg (ISRIC-WISE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The data set consists of a southern African subset of the ISRIC-WISE global data set of derived soil properties. The World Inventory of Soil Emission...

  15. Global Data Set of Derived Soil Properties, 0.5-Degree Grid (ISRIC-WISE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The World Inventory of Soil Emission Potentials (WISE) database was used to generate a series of uniform data sets of derived soil properties for each of...

  16. The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Aly, Adel; Ladisa, Gaetano; Calabrese, Generosa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards Madzaric S., Aly A., Ladisa G. and Calabrese G. The loss of natural plant cover due to the inappropriate soil cover management is often a decisive factor for soil degradation in Mediterranean area. This accompanied with typical climate, characterized by cool, wet winters and hot and dry summers leads to soil erosion and loss of productivity. Due to simplification of agricultural practice and to the attempt to decrease cost of production, keeping soil bare is a widespread agricultural practice in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards (AOOs). The consequences of this are degradation of soil quality and reduction of plant biodiversity. In last year's some alternative practices are proposed in order to protect soil and biodiversity. One of these practices is the "grassing" i.e. covering the soil by selected autochthonous plant species. Objectives of our study are: (1) to evaluate impact of different soil cover management practices on soil properties and plant biodiversity in AOOs and (2) to define a minimum indicators' set (Minimum Data Set - MDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of different agricultural practices in environmental performance of AOOs. A comparison was carried on considering two management systems (conventional vs. organic) and three agricultural practices: conventional with bare soil (CON), organic with soil covered by selected autochthonous species (MIX) and organic left to the native vegetation (NAT). In general a clear positive influence of organic management system was recognized. Some soil quality indicators (physical, chemical and biological) showed responsiveness in describing the effects of management system and agricultural practices on soil properties. The both approaches with vegetation cover on the soil surface (either sowing of mixture or soil left to the natural plant cover) performed better than

  17. Relationships between soil properties and toxicity of copper and nickel to bok choy and tomato in Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2013-10-01

    The toxicity of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) to bok choy and tomato shoot growth was investigated in a wide range of Chinese soils with and without leaching with artificial rainwater. The results showed that the variations of Ni toxicity induced by soil properties were wider than those of Cu toxicity to both tomato and bok choy plant growth. Leaching generally decreased the toxicity of Cu and Ni added to soils, which also depended on soils, metals, and test plant species. Soil factors controlling metal phytotoxicity were found to be soil pH and soil organic carbon content for Cu, and soil pH for Ni. It was also found that soil pH had stronger effects on Ni toxicity than on Cu toxicity. Predictive toxicity models based on these soil factors were developed. These toxicity models for Cu and Ni toxicity to tomato plant growth were validated using an independent data set for European soils. These models could be applied to predict the Cu and Ni phytotoxicity in not only Chinese soils but also European soils. © 2013 SETAC.

  18. Impact of forest vegetation on soil characteristics: a correlation between soil biological and physico-chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, L R; Gupta, S; Pande, V; Singh, N

    2016-12-01

    Temperate and dry deciduous forest covers major portion of terrestrial ecosystem in India. The two forest types with different dominant tree species differ in litter quality and root exudates, thereby exerting species-specific impact on soil properties and microbial activity. This study aims to examine the influence of forest type or dominant tree species on soil physico-chemical properties and its relationship with microbial characters in temperate and dry deciduous forest types. We assessed soil physico-chemical properties among five different sites located within the selected forest stand covered by different dominant species. The soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), nitrogen (MBN) and phosphorous (MBP) were recorded high in oak soil, i.e., the MBC/TOC ratio was significantly higher in dry deciduous forest. Basal respiration was recorded highest at oak-mixed soil while qCO2 was comparatively high in oak soil. Temperate forest displayed the highest MBC/MBN ratio, while dry deciduous forest had the highest MBC/MBP ratio. Moreover, the MBN/TN ratio was found high in dry deciduous forest, whereas MBP/TP ratio was high in temperate forest. Additionally, the enzyme activities were significantly higher in an oak-mixed soil among all the sites. The results displayed that the soil microbial characters and soil physico-chemical uniqueness are interrelated, and were significantly influenced by specific forest type and climatic variables.

  19. Effects of land use changes on the dynamics of selected soil properties in northeast Wellega, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adugna, Alemayehu; Abegaz, Assefa

    2016-02-01

    Land use change can have negative or positive effects on soil quality. Our objective was to assess the effects of land uses changes on the dynamics of selected soil physical and chemical properties. Soil samples were collected from three adjacent soil plots under different land uses, namely forestland, grazing land, and cultivated land at 0-15 cm depth. Changes in soil properties on cultivated and grazing land were computed and compared to forestland, and ANOVA (analysis of variance) was used to test the significance of the changes. Sand and silt proportions, soil organic content, total nitrogen content, acidity, cation exchange capacity, and exchangeable Ca2+ content were higher in forestlands. Exchangeable Mg2+ was highest in grazing land, while clay, available phosphorous, and exchangeable K+ were highest in cultivated land. The percentage changes in sand, clay, soil organic matter, cation exchange capacity, and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ were higher in cultivated land than in grazing land and forestland. In terms of the relation between soil properties, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, and exchangeable Ca2+ were strongly positively correlated with most of soil properties, while available phosphorous and silt have no significant relationship with any of the other considered soil properties. Clay has a negative correlation with all soil properties. Generally, cultivated land has the least concentration of soil physical and chemical properties except clay and available phosphorous, which suggests an increasing degradation rate in soils of cultivated land. So as to increase soil organic matter and other nutrients in the soil of cultivated land, the integrated implementation of land management through compost, cover crops, manures, minimum tillage, crop rotation, and liming to decrease soil acidity are suggested.

  20. A review of the impacts of degradation threats on soil properties in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Gregory; Ritz, Karl; McGrath, S.P.; Quinton, J.N.; Goulding, K.W.T.; Jones, R.J.A.; Harris, J.A.; Bol, R.; Wallace, P; Pilgrim, E.S.; Whitmore, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract National governments are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of their soil resources and are shaping strategies accordingly. Implicit in any such strategy is that degradation threats and their potential effect on important soil properties and functions are defined and understood. In this paper, we aimed to review the principal degradation threats on important soil properties in the UK, seeking quantitative data where possible. Soil erosion results in the removal of importan...

  1. Exploring functional relationships between post-fire soil water repellency, soil structure and physico-chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarfeld, Jamie; Brook, Anna; Keestra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) and aggregate stability (AS) are two soil properties that are typically modified after burning and impose significant influence on subsequent hydrological and geomorphological dynamics. The response of AS and soil WR to fire depends upon how fire has influenced other key soil properties (e.g. soil OM, mineralogy). Meanwhile, routine thinning of trees and woody vegetation may alter soil properties (e.g. structure and porosity, wettability) by use of heavy machinery and species selection. The study area is situated along a north-facing slope of Mount Carmel national park (Israel). The selected sites are presented as a continuum of management intensity and fire histories. To date, the natural baseline of soil WR has yet to be thoroughly assessed and must be investigated alongside associated soil aggregating parameters in order to understand its overall impact. This study examines (i) the natural baseline of soil WR and physical properties compared to those of disturbed sites in the immediate (controlled burn) and long-term (10-years), and (ii) the interactions of soil properties with different control factors (management, surface cover, seasonal-temporal, burn temperature, soil organic carbon (OC) and mineralogy) in Mediterranean calcareous soils. Analysis of surface soil samples before and after destruction of WR by heating (200-600°C) was implemented using a combination of traditional methods and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Management and surface cover type conditioned the wettability, soil structure and porosity of soils in the field, although this largely did not affect the heat-induced changes observed in the lab. A positive correlation was observed along an increasing temperature gradient, with relative maxima of MWD and BD reached by most soils at the threshold of 400-500°C. Preliminary analyses of soil OC (MIR) and mineralogical composition (VIS-NIR) support existing research regarding: (i) the importance of soil OC quality and

  2. The Effect of Soil Properties on Metal Bioavailability: Field Scale Validation to Support Regulatory Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    materials, including lead battery cell plates. McClellan AFB: McClellan AFB is located in Sacramento, CA. Soils from a former wastewater treatment ... wastewater treatment was the contaminant source for the Hill and McClellan soils. Incinerator ash was the contaminant source for the Cherry Point soil. 6.1...extractable iron (CBD Fe) for soils where arsenical pesticide was the contaminant source. However, properties of the Deseret soil, where mine tailing

  3. Ferrosilt (Red Mud): Geotechnical Properties and Soil Mechanical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, F. C.

    The disposal of ferrosilt tailings creates problems because of the rather unusual geotechnical properties. Ferrosilt samples from three different bauxites were tested in connection with the alumina plant project in Wilhelmshaven (West Germany). The results of these laboratory tests explain various ferrosilt slides experienced during the past. Should ferrosilt be utilized for application where better physical qualities of the material are required it is possible to separate the coarser fraction from the finer fractions by using cyclons. The soil mechanical properties of the coarser fraction — called ferrosilt-sand — is of much better quality than the ferrosilt proper. On the other hand the quality of the finder fractions is not much inferior to the ferrosilt.

  4. A comparison of indexing methods to evaluate quality of soils subjected to different erosion: the role of soil microbiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Romina; Lidia, Giuffre; Alejandro, Costantini; Norberto, Bartoloni; Paolo, Nannipieri

    2010-05-01

    Soil quality assessment is needed to evaluate the soil conditions and sustainability of soil and crop management properties, and thus requires a systematic approach to select and interpret soil properties to be used as indicators. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare different indexing methods to assess quality of an undisturbed grassland soil (UN), a degraded pasture soil (GL) and a no tilled soil (NT) with four different A horizon depths (25, 23, 19 and 14 cm) reflecting a diverse erosion. Twenty four soil properties were measured from 0 to10 (1) and 10 to 20 cm. (2) and a minimum data set was chosen by multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) considering all measured soil properties together (A), or according to their classification in physical, chemical or microbiological (B) properties. The measured soil properties involved either inexpensive or not laborious standard protocols, to be used in routine laboratory analysis (simple soil quality index - SSQI), or a more laborious, time consuming and expensive protocols to determine microbial diversity and microbial functionality by methyl ester fatty acids (PLFA) and catabolic response profiles (CRP), respectively (complex soil quality index - CSQI). The selected properties were linearly normalized and integrated by the weight additive method to calculate SSQI A, SSQI B, CSQI A and CSQI B indices. Two microbiological soil quality indices (MSQI) were also calculated: the MSQI 1 only considered microbiological properties according to the procedure used for calculating SQI; the MSQI 2 was calculated by considering microbial carbon biomass (MCB), microbial activity (Resp) and functional diversity determined by CPR (E). The soil quality indices were SSQI A = MCB 1 + Particulate Organic Carbon (POC)1 + Mean Weight Diameter (MWD)1; SSQI B = Saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) 1 + Total Organic Carbon (TOC) 1 + MCB 1; CSQI A = MCB 1 + POC 1 + MWD 1; CSQI B = K 1+ TOC 1+ 0.3 * (MCB 1+ i/a +POC 1) + 0

  5. [Effects of nitrogen addition on soil physico-chemical properties and enzyme activities in desertified steppe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie-Qiong; Li, Xin-Rong; Bao, Jing-Ting

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the impacts of nitrogen (N) enrichment on soil physico-chemical property and soil enzyme activities in desert ecosystems, a field experiment by adding N at 0, 1.75, 3.5, 7, or 14 g N x m(-2) a(-1) was conducted in a temperate desert steppe in the southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert. The results showed that N addition led to accumulations of total N, NO(3-)-N, NH(4+)-N, and available N in the upper soil (0-10 cm) and subsoil (10-20 cm), however, reductions in soil pH were observed, causing soil acidification to some extent. N addition pronouncedly inhibited soil enzyme activities, which were different among N addition levels, soil depths, and years, respectively. Soil enzyme activities were significantly correlated with the soil N level, soil pH, and soil moisture content, respectively.

  6. Soil Properties and Earthworm Population Dynamics Influenced by Organic Manure in Winter and Spring Seasons at Rampur, Chitwan, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Roshan Babu Ojha; Shree Chand Shah; Keshab Raj Pande; Durga Datta Dhakal

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with six treatments (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 Mg FYM ha-1) replicated four times at the horticultural farm, IAAS, Rampur, Chitwan, Nepal in winter (Oct-Jan) and spring (Feb-May) seasons to quantify optimum dose of organic manure (FYM) to maintain earthworm population and enhance soil properties. In each treatment 100 earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were inoculated within one square meter of each plot. Porosity in the first season...

  7. Sweet potato yield and physical and chemical properties of soil in function of organic and mineral fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Amarílis Beraldo Rós; Nobuyoshi Narita; Andréia Cristina Silva Hirata

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato crop is usually cultivated with low fertilization investments, but the crop can present significant yield increase when correct fertilization is carried out in its cultivation. In this study aimed to evaluate the influence of the use of different fertilizer sources and doses on sweet potato yield and on physical and chemical properties of soil. The experimental design was a randomized block in 3x5 factorial scheme, with three replications. The treatments were composed of fertiliz...

  8. Soil chemical and physical properties that differentiate urban land-use and cover types

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.V. Pouyat; I.D. Yesilonis; J. Russell-Anelli; N.K. Neerchal

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of land use and cover and surface geology on soil properties in Baltimore, MD, with the objectives to: (i) measure the physical and chemical properties of surface soils (0?10 cm) by land use and cover; and (ii) ascertain whether land use and cover explain differences in these properties relative to surface geology. Mean and median values of...

  9. Effects of traffic-induced soil compaction on crop growth and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibay, Amélia; Ren, Lidong; D'Hose, Tommy; De Pue, Jan; Ruysschaert, Greet; Cornelis, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Traffic-induced soil compaction on arable soils constitutes a major threat for agricultural productivity and the environmental quality of the soil, water and atmosphere. The objective of this work is to evaluate a set of prevention strategies for agricultural traffic under real farming conditions. To that end, a one-pass traffic experiment was conducted near Ghent, Belgium in winter 2015 on a sandy loam (haplic Luvisol; 43% sand, 47% silt, 10% clay). Winter rye (Secale cereale L.), which promotes the removal of residual soil nitrogen and thus reduces the potential for nitrogen leaching, was sown as cover crop using different tractor and weather settings on different field lanes: dry (D, 0.16 m3 m-3) or wet (W, 0.20-0.23 m3 m-3) conditions, normal (N, 65 cm width, axle load 8520 kg) or wide (W, 90 cm width, axle load 8520 kg) tires and high (HP, 1.4 bars for N, 1.0 bar for W) or low (LP, 1.0 bar for N, 0.5 bar for W) inflation pressure. Subsequently, crop biomass, root density and a set of hydrophysical properties (penetration resistance, saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention at 15, 35 and 55 cm depth) were measured. Bulk density, soil quality indicators (such as air capacity) and the pore size distribution were also calculated. Results showed significant biomass reduction (p compaction on crop growth, worse under wet conditions, but the choice of tires did not prove to have an effect. Observations on the hydrophysical properties were more mitigated, as expected: distinct differences are primarily found under controlled lab conditions or after several passes. Moreover, high moisture conditions could not be obtained for the wet experiment, which never exceeded field capacity, conceived as threshold. Nevertheless, penetration resistance profiles indicated a plough pan about 40 cm depth, witness of previous agricultural operations on the field, and high values (3.5 to 4 MPa) were found in the subsoil too. Moreover, bulk densities were higher for all

  10. Connectivity properties of the random-cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Martin; Metin Elci, Eren; Fytas, Nikolaos G.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the connectivity properties of the random-cluster model mediated by bridge bonds that, if removed, lead to the generation of new connected components. We study numerically the density of bridges and the fragmentation kernel, i.e., the relative sizes of the generated fragments, and find that these quantities follow a scaling description. The corresponding scaling exponents are related to well known equilibrium critical exponents of the model. Using the Russo-Margulis formalism, we derive an exact relation between the expected density of bridges and the number of active edges. The same approach allows us to study the fluctuations in the numbers of bridges, thereby uncovering a new singularity in the random- cluster model as q clusters connected by bridges and candidate-bridges play a pivotal role. We discuss several different implementations of the necessary connectivity algorithms and assess their relative performance.

  11. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    mineralizable nitrogen (N0) was higher in tilled than in no-tilled soil and was at its maximum in the 0 –. 15 cm layer of the soil. ..... the soil characteristices. Furthermore, both tillage and manure influence soil organic matter dynamics and quality. REFERENCES. Anderson JPE (1982). Soil respiration.. In Page AL ed. Methods ...

  12. Soil properties and not inputs control carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus ratios in cropped soils in the long-term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, E.; Buchmann, N.; Bünemann, E. K.; Kiba, D. I.; Lompo, F.; Oberson, A.; Tamburini, F.; Traoré, O. Y. A.

    2015-09-01

    Stoichiometric approaches have been applied to understand the relationship between soil organic matter dynamics and biological nutrient transformations. However, very few studies explicitly considered the effects of agricultural management practices on soil C : N : P ratio. The aim of this study was to assess how different input types and rates would affect the C : N : P molar ratios of bulk soil, organic matter and microbial biomass in cropped soils in the long-term. Thus, we analysed the C, N and P inputs and budgets as well as soil properties in three long-term experiments established on different soil types: the Saria soil fertility trial (Burkina Faso), the Wagga Wagga rotation/stubble management/soil preparation trial (Australia), and the DOK cropping system trial (Switzerland). In each of these trials, there was a large range of C, N and P inputs which had a strong impact on element concentrations in soils. However, although C : N : P ratios of the inputs were highly variable, they had only weak effects on soil C : N : P ratios. At Saria, a positive correlation was found between the N : P ratio of inputs and microbial biomass, while no relation was observed between the nutrient ratios of inputs and soil organic matter. At Wagga Wagga, the C : P ratio of inputs was significantly correlated to total soil C : P, N : P and C : N ratios, but had no impact on the elemental composition of microbial biomass. In the DOK trial, a positive correlation was found between the C budget and the C to organic P ratio in soils, while the nutrient ratios of inputs were not related to those in the microbial biomass. We argue that these responses are due to differences in soil properties among sites. At Saria, the soil is dominated by quartz and some kaolinite, has a coarse texture, a fragile structure and a low nutrient content. Thus, microorganisms feed on inputs (plant residues, manure). In contrast, the soil at Wagga Wagga contains illite and haematite, is richer in clay and

  13. Relationships between respiration, chemical and microbial properties of afforested mine soils with different soil texture and tree species: Does the time of incubation matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Józefowska, A.; Pietrzykowski, M.; Woś, B.; Cajthaml, T.; Frouz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 80, May (2017), s. 102-109 ISSN 1164-5563 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : afforested mine soil s * soil texture * tree species * chemical properties * microbial properties Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science OBOR OECD: Soil science Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2016

  14. Changes in soil chemical properties as affected by pyrogenic organic matter amendment with different intensity and frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yulan; Cerda Bolinches, Artemio; Cao, Mingming; Zhang, Yongyong; Yin, Jinfei; Jiang, Yong; Chen, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has long been used as a soil amendment to improve soil physicochemical properties. However, few studies simultaneously investigated both intensities and frequencies of PyOM addition on soil chemical properties of soil base cations, soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC),

  15. Organic matter identifies the nano-mechanical properties of native soil aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazze, S A; Hallin, I; Quinn, G; Dudley, E; Matthews, G P; Rees, P; van Keulen, G; Doerr, S H; Francis, L W

    2017-12-14

    Localized variations at the nanoscale in soil aggregates and in the spatial organisation of soil organic matter (SOM) are critical to understanding the factors involved in soil composition and turnover. However soil nanoscience has been hampered by the lack of suitable methods to determine soil biophysical properties at nanometre spatial resolution with minimal sample preparation. Here we introduce for the first time an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based Quantitative Nano-Mechanical mapping (QNM) approach that allows the characterisation of the role of SOM in controlling surface nano-mechanical properties of soil aggregates. SOM coverage resulted in an increased roughness and surface variability of soil, as well as in decreased stiffness and adhesive properties. The latter also correlates with nano- to macro-wettability features as determined by contact angle measurements and Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) testing. AFM thus represents an ideal quantitative tool to complement existing techniques within the emerging field of soil nanoscience.

  16. Properties of volcanic soils in cold climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Layers of volcanic ash and the Andosol soils derived from them may play an important role in preserving snow and ice as well as developing permafrost conditions in the immediate vicinity of volcanoes of high elevation or those situated at high latitudes, and land areas, often distant from volcanic activity that are either prone to permafrost or covered by snow and ice, but are affected by the deposition of subaerial ash. The special properties of volcanic ash that are responsible are critically reviewed particularly in relation to recent research in Kamchatka in the Far East of Russia. Of particular importance are the thermal properties and the unfrozen water contents of ash layers and the rate at which the weathering of volcanic glass takes place. Volcanic glass is the most easily weathered component of volcanic ejecta (Shoji et al., 1993; Kimble et al., 2000). There are many specific environmental conditions, including paleoclimate and present-day climate, the composition of volcanic tephra and glaciation history, which cause the differences in weathering and development of volcanic ash soils (Zehetner et al., 2003). The preservation of in situ, unweathered, and unaltered surficial ash-fall deposits in the cold regions has important implications for paleoclimate and glacial history. Ash-fall deposits, which trap and preserve the soils, sediments, and landforms on which they fall, can be used to resolve local climate conditions (temperature and moisture) at the ash site during ash-fall deposition. The preservation of detailed sedimentary features (e.g. bedding in the ash, sharpness of stratigraphic contacts) can tell us about their post-depositional history, whether they have been redeposited by wind or water, or overridden by glaciers (Marchant et al., 1996). Weathering of volcanic glass results in the development of amorphous clay minerals (e.g. allophane, opal, palagonite) but this takes place much slower in cold than under warmer climate conditions. Only few

  17. Soil properties and soil nitrogen dynamics of prairie-like forest openings and surrounding forests in Kentucky's Knobs Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.C. Rhoades; S.P. Miller; M.M. Shea

    2004-01-01

    Herbaceous communities located within forest openings increase plant species diversity of forests in the Knobs Region of Kentucky. Although these grass-dominated communities are protected and managed for rare plant species conservation, it is unclear how soil conditions may delineate the grassland-forest boundary. We compared soil chemical and physical properties and...

  18. Prescribed burning effects on soil physical properties and soil water repellency in a steep chaparral watershed, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.R. Hubbert; H.K. Preisler; P.M. Wohlgemuth; R.C. Graham; M.G. Narog

    2006-01-01

    Chaparral watersheds associated with Mediterranean-type climate are distributed over five regions of the world. Because brushland soils are often shallow with low water holding capacities, and are on slopes prone to erosion, disturbances such as fire can adversely affect their physical properties. Fire can also increase the spatial coverage of soil water repellency,...

  19. Effect of soil roughness on the inversion of off-ground monostatic GPR signal for noninvasive quantification of soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Antoine, M.; Vanclooster, M.; Slob, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a laboratory experiment that investigates the effect of soil surface roughness on the identification of the soil electromagnetic properties from full-wave inversion of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data in the frequency domain. The GPR system consists of an ultrawide band

  20. Effect of soil compaction and organic matter removal on two earthworm populations and some soil properties in a hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jordan; V. C. Hubbard; F., Jr. Ponder; E. C. Berry

    1999-01-01

    Earthworms can alter the physical, chemical, and biological properties of a forest ecosystem. Any physical manipulation to the soil ecosystem may, in turn, affect the activities and ecology of earthworms. The effects of organic matter removal (logs and forest floor) and soil compaction on earthworm activities were measured in a central hardwood region (oakhickory)...

  1. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water compared to the control. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Spent mushroom...

  2. Randomized Soil Survey of the Distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Rice Fields in Laos ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Langla, Sayan; Amornchai, Premjit; Sirisouk, Joy; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Moore, Catrin E.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Buisson, Yves; Newton, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Melioidosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia, where the causative organism (Burkholderia pseudomallei) is present in the soil. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos), B. pseudomallei is a significant cause of sepsis around the capital, Vientiane, and has been isolated in soil near the city, adjacent to the Mekong River. We explored whether B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soil distant from the Mekong River, drawing three axes across northwest, northeast, and southern Laos to create nine sampling areas in six provinces. Within each sampling area, a random rice field site containing a grid of 100 sampling points each 5 m apart was selected. Soil was obtained from a depth of 30 cm and cultured for B. pseudomallei. Four of nine sites (44%) were positive for B. pseudomallei, including all three sites in Saravane Province, southern Laos. The highest isolation frequency was in east Saravane, where 94% of soil samples were B. pseudomallei positive with a geometric mean concentration of 464 CFU/g soil (95% confidence interval, 372 to 579 CFU/g soil; range, 25 to 10,850 CFU/g soil). At one site in northwest Laos (Luangnamtha), only one sample (1%) was positive for B. pseudomallei, at a concentration of 80 CFU/g soil. Therefore, B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soils beyond the immediate vicinity of the Mekong River, alerting physicians to the likelihood of melioidosis in these areas. Further studies are needed to investigate potential climatic, soil, and biological determinants of this heterogeneity. PMID:21075883

  3. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  4. Effects of amendment of different biochars on soil physical and biological properties related to carbon mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renduo; Zhu, Shuzhi; Ouyang, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Biochar addition to soils potentially affects various soil properties, and these effects are dependent on biochars derived from different feedstock materials and pyrolysis processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of amendment of different biochars on soil physical and biological properties. Biochars were produced with dairy manure and woodchip at temperatures of 300, 500, and 700°C, respectively. Each biochar was mixed at 5% (w/w) with a forest soil and the mixture was incubated for 180 days, during which soil physical and biological properties, and soil respiration rates were measured. Results showed that the biochar addition significantly enhanced the formation of soil macroaggregates at the early incubation time. The biochar application significantly reduced soil bulk density, increased the amount of soil organic matter, and stimulated microbial activity and soil respiration rates at the early incubation stage. Biochar applications improved water retention capacity, with stronger effects by biochars produced at higher pyrolysis temperatures. At the same suction, the soil with woodchip biochars possessed higher water content than with the dairy manure biochars. Biochar addition significantly affected the soil physical and biological properties, which resulted in different soil carbon mineralization rates.

  5. Organic Carbon and Physical Properties in Sandy Soil after Conversion from Degraded Pasture to Eucalyptus in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Nascimento Sena

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil is currently seen as the most relevant carbon sink and the most effective carbon stabilizer. In contrast, agriculture is the second largest C emitter, after burning of fossil fuels. This organic carbon (OC introduced into the soil, mainly via organic matter (OM, is essential for several soil properties and plays an extremely important role in sandy soils. The objective of this study was to describe the changes in the amounts and pools of OC and the influence thereof on some physical soil properties in areas converted from pasture to eucalyptus. The following areas were analyzed: a degraded pasture (PAST, two areas of pasture-eucalyptus conversion after 2 and 15 years (EU02 and EU15, respectively and a preserved Cerrado area (CER in the east of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. Soil samples were taken from the 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, and 0.10-0.30 m layers. The OC was measured and analyzed, the carbon pool (CP calculated, aggregate stability, bulk density (BD, and macro- and microporosity determined, and total porosity (TP calculated to analyze the influence of land use on soil properties. The experimental design was completely randomized, and four clusters per area were established, with nine subsampling points, for a total of 36 subsamples per area, organized in 20 × 20 m grids, The soil under natural vegetation (preserved Cerrado was used as a control. The change from CER to commercial cultivation accelerates the process of OC loss (reductions of 25-35 % and reductions in soil physical quality. In the PAST area, OC was reduced by 30 % in the 0.00-0.05 m layer. Cumulative OC and CP were highest in the 0.00-0.05 m layer and decreased in the deeper layers in all land use treatments. Organic C in the 0.10-0.30 m layer was not influenced by land use, indicating the possibility of OC persistence in the soil for longer periods. Macroporosity and total porosity may be considered appropriate in CER and EU15, whereas the conditions for plant

  6. Prediction of soil water retention properties using pore-size distribution and porosity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beckett, Christopher T.S; Augarde, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    .... This paper presents a method that builds on previous techniques by incorporating porosity and particles of different sizes, shapes, and separation distances to predict soil water retention properties...

  7. Sorption of Cu and Zn in low organic matter-soils as influenced by soil properties and by the degree of soil weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, V; Golia, E E

    2015-11-01

    Copper and Zn sorption and desorption, among other factors, depend on soil pH, but in soils with different degree of weathering the role of other soil properties (e.g., oxides content and the level of their crystallinity) has not been thoroughly examined. We conducted batch sorption and desorption tests using 21 low-organic C soils that belonged to the soil orders of Entisols, newly developed soils, Inceptisols, and Alfisols, the most weathered soils. Zinc sorption was lower than that of Cu, and its desorption faster, confirming that it is a highly mobile metal. Alfisols had the weaker affinity for metals, due to the lower soil pH typical of this soil order, but also due to the low reactivity colloids they contained. Correlation analyses showed that Fe oxides in Alfisols increased metal release from soils, while they decreased metal desorption from Entisols. We conclude that in low organic matter-content soils, where the protective role of organic colloids is not to be expected, high soil pH alone is not sufficient to protect against metal contamination, but the degree of soil weathering is also important, due to the dominant role of other mineral phases (here, Fe oxides). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Evolution of Black Carbon Physicochemical Properties in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Y.; Pyle, L. A.; Masiello, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is a unique product of the incomplete combustion of biomass that occurs during wildfires. BC is a partially combusted solid residue of plant tissue that is highly porous, a source of soil organic carbon, and degrades more slowly than other forms of organic matter. A recent study by Westerling et al. 2006 showed that regional changes in climate led to increased wildfire activity over recent decades. One implication of this is that as the climate changes, increasing wildfire rates may increase production of BC. We analyzed how the physical and chemical properties of BC particles change over time in order to assess the stability of BC in soils. BC used in this study came from soils collected in Silas Little Experimental Forest (SLEF) which is a US Forest Service Site in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. This area has historical and geographical records on occurrences of fire events beginning in 1935. This allows us to simulate an almost 85 year study by looking at a range of BC particles of very different ages spanning the years between 1935 and 2015. BC particles from five different locations within SLEF were selected to represent the years 1930, 1963, 1995, and 2015. We used pycnometry to measure skeletal density where volume of pores is excluded and envelope density where volume of pores is included. Density of BC particles is important because it impacts BC mobility and interaction with soil and water which can affect whether BC will get stored in soils or be weathered away. We also used an elemental analyzer to measure the weight percent of carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen of the BC particles to identify relative mineral and organic contributions. Pycnometry results revealed an overall increase in the skeletal density of aged BC particles from 1.64 to 1.70 g/cm3, and that BC particles from the O horizon had a lower skeletal density (1.60-1.71 g/cm3) than those from the A horizon (1.68- 1.77 g/cm3). Elemental analysis revealed a weight percent increase

  9. Organic and inorganic amendment application on mercury-polluted soils: effects on soil chemical and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Klouza, Martin; Holečková, Zlata; Tlustoš, Pavel; Száková, Jiřina

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a previous study performed in our laboratory, the use of organic and inorganic amendments can significantly modify the Hg mobility in soil. We have compared the effectiveness of organic and inorganic amendments such as digestate and fly ash, respectively, reducing the Hg mobility in Chernozem and Luvisol soils differing in their physicochemical properties. Hence, the aim of this work was to compare the impact of digestate and fly ash application on the chemical and biochemical parameters in these two mercury-contaminated soils in a model batch experiment. Chernozem and Luvisol soils were artificially contaminated with Hg and then incubated under controlled conditions for 21 days. Digestate and fly ash were applied to both soils in a dose of 10 and 1.5 %, respectively, and soil samples were collected after 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of incubation. The presence of Hg in both soils negatively affected to processes such as nitrification, provoked a decline in the soil microbial biomass C (soil microbial biomass C (MBC)), and the microbial activities (arylsulfatase, and β-glucosaminidase) in both soils. Meanwhile, the digestate addition to Chernozem and Luvisol soils contaminated with Hg improved the soil chemical properties (pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N (Ntot), inorganic-N forms (N-NH4 (+) and N-NO3 (-))), as consequence of high content in C and N contained in digestate. Likewise, the soil MBC and soil microbial activities (dehydrogenase, arylsulfatase, and β-glucosaminidase) were greatly enhanced by the digestate application in both soils. In contrast, fly ash application did not have a remarkable positive effect when compared to digestate in Chernozem and Luvisol soil contaminated with mercury. These results may indicate that the use of organic amendments such as digestate considerably improved the soil health in Chernozem and Luvisol compared with fly ash, alleviating the detrimental impact of Hg. Probably, the chemical properties present in

  10. Visible and near infrared spectroscopy coupled to random forest to quantify some soil quality parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Felipe Bachion; de Souza, André Marcelo; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the use of visible and near infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) combined with multivariate regression based on random forest to quantify some quality soil parameters. The parameters analyzed were soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), sum of exchange bases (SB), organic matter (OM), clay and sand present in the soils of several regions of Brazil. Current methods for evaluating these parameters are laborious, timely and require various wet analytical methods that are not adequate for use in precision agriculture, where faster and automatic responses are required. The random forest regression models were statistically better than PLS regression models for CEC, OM, clay and sand, demonstrating resistance to overfitting, attenuating the effect of outlier samples and indicating the most important variables for the model. The methodology demonstrates the potential of the Vis-NIR as an alternative for determination of CEC, SB, OM, sand and clay, making possible to develop a fast and automatic analytical procedure.

  11. Measurement of soil lead bioavailability and influence of soil types and properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kaihong; Dong, Zhaomin; Wijayawardena, M A Ayanka; Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi; Semple, Kirk

    2017-10-01

    Lead (Pb) is a widespread heavy metal which is harmful to human health, especially to young children. To provide a human health risk assessment that is more relevant to real conditions, Pb bioavailability in soils is increasingly employed in the assessment procedure. Both in vivo and in vitro measurements for lead bioavailability are available. In vivo models are time- consuming and expensive, while in vitro models are rapid, economic, reproducible, and reliable while involving more uncertainties. Uncertainties in various measurements create difficulties in accurately predicting Pb bioavailability, resulting in the unnecessary remediation of sites. In this critical review, we utilised available data from in vivo and in vitro studies to identify the key parameters influencing the in vitro measurements, and presented uncertainties existing in Pb bioavailability measurements. Soil type, properties and metal content are reported to influence lead bioavailability; however, the differences in methods for assessing bioavailability and the differences in Pb source limit one's ability to conduct statistical analyses on influences of soil factors on Pb bioavailability. The information provided in the review is fundamentally useful for the measurement of bioavailability and risk assessment practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid waste disposal in the soil: effects on the physical, chemical, and organic properties of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Regina Lasaro Mangieri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is growing concern over the final destination of the solid waste generated by society. Landfills should not be considered the endpoint for substances contained or generated in solid waste. The sustainable use of natural resources, especially soil and water, has become relevant, given the increase in anthropogenic activities. Agricultural use is an alternative to solid waste (leachate, biosolid disposal, considering the hypothesis that the agricultural use of waste is promising for reducing waste treatment costs, promoting nutrient reuse and improving the physical and chemical conditions of soil. Thus, this literature review, based on previously published data, seeks to confirm or disprove the hypothesis regarding the promising use of solid waste in agriculture to decrease the environmental liability that challenges public administrators in the development of efficient management. The text below addresses the following subtopics after the introduction: current solid waste disposal and environmental issues, the use of solid waste in agriculture, and the effect on the physical and chemical properties of soil and on organic matter, ending with final considerations.

  13. Impact of forest vegetation on soil characteristics: a correlation between soil biological and physico-chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, L. R.; Gupta, S.; Pande, V.; Singh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Temperate and dry deciduous forest covers major portion of terrestrial ecosystem in India. The two forest types with different dominant tree species differ in litter quality and root exudates, thereby exerting species-specific impact on soil properties and microbial activity. This study aims to examine the influence of forest type or dominant tree species on soil physico-chemical properties and its relationship with microbial characters in temperate and dry deciduous forest types. We assessed...

  14. Evaluation of statistical and geostatistical models of digital soil properties mapping in tropical mountain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldir de Carvalho Junior

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil properties have an enormous impact on economic and environmental aspects of agricultural production. Quantitative relationships between soil properties and the factors that influence their variability are the basis of digital soil mapping. The predictive models of soil properties evaluated in this work are statistical (multiple linear regression-MLR and geostatistical (ordinary kriging and co-kriging. The study was conducted in the municipality of Bom Jardim, RJ, using a soil database with 208 sampling points. Predictive models were evaluated for sand, silt and clay fractions, pH in water and organic carbon at six depths according to the specifications of the consortium of digital soil mapping at the global level (GlobalSoilMap. Continuous covariates and categorical predictors were used and their contributions to the model assessed. Only the environmental covariates elevation, aspect, stream power index (SPI, soil wetness index (SWI, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, and b3/b2 band ratio were significantly correlated with soil properties. The predictive models had a mean coefficient of determination of 0.21. Best results were obtained with the geostatistical predictive models, where the highest coefficient of determination 0.43 was associated with sand properties between 60 to 100 cm deep. The use of a sparse data set of soil properties for digital mapping can explain only part of the spatial variation of these properties. The results may be related to the sampling density and the quantity and quality of the environmental covariates and predictive models used.

  15. A historical review of the methods of determination of soil properties for soil quality and land degradation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Miralles, Isabel; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Antoneli, Valdemir; Brevik, Eric C.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Properly assessing soil quality and land degradation is one of the main concerns of soil scientists in recent decades. Nowadays there are several available assessment systems based mainly on indicators, i.e. on soil-related parameters, that allow one to determine the current state of natural soils at different scales. These systems vary depending on ecosystem type and soil function studied as well as the accuracy of the methods (techniques and tools) historically used in the determination of several soil parameters. In this study, we show a historical review of many methods of determining soil properties used regularly as soil quality and land degradation indicators. We have considered 5 worldwide historical periods: [1] The pioneers: before 1889, [2] USDA impulse: 1889 - 1945, [3] Productivity paradigm: 1946 - 1972, [4] Conservationist paradigm: 1973 - 2001, and [5] Current methodologies: 2002 - present. The limits of each period have been determined according to some key milestones, for humanity in general and soil science in particular, such as the creation of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 1889, the end of World War II in 1945 or the publication of relevant works such as The limits to growth in 1972. The development of the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) indexing tool by American soil scientists in 2001 marks a turning point from which new methodologies and paradigms began to be dominant among methods of determination. Finally, the methods historically used to determine more than 100 soil properties have been reviewed by consulting around 1,500 references published between 1305 and 2017. Approximately 10% of the references were key works to contextualize the first two historical periods, i.e. before 1945, and almost half of all references were published in the second half of the twentieth century (1946 - 2001). A logical tendency in gaining progressively accuracy in methods has been observed as well as a major boom in the

  16. Fractal Scaling of Particle Size Distribution and Relationships with Topsoil Properties Affected by Biological Soil Crusts: e88559

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guang-Lei Gao; Guo-Dong Ding; Bin Wu; Yu-Qing Zhang; Shu-Gao Qin; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yan-Feng Bao; Yun-Dong Liu; Li Wan; Ji-Feng Deng

    2014-01-01

    .... Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts...

  17. Relationships between soil properties and community structure of soil macroinvertebrates in oak-history forests along an acidic deposition gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-02-01

    Soil macroinvertebrate communities were studied in ecologically analogous oak-hickory forests across a three-state atmospheric pollution gradient in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The goal was to investigate changes in the community structure of soil fauna in study sites receiving different amounts of acidic deposition for several decades and the possible relationships between these changes and physico-chemical properties of soil. The study revealed significant differences in the numbers of soil animals among the three study sites. The sharply differentiated pattern of soil macroinvertebrate fauna seems closely linked to soil chemistry. Significant correlations of the abundance of soil macroinvertebrates with soil parameters suggest that their populations could have been affected by acidic deposition in the region. Abundance of total soil macroinvertebrates decreased with the increased cumulative loading of acidic deposition. Among the groups most sensitive to deposition were: earthworms gastropods, dipteran larvae, termites, and predatory beetles. The results of the study support the hypothesis that chronic long-term acidic deposition could aversely affect the soil decomposer community which could cause lower organic matter turnover rates leading to an increase in soil organic matter content in high deposition sites.

  18. Alteration of soil hydraulic properties and soil water repellency by fire and vegetation succession in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    This study explores the impacts of fire and plant community succession on soil water repellency (SWR) and infiltration properties to improve understanding the long term impacts of prescribed fire on SWR and infiltration properties in sagebrush-steppe ecosystem. The objectives of this study were: 1) To explore the temporal effects of prescribed burning in sagebrush dominated landscape; 2) To investigate spatial variability of soil hydrologic properties; 3) To determine the relationship among soil organic fraction, soil hydrophobicity and infiltration properties. Fieldwork was conducted in paired catchments with three dominant vegetation cover communities: Low sage, big mountain sage and aspen. Detailed, heavily replicated analyses were conducted for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, sorptivity water drop penetration time and static soil-water-air contact angle. The results show that the severity and presence of surface soil water repellency were considerably reduced six years after fire and that hydraulic conductivity increased significantly in each vegetation cover compared to pre-burn condition. Comparisons among soil hydrological properties shows that hydraulic conductivity is not strongly related to SWR, and that sorptivity is negatively correlated with SWR. The spatial variance of hydraulic properties within the burned high sage and low sage, in particularly, spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity is basically controlled by soil texture and sorptivity is affected by soil wettability. The average water repellency in Low Sage area was significantly different with Big Sage and Aspen as the gap of organic content between Low Sage and other vegetation area. The result of contact angle measurement and organic content analysis shows a strong positive correlation between SWR and organic matter.

  19. Multivariate analysis of toxicological and environmental properties of soil nematicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Moreno, Sara; Alonso-Prados, Elena; Alonso-Prados, J Luis; García-Baudín, José M

    2009-01-01

    In intensive agriculture, the use of pesticides and soil fumigants is necessary to produce economically viable crops worldwide. However, this practice may involve undesirable effects on human health and the environment. In 1995, methyl bromide was restricted by the Montreal Protocol because of possible ozone depletion. The objective of this study was to compare intrinsic environmental and toxicological properties of 11 active substances with nematicidal properties, some of them recognized as methyl bromide alternatives. Four groups of active substances were discriminated by a series of principal component analyses (PCAs): (a) high toxicity to non-target fauna, humans and animals and medium persistence in the environment (cadusafos, ethoprophos and fenamiphos); (b) high toxicity to humans, animals and non-target fauna and high persistence (carbofuran and fosthiazate); (c) low toxicity to non-target fauna, humans and animals and low persistence (carbosulfan, benfuracarb and oxamyl); (d) low toxicity to humans, animals and non-target fauna and medium persistence in the environment (1,3-dichloropropene, chloropicrin and methyl bromide). Evaluating the multiple aspects of toxicological and environmental properties of active substances through PCA is proposed as a helpful tool for initially comparing the complex toxicological behaviour of active substances as plant protection products.

  20. Effects of tree species on soil properties in a forest of the Northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Large differences in soil pH and available Ca in the surface soil exist among tree species growing in a mixed hardwood forest in northwestern Connecticut. The observed association between tree species and specific soil chemical properties within mixed-species stands implies that changes in

  1. Development and use of a database of hydraulic properties of European soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, J.H.M.; Nemes, A.; Lilly, A.; Bas, Le C.

    1999-01-01

    Many environmental studies on the protection of European soil and water resources make use of soil water simulation models. A major obstacle to the wider application of these models is the lack of easily accessible and representative soil hydraulic properties. In order to overcome this apparent lack

  2. Ameliorating soil acidity and physical properties of two contrasting texture Ultisols with wastewater sludge biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Wang, Yefeng; Sheng, Ye; Wu, Chengfeng; Lu, Shenggao

    2017-06-21

    The production of biochar is a safe and beneficial disposal way for wastewater sludge. The biochar produced from wastewater sludge can be used as soil amendments for improving soil properties and for increasing crop yield. This work investigated the influences of wastewater sludge biochar (WSB) on the pH, exchangeable acidity, and physical properties of strongly acidic Ultisols with contrasting texture (clayey soil and sandy loam). Two soils were mixed with WSB at the rate of 0, 10, 20, and 40 g biochar kg-1 soil and incubated for 240 days at 75% field water capacity. Incubation experimental results indicated that WSB significantly increased soil pH and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ contents, and decreased soil exchangeable H+ and Al3+, compared with the control. The application of WSB enhanced the formation of 5-2-mm macroaggregate, and decreased the content of aggregate stability of soils, determined by mean weight diameter (MWD) of aggregate. WSB increased the field water capacity and available water content (AWC) of sandy loam while WSB was not found to increase significantly water-holding capacity and AWC of clayey soil. WSB significantly reduced plastic index and tensile strength (TS) of clayey soil and did not alter the TS of sandy loam. Overall results suggest that WSB is a suitable amendment for strongly acidic Ultisols with poor physical properties. However, the soil texture affected greatly the improvement effect of WSB on poor physical properties in soils.

  3. Soil properties of mangroves in contrasting geomorphic settings within the Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christina E. Stringer; Carl C. Trettin; Stan Zarnoch

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves are well-known for their numerous ecosystem services, including sequestering a significant carbon stock, with soils accounting for the largest pool. The soil carbon pool is dependent on the carbon content and bulk density. Our objective was to assess the spatial variability of mangrove soil physical and chemical properties within the Zambezi River Delta and...

  4. Changes in soil properties and plant uptake of heavy metals on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... for Pb. The study therefore showed that changes in physico-chemical characteristics at dump sites could be attributed to interactions of different soil properties rather a single factor. Key words: Heavy metal contamination, seasonal changes, soil pH, soil texture, specific adsorption mechanism, transfer factor, food chain.

  5. Soil properties associated with net nitrification following watershed conversion with Appalachian hardwoods to Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlene N. Kelly; Stephen H. Schoenholtz; Mary Beth. Adams

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-N) in soil solution and streamwater can be an important vector of nitrogen (N) loss from forested watersheds, and nitrification is associated with negative consequences of soil acidification and eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to identify vegetation-mediated soil properties that may control...

  6. Effects of Thinning on Soil Organic Carbon Fractions and Soil Properties in Cunninghamia lanceolata Stands in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC fractions, along with soil properties, are greatly affected by forest management. In this study, three thinning treatments: control (conventional management mode, moderate thinning intensity and heavy thinning intensity, were applied in Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations in eastern China. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC, soil light fraction organic carbon (LFOC and heavy fraction organic carbon (HFOC, total SOC, DOC/SOC and LFOC/HFOC were not affected by thinning treatments. In the heavy thinning treatment, soil bulk density decreased, and soil water holding capacity and porosity increased in the topsoil layers (0–10 cm and 10–20 cm. Total nitrogen, hydrolysable nitrogen, and zinc concentrations increased in the topsoil layers (0–20 cm in the heavy thinning treatment compared to the control treatment, while the available potassium concentration reduced. The moderate thinning treatment had little effect on the soil physical and chemical properties. Moreover, the variation of SOC fractions was strongly correlated to soil physical and chemical properties. These results suggest that thinning has little effect on the total SOC and its fractions in one rotation of Chinese fir tree in eastern China. In contrast, however, results also suggest that thinning has a positive effect on soil quality, to a certain extent.

  7. Impact of biochar addition on thermal properties of a sandy soil: modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy; Lukowski, Mateusz; Bis, Zbigniew; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    Adding biochar can alter soil thermal properties and increase the water holding capacity and reduce the mineral soil fertilization. Biochar in the soil can determine the heat balance on the soil surface and the temperature distribution in the soil profile through changes in albedo and the thermal properties. Besides, amendment of soil with biochar results in improvement of water retention, fertility and pH that are of importance in sandy and acid soils, widely used in agriculture. In this study we evaluated the effects of wood-derived biochar (0, 10, 20, and 40 Mg ha-1) incorporated to a depth of 0-15 cm on the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and porosity in sandy soil under field conditions. In addition, soil-biochar mixtures of various percentages of biochar were prepared to determine the thermal properties in function of soil water status and density in laboratory. It was shown that a small quantity of biochar added to the soil does not significantly affect all the thermal properties of the soil. Increasing biochar concentration significantly enhanced porosity and decreased thermal conductivity and diffusivity with different rate depending on soil water status. The soil thermal conductivity and diffusivity varied widely and non-linearly with water content for different biochar content and soil bulk density. However, the heat capacity increased with biochar addition and water content linearly and was greater at higher than lower soil water contents. The measured and literature thermal data were compared with those obtained from the analytic model of Zhang et al. (2013) and statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2016) based on soil texture, biochar content, bulk density and water content.

  8. Biochar from different residues on soil properties and common bean production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isley Cristiellem Bicalho da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The production of biochar from organic residues promises to be an interesting strategy for the management of organic waste. To assess the effect of biochar on soil properties and the production and nutrition of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., three simultaneous experiments were conducted in a greenhouse with different biochar from organic residues (rice husk, sawdust, and sorghum silage used as filtration material for swine biofertilizer. In each experiment the treatments consisted of five different biochar concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 L m−3, arranged in a completely randomized design, with four repetitions. In the experiments, the use of biochar increased soil pH, cation exchange capacity, nutrient availability in the soil, and nutrient accumulation in grains. The biochar concentrations corresponding to the maximum production of grain dry matter of bean plants were 100, 68, and 71 L m−3 for biochar from rice husk filter (BRHF, biochar from sawdust filter (BSF, and biochar from sorghum silage filter (BSSF, respectively.

  9. Chemical properties of soils treated with biological sludge from gelatin industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Melo Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of agro-industrial organic wastes in the environment can be reduced when used in agriculture. From the standpoint of soil fertility, residue applications can increase the organic matter content and provide nutrients for plants. This study evaluated the effect of biological sludge from gelatin industry on the chemical properties of two Ultisols (loamy sand and sandy clay and an Oxisol (clay. The experiment lasted 120 days and was carried out in laboratory in a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement, combining the three soils and six biological sludge rates (0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m³ ha-1, with three replications. Biological sludge rates of up to 500 m³ ha-1 decreased soil acidity and increased the effective cation exchange capacity (CEC and N, Ca, Mg, and P availability, without exceeding the tolerance limit for Na. The increase in exchangeable base content, greater than the effective CEC, indicates that the major part of cations added by the sludge remains in solution and can be lost by leaching.

  10. Analysis of microbiological and physiochemical properties of top soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of disposing municipal waste on soil was evaluated by analyzing the microbiological and enzyme activity of soil samples at three different locations, from five municipal waste dumpsites and compared with soil samples from a farmland which serves as the control. Soil microbial load, physicochemical parameters ...

  11. compaction delay versus properties of cement-bound lateritic soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    ABSTRACT. This study is an investigation into the effect of 0 to 3 hours compaction delay with half an hour intervals on soil-cement mixes 3,5,8; and 1, 3, 5 percent cement contents by weight of dry soils, for yellow and red lateritic soils respectively. The tests carried out on the cement stabilized soils were the Compaction test ...

  12. Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Franciska T; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C; d'Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W H Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-08-27

    Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world.

  13. Time-dependent effect of composted tannery sludge on the chemical and microbial properties of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Ricardo Silva; Santos, Vilma Maria; de Melo, Wanderley Jose; Nunes, Luis Alfredo Pinheiro Leal; van den Brink, Paul J; Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira

    2017-12-01

    Composting has been suggested as an efficient method for tannery sludge recycling before its application to the soil. However, the application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) should be monitored to evaluate its effect on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. This study evaluated the time-dependent effect of CTS on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. CTS was applied at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Mg ha-1 and the soil chemical and microbial properties were evaluated at 0, 45, 75, 150, and 180 days. Increased CTS rates increased the levels of Ca, Cr, and Mg. While Soil pH, organic C, and P increased with the CTS rates initially, this effect decreased over time. Soil microbial biomass, respiration, metabolic quotient, and dehydrogenase increased with the application of CTS, but decreased over time. Analysis of the Principal Response Curve showed a significant effect of CTS rate on the chemical and microbial properties of the soil over time. The weight of each variable indicated that all soil properties, except β-glucosidase, dehydrogenase and microbial quotient, increased due to the CTS application. However, the highest weights were found for Cr, pH, Ca, P, phosphatase and total organic C. The application of CTS in the soil changed the chemical and microbial properties over time, indicating Cr, pH, Ca, phosphatase, and soil respiration as the more responsive chemical and microbial variables by CTS application.

  14. Chemical fractionation of Cu and Zn and their impacts on microbial properties in slightly contaminated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Aiju

    2013-01-01

    Chemical fractionation of Cu and Zn in bulk soil and its effects on soil microbial properties were determined in Cu and Zn contaminated soils (Cu: 35.57~46.37 mg•kg-1, Zn: 74.33~127.20 mg•kg-1) sampled from an agricultural field in outskirts of Zibo, China during the month of September, 2011. A sequential extraction technique (SET) was used for metals chemical fractionation analysis in soils and a correlation analysis was applied to determinate the effects of metal on soil microbial propertie...

  15. [Heidaigou Opencast Coal Mine: Soil Enzyme Activities and Soil Physical and Chemical Properties Under Different Vegetation Restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ying; Ma, Ren-tian; An, Shao-shan; Zhao, Jun-feng; Xiao, Li

    2016-03-15

    Choosing the soils under different vegetation recovery of Heidaigou dump as the research objects, we mainly analyzed their basic physical and chemical properties and enzyme activities with the method of Analysis of Variance as well as their relations using Pearson correlation analysis and path analysis hoping to uncover the driving factors of the differences between soil enzyme activities under different vegetation restoration, and provide scientific suggestions for the plant selection as well as make a better evaluation to the reclamation effect. The results showed that: (1) Although the artificial vegetation restoration improved the basic physical and chemical properties of the soils while increasing their enzyme activities to a certain extent, the soil conditions still did not reach the level of the natural grassland; (2) Contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total nitrogen (TN) of the seabuckthorns were the nearest to those of the grassland, which reached 54. 22% and 70. 00% of those of the grassland. In addition, the soil bulk density of the seabuckthorns stand was 17. 09% lower than the maximum value of the amorpha fruitcosa land. The SOC and TN contents as well as the bulk density showed that seabuckthorns had advantages as the species for land reclamation of this dump; Compared with the seabuckthorn, the pure poplar forest had lower contents of SOC and TN respectively by 35.64% and 32.14% and displayed a 16.79% higher value of soil bulk density; (3) The activities of alkaline phosphotase under different types of vegetation rehabilitation had little variation. But soil urease activities was more sensitive to reflect the effects of vegetation restoration on soil properties; (4) Elevation of the SOC and TN turned out to be the main cause for soil fertility restoration and increased biological activities of the dump.

  16. Temporal and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties with implications on soil moisture simulations and irrigation scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Mouna; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Mancini, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The increase in consumption of water resources, combined with climate change impacts, calls for new sources of water supply and/or different managements of available resources in agriculture. One way to increase the quality and quantity of agricultural production is using modern technology to make farms more "intelligent", the so-called "precision agriculture" also known as 'smart farming'. To this aim hydrological models play crucial role for their ability to simulate water movement from soil surface to groundwater and to predict onset of stress condition. However, optimal use of mathematical models requires intensive, time consuming and expensive collection of soil related parameters. Typically, soils to be characterized, exhibit large variations in space and time as well during the cropping cycle, due to biological processes and agricultural management practices: tillage, irrigation, fertilization and harvest. Soil properties are subjected to diverse physical and chemical changes that lead to a non-stability in terms of water and chemical movements within the soil and to the groundwater as well. The aim of this study is to assess the variability of soil hydraulic properties over a cropping cycle. The study site is a surface irrigated Maize field located in Secugnago (45◦13'31.70" N, 9 ◦36'26.82 E), in Northern Italy-Lombardy region. The field belongs to the Consortium Muzza Bassa Lodigiana, within which meteorological data together with soil moisture were monitored during the cropping season of 2015. To investigate soil properties variations, both measurements in the field and laboratory tests on both undisturbed and disturbed collected samples were performed. Soil samples were taken from different locations within the study area and at different depths (surface, 20cm and 40cm) at the beginning and in the middle of the cropping cycle and after the harvest. During three measuring campaigns, for each soil samples several parameters were monitored (Organic

  17. Estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability from soil physical properties using state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe; Møldrup, Per; Nielsen, Don

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic conductivity (K) and air permeability (k(a)) at given soil-water potentials are often used as reference points in constitutive models for K and k(a) as functions of moisture content and are, therefore, a prerequisite for predicting migration of water, air, and dissolved......) ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) modeling, and (iii) State-space modeling. In addition to actual soil property values, ARIMA and state-space models account for effects of spatial correlation in soil properties. Measured data along two 70-m-long transects at a 20-year old constructed...... and gaseous chemicals in the vadose zone. In this study, three modeling approaches were used to identify the dependence of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-S) and air permeability at -100 cm H2O soil-water potential (k(a100)) on soil physical properties in undisturbed soil: (i) Multiple regression, (ii...

  18. Effects of spent mushroom compost application on the physicochemical properties of a degraded soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, İlknur; Şeker, Cevdet

    2017-11-01

    Under field and laboratory conditions, the application of organic amendments has generally shown an improvement in soil physicochemical properties. Here, spent mushroom compost (SMC) is proposed as a suitable organic amendment for soil structure restoration. Our study assessed the impact of SMC on the physicochemical properties of a weak-structured and physically degraded soil. The approach involved the establishment of a pot experiment with SMC applications into soil (control, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 %). Soils were incubated at field capacity (-33 kPa) for 21, 42, and 62 days under laboratory conditions. SMC applications into the soil significantly increased the aggregate stability (AS) and decreased the modulus of rupture. The application of SMC at rates of 1, 2, 4, and 8 % significantly increased the total nitrogen and soil organic carbon contents of the degraded soil at all incubation periods (p mushroom growers.

  19. Effects of climate and soil properties on U.S. home lawn soil organic carbon concentration and pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selhorst, Adam; Lal, Rattan

    2012-12-01

    Following turfgrass establishment, soils sequester carbon (C) over time. However, the magnitude of this sequestration may be influenced by a range of climatic and soil factors. Analysis of home lawn turfgrass soils throughout the United States indicated that both climatic and soil properties significantly affected the soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration and pool to 15-cm depth. Soil sampling showed that the mean annual temperature (MAT) was negatively correlated with SOC concentration. Additionally, a nonlinear interaction was observed between mean annual precipitation (MAP) and SOC concentration with optimal sequestration occurring in soils receiving 60-70 cm of precipitation per year. Furthermore, soil properties also influenced SOC concentration. Soil nitrogen (N) had a high positive correlation with SOC concentration, as a 0.1 % increase in N concentration led to a 0.99 % increase in SOC concentration. Additionally, soil bulk density (ρ(b)) had a curvilinear interaction with SOC concentration, with an increase in ρ(b) indicating a positive effect on SOC concentration until a ρ(b) of ~1.4-1.5 Mg m(-3) was attained, after which, inhibition of SOC sequestration occurred. Finally, no correlation between SOC concentration or pool was observed with texture. Based upon these results, highest SOC pools within this study are observed in regions of low MAT, moderate MAP (60-70 cm year(-1)), high soil N concentration, and moderate ρ(b) (1.4-1.5 Mg m(-3)). In order to maximize the C storage capacity of home lawns, non C-intensive management practices should be used to maintain soils within these conditions.

  20. SOIL POLLUTION OF SELECTED PAHS AS A FACTOR AFFECTING THE PROPERTIES OF HUMIC ACIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bożena Dębska; Magdalena Banach-Szott; Ewa Rosa

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the properties of humus soil substances (including humic acids) are soil-type-specific. However, one shall consider the fact that properties of organic matter of soil can be modified by farming system (crop rotation, fertilisation) as well as other external factors, including pollutants; PAHs. The objective of the paper is to determine the effect of a single-time pollution of soils with high rates of PAHs on the properties of humic acids. The research was performed with ...

  1. Towards soil property retrieval from space: Proof of concept using in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Ranmalee; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable that controls the exchange of water and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, the temporal evolution of soil moisture is neither easy to measure nor monitor at large scales because of its high spatial variability. This is mainly a result of the local variation in soil properties and vegetation cover. Thus, land surface models are normally used to predict the evolution of soil moisture and yet, despite their importance, these models are based on low-resolution soil property information or typical values. Therefore, the availability of more accurate and detailed soil parameter data than are currently available is vital, if regional or global soil moisture predictions are to be made with the accuracy required for environmental applications. The proposed solution is to estimate the soil hydraulic properties via model calibration to remotely sensed soil moisture observation, with in situ observations used as a proxy in this proof of concept study. Consequently, the feasibility is assessed, and the level of accuracy that can be expected determined, for soil hydraulic property estimation of duplex soil profiles in a semi-arid environment using near-surface soil moisture observations under naturally occurring conditions. The retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were then assessed by their reliability to predict the root zone soil moisture using the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator model. When using parameters that were retrieved using soil moisture observations, the root zone soil moisture was predicted to within an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3, which is an improvement of ∼0.025 m3/m3 on predictions that used published values or pedo-transfer functions.

  2. Long-term Impact of Rotary Method of Soil Mechanical Treatment on Soil Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy P. Kalinichenko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The imitating approach to the technique and technology of soil cultivation excels the influence of natural factors of soil formation and leads to the anthropogenic biosphere degradation. The article fundamentally justifies the rotary soil cultivation in terms of genesis of soil. This method provides the formation of a new layer in the soil depth, which intensifies the geological and biological processes, influences the overlying soil layers, increases the biological productivity of the soil and stability of its mechanical system for a long term. Technical solutions of rotary devices for soil cultivation are considered and long-term results of their practical application are presented.

  3. Evaluation of random cascade hierarchical and statistical arrangement model in disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.; Magagi, R.; Goita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology that can be derived from remote sensing. In different studies, it was shown that optical-thermal, active and passive microwave remote sensing data can be used for soil moisture estimation. However, the most promising approach to estimate soil moisture in large areas is passive microwave radiometry. Global estimation of soil moisture is now operational by using remote sensing techniques. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave radiometers that were lunched on 2002 and 2009 respectively along with the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite that was planned to be lunched in the time frame of 2014-2015 make remote sensing to be more useful in soil moisture estimation. However, the spatial resolutions of AMSR-E, SMOS and SMAP are 60 km, 40 km and 10 km respectively. These very low spatial resolutions can not show the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture in field or small scales. So, using disaggregation methods is required to efficiently using the passive microwave derived soil moisture information in different scales. The low spatial resolutions of passive microwave satellites can be improved by using disaggregation methods. Random Cascade (RC) model (Over and Gupta, 1996) is used in this research to downscale the 40 km resolution of SMOS satellite. By using this statistical method, the SMOS soil moisture resolutions are improved to 20 km, 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km, respectively. The data that were measured during Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) field campaign are used to do the experiments. Totally the ground data and SMOS images that were obtained during 13 different days from 7-June-2012 to 13-July-2012 are used. By comparison with ground soil moisture, it is observed that the SMOS soil moisture is underestimated for all the images and so bias amounts

  4. The Effects of Soil Properties on Rain-garden Bioretention and Soil Processes in a Semi-arid City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinley, M. L.; Pavao-zuckerman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Urban raingardens have the potential to retain pollutants in stormwater runoff, and are a fairly common green infrastructure practice in mesic environments. However, it is not fully understood how soil properties in desert ecosystems impact raingarden bioretention. The stormwater runoff that is intercepted by rain gardens may be treated by a number of physical, chemical and biological processes as it infiltrates through soils. Our objective was to measure pollutant removal efficiencies of urban soils combinations with different biophysicochemical properties with and without a mulch layer. During July 2012, we collected soil samples from three separate washes in the city of Tucson, AZ, each with disparate textural characteristics. Soils were sieved and analyzed soils for pH, soil moisture (%), soil organic matter (%), and microbial biomass (pg g soil-1). Soils were loaded into bioretention columns (with and without a mulch layer) and flushed with synthetic runoff (with NO3, NH4, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cu added to reflect runoff concentrations in Tucson, AZ) for 60 minutes, and effluent samples were collected every 15 minutes. Infiltration rates were estimated for the columns and effluent samples were analyzed for concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn) and NO3-N and NH4-N and we then calculated pollution retention efficiencies. Surprisingly, we found that mulch decreases infiltration for the loam soils and increases rates in sandy soils. Nitrate removal ranged from 0-53% and metal removal rates ranged from 69-98%, suggesting that native Tucson soils might be suitable for raingarden applications. Nitrate removal varied by soil type, but was correlated with infiltration rates, such that soils with greater infiltration rates had a higher NO3 removal efficiency. Removal of Pb varied in a similar fashion, where soils with greater infiltration rates had higher removal efficiencies. The results from this laboratory study suggest that bioretention in desert soils may

  5. Impact of petroleum products on soil composition and physical-chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakorenko, N. N.; Korotchenko, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the grain-size distribution, physical and mechanical properties, swelling and specific electrical resistivity of soils before and after the contact with petroleum products. The changes in mechanical properties of soils contaminated with petroleum products have been stated. It leads to the increase in compressibility values, decline in internal friction angle and cohesion.

  6. Properties of fine soils of Klaipėda Port area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medzvieckas, Jurgis; Gadeikis, Saulius; Dundulis, Kastytis

    2008-01-01

    In the article, taking Klaipėda quays 7, 8 and 9 as examples, peculiarities of fine soil (silty clay, silty sandy clay and clayey silt) grain size distribution, physical state and mechanical properties are discussed. It was established that in these soils of a very similar physical state, the grain composition determines their mechanical properties.

  7. Effect of Gap Size on Seasonal Variation of Soil Chemical Properties in Subtropical Forest, Southern China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Supaporn Buajan; Liu JinFu; He ZhongSheng; Abrar Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Gap area has an effect on the soil chemical properties. To find out whatever the effect of gap area on the soil chemical properties, gap area was divided into small, medium, and large gap sizes and under the canopy as control...

  8. Spatial Variation of some Soil Physico-Chemical Properties of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial dependence of the properties studied was weak to moderate. Sampling spacing of 30 – 60 m is appropriate for soil fertility assessment in the test area. A sample size of 37 core samples per hectare is required to adequately predict the mean of soil properties with 5 % allowable error. Keywords: Spatial variability ...

  9. Ground-based forest harvesting effects on soil physical properties and Douglas-fir growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian Ares; Thomas A. Terry; Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Barry L. Flaming

    2005-01-01

    Soil properties and forest productivity can be affected by heavy equipment used for harvest and site preparation but these impacts vary greatly with site conditions and operational practices. We assessed the effects of ground-based logging on soil physical properties and subsequent Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb) Franco] growth on a highly...

  10. Characterizing shear properties of fine-grained subgrade soils under large capacity construction equipment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available properties including friction angle and cohesion for strength properties and shear modulus of the soil at three moisture states. Mohr-Coulomb failure models were developed together with shear modulus correlations for the soil sample. These models can be used...

  11. Laboratory assessment of the influence of the proportion of waste foundry sand on the geotechnical engineering properties of clayey soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, Martin B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil improvement can be achieved through mechanical stabilisation using industrial byproducts. Clayey soils were blended with waste foundry sand to examine its influence on the geotechnical engineering properties of the soils. The waste foundry sand...

  12. Bio-chemical properties of sandy calcareous soil treated with rice straw-based hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2016-06-01

    The results obtained show that, application of the investigated hydrogels positively affects bio-chemical properties of the soil. These effects are assembled in the following: (a slightly decreasing soil pH, (b increasing cation exchange capacity (CEC of the soil indicating improvement in activating chemical reactions in the soil, (c increasing organic matter (OM, organic carbon, total nitrogen percent in the soil. Because the increase in organic nitrogen surpassed that in organic carbon, a narrower CN ratio of treated soils was obtained. This indicated the mineralization of nitrogen compounds and hence the possibility to save and provide available forms of N to growing plants, (d increasing available N, P and K in treated soil, and (e improving biological activity of the soil expressed as total count of bacteria and counts of Azotobacter sp., phosphate dissolving bacteria (PDB, fungi and actinomycetes/g soil as well as the activity of both dehydrogenase and phosphatase.

  13. Effect of Cirsium arvense L. on soil physical properties and crop growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. REINTAM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The re-cultivation of abandoned areas creates weed control problems. The main problems in these areas are perennial weeds, such as Cirsium arvense L. but this perennial deep-rooted plant may have a beneficial effect on the physical properties of compacted soil. In order to study the effect of C. arvense’s root system on soil properties, the field experiment and a survey of arable fields were conducted in Estonia. The soil bulk density and penetration resistance were measured from soils covered by C. arvense or spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. on compacted and un-compacted soil. The results showed significantly lower penetration resistance and bulk density underneath C. arvense than under barley in both the field experiment and a field survey on arable soils. The shoot mass of C. arvense was less affected than the shoot mass of barley by soil compaction and was caused by C. arvense’s better ability to develop its root system in compacted soil. Wheat yield, on soils affected by C. arvense, was increased by 28% on loose soil and 37% on compacted soil. It may be concluded that in areas affected by deep-rooted weed species, such C. arvense, the soil’s physical properties will improve at least in the first two years.;

  14. Effects of Fire on Soil Properties, Erosion and Hydrologic Regime of Zrebar Lake Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirko Ebrahimi Mohammadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Forest herbs due to decrease of runoff coefficient and the kinetic energy of raindrops, is known as a key factor in controlling runoff and soil conservation. Many physical (hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity, pH, particle size distribution, color and temperature regimes, chemical (quality and quantity of organic matter, nutrient availability and biological (Microbial biomass, soil invertebrates living community soil properties can be affected by forest fires. Fire not only reduces forest herbs, vulnerability against splashing rain but also has strong effects on the hydrological cycle and soil loss. despite of repeated fires, there are very few studies about fire impact on natural resources of the west of the country, especially the city of Marivan, in Kurdistan province so this study aimed to investigate the short-term fire impacts on soil properties, Hydrologic regime, soil erosion and sedimentation of Zrebar Lake watershed in west of Iran. Materials and Methods: Considering the importance of the slope on the hydrological response of the watershed, slope classes of the Zrebar Lake watershed were mapped. Therefore, effects of fire on hydrological characteristics, erosion and sedimentation were studied by the establishment of twelve 0.25 square meter plots in three replications at two dominant slope classes (0 to 30 and 30 to 60% in burned and natural areas . The first plots in the burned and natural sections, was established randomly and two other plots with the similar conditions at a distance of 1.5 meters from each other were established. Garden Spray Simulator with constant pressure was used to fall rain from half a meter height for thirty minutes with an intensity of about 2 mm min-1 and 1 mm droplet diameter according to the general weather conditions of the studied area. For every five minutes, runoff and sediment were collected. Runoff volume by weighting and suspended sediment concentration by drying at 105°c were

  15. Spatial Distribution Analysis of Soil Properties in Varzaneh Region of Isfahan Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahmoodi

    2016-02-01

    annual evaporation rate is 3265 mm. In this study, image processing techniquess including band combinations, Principal Component Analysis (PC1, PC2 and PC3, and classification were applied to a TM image to map different soil properties. In order to prepare the satellite image, geometric correction was performed. A 1:25,000 map (UTM 39 was used as a base to georegister the Landsat image. 40 Ground Control Points (GCPs were selected throughout the map and image. Road intersections or other man-made features were appropriate targets for this purpose. The raw image was transformed to the georectified image using a first order polynomial, and then resampled using the nearest neighbour method to preserve radiometry. The final Root Mean Square (RMS error for the selected points was 0.3 pixels. To establish relationships between image and field data, stratified random sampling techniques were used to collect 53 soil samples at the GPS (Global Positioning System points. The continuous map of soil properties was achieved using simple and multiple linear regression models by averaging 9 image pixels around sampling sites. Different image spectral indices were used as independent variables and the dependent variables were field- based data. Results and Discussion: The results of multiple regression analysis showed that the strongest relationships was between sandy soil and TM bands 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, explaining up to 83% of variation in this component. The weakest relationship was found between CaCo3 and 3, 5, and 7 TM bands. In some cases, the multiple regressions was not an appropriate predicting model of soil properties, therefore, the TM and PC bands that had the highest relationship with field data (confidence level, 99% based on simple regression were classified by the maximum likelihood algorithm. According to error matrix, the overall accuracy of classified maps was between 85 and 93% for chlorine (Cl and silt componets, repectively. Conclusions: The results indicated that

  16. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-03-28

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration.

  17. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration. PMID:28349918

  18. Land-use types and soil chemical properties influence soil microbial communities in the semiarid Loess Plateau region in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Shi, Wei-Yu; Li, Guoqing; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Du, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Similar land-use types usually have similar soil properties, and, most likely, similar microbial communities. Here, we assessed whether land-use types or soil chemical properties are the primary drivers of soil microbial community composition, and how changes in one part of the ecosystem affect another. We applied Ion Torrent sequencing to the bacterial and fungal communities of five different land-use (vegetation) types in the Loess Plateau of China. We found that the overall trend of soil quality was natural forest > plantation > bare land. Dominant bacterial phyla consisted of Proteobacteria (42.35%), Actinobacteria (15.61%), Acidobacteria (13.32%), Bacteroidetes (8.43%), and Gemmatimonadetes (6.0%). The dominant fungi phyla were Ascomycota (40.39%), Basidiomycota (38.01%), and Zygomycota (16.86%). The results of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) and Redundancy Analysis (RDA) based on land-use types displayed groups according to the land-use types. Furthermore, the bacterial communities were mainly organized by soil organic carbon (SOC). The fungal communities were mainly related to available phosphorus (P). The results suggested that the changes of land use type generated changes in soil chemical properties, controlling the composition of microbial community in the semiarid Loess Plateau region. The microbial community could be an indicator for soil quality with respect to ecological restoration.

  19. Geochemical Modeling of Trivalent Chromium Migration in Saline-Sodic Soil during Lasagna Process: Impact on Soil Physicochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salihu Lukman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trivalent Cr is one of the heavy metals that are difficult to be removed from soil using electrokinetic study because of its geochemical properties. High buffering capacity soil is expected to reduce the mobility of the trivalent Cr and subsequently reduce the remedial efficiency thereby complicating the remediation process. In this study, geochemical modeling and migration of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil (high buffering capacity and alkaline during integrated electrokinetics-adsorption remediation, called the Lasagna process, were investigated. The remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in addition to the impacts of the Lasagna process on the physicochemical properties of the soil was studied. Box-Behnken design was used to study the interaction effects of voltage gradient, initial contaminant concentration, and polarity reversal rate on the soil pH, electroosmotic volume, soil electrical conductivity, current, and remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil that was artificially spiked with Cr, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, phenol, and kerosene. Overall desirability of 0.715 was attained at the following optimal conditions: voltage gradient 0.36 V/cm; polarity reversal rate 17.63 hr; soil pH 10.0. Under these conditions, the expected trivalent Cr remedial efficiency is 64.75 %.

  20. Geochemical modeling of trivalent chromium migration in saline-sodic soil during Lasagna process: impact on soil physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman, Salihu; Bukhari, Alaadin; Al-Malack, Muhammad H; Mu'azu, Nuhu D; Essa, Mohammed H

    2014-01-01

    Trivalent Cr is one of the heavy metals that are difficult to be removed from soil using electrokinetic study because of its geochemical properties. High buffering capacity soil is expected to reduce the mobility of the trivalent Cr and subsequently reduce the remedial efficiency thereby complicating the remediation process. In this study, geochemical modeling and migration of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil (high buffering capacity and alkaline) during integrated electrokinetics-adsorption remediation, called the Lasagna process, were investigated. The remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in addition to the impacts of the Lasagna process on the physicochemical properties of the soil was studied. Box-Behnken design was used to study the interaction effects of voltage gradient, initial contaminant concentration, and polarity reversal rate on the soil pH, electroosmotic volume, soil electrical conductivity, current, and remedial efficiency of trivalent Cr in saline-sodic soil that was artificially spiked with Cr, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, phenol, and kerosene. Overall desirability of 0.715 was attained at the following optimal conditions: voltage gradient 0.36 V/cm; polarity reversal rate 17.63 hr; soil pH 10.0. Under these conditions, the expected trivalent Cr remedial efficiency is 64.75%.

  1. Burn effects on soil properties associated to heat transfer under contrasting moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badía, David; López-García, Sergio; Martí, Clara; Ortíz-Perpiñá, Oriol; Girona-García, Antonio; Casanova-Gascón, José

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the topsoil thickness affected by burning under contrasting soil moisture content (field capacity versus air-dried conditions). A mollic horizon of an Aleppo pine forest was sampled and burned in the laboratory, recording the temperature continuously at the topsoil surface and at soil depths of 1, 2, and 3cm. Changes in soil properties were measured at 0-1, 1-2, 2-3, and 3-4cm. Both the maximum temperature and the charring intensities were significantly lower in wet soils than in air-dried soils up to 3cm in depth. Moreover, soil heating was slower and cooling faster in wet soils as compared to dry soils. Therefore, the heat capacity increase of the soil moistened at field capacity plays a more important role than the thermal conductivity increase on heat transfer on burned soils. Burning did not significantly modify the pH, the carbonate content and the chroma, for either wet or dry soil. Fire caused an immediate and significant decrease in water repellency in the air-dried soil, even at 3cm depth, whereas the wet soil remained hydrophilic throughout its thickness, without being affected by burning. Burning depleted 50% of the soil organic C (OC) content in the air-dried soil and 25% in the wet soil at the upper centimeter, which was blackened. Burning significantly decreased the total N (TN) content only in the dry soil (to one-third of the original value) through the first centimeter of soil depth. Soluble ions, measured by electrical conductivity (EC), increased after burning, although only significantly in the first centimeter of air-dried soils. Below 2cm, burning had no significant effects on the brightness, OC, TN, or EC, for either wet or dry soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Trends in soil-vegetation dynamics in burned Mediterranean pine forests: the effects of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, L.; Malkinson, D.

    2009-04-01

    Fire can impact a variety of soil physical and chemical properties. These changes may result, given the fire severity and the local conditions, in decreased infiltration and increased runoff and erosion rates. Most of these changes are caused by complex interactions among eco-geomorphic processes which affect, in turn, the rehabilitation dynamics of the soil and the regeneration of the burnt vegetation. Following wildfire events in two forests growing on different soil types, we investigated runoff, erosion, nutrient export (specifically nitrogen and phosphorous) and vegetation recovery dynamics. The Biriya forest site, burned during the 2006 summer, is composed of two dominant lithological types: soft chalk and marl which are relatively impermeable. The rocks are usually overlain by relatively thick, up of to 80 cm, grayish-white Rendzina soil, which contains large amounts of dissolved carbonate. These carbonates serve as a limiting factor for vegetation growth. The planted forest in Biriya is comprised of monospecific stands of Pinus spp. and Cupressus spp. The Mt. Carmel area, which was last burned in the 2005 spring, represents a system of varied Mediterranean landscapes, differentiated by lithology, soils and vegetation. Lithology is mainly composed of limestone, dolomite, and chalk. The dominant soil is Brown Rendzina whilst in some locations Grey Rendzina and Terra Rossa can be found. The local vegetation is composed mainly of a complex of pine (Pinus halepensis), oak (Quercus calliprinos), Pistacia lentiscus and associations At each site several 3X3 m monitoring plots were established to collect runoff and sediment. In-plot vegetation changes were monitored by a sequence of aerial photographs captured using a 6 m pole-mounted camera. At the terra-rosa sites (Mt. Carmel) mean runoff coefficients were 2.18% during the first year after the fire and 1.6% in the second. Mean erosion rates also decreased, from 42 gr/m2 to 4 gr/m2. The recovering vegetation was

  3. Assessment of some soil properties by spatial variability in saline and sodic soils in Arsanjan plain, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Mostafa; Baghernejad, Majid; Emadi, Mehdi; Maftoun, Manouchehr

    2008-01-15

    Spatial patterns for several soil parameters such soil texture, Exchangeable Sodium Percentage (ESP), Electrical Conductivity (ECe), soil pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) were examined in saline and sodic soils in Arsanjan plain, Southern Iran, in order to identify their spatial distribution for implementation of a site-specific management. Soil samples were collected from 0-30, 30-60 and 60-90 cm soil depths at 85 sampling sites. Data were analyzed both statistically and geostatistically on the basis of the semivariogram. The spatial distribution model and spatial dependence level varied between soil parameters. Soil pH and ESP had the minimum and maximum variability at all depths, respectively. Soil properties indicated moderate to strong spatial dependence. ECe exhibited moderate spatial dependence at three depths; pH and ESP had a moderate spatial dependence at 0-30 cm and strong spatial dependence at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. Clay and CEC exhibited strong spatial dependence for the 0-30 cm and weak spatial dependence at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. Sand and silt had a non-spatial dependence at 0-30 cm and weak spatial dependency at 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths. The spatial variability in small distances of ECe, CEC, pH and ESP generally increased with depth. All geostatistical range values were greater than 1168 m. The results reported herein indicated that the strong spatial dependency of soil properties would lead to the extrinsic factors such as ground water level and drainage. It is important to know the spatial dependence of soil parameters, as management parameters with strong spatial dependence will be more readily managed and an accurate site-specific scheme for precision farming more easily developed.

  4. Effect of aggregation on SOC transport: linking soil properties to sediment organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Soils are an interface between the Earth's spheres and shaped by the nature of the interaction between them. The relevance of soil properties for the nature of the interaction between atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere is well-studied and accepted, on point- or ecotone-scale. However, this understanding of the largely vertical connections between spheres is not matched by a similar recognition of soil properties affecting processes acting largely in a lateral way across the land surface, such as erosion, transport and deposition of soil and the associated organic matter. Understanding the redistribution of eroded soil organic matter falls into several disciplines, most notably soil science, agronomy, hydrology and geomorphology, and recently into biogeochemistry. Accordingly, the way soil and sediment are described differs: in soil science, aggregation and structure are essential properties, while most process-based soil erosion models treat soil as a mixture of individual mineral grains, based on concepts derived in fluvial geomorphology or civil engineering. The actual behavior of aggregated sediment and the associated organic matter is not reflected by either approach and difficult to capture due to the dynamic nature of aggregation, especially in an environment such as running water. Still, a proxy to assess the uncertainties introduced by aggregation on the behavior of soil/sediment organic while moving in water across landscapes and into the aquatic system would represent a major step forward. To develop such a proxy, a database collating relevant soil, organic matter and sediment properties could serve as an initial step to identify which soil types and erosion scenarios are prone to generate a high uncertainty compared to the use of soil texture in erosion models. Furthermore, it could serve to develop standardized analytical procedures for appropriate description of soil and organic matter as sediment.

  5. Sweet potato yield and physical and chemical properties of soil in function of organic and mineral fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarílis Beraldo Rós

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sweet potato crop is usually cultivated with low fertilization investments, but the crop can present significant yield increase when correct fertilization is carried out in its cultivation. In this study aimed to evaluate the influence of the use of different fertilizer sources and doses on sweet potato yield and on physical and chemical properties of soil. The experimental design was a randomized block in 3x5 factorial scheme, with three replications. The treatments were composed of fertilizer sources (chicken manure, mineral fertilizer with chemical composition equivalent to the nutrients found in chicken manure and blend of chicken manure (50% with mineral fertilizer (50% equivalent to the sum of nutrients found in chicken manure and fertilizer doses (nutrients equivalent to 0, 8, 16 and 24 t ha-1 of chicken manure. As result of study, it was found that the crop responds to soil fertilization with increases in total and commercial yields with the use of chicken manure, mineral fertilizers and the combination of both until the doses of 5.8, 6.5 and 7.0 t ha-1, respectively. Fertilization with chicken manure, alone or in combination with chemical fertilizers, promotes highest yields. There is no difference in soil bulk density and in total soil porosity as a function of fertilizer sources or doses. The addition of fertilizer promotes increases in pH and organic matter, P, K, Ca and Mg levels in the soil in relation to soil without fertilizer.

  6. Soil thermal properties at Kalpakkam in coastal south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . ... two locations in Kalpakkam, coastal southeast India. The data were analysed to estimate soil thermal di usivity, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and soil heat ux. This paper describes the results and discusses their implications.

  7. Investigation of the reduction in uncertainty due to soil variability when conditioning a random field using Kriging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloret Cabot, M.; Hicks, M.A.; Van den Eijnden, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial variability of soil properties is inherent in soil deposits, whether as a result of natural geological processes or engineering construction. It is therefore important to account for soil variability in geotechnical design in order to represent more realistically a soil’s in situ state. This

  8. Soil Chemical and Physical Properties on an Inceptisol after Liming (Surface and Incorporated Associated with Gypsum Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delcio Rudinei Bortolanza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Inceptsoils have high aluminum contents, and amendments are required to ensure a satisfactory crop development. Liming is efficient in neutralizing Al3+, but when applied to the topsoil its action is restricted to the surface layers, and sometimes lime incorporation into the soil is recommendable. However, tillage may negatively alter physical soil properties. Thus, gypsum could be an alternative to increase Ca2+ levels and reduce Al saturation in deeper layers, without requiring tillage. An experiment was initiated in 2010, to assess chemical and physical soil properties. Soil samples were collected in February 2013. A random block design with sub-subplots and two replications was used. Lime was applied to the surface of the main plot (0, 8 and 16 Mg ha-1 and incorporated into the soil by plowing and light harrowing. Gypsum was applied to the subplot (0 and 6 Mg ha-1, and the sub-subplots corresponded to the sampled layers (thickness of 0.05 m, to a depth of 0.25 m. The following parameters were evaluated: pH in water, base saturation, Al saturation, Ca2+, Mg2+, soil organic matter, water retention, and least limiting water range (LLWR. Lime incorporated into the soil reduced Al3+ and increased pH and Ca2+ levels, especially in the deeper soil layers, although pH levels did not exceed 5.1 and base saturation was lower than 60 %, still inadequate for crops. The gypsum rate of 6 Mg ha-1 did not decrease Al saturation, but reduced Mg2+ levels in top soil layers. Soil water retention and LLWR were not affected by plowing and harrowing within a period of three years. Gypsum rates below 6 Mg ha-1 were not effective in reducing Al saturation and increasing Ca2+ levels. Incorporated lime is more effective in correcting the acidity of the soil profile and, after three years, soil water retention and LLWR were similar under both liming methods.

  9. Prediction of landslide probability by geomorphic characteristics and soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong-Su [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Taejeon(Korea)

    2001-12-01

    A study of landslide occurrence Prediction was carried out for the Janghung area of Yangju-gun, Gyeonggi-do. In this area, many landslides took place by periodic severe rainfalls in August of 1998. The landslides were triggered in general as a type of translational slide in the beginning. Thereafter, as flowing down to the lower part of the valley, the translational slide changed to debris flow, which is commonly called flow type landslide. The permeability of soils ranges form 8.65 X 10{sup -6} to 7.32 X 10{sup -3} cm/sec with an average of 2.66 X 10{sup -3} cm/sec, which shows that the values of landslide-unoccurred areas are 1.5 to 2 order of magnitude greater than those of landslide-occurred areas. In areas of the same geologic properties, the coarse-grained soils with high void ratio and permeability are assessed as highly stable in landslide occurrence. Using logistic regression model with the landslide data obtained, the possibility of landslide occurrence was quantitatively analyzed, and then a landslide probability map was compiled. According to the results, the potential landslide sites are located on the areas of its possible occurrence with more than 90% probability. It was confirmed that the landslide triggering points well agreed with the unstable areas in which the possibility of landslide occurrence is high on the probability map. Therefore, according to the logistic regression, the selection of effective factors causing landslide occurrence and the assignment of weighting value for each factor have high accuracy of landslide occurrence prediction. (author). 13 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  10. EFFECT OF ORGANIC AND INORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENTS ON SOIL PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN A WEST AFRICA SAVANNA AGROECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua. Olalekan. Ogunwole

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-term agroecosystem productivity has stirred up the need to develop and implement nutrient management strategies that maintain and protect soil resources. In an attempt to address this, the current study involved the incorporation of residues of Centrosema pascuorum, Lablab purpureus and Parkia biglobosa. In addition, an inorganic fertilizer amended soil and, a maize/Lablab purpureus intercrop, along with the control (no amendment was included. The treatments were replicated three times and the site had been under continuous cultivation for eight years in a savanna Alfisol. Soil quality (physical and chemical indicators were examined for treatments effects. Dry macroaggregate turnover increased by 7% under C. pascuorum amended soils. This same treatment had more water-stable large microaggregates and a 40% increase in aggregated silt and clay content. Soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity reduced in nutrient management practices involving residue incorporation. However, soil organic carbon, total soil nitrogen, exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentration were highest with soil receiving C. pascuorum. Crop residue management practices involving incorporation of C. pascuorum significantly improved soil physical and chemical properties of the study area.

  11. China Topsoil Stripping Suitability Evaluation Based on Soil Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan; Wang, YuePeng; Liu, Xing; Luo, Dan; Liu, Hongman

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of topsoil stripping reuse is to provide a good cultivation platform for agricultural site conditions, namely increasing soil thickness and improving soil fertility levels. Based on soil type, using the thickness of the soil and organic matter content as criteria, the natural suitability of stripped topsoil from different regions were evaluated. The evaluation results were divided into five levels: Most suitable, suitable, moderately suitable, less suitable...

  12. The Effects of Rubber Effluent on Some Chemical Properties of Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of rubber effluent used were 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 ml per 2 kg soil. The trial was organized in a completely randomized design and replicated three times. Result showed that the soil pH, organic carbon, N, P, K, Mg, Ca Na, ECEC, Fe, Mn and Zn were significantly higher (p<0.05) in rubber effluent treated soils ...

  13. Electronic Properties of Random Polymers: Modelling Optical Spectra of Melanins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Kinga; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2003-05-01

    Melanins are a group of complex pigments of biological origin, widely spread in all species from fungi to man. Among diverse types of melanins, the human melanins, eumelanins, are brown or black nitrogen-containing pigments, mostly known for their photoprotective properties in human skin. We have undertaken theoretical studies aimed to understand absorption spectra of eumelanins and their chemical precursors. The structure of the biopigment is poorly defined, although it is believed to be composed of cross-linked heteropolymers based on indolequinones. As a basic model of the eumelanin structure, we have chosen pentamers containing hydroquinones (HQ) and/or 5,6-indolequinones (IQ) and/or semiquinones (SQ) often listed as structural melanin monomers. The eumelanin oligomers have been constructed as random compositions of basic monomers and optimized for the energy of bonding. Absorption spectra of model assemblies have been calculated within the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) approximation. Model spectrum of eumelanin has been further obtained by sum of independent spectra of singular polymers. By comparison with experimental data it is shown that the INDO/CI method manages to reproduce well characteristic properties of experimental spectrum of synthetic eumelanins.

  14. Properties of Soils in River Katsina-Ala Catchments Area, Benue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil samples were collected from Northern part of River Katsina-Ala catchment's area used for fadama farming by random sampling using the soil map of Benue State as a guide. Surface sampling (0-20cm) and subsurface (21-200cm) sampling were taken for analysis. Nine profile pits were dug covering about 100ha.

  15. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis in examining scaling properties of the spatial patterns of soil water storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Biswas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the scaling properties of soil water storage is crucial in transferring locally measured fluctuations to larger scales and vice-versa. Studies based on remotely sensed data have shown that the variability in surface soil water has clear scaling properties (i.e., statistically self similar over a wider range of spatial scales. However, the scaling property of soil water storage to a certain depth at a field scale is not well understood. The major challenges in scaling analysis for soil water are the presence of localized trends and nonstationarities in the spatial series. The objective of this study was to characterize scaling properties of soil water storage variability through multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA. A field experiment was conducted in a sub-humid climate at Alvena, Saskatchewan, Canada. A north-south transect of 624-m long was established on a rolling landscape. Soil water storage was monitored weekly between 2002 and 2005 at 104 locations along the transect. The spatial scaling property of the surface 0 to 40 cm depth was characterized using the MFDFA technique for six of the soil water content series (all gravimetrically determined representing soil water storage after snowmelt, rainfall, and evapotranspiration. For the studied transect, scaling properties of soil water storage are different between drier periods and wet periods. It also appears that local controls such as site topography and texture (that dominantly control the pattern during wet states results in multiscaling property. The nonlocal controls such as evapotranspiration results in the reduction of the degree of multiscaling and improvement in the simple scaling. Therefore, the scaling property of soil water storage is a function of both soil moisture status and the spatial extent considered.

  16. Uncertainty quantification of soil property maps with statistical expert elicitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, N.P.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Accuracy assessment and uncertainty analyses are key to the quality of data and data analysis in a wide array of scientific disciplines. For soil science, it is important to quantify the accuracy of soil maps that are used in environmental and agro-ecological studies and decision making. Many soil

  17. Chemical and microbial properties of farmer's field soils fertilized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the chemical and microbial characteristic of soils receiving different quantity of waste for several years (20, 10 and 7 years). Soils were sampled around the city of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). Soil chemical (C, N, P and pH) and microbial (basal respiration, microbial biomass and microbial diversity) ...

  18. Effects of rainwater harvesting and afforestation on soil properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusively, RWH and afforestation facilitated soil improvement but CT/BT treatments were more efficient in conserving soil and water facilitating plant growth and helped restore the degraded hill. However, further research is required on soil water use and its partitioning in different vegetation component and the benefits ...

  19. Modification of strength properties of soil-aggregate system on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work in place of soil alone Soil-Aggregate mix is taken into consideration and the same is tested for strength parameters by increasing doses of cement addition. Soil-Aggregate mixture can be effectively used as base and subbase layer of a flexible pavement system. For assessing strength parameters tests ...

  20. Physicochemical Properties of the Soils of Wassaniya Forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collected at the depth of 0 to 15cm from each plot using a soil auger for laboratory analyses. Four other undisturbed soil samples were collected for bulk density determination using a core sampler. The soils at the four locations varied in texture from sandy loam (SL) at Yartagimba, clay loam (CL) at Wassaniya and Daiji to ...

  1. Soil thermal properties at Kalpakkam in coastal south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... face energy balance. Such estimates are, however, not easily available. The purpose of this paper is to report a study carried out at Kalpakkam, located on the south east coast of India. Using measured soil temperature and soil heat flux, site specific thermal parameters are estimated. The soil heat flux was ...

  2. Comparison of soil properties under tropical Acacia hybrid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the common use of Acacia species in Vietnam, few studies have examined changes to total soil nitrogen (TN) and total soil carbon (TC) following the planting of Acacia mangium × Acacia auriculiformis (Acacia hybrid) plantations (AH) on formerly eroded and degraded soils. We compared the impact of AH with ...

  3. Impact of Newly Constructed Roads on Adjoining Soil Properties in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Road construction often results in the displacement of animals and plants that may not be recovered, and the long-term consequences limits productivity of roadside biota due to exposure of sub-soils, reduction in water holding capacity by the soils, and compacting soil materials which makes it difficult for roadside ...

  4. Effect of animal manures on selected soil chemical properties (1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... increased soil pH with POM and SWM having the greatest effect followed by RBM, GTM and lastly COM. Animal manures also reduced exchangeable acidity and increased exchangeable Ca and Mg. With the exception of GTM, all the other manures did not improve soil organic carbon. Nigerian Journal of Soil Science Vol ...

  5. Soil Properties of a Toposequence in the Moist Semi Deciduous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. I, 2000 which consists mainly of argillaceous se- diments metamorphosed into phyllite, The well-drained upland soils belong to the For est Ochrosol Great Soil Group of the Ghaw naian soil classification system (Bramner, l962) and are generally accommodated as. Acrisols in the ...

  6. Plant species and functional group effects on abiotic and microbial soil properties and plant-soil feedback responses in two grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Lawson, C.S.; Hedlund, K.; Edwards, A.R.; Brooks, A.J.; Igual, J.M.; Mortimer, S.R.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2006-01-01

    1 Plant species differ in their capacity to influence soil organic matter, soil nutrient availability and the composition of soil microbial communities. Their influences on soil properties result in net positive or negative feedback effects, which influence plant performance and plant community

  7. Soil physical property changes at the North American long-term soil productivity study sites: 1 and 5 years after compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Martin F. Jurgensen; Allan E. Tiarks; Felix Ponder; Felipe G. Sanchez; Robert L. Fleming; J. Marty Kranabetter; Robert F. Powers; Douglas M. Stone; John D. Elioff; D. Andrew. Scott

    2006-01-01

    The impact of forest management operations on soil physical properties is important to understand, since management can significantly change site productivity by altering root growth potential, water infiltration and soil erosion, and water and nutrient availability. We studied soil bulk density and strength changes as indicators of soil compaction before harvesting...

  8. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (Pproperties (R(2) = 0.494∼0.955, Pproperties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  9. Root Zone Soil Hydraulic Property Estimation by SMAP: An Unified Framework for Continental USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.

    2016-12-01

    We hypothesized that effective soil hydraulic property in the root zone at the footprint-scale is an effective indicator for combined soil, topography, and vegetation heterogeneities in land-atmosphere interaction models at different spatial scales. To test this overarching scientific hypothesis we will utilize SMAP near-surface soil moisture data at multiple resolutions (by downscaling), CONUS soil maps with a newly developed inverse model including a soil-water-atmosphere-plant model and advanced parameter estimation techniques. Efficacy related to various soil types, vegetation, rooting depth, and hydroclimates across the continental USA will be discussed. Determining "effective root zone soil hydraulic properties" in complex landscapes from remote sensing data at continental scale will open up a new paradigm and will have tremendous impacts on our ability to predict terrestrial hydrology, weather, climate, and global circulation of water, energy, and chemicals in the environment.

  10. Evaluation of Soil Physical and Chemical Properties in Poplar Plantations in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salehi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil physical and chemical properties and some quantitative characteristics of Populus deltoides Marsh (clone 79.51 plantations and relationships between them were evaluated in Guilan plain of north of Iran. Two same aged poplar plantations with low and high qualities were selected. In each poplar plantation, fifteen sample plots with systematic sampling method were selected. In each sample plot diameter at breast height (DBH as well as height of all trees within them was determined. Soil samples were taken from 0-20cm in each plot and soil texture, water holding capacity (WHC, bulk density (B.D and particle density (P.D as well as soil porosity, O.C, N, available P and exchangeable K were determined for each soil sample in laboratory. Tree data and soil properties between two plantations were analysed using independent samples t-test (Student’s t test at p < 0.05. The results showed that among soil physical properties, percentage of clay, sand, B.D and WHC and amongst soil chemical properties O.C, N, available P and exchangeable K were significantly different between two plantations. Heavy textured soils with high B.D are undesirable for growing of populus deltoides in study area. The results also indicated that poor quality plantations has negative effect on soil nutrient and reduces its fertility. Reduction of nutrient availability had negative effects on quantity and quality of poplar trees.

  11. Moss Mediates the Influence of Shrub Species on Soil Properties and Processes in Alpine Tundra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Guillermo Bueno

    Full Text Available In tundra ecosystems, bryophytes influence soil processes directly and indirectly through interactions with overstory shrub species. We experimentally manipulated moss cover and measured seasonal soil properties and processes under two species of deciduous shrubs with contrasting canopy structures, Salix planifolia pulchra and Betula glandulosa-nana complex. Soil properties (seasonal temperature, moisture and C:N ratios and processes (seasonal litter decomposition and soil respiration were measured over twelve months. Shrub species identity had the largest influence on summer soil temperatures and soil respiration rates, which were higher under Salix canopies. Mosses were associated with lower soil moisture irrespective of shrub identity, but modulated the effects of shrubs on winter soil temperatures and soil C:N ratios so that moss cover reduced differences in soil winter temperatures between shrub species and reduced C:N ratios under Betula but not under Salix canopies. Our results suggest a central role of mosses in mediating soil properties and processes, with their influence depending on shrub species identity. Such species-dependent effects need to be accounted for when forecasting vegetation dynamics under ongoing environmental changes.

  12. Efficacy of Natural Polymer Derivatives on Soil Physical Properties and Erosion on an Experimental Loess Hillslope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun'e; Wang, Zhanli; Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-12-22

    Raindrops disperse large soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can clog soil pores, cause soil crusting, reduce rainfall infiltration and increase soil loss. It was found that natural polymer derivatives were effective in improving soil physical properties and decreasing soil erosion on an experimental loess hillslope. This study investigated the effect of new natural polymer derivatives (Jag S and Jag C162) on soil properties, rainfall infiltration and sediment yield at four rates of sprayed polymers (0, 1, 3 and 5 g/m²), three rainfall intensities (1, 1.5 and 2 mm/min) and a slope gradient of 15° with a silt loam soil through simulated rain. The results showed that both Jag S and Jag C162 significantly increased the shear strength and improved the aggregates composition of the soil surface. The water-stable soil aggregates >0.25 mm increased from 9% to 50% with increasing rates of Jag S and Jag C162. Jag S and Jag C162 also effectively increased rainfall infiltration and final infiltration rate, and reduced erosion compared to controls without natural polymer derivatives added. However, higher rates of Jag S produced lower infiltration rates. Although both Jag S and Jag C162 effectively influenced soil physical properties and erosion, the effect of Jag C162 was more significant than that of Jag S.

  13. Moss Mediates the Influence of Shrub Species on Soil Properties and Processes in Alpine Tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, C Guillermo; Williamson, Scott N; Barrio, Isabel C; Helgadóttir, Ágústa; HiK, David S

    2016-01-01

    In tundra ecosystems, bryophytes influence soil processes directly and indirectly through interactions with overstory shrub species. We experimentally manipulated moss cover and measured seasonal soil properties and processes under two species of deciduous shrubs with contrasting canopy structures, Salix planifolia pulchra and Betula glandulosa-nana complex. Soil properties (seasonal temperature, moisture and C:N ratios) and processes (seasonal litter decomposition and soil respiration) were measured over twelve months. Shrub species identity had the largest influence on summer soil temperatures and soil respiration rates, which were higher under Salix canopies. Mosses were associated with lower soil moisture irrespective of shrub identity, but modulated the effects of shrubs on winter soil temperatures and soil C:N ratios so that moss cover reduced differences in soil winter temperatures between shrub species and reduced C:N ratios under Betula but not under Salix canopies. Our results suggest a central role of mosses in mediating soil properties and processes, with their influence depending on shrub species identity. Such species-dependent effects need to be accounted for when forecasting vegetation dynamics under ongoing environmental changes.

  14. Geoelectrical Soil Properties of Farmlands Located on Ancient River Floodplains in EL Paso County Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegues, J. G.; Kaip, G.; Doser, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Farming in Rio Grande flood plain deposit soils has presented challenges concerning soil salinity, soil drainage and soil collapse. Typical soil forms include Saneli silted clay loam, Harkey loam, Harkey silky loam clay and Tigua silty clay. In the lower valley farmlands of Socorro, TX, cotton and alfalfa are the principal crops, but grain sorghum, corn and vegetable crops also are suitable. Pecan trees, as well as fruit trees suited to the climate, can be grown. Agrarians are faced with varying results of crop yields over relatively small stretches of land; for example, a 22 acre area can contain multiple soil inclusions. This study was conducted on a 22 acre tract of farmland which has recently undergone multiple geophysical testing analyses that include: magnetics, DC resistivity, gravity, and ground penetrating radar. Results will compare flood plain sedimentation qualities to agricultural soil classes through the identification of soil salinity and grain size. This investigation will focus on the testing of geo-electrical soil properties through resistivity assessment. Examination of the sight using a capacity coupled resistivity meter to measure the soil properties over various time periods will be conducted. The results will be compared with the other geophysical data to look for correlations that highlight soil properties.

  15. The Effect of Compost and the Ripe Fruit Waste of Fig on some Physical Properties of Surface Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra dianat maharluei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In arid and semi-arid soils, low organic matter is one of the barriers to achieving optimal performance. The soils with more organic matter have a better structure and are more resistant to erosive factors such as water and wind. Soil organic matter has a particular importance and has significant impact on the stability of soil aggregates, the extension of plant root system, carbon and water cycles and soil resistance to erosion. This substance acts as a cementing agent and plays an important role in soil flocculation and formation of resistant aggregates.Also, the addition of organic matter to the soil increases soil porosity and decreases soil bulk density. Materials and Methods: In this research, the effect of the two types of organic matter (compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig on some soil physical properties was studied. A factorial experiment based on completely randomized design, including the four levels of compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig (0, 1, 2 and 4 by weight % and three soil types (loamy sand, loam and silty clay loam with three replications was carried out. The soil samples were collected from the three territories of Fars Province: loamy sand soil from Shiraz, loamy soil from Maharlu and Silty clay loam soil from Zarghan area. The soil samples were air dried and passed through a 2 mm sieve. The physical properties including the bulk density, particle density, porosity, moisture content and soil crust strength was measured. In this research, the soil texture by hydrometer method, Electrical conductivity of the soil saturated paste extract by electrical conductivity meter, saturated paste pH by pH meter, seedling emergence test, soil crust strength by a pocket penetrometer (HUMBOLDT MFG.CO. bulk density by cylindrical sample and particle density by pycnometer method were measured. The fig fruit treatments were prepared by thoroughly mixing the dried powder of ripe fig fruit passed through a 2 mm sieve (with

  16. PROPERTIES AND MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS OF SOILS FORMED FROM VOLCANIC MATERIALS IN LEMBANG AREA, WEST JAVA

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    Edi Yatno

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soils formed from volcanic materials have a high potential for agricultural development, especially for horticultural crops, tea, and pine trees. Data on the characteristics of these soils are important for the management planning. Six representative soil profiles developed on andesitic volcanic ash and tuff in Lembang area, West Java were studied to determine the soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties, to study the relationship between the soil properties, and to classify the soils according to the Soil Taxonomy. The results indicated that all the soils had very deep (>150 cm solum. In general, the volcanic ash soils were darker colored, more granular, more friable, less sticky and less plastic than the volcanic tuff soils. Physically, the ash soils had lower bulk density (0.44-0.73 mg m-3 and higher available water content (13-33% than the tuff soils. Bulk density decreased with increasing allophane. Chemically, the ash soils had higher pHNaF (mostly > 10, higher organic carbon (4.3-6.8% in upper horizons, higher CEC (20- 44 cmolc kg-1, and higher P retention (> 85% than the tuff soils. P retention logarithmically increased with increasing oxalate extractable Al and allophane. The sand fractions of the ash soils were dominated by hornblende, while the tuff soils were predominantly composed of opaque minerals. In the clay fractions, the ash soils were dominated by allophane, whereas the tuff soils showed high contents of gibbsite and metahalloysite. Soils developed on volcanic ash were classified as Thaptic Hapludands and Typic Melanudands, while soils formed from volcanic tuff were classified as Andic Dystrudepts. The low bulk density and friable consistency of the soils contributed to favorable soil tilth. However, high P retention and Al saturation in most soils are limiting factors for plant growth. Application of P fertilizers and liming coupled with efficient placement can be recommended to enhance P availability and

  17. Influence of biochar on the physical, chemical and retention properties of an amended sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiamonte, Giorgio; De Pasquale, Claudio; Parrino, Francesco; Crescimanno, Giuseppina

    2017-04-01

    Soil porosity plays an important role in soil-water retention and water availability to crops, potentially affecting both agricultural practices and environmental sustainability. The pore structure controls fluid flow and transport through the soil, as well as the relationship between the properties of individual minerals and plants. Moreover, the anthropogenic pressure on soil properties has produced numerous sites with extensive desertification process close to residential areas. Biochar (biologically derived charcoal) is produced by pyrolysis of biomasses under low oxygen conditions, and it can be applied for recycling organic waste in soils and increase soil fertility, improving soil structure and enhancing soil water storage and soil water movement. Soil application of biochar might have agricultural, environmental and sustainability advantages over the use of organic manures or compost, as it is a porous material with a high inner surface area. The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the possible application of biochar from forest residues, derived from mechanically chipped trunks and large branches of Abies alba M., Larix decidua Mill., Picea excelsa L., Pinus nigra A. and Pinus sylvestris L. pyrolysed at 450 °C for 48h, to improve soil structural and hydraulic properties (achieving a stabilization of soil). Different amount of biochar were added to a desertic sandy soil, and the effect on soil porosity water retention and water available to crops were investigated. The High Energy Moisture Characteristic (HEMC) technique was applied to investigate soil-water retention at high-pressure head levels. The adsorption and desorption isotherms of N2 on external surfaces were also determined in order to investigate micro and macro porosity ratio. Both the described model of studies on adsorption-desorption experiments with the applied isotherms model explain the increasing substrate porosity with a particular attention to the macro and micro

  18. Interpolation Approaches for Characterizing Spatial Variability of Soil Properties in Tuz Lake Basin of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Tanik, Aysegul

    2017-12-01

    Soil management is an essential concern in protecting soil properties, in enhancing appropriate soil quality for plant growth and agricultural productivity, and in preventing soil erosion. Soil scientists and decision makers require accurate and well-distributed spatially continuous soil data across a region for risk assessment and for effectively monitoring and managing soils. Recently, spatial interpolation approaches have been utilized in various disciplines including soil sciences for analysing, predicting and mapping distribution and surface modelling of environmental factors such as soil properties. The study area selected in this research is Tuz Lake Basin in Turkey bearing ecological and economic importance. Fertile soil plays a significant role in agricultural activities, which is one of the main industries having great impact on economy of the region. Loss of trees and bushes due to intense agricultural activities in some parts of the basin lead to soil erosion. Besides, soil salinization due to both human-induced activities and natural factors has exacerbated its condition regarding agricultural land development. This study aims to compare capability of Local Polynomial Interpolation (LPI) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) as two interpolation methods for mapping spatial pattern of soil properties including organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron. Both LPI and RBF methods demonstrated promising results for predicting lime, organic matter, phosphorous and boron. Soil samples collected in the field were used for interpolation analysis in which approximately 80% of data was used for interpolation modelling whereas the remaining for validation of the predicted results. Relationship between validation points and their corresponding estimated values in the same location is examined by conducting linear regression analysis. Eight prediction maps generated from two different interpolation methods for soil organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron parameters

  19. Geoelectric method applied in correlation between physical characteristics and electrical properties of the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcelino Silva Filho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of the relationship between electrical properties and physical characteristics of the soil. Measures of apparent electrical resistivity of the soil were made for different types of soil, varying moisture content gradually while maintaining a constant compaction, and then varying the compaction and relating it to a constant humidity. Development of a correlation surface is proposed in order to identify granulometry of the soil from moisture and compaction measurements. For the study of spatial variability, two areas were chosen to allow the change of moisture content and compaction in order to verify the measurement capacity of apparent electrical resistivity of the soil as methodology to identify change in soil dynamics. Results obtained show correlations among apparent electrical resistivity of the soil, moisture, soil compaction and clay content.

  20. Analysis on Soil Seed Bank Diversity Characteristics and Its Relation with Soil Physical and Chemical Properties after Substrate Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mengxuan; Lv, Lingyue; Li, Hongyuan; Meng, Weiqing; Zhao, Na

    2016-01-01

    Considered as an essential measure in the application of soil seed bank (SSB) projects, the mixing of substrate and surface soil can effectively improve soil condition. This research is aimed at exploring the diversity characteristics of SSBs and the relationships between SSBs and soil properties. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was adopted to describe the ordination of SSBs on soil properties' gradients; multiple linear regressions were adopted to analyze the relationship between average growth height and soil properties, density and soil properties. Experimental groups of mixed substrate (the mixture of organic and inorganic substrates) had high diversity indexes, especially the Shannon-Wiener Index compared with those of single substrate. Meanwhile, a higher number of species and increased density were also noted in those of mixed substrate. The best test group, No.16, had the highest diversity indexes with a Shannon-Wiener of 1.898, Simpson of 0.633 and Pielou of 0.717, and also showed the highest density of 14000 germinants /m2 and 21 species. In addition, an improvement of the soil's chemical and physical properties was noted when the substrates were mixed. The mixed substrate of turfy soil and perlite could effectively enhance the soil moisture content, whilst a mixed substrate of rice husk carbon and vermiculite could improve the content of available potassium (AK) and phosphorus (AP) and strengthen soil fertility. The germinated plants also reflected obvious regularities of ordination on soil factor gradients. Three distinct cluster groups were presented, of which the first cluster was distributed in an area with a relatively higher content of AK and AP; the second cluster was distributed at places with relatively higher soil moisture content; and the third cluster of plants didn't show any obvious relationship with soil physical and chemical properties. Through CCA analysis, AK and AP were considered the most important soil factors to influence

  1. Influence of soil properties and soil moisture on the efficacy of indaziflam and flumioxazin on Kochia scoparia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Derek J; Nissen, Scott J; Westra, Phil; Shaner, Dale L; Butters, Greg

    2017-02-01

    Kochia (Kochia scoparia L.) is a highly competitive, non-native weed found throughout the western United States. Flumioxazin and indaziflam are two broad-spectrum pre-emergence herbicides that can control kochia in a variety of crop and non-crop situations; however, under dry conditions, these herbicides sometimes fail to control this important weed. There is very little information describing the effect of soil properties and soil moisture on the efficacy of these herbicides. Soil organic matter (SOM) explained the highest proportion of variability in predicting the herbicide dose required for 80% kochia growth reduction (GR80 ) for flumioxazin and indaziflam (R2 = 0.72 and 0.79 respectively). SOM had a greater impact on flumioxazin phytotoxicity compared to indaziflam. Flumioxazin and indaziflam kochia phytotoxicity was greatly reduced at soil water potentials below -200 kPa. Kochia can germinate at soil moisture potentials below the moisture required for flumioxazin and indaziflam activation, which means that kochia control is greatly influenced by the complex interaction between soil physical properties and soil moisture. This research can be used to gain a better understanding of how and why some weeds, like kochia, are so difficult to manage even with herbicides that normally provide excellent control. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Effect of Mineral and Humic Substances on Tailing Soil Properties and Nutrient Uptake by Pennisetum purpureum Schumach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhe Phoppy Wira Etika

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tin mining produces a by-product sand tailing from soil leaching with characteristic low pH and total organic carbon, and can be reclaimed by providing a suitable ameliorant. When available in situ, ameliorant materials can be economically used as they are required in large amounts. Fortunately, Bangka Belitung has sample stock of such kaolinite-rich minerals that can be utilized for improving soil chemical properties. Extracted organic materials, such as humic substances, can also be utilized as they influence the complex soil reactions, and promote plant growth. Thus, this study aimed to assess the effects of mineral, humic materials and interaction of both material on soil chemical properties and nutrient uptake of Pennisetum purpureum Schumach. A completely randomized design with 2 factors and 3 replications each was employed. Factor 1 was mineral matter is 0; 420; 840; 1.260 Mg ha-1 while Factor 2 was humic material is 0; 0.46; 0.92; 1.38 kg C ha-1. Air-dried samples of tailing were applied with oil palm compost then mixed evenly with mineral and humic materials. Penissetum purpureum Schumach was planted after 4 weeks incubation, and maintained for another 4 weeks. The results demonstrated that the addition of mineral matter significantly increased soil organic carbon content, total N, exchangeable K, Fe, Mn and boosted nutrient - total Ca, Mg and Mn – uptake of the plant. But the application of humic material increased only soil organic carbon content. The interaction of both materials only lowered soil pH.

  3. Application of a green manure and green manure composted with beet vinasse on soil restoration: effects on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, M; Gonzalez, J L; García-Martínez, A M; Parrado, J

    2008-07-01

    Beet vinasse (BV), a green manure constituted by Trifolium pratense L. uncomposted (TP) and composted with beet vinasse (at 1:1 rate, (TP+BV)1, and 2:1 rate, (TP+BV)2) at 10t organic matter ha(-1) rate were applied during a period of four years for purpose of restoration of a Xelloric Calciorthid located near Seville (Guadalquivir Valley, Andalusia, Spain). The effect on the plant cover, soil physical (structural stability and bulk density), chemical (exchangeable sodium percentage), and biological properties (microbial biomass, soil respiration and enzymatic activities such as dehydrogenase, urease, beta-glucosidase, phosphatase and arylsulfatase) were determined. The application of BV had a detrimental impact on soil physical (structural stability decreased 16.5% and bulk density increased 18.7% respect to the control soil), chemical (exchangeable sodium percentage increased 87.3% respect to the control soil), and biological properties (microbial biomass, soil respiration, and dehydrogenase, urease, beta-glucosidase, phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities decreased by 53.5%, 24.5%, 27.8%, 15%, 39.7%, 42.7%, and 65.6%, respectively with respect to the control soil), probably because high quantities of monovalent cations (Na principally) were introduced into the soil by the vinasse, thus destabilizing its structure. The application of TP had a positive impact on soil physical (structural stability increased 5.9% and bulk density decreased 6.1% respect to the control soil), and biological properties (microbial biomass, soil respiration, and dehydrogenase, urease, beta-glucosidase, phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities increased by 66.3%, 45.6%, 97.7%, 98.9%, 97.7%, 87.2%, and 89.4%, respectively with respect to the control soil). However, when BV was co-composted with a green manure, principally at a 2:1 rate, the resulting compost had a positive effect on soil physical (structural stability increased 10.5% and bulk density decreased 13.5% respect to the

  4. Utilization of crops residues as compost and biochar for improving soil physical properties and upland rice productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Barus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of crops waste in the agricultural field can be converted to organic fertilizer throughout the process of composting or pyrolysis to return back into the soil. The study aimed to elucidate the effect of compost and biochar application on the physical properties and productivity of upland rice at Village of Sukaraja Nuban, Batanghari Nuban Sub district, East Lampung Regency in 2015. The amendment treatments were A. control; B. 10 t rice husk biochar/ ha; C. 10 t maize cob biochar/ha; D. 10 t straw compost/ha; E. 10 t stover compost/ha, F. 10 t rice husk biochar/ha + 10 t straw compost/ha; F. 10 t maize cob biochar/ha + 10 t maize stover compost/ha. The treatments were arranged in randomized block design with four replicates. The plot size for each treatment was 10 x 20 m. After incubation for about one month, undisturbed soil samples were taken using copper ring at 10–20 cm depth for laboratory analyzes. Analyses of soil physical properties included bulk density, particle density, total porosity, drainage porosity, and soil water condition. Plant observations conducted at harvest were plant height, number of panicle, number of grain/panicle, and grain weight/plot. Results of the study showed that biochar and compost improved soil physical properties such as bulk density, total porosity, fast drainage pores, water content, and permeability of soil. The combination of rice husk biochar and straw compost gave better effect than single applications on rice production components (numbers of panicle and grains of rice, and gave the highest yield of 4.875 t/ha.

  5. The effects of the physical and chemical properties of soils on the spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, O. L.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of organic matter, free iron oxides, texture, moisture content, and cation exchange capacity on the spectral reflectance of soils were investigated along with techniques for differentiating soil orders by computer analysis of multispectral data. By collecting soil samples of benchmark soils from the different climatic regions within the United States and using the extended wavelength field spectroradiometer to obtain reflectance values and curves for each sample, average curves were constructed for each soil order. Results indicate that multispectral analysis may be a valuable tool for delineating and quantifying differences between soils.

  6. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  7. Can Brazil nut plantations recover soil properties in former pasture lands?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro Bastos, Rodrigo; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Stupak, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Soils of livestock pastures are heavily degraded in the Amazon region compared to conditions immediately after deforestation. We hypothesized that incoming-generating Brazil nut plantations (Bertholletia excelsa) and natural succession secondary forests can recover soil properties of these lands....... To test this, we sampled two 200-cm soil pits in four vegetation types: pasture (PA), Brazil-nut plantation (BN), secondary forest (SF) and primary forest (PF). Soil samples were collected at nine fixed depths to measure bulk density, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and C...

  8. Degradation of fenamiphos in soils collected from different geographical regions: the influence of soil properties and climatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Tanya; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2008-05-01

    The persistence of fenamiphos (nematicide) in five soils collected from different geographical regions such as Australia, Ecuador and India under three temperature regimes (18, 25 and 37 degrees C) simulating typical environmental conditions was studied. The effect of soil properties (soil pH, temperature and microbial biomass) on the degradation of fenamiphos was determined. The rate of degradation increased with increase in temperature. Fenamiphos degradation was higher at 37 degrees C than at 25 and 18 degrees C (except under alkaline pH). The degradation pathway differed in different soils. Fenamiphos sulfoxide (FSO) was identified as the major degradation product in all the soils. Fenamiphos sulfone (FSO2), and the corresponding phenols: fenamiphos phenol (FP), fenamiphos sulfoxide phenol (FSOP) and fenamiphos sulfone phenol (FSO2P) were also detected. The degradation of fenamiphos was faster in the alkaline soils, followed by neutral and acidic soils. Under sterile conditions, the dissipation of the pesticide was slower than in the non-sterile soils suggesting microbial role in the pesticide degradation. The generation of new knowledge on fenamiphos degradation patterns under different environmental conditions is important to achieve better pesticide risk management.

  9. Adsorption properties of subtropical and tropical variable charge soils: Implications from climate change and biochar amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Qafoku, Nikolla; Van Ranst, Eric; Li, Jiu-yu; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-25

    This review paper attempts to summarize the progress made in research efforts conducted over the last years to study the surface chemical properties of the tropical and subtropical soils, usually called variable charge soils, and the way they response to different management practices. The paper is composed of an introductory section that provides a brief discussion on the surface chemical properties of these soils, and five other review sections. The focus of these sections is on the evolution of surface chemical properties during the development of the variable charge properties (second section), interactions between oppositely charged particles and the resulting effects on the soil properties and especially on soil acidity (third section), the surface effects of low molecular weight organic acids sorbed to mineral surfaces and the chemical behavior of aluminum (fourth section), and the crop straw derived biochar induced changes of the surface chemical properties of these soils (fifth section). A discussion on the effect of climate change variables on the properties of the variable charge soils is included at the end of this review paper (sixth section).

  10. Assessment of spatial variability of soil thermal properties in cultivated field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    Most of soil physical properties are spatially variable both in regional and field scale. Spatial heterogeneity of soil properties in the field is related to the nature of the soil itself, but some of the variation is caused by tillage and other management practices. The aim of this work was to determine spatial variability of thermal properties on the cultivated field (40 x 350 m) using geostatistical method. The present work used data obtained from the measurements of topsoil soil texture (sand, silt and clay content), organic carbon, water content, bulk density, particle density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity after harvest of triticale. The measurements were done in 45 points using TDR and KD2Pro for soil water content and thermal properties, respectively. Moreover, measurements of the thermal properties were performed in the laboratory at dry and saturated soil. The coefficient of variations (CV) varied from 1.6% for the particle density to 67% for the clay content. Among the thermal properties the most variable was thermal diffusivity at saturation (24%) and the least variable thermal conductivity in dry state (8.4%). The exponential semivariogram models matched well with empirical semivariogram. The range of the thermal properties measured in the field varied from 10 m for the thermal diffusivity to 23 m for the thermal conductivity. The ranges in dry and saturated soil were greater than at field water content. Among the remaining properties the largest range of the semivariograms was for soil textural fractions (100-250 m) and bulk density (145 m) and the lowest water content (14 m). This indicates that the thermal properties were resultant of both soil water content and bulk density. Most of the soil properties exhibited strong and moderate spatial dependency. Heterogeneity and variation of soil physical and thermal parameters in a field due to soil cultivation should be taken into consideration for a successful agricultural

  11. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils. Volume XIII.- Navarra and La Rioja; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles. Volumen XIII.- Navarra y La Rioja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Lago, C.; Roquero, C.; Magister, M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidades Autonomas of Navarra and La Rioja. (Author) 46 refs.

  12. Soil properties and understory herbaceous biomass in forests of three species of Quercus in Northeast Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Castro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This paper aims to characterize some soil properties within the first 25 cm of the soil profile and the herbaceous biomass in Quercus forests, and the possible relationships between soil properties and understory standing biomass.Area of study: Three monoespecific Quercus forests (Q. suber L., Q. ilex subsp. rotundifolia Lam. and Q. pyrenaica Willd in NE Portugal.Material and methods: During 1999 and 2000 soil properties (pH-KCl, total soil nitrogen (N, soil organic carbon (SOC, C/N ratio, available phosphorus (P, and available potassium (K and herbaceous biomass production of three forest types: Quercus suber L., Quercus ilex subsp. rotundifolia Lam. and Quercus pyrenaica Willd were studied.Main results: The results showed a different pattern of soil fertility (N, SOC, P, K in Quercus forests in NE of Portugal. The C/N ratio and the herbaceous biomass confirmed this pattern. Research highlights: There is a pattern of Quercus sp. distribution that correlates with different soil characteristics by soil characteristics in NE Portugal. Q. pyrenaica ecosystems were found in more favoured areas (mesic conditions; Q. rotundifolia developed in nutrient-poor soils (oligotrophic conditions; and Q. suber were found in intermediate zones.Keywords: fertility; biomass; C/N ratio; cork oak; holm oak; pyrenean oak.

  13. Effects of Superabsorbent Polymers on the Hydraulic Parameters and Water Retention Properties of Soil

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    Renkuan Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs are widely applied in dryland agriculture. However, their functional property of repeated absorption and release of soil water exerts periodic effects on the hydraulic parameters and water-retention properties of soil, and as this property gradually diminishes with time, its effects tend to be unstable. During the 120-day continuous soil cultivation experiment described in this paper, horizontal soil column infiltration and high-speed centrifugation tests were conducted on SAP-treated soil to measure unsaturated diffusivity D and soil water characteristic curves. The experimental results suggest that the SAP increased the water retaining capacity of soil sections where the suction pressure was between 0 and 3,000 cm. The SAP significantly obstructed water diffusion in the soil in the early days of the experiment, but the effect gradually decreased in the later period. The average decrease in water diffusivity in the treatment groups fell from 76.6% at 0 days to 1.2% at 120 days. This research also provided parameters of time-varying functions that describe the unsaturated diffusivity D and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K of soils under the effects of SAPs; in future research, these functions can be used to construct water movement models applicable to SAP-treated soil.

  14. Influence of soil properties on the bioaccumulation and effects of arsenic in the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Freire, A; Peinado, F J Martín; Ortiz, M Díez; van Gestel, C A M

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at assessing the influence of soil properties on the uptake and toxicity effects of arsenic in the earthworm Eisenia andrei exposed for 4 weeks to seven natural soils spiked with different arsenic concentrations. Water-soluble soil concentrations (AsW) and internal As concentrations in the earthworms (AsE) were greatly different between soils. These two variables were highly correlated and were key factors in earthworm toxicity response. AsW was explained by some soil properties, such as the pH, calcium carbonate content, ionic strength, texture or oxide forms. Toxicity showed a clear variation between soils, in some cases without achieving 50 % adverse effect at the highest As concentration added (600 mg kg(-1)). Nevertheless, soil properties did not show, in general, a high relation with studied toxicity endpoints, although the high correlation with AsW could greatly reduce indirectly As bioavailability and toxicity risk for earthworms. Obtained results suggest that soil properties should be part of the criteria to establishing thresholds for contaminated soils because they will be key in controlling As availability and thus result in different degrees of toxicity.

  15. Effect of adding natural pozzolana on geotechnical properties of lime-stabilized clayey soil

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    Aref al-Swaidani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soils in Syria cover a total area of more than 20,000 km2 of the country, most of which are located in the southwestern region. In many places of the country, the clayey soils caused severe damage to infrastructures. Extensive studies have been carried out on the stabilization of clayey soils using lime. Syria is rich in both lime and natural pozzolana. However, few works have been conducted to investigate the influence of adding natural pozzolana on the geotechnical properties of lime-treated clayey soils. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of adding natural pozzolana on some geotechnical properties of lime-stabilized clayey soils. Natural pozzolana and lime are added to soil within the range of 0%–20% and 0%–8%, respectively. Consistency, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and linear shrinkage properties are particularly investigated. The test results show that the investigated properties of lime-treated clayey soils can be considerably enhanced when the natural pozzolana is added as a stabilizing agent. Analysis results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX show significant changes in the microstructure of the treated clayey soil. A better flocculation of clayey particles and further formation of cementing materials in the natural pozzolana-lime-treated clayey soil are clearly observed.

  16. Chemical and biological properties of phosphorus-fertilized soil under legume and grass cover (Cerrado region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fernando Pereira Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops has been suggested as an effective method to maintain and/or increase the organic matter content, while maintaining and/or enhancing the soil physical, chemical and biological properties. The fertility of Cerrado soils is low and, consequently, phosphorus levels as well. Phosphorus is required at every metabolic stage of the plant, as it plays a role in the processes of protein and energy synthesis and influences the photosynthetic process. This study evaluated the influence of cover crops and phosphorus rates on soil chemical and biological properties after two consecutive years of common bean. The study analyzed an Oxisol in Selvíria (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in a randomized block, split plot design, in a total of 24 treatments with three replications. The plot treatments consisted of cover crops (millet, pigeon pea, crotalaria, velvet bean, millet + pigeon pea, millet + crotalaria, and millet + velvet bean and one plot was left fallow. The subplots were represented by phosphorus rates applied as monoammonium phosphate (0, 60 and 90 kg ha-1 P2O5. In August 2011, the soil chemical properties were evaluated (pH, organic matter, phosphorus, potential acidity, cation exchange capacity, and base saturation as well as biological variables (carbon of released CO2, microbial carbon, metabolic quotient and microbial quotient. After two years of cover crops in rotation with common bean, the cover crop biomass had not altered the soil chemical properties and barely influenced the microbial activity. The biomass production of millet and crotalaria (monoculture or intercropped was highest. The biological variables were sensitive and responded to increasing phosphorus rates with increases in microbial carbon and reduction of the metabolic quotient.

  17. Soil properties and not inputs control carbon : nitrogen : phosphorus ratios in cropped soils in the long term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Emmanuel; Buchmann, Nina; Bünemann, Else K.; Kiba, Delwende I.; Lompo, François; Oberson, Astrid; Tamburini, Federica; Traoré, Ouakoltio Y. A.

    2016-02-01

    Stoichiometric approaches have been applied to understand the relationship between soil organic matter dynamics and biological nutrient transformations. However, very few studies have explicitly considered the effects of agricultural management practices on the soil C : N : P ratio. The aim of this study was to assess how different input types and rates would affect the C : N : P molar ratios of bulk soil, organic matter and microbial biomass in cropped soils in the long term. Thus, we analysed the C, N, and P inputs and budgets as well as soil properties in three long-term experiments established on different soil types: the Saria soil fertility trial (Burkina Faso), the Wagga Wagga rotation/stubble management/soil preparation trial (Australia), and the DOK (bio-Dynamic, bio-Organic, and "Konventionell") cropping system trial (Switzerland). In each of these trials, there was a large range of C, N, and P inputs which had a strong impact on element concentrations in soils. However, although C : N : P ratios of the inputs were highly variable, they had only weak effects on soil C : N : P ratios. At Saria, a positive correlation was found between the N : P ratio of inputs and microbial biomass, while no relation was observed between the nutrient ratios of inputs and soil organic matter. At Wagga Wagga, the C : P ratio of inputs was significantly correlated to total soil C : P, N : P, and C : N ratios, but had no impact on the elemental composition of microbial biomass. In the DOK trial, a positive correlation was found between the C budget and the C to organic P ratio in soils, while the nutrient ratios of inputs were not related to those in the microbial biomass. We argue that these responses are due to differences in soil properties among sites. At Saria, the soil is dominated by quartz and some kaolinite, has a coarse texture, a fragile structure, and a low nutrient content. Thus, microorganisms feed on inputs (plant residues, manure). In contrast, the soil at

  18. Visible-near infrared spectroscopy as a tool to improve mapping of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgrafova, Alevtina; Kühnel, Anna; Bogner, Christina; Haase, Ina; Shibistova, Olga; Guggenberger, Georg; Tananaev, Nikita; Sauheitl, Leopold; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Spectroscopic measurements, which are non-destructive, precise and rapid, can be used to predict soil properties and help estimate the spatial variability of soil properties at the pedon scale. These estimations are required for quantifying soil properties with higher precision, identifying the changes in soil properties and ecosystem response to climate change as well as increasing the estimation accuracy of soil-related models. Our objectives were to (i) predict soil properties for nested samples (n = 296) using the laboratory-based visible-near infrared (vis-NIR) spectra of air-dried (sieved through a 2-mm sieve and ground with an agate mortar prior to the elemental analysis. The soil organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations (in %) were determined using a dry combustion method on the Vario EL cube analyzer (Elementar Analysensysteme GmbH, Germany). Inorganic C was removed from the mineral soil samples with pH values higher than 7 prior to the elemental analysis using the volatilization method (HCl, 6 hours). The pH of soil samples was measured in 0.01 M CaCl2 using a 1:2 soil:solution ratio. However, for soil sample with a high in organic matter content, a 1:10 ratio was applied. We also measured oxalate and dithionite extracted iron, aluminum and manganese oxides and hydroxides using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (Varian Vista MPX ICP-OES, Agilent Technologies, USA). We predicted the above-mentioned soil properties for all nested samples using partial least squares regression, which was performed using R program. We can conclude that vis-NIR spectroscopy can be used effectively in order to describe, estimate and further map the spatial patterns of soil properties using geostatistical methods. This research could also help to improve the global soil spectral library taking into account that only few previous applications of vis-NIR spectroscopy were conducted on permafrost-affected soils of Northern Siberia. Keywords: Visible

  19. Effects of biochar amendment on geotechnical properties of landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna R; Yaghoubi, Poupak; Yukselen-Aksoy, Yeliz

    2015-06-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich product obtained when plant-based biomass is heated in a closed container with little or no available oxygen. Biochar-amended soil has the potential to serve as a landfill cover material that can oxidise methane emissions for two reasons: biochar amendment can increase the methane retention time and also enhance the biological activity that can promote the methanotrophic oxidation of methane. Hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength are the most important geotechnical properties that are required for the design of effective and stable landfill cover systems, but no studies have been reported on these properties for biochar-amended landfill cover soils. This article presents physicochemical and geotechnical properties of a biochar, a landfill cover soil and biochar-amended soils. Specifically, the effects of amending 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (of different particle sizes as produced, size-20 and size-40) to soil on its physicochemical properties, such as moisture content, organic content, specific gravity and pH, as well as geotechnical properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength, were determined from laboratory testing. Soil or biochar samples were prepared by mixing them with 20% deionised water based on dry weight. Samples of soil amended with 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (w/w) as-is or of different select sizes, were also prepared at 20% initial moisture content. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity of the soil increases, compressibility of the soil decreases and shear strength of the soil increases with an increase in the biochar amendment, and with a decrease in biochar particle size. Overall, the study revealed that biochar-amended soils can possess excellent geotechnical properties to serve as stable landfill cover materials. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Toxic Chemicals in the Soil Environment. Volume 1. Chemical Properties and Characterization of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITTAN (Brown, 1955). I. Amorphous (noncrxstalline cliys) Allophane (examnr1C, Ando soils of Japan) II. Crystalline Minerals A. Two...Lhis silica is usually contaminated with Al to form allophane and imogolite and similar soil mi;nerals. allophane and imogolite are gel- like...1977. Allophane and imogolite. In Minerals in Soil Environments, ed. J. B. Dixon and S. B. Weed. Madison, Wisconsin: Soil Science Society of America

  1. Changes in some soil properties at different incubation periods after tobacco waste application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulser, Coskun; Demir, Zeynep; Ic, Serkan

    2010-09-01

    In this study changes in organic carbon (OC), basal soil respiration (BSR), nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), electrical conductivity (EC) and aggregate stability (AS) of a clay loam soil due to tobacco waste (TOW) application were monitored for 240 days. After incorporating 5% TOW into soil according to oven dry weight basis, soil samples were incubated at field capacity for 20, 40, 80, 140 and 240 days under a greenhouse condition. TOW application significantly increased all soil properties over the control treatment Soil OC and AS values had significant positive correlations each other and with the other soil properties. Soil OC, BSR and AS values significantly increased from 0.12%, 0.03 microg CO2-C g(-1) dry soil 24 hr and 20.7% in control treatment to 1.13%, 3.7 microg CO2-C g(-1) dry soil 24 hr and 54.4% in TOW treatment, respectively in 20 days. While the highest NO3-N (1780 ppm) was found in 40 days, the highest EC (3.35 dS m(-1)) was in 240 days after TOW application. Disaggregation occurred in all treatments after 20 days of incubation due to probably the more substrate demands of microorganisms in soil.

  2. The influence of surface reflectance anisotropy on estimation of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Roosjen, Peter; Clevers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The spatial variation in soil properties is an important factor for agricultural management. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV's) equipped with a hyperspectral mapping system may provide these data, but anisotropic reflectance effects may have an influence on the derived soil properties. Besides influencing the reflectance, angular observations may deliver added information about soil properties. We investigated the anisotropic behavior of 59 soil samples with a large variation in soil composition, by measuring their reflectance (350-2500 nm) over 92 different angles using a robot-based laboratory goniometer system. The results show that the anisotropic behavior of the soils influences the measured reflectance significantly, which limits the accurate prediction of soil properties (OM and clay especially). However, prediction accuracies of OM increase when spectra are measured under specific angles. Prediction accuracies further increase when a combination of observation angles is being used. Apart from that, using UAV's the wavelength range is limited to about 1000 nm. In general, this will decrease the model performance, but our results show that this effect can largely be compensated by combining multiple observation angles. Altogether, we demonstrate that surface anisotropy influences the prediction of soil properties negatively. This effect can be reduced by combining spectra acquired under different angles. Moreover, predictions can be improved if combinations of different observation angles are used.

  3. Long-term application of bioorganic fertilizers improved soil biochemical properties and microbial communities of an apple orchard soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil biochemical properties and microbial communities are usually considered as important indicators of soil health because of their association with plant nutrition. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term application of bioorganic fertilizer (BOF on soil biochemical properties and microbial communities in the apple orchard soil of the Loess Plateau. The experiment included three treatments: (1 control without fertilization (CK; (2 chemical fertilizer application (CF; and (3 bioorganic fertilizer application (BOF. The high throughput sequencing was used to examine the bacterial and fungal communities in apple orchard soil. The results showed that the BOF treatment significantly increased the apple yield during the experimental time (2009-2015. The application of BOF significantly increased the activities of catalase and invertase compared to those in CK and CF treatments. The high throughput sequencing data showed that the application of BOF changed the microbial community composition of all soil depths considered (0-20cm, 20-40cm, and 40-60cm, e.g., the relative abundance of bio-control bacteria (Xanthomonadales, Lysobacter, Pseudomonas and Bacillus, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Ohtaekwangia, Ilyonectria and Lecanicillium was increased while that of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gp4, Gp6 and Sphaerobacter was decreased. The increase in apple yield after the application of BOF might be due to increase in organic matter, total nitrogen and catalase and invertase activities of soil and change in the bacterial community composition by enriching Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Lysobacter and Ohtaekwangia. These results further enhance the understanding on how BOFs alter soil microbial community composition to stimulate soil productivity.

  4. Effects of shrub revegetation with Atriplex halimus L. and Retama sphaerocarpa L. in gypsiferous soils. Influence in soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienes, Ramón; Marques, Maria Jose; Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Arevalo, Diana; Sastre, Blanca; Garcia-Diaz, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    The low crop yield obtained in semi-arid climates has led to the decline of agriculture and the abandonment of large areas resulting in a high risk of land degradation due to the lack of vegetation. Revegetation with shrubs is considered a way to prevent land degradation and enhance soil conditions, particularly in problematic soils. The study area is located in Colmenar de Oreja (Madrid, Spain, UTM 30T X=455236, Y=4436368). This is a semi-arid region, close to aridity in certain years, with a mean annual rainfall of 390 mm and annual evapotranspiration (Thornthwaite) of 769 mm. The soil is developed over gypsum marls with a xeric moisture regime. These soils are frequent in semiarid and arid countries in the world because leaching is prevented due to low rainfall. They usually show shallow depth, high penetration resistance and compaction, particularly when the soil is dry. Moreover they exhibit low fertility and small water retention capacity. All these circumstances hinder the development of roots and therefore the spontaneous recovery of vegetation after abandonment. Two different species of shrubs -Atriplex halimus L. and Retama sphaerocarpa L.- were planted in USLE plots (80 m2) in 2003 in a sloping area (average 10%). Changes in the physical and chemical properties of soils beneath these different treatments were studied since then, and they were compared with spontaneous vegetation. We considered soil indicators such as bulk density, intrapedal porosity, soil organic matter content, aggregate stability and soil penetration resistance. Two years after planting, vegetation coverage in the low part of the plots covered 70% of soil, rising 80% after the third year. The litter generated by shrubs did not change soil organic matter content at the site where it occurred, but rather a few feet below, where it was deposited by water erosion. Five years later, the lower section of the plots exhibited an increase in soil organic matter (from 2.3 to 3.2%), a decrease

  5. Soil Properties from Low-Velocity Probe Penetration

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    Jerome B. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical model of low-velocity probe penetration is developed to characterize soil by type, strength, maximum compaction, and initial density using Newton's second law to describe the processes controlling probe momentum loss. The probe loses momentum by causing soil failure (strength, accelerating and compacting soil around the probe (inertia, and through frictional sliding at the probe/soil interface (friction. Probe geometry, mass, and impact velocity influences are incorporated into the model. Model predictions of probe deceleration history and depth of penetration agree well with experiments, without the need for free variables or complex numerical simulations.

  6. Electronic properties of Fibonacci and random Si-Ge chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, M S [Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Azevedo, David L; Hadad, A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao 65080-040, Sao LuIs-MA (Brazil); Galvao, D S, E-mail: mvasconcelos@ect.ufrn.br [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas CP 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-12

    In this paper we address a theoretical calculation of the electronic spectra of an Si-Ge atomic chain that is arranged in a Fibonacci quasi-periodic sequence, by using a semi-empirical quantum method based on the Hueckel extended model. We apply the Fibonacci substitutional sequences in the atomic building blocks A(Si) and B(Ge) through the inflation rule or a recursion relation. In our ab initio calculations we use only a single point, which is sufficient for considering all the orbitals and charge distribution across the entire system. Although the calculations presented here are more complete than the models adopted in the literature which take into account the electronic interaction only up to the second and third neighbors, an interesting property remains in their electronic spectra: the fractality (which is the main signature of this kind of system). We discuss this fractality of the spectra and we compare them with the random arrangement of the Si-Ge atomic chain, and with previous results based on the tight-binding approximation of the Schroedinger equation considering up to the nearest neighbor. (paper)

  7. Effect of basic slag addition on soil properties, growth and leaf mineral composition of beans in a Cu-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Negim, O.; Eloifi, B.; Bes, C.; Gaste, H.; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Le Coustumer, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Basic slag (BS) is an alkaline by-product of the steel industry with potential properties to ameliorate nutrient supply and metal stabilisation in contaminated soils. The BS effects on soil pH, soil conductivity, growth and chemical composition of beans were investigated using an acid, sandy soil from a wood treatment facility containing 630 mg Cu kg-1. Pot experiments were carried out on a 2-week period with Phaseolus vulgaris L. An uncontaminated, sandy soil was used...

  8. Interrelationships between soil biota and soil physical properties in forest areas of the Pieniny National Park (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefowska, Agnieszka; Zaleski, Tomasz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Dzierwa, Agata

    2017-04-01

    The study area was located in the Pieniny National Park (PNP) in the Carpathian Mountain (Southern Poland). Investigated soil belonged to Eutric Cambisols and had silt or silt loam texture. The purpose of this research was to investigated relationship between soil biota, such as microbial activity, soil Oligochaeta (Lumbricidae and Enchytraeidae) and soil physical properties, such as water retention or aggregates stability. This research was conducted at six forest monitoring areas of the PNP. Sampling was collected in the September 2016. For each of the 6 places, undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were taken from the 0-15-cm and 15-30-cm layer in 3 to 5 replicates. Undisturbed soil was taken: i) into Kopecky cylinders to determined soil physical properties; ii) a soil cores to determined enchytraeids and fine roots biomass (RB). Disturbed soil was collected in 3 reps and homogenized. Next such soil samples were divided into three parts: i) fresh one to determined dehydrogenase activity (ADh), microbial carbon biomass (MC) and labile carbon (LC); ii) air-dried, passed through a sieve (2-mm mesh size) and used for analysis: pH, organic carbon and bulk density; iii) last part air dried was used to determined stability of different size aggregates. In field, earthworms were collected in 3 reps using hand sorting method. Investigated soils were strongly acidic to neutral (pH 4.8-6.8). Organic carbon (Corg) content was varied from 0.8% to 4.5% and was higher in 0-15-cm layers than in 15-30-cm layers. Higher Corgcontent was connected with lower bulk density. Enchytraeids density was ranged from 1807 ind. m-2 to 88855 ind. m-2 and was correlated with microbial activity (ADh and MB) and RB. Earthworms density (ED) was ranged from 7 ind. m-2to 507 ind. m-2. In investigated soil was 6 genus and 7 species (Octolasion lacteum, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea jassyensis, Lumbricus rubellus, Eisenia lucens, and Fitzingeria platyura depressa). ED was

  9. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg−1·year−1 for SOM, 438.9 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:P, 5.3 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:K, and −3.23 mg·cm−3·year−1 for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0–80-cm soil profile (P: −4.10 mg·kg−1·year−1; pH: −0.0061 unit·year−1; C:N: 167.1 mg·g−1·year−1; K:P: 371.5 mg·g−1 year−1; N:K: −0.242 mg·g−1·year−1; EC: 0.169 μS·cm−1·year−1), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance. PMID:24772281

  10. Soil Tillage Conservation and its Effect on Soil Properties Bioremediation and Sustained Production of Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Muresan, Liliana; Andriuca, Valentina; Cojocaru, Olesea

    2017-04-01

    Soil Tillage Conservation (STC) is considered major components of agricultural technology for soil conservation strategies and part of Sustainable Agriculture (SA). Human action upon soil by tillage determines important morphological, physical-chemical and biological changes, with different intensities and evaluative directions. Nowadays, internationally is unanimous accepted the fact that global climatic changes are the results of human intervention in the bio-geo-chemical water and material cycle, and the sequestration of carbon in soil is considered an important intervention to limit these changes. STC involves reducing the number of tillage's (minimum tillage) to direct sowing (no-tillage) and plant debris remains at the soil surface in the ratio of at least 30%. Plant debris left on the soil surface or superficial incorporated contributes to increased biological activity and is an important source of carbon sequestration. STC restore soil structure and improve overall soil drainage, allowing more rapid infiltration of water into soil. The result is a soil bioremediation, more productive, better protected against wind and water erosion and requires less fuel for preparing the germinative bed. Carbon sequestration in soil is net advantageous, improving the productivity and sustainability. We present the influence of conventional plough tillage system on soil, water and organic matter conservation in comparison with an alternative minimum tillage (paraplow, chisel plow and rotary harrow) and no-tillage system. The application of STC increased the organic matter content 0.8 to 22.1% and water stabile aggregate content from 1.3 to 13.6%, in the 0-30 cm depth, as compared to the conventional system. For the organic matter content and the wet aggregate stability, the statistical analysis of the data showed, increasing positive significance of STC. While the soil fertility and the wet aggregate stability were initially low, the effect of conservation practices on the

  11. Influence of green manure in physical and biological properties of soil and productivity in the culture of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alves Cardoso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Green manuring is the practice of using plant species in rotation, succession or intercropped with other crops, aiming improvement, maintenance and recovery of physical, chemical and biological soil properties. The objective was to evaluate the influence of different green manures on soil characteristics and productivity of soybean. The experiment was conducted in Maringá (PR in a randomized block design with six treatments and four replications: T1: oat (Avena Sativa, T2: black oat (Avena strigosa, T3: dwarf pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan, T4: radish (Raphanus sativus L., T5: white lupine (Lupinus albus and T6: control (fallow. At the end of the experiment, relations were established between the green manure used for soybean production, the production of biomass, the development of microorganisms and soil bulk density. The data were analyzed with statistical software and means were compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. The coverages provided higher content of dry matter were lupine, black oat and faba bean. Treatments that most influenced the increase of soil microorganisms were lupine, radish and pigeonpea. Regarding productivity, higher values were obtained in treatments with pigeon pea, lupine and oat. The apparent density of the soil, treatment with turnip showed better results.

  12. Effects of heavy metals and soil physicochemical properties on wetland soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang; Nie, Shuang; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Haipeng; Hua, Shanshan; Liu, Jiayu; Yuan, Yujie; Xiao, Haibing; Deng, Linjing; Xiang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals (HMs) contamination is a serious environmental issue in wetland soil. Understanding the micro ecological characteristic of HMs polluted wetland soil has become a public concern. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of HMs and soil physicochemical properties on soil microorganisms and prioritize some parameters that contributed significantly to soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure. Bacterial community structure was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Relationships between soil environment and microorganisms were analyzed by correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). The result indicated relationship between SMB and HMs was weaker than SMB and physicochemical properties. The RDA showed all eight parameters explained 74.9% of the variation in the bacterial DGGE profiles. 43.4% (contain the variation shared by Cr, Cd, Pb and Cu) of the variation for bacteria was explained by the four kinds of HMs, demonstrating HMs contamination had a significant influence on the changes of bacterial community structure. Cr solely explained 19.4% (pstructure, and Cd explained 17.5% (pstructure changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Key indicator tools for shallow slope failure assessment using soil chemical property signatures and soil colour variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rashidi; Hasni, Shah Irani; Baharuddin, Zainul Mukrim; Hashim, Khairusy Syakirin Has-Yun; Mahamod, Lukman Hakim

    2017-10-01

    Slope failure has become a major concern in Malaysia due to the rapid development and urbanisation in the country. It poses severe threats to any highway construction industry, residential areas, natural resources and tourism activities. The extent of damages that resulted from this catastrophe can be lessened if a long-term early warning system to predict landslide prone areas is implemented. Thus, this study aims to characterise the relationship between Oxisols properties and soil colour variables to be manipulated as key indicators to forecast shallow slope failure. The concentration of each soil property in slope soil was evaluated from two different localities that consist of 120 soil samples from stable and unstable slopes located along the North-South Highway (PLUS) and East-West Highway (LPT). Analysis of variance established highly significant difference (P slope failure were high value of L*(62), low values of c* (20) and h* (66), low concentration of iron (53 mg kg-1) and aluminium oxide (37 mg kg-1), low soil TOC (0.5%), low CEC (3.6 cmol/kg), slightly acidic soil pH (4.9), high amount of sand fraction (68%) and low amount of clay fraction (20%).

  14. Effect of Chemical Remediation of Crude-Oil-Polluted Agricultural Land on Soil Properties and Crop Performance

    OpenAIRE

    O. E. Essien

    2010-01-01

    Chemical degreaser with detergent was used to wash crude-oil-polluted agricultural soil and restore it to 83% -93% of the unpolluted soil's status for sustainable productivity. Comparison of reclaimed soil's properties with unpolluted soil sample of the significant differences (p=0.05) between their values for soil moisture content, soil pH, evapotranspiration, root elongation and soil fertility. Root elongation at 1.1 cm/day in the reclaimed soil compared with 1.29 cm/day in unpolluted soil ...

  15. Effects of rumen digesta on the physico-chemical properties of soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0, 50, 100 and 150 g/kg soils). Physical and chemical properties of the soil were determined pre- and post-experiment. The results obtained reveal that rumen digesta significantly (p = 0.05) increased the mean weight diameter (0.49 to 1.75 mm), aggregate stability (54.7 to 75.3%), soil pH (3.8 to 7.8), total nitrogen (0.01 to ...

  16. Effects of rumen digesta on the physico-chemical properties of soil in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0, 50, 100, and 150 gkg-1 soils). Physical and chemical properties of the soil were determined pre and post-experiment. The results obtained revealed that rumen digesta significantly (p = 0.05) increased the mean weight diameter (0.49 to 1.75 mm), aggregate stability (54.7% to 75.3%), soil pH (3.8 to 7.8), total nitrogen ...

  17. Determining the Most Important Soil Properties Affecting the Yield of Saffron in the Ghayenat Area

    OpenAIRE

    amir ranjbar; H EMAMI; A. Karimi Karouyeh; R. Khorassani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Saffron is one of the most important economic plants in the Khorasan province. Awareness of soil quality in agricultural lands is essential for the best management of lands and for obtaining maximum economic benefit. In general, plant growth is a function of environmental factors especially chemical and physical properties of soil (20). It has been demonstrated that there was a positive and high correlation between soil organic matter and saffron yield. Increasing the yield of s...

  18. Effects of Fire on Soil Properties, Erosion and Hydrologic Regime of Zrebar Lake Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Shirko Ebrahimi Mohammadi; Mahmood Azari; Esmaeel Manoochehri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Forest herbs due to decrease of runoff coefficient and the kinetic energy of raindrops, is known as a key factor in controlling runoff and soil conservation. Many physical (hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity, pH, particle size distribution, color and temperature regimes), chemical (quality and quantity of organic matter, nutrient availability) and biological (Microbial biomass, soil invertebrates living community) soil properties can be affected by forest fires. Fire not on...

  19. Physical Properties of the Mountain Soils of Cross River State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Properties of the Mountain Soils of Cross River State, Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Soil Science ... The surface soil horizon values at the Obudu mountains ranged between 33.96 and 70.08%, giving a mean of 50.63% while the subsurface values ranged from 19.62 to 55.47%, with the mean of 29.08%. Oban hills ...

  20. Evaluation of Changes in Index Properties of Lateritic Soil Stabilized with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapitus AMADI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For soils to be suitable in civil engineering projects, they must meet existing local requirements for index properties in addition to certain strength criteria. Typically, specifications limit these properties to some threshold values which in most cases are project specific. Some lateritic soils in their natural state need some treatment/modification to meet these specification requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the index properties (i.e., particle size distribution, Atterberg limits and compaction characteristics of a residually derived lateritic soil following fly ash application. Lateritic soil – fly ash mixtures with up to 20% fly ash by dry weight of soil were tested and specimens for compaction characteristics were prepared at different compaction states (optimum, dry and wet of optimum moisture content and compacted using British Standard Light (BSL compactive effort. While soil – fly ash mixtures containing up to 15% fly ash classify as CL according to USCS classification system and plotted above A-line in the plasticity chart, it was observed that changes in the gradation characteristics of soil sample treated with 20% fly ash resulted in the alteration of its classification to ML as well as the crossing of the A- line to the silty region. The liquid limit (LL varied from 42.2 to 29.53% representing 70% reduction while the plasticity index (PI of specimen treated with 20% fly ash was 16% lower than that of natural soil. The optimum moisture content (OMC ranged from 17.36% for the natural soil to 18.34% for soil mixtures containing 20% fly ash which yielded dry unit weight of 17.2kN/m3 for the natural soil and 16.1kN/m3 for samples treated with 20% fly ash. From the study, useful data were obtained showing substantial and desirable changes in the properties of lateritic soil as a civil engineering material on application of fly ash.

  1. Change of soils agrochemical properties at industrial plots polluted by fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Pavlyukova

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The changes of some agrochemical properties of soils of model plots closed to industrial enterprises with fluoride atmospheric emissions were studied. The alkalescence of soils at the plots was found. The reduction of content of the mobile forms of phosphorus, nitrite and nitrate forms of nitrogen and humus level in soil is caused by the increasing amount of nitrogen of ammonium compounds.

  2. Impacts of land use changes on physical and chemical soil properties in the Central Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal Romero, Estela; Hoitinga, Leo; Valdivielso, Sergio; Pérez Cardiel, Estela; Serrano Muela, Pili; Lasanta, Teodoro; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Soils and vegetation tend to evolve jointly in relation to climate evolution and the impacts of human activity. Afforestation has been one of the main policies for environmental management of forest landscapes in Mediterranean areas. Afforestation has been based mainly on conifers because they are fast-growing species, and also because it was believed that this would lead to rapid restoration of soil properties and hydrological processes, and the formation of protective vegetation cover. This study analyses the effects of afforestation on physical and chemical soil properties. Specifically, we addressed this research question: (i) How do soil properties change after land abandonment? The 11 microsites considered were: Afforestation Pinus sylvestris (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), Afforestation Pinus nigra (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), natural shrubland, grasslands, bare lands, and undisturbed forest site (pine cover and close to the stem). An extensive single sampling was carried out in September 2014. We systematically collected 5 top soil samples (0-10 cm) and 3 deep soil samples (10-20 cm) per microsite (88 composite samples in total). These properties were analysed: (i) soil texture, (ii) bulk density, (iii) pH and electrical conductivity, (iv) total SOC, (v) Total Nitrogen, (vi) organic matter, (vii) CaCO3 and (viii) aggregate stability. Statistical tests have been applied to determine relationships between the different soil properties and are used to assess differences between different soil samples, land use areas and soil depths. Implications of reafforestation for soil development and environmental response are discussed. Acknowledgments This research was supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship in the project "MED-AFFOREST" (PIEF-GA-2013-624974).