WorldWideScience

Sample records for random point spread

  1. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  2. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  3. Quasi-Random Rumor Spreading: Reducing Randomness Can Be Costly

    OpenAIRE

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fouz, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    We give a time-randomness tradeoff for the quasi-random rumor spreading protocol proposed by Doerr, Friedrich and Sauerwald [SODA 2008] on complete graphs. In this protocol, the goal is to spread a piece of information originating from one vertex throughout the network. Each vertex is assumed to have a (cyclic) list of its neighbors. Once a vertex is informed by one of its neighbors, it chooses a position in its list uniformly at random and then informs its neighbors starting from that positi...

  4. Random fixed points and random differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos S. Papageorgiou

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, first, we study random best approximations to random sets, using fixed point techniques, obtaining this way stochastic analogues of earlier deterministic results by Browder-Petryshyn, KyFan and Reich. Then we prove two fixed point theorems for random multifunctions with stochastic domain that satisfy certain tangential conditions. Finally we consider a random differential inclusion with upper semicontinuous orientor field and establish the existence of random solutions.

  5. Point Spread Function Estimation for a Terahertz Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu DanC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for estimating the point spread function of a terahertz imaging system designed to operate in reflection mode. The method is based on imaging phantoms with known geometry, which have patterns with sharp edges at all orientations. The point spread functions are obtained by a deconvolution technique in the Fourier domain. We validate our results by using the estimated point spread functions to deblur several images of natural scenes and by direct comparison with a point source response. The estimations turn out to be robust and produce consistent deblurring quality over the entire depth of the focal region of the imaging system.

  6. Point-spread function engineering enhances digital Fourier microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulstein, Devynn M.; McGorty, Ryan

    2017-11-01

    While numerous optical methods exist to probe the dynamics of biological or complex fluid samples, in recent years digital Fourier microscopy techniques, like differential dynamic microscopy, have emerged as ways to efficiently combine elements of imaging and scattering methods. Here, we demonstrate, through experiments and simulations, how point-spread function engineering can be used to extend the reach of differential dynamic microscopy.

  7. Blind reconstruction of sparse images with unknown point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrity, Kyle; Raich, Raviv; Hero, Alfred O., III

    2008-02-01

    We consider the image reconstruction problem when the original image is assumed to be sparse and when partial knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) is available. In particular, we are interested in recovering the magnetization density given magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) data, and we present an iterative alternating minimization algorithm (AM) to solve this problem. A smoothing penalty is introduced on allowable PSFs to improve the reconstruction. Simulations demonstrate its performance in reconstructing both the image and unknown point spread function. In addition, we develop an optimization transfer approach to solving a total variation (TV) blind deconvolution algorithm presented in a paper by Chan and Wong. We compare the performance of the AM algorithm to the blind TV algorithm as well as to a TV based majorization-minimization algorithm developed by Figueiredo et al.

  8. Epidemic Spreading in Random Rectangular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Estrada and Sheerin (Phys. Rev. E 91, 042805 (2015)) developed the random rectangular graph (RRG) model to account for the spatial distribution of nodes in a network allowing the variation of the shape of the unit square commonly used in random geometric graphs (RGGs). Here, we consider an epidemics dynamics taking place on the nodes and edges of an RRG and we derive analytically a lower bound for the epidemic threshold for a Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) or Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model on these networks. Using extensive numerical simulations of the SIS dynamics we show that the lower bound found is very tight. We conclude that the elongation of the area in which the nodes are distributed makes the network more resilient to the propagation of an epidemics due to the fact that the epidemic threshold increases with the elongation of the rectangle. On the other hand, using the "classical" RGG for modeling epidemics on non-squared cities generates a larger error due to the effects...

  9. Point spread function based image reconstruction in optical projection tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Anna K.; van der Horst, Jelle; Palenstijn, Willem Jan; van Vliet, Lucas J.; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Kalkman, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    As a result of the shallow depth of focus of the optical imaging system, the use of standard filtered back projection in optical projection tomography causes space-variant tangential blurring that increases with the distance to the rotation axis. We present a novel optical tomographic image reconstruction technique that incorporates the point spread function of the imaging lens in an iterative reconstruction. The technique is demonstrated using numerical simulations, tested on experimental optical projection tomography data of single fluorescent beads, and applied to high-resolution emission optical projection tomography imaging of an entire zebrafish larva. Compared to filtered back projection our results show greatly reduced radial and tangential blurring over the entire 5.2×5.2 mm2 field of view, and a significantly improved signal to noise ratio.

  10. Gaussian approximations of fluorescence microscope point-spread function models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zerubia, Josiane; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2007-04-01

    We comprehensively study the least-squares Gaussian approximations of the diffraction-limited 2D-3D paraxial-nonparaxial point-spread functions (PSFs) of the wide field fluorescence microscope (WFFM), the laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), and the disk scanning confocal microscope (DSCM). The PSFs are expressed using the Debye integral. Under an L(infinity) constraint imposing peak matching, optimal and near-optimal Gaussian parameters are derived for the PSFs. With an L1 constraint imposing energy conservation, an optimal Gaussian parameter is derived for the 2D paraxial WFFM PSF. We found that (1) the 2D approximations are all very accurate; (2) no accurate Gaussian approximation exists for 3D WFFM PSFs; and (3) with typical pinhole sizes, the 3D approximations are accurate for the DSCM and nearly perfect for the LSCM. All the Gaussian parameters derived in this study are in explicit analytical form, allowing their direct use in practical applications.

  11. Proper Analytic Point Spread Function for Lateral Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Shimizu, Kunio; Matsui, Norihiko

    2010-07-01

    For ultrasonic lateral modulation for the imaging and measurement of tissue motion, better envelope shapes of the point spread function (PSF) than of a parabolic function are searched for within analytic functions or windows on the basis of the knowledge of the ideal shape of PSF previously obtained, i.e., having a large full width at half maximum and short feet. Through simulation of displacement vector measurement, better shapes are determined. As a better shape, a new window is obtained from a Turkey window by changing Hanning windows by power functions with an order larger than the second order. The order of measurement accuracies obtained is as follows, the new window > rectangular window > power function with a higher order > parabolic function > Akaike window.

  12. Finding Exoplanets Using Point Spread Function Photometry on Kepler Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Scolnic, Daniel; Montet, Ben

    2018-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has been able to identify over 5,000 exoplanet candidates using mostly aperture photometry. Despite the impressive number of discoveries, a large portion of Kepler’s data set is neglected due to limitations using aperture photometry on faint sources in crowded fields. We present an alternate method that overcomes those restrictions — Point Spread Function (PSF) photometry. This powerful tool, which is already used in supernova astronomy, was used for the first time on Kepler Full Frame Images, rather than just looking at the standard light curves. We present light curves for stars in our data set and demonstrate that PSF photometry can at least get down to the same photometric precision as aperture photometry. As a check for the robustness of this method, we change small variables (stamp size, interpolation amount, and noise correction) and show that the PSF light curves maintain the same repeatability across all combinations for one of our models. We also present our progress in the next steps of this project, including the creation of a PSF model from the data itself and applying the model across the entire data set at once.

  13. Robustness of double random phase encoding spread-space spread-spectrum image watermarking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi; Hennelly, Bryan M.; Sheridan, John T.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the robustness of a recently proposed image watermarking scheme is investigated, namely the Double Random Phase Encoding spread-space spread-spectrum watermarking (DRPE SS-SS) technique. In the DRPE SS-SS method, the watermark is in the form of a digital barcode image which is numerically encrypted using a simulation of the optical DRPE process. This produces a random complex image, which is then processed to form a real valued random image with a low number of quantization levels. This signal is added to the host image. Extraction of the barcode, involves applying an inverse DRPE process to the watermarked image followed by a low pass filter. This algorithm is designed to utilize the capability of the DRPE to reversibly spread the energy of the watermarking information in both the space and spatial frequency domains, and the energy of the watermark in any spatial or spatial frequency bin is very small. The common geometric transformations and signal processing operations are performed using both the informed and the blind detections for different barcode widths and different quantization levels. The results presented indicate that the DRPE SS-SS method is robust to scaling, JPEG compression distortion, cropping, low pass and high pass filtering. It is also demonstrated that the bigger the barcode width is, the lower the false positive rate will be.

  14. The Random Material Point Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, B.; Vardon, P.J.; Hicks, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The material point method is a finite element variant which allows the material, represented by a point-wise discretization, to move through the background mesh. This means that large deformations, such as those observed post slope failure, can be computed. By coupling this material level

  15. Random point sets and their diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, Michael; Kösters, Holger

    2011-07-01

    The diffraction of various random subsets of the integer lattice ℤ d , such as the coin tossing and related systems, are well understood. Here, we go one important step beyond and consider random point sets in ℝ d . We present several systems with an effective stochastic interaction that still allow for explicit calculations of the autocorrelation and the diffraction measure. We concentrate on one-dimensional examples for illustrative purposes, and briefly indicate possible generalisations to higher dimensions. In particular, we discuss the stationary Poisson process in ℝ d and the renewal process on the line. The latter permits a unified approach to a rather large class of one-dimensional structures, including random tilings. Moreover, we present some stationary point processes that are derived from the classical random matrix ensembles as introduced in the pioneering work of Dyson and Ginibre. Their reconsideration from the diffraction point of view improves the intuition on systems with randomness and mixed spectra.

  16. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of the erg-3 gene, present in single copy, to the spread of RIP from duplications of adjoining sequences. Ge- nomic segments ... [Vyas M and Kasbekar D P 2005 Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an ad- .... was essentially as described by Davis and De Serres.

  17. Slope failure analysis using the random material point method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, B.; Hicks, M.A.; Vardon, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    The random material point method (RMPM), which combines random field theory and the material point method (MPM), is proposed. It differs from the random finite-element method (RFEM), by assigning random field (cell) values to material points that are free to move relative to the computational grid

  18. Accuracy of the Gaussian Point Spread Function model in 2D localization microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, S.; Rieger, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Gaussian function is simple and easy to implement as Point Spread Function (PSF) model for fitting the position of fluorescent emitters in localization microscopy. Despite its attractiveness the appropriateness of the Gaussian is questionable as it is not based on the laws of optics. Here we

  19. Improved axial point spread function in a two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jheng-Syong; Chung, Yung-Chin; Chien, Jun-Jei; Chou, Chien

    2018-01-01

    A two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope (TF-LSCFM) based on intensity modulated fluorescence signal detection was proposed. The specimen-induced spherical aberration and scattering effect were suppressed intrinsically, and high image contrast was presented due to heterodyne interference. An improved axial point spread function in a TF-LSCFM compared with a conventional laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope was demonstrated and discussed. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions.

  1. Analysis of point source size on measurement accuracy of lateral point-spread function of confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shihang; Zhang, Li; Hu, Yao; Ding, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) has matured to become one of the most powerful instruments in analytical science because of its molecular sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional Raman Microscopy, CRM can perform three dimensions mapping of tiny samples and has the advantage of high spatial resolution thanking to the unique pinhole. With the wide application of the instrument, there is a growing requirement for the evaluation of the imaging performance of the system. Point-spread function (PSF) is an important approach to the evaluation of imaging capability of an optical instrument. Among a variety of measurement methods of PSF, the point source method has been widely used because it is easy to operate and the measurement results are approximate to the true PSF. In the point source method, the point source size has a significant impact on the final measurement accuracy. In this paper, the influence of the point source sizes on the measurement accuracy of PSF is analyzed and verified experimentally. A theoretical model of the lateral PSF for CRM is established and the effect of point source size on full-width at half maximum of lateral PSF is simulated. For long-term preservation and measurement convenience, PSF measurement phantom using polydimethylsiloxane resin, doped with different sizes of polystyrene microspheres is designed. The PSF of CRM with different sizes of microspheres are measured and the results are compared with the simulation results. The results provide a guide for measuring the PSF of the CRM.

  2. Deconvolution of the two-dimensional point-spread function of area detectors using the maximum-entropy algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafsma, H; de Vries, R.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The maximum-entropy method (MEM) has been applied for the deconvolution of the point-spread function (PSF) of two-dimensional X-ray detectors. The method is robust, model and image independent, and only depends on the correct description of the two-dimensional point-spread function and gain factor

  3. Double random phase spread spectrum spread space technique for secure parallel optical multiplexing with individual encryption key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennelly, B. M.; Javidi, B.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2005-09-01

    A number of methods have been recently proposed in the literature for the encryption of 2-D information using linear optical systems. In particular the double random phase encoding system has received widespread attention. This system uses two Random Phase Keys (RPK) positioned in the input spatial domain and the spatial frequency domain and if these random phases are described by statistically independent white noises then the encrypted image can be shown to be a white noise. Decryption only requires knowledge of the RPK in the frequency domain. The RPK may be implemented using a Spatial Light Modulators (SLM). In this paper we propose and investigate the use of SLMs for secure optical multiplexing. We show that in this case it is possible to encrypt multiple images in parallel and multiplex them for transmission or storage. The signal energy is effectively spread in the spatial frequency domain. As expected the number of images that can be multiplexed together and recovered without loss is proportional to the ratio of the input image and the SLM resolution. Many more images may be multiplexed with some loss in recovery. Furthermore each individual encryption is more robust than traditional double random phase encoding since decryption requires knowledge of both RPK and a lowpass filter in order to despread the spectrum and decrypt the image. Numerical simulations are presented and discussed.

  4. Estimation Methods of the Point Spread Function Axial Position: A Comparative Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Eduardo Diaz Zamboni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise knowledge of the point spread function is central for any imaging system characterization. In fluorescence microscopy, point spread function (PSF determination has become a common and obligatory task for each new experimental device, mainly due to its strong dependence on acquisition conditions. During the last decade, algorithms have been developed for the precise calculation of the PSF, which fit model parameters that describe image formation on the microscope to experimental data. In order to contribute to this subject, a comparative study of three parameter estimation methods is reported, namely: I-divergence minimization (MIDIV, maximum likelihood (ML and non-linear least square (LSQR. They were applied to the estimation of the point source position on the optical axis, using a physical model. Methods’ performance was evaluated under different conditions and noise levels using synthetic images and considering success percentage, iteration number, computation time, accuracy and precision. The main results showed that the axial position estimation requires a high SNR to achieve an acceptable success level and higher still to be close to the estimation error lower bound. ML achieved a higher success percentage at lower SNR compared to MIDIV and LSQR with an intrinsic noise source. Only the ML and MIDIV methods achieved the error lower bound, but only with data belonging to the optical axis and high SNR. Extrinsic noise sources worsened the success percentage, but no difference was found between noise sources for the same method for all methods studied.

  5. An approach for de-identification of point locations of livestock premises for further use in disease spread modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael K; Helm, Julie; Patyk, Kelly A

    2015-06-15

    We describe a method for de-identifying point location data used for disease spread modeling to allow data custodians to share data with modeling experts without disclosing individual farm identities. The approach is implemented in an open-source software program that is described and evaluated here. The program allows a data custodian to select a level of de-identification based on the K-anonymity statistic. The program converts a file of true farm locations and attributes into a file appropriate for use in disease spread modeling with the locations randomly modified to prevent re-identification based on location. Important epidemiological relationships such as clustering are preserved to as much as possible to allow modeling similar to those using true identifiable data. The software implementation was verified by visual inspection and basic descriptive spatial analysis of the output. Performance is sufficient to allow de-identification of even large data sets on desktop computers available to any data custodian. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. JWST Point Spread Function Quality and Stability: Ground Testing, Integrated Modeling, and Space Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael; Van Gorkom, Kyle; Bowers, Charles W.; Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Knight, J. Scott; Lightsey, Paul; Maghami, Peiman G.; Mustelier, David; Niedner, Malcolm B.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.5 m) cryogenic segmented aperture telescope with science instruments that cover the near- and mid-infrared from 0.6-27 microns. The large aperture not only provides high photometric sensitivity, but it also enables high angular resolution across the bandpass, with a diffraction limited point spread function (PSF) at wavelengths longer than 2 microns. The JWST PSF quality and stability are intimately tied to the science capabilities as it is convolved with the astrophysical scene. However, the PSF evolves at a variety of timescales based on telescope jitter and thermal distortion as the observatory attitude is varied. We present the image quality and stability requirements, recent predictions from integrated modeling, measurements made during ground-based testing, and performance characterization activities that will be carried out as part of the commissioning process.

  7. “Hot Hand” in the National Basketball Association Point Spread Betting Market: A 34-Year Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Waggoner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several articles have looked at factors that affect the adjustments of point spreads, based on hot hands or streaks, for smaller durations of time. This study examines these effects for 34 regular seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA. Estimating a Seemingly Unrelated Regression model using all 34 seasons, all streaks significantly impacted point spreads and difference in actual points. When estimating each season individually, differences emerged particularly examining winning and losing streaks of six games or more. The results indicate both the presence of momentum effects and the gambler’s fallacy.

  8. Damage Spreading in Spatial and Small-world Random Boolean Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qiming [Fermilab; Teuscher, Christof [Portland State U.

    2014-02-18

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are commonly used a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ($\\bar{K} \\ll 1$) and that the critical connectivity of stability $K_s$ changes compared to random networks. At higher $\\bar{K}$, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  9. Some common random fixed point theorems for contractive type conditions in cone random metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Gurucharan S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish some common random fixed point theorems for contractive type conditions in the setting of cone random metric spaces. Our results unify, extend and generalize many known results from the current existing literature.

  10. Single shot, three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy with a spatially rotating point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Cai, Yanan; Liang, Yansheng; Zhou, Xing; Yan, Shaohui; Dan, Dan; Bianco, Piero R.; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli

    2017-01-01

    A wide-field fluorescence microscope with a double-helix point spread function (PSF) is constructed to obtain the specimen’s three-dimensional distribution with a single snapshot. Spiral-phase-based computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are adopted to make the depth-of-field of the microscope adjustable. The impact of system aberrations on the double-helix PSF at high numerical aperture is analyzed to reveal the necessity of the aberration correction. A modified cepstrum-based reconstruction scheme is promoted in accordance with properties of the new double-helix PSF. The extended depth-of-field images and the corresponding depth maps for both a simulated sample and a tilted section slice of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells are recovered, respectively, verifying that the depth-of-field is properly extended and the depth of the specimen can be estimated at a precision of 23.4nm. This three-dimensional fluorescence microscope with a framerate-rank time resolution is suitable for studying the fast developing process of thin and sparsely distributed micron-scale cells in extended depth-of-field. PMID:29296483

  11. Imaging samples in silica aerogel using an experimental point spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amanda J; Ebel, Denton S

    2015-02-01

    Light microscopy is a powerful tool that allows for many types of samples to be examined in a rapid, easy, and nondestructive manner. Subsequent image analysis, however, is compromised by distortion of signal by instrument optics. Deconvolution of images prior to analysis allows for the recovery of lost information by procedures that utilize either a theoretically or experimentally calculated point spread function (PSF). Using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), we have imaged whole impact tracks of comet particles captured in silica aerogel, a low density, porous SiO2 solid, by the NASA Stardust mission. In order to understand the dynamical interactions between the particles and the aerogel, precise grain location and track volume measurement are required. We report a method for measuring an experimental PSF suitable for three-dimensional deconvolution of imaged particles in aerogel. Using fluorescent beads manufactured into Stardust flight-grade aerogel, we have applied a deconvolution technique standard in the biological sciences to confocal images of whole Stardust tracks. The incorporation of an experimentally measured PSF allows for better quantitative measurements of the size and location of single grains in aerogel and more accurate measurements of track morphology.

  12. Deconvolution of vibroacoustic images using a simulation model based on a three dimensional point spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perciano, Talita; Urban, Matthew W; Mascarenhas, Nelson D A; Fatemi, Mostafa; Frery, Alejandro C; Silva, Glauber T

    2013-01-01

    Vibro-acoustography (VA) is a medical imaging method based on the difference-frequency generation produced by the mixture of two focused ultrasound beams. VA has been applied to different problems in medical imaging such as imaging bones, microcalcifications in the breast, mass lesions, and calcified arteries. The obtained images may have a resolution of 0.7-0.8mm. Current VA systems based on confocal or linear array transducers generate C-scan images at the beam focal plane. Images on the axial plane are also possible, however the system resolution along depth worsens when compared to the lateral one. Typical axial resolution is about 1.0cm. Furthermore, the elevation resolution of linear array systems is larger than that in lateral direction. This asymmetry degrades C-scan images obtained using linear arrays. The purpose of this article is to study VA image restoration based on a 3D point spread function (PSF) using classical deconvolution algorithms: Wiener, constrained least-squares (CLSs), and geometric mean filters. To assess the filters' performance on the restored images, we use an image quality index that accounts for correlation loss, luminance and contrast distortion. Results for simulated VA images show that the quality index achieved with the Wiener filter is 0.9 (when the index is 1.0 this indicates perfect restoration). This filter yielded the best result in comparison with the other ones. Moreover, the deconvolution algorithms were applied to an experimental VA image of a phantom composed of three stretched 0.5mm wires. Experiments were performed using transducer driven at two frequencies, 3075kHz and 3125kHz, which resulted in the difference-frequency of 50kHz. Restorations with the theoretical line spread function (LSF) did not recover sufficient information to identify the wires in the images. However, using an estimated LSF the obtained results displayed enough information to spot the wires in the images. It is demonstrated that the phase of the

  13. Epitope mapping by random peptide phage display reveals essential residues for vaccinia extracellular enveloped virion spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A33 is a type II integral membrane protein expressed on the extracellular enveloped form of vaccinia virus (VACV. Passive transfer of A33-directed monoclonal antibodies or vaccination with an A33 subunit vaccine confers protection against lethal poxvirus challenge in animal models. Homologs of A33 are highly conserved among members of the Orthopoxvirus genus and are potential candidates for inclusion in vaccines or assays targeting extracellular enveloped virus activity. One monoclonal antibody directed against VACV A33, MAb-1G10, has been shown to target a conformation-dependent epitope. Interestingly, while it recognizes VACV A33 as well as the corresponding variola homolog, it does not bind to the monkeypox homolog. In this study, we utilized a random phage display library to investigate the epitope recognized by MAb-1G10 that is critical for facilitating cell-to-cell spread of the vaccinia virus. Results By screening with linear or conformational random phage libraries, we found that phages binding to MAb-1G10 display the consensus motif CEPLC, with a disulfide bond formed between two cysteine residues required for MAb-1G10 binding. Although the phage motif contained no linear sequences homologous to VACV A33, structure modeling and analysis suggested that residue D115 is important to form the minimal epitope core. A panel of point mutants expressing the ectodomain of A33 protein was generated and analyzed by either binding assays such as ELISA and immunoprecipitation or a functional assessment by blocking MAb-1G10 mediated comet inhibition in cell culture. Conclusions These results confirm L118 as a component of the MAb-1G10 binding epitope, and further identify D115 as an essential residue. By defining the minimum conformational structure, as well as the conformational arrangement of a short peptide sequence recognized by MAb-1G10, these results introduce the possibility of designing small molecule mimetics that may

  14. Multi-system comparison of optical coherence tomography performance with point spread function phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, Joshua; Fouad, Anthony; Chen, Chao-Wei; Gong, Wei; Tomlins, Peter; Woolliams, Peter; Drezek, Rebekah; Agrawal, Anant; Chen, Yu

    2013-03-01

    Point spread function (PSF) phantoms based on unstructured distributions of sub-resolution particles in a transparent matrix have proven effective for evaluating resolution and its spatial variation in optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. Measurements based on PSF phantoms have the potential to become a standard test method for consistent, objective and quantitative inter-comparison of OCT system performance. Towards this end, we have evaluated three PSF phantoms and investigated their ability to compare the performance of four OCT systems. The phantoms are based on 260-nm-diameter gold nanoshells, submicron-diameter iron oxide particles and 1.5-micron-diameter silica particles. The OCT systems included spectral-domain and swept source systems in free-beam geometries as well as a time-domain system in both free-beam and fiberoptic probe geometries. Results indicated that iron oxide particles and gold nanoshells were most effective for measuring spatial variations in the magnitude and shape of PSFs across the image volume. The intensity of individual particles was also used to evaluate spatial variations in signal intensity uniformity. Significant system-to-system differences in resolution and signal intensity and their spatial variation were readily quantified. The phantoms proved useful for identification and characterization of irregularities such as astigmatism. Particle concentrations of 5000 per cubic millimeter or greater provided accurate determination of performance metrics. Our multi-system inter-comparison provides evidence of the effectiveness of PSF-phantom-based test methods for comparison of OCT system resolution and signal uniformity.

  15. The point-spread function measure of resolution for the 3-D electrical resistivity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenborger, Greg A.; Routh, Partha S.

    2009-02-01

    The solution appraisal component of the inverse problem involves investigation of the relationship between our estimated model and the actual model. However, full appraisal is difficult for large 3-D problems such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). We tackle the appraisal problem for 3-D ERT via the point-spread functions (PSFs) of the linearized resolution matrix. The PSFs represent the impulse response of the inverse solution and quantify our parameter-specific resolving capability. We implement an iterative least-squares solution of the PSF for the ERT experiment, using on-the-fly calculation of the sensitivity via an adjoint integral equation with stored Green's functions and subgrid reduction. For a synthetic example, analysis of individual PSFs demonstrates the truly 3-D character of the resolution. The PSFs for the ERT experiment are Gaussian-like in shape, with directional asymmetry and significant off-diagonal features. Computation of attributes representative of the blurring and localization of the PSF reveal significant spatial dependence of the resolution with some correlation to the electrode infrastructure. Application to a time-lapse ground-water monitoring experiment demonstrates the utility of the PSF for assessing feature discrimination, predicting artefacts and identifying model dependence of resolution. For a judicious selection of model parameters, we analyse the PSFs and their attributes to quantify the case-specific localized resolving capability and its variability over regions of interest. We observe approximate interborehole resolving capability of less than 1-1.5m in the vertical direction and less than 1-2.5m in the horizontal direction. Resolving capability deteriorates significantly outside the electrode infrastructure.

  16. Monte Carlo investigation of backscatter point spread function for x-ray imaging examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray imaging examinations, especially complex interventions, may result in relatively high doses to the patient's skin inducing skin injuries. A method was developed to determine the skin-dose distribution for non-uniform x-ray beams by convolving the backscatter point-spread-function (PSF) with the primary-dose distribution to generate the backscatter distribution that, when added to the primary dose, gives the total-dose distribution. This technique was incorporated in the dose-tracking system (DTS), which provides a real-time color-coded 3D-mapping of skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures. The aim of this work is to investigate the variation of the backscatter PSF with different parameters. A backscatter PSF of a 1-mm x-ray beam was generated by EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code for different x-ray beam energies, different soft-tissue thickness above bone, different bone thickness and different entrance-beam angles, as well as for different locations on the SK-150 anthropomorphic head phantom. The results show a reduction of the peak scatter to primary dose ratio of 48% when X-ray beam voltage is increased from 40 keV to 120 keV. The backscatter dose was reduced when bone was beneath the soft tissue layer and this reduction increased with thinner soft tissue and thicker bone layers. The backscatter factor increased about 21% as the angle of incidence of the beam with the entrance surface decreased from 90° (perpendicular) to 30°. The backscatter PSF differed for different locations on the SK-150 phantom by up to 15%. The results of this study can be used to improve the accuracy of dose calculation when using PSF convolution in the DTS.

  17. An advanced monolithic digitalized random carrier frequency spread-spectrum clock generator for EMI suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Haiyan; Chen Zao; Zhang Bo; Li Zhaoji, E-mail: guohy5@sina.co [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2010-06-15

    A novel monolithic digitalized random carrier frequency modulation spread-spectrum clock generator (RCF-SSCG) is proposed. In this design, the output frequency of the proposed RCF-SSCG changes with the intensity of the capacitive charge and discharge current. Its analytical model is induced and the effect of the modulation parameters on the spread spectrum is numerically simulated and discussed. Compared with other works, this design has the advantages of small size, low power consumption and good robustness. The circuit has been fabricated in a 0.5 {mu}m CMOS process and applied to a class D amplifier in which the proposed RCF-SSCG occupies an area of 0.112 mm{sup 2} and consumes 9 mW. The experimental results confirm the theoretical analyses. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  18. A random walk evolution model of wireless sensor networks and virus spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, considering both cluster heads and sensor nodes, we propose a novel evolving a network model based on a random walk to study the fault tolerance decrease of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) due to node failure, and discuss the spreading dynamic behavior of viruses in the evolution model. A theoretical analysis shows that the WSN generated by such an evolution model not only has a strong fault tolerance, but also can dynamically balance the energy loss of the entire network. It is also found that although the increase of the density of cluster heads in the network reduces the network efficiency, it can effectively inhibit the spread of viruses. In addition, the heterogeneity of the network improves the network efficiency and enhances the virus prevalence. We confirm all the theoretical results with sufficient numerical simulations.

  19. Return times at periodic points in random dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, Nicolai; Todd, Mike

    2017-01-01

    We prove a quenched limiting law for random measures on subshifts at periodic points. We consider a family of measures {≤ft\\{{{μω}\\right\\}}ω \\in Ω } , where the ‘driving space’ Ω is equipped with a probability measure which is invariant under a transformation θ. We assume that the fibred measures {μω} satisfy a generalised invariance property and are ψ-mixing. We then show that for almost every ω the return times to cylinders A n at periodic points are in the limit compound Poisson distributed for a parameter ϑ which is given by the escape rate at the periodic point.

  20. Anisoplanatism effect on the E-ELT SCAO point spread function. A preserved coherent core across the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clénet, Y.; Gendron, E.; Gratadour, D.; Rousset, G.; Vidal, F.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The science case studies and the optimized designing of the future adaptive optics-fed extremely large telescope instruments require the precise simulation of their adaptive optics system, potentially over their whole field of view, whatever the adaptive optics flavor the instruments will be equipped with. Aims: We simulate the anisoplanatism effect on the extremely large telescope single conjugate adaptive optics point spread function. Our interest in this expected degradation of the correction performance with respect to the off-axis distance is in terms of the point spread function Strehl ratio and profile. Methods: Adaptive optics simulations at the scale of extremely large telescopes are challenging given the large parameter space to explore for the adaptive optics dimensioning and the large number of degrees of freedom at play for a given set of simulation parameters. To address this problem, we have used three different simulation tools with increasing degree of fidelity compared to a real adaptive optics system. The first is based on analytical formulae and allowed us to derive the Strehl ratio degradation with the off-axis distance. The second is a Fourier-based code and provided us with both the Strehl ratio and the point spread function profile in the field. The last is an end-to-end code based on the graphical processing unit technology and also provided us with the Strehl ratio and the point spread function profile in the field. Results: The three tools we used demonstrated a fast execution time even at the extremely large telescope scale. Cross-checks between the different codes were performed and demonstrated the coherency of the results. In addition to the expected degradation of the adaptive optics performance with the field angle, we demonstrated that in the simulation conditions applicable to the E-ELT, the single conjugate adaptive optics point spread function remains topped with a coherent core even at off-axis distances as large as 60

  1. Shape modelling using Markov random field restoration of point correspondences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Rasmus R; Hilger, Klaus B

    2003-07-01

    A method for building statistical point distribution models is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaption of Markov random field regularization of the correspondence field over the set of shapes. The new approach leads to a generative model that produces highly homogeneous polygonized shapes and improves the capability of reconstruction of the training data. Furthermore, the method leads to an overall reduction in the total variance of the point distribution model. Thus, it finds correspondence between semi-landmarks that are highly correlated in the shape tangent space. The method is demonstrated on a set of human ear canals extracted from 3D-laser scans.

  2. Shape Modelling Using Markov Random Field Restoration of Point Correspondences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Hilger, Klaus Baggesen

    2003-01-01

    A method for building statistical point distribution models is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaption of Markov random field regularization of the correspondence field over the set of shapes. The new approach leads to a generative model that produces highly homogeneous polygonized...... shapes and improves the capability of reconstruction of the training data. Furthermore, the method leads to an overall reduction in the total variance of the point distribution model. Thus, it finds correspondence between semilandmarks that are highly correlated in the shape tangent space. The method...

  3. Level crossings and turning points of random hyperbolic polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Farahmand

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show that the asymptotic estimate for the expected number of K-level crossings of a random hyperbolic polynomial a1sinhx+a2sinh2x+⋯+ansinhnx, where aj(j=1,2,…,n are independent normally distributed random variables with mean zero and variance one, is (1/πlogn. This result is true for all K independent of x, provided K≡Kn=O(n. It is also shown that the asymptotic estimate of the expected number of turning points for the random polynomial a1coshx+a2cosh2x+⋯+ancoshnx, with aj(j=1,2,…,n as before, is also (1/πlogn.

  4. Modified point spread function for efficient high dynamic range LED backlight capable of high uniformity, high contrast, and smooth gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmel, Jakob; Whitehead, Lorne A

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effect of new point spread functions (PSFs) on the uniformity and contrast of high dynamic range displays that use local dimming of LEDs to yield a large dynamic range. A PSF shaped like a quadratic B-spline was hypothesized to create a uniform brightness backlight, as well as producing linear and quadratic gradients, while maintaining a very high contrast. We have found a practical optical structure to produce such a PSF, yielding a nonuniformity of only ±0.8%, while enabling a contrast ratio of 5∶1 and 33∶1 over distances of one and two unit cell spacings, respectively.

  5. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  6. Evaluation of spatial dependence of point spread function-based PET reconstruction using a traceable point-like 22Na source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisuke Murata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The point spread function (PSF of positron emission tomography (PET depends on the position across the field of view (FOV. Reconstruction based on PSF improves spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy. The present study aimed to quantify the effects of PSF correction as a function of the position of a traceable point-like 22Na source over the FOV on two PET scanners with a different detector design. Methods We used Discovery 600 and Discovery 710 (GE Healthcare PET scanners and traceable point-like 22Na sources (<1 MBq with a spherical absorber design that assures uniform angular distribution of the emitted annihilation photons. The source was moved in three directions at intervals of 1 cm from the center towards the peripheral FOV using a three-dimensional (3D-positioning robot, and data were acquired over a period of 2 min per point. The PET data were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP, the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM, OSEM + PSF, and OSEM + PSF + time-of-flight (TOF. Full width at half maximum (FWHM was determined according to the NEMA method, and total counts in regions of interest (ROI for each reconstruction were quantified. Results The radial FWHM of FBP and OSEM increased towards the peripheral FOV, whereas PSF-based reconstruction recovered the FWHM at all points in the FOV of both scanners. The radial FWHM for PSF was 30–50 % lower than that of OSEM at the center of the FOV. The accuracy of PSF correction was independent of detector design. Quantitative values were stable across the FOV in all reconstruction methods. The effect of TOF on spatial resolution and quantitation accuracy was less noticeable. Conclusions The traceable 22Na point-like source allowed the evaluation of spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy across the FOV using different reconstruction methods and scanners. PSF-based reconstruction reduces dependence of the spatial resolution on the

  7. Multielectrode vs. point-by-point mapping for ventricular tachycardia substrate ablation: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Juan; Penela, Diego; Andreu, David; Cabrera, Mario; Carlosena, Alicia; Vassanelli, Francesca; Alarcón, Francisco; Soto-Iglesias, David; Korshunov, Viatcheslav; Borras, Roger; Linhart, Markus; Martínez, Mikel; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Mont, Lluis; Berruezo, Antonio

    2017-01-08

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) substrate ablation is based on detailed electroanatomical maps (EAM). This study analyses whether high-density multielectrode mapping (MEM) is superior to conventional point-by-point mapping (PPM) in guiding VT substrate ablation procedures. This was a randomized controlled study (NCT02083016). Twenty consecutive ischemic patients undergoing VT substrate ablation were randomized to either group A [n = 10; substrate mapping performed first by PPM (Navistar) and secondly by MEM (PentaRay) ablation guided by PPM] or group B [n = 10; substrate mapping performed first by MEM and second by PPM ablation guided by MEM]. Ablation was performed according to the scar-dechanneling technique. Late potential (LP) pairs were defined as a Navistar-LP and a PentaRay-LP located within a three-dimensional distance of ≤ 3 mm. Data obtained from EAM, procedure time, radiofrequency time, and post-ablation VT inducibility were compared between groups. Larger bipolar scar areas were obtained with MEM (55.7±31.7 vs. 50.5±26.6 cm(2); P = 0.017). Substrate mapping time was similar with MEM (19.7±7.9 minutes) and PPM (25±9.2 minutes); P = 0.222. No differences were observed in the number of LPs identified within the scar by MEM vs. PPM (73±50 vs. 76±52 LPs per patient, respectively; P = 0.965). A total of 1104 LP pairs were analysed. Using PentaRay, far-field/LP ratio was significantly lower (0.58±0.4 vs. 1.64±1.1; P = 0.01) and radiofrequency time was shorter [median (interquartile range) 12 (7-20) vs. 22 (17-33) minutes; P = 0.023]. No differences were observed in VT inducibility after procedure. MEM with PentaRay catheter provided better discrimination of LPs due to a lower sensitivity for far-field signals. Ablation guided by MEM was associated with a shorter radiofrequency time. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email

  8. Optimal transport-based dictionary learning and its application to Euclid-like Point Spread Function representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Morgan A.; Heitz, Matthieu; Bonneel, Nicolas; Ngolè, Fred; Coeurjolly, David; Cuturi, Marco; Peyré, Gabriel; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2017-08-01

    Optimal Transport theory enables the definition of a distance across the set of measures on any given space. This Wasserstein distance naturally accounts for geometric warping between measures (including, but not exclusive to, images). We introduce a new, Optimal Transport-based representation learning method in close analogy with the usual Dictionary Learning problem. This approach typically relies on a matrix dot-product between the learned dictionary and the codes making up the new representation. The relationship between atoms and data is thus ultimately linear. By reconstructing our data as Wasserstein barycenters of learned atoms instead, our approach yields a representation making full use of the Wasserstein distance's attractive properties and allowing for non-linear relationships between the dictionary atoms and the datapoints. We apply our method to a dataset of Euclid-like simulated PSFs (Point Spread Function). ESA's Euclid mission will cover a large area of the sky in order to accurately measure the shape of billions of galaxies. PSF estimation and correction is one of the main sources of systematic errors on those galaxy shape measurements. PSF variations across the field of view and with the incoming light's wavelength can be highly non-linear, while still retaining strong geometrical information, making the use of Optimal Transport distances an attractive prospect. We show that our representation does indeed succeed at capturing the PSF's variations.

  9. Skin dose mapping for non-uniform x-ray fields using a backscatter point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    Beam shaping devices like ROI attenuators and compensation filters modulate the intensity distribution of the xray beam incident on the patient. This results in a spatial variation of skin dose due to the variation of primary radiation and also a variation in backscattered radiation from the patient. To determine the backscatter component, backscatter point spread functions (PSF) are generated using EGS Monte-Carlo software. For this study, PSF's were determined by simulating a 1 mm beam incident on the lateral surface of an anthropomorphic head phantom and a 20 cm thick PMMA block phantom. The backscatter PSF's for the head phantom and PMMA phantom are curve fit with a Lorentzian function after being normalized to the primary dose intensity (PSFn). PSFn is convolved with the primary dose distribution to generate the scatter dose distribution, which is added to the primary to obtain the total dose distribution. The backscatter convolution technique is incorporated in the dose tracking system (DTS), which tracks skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures and provides a color map of the dose distribution on a 3D patient graphic model. A convolution technique is developed for the backscatter dose determination for the nonuniformly spaced graphic-model surface vertices. A Gafchromic film validation was performed for shaped x-ray beams generated with an ROI attenuator and with two compensation filters inserted into the field. The total dose distribution calculated by the backscatter convolution technique closely agreed with that measured with the film.

  10. Effect of time-of-flight and point spread function modeling on detectability of myocardial defects in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua, E-mail: dnrjds@nus.edu.sg [A-STAR-NUS Clinical Imaging and Research Centre (CIRC), Singapore 117599 (Singapore); Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Nappi, Carmela [Radiology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples 80131 (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples 80142 (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A study was designed to investigate the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling on the detectability of myocardial defects. Methods: Clinical FDG-PET data were used to generate populations of defect-present and defect-absent images. Defects were incorporated at three contrast levels, and images were reconstructed by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) iterative methods including ordinary Poisson, alone and with PSF, TOF, and PSF+TOF. Channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was the surrogate for human observer performance. Results: For three iterations, 12 subsets, and no postreconstruction smoothing, TOF improved overall defect detection SNR by 8.6% as compared to its non-TOF counterpart for all the defect contrasts. Due to the slow convergence of PSF reconstruction, PSF yielded 4.4% less SNR than non-PSF. For reconstruction parameters (iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing kernel size) optimizing observer SNR, PSF showed larger improvement for faint defects. The combination of TOF and PSF improved mean detection SNR as compared to non-TOF and non-PSF counterparts by 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Conclusions: For typical reconstruction protocol used in clinical practice, i.e., less than five iterations, TOF improved defect detectability. In contrast, PSF generally yielded less detectability. For large number of iterations, TOF+PSF yields the best observer performance.

  11. Comparison of Different Hypotheses Regarding the Spread of Alzheimer's Disease Using Markov Random Fields and Multimodal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrba, Martin; Grothe, Michel J; Mohammadi, Abdolreza; Binder, Harald; Kirste, Thomas; Teipel, Stefan J

    2017-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a cascade of pathological processes that can be assessed in vivo using different neuroimaging methods. Recent research suggests a systematic sequence of pathogenic events on a global biomarker level, but little is known about the associations and dependencies of distinct lesion patterns on a regional level. Markov random fields are a probabilistic graphical modeling approach that represent the interaction between individual random variables by an undirected graph. We propose the novel application of this approach to study the interregional associations and dependencies between multimodal imaging markers of AD pathology and to compare different hypotheses regarding the spread of the disease. We retrieved multimodal imaging data from 577 subjects enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Mean amyloid load (AV45-PET), glucose metabolism (FDG-PET), and gray matter volume (MRI) were calculated for the six principle nodes of the default mode network- a functional network of brain regions that appears to be preferentially targeted by AD. Multimodal Markov random field models were developed for three different hypotheses regarding the spread of the disease: the "intraregional evolution model", the "trans-neuronal spread" hypothesis, and the "wear-and-tear" hypothesis. The model likelihood to reflect the given data was evaluated using tenfold cross-validation with 1,000 repetitions. The most likely graph structure contained the posterior cingulate cortex as main hub region with edges to various other regions, in accordance with the "wear-and-tear" hypothesis of disease vulnerability. Probabilistic graphical models facilitate the analysis of interactions between several variables in a network model and therefore afford great potential to complement traditional multiple regression analyses in multimodal neuroimaging research.

  12. Edge Artifacts in Point Spread Function-based PET Reconstruction in Relation to Object Size and Reconstruction Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Tsutsui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: We evaluated edge artifacts in relation to phantom diameter and reconstruction parameters in point spread function (PSF-based positron emission tomography (PET image reconstruction.Methods: PET data were acquired from an original cone-shaped phantom filled with 18F solution (21.9 kBq/mL for 10 min using a Biograph mCT scanner. The images were reconstructed using the baseline ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM algorithm and the OSEM with PSF correction model. The reconstruction parameters included a pixel size of 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mm, 1-12 iterations, 24 subsets, and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of the post-filter Gaussian filter of 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mm. We compared both the maximum recovery coefficient (RCmax and the mean recovery coefficient (RCmean in the phantom at different diameters.Results: The OSEM images had no edge artifacts, but the OSEM with PSF images had a dense edge delineating the hot phantom at diameters 10 mm or more and a dense spot at the center at diameters of 8 mm or less. The dense edge was clearly observed on images with a small pixel size, a Gaussian filter with a small FWHM, and a high number of iterations. At a phantom diameter of 6-7 mm, the RCmax for the OSEM and OSEM with PSF images was 60% and 140%, respectively (pixel size: 1.0 mm; FWHM of the Gaussian filter: 2.0 mm; iterations: 2. The RCmean of the OSEM with PSF images did not exceed 100%.Conclusion: PSF-based image reconstruction resulted in edge artifacts, the degree of which depends on the pixel size, number of iterations, FWHM of the Gaussian filter, and object size.

  13. Study of the point spread function (PSF) for {sup 123}I SPECT imaging using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cot, A [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sempau, J [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pareto, D [Unitat de BiofIsica i Bioenginyeria, Universitat de Barcelona, Casanova 143, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Bullich, S [Unitat de BiofIsica i Bioenginyeria, Universitat de Barcelona, Casanova 143, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); PavIa, J [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital ClInic i Provincial de Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Calvino, F [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ros, D [Unitat de BiofIsica i Bioenginyeria, Universitat de Barcelona, Casanova 143, 08036 Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-07-21

    The iterative reconstruction algorithms employed in brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allow some quantitative parameters of the image to be improved. These algorithms require accurate modelling of the so-called point spread function (PSF). Nowadays, most in vivo neurotransmitter SPECT studies employ pharmaceuticals radiolabelled with {sup 123}I. In addition to an intense line at 159 keV, the decay scheme of this radioisotope includes some higher energy gammas which may have a non-negligible contribution to the PSF. The aim of this work is to study this contribution for two low-energy high-resolution collimator configurations, namely, the parallel and the fan beam. The transport of radiation through the material system is simulated with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. We have developed a main program that deals with the intricacies associated with tracking photon trajectories through the geometry of the collimator and detection systems. The simulated PSFs are partly validated with a set of experimental measurements that use the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted by a {sup 18}F source. Sensitivity and spatial resolution have been studied, showing that a significant fraction of the detection events in the energy window centred at 159 keV (up to approximately 49% for the parallel collimator) are originated by higher energy gamma rays, which contribute to the spatial profile of the PSF mostly outside the 'geometrical' region dominated by the low-energy photons. Therefore, these high-energy counts are to be considered as noise, a fact that should be taken into account when modelling PSFs for reconstruction algorithms. We also show that the fan beam collimator gives higher signal-to-noise ratios than the parallel collimator for all the source positions analysed.

  14. Partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised of partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment, or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discover LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner’s center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method’s correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom, and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of ±30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV

  15. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Francisco [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036, Spain and Servei de Física Mèdica i Protecció Radiològica, Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat 08907 (Spain); Roé, Nuria [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain and Grupo de Imagen Molecular, Instituto de Investigacións Sanitarias de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Galicia 15782 (Spain); Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 08036, Spain and CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Pavía, Javier [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 080836 (Spain); CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); and Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona 08036 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  16. Investigation of Random Switching Driven by a Poisson Point Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Maria; Schiøler, Henrik; Leth, John-Josef

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the switching mechanism of a two-dimensional switched system, when the switching events are generated by a Poisson point process. A model, in the shape of a stochastic process, for such a system is derived and the distribution of the trajectory's position is developed...

  17. Transforming spatial point processes into Poisson processes using random superposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Berthelsen, Kasper Klitgaaard

    with a complementary spatial point process Y  to obtain a Poisson process X∪Y  with intensity function β. Underlying this is a bivariate spatial birth-death process (Xt,Yt) which converges towards the distribution of (X,Y). We study the joint distribution of X and Y, and their marginal and conditional distributions....... In particular, we introduce a fast and easy simulation procedure for Y conditional on X. This may be used for model checking: given a model for the Papangelou intensity of the original spatial point process, this model is used to generate the complementary process, and the resulting superposition is a Poisson...... process with intensity function β if and only if the true Papangelou intensity is used. Whether the superposition is actually such a Poisson process can easily be examined using well known results and fast simulation procedures for Poisson processes. We illustrate this approach to model checking...

  18. Impact of Point-Spread Function Modeling on PET Image Quality in Integrated PET/MR Hybrid Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklan, Bassim; Oehmigen, Mark; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Paulus, Daniel H; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Ritt, Philipp; Quick, Harald H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically assess the quantitative and qualitative impact of including point-spread function (PSF) modeling into the process of iterative PET image reconstruction in integrated PET/MR imaging. All measurements were performed on an integrated whole-body PET/MR system. Three substudies were performed: an (18)F-filled Jaszczak phantom was measured, and the impact of including PSF modeling in ordinary Poisson ordered-subset expectation maximization reconstruction on quantitative accuracy and image noise was evaluated for a range of radial phantom positions, iteration numbers, and postreconstruction smoothing settings; 5 representative datasets from a patient population (total n = 20, all oncologic (18)F-FDG PET/MR) were selected, and the impact of PSF on lesion activity concentration and image noise for various iteration numbers and postsmoothing settings was evaluated; and for all 20 patients, the influence of PSF modeling was investigated on visual image quality and number of detected lesions, both assessed by clinical experts. Additionally, the influence on objective metrics such as changes in SUVmean, SUVpeak, SUVmax, and lesion volume was assessed using the manufacturer-recommended reconstruction settings. In the phantom study, PSF modeling significantly improved activity recovery and reduced the image noise at all radial positions. This effect was measurable only at a high number of iterations (>10 iterations, 21 subsets). In the patient study, again, PSF increased the detected activity in the patient's lesions at concurrently reduced image noise. Contrary to the phantom results, the effect was notable already at a lower number of iterations (>1 iteration, 21 subsets). Lastly, for all 20 patients, when PSF and no-PSF reconstructions were compared, an identical number of congruent lesions was found. The overall image quality of the PSF reconstructions was rated better when compared with no-PSF data. The SUVs of the detected lesions

  19. A Comparison of Spread and Point-Source Multiple-Direction Estimation Techniques for High Latitude HF Direction Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    nouvel algorithme de goniometrie . Cet algorithme dit ä ’probabilite maximale de dispersion’ (PMD, SML en anglais pour ’spread maximum likelihood...and E layers to exist. These layers reflect radio waves in a predictable manner, thus facilitating reliable direction finding at those times

  20. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Kyoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral and direction (ventral or dorsal were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI.

  1. Analysis of motion tracking in echocardiographic image sequences: influence of system geometry and point-spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touil, Basma; Basarab, Adrian; Delachartre, Philippe; Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis

    2010-03-01

    This paper focuses on motion tracking in echocardiographic ultrasound images. The difficulty of this task is related to the fact that echographic image formation induces decorrelation between the underlying motion of tissue and the observed speckle motion. Since Meunier's seminal work, this phenomenon has been investigated in many simulation studies as part of speckle tracking or optical flow-based motion estimation techniques. Most of these studies modeled image formation using a linear convolution approach, where the system point-spread function (PSF) was spatially invariant and the probe geometry was linear. While these assumptions are valid over a small spatial area, they constitute an oversimplification when a complete image is considered. Indeed, echocardiographic acquisition geometry relies on sectorial probes and the system PSF is not perfectly invariant, even if dynamic focusing is performed. This study investigated the influence of sectorial geometry and spatially varying PSF on speckle tracking. This was done by simulating a typical 64 elements, cardiac probe operating at 3.5 MHz frequency, using the simulation software Field II. This simulation first allowed quantification of the decorrelation induced by the system between two images when simple motion such as translation or incompressible deformation was applied. We then quantified the influence of decorrelation on speckle tracking accuracy using a conventional block matching (BM) algorithm and a bilinear deformable block matching (BDBM) algorithm. In echocardiography, motion estimation is usually performed on reconstructed images where the initial sectorial (i.e., polar) data are interpolated on a cartesian grid. We therefore studied the influence of sectorial acquisition geometry, by performing block matching on cartesian and polar data. Simulation results show that decorrelation is spatially variant and depends on the position of the region where motion takes place relative to the probe. Previous

  2. Infinite-randomness fixed points for chains of non-Abelian quasiparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesteel, N E; Yang, Kun

    2007-10-05

    One-dimensional chains of non-Abelian quasiparticles described by SU(2)k Chern-Simons-Witten theory can enter random singlet phases analogous to that of a random chain of ordinary spin-1/2 particles (corresponding to k-->infinity). For k=2 this phase provides a random singlet description of the infinite-randomness fixed point of the critical transverse field Ising model. The entanglement entropy of a region of size L in these phases scales as S(L) approximately lnd/3 log(2)L for large L, where d is the quantum dimension of the particles.

  3. Quasirandom Rumor Spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Doerr, Benjamin; Friedrich, Tobias; Sauerwald, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a quasirandom analogue of the classical push model for disseminating information in networks ("randomized rumor spreading"). In the classical model, in each round each informed vertex chooses a neighbor at random and informs it, if it was not informed before. It is known that this simple protocol succeeds in spreading a rumor from one vertex to all others within O(log n) rounds on complete graphs, hypercubes, random regular graphs, Erdos-Renyi random graph and Ramanujan...

  4. ERROR DISTRIBUTION EVALUATION OF THE THIRD VANISHING POINT BASED ON RANDOM STATISTICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available POS, integrated by GPS / INS (Inertial Navigation Systems, has allowed rapid and accurate determination of position and attitude of remote sensing equipment for MMS (Mobile Mapping Systems. However, not only does INS have system error, but also it is very expensive. Therefore, in this paper error distributions of vanishing points are studied and tested in order to substitute INS for MMS in some special land-based scene, such as ground façade where usually only two vanishing points can be detected. Thus, the traditional calibration approach based on three orthogonal vanishing points is being challenged. In this article, firstly, the line clusters, which parallel to each others in object space and correspond to the vanishing points, are detected based on RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus and parallelism geometric constraint. Secondly, condition adjustment with parameters is utilized to estimate nonlinear error equations of two vanishing points (VX, VY. How to set initial weights for the adjustment solution of single image vanishing points is presented. Solving vanishing points and estimating their error distributions base on iteration method with variable weights, co-factor matrix and error ellipse theory. Thirdly, under the condition of known error ellipses of two vanishing points (VX, VY and on the basis of the triangle geometric relationship of three vanishing points, the error distribution of the third vanishing point (VZ is calculated and evaluated by random statistical simulation with ignoring camera distortion. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods utilized for random statistical estimation are presented. Finally, experimental results of vanishing points coordinate and their error distributions are shown and analyzed.

  5. Responsiveness of Myofascial Trigger Points to Single and Multiple Trigger Point Release Massages: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraska, Albert F; Schmiege, Sarah J; Mann, John D; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of single and multiple massage treatments on pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in people with myofascial pain syndrome expressed as tension-type headache. Individuals (n = 62) with episodic or chronic tension-type headache were randomized to receive 12 twice-weekly 45-min massage or sham ultrasound sessions or wait-list control. Massage focused on trigger point release (ischemic compression) of MTrPs in the bilateral upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles. PPT was measured at MTrPs with a pressure algometer pre and post the first and final (12th) treatments. PPT increased across the study timeframe in all four muscle sites tested for massage, but not sham ultrasound or wait-list groups (P pain threshold of MTrPs have a great capacity to increase; even after multiple massage treatments additional gain in PPT was observed. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand the contribution of myofascial trigger points to myofascial pain; (2) Describe an effective treatment for decreasing tenderness of a myofascial trigger point; and (3) Discuss the relative values of single vs. multiple massage sessions on increasing pressure-pain thresholds at myofascial trigger points. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  6. Lightwave Propagation in the Presence of Random Turbulent Media and Pointing Jitter in Optical Space Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoshima, Morio

    2003-01-01

    This study is devoted to lightwave propagation in the presence of random pointing jitter and atmospheric turbulence. The intrinsic narrow beam/high gain nature of free-space laser communications produces several extremely valuable advantages when compared to microwaves, but also requires a very high tracking and pointing accuracy. Furthermore, space-to-ground optical communications are strongly affected by scintillation effects due to the turbulent atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to ...

  7. N-point free energy distribution function in one dimensional random directed polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dotsenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Explicit expression for the N-point free energy distribution function in one dimensional directed polymers in a random potential is derived in terms of the Bethe ansatz replica technique. The obtained result is equivalent to the one derived earlier by Prolhac and Spohn [J. Stat. Mech., 2011, P03020].

  8. Hematological clozapine monitoring with a point-of-care device: A randomized cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Thode, Dorrit; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    for several reasons, perhaps most importantly because of the mandatory hematological monitoring. The Chempaq Express Blood Counter (Chempaq XBC) is a point-of-care device providing counts of white blood cells (WBC) and granulocytes based on a capillary blood sampling. A randomized cross-over trial design...

  9. Hematological clozapine monitoring with a point-of-care device: A randomized cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Thode, Dorrit; Stenager, Elsebeth

    for several reasons, perhaps most importantly because of the mandatory hematological monitoring. The Chempaq Express Blood Counter (Chempaq XBC) is a point-of-care device providing counts of white blood cells (WBC) and granulocytes based on a capillary blood sampling. A randomized cross-over trial design...

  10. Inertial particles distribute in turbulence as Poissonian points with random intensity inducing clustering and supervoiding

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Lukas; Holzner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This work considers the distribution of inertial particles in turbulence using the point-particle approximation. We demonstrate that the random point process formed by the positions of particles in space is a Poisson point process with log-normal random intensity ("log Gaussian Cox process" or LGCP). The probability of having a finite number of particles in a small volume is given in terms of the characteristic function of a log-normal distribution. Corrections due to discreteness of the number of particles to the previously derived statistics of particle concentration in the continuum limit are provided. These are relevant for dealing with experimental or numerical data. The probability of having regions without particles, i.e. voids, is larger for inertial particles than for tracer particles where voids are distributed according to Poisson processes. Further, the probability of having large voids decays only log-normally with size. This shows that particles cluster, leaving voids behind. At scales where the...

  11. A prospective randomized study of the efficacy of "Turning Point," an inpatient violence intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland-Jones, Catherine; Ferrer, Lucas; Charles, Scott; Ramsey, Frederick; van Zandt, Andrea; Volgraf, Jill; Santora, Thomas; Pathak, Abhijit; Dujon, Jay; Sjoholm, Lars; Rappold, Joseph; Goldberg, Amy

    2016-11-01

    From 2002 to 2011, there were more than 17,000 shootings in Philadelphia. "Turning Point," Temple University Hospital's inpatient violence intervention program, takes advantage of the teachable moment that occurs after violent injury. In addition to receiving traditional social work services, Turning Point patients watch their trauma bay resuscitation video and a movie about violence, meet with a gunshot wound survivor and an outpatient case manager, and also undergo psychiatric assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Turning Point in changing attitudes toward guns and violence among victims of penetrating trauma. This prospective randomized study was conducted from January 2012 to January 2014. Patients who sustained a gunshot or stab wound were randomized to standard of care, which involved traditional social work services only, or Turning Point. The Attitudes Toward Guns and Violence Questionnaire was administered to assess attitude change. Analysis was performed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. A p violence. Turning Point is effective in changing attitudes toward guns and violence among victims of penetrating trauma. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if this program can truly be a turning point in patients' lives. Therapeutic/care management study, level II.

  12. Optimum signal input distribution design in the presence of random pointing jitter for intersatellite optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Tan, Liying; Shen, Tao

    2013-02-01

    Channel capacity is widely investigated for free space optical links to approach high-speed data-rate communication. Instead of traditional equiprobable binary symbol input distribution, an optimum input distribution is proposed with respect to channel capacity by maximizing mutual information for intersatellite optical communications in the presence of random pointing jitter. It is shown that the optimum input distribution varies with the variance of pointing jitter σ and laser beam divergence angle w0 and the normalized intensity threshold IT. For traditional normalized intensity threshold IT=0.5, the optimum input distribution ranges from about p(x=0)=0.52 for weak pointing jitter to about p(x=0)=0.24 for strong pointing jitter given the same laser beam divergence angle. The results obtained in this paper will be useful for intersatellite optical communication system design.

  13. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stegenga Boudewijn; Dommerholt Jan; de Gast Arthur; Bron Carel; Wensing Michel; Oostendorp Rob AB

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group receiv...

  14. Clinical validation of high-resolution image reconstruction algorithms in brain 18F-FDG-PET: effect of incorporating Gaussian filter, point spread function, and time-of-flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, Akio; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Matsutomo, Norikazu

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the brain is difficult because of count statistics, low spatial resolution, and smoothing filter. The aim of this study was to assess the counting rate performance of PET scanners and the image quality with different combinations of high-resolution image reconstruction algorithms in brain F-2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (F-FDG)-PET. Using 23 patient studies, we analyzed the coincidence rates of true and random, random fraction, and the noise equivalent counts per axial length (NECpatient) in brain and liver bed positions. The reconstruction algorithms were combined with baseline ordered subsets expectation maximization, Gaussian filter (GF), point spread function (PSF), and time-of-flight (TOF). The image quality of the brain cortex was quantitatively evaluated with respect to spatial resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The true coincidence rate in the brain was higher by 1.86 times and the random coincidence rate was lower by 0.61 times compared with that in the liver. In the brain, random fraction was lower and NECpatient was higher than that of the liver. Although GF improved the SNR, spatial resolution and contrast were reduced by 12 and 11%, respectively (P<0.01). PSF improved spatial resolution and SNR by 11 and 53%, respectively (P<0.01), and TOF improved SNR by ∼23% (P<0.01). We have demonstrated that a high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for brain F-FDG-PET is promising without the use of a GF because of high true coincidence counts and that combined with PSF and TOF is optimal for obtaining a better SNR of the image.

  15. Acupuncture at local and distant points for tinnitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Guang-Xia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an objective physical source. Up to now, there is no generally accepted view how these phantom sounds come about, and also no efficient treatment. Patients are turning to complementary or alternative medical therapies, such as acupuncture. Based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, acupoints located on both the adjacent and distal area of the disease can be needled to treat disease. Furthermore, the way of combining acupoints is for strengthening the curative effect. We aim to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture at local points in combination with distal points in subjective tinnitus patients. Method This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 112 participants will be randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups receiving acupuncture treatment for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure is subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance perception, which is graded using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation, 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion Completion of this trial will help to identify whether acupuncture at local acupoints in combination with distal acupoints may be more effective than needling points separately. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN29230777

  16. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotchett, Matthew P; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B

    2014-08-01

    Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points; however, there is only poor-quality evidence supporting its use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The study was a parallel-group, participant-blinded, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a university health sciences clinic. Study participants were 84 patients with plantar heel pain of at least 1 month's duration. Participants were randomly assigned to receive real or sham trigger point dry needling. The intervention consisted of 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks. Participants were followed for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures included first-step pain, as measured with a visual analog scale (VAS), and foot pain, as measured with the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ). The primary end point for predicting the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain was 6 weeks. At the primary end point, significant effects favored real dry needling over sham dry needling for pain (adjusted mean difference: VAS first-step pain=-14.4 mm, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=-23.5 to -5.2; FHSQ foot pain=10.0 points, 95% CI=1.0 to 19.1), although the between-group difference was lower than the minimal important difference. The number needed to treat at 6 weeks was 4 (95% CI=2 to 12). The frequency of minor transitory adverse events was significantly greater in the real dry needling group (70 real dry needling appointments [32%] compared with only 1 sham dry needling appointment [Dry needling provided statistically significant reductions in plantar heel pain, but the magnitude of this effect should be considered against the frequency of minor transitory adverse events. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  17. SEGMENTATION OF LARGE UNSTRUCTURED POINT CLOUDS USING OCTREE-BASED REGION GROWING AND CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bassier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Point cloud segmentation is a crucial step in scene understanding and interpretation. The goal is to decompose the initial data into sets of workable clusters with similar properties. Additionally, it is a key aspect in the automated procedure from point cloud data to BIM. Current approaches typically only segment a single type of primitive such as planes or cylinders. Also, current algorithms suffer from oversegmenting the data and are often sensor or scene dependent. In this work, a method is presented to automatically segment large unstructured point clouds of buildings. More specifically, the segmentation is formulated as a graph optimisation problem. First, the data is oversegmented with a greedy octree-based region growing method. The growing is conditioned on the segmentation of planes as well as smooth surfaces. Next, the candidate clusters are represented by a Conditional Random Field after which the most likely configuration of candidate clusters is computed given a set of local and contextual features. The experiments prove that the used method is a fast and reliable framework for unstructured point cloud segmentation. Processing speeds up to 40,000 points per second are recorded for the region growing. Additionally, the recall and precision of the graph clustering is approximately 80%. Overall, nearly 22% of oversegmentation is reduced by clustering the data. These clusters will be classified and used as a basis for the reconstruction of BIM models.

  18. [Manual trigger point therapy of shoulder pain : Randomized controlled study of effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohns, S; Schnieder, K; Licht, G; von Piekartz, H

    2016-12-01

    Although chronic shoulder pain is highly prevalent and myofascial trigger points (mTrP) are thought to be found in the majority of patients with shoulder complaints, the influence on the pain mechanism remains unclear. There are only very few controlled clinical studies on the effects of manual trigger point compression therapy. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared the short-term effects of manual trigger point compression therapy (n = 6) with manual sham therapy (n = 6) in patients with unilateral shoulder pain due to myofascial syndrome (MFS). The measurement data were collected before and after two sessions of therapy. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) of mTrP and symmetrically located points on the asymptomatic side were measured together with neutral points in order to detect a potential unilateral or generalized hyperalgesia. Additionally, the pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at rest and during movement and the neck disability index (NDI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaires were also completed and evaluated. Both treatment modalities led to a significant improvement; however, the manual trigger point compression therapy was significantly more effective in comparison to sham therapy, as measured by different parameters. The significant improvement of PPT values in the interventional group even at sites that were not directly treated, indicates central mechanisms in pain threshold modulation induced by manual compression therapy. The weaker but still measurable effects of sham therapy might be explained by the sham modality being a hands on technique or by sufficient stimulation of the trigger point region during the diagnostics and PPT measurements.

  19. Regular and Random Components in Aiming-Point Trajectory During Rifle Aiming and Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Simon; Haufler, Amy; Shim, Jae Kun; Hatfield, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the kinematic qualities of the aiming trajectory as related to expertise. In all, 2 phases of the trajectory were discriminated. The first phase was regular approximation to the target accompanied by substantial fluctuations obeying the Weber–Fechner law. During the first phase, shooters did not initiate the triggering despite any random closeness of the aiming point (AP) to the target. In the second phase, beginning at 0.6–0.8 s before the trigger pull, shooters applied a different control strategy: They waited until the following random fluctuation brought the AP closer to the target and then initiated triggering. This strategy is tenable when sensitivity of perception is greater than precision of the motor action, and could be considered a case of stochastic resonance. The strategies that novices and experts used distinguished only in the values of parameters. The authors present an analytical model explaining the main properties of shooting. PMID:19508963

  20. Markov Random Field Restoration of Point Correspondences for Active Shape Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    In this paper it is described how to build a statistical shape model using a training set with a sparse of landmarks. A well defined model mesh is selected and fitted to all shapes in the training set using thin plate spline warping. This is followed by a projection of the points of the warped...... model mesh to the target shapes. When this is done by a nearest neighbour projection it can result in folds and inhomogeneities in the correspondence vector field. The novelty in this paper is the use and extension of a Markov random field regularisation of the correspondence field. The correspondence...... model that produces highly homogeneous polygonised shapes with improved reconstruction capabilities of the training data. Furthermore, the method leads to an overall reduction in the total variance of the resulting point distribution model. The method is demonstrated on a set of human ear canals...

  1. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Fan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS super-resolution (SR reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the highresolution (HR image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40 three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method.

  2. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chong; Wu, Chaoyun; Li, Grand; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF) of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS) super-resolution (SR) reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR) remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the high-resolution (HR) image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40) three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method. PMID:28208837

  3. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: mdwood@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: mar0@uw.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from Almost-Equal-To 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of {gamma} rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of {gamma}-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347-121.

  4. Enhanced information content for three-dimensional localization and tracking using the double-helix point spread function with variable-angle illumination epifluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Agrawal, Anurag; Piestun, Rafael; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2017-05-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and three-dimensional localization precision of a double helix point spread function (DH-PSF) can be significantly improved by applying variable-angle illumination epifluorescence microscopy (VAI, also commonly known as "pseudo-TIRF" or "quasi-TIRF"). Here, we performed a quantitative analysis of the dependence of SNR and localization precision on the number of measured photons and the incident angle for static particles under both low (at a planar index-matched interface) and high (within a porous silica matrix) fluorescent background conditions. We found that under noisier imaging conditions, the SNR and localization precision obtained using VAI are up to fivefold and threefold greater, respectively, than those obtained using epi-illumination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the combination of DH-PSF and VAI can significantly improve the accuracy of the measured diffusion coefficient for mobile particles, even at a relatively large distance (50 μm) from the boundary of the optical cell.

  5. Clinical evaluation of whole-body oncologic PET with time-of-flight and point-spread function for the hybrid PET/MR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kun; Cui, Bixiao; Ma, Jie; Shuai, Dongmei; Liang, Zhigang; Jansen, Floris; Zhou, Yun; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Guoguang

    2017-08-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging is a new multimodality imaging technology that can provide structural and functional information simultaneously. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the time-of-flight (TOF) and point-spread function (PSF) on small lesions observed in PET/MR images from clinical patient image sets. This study evaluated 54 small lesions in 14 patients who had undergone 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MR. Lesions up to 30mm in diameter were included. The PET data were reconstructed with a baseline ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm, OSEM+PSF, OSEM+TOF and OSEM+TOF+PSF. PET image quality and small lesions were visually evaluated and scored by a 3-point scale. A quantitative analysis was then performed using the mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of the small lesions (SUVmean and SUVmax). The lesions were divided into two groups according to the long-axis diameter and the location respectively and evaluated with each reconstruction algorithm. We also evaluated the background signal by analyzing the SUVliver. OSEM+TOF+PSF provided the highest value and OSEM+TOF or PSF showed a higher value than OSEM for the visual assessment and quantitative analysis. The combination of TOF and PSF increased the SUVmean by 26.6% and the SUVmax by 30.0%. The SUVliverwas not influenced by PSF or TOF. For the OSEM+TOF+PSF model, the change in SUVmean and SUVmax for lesions PET/MR images, potentially improving small lesion detectability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept study of the cortical spreading depression inhibiting agent tonabersat in migraine prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goadsby, P J; Ferrari, M D; Csanyi, A

    2009-01-01

    Tonabersat is a novel putative migraine prophylactic agent with an unique stereospecific binding site in the brain. Tonabersat has been shown, in animal models, to inhibit experimentally induced cortical spreading depression, the likely underlying mechanism for migraine aura, and cerebrovascular...... responses to trigeminal nerve stimulation. The aim was to study the potential for tonabersat as a migraine preventive. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, parallel group study recruited patients with migraine with and without aura experiencing between two and six migraine attacks...

  7. Depression treatment for impoverished mothers by point-of-care providers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S; Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman's usual point-of-care, including home visits or an ob-gyn office. Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician's assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study's participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from 4 study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared with women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. A Phytosterol-Enriched Spread Improves Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Xing, Baoheng

    2016-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has become a serious health risk among pregnant women throughout the world. Phytosterol-enriched margarines are capable of lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but little is known about its effects on GDM. We aimed to examine the effects of daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread on insulin resistance and lipid profile in pregnant GDM women. Pregnant women suffering from GDM in their second trimester were recruited and randomly assigned to consume a margarine spread either with or without phytosterols daily for 16 weeks. Serum lipid profile and glucose and insulin metabolisms were assessed at week 0 (baseline) and week 16 (end of trial). After 16 weeks, levels of triacylglycerol, TC, and LDL were significantly decreased, while high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased, compared with the baseline in the phytosterol group. In addition, in the same treatment group, glucose metabolic parameters, including fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, the quantitative insulin check index, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance, and β-cell function, were also significantly improved. Daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread improved insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with GDM.

  9. [Efficacy of cervical fixed-point traction manipulation for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chong-Bo; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Zhi-Xin; Hou, Jing-Shan; Ma, Ling; Sun, Tong

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy is a commonly encountered and frequently occurring disease. Traditional Chinese osteopathic manipulations may have better therapeutic efficacy than that of other methods in treating patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. To evaluate the clinical therapeutic effects of cervical fixed-point traction manipulation in treating patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was adopted. Eighty-four patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were randomly divided into treatment group (n=42) and control group (n=42). All patients were enrolled from the outpatient service of Department of Rehabilitation of Chinese PLA General Hospital of China. Patients received oral and written information about clinical procedures before giving their written informed consent. The patients were treated with cervical fixed-point traction manipulation (treatment group) or cervical computer traction (control group). Cervical fixed-point traction was performed once every other day for a total of seven treatment periods and cervical computer traction was performed 30 min, once per day for 14 d. Before and after treatment, visual analogue scale (VAS) score and temperature of upper limb skin (normal limb and abnormal limb) detected by infrared thermal imaging system were contrastively analyzed. Five patients were lost to follow-up, one patient in the treatment group and four patients in the control group. There were significant differences in VAS score and temperature difference between the normal and abnormal upper limbs of infrared thermal imaging in the treatment group (t=28.652, Pmanipulation has better efficacy than cervical computer traction in treating patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy.

  10. Analysis of tree stand horizontal structure using random point field methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Sekretenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the model approach to analyze the horizontal structure of forest stands. The main types of models of random point fields and statistical procedures that can be used to analyze spatial patterns of trees of uneven and even-aged stands are described. We show how modern methods of spatial statistics can be used to address one of the objectives of forestry – to clarify the laws of natural thinning of forest stand and the corresponding changes in its spatial structure over time. Studying natural forest thinning, we describe the consecutive stages of modeling: selection of the appropriate parametric model, parameter estimation and generation of point patterns in accordance with the selected model, the selection of statistical functions to describe the horizontal structure of forest stands and testing of statistical hypotheses. We show the possibilities of a specialized software package, spatstat, which is designed to meet the challenges of spatial statistics and provides software support for modern methods of analysis of spatial data. We show that a model of stand thinning that does not consider inter-tree interaction can project the size distribution of the trees properly, but the spatial pattern of the modeled stand is not quite consistent with observed data. Using data of three even-aged pine forest stands of 25, 55, and 90-years old, we demonstrate that the spatial point process models are useful for combining measurements in the forest stands of different ages to study the forest stand natural thinning.

  11. [Myofascial pain syndrome treated with sparrow-pecking moxibustion at trigger points: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Bu, He; Jia, Ji-rong; Liu, Zheng

    2014-11-01

    To compare the efficacy difference in treatment of myofasical pain syndrome between sparrow-pecking moxibustion and acupuncture at trigger points so as to provide the reference of the effective therapeutic method for myofascial pain syndrome. Ninety patients were randomized into a sparrow-pecking moxibustion group and an acupuncture group, 45 cases in each one. The trigger points were selected in pain areas in the two groups. In the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group, the sparrow-pecking moxibustion was applied, 30 min in each time. In the acupuncture group, the filiform needles were inserted obliquely at 45 degrees and retained for 40 min in each treatment. The treatment was given once a day and 10 treatments made one session in the two groups. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire was used as the observation index, and the changes in pain rating index (PRI), present pain intensity (PPI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after treatment were used for efficacy assessment. The results of PRI, PPI and VAS after treatment were reduced apparently as compared with those before treatment in the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group and the acupuncture group (all P0.05). The curative and remarkably effective rate was 80.0% (36/45) in the sparrow-pecking moxibustion group, which was better than 40.0% (18/45, Pmyofascial pain syndrome as compared with acupuncture at trigger points. This therapy is simpler in operation additionally.

  12. X-ray beam-shaping via deformable mirrors: surface profile and point spread function computation for Gaussian beams using physical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D

    2018-01-01

    X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are commonly used in different sectors of science, such as X-ray astronomy, medical imaging and synchrotron/free-electron laser beamlines. While deformations of the mirror profile may cause degradation of the focus sharpness, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators. The resulting profile can be characterized with suitable metrology tools and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code or, sometimes, predicted using geometric optics. In the latter case and for the special class of profile deformations with monotonically increasing derivative, i.e. concave upwards, the point spread function (PSF) can even be predicted analytically. Moreover, under these assumptions, the relation can also be reversed: from the desired PSF the required profile deformation can be computed analytically, avoiding the use of trial-and-error search codes. However, the computation has been so far limited to geometric optics, which entailed some limitations: for example, mirror diffraction effects and the size of the coherent X-ray source were not considered. In this paper, the beam-shaping formalism in the framework of physical optics is reviewed, in the limit of small light wavelengths and in the case of Gaussian intensity wavefronts. Some examples of shaped profiles are also shown, aiming at turning a Gaussian intensity distribution into a top-hat one, and checks of the shaping performances computing the at-wavelength PSF by means of the WISE code are made.

  13. Influences of point-spread function and time-of-flight reconstructions on standardized uptake value of lymph node metastases in FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akamatsu, Go, E-mail: golilin5@gmail.com [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2, Minatojima-Minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Mitsumoto, Katsuhiko, E-mail: kamitsumo@gmail.com [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takafumi, E-mail: bock.0517.tt@gmail.com [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yuji, E-mail: yuji1006@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Technology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Baba, Shingo, E-mail: sbaba127@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki, E-mail: msasaki@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of point-spread function (PSF) and time-of-flight (TOF) on the standardized uptake value (SUV) of lymph node metastasis in FDG-PET/CT. Materials and methods: This study evaluated 41 lymph node metastases in 15 patients who had undergone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The lesion diameters were 2.5 cm or less. The mean short-axis diameter of the lymph nodes was 10.5 ± 3.7 mm (range 4.6–22.8 mm). The PET data were reconstructed with baseline OSEM algorithm, with OSEM + PSF, with OSEM + TOF and with OSEM + PSF + TOF. A semi-quantitative analysis was performed using the maximum and mean SUV of lymph node metastases (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) and mean SUV of normal lung tissue (SUV{sub lung}). We also evaluated image quality using the signal-to-noise ratio in the liver (SNR{sub liver}). Results: Both PSF and TOF increased the SUV of lymph node metastases. The combination of PSF and TOF increased the SUV{sub max} by 43.3% and the SUV{sub mean} by 31.6% compared with conventional OSEM. By contrast, the SUV{sub lung} was not influenced by PSF and TOF. TOF significantly improved the SNR{sub liver}. Conclusion: PSF and TOF both increased the SUV of lymph node metastases. Although PSF and TOF are considered to improve small-lesion detectability, it is important to be aware that PSF and TOF influence the accuracy of quantitative measurements.

  14. Unbiased stereological estimation of d-dimensional volume in Rn from an isotropic random slice through a fixed point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva B. Vedel; Kiêu, K

    1994-01-01

    Unbiased stereological estimators of d-dimensional volume in R(n) are derived, based on information from an isotropic random r-slice through a specified point. The content of the slice can be subsampled by means of a spatial grid. The estimators depend only on spatial distances. As a fundamental ...... lemma, an explicit formula for the probability that an isotropic random r-slice in R(n) through 0 hits a fixed point in R(n) is given....

  15. A method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-07

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised by partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discovery LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner's center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method's correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three-dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of +/-30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV-PVC demonstrated

  16. Inertial particles distribute in turbulence as Poissonian points with random intensity inducing clustering and supervoiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Holzner, Markus

    2017-07-01

    This work considers the distribution of discrete inertial particles in turbulence. We demonstrate that even for weak inertia the distribution can be strongly different from the Poisson distribution that holds for tracers. We study the cases of weak inertia or strong gravity where single-valued particle flow holds in space. In these cases, the particles distribute over a random multifractal attractor in space. This attractor is characterized by fractal dimensions describing scaling exponents of moments of number of particles inside a ball with size much smaller than the viscous scale of turbulence. Previous studies used a continuum approach to the moments which requires having a large number of particles below the viscous scale. This condition often does not hold in practice; for instance, for water droplets in clouds there is typically one droplet per viscous scale. This condition is also hard to realize in numerical simulations. In this work, we overcome this difficulty by deriving the probability pl(k ) of having k particles in a ball of small radius l for which the continuum approximation may not hold. We demonstrate that the random point process formed by positions of particles' centers in space is a Poisson point process with log-normal random intensity (the so-called log Gaussian Cox process or LGCP). This gives pl(k ) in terms of the characteristic function of a log-normal distribution from which the moments are derived. This allows finding the correlation dimension relevant for statistics of particles' collisions. The case of zero number of particles provides the statistics of the size of voids—regions without particles—that were not studied previously. The probability of voids is increased compared to a random distribution of particles because preferential concentration of inertial particles implies voids in the deserted regions. Thus voids and preferential concentration are different reflections of the same phenomena. In the limit of tracers with zero

  17. Dry needling in the management of myofascial trigger points: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Antúnez, Luis; Tejeda, Jaime Fernández-Huertas; Albornoz-Cabello, Manuel; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; de la Cruz-Torres, Blanca; Ribeiro, Fernando; Silva, Anabela G

    2017-08-01

    This systematic review of randomized controlled trials aimed to examine the effectiveness of dry needling in the treatment of myofascial trigger points and to explore the impact of specific aspects of the technique on its effectiveness. Relevant studies published between 2000 and 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Scopus, The Cochrane Library and Physiotherapy Evidence Database. Studies identified by electronic searches were screened against a set of pre-defined inclusion criteria. Fifteen studies were included in this systematic review. The main outcomes that were measured were pain, range of motion, disability, depression and quality of life. The results suggest that dry needling is effective in the short term for pain relief, increase range of motion and improve quality of life when compared to no intervention/sham/placebo. There is insufficient evidence on its effect on disability, analgesic medication intake and sleep quality. Despite some evidence for a positive effect in the short term, further randomized clinical trials of high methodological quality, using standardized procedures for the application of dry needling are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Mean Distance to the nth Neighbour in a Uniform Distribution of Random Points: An Application of Probability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pratip; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2008-01-01

    We study different ways of determining the mean distance (r[subscript n]) between a reference point and its nth neighbour among random points distributed with uniform density in a D-dimensional Euclidean space. First, we present a heuristic method; though this method provides only a crude mathematical result, it shows a simple way of estimating…

  19. Randomized trial of trigger point acupuncture treatment for chronic shoulder pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kazunori; Saito, Shingo; Sahara, Shunsaku; Naitoh, Yuki; Imai, Kenji; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    There is evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture treatment for chronic shoulder pain, but it remains unclear which acupuncture modes are most effective. We compared the effect of trigger point acupuncture (TrP), with that of sham (SH) acupuncture treatments, on pain and shoulder function in patients with chronic shoulder pain. The participants were 18 patients (15 women, 3 men; aged 42-65 years) with nonradiating shoulder pain for at least 6 months and normal neurological findings. The participants were randomized into two groups, each receiving five treatment sessions. The TrP group received treatment at trigger points for the muscle, while the other group received SH acupuncture treatment on the same muscle. Outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS) and shoulder function (Constant-Murley Score: CMS). After treatment, pain intensity between pretreatment and 5 weeks after TrP decreased significantly (pShoulder function also increased significantly between pretreatment and 5 weeks after TrP (pshoulder pain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Scattering by Atmospheric Particles: From Aerosols to Clouds with the Point-Spread Function ... using Water, Milk, Plastic Cups, and a Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres are made primarily of molecules, and their optical properties are well known. They scatter sunlight across the spectrum, but far more potently at shorter wavelengths. Consequently, they redden the Sun as it sets and, at the same time, endow the daytime sky with its characteristic blue hue. There are also microscopic atmospheric particulates that are equally omnipresent because small enough (up to ~10s of microns) to remain lofted for long periods of time. However, in contrast with molecules of the major gases, their concentrations are highly variable in space and time. Their optical properties are also far more interesting. These airborne particles are either solid---hence the word "aerosols"---or liquid, most notably in the form of cloud droplets. Needless to say that both aerosols and clouds have major impacts on the balance of the Earth's climate system. Harder to understand, but nonetheless true, is that their climate impacts are much harder to assess by Earth system modelers than those of greenhouse gases such as CO2. That makes them prime targets of study by multiple approaches, including ground- and space-based remote sensing. To characterize aerosols and clouds quantitatively by optical remote sensing methods, either passive (sunlight-based) or active (laser-based), we need predictive capability for the signals recorded by sensors, whether ground-based, airborne, or carried by satellites. This in turn draws on the physical theory of "radiative transfer" that describes how the light propagates and scatters in the molecular-and-particulate atmosphere. This is a challenge for remote sensing scientists. I will show why by simulating with simple means the point spread function or "PSF" of scattering particulate atmospheres with varying opacity, thus covering tabletop analogs of the pristine air, the background aerosol, all the way to optically thick cloudy airmasses. I will also show PSF measurements of real clouds over New Mexico and

  1. The edge artifact in the point-spread function-based PET reconstruction at different sphere-to-background ratios of radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidera, Daisuke; Kihara, Ken; Akamatsu, Go; Mikasa, Shohei; Taniguchi, Takafumi; Tsutsui, Yuji; Takeshita, Toshiki; Maebatake, Akira; Miwa, Kenta; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the edge artifacts in PET images reconstructed using the point-spread function (PSF) algorithm at different sphere-to-background ratios of radioactivity (SBRs). We used a NEMA IEC body phantom consisting of six spheres with 37, 28, 22, 17, 13 and 10 mm in inner diameter. The background was filled with (18)F solution with a radioactivity concentration of 2.65 kBq/mL. We prepared three sets of phantoms with SBRs of 16, 8, 4 and 2. The PET data were acquired for 20 min using a Biograph mCT scanner. The images were reconstructed with the baseline ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm, and with the OSEM + PSF correction model (PSF). For the image reconstruction, the number of iterations ranged from one to 10. The phantom PET image analyses were performed by a visual assessment of the PET images and profiles, a contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), which is the ratio of SBR in the images to the true SBR, and the percent change in the maximum count between the OSEM and PSF images (Δ % counts). In the PSF images, the spheres with a diameter of 17 mm or larger were surrounded by a dense edge in comparison with the OSEM images. In the spheres with a diameter of 22 mm or smaller, an overshoot appeared in the center of the spheres as a sharp peak in the PSF images in low SBR. These edge artifacts were clearly observed in relation to the increase of the SBR. The overestimation of the CRC was observed in 13 mm spheres in the PSF images. In the spheres with a diameter of 17 mm or smaller, the Δ % counts increased with an increasing SBR. The Δ % counts increased to 91 % in the 10-mm sphere at the SBR of 16. The edge artifacts in the PET images reconstructed using the PSF algorithm increased with an increasing SBR. In the small spheres, the edge artifact was observed as a sharp peak at the center of spheres and could result in overestimation.

  2. [Efficacy comparison of different points combination in the treatment of menopausal insomnia: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-Bai; Mei, Zhi-Gang; Cai, San-Jin; Lei, Hua-Ping; Sun, Cheng-Hong; Chen, Ling; Zhou, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of different points combination in the treatment of menopausal insomnia. Ninety-six cases of menopausal insomnia were randomized into 3 groups, Xinshu (BL 15), Shenshu (BL 23), Sishencong (EX-HN 1), Shenmen (HT 7), Sanyinjiao (SP 6) were chosen in the restore interaction between the heart and the kidney group (group A, 32 cases); Zhaohai (KI 6), Jiaoxin (KI 8), Shenmai (BL 62), Pucan (BL 61) were chosen in the acupuncturing qiao mai group (group B, 32 cases); auricular Shenmen (TF4) and sensitive spot at the distribution area of auricular vagus nervus were chosen in the ear acupuncture group (group C, 32 cases). Six days made one session and the treatments were finished after 4 courses. The polysomnography (PSG) and Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) were employed before and after treatment to evaluate the alleviation of insomnia. The parameters of the sleep latency (SL), rapid wave sleep latency (RL) and sleep efficiency (SE) were significantly improved in the three groups, and the differences were statistically significant (P acupuncture has a better curative effect than the restore interaction between the heart and the kidney group and acupuncturing qiao mai group, it is worth of being promoted.

  3. Effect of bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points on upper back myofascial pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guimei; Jia, Chao; Lin, Mode

    2016-02-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of bloodletting therapy and acupuncture at Jiaji points for treating upper back myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), and compare this with lidocaine block therapy. A total of 66 upper back MPS patients were randomly assigned to either the treatment group or the control group in a 1: 1 ratio. The treatment group (n = 33) were treated with bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points; one treatment course consisted of five, single 20-min-treatments with a 2-day break between each treatment. The control group (n = 33) were treated with a lidocaine block at trigger points; one treatment course consisted of five sessions of lidocaine block therapy with a 2-day break between each session. The simplified McGill Scale (SF-MPQ) and tenderness threshold determination were used to assess pain before and after a course of treatment. After the third and fifth treatment, the SF-MPQ values were significantly decreased (P pain assessments between the two groups after three and five treatments (P > 0.05). There were five cases with minor adverse reactions reported in the control patients, while no adverse reactions were reported in the treatment group. Bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji points was effective in treating upper back MPS. Clinically, bloodletting and acupuncture therapy had the same efficacy as the lidocaine block therapy, with fewer adverse reactions.

  4. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegenga Boudewijn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire score (primary outcome, Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P, Global Perceived Effect (GPE scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P Conclusions The results of this study show that 12-week comprehensive treatment of MTrPs in shoulder muscles reduces the number of muscles with active MTrPs and is effective in reducing symptoms and improving shoulder function in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN75722066

  5. Exact two-point resistance, and the simple random walk on the complete graph minus N edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chair, Noureddine, E-mail: n.chair@ju.edu.jo

    2012-12-15

    An analytical approach is developed to obtain the exact expressions for the two-point resistance and the total effective resistance of the complete graph minus N edges of the opposite vertices. These expressions are written in terms of certain numbers that we introduce, which we call the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers; these numbers are the natural generalizations of the bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The correspondence between random walks and the resistor networks is then used to obtain the exact expressions for the first passage and mean first passage times on this graph. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain exact formulas for the two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain also the total effective resistance of this graph. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified Schwatt's formula on trigonometrical power sum to suit our computations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced the generalized bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers: the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first passage and mean first passage times of the random walks have exact expressions.

  6. Can Ashi points stimulation have specific effects on shoulder pain? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang-Feng; Zhang, Li-Juan; Lu, Feng; Lu, Yong-Hui; Yang, Chuan-Hua

    2016-06-01

    To provide an evidence-based overview regarding the efficacy of Ashi points stimulation for the treatment of shoulder pain. A comprehensive search [PubMed, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chongqing Weipu Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP) and Wanfang Database] was conducted to identify randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of Ashi points stimulation for shoulder pain compared with conventional treatment. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. RevMan 5.0 was used for data synthesis. Nine trials were included. Seven studies assessed the effectiveness of Ashi points stimulation on response rate compared with conventional acupuncture. Their results suggested significant effect in favour of Ashi points stimulation [odds ratio (OR): 5.89, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.97 to 11.67, Ppoints stimulation with drug therapy. The result showed there was a significantly greater recovery rate in group of Ashi points stimulation (OR: 9.58, 95% CI: 2.69 to 34.12). One trial compared comprehensive treatment on the myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) with no treatment and the result was in favor of MTrPs. Ashi points stimulation might be superior to conventional acupuncture, drug therapy and no treatment for shoulder pain. However, due to the low methodological quality of included studies, a firm conclusion could not be reached until further studies of high quality are available.

  7. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P), Global Perceived Effect (GPE) scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P pain (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 25.0), on the VAS-P2 for pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 10.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 19.7) and VAS-P3 most severe pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 0.8 to 28.4). After 12 weeks, 55% of the patients in the intervention group reported improvement (from slightly improved to completely recovered) versus 14% in the control group. The mean number of muscles with active MTrPs decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). Conclusions The results of this study show that 12-week comprehensive treatment of MTrPs in shoulder muscles reduces the number of muscles with active

  8. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; de Gast, Arthur; Dommerholt, Jan; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Wensing, Michel; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2011-01-24

    Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P), Global Perceived Effect (GPE) scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P < 0.05) on the DASH after 12 weeks (mean difference, 7.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.2 to 14.2), on the VAS-P1 for current pain (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 25.0), on the VAS-P2 for pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 10.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 19.7) and VAS-P3 most severe pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 0.8 to 28.4). After 12 weeks, 55% of the patients in the intervention group reported improvement (from slightly improved to completely recovered) versus 14% in the control group. The mean number of muscles with active MTrPs decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). The results of this study show that 12-week

  9. Bayesian Piecewise Linear Mixed Models With a Random Change Point: An Application to BMI Rebound in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilleman, Samuel L; Howe, Laura D; Wolfe, Rory; Tilling, Kate

    2017-11-01

    Body mass index (BMI) rebound refers to the beginning of the second rise in BMI during childhood. Accurate estimation of an individual's timing of BMI rebound is important because it is associated with health outcomes in later life. We estimated BMI trajectories for 6545 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. We used a novel Bayesian two-phase piecewise linear mixed model where the "change point" was an individual-level random effect corresponding to the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound. The model's individual-level random effects (intercept, prechange slope, postchange slope, change point) were multivariate normally distributed with an unstructured variance-covariance matrix, thereby, allowing for correlation between all random effects. Average age at BMI rebound (mean change point) was 6.5 (95% credible interval: 6.4 to 6.6) years. The standard deviation of the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound (random effects) was 2.0 years for females and 1.6 years for males. Correlation between the prechange slope and change point was 0.57, suggesting that faster rates of decline in BMI prior to rebound were associated with rebound occurring at an earlier age. Simulations showed that estimates from the model were less biased than those from models, assuming a common change point for all individuals or a nonlinear trajectory based on fractional polynomials. Our model flexibly estimated the individual-specific timing of BMI rebound, while retaining parameters that are meaningful and easy to interpret. It is applicable in any situation where one wishes to estimate a change-point process which varies between individuals.

  10. Model of Opinion Spreading in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kanovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a new model, which capture the main difference between information and opinion spreading. In information spreading additional exposure to certain information has a small effect. Contrary, when an actor is exposed to 2 opinioned actors the probability to adopt the opinion is significant higher than in the case of contact with one such actor (called by J. Kleinberg "the 0-1-2 effect"). In each time step if an actor does not have an opinion, we randomly choose 2 his network neighbors. If one of them has an opinion, the actor adopts opinion with some low probability, if two - with a higher probability. Opinion spreading was simulated on different real world social networks and similar random scale-free networks. The results show that small world structure has a crucial impact on tipping point time. The "0-1-2" effect causes a significant difference between ability of the actors to start opinion spreading. Actor is an influencer according to his topological position in the network.

  11. ESCIMO.spread – a spreadsheet-based point snow surface energy balance model to calculate hourly snow water equivalent and melt rates for historical and changing climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the spreadsheet-based point energy balance model ESCIMO.spread which simulates the energy and mass balance as well as melt rates at the snow surface. The model makes use of hourly recordings of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, and incoming global and longwave radiation. The effect of potential climate change on the seasonal evolution of the snow cover can be estimated by modifying the time series of observed temperature and precipitation by means of adjustable parameters. Model output is graphically visualized in hourly and daily diagrams. The results compare well with weekly measured snow water equivalent (SWE. The model is easily portable and adjustable, and runs particularly fast: an hourly calculation of a one winter season is instantaneous on a standard computer. ESCIMO.spread can be obtained from the authors on request.

  12. Eigen Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-27

    effort the LMAC was fully specified and characterized. The first order VHDL code was written up for the block and simulated, but it was not taken to the...combination of high performance FPGAs and DSPs are needed in the digital baseband portion. There are a number of vendors that specialize in providing...the main features of this board are: •600 MHz TI TMS320C6416 DSP ; Status Report: Eigen Spreading 18 Silvus Communication Systems, Inc. DARPA ATO

  13. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  14. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Liang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA, body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects.

  15. The Effects of Point or Polygon Based Training Data on RandomForest Classification Accuracy of Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Corcoran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are dynamic in space and time, providing varying ecosystem services. Field reference data for both training and assessment of wetland inventories in the State of Minnesota are typically collected as GPS points over wide geographical areas and at infrequent intervals. This status-quo makes it difficult to keep updated maps of wetlands with adequate accuracy, efficiency, and consistency to monitor change. Furthermore, point reference data may not be representative of the prevailing land cover type for an area, due to point location or heterogeneity within the ecosystem of interest. In this research, we present techniques for training a land cover classification for two study sites in different ecoregions by implementing the RandomForest classifier in three ways: (1 field and photo interpreted points; (2 fixed window surrounding the points; and (3 image objects that intersect the points. Additional assessments are made to identify the key input variables. We conclude that the image object area training method is the most accurate and the most important variables include: compound topographic index, summer season green and blue bands, and grid statistics from LiDAR point cloud data, especially those that relate to the height of the return.

  16. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using

  17. Considering Horn’s parallel analysis from a random matrix theory point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccenti, Edoardo; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    Horn’s parallel analysis is a widely used method for assessing the number of principal components and common factors. We discuss the theoretical foundations of parallel analysis for principal components based on a covariance matrix by making use of arguments from random matrix theory. In particular,

  18. Considering Horn’s Parallel Analysis from a Random Matrix Theory Point of View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccenti, Edoardo; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    2017-01-01

    Horn’s parallel analysis is a widely used method for assessing the number of principal components and common factors. We discuss the theoretical foundations of parallel analysis for principal components based on a covariance matrix by making use of arguments from random matrix theory. In

  19. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Angelis, G I; Noonan, P J; Jackson, A [Imaging, Genomics and Proteomics, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, P [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: fotis.kotasidis@mmic.man.ac.uk [Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-05-21

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [{sup 11}C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [{sup 18}F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to

  20. Comparison between the effects of trigger point mesotherapy versus acupuncture points mesotherapy in the treatment of chronic low back pain: a short term randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Annalisa; Giombini, Arrigo; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Ripani, Maurizio; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of trigger point (TRP) mesotherapy and acupuncture (ACP) mesotherapy in the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain. Short term randomized controlled trial. 62 subjects with chronic low back pain were recruited at outpatients Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in the period between July 2006 and May 2008. Study subjects were assigned to receive 4 weeks treatments with either trigger point mesotherapy (TRP mesotherapy, n=29) or acupoints mesotherapy (ACP mesotherapy, n=33). Pain intensity with a pain visual analogic scale (VAS) and verbal rating scale (VRS) and pain disability with McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form (SFMPQ), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ) and Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionaire (ODQ). ACP mesotherapy shows a more effective results in VRS and VAS measures in the follow-up (p(VRS)=mesotherapy group. Our results suggest that the response to ACP mesotherapy may be greater than the response to TRP mesotherapy in the short term follow-up. This technique could be nevertheless a viable option as an adjunct treatment in an overall treatment planning of CLBP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain : a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Carel; de Gast, Arthur; Dommerholt, Jan; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Wensing, Michel; Oostendorp, Rob A. B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the

  2. Critical points of quadratic renormalizations of random variables and phase transitions of disordered polymer models on diamond lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    We study the wetting transition and the directed polymer delocalization transition on diamond hierarchical lattices. These two phase transitions with frozen disorder correspond to the critical points of quadratic renormalizations of the partition function. (These exact renormalizations on diamond lattices can also be considered as approximate Migdal-Kadanoff renormalizations for hypercubic lattices.) In terms of the rescaled partition function z=Z/Z(typ) , we find that the critical point corresponds to a fixed point distribution with a power-law tail P(c)(z) ~ Phi(ln z)/z(1+mu) as z-->+infinity [up to some subleading logarithmic correction Phi(ln z)], so that all moments z(n) with n>mu diverge. For the wetting transition, the first moment diverges z=+infinity (case 0infinity (case 1fixed point distribution coincides with the transfer matrix describing a directed polymer on the Cayley tree, but the random weights determined by the fixed point distribution P(c)(z) are broadly distributed. This induces some changes in the traveling wave solutions with respect to the usual case of more narrow distributions.

  3. Detection of randomized bot command and control traffic on an end-point host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Soniya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bots are malicious software entities that unobtrusively infect machines and silently engage in activities ranging from data stealing to cyber warfare. Most recent bot detection methods rely on regularity of bot command and control (C&C traffic for bot detection but state-of-the-art bots randomize traffic properties to evade regularity based detection techniques. We propose a bot detection system that aims to detect randomized bot C&C traffic and also aim at early bot detection. To this end, separate strategies are devised for bot detection: (i over a user session and (ii time periods larger than a user session. Normal HTTP traffic and bot control traffic are modeled over a user session and a Multi-Layer Perceptron Classifier is trained on the two models and later used to classify unlabeled destinations as benign or malicious. For traffic spanning time intervals larger than a user session, temporal persistence, is used to differentiate between traffic to benign and malicious destinations. Testing with multiple datasets yielded good results.

  4. The Effect of Acupressure on Sanyinjiao and Hugo Points on Labor Pain in Nulliparous Women : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Heshmat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Most women have experienced child birth and its pain, which is inevitable. If this pain is not controlled it leads to prolonged labor and injury to the mother and fetus. This study was conducted to identify the effect of acupressure on sanyinjiao and hugo points on delivery pain in nulliparous women. Methods:This was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 84 nulliparous women in hospitals of Ardebil, Iran. The participants were divided by randomized blocks of 4 and 6 into two groups. The intervention was in the form of applying pressure at sanyinjiao and hugo points based on different dilatations. The intensity of the pain before and after the intervention was recorded by visual scale of pain assessment. To determine the effect of pressure on the intensity of labor pain, analytical descriptive test was conducted in SPSS (version 13. Results:There was a significant decrease in mean intensity of pain after each intervention in the experimental group with different dilatations (4, 6, 8, and 10 cm. Moreover, the Student’s independent t-test results indicated that the mean intensity of pain in the experimental group after the intervention in all four dilatations was significantly lower than the control group. Repeated measures ANOVA test indicated that in both experimental and control groups in four time periods, there was a statistically significant difference. Conclusion:Acupressure on sanyinjiao and hugo points decreases the labor pain. Therefore, this method can be used effectively in the labor process.

  5. The effect of acupressure on sanyinjiao and hugo points on labor pain in nulliparous women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehhatie-Shafaie, Fahimeh; Kazemzadeh, Rafat; Amani, Firouz; Heshmat, Reza

    2013-06-01

    Most women have experienced child birth and its pain, which is inevitable. If this pain is not controlled it leads to prolonged labor and injury to the mother and fetus. This study was conducted to identify the effect of acupressure on sanyinjiao and hugo points on delivery pain in nulliparous women. This was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 84 nulliparous women in hospitals of Ardebil, Iran. The participants were divided by randomized blocks of 4 and 6 into two groups. The intervention was in the form of applying pressure at sanyinjiao and hugo points based on different dilatations. The intensity of the pain before and after the intervention was recorded by visual scale of pain assessment. To determine the effect of pressure on the intensity of labor pain, analytical descriptive test was conducted in SPSS (version 13). There was a significant decrease in mean intensity of pain after each intervention in the experimental group with different dilatations (4, 6, 8, and 10 cm). Moreover, the Student's independent t-test results indicated that the mean intensity of pain in the experimental group after the intervention in all four dilatations was significantly lower than the control group. Repeated measures ANOVA test indicated that in both experimental and control groups in four time periods, there was a statistically significant difference. Acupressure on sanyinjiao and hugo points decreases the labor pain. Therefore, this method can be used effectively in the labor process.

  6. Analytic treatment of tipping points for social consensus in large random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Lim, C.; Szymanski, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a homogeneous pair approximation to the naming game (NG) model by deriving a six-dimensional Open Dynamics Engine (ODE) for the two-word naming game. Our ODE reveals the change in dynamical behavior of the naming game as a function of the average degree of an uncorrelated network. This result is in good agreement with the numerical results. We also analyze the extended NG model that allows for presence of committed nodes and show that there is a shift of the tipping point for social consensus in sparse networks.

  7. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in female patients with chronic tension-type headache - A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, S.; Wiik, E.; Lund, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of myofascial trigger point massage in the muscles of the head, neck and shoulders regarding pain in the treatment of females with chronic tension-type headache. They were randomized into either a treatment group (n = 20) (one session of trigger...... point massage per week for 10 weeks) or a control group receiving no treatment (n = 19). The patients kept a diary to record their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and the daily intake of drugs (mg) during the 4 weeks before and after the treatment period. The McGill Pain Questionnaire...... and the Short Form (SF-36) Questionnaire 1.1 were completed immediately before and after each treatment period. Morning pain measured on VAS was chosen as the primary outcome. A significant improvement in morning pain was recorded in the treatment group compared with the control group (difference of the change...

  8. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C; Trial Steering Committee

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using electronic health records. Family practices were recruited from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and allocated to intervention and control trial arms by minimization. Remotely installed, electronic decision support tools promoted intensified secondary prevention for 12 months with last measure of systolic blood pressure as the primary outcome. Outcome data from electronic health records were analyzed using marginal models. There were 106 Clinical Practice Research Datalink family practices allocated (intervention, 53; control, 53), with 11 391 (control, 5516; intervention, 5875) participants with acute stroke ever diagnosed. Participants at trial practices had similar characteristics as 47,887 patients with stroke at nontrial practices. During the intervention period, blood pressure values were recorded in the electronic health records for 90% and cholesterol values for 84% of participants. After intervention, the latest mean systolic blood pressure was 131.7 (SD, 16.8) mm Hg in the control trial arm and 131.4 (16.7) mm Hg in the intervention trial arm, and adjusted mean difference was -0.56 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -1.38 to 0.26; P=0.183). The financial cost of the trial was approximately US $22 per participant, or US $2400 per family practice allocated. Large pragmatic intervention studies may be implemented at low cost by using electronic health records. The intervention used in this trial was not found to be effective, and further research is needed to develop more effective intervention strategies. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Current Controlled Trials identifier: ISRCTN35701810. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Inflammation, insulin resistance, and diabetes--Mendelian randomization using CRP haplotypes points upstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Brunner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Raised C-reactive protein (CRP is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. According to the Mendelian randomization method, the association is likely to be causal if genetic variants that affect CRP level are associated with markers of diabetes development and diabetes. Our objective was to examine the nature of the association between CRP phenotype and diabetes development using CRP haplotypes as instrumental variables.We genotyped three tagging SNPs (CRP + 2302G > A; CRP + 1444T > C; CRP + 4899T > G in the CRP gene and measured serum CRP in 5,274 men and women at mean ages 49 and 61 y (Whitehall II Study. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were measured at age 61 y. Diabetes was ascertained by glucose tolerance test and self-report. Common major haplotypes were strongly associated with serum CRP levels, but unrelated to obesity, blood pressure, and socioeconomic position, which may confound the association between CRP and diabetes risk. Serum CRP was associated with these potential confounding factors. After adjustment for age and sex, baseline serum CRP was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.39 [95% confidence interval 1.29-1.51], HOMA-IR, and HbA1c, but the associations were considerably attenuated on adjustment for potential confounding factors. In contrast, CRP haplotypes were not associated with HOMA-IR or HbA1c (p = 0.52-0.92. The associations of CRP with HOMA-IR and HbA1c were all null when examined using instrumental variables analysis, with genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP. Instrumental variables estimates differed from the directly observed associations (p = 0.007-0.11. Pooled analysis of CRP haplotypes and diabetes in Whitehall II and Northwick Park Heart Study II produced null findings (p = 0.25-0.88. Analyses based on the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (1,923 diabetes cases, 2,932 controls using three SNPs in tight linkage disequilibrium with our

  10. Thermal effects on PLATO point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullieuszik, Marco; Magrin, Demetrio; Greggio, Davide; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Chinellato, Simonetta; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Sicilia, Daniela; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Ghigo, Mauro; Spiga, Daniele; Bandy, Thimoty; Benz, Willy; Brändli, Mathias; Bruno, Giordano; De Roche, Thierry; Piazza, Daniele; Rieder, Martin; Brandeker, Alexis; Klebor, Maximilian; Mogulsky, Valery; Schweitzer, Mario; Wieser, Matthias; Erikson, Anders; Rauer, Heike

    2016-07-01

    Thermal effects in PLATO are analyzed in terms of uniform temperature variations, longitudinal and lateral temperature gradients. We characterize these effects by evaluating the PSF centroid shifts and the Enclosed Energy variations across the whole FoV. These patterns can then be used to gauge the thermal behavior of each individual telescope in order to improve the local photometric calibration across the PLATO field of view.

  11. A RANDOMIZED TRIAL TO STUDY THE COMPARISON OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING VERSUS KINESIO TAPING TECHNIQUE IN MYOFASCIAL PAIN SYNDROME DURING A 3-MONTH FOLLOW UP

    OpenAIRE

    Emrullah Hayta; Nur Mine Umdu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Managemen of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a current research subject since there is a small number of randomized studies comparing different management techniques. Multiple studies attempted to assess various treatment options including trigger point dry needling and kinesiotaping. We compared the effects of trigger point dry needling and kinesiotaping in the management of myofascial pain syndome during a 3-month follow-up period. Methods: In this prospective randomized st...

  12. Auricular Point Acupressure to Manage Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT pilot study was designed to (1 assess the feasibility and tolerability of an easily administered, auricular point acupressure (APA intervention and (2 provide an initial assessment of effect size as compared to a sham treatment. Thirty-seven subjects were randomized to receive either the real or sham APA treatment. All participants were treated once a week for 4 weeks. Self-report measures were obtained at baseline, weekly during treatment, at end-of-intervention (EOI, and at a 1-month follow-up. A dropout rate of 26% in the real APA group and 50% in the sham group was observed. The reduction in worst pain from baseline to EOI was 41% for the real and 5% for the sham group with a Cohen’s effect size of 1.22 P<0.00. Disability scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ decreased in the real group by 29% and were unchanged in the sham group (+3% P<0.00. Given the high dropout rate, results must be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, our results suggest that APA may provide an inexpensive and effective complementary approach for the management of back pain in older adults, and further study is warranted.

  13. Efficacy and Effectiveness of Exercise on Tender Points in Adults with Fibromyalgia: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a major public health problem affecting an estimated 200 to 400 million people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to use the meta-analytic approach to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of randomized controlled exercise intervention trials (aerobic, strength training, or both on tender points (TPs in adults with fibromyalgia. Using random effects models and 95% confidence intervals (CI, a statistically significant reduction in TPs was observed based on per-protocol analyses (8 studies representing 322 participants but not intention-to-treat analyses (5 studies representing 338 participants (per-protocol, , −0.68, 95% CI, −1.16, −0.20; intention-to-treat, , −0.24, 95% CI, −0.62, 0.15. Changes were equivalent to relative reductions of 10.9% and 6.9%, respectively, for per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses. It was concluded that exercise is efficacious for reducing TPs in women with FM. However, a need exists for additional well-designed and reported studies on this topic.

  14. Acupuncture at local and distal points for chronic shoulder pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing-Nan; Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; He, Tian; Liu, Bao-Zhen; Sun, San-Feng; Wang, Jun; Tan, Cheng; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-04-17

    Chronic shoulder pain (CSP) is the third most common type of musculoskeletal pain. It has a major impact on health-related quality of life. In Chinese medicine, CSP is considered one of the conditions most amenable to treatment with acupuncture. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of local acupoints in combination with distal acupoints in pain relief and shoulder function improvement in CSP patients. This is a multicenter, single blind, factorial randomized controlled clinical trial. A total of 164 participants will be randomly allocated to four different groups: Group A will receive acupuncture at local acupoints in combination with distal acupoint. Group B will receive acupuncture at local acupoints in combination with distal non-acupoint. Group C will receive acupuncture at local non-acupoints in combination with distal acupoint. Group D will receive acupuncture at local non-acupoints in combination with distal non-acupoint. Each group will receive 12 treatments of acupuncture one to three times per week for six weeks in total. The primary outcome is shoulder pain intensity, which is graded using a 100 -mm Visual Analogue Scale. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 6 weeks after the first acupuncture, 10 weeks after the first acupuncture and 18 weeks after the first acupuncture. This trial will be helpful in identifying whether acupuncture at local acupoints in combination with distal acupoints may be more effective than needling points separately. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN61861069 (http://www.controlled-trials.com).

  15. Random Forest-Based Approach for Maximum Power Point Tracking of Photovoltaic Systems Operating under Actual Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Hussain; Mutlag, Ammar Hussein; Mohamed, Azah

    2017-01-01

    Many maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms have been developed in recent years to maximize the produced PV energy. These algorithms are not sufficiently robust because of fast-changing environmental conditions, efficiency, accuracy at steady-state value, and dynamics of the tracking algorithm. Thus, this paper proposes a new random forest (RF) model to improve MPPT performance. The RF model has the ability to capture the nonlinear association of patterns between predictors, such as irradiance and temperature, to determine accurate maximum power point. A RF-based tracker is designed for 25 SolarTIFSTF-120P6 PV modules, with the capacity of 3 kW peak using two high-speed sensors. For this purpose, a complete PV system is modeled using 300,000 data samples and simulated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK package. The proposed RF-based MPPT is then tested under actual environmental conditions for 24 days to validate the accuracy and dynamic response. The response of the RF-based MPPT model is also compared with that of the artificial neural network and adaptive neurofuzzy inference system algorithms for further validation. The results show that the proposed MPPT technique gives significant improvement compared with that of other techniques. In addition, the RF model passes the Bland-Altman test, with more than 95 percent acceptability.

  16. Convergence estimates in probability and in expectation for discrete least squares with noisy evaluations at random points

    KAUST Repository

    Migliorati, Giovanni

    2015-08-28

    We study the accuracy of the discrete least-squares approximation on a finite dimensional space of a real-valued target function from noisy pointwise evaluations at independent random points distributed according to a given sampling probability measure. The convergence estimates are given in mean-square sense with respect to the sampling measure. The noise may be correlated with the location of the evaluation and may have nonzero mean (offset). We consider both cases of bounded or square-integrable noise / offset. We prove conditions between the number of sampling points and the dimension of the underlying approximation space that ensure a stable and accurate approximation. Particular focus is on deriving estimates in probability within a given confidence level. We analyze how the best approximation error and the noise terms affect the convergence rate and the overall confidence level achieved by the convergence estimate. The proofs of our convergence estimates in probability use arguments from the theory of large deviations to bound the noise term. Finally we address the particular case of multivariate polynomial approximation spaces with any density in the beta family, including uniform and Chebyshev.

  17. Random Forest-Based Approach for Maximum Power Point Tracking of Photovoltaic Systems Operating under Actual Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Shareef

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many maximum power point tracking (MPPT algorithms have been developed in recent years to maximize the produced PV energy. These algorithms are not sufficiently robust because of fast-changing environmental conditions, efficiency, accuracy at steady-state value, and dynamics of the tracking algorithm. Thus, this paper proposes a new random forest (RF model to improve MPPT performance. The RF model has the ability to capture the nonlinear association of patterns between predictors, such as irradiance and temperature, to determine accurate maximum power point. A RF-based tracker is designed for 25 SolarTIFSTF-120P6 PV modules, with the capacity of 3 kW peak using two high-speed sensors. For this purpose, a complete PV system is modeled using 300,000 data samples and simulated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK package. The proposed RF-based MPPT is then tested under actual environmental conditions for 24 days to validate the accuracy and dynamic response. The response of the RF-based MPPT model is also compared with that of the artificial neural network and adaptive neurofuzzy inference system algorithms for further validation. The results show that the proposed MPPT technique gives significant improvement compared with that of other techniques. In addition, the RF model passes the Bland–Altman test, with more than 95 percent acceptability.

  18. Effects of compression at myofascial trigger points in patients with acute low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamoto, K; Bito, I; Urakawa, S; Sakai, S; Kigawa, M; Ono, T; Nishijo, H

    2015-09-01

    Although there is some evidence that massage therapy, especially compression at myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), is effective for sub-acute and chronic low back pain, the effectiveness of massage therapy with compression at MTrPs for acute low back pain has not been studied. To evaluate the effectiveness of compression at MTrPs for acute low back pain, 63 patients with acute low back pain were randomly assigned to one of three groups: the MTrP group who received compression at MTrPs (N = 23), the non-MTrP group who received compression at non-trigger points (N = 21), and the effleurage massage group who received superficial massage (N = 19). The patients received the assigned treatment 3 times/week for 2 weeks. The subjective pain intensity in static and dynamic conditions and disability caused by low back pain were measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ), respectively; along with the range of motion (ROM) at the lumbar region and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at trigger points before treatment (baseline), 1 week after the start of treatment, and 1 month after the end of treatment (follow-up). Static and dynamic VAS score, PPT and ROM were significantly improved in the MTrP group compared with those in the non-MTrP and effleurage groups. These results indicate that compression at MTrPs is effective to treat acute low back pain compared with compression at non-MTrPs and superficial massage. For this article, a commentary is available at the Wiley Online Library. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  19. [A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial for Treatment of Shoulder-back Myofascial Pain Syndrome with Mild Moxibustion at Trigger Points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lie; Ma, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Cao, Rui; Wang, Ying; Ma, Tie-Ming

    2016-08-25

    To compare the efficacy difference between the mild moxibustion and acupuncture stimulation at trigger points in the treatment of shoulder and back myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), so as to provide a reference for clinical treatment of MPS. A total of 60 patients with shoulder and back MPS were equally and randomly divided into mild moxibustion group and acupuncture group. The myofascial trigger points in the shoulder and back regions were stimulated with mild moxibustion for 20-100 min every time or punctured with filiform needles by retaining the needles for 30 min after twirling for a while. The treatment was conducted once daily for 10 days. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) including the pain rating index[PRI consisting of 15 descriptors (11 sensory, 4 affective) which are rated on an intensity scale as 0=none, 1=mild, 2=moderate and 3=severe], present pain intensity (PPI) index of the standard MPQ and a visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the patient's pain severity before and after the treatment. Following the treatment, of the two 30 cases of MPS patients in the acupuncture and mild moxibustion groups, 1 and 7 were cured, 11 and 17 experienced marked improvement, 14 and 5 were effective, 4 and 1 was invalid, with the effective rates being 86.7% (26/30) and 96.7%(29/30), respectively. The cured plus markedly effective rate of the mild moxibustion group was significantly better than that of the acupuncture group(P0.05). Mild moxibustion stimulation of myofascial trigger point is effective in relieving shoulder-back MPS, being comparable to that of acupuncture therapy.

  20. Fixed-points in random Boolean networks: The impact of parallelism in the Barabási-Albert scale-free topology case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset de Espanés, P; Osses, A; Rapaport, I

    2016-12-01

    Fixed points are fundamental states in any dynamical system. In the case of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) they correspond to stable genes profiles associated to the various cell types. We use Kauffman's approach to model GRNs with random Boolean networks (RBNs). In this paper we explore how the topology affects the distribution of the number of fixed points in randomly generated networks. We also study the size of the basins of attraction of these fixed points if we assume the α-asynchronous dynamics (where every node is updated independently with probability 0≤α≤1). It is well-known that asynchrony avoids the cyclic attractors into which parallel dynamics tends to fall. We observe the remarkable property that, in all our simulations, if for a given RBN with Barabási-Albert topology and α-asynchronous dynamics an initial configuration reaches a fixed point, then every configuration also reaches a fixed point. By contrast, in the parallel regime, the percentage of initial configurations reaching a fixed point (for the same networks) is dramatically smaller. We contrast the results of the simulations on Barabási-Albert networks with the classical Erdös-Rényi model of random networks. Everything indicates that Barabási-Albert networks are extremely robust. Finally, we study the mean and maximum time/work needed to reach a fixed point when starting from randomly chosen initial configurations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. On the Delay Characteristics for Point-to-Point links using Random Linear Network Coding with On-the-fly Coding Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tömösközi, Máté; Fitzek, Frank; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    . This metric captures the elapsed time between (network) encoding RTP packets and completely decoding the packets in-order on the receiver side. Our solutions are implemented and evaluated on a point-to-point link between a Raspberry Pi device and a network (de)coding enabled software running on a regular PC...

  2. Effect of Auricular Point Acupressure on Axial Neck Pain After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bingjiang; Xie, Yiping; Hu, Songfeng; Xu, Taotao; Tong, Peijian

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of auricular point acupressure (APA) on axial neck pain after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery. A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed. Twenty-nine participants were randomly divided into two groups, real or sham APA. Participants were enrolled from Shaoxing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, affiliated with Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Eligible participants received a four-week real or sham APA treatment according to their assigned groups. The clinical outcomes were assessed by the criteria of Hosono et al., the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI), and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). In addition, plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analyzed. Patients with severe or moderate axial neck pain accounted for 28.6% and 35.7% in the real APA group at the end of treatment and one-month follow-up. BPI scores were decreased in the real APA group at the end of treatment and one-month follow-up. The total mean score of SF-36 was improved in the real APA group and significantly higher than in the sham APA group. Additional, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were decreased in the real APA group. The findings supported the therapeutic effect of APA treatment on axial neck pain after ACDF surgery, and they exert the possible therapeutic effect on downregulating the levels of plasma IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α.

  3. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunhui; Ma, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs); however, whether MTrP needling is effective remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of MTrP needling in patients with plantar heel pain. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed (Chinese BioMedical Literature Service System, People's Republic of China), and CNKI (National Knowledge Infrastructure, People's Republic of China) databases were systematically reviewed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effects of MTrP needling. Pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% CIs were calculated for change in visual analog scale (VAS) score, and pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% CIs were calculated for success rate for pain and incidence of adverse events. A fixed-effects model or random-effects model was used to pool the estimates, depending on the heterogeneity among the included studies. Extensive literature search yielded 1,941 articles, of which only seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that MTrP needling significantly reduced the VAS score (WMD =-15.50, 95% CI: -19.48, -11.53; Pneedling was associated with a similar incidence of adverse events with control (RR =1.89, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.39; P=0.438). MTrP needling effectively reduced the heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, adequately powered, good-quality placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more trustworthy evidence in this area.

  4. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chunhui He,1,* Hua Ma2,* 1Internal Medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Medical Image Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Wulumuqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; however, whether MTrP needling is effective remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of MTrP needling in patients with plantar heel pain. Materials and methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed (Chinese BioMedical Literature Service System, People’s Republic of China, and CNKI (National Knowledge Infrastructure, People’s Republic of China databases were systematically reviewed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs that assessed the effects of MTrP needling. Pooled weighted mean difference (WMD with 95% CIs were calculated for change in visual analog scale (VAS score, and pooled risk ratio (RR with 95% CIs were calculated for success rate for pain and incidence of adverse events. A fixed-effects model or random-effects model was used to pool the estimates, depending on the heterogeneity among the included studies. Results: Extensive literature search yielded 1,941 articles, of which only seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that MTrP needling significantly reduced the VAS score (WMD =–15.50, 95% CI: –19.48, –11.53; P<0.001 compared with control, but it had a similar success rate for pain with control (risk ratio [RR] =1.15, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.51; P=0.320. Moreover, MTrP needling was associated with a similar incidence of adverse events with control (RR =1.89, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.39; P=0.438. Conclusion: MTrP needling effectively reduced the heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, adequately powered, good

  5. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33 ± 3 years) individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS). They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F = 8.211; P = 0.008; SPORTS: F = 13.943; P 2.1) in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability. PMID:26064172

  6. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Salom-Moreno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability. Methods. Twenty-seven (44% female, mean age: 33±3 years individuals with unilateral ankle instability were randomly assigned to an experimental group who received proprioceptive/strengthening exercises combined with TrP-DN into the lateral peroneus muscle and a comparison group receiving the same proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program alone. Outcome included function assessed with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM and ankle pain intensity assessed with a numerical pain rate scale (NPRS. They were captured at baseline and 1-month follow-up after the intervention. Results. The ANOVAs found significant Group ∗ Time Interactions for both subscales of the FAAM (ADL: F=8.211; P=0.008; SPORTS: F=13.943; P 2.1 in favor of the TrP-DN group. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that the inclusion of TrP-DN within the lateral peroneus muscle into a proprioceptive/strengthening exercise program resulted in better outcomes in pain and function 1 month after the therapy in ankle instability.

  7. Social media to supplement point-of-care ultrasound courses: the "sandwich e-learning" approach. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Dorothea; Haunhorst, Stephanie; Sinnathurai, Sivajini; Seibel, Armin; Recker, Florian; Heringer, Frank; Michels, Guido; Breitkreutz, Raoul

    2016-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POC-US) is gaining importance in almost all specialties. E-learning has been used to teach theoretical knowledge and pattern recognition. As social media are universally available, they can be utilized for educational purposes. We wanted to evaluate the utility of the sandwich e-learning approach defined as a pre-course e-learning and a post-course learning activity using Facebook after a one-day point-of-care ultrasound (POC-US) course and its effect on the retention of knowledge. A total of 62 medial students were recruited for this study and randomly assigned to one of four groups. All groups received an identical hands-on training and performed several tests during the study period. The hands-on training was performed in groups of five students per instructor with the students scanning each other. Group 1 had access to pre-course e-learning, but not to post-course e-learning. Instead of a pre-course e-learning, group 2 listened to presentations at the day of the course (classroom teaching) and had access to the post-course learning activity using Facebook. Group 3 had access to both pre- and post-course e-learning (sandwich e-learning) activities, while group 4 listened classroom presentations only (classroom teaching only). Therefore only groups 2 and 3 had access to post-course learning via Facebook by joining a secured group. Posts containing ultrasound pictures and videos were published to this group. The students were asked to "like" the posts to monitor attendance. Knowledge retention was assessed 6 weeks after the course. After 6 weeks, group 3 achieved comparable results when compared to group 2 (82.2 % + -8.2 vs. 84.3 + -8.02) (p = 0.3). Students who participated in the post-course activity were more satisfied with the overall course than students without post-course learning (5.5 vs. 5.3 on a range from 1 to 6). In this study, the sandwich e-learning approach led to equal rates of knowledge retention compared to

  8. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; Wensing, Michel; Franssen, Jo Lm; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2007-11-05

    Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation) are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis), but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle). It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders.The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 - September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects have unilateral shoulder pain for at least six months

  9. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Jo LM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis, but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle. It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects

  10. Quasirandom Rumor Spreading: An Experimental Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Doerr, Benjamin; Friedrich, Tobias; Künnemann, Marvin; Sauerwald, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We empirically analyze two versions of the well-known "randomized rumor spreading" protocol to disseminate a piece of information in networks. In the classical model, in each round each informed node informs a random neighbor. In the recently proposed quasirandom variant, each node has a (cyclic) list of its neighbors. Once informed, it starts at a random position of the list, but from then on informs its neighbors in the order of the list. While for sparse random graphs a better performance ...

  11. How Is Mono Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread? Print A A A My sister has mononucleosis. I drank out of her drink before we ... that I have mono now? – Kyle* Mono, or mononucleosis, is spread through direct contact with saliva. This ...

  12. SPARSE: Seed Point Auto-Generation for Random Walks Segmentation Enhancement in medical inhomogeneous targets delineation of morphological MR and CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhen, Xin; Gu, Xuejun; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Xiao, Yang; Zhou, Linghong

    2015-03-08

    In medical image processing, robust segmentation of inhomogeneous targets is a challenging problem. Because of the complexity and diversity in medical images, the commonly used semiautomatic segmentation algorithms usually fail in the segmentation of inhomogeneous objects. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm imbedded with a seed point autogeneration for random walks segmentation enhancement, namely SPARSE, for better segmentation of inhomogeneous objects. With a few user-labeled points, SPARSE is able to generate extended seed points by estimating the probability of each voxel with respect to the labels. The random walks algorithm is then applied upon the extended seed points to achieve improved segmentation result. SPARSE is implemented under the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming environment on graphic processing unit (GPU) hardware platform. Quantitative evaluations are performed using clinical homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases. It is found that the SPARSE can greatly decrease the sensitiveness to initial seed points in terms of location and quantity, as well as the freedom of selecting parameters in edge weighting function. The evaluation results of SPARSE also demonstrate substantial improvements in accuracy and robustness to inhomogeneous target segmentation over the original random walks algorithm.

  13. Controlling droplet spreading with topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, P.; Hazel, A. L.; Dowling, M.; Thompson, A. B.; Juel, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present an experimental system that can be used to study the dynamics of a picoliter droplet (in-flight radius of 12.2 μ m ) as it spreads over substrates with topographic variations. We concentrate on the spreading of a droplet within a recessed stadium-shaped pixel, with applications to the manufacture of polymer organic light-emitting-diode displays, and find that the sloping sidewall of the pixel can either locally enhance or hinder spreading depending on whether the topography gradient ahead of the contact line is positive or negative, respectively. Locally enhanced spreading occurs via the formation of thin pointed rivulets along the sidewalls of the pixel through a mechanism similar to capillary rise in sharp corners. We demonstrate that a simplified model involving quasistatic surface-tension effects within the framework of a thin-film approximation combined with an experimentally measured dynamic spreading law, relating the speed of the contact line to the contact angle, provides excellent predictions of the evolving liquid morphologies. A key feature of the liquid-substrate interaction studied here is the presence of significant contact angle hysteresis, which enables the persistence of noncircular fluid morphologies. We also show that the spreading law for an advancing contact line can be adequately approximated by a Cox-Voinov law for the majority of the evolution. The model does not include viscous effects in the bulk of the droplet and hence the time scales for the propagation of the thin pointed rivulets are not captured. Nonetheless, this simple model can be used very effectively to predict the areas covered by the liquid and may serve as a useful design tool for systems that require precise control of liquid on substrates.

  14. Point-by-Point Radiofrequency Ablation Versus the Cryoballoon or a Novel Combined Approach: A Randomized Trial Comparing 3 Methods of Pulmonary Vein Isolation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (The Cryo Versus RF Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ross J; Baker, Victoria; Finlay, Malcolm C; Duncan, Edward R; Lovell, Matthew J; Tayebjee, Muzahir H; Ullah, Waqas; Siddiqui, M Shoaib; McLEAN, Ailsa; Richmond, Laura; Kirkby, Claire; Ginks, Matthew R; Dhinoja, Mehul; Sporton, Simon; Earley, Mark J; Schilling, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Catheter ablation of paroxysmal AF using the Cryoballoon (CRYO) has yielded similar success rates to conventional wide encirclement using radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA), but randomized data are lacking. Pilot data suggested a high success rate with a combined approach (COMBINED) using wide encirclement with RFCA followed by 2 CRYO applications to each vein. We compared these 3 strategies in a randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing first time paroxysmal AF ablation were randomized to RFCA, CRYO, or COMBINED. Patients were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months with 7 days of ambulatory ECG monitoring. Success was defined as freedom from arrhythmia without antiarrhythmic drugs after a single procedure. A total of 237 patients were randomized. Success at 1 year was achieved in 47% in the RFCA group, 67% in the CRYO group, and 76% in the COMBINED group (P CRYO, PCRYO vs. COMBINED). Procedure time was 211 (IQR 174-256) minutes for RFCA compared to 167 (136-202) minutes for CRYO and 278 (243-327) minutes for COMBINED (P CRYO, and CRYO vs. COMBINED groups). Pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal AF is faster with CRYO and results in a higher single procedure success rate than conventional point by point RFCA. The COMBINED approach was not superior to CRYO alone. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Adaptive localization of focus point regions via random patch probabilistic density from whole-slide, Ki-67-stained brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Yazan M; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; MdZin, Reena Rahayu; Omar, Khairuddin

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  16. Adaptive Localization of Focus Point Regions via Random Patch Probabilistic Density from Whole-Slide, Ki-67-Stained Brain Tumor Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan M. Alomari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  17. Repeated tender point injections of granisetron alleviate chronic myofascial pain - a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Omrani, Shahin; Fredriksson, Lars; Gjelset, Mattias; Louca, Sofia; Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate if repeated intramuscular tender-point injections of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron alleviate pain in patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD...

  18. Trigger Point Dry Needling and Proprioceptive Exercises for the Management of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ayuso-Casado, Blanca; Tamaral-Costa, Beatriz; Sánchez-Milá, Zacarías; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of combined trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) and proprioceptive/strengthening exercises to proprioceptive/strengthening exercises on pain and function in ankle instability...

  19. Choosing between Higher Moment Maximum Entropy Models and Its Application to Homogeneous Point Processes with Random Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfi Khribi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Bayesian framework, the usual choice of prior in the prediction of homogeneous Poisson processes with random effects is the gamma one. Here, we propose the use of higher order maximum entropy priors. Their advantage is illustrated in a simulation study and the choice of the best order is established by two goodness-of-fit criteria: Kullback–Leibler divergence and a discrepancy measure. This procedure is illustrated on a warranty data set from the automobile industry.

  20. The spreading of disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keizer, Kees; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Steg, Linda

    2008-12-12

    Imagine that the neighborhood you are living in is covered with graffiti, litter, and unreturned shopping carts. Would this reality cause you to litter more, trespass, or even steal? A thesis known as the broken windows theory suggests that signs of disorderly and petty criminal behavior trigger more disorderly and petty criminal behavior, thus causing the behavior to spread. This may cause neighborhoods to decay and the quality of life of its inhabitants to deteriorate. For a city government, this may be a vital policy issue. But does disorder really spread in neighborhoods? So far there has not been strong empirical support, and it is not clear what constitutes disorder and what may make it spread. We generated hypotheses about the spread of disorder and tested them in six field experiments. We found that, when people observe that others violated a certain social norm or legitimate rule, they are more likely to violate other norms or rules, which causes disorder to spread.

  1. Transfer from point-of-care Ultrasonography training to diagnostic performance on patients-a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todsen, Tobias; Jensen, Morten Lind; Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk

    2016-01-01

    on patients. METHODS: Thirty-one physicians were randomized to participate in a focused Ultrasonography course or control circumstances before they examined 4 patients with different abdominal conditions by ultrasonography. Performance scores and diagnostic accuracy were compared using independent samples t...... test and binary logistic regression, respectively. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the performance score between the intervention group (27.4%) and the control group (18.0%, P = .004) and the diagnostic accuracy between the intervention group (65%) and the control group (39%, P = .014...

  2. Impact of random pointing and tracking errors on the design of coherent and incoherent optical intersatellite communication links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Gardner, Chester S.

    1989-01-01

    Given the rms transmitter pointing error and the desired probability of bit error (PBE), it can be shown that an optimal transmitter antenna gain exists which minimizes the required transmitter power. Given the rms local oscillator tracking error, an optimum receiver antenna gain can be found which optimizes the receiver performance. The impact of pointing and tracking errors on the design of direct-detection pulse-position modulation (PPM) and heterodyne noncoherent frequency-shift keying (NCFSK) systems are then analyzed in terms of constraints on the antenna size and the power penalty incurred. It is shown that in the limit of large spatial tracking errors, the advantage in receiver sensitivity for the heterodyne system is quickly offset by the smaller antenna gain and the higher power penalty due to tracking errors. In contrast, for systems with small spatial tracking errors, the heterodyne system is superior because of the higher receiver sensitivity.

  3. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    He C; Ma H

    2017-01-01

    Chunhui He,1,* Hua Ma2,* 1Internal Medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Medical Image Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Wulumuqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs); however, whether MTrP needling is effective remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of MTrP nee...

  4. Random Capillary Blood Glucose Cut Points for Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Derived From Community-Based Opportunistic Screening in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somannavar, Suresh; Ganesan, Anbazhagan; Deepa, Mohan; Datta, Manjula; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine random capillary blood glucose (RCBG) cut points that discriminate diabetic and pre-diabetic subjects from normal individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS RCBG was performed in 1,333 individuals randomly chosen from 63,305 individuals who had participated in an opportunistic screening program. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed by venous plasma glucose on an autoanalyzer. RCBG cut points that discriminate diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. RESULTS Using 2-h plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) criterion, the RCBG cut point of 140 mg/dl (7.7 mmol/l) gave the highest sensitivity and specificity. For 2-h plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l) criteria, either 2-h plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) or FPG ≥126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l) criterion, and the FPG ≥126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l) criterion, RCBG cut point was 143 mg/dl (7.9 mmol/l). RCBG cut points for IGT, IFG according to World Health Organization criterion, and IFG according to American Diabetes Association criterion were 119 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/l), 118 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/l), and 113 mg/dl (6.3 mmol/l), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Asian Indians with RCBG >110 mg/dl at screening can be recommended to undergo definitive testing. PMID:19073758

  5. Adhesion patterns in early cell spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhkov, Pavel; Prass, Marcus; Gummich, Meike; Kuehn, Jac-Simon; Oettmeier, Christina; Doebereiner, Hans-Guenther, E-mail: hgd@uni-bremen.d [Institut fuer Biophysik, Universitaet Bremen, D-28334 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts explore the chemical suitability before spreading on a given substrate. We find this early phase of cell spreading to be characterized by transient adhesion patches with a typical mean size of (1.0 {+-} 0.4) {mu}m and a lifetime of (33 {+-} 12) s. Eventually, these patches fuse to initiate extensive spreading of the cell. We monitor cell adhesion using reflection interference contrast and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Digital time lapse movies are analysed employing spatio-temporal correlation functions of adhesion patterns. Correlation length and time can be scaled to obtain a master curve at the fusion point.

  6. A RANDOMIZED TRIAL TO STUDY THE COMPARISON OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING VERSUS KINESIO TAPING TECHNIQUE IN MYOFASCIAL PAIN SYNDROME DURING A 3-MONTH FOLLOW UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrullah Hayta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managemen of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS is a current research subject since there is a small number of randomized studies comparing different management techniques. Multiple studies attempted to assess various treatment options including trigger point dry needling and kinesiotaping. We compared the effects of trigger point dry needling and kinesiotaping in the management of myofascial pain syndome during a 3-month follow-up period. Methods: In this prospective randomized studyin MPS patients with upper trapezius muscle trigger points, the effects of dry needling (n=28 and kinesiotaping (n=27 was compared with regard to the visual analog scale (VAS, neck disability index (NDI, and Nottingham health profile (NHP scores measured at the weeks 0, 4, and 12. Results: Both dry needling and kinesiotaping comparably reduced VAS scores measured at the weeks 4 and 12 and their efficacies were more remarkable at the week 12 (p<0.05. These interventions significantly reduced the NDI and NHP score and their effects were also more remarkable at the week 12; however, dry needling was found more effective (p<0.05. Conclusion: Overall, in current clinical settings, during the management of MPS, pain can be reduced comparably by both dry needling and kinesiotaping; however, restriction in the range of motionin neck region and quality of life are more remarkably reduced by dry needling. Both dry needling and kinesiotaping can provide an increasing effectiveness up to 12 weeks.

  7. [Functional brain magnetic resonance imaging in healthy people receiving acupuncture at Waiguan versus Waiguan plus Yanglingquan points: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Li, Tian-Le; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Zou, Yan-Qi; Wu, Jun-Xian; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Yang, Jun-Jun

    2009-06-01

    To observe the cerebral activating effects of needling at Waiguan (SJ5) versus SJ5 plus Yanglingquan (GB34) points in young healthy volunteers based on the hypothesis of "needling effect of combined acupuncture points relates to the brain activation". Sixteen healthy volunteers were randomly divided into SJ5 group and SJ5 plus GB34 group, and there were 8 volunteers in each group. The volunteers in the two groups received needling at corresponding points on the right hand or foot respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance (1.5T, GE Corporation) was used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before and during the needling, and the obtained experimental data in the regional brain were processed and analyzed by the method of region of interest (ROI). The ROI activation induced by needling of SJ5 or SJ5 plus GB34 was all relatively concentrated (activation rate more than 4 or activation point more than 10) on bilateral frontal and parietal lobes. There were no significant differences in ROI activation rates of brain regions between the two groups. ROI activation points showed that needling at SJ5 could activate the right cerebellum specifically (P vs SJ5 plus GB34), while needling at SJ5 plus GB34 could activate the left parietal and occipital lobes and bilateral basal ganglion more effectively than activate the other brain regions (P vs SJ5). ROI activation strength showed that needling at SJ5 plus GB34 could more strongly activate the right cerebellum (P vs SJ5). Based on fMRI data, a kind of acupuncture point combination of SJ5 and GB34 within the hand-foot Shaoyang meridians, could improve the motor and sensory dysfunctions and equilibrium disturbance. The effect of combined acupuncture points was proved by cerebral activity initially.

  8. Thermoresponsive Poly(2-Oxazoline) Molecular Brushes by Living Ionic Polymerization: Modulation of the Cloud Point by Random and Block Copolymer Pendant Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-08-10

    Molecular brushes (MBs) of poly(2-oxazoline)s were prepared by living anionic polymerization of 2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline to form the backbone and living cationic ring-opening polymerization of 2-n-propyl-2-oxazoline and 2-methyl-2-oxazoline to form random and block copolymers. Their aqueous solutions displayed a distinct thermoresponsive behavior as a function of the side-chain composition and sequence. The cloud point (CP) of MBs with random copolymer side chains is a linear function of the hydrophilic monomer content and can be modulated in a wide range. For MBs with block copolymer side chains, it was found that the block sequence had a strong and surprising effect on the CP. While MBs with a distal hydrophobic block had a CP at 70 °C, MBs with hydrophilic outer blocks already precipitated at 32 °C. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pathways of lateral spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, U; Schanzer, S; Weigmann, H-J; Patzelt, A; Vergou, T; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2011-01-01

    In the case of topically applied substances, usually both lateral spreading and competitive penetration into the skin occur in parallel. In the present study, the pathways of lateral spreading were studied quantitatively and visually. The local distribution and lateral spreading of the UV filter substance butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane applied in an o/w emulsion was studied on the forearm and the back. The tape stripping procedure was used to determine the recovery rates inside and outside the area of application. The skin characteristics of transepidermal water loss, pH value, hydration of the stratum corneum and sebum rate were determined at both anatomic sites. Photography and laser scanning microscopy were used to visually investigate the lateral spreading of topically applied dyes. On the back, a preferred direction of lateral spreading parallel to the body axis was observed. This result was caused by differences in the network of furrows. The furrows functioned as a pathway for lateral spreading, whereas the follicles formed a reservoir for the topically applied substance. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Thirty-Month Complete Response as a Surrogate End Point in First-Line Follicular Lymphoma Therapy: An Individual Patient-Level Analysis of Multiple Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian; Flowers, Christopher R; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Marcus, Robert; Herold, Michael; Hagenbeek, Anton; Kimby, Eva; Hochster, Howard; Vitolo, Umberto; Peterson, Bruce A; Gyan, Emmanuel; Ghielmini, Michele; Nielsen, Tina; De Bedout, Sabine; Fu, Tommy; Valente, Nancy; Fowler, Nathan H; Hoster, Eva; Ladetto, Marco; Morschhauser, Franck; Zucca, Emanuele; Salles, Gilles; Sargent, Daniel J

    2017-02-10

    Purpose Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent cancer, with effective but rarely curative treatment options. As a standard study end point for first-line FL therapy, progression-free survival (PFS) requires extended follow-up (median PFS, > 7 years). To provide patients with earlier access to newer therapies, an earlier end point to expedite clinical trials is needed. Our objective was to formally assess the complete response rate at 30 months (CR30) after initiation of induction therapy as a potential surrogate end point for PFS in first-line FL therapy. Patients and Methods We analyzed individual patient data from 13 randomized multicenter trials of induction and maintenance regimens in first-line FL therapy published after 1990 and with sufficient data to evaluate whether CR30 could predict treatment effects on PFS. Correlation of the CR30 odds ratio with the PFS hazard ratio was evaluated by both linear regression (R2WLS) and bivariate copula (R2Copula) models. Prespecified criteria for surrogacy required either R2WLS or R2Copula ≥ 0.80, with a lower-bound 95% CI > 0.60. Results Data from eight induction and five maintenance randomized trials in 3,837 evaluable patients were analyzed. The prespecified surrogacy threshold was met, with an R2WLS of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.96) and an R2Copula of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.72 to 1.00). Multiple sensitivity and supplemental analyses supported the robustness of the findings. A minimum 11% absolute improvement in CR30 from a 50% control rate predicted a significant treatment effect on PFS (hazard ratio, 0.69). Conclusion This large, prospective, pooled analysis of randomized chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and chemoimmunotherapy trials demonstrates that CR30 is a surrogate end point for PFS in first-line FL treatment trials. Use of this end point may expedite therapeutic development with the intent of bringing novel therapies to this patient population years before PFS results are mature.

  11. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of gastroc-soleus trigger points in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is an alternative treatment for refractory cases of plantar fasciitis. Studies also demonstrated that ESWT may be an appropriate treatment for myofascial trigger points. This study was designed to evaluate its effectiveness by comparing the ESWT of Gastrocnemius/Soleus (gastroc-soleus) trigger points and heel region with the ESWT of the heel region alone. The study was carried out among 40 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis, divided randomly to case (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. The case group received ESWT for the heel region and for the gastroc-soleus trigger points. The control group received ESWT just for the heel region. The protocol was the same in both groups and they were treated for three sessions every week. The pain score (100 mm visual analog score [VAS]) and the modified Roles and Maudsley score was evaluated before the first session and eight weeks after the last session. Eight weeks after the last session, although the mean VAS had decreased significantly in both groups, this decrement was more significant in the case group. (P = 0.04). According to the modified Roles and Maudsley score, there was a significant improvement in both the case (P plantar fasciitis and gastroc-soleus trigger points in treating patients with plantar fasciitis is more effective than utilizing it solely for plantar fasciitis.

  12. Comparison of the Effects of Hegu Point Ice Massage and 2% Lidocaine Gel on Arteriovenous Fistula Puncture-Related Pain in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Arab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a paucity of information on the effects of Hegu point ice massage and 2% lidocaine gel on fistula puncture-related pain in hemodialysis patients. The aim of the present research was compare the two methods in terms of their effectiveness. Methods: This study is a randomized controlled trial. Seventy hemodialysis patients were divided into two groups. The fistula puncture-related pain in the two groups was measured in the first session of hemodialysis without any intervention. During a hemodialysis session, 2% lidocaine gel was applied on the patient’s arteriovenous fistula site in one group. Also, for the other group, an ice cube was used to massage on the Hegu point in the hand without fistula in the other hemodialysis session. The pain score was recorded, using the Visual Analogue Scale. The data were analyzed using SPSS ver.13. Results: No significant differences were observed in the mean pain scores of the two groups in the preintervention phase. The comparison of the pain score before and after interventions of the lidocaine gel and ice massage groups was found to bear significant differences. Moreover, the comparison of the mean changes of the pain score before and after the intervention of the Hegu point ice massage groups revealed a further reduction for Hegu point than of lidocaine gel groups. Conclusion: Lidocaine gel and Hegu point ice massage affect the intensity of fistula puncture related pain in hemodialysis patients. Given the higher effectiveness of Hegu point ice massage, this method is recommended to be used for fast and safe pain reduction in hemodialysis patients.

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Women with Fibromyalgia: Group Acupuncture with Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis-Based Point Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, Scott D; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2018-02-13

    Group acupuncture is a growing and cost-effective method for delivering acupuncture in the United States and is the practice model in China. However, group acupuncture has not been tested in a research setting. To test the treatment effect of group acupuncture vs group education in persons with fibromyalgia. Random allocation two-group study with repeated measures. Group clinic in an academic health center in Portland, Oregon. Women with confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia (American College of Radiology 1990 criteria) and moderate to severe pain levels. Twenty treatments of a manualized acupuncture treatment based on Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis or group education over 10 weeks (both 900 minutes total). Weekly Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and Global Fatigue Index at baseline, five weeks, and 10 weeks and a four-week follow-up were assessed. Thirty women were recruited, with 78% reporting symptoms for longer than 10 years. The mean attendance was 810 minutes for acupuncture and 861 minutes for education. FIQR total, FIQR pain, and Global Fatigue Index all had clinically and statistically significant improvement in the group receiving acupuncture at end of treatment and four weeks post-treatment but not in participants receiving group education between groups. Compared with education, group acupuncture improved global symptom impact, pain, and fatigue. Furthermore, it was a safe and well-tolerated treatment option, improving a broader proportion of patients than current pharmaceutical options.

  14. Spreading effect of tDCS in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as shown by functional cortical networks: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila eCosmo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is known to modulate spontaneous neural network excitability. The cognitive improvement observed in previous trials raises the potential of this technique as a possible therapeutic tool for use in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD population. However, to explore the potential of this technique as a treatment approach the functional parameters of brain connectivity and the extent of its effects need to be more fully investigated.The aim of this study was to investigate a functional cortical network model based on electroencephalographic activity for studying the dynamic patterns of brain connectivity modulated by tDCS and the distribution of its effects in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.Sixty ADHD patients participated in a parallel, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial. Individuals underwent a single session of sham or anodal tDCS at 1 mA of current intensity over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 20 minutes. The acute effects of stimulation on brain connectivity were assessed using the functional cortical network model based on electroencephalography (EEG activity.Comparing the weighted node degree within groups prior to and following the intervention, a statistically significant difference was found in the electrodes located on the target and correlated areas in the active group (p<0.05, while no statistically significant results were found in the sham group (p ≥0.05; paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank test. Anodal tDCS increased functional brain connectivity in individuals with ADHD compared to data recorded in the baseline resting state. In addition, although some studies have suggested that the effects of tDCS are selective, the present findings show that its modulatory activity spreads. Further studies need to be performed to investigate the dynamic patterns and physiological mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of tDCS.

  15. Comparison of the short-term outcomes between trigger point dry needling and trigger point manual therapy for the management of chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas-Ramos, Rocio; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Llamas-Ramos, Inés; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Cleland, Joshua; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2014-11-01

    Randomized clinical study. To compare the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) and TrP manual therapy (MT) on pain, function, pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain. Recent evidence suggests that TrP DN could be effective in the treatment of neck pain. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of TrP DN and TrP MT in this population. Ninety-four patients (mean ± SD age, 31 ± 3 years; 66% female) were randomized into a TrP DN group (n = 47) or a TrP MT group (n = 47). Neck pain intensity (11-point numeric pain rating scale), cervical range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the spinous process of C7 were measured at baseline, postintervention, and at follow-ups of 1 week and 2 weeks after treatment. The Spanish version of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire was used to measure disability/function at baseline and the 2-week follow-up. Mixed-model, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to determine if a time-by-group interaction existed on the effects of the treatment on each outcome variable, with time as the within-subject variable and group as the between-subject variable. The ANOVA revealed that participants who received TrP DN had outcomes similar to those who received TrP MT in terms of pain, function, and cervical range of motion. The 4-by-2 mixed-model ANOVA also revealed a significant time-by-group interaction (Peffects of TrP DN and TrP MT over long-term follow-up periods. Therapy, level 1b.

  16. [Scraping technique of stuck needle at Anmian point in the treatment of insomnia: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-Ai; Sun, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Jia-Ju; Li, Xing-Ling

    2013-06-01

    To compare the efficacy difference in the treatment of insomnia between scraping technique of stuck needle and conventional acupuncture at Anmian (Extra). One hundred and thirty one cases were randomized into an Anmian group (68 cases) and a conventional acupuncture group (63 cases). In the Anmian group, Anmian (Extra) was selected. After arrival of qi, the stuck needling was adopted by rotating the needle gently in single direction, 2-3 rounds till the needle body was stuck tightly. Afterwards, the needle tail was touched gently with the index finger to fix the needle body and the needle handle was scraped gently with the thumbnail from bottom to up. The needle was retained for 30 min. In the conventional acupuncture group, Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Shenmen (HT 7) and Baihui (GV 20) were selected and stimulated with reducing technique by rotating the needles. The needles were retained for 30 min. The treatment was given once every day, continuously for 2 weeks in both groups. The score of each factor and the total score in Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) were assessed before and after treatment in the two groups. Additionally, the efficacies of two groups were evaluated. For the patients in the conventional acupuncture group, the sleep quality and time of falling into spleen after treatment were improved as compared with those before treatment (all P efficiency, sleep disturbance, hypnotic drug and daytime dysfunction, and PSQI total score did not present statistically significant difference as compared with those before treatment (all P > 0.05). After treatment, for the patients in the Anmian group, the factor score and total score in PSQI were apparently improved as compared with those before treatment (P acupuncture group (P acupuncture group. The clinical efficacy in the Anmian group was apparently superior to the conventional acupuncture group. The scraping technique of stuck needle at Anmian (Extra) achieves the superior effect on insomnia as compared with

  17. Friction massage versus kinesiotaping for short-term management of latent trigger points in the upper trapezius: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Marzieh; Piroozi, Soraya; Rashidi, Iman; Hosseinifard, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Latent trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle may disrupt muscle movement patterns and cause problems such as cramping and decreased muscle strength. Because latent trigger points may spontaneously become active trigger points, they should be addressed and treated to prevent further problems. In this study we compared the short-term effect of kinesiotaping versus friction massage on latent trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Fifty-eight male students enrolled with a stratified sampling method participated in this single-blind randomized clinical trial (Registration ID: IRCT2016080126674N3) in 2016. Pressure pain threshold was recorded with a pressure algometer and grip strength was recorded with a Collin dynamometer. The participants were randomly assigned to two different treatment groups: kinesiotape or friction massage. Friction massage was performed daily for 3 sessions and kinesiotape was used for 72 h. One hour after the last session of friction massage or removal of the kinesiotape, pressure pain threshold and grip strength were evaluated again. Pressure pain threshold decreased significantly after both friction massage (2.66 ± 0.89 to 2.25 ± 0.76; P  = 0.02) and kinesiotaping (2.00 ± 0.74 to 1.71 ± 0.65; P  = 0.01). Grip strength increased significantly after friction massage (40.78 ± 9.55 to 42.17 ± 10.68; P  = 0.03); however there was no significant change in the kinesiotape group (39.72 ± 6.42 to 40.65 ± 7.3; P  = 0.197). There were no significant differences in pressure pain threshold (2.10 ± 0.11 & 1.87 ± 0.11; P  = 0.66) or grip strength (42.17 ± 10.68 & 40.65 ± 7.3; P  = 0.53) between the two study groups. Friction massage and kinesiotaping had identical short-term effects on latent trigger points in the upper trapezius. Three sessions of either of these two interventions did not improve latent trigger points. Registration ID in IRCT: IRCT2016080126674N3.

  18. Does point of care prothrombin time measurement reduce the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in patients undergoing major surgery? The POC-OP randomized-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberio Lorenzo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleeding is a frequent complication during surgery. The intraoperative administration of blood products, including packed red blood cells, platelets and fresh frozen plasma (FFP, is often live saving. Complications of blood transfusions contribute considerably to perioperative costs and blood product resources are limited. Consequently, strategies to optimize the decision to transfuse are needed. Bleeding during surgery is a dynamic process and may result in major blood loss and coagulopathy due to dilution and consumption. The indication for transfusion should be based on reliable coagulation studies. While hemoglobin levels and platelet counts are available within 15 minutes, standard coagulation studies require one hour. Therefore, the decision to administer FFP has to be made in the absence of any data. Point of care testing of prothrombin time ensures that one major parameter of coagulation is available in the operation theatre within minutes. It is fast, easy to perform, inexpensive and may enable physicians to rationally determine the need for FFP. Methods/Design The objective of the POC-OP trial is to determine the effectiveness of point of care prothrombin time testing to reduce the administration of FFP. It is a patient and assessor blind, single center randomized controlled parallel group trial in 220 patients aged between 18 and 90 years undergoing major surgery (any type, except cardiac surgery and liver transplantation with an estimated blood loss during surgery exceeding 20% of the calculated total blood volume or a requirement of FFP according to the judgment of the physicians in charge. Patients are randomized to usual care plus point of care prothrombin time testing or usual care alone without point of care testing. The primary outcome is the relative risk to receive any FFP perioperatively. The inclusion of 110 patients per group will yield more than 80% power to detect a clinically relevant relative risk

  19. Optimal production lot size and reorder point of a two-stage supply chain while random demand is sensitive with sales teams' initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Sana, Shib

    2016-01-01

    The paper develops a production-inventory model of a two-stage supply chain consisting of one manufacturer and one retailer to study production lot size/order quantity, reorder point sales teams' initiatives where demand of the end customers is dependent on random variable and sales teams' initiatives simultaneously. The manufacturer produces the order quantity of the retailer at one lot in which the procurement cost per unit quantity follows a realistic convex function of production lot size. In the chain, the cost of sales team's initiatives/promotion efforts and wholesale price of the manufacturer are negotiated at the points such that their optimum profits reached nearer to their target profits. This study suggests to the management of firms to determine the optimal order quantity/production quantity, reorder point and sales teams' initiatives/promotional effort in order to achieve their maximum profits. An analytical method is applied to determine the optimal values of the decision variables. Finally, numerical examples with its graphical presentation and sensitivity analysis of the key parameters are presented to illustrate more insights of the model.

  20. Virus spread in networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieghem, P. van; Omic, J.; Kooij, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the network characteristics on the virus spread is analyzed in a new-the N-intertwined Markov chain-model, whose only approximation lies in the application of mean field theory. The mean field approximation is quantified in detail. The N-intertwined model has been compared with the

  1. Emergence of blind areas in information spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhang, Chu-Xu; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely Information Blind Areas where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterogeneity for the spreading process, which is complete the contrary to that of random selection. Moreover, the critical value in the latter process is also larger than that of the former for the same network. Those findings might shed some lights in in-depth understanding the effect of network properties on information spreading.

  2. Emergence of blind areas in information spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Ke Zhang

    Full Text Available Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc. spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely Information Blind Areas where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterogeneity for the spreading process, which is complete the contrary to that of random selection. Moreover, the critical value in the latter process is also larger than that of the former for the same network. Those findings might shed some lights in in-depth understanding the effect of network properties on information spreading.

  3. Dry Needling on the Infraspinatus Latent and Active Myofascial Trigger Points in Older Adults With Nonspecific Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Lobo, César; Pacheco-da-Costa, Soraya; Martínez-Martínez, Jorge; Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Cuesta-Álvaro, Pedro; López-López, Daniel

    Shoulder pain is a prevalent condition in older adults. Some authors associate nonspecific shoulder pain with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle. Dry needling is recommended to relieve the MTrP pain of shoulders in the short term (Active MTrPs dry needling improves shoulder pain and the irritability of the satellite MTrPs in the referred pain area. Nociceptive activity at a latent MTrP may influence motor activity and the sensitivity of MTrPs in distant muscles at a similar segmental level. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate dry needling on 1 latent MTrP, in conjunction with 1 active MTrP, in the infraspinatus muscle of older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain. A single-center, randomized, single-blinded, controlled study (NCT02032602) was carried out. Sixty-six patients aged 65 years and older with trigger points in the ipsilateral infraspinatus of the painful shoulder were randomly assigned to (1) of (2) treatment groups. A session of dry needling on the infraspinatus was performed in (1) the most hyperalgesic active and latent MTrP or (2) only the most hyperalgesic active MTrP. The Numeric Rating Scale, the pressure pain threshold (primary outcome) on the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis latent MTrPs, and grip strength were assessed before, after, and 1 week after the intervention. Statistically significant differences in the reduction of pain intensity (P ≤ .001; η = 0.159-0.269; d = 1.017-1.219) and the increase of pressure pain threshold (P . 05; η = 0.006-0.033; d = 0.158-0.368). One dry needling intervention of the latent MTrP associated with the key active MTrP of the infraspinatus reduces pain intensity and the irritability of the satellite MTrPs located in the referred pain area in the short term in older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain.

  4. Combinatorics of spreads and parallelisms

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Partitions of Vector Spaces Quasi-Subgeometry Partitions Finite Focal-SpreadsGeneralizing André SpreadsThe Going Up Construction for Focal-SpreadsSubgeometry Partitions Subgeometry and Quasi-Subgeometry Partitions Subgeometries from Focal-SpreadsExtended André SubgeometriesKantor's Flag-Transitive DesignsMaximal Additive Partial SpreadsSubplane Covered Nets and Baer Groups Partial Desarguesian t-Parallelisms Direct Products of Affine PlanesJha-Johnson SL(2,

  5. High-power pain threshold ultrasound technique in the treatment of active myofascial trigger points: a randomized, double-blind, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Javid; Unalan, Halil

    2004-05-01

    To study what effects a high-power, pain-threshold, static ultrasound technique applied to acute myofascial trigger points of the upper trapezius has on pain and on active cervical lateral bending. Double-blind randomized trial. Physical therapy unit of a private general hospital. Seventy-two adults with acute pain on 1 side of the neck, admitted to the outpatient unit during 1999 and 2000. Not applicable. Visual analog scale and goniometric measurement of active lateral bending of the neck performed daily after treatment sessions and length of treatment (number of therapy sessions). High-power ultrasound applied to the trigger points before stretching the muscle was more effective (P<.05) than conventional ultrasound, and it also significantly (P<.001) decreased the length of therapy. High-power, pain-threshold, static ultrasound technique may be considered in the treatment of patients with acute myofascial pain syndrome, with the understanding that this technique demands more concentration and communication between the patient and the therapist.

  6. [Efficacy on hemiplegic spasticity treated with plum blossom needle tapping therapy at the key points and Bobath therapy: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Liya

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on hemiplegic spasticity after cerebral infarction treated with plum blossom needle tapping therapy at the key points and Bobath therapy. Eighty patients were collected, in compliance with the inclusive criteria of hemiplegic spasticity after cerebral infarction, and randomized into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. In the control group, Bobath manipulation therapy was adopted to relieve spasticity and the treatment of 8 weeks was required. In the observation group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, the tapping therapy with plum blossom needle was applied to the key points, named Jianyu (LI 15), Jianliao (LI 14), Jianzhen (SI 9), Hegu (LI 4), Chengfu (BL 36), Zusanli (ST 36), Xiyangguan (GB 33), etc. The treatment was given for 15 min each time, once a day. Before treatment, after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and Barthel index (BI) were adopted to evaluate the motor function of the extremity and the activity of daily life in the patients of the two groups separately. The modified Ashworth scale was used to evaluate the effect of anti-spasticity. In 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, FMA: scores and BI scores were all significantly increased as compared with those before treatment in the two groups: (both PBobath therapy effectively relieves hemiplegic spasticity in the patients of cerebral infarction and improves the motor function of extremity and the activity of daily life.

  7. Comparison Between the Effects of Passive and Active Soft Tissue Therapies on Latent Trigger Points of Upper Trapezius Muscle in Women: Single-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojidi, Marzieh Mohammadi; Okhovatian, Farshad; Rahimi, Abbas; Baghban, Alireza Akbaezade; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of passive versus active soft tissue therapies on pain and ranges of motion in women with latent myofascial trigger points. Forty-two female patients, aged 18 to 64 years, with a history of neck pain and latent myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group A received passive soft tissue therapy, group B received active soft tissue therapy, and a control group C received a sham procedure. The treatment consisted of 3 sessions in a 1-week period with 1-day break between each session. The local pain intensity, measured with a visual analog scale and pain pressure threshold (PPT) using algometry, and active cervical contralateral flexion (ACLF) measured with goniometry, were obtained at baseline, after the third session, and a week after the third session. The results indicated a significant decrease in local pain intensity on the visual analog scale within each group (A and B) compared with the control group (C) (P .05). Both passive and active soft tissue therapies were determined to reduce pain intensity and increase ACLF range of motion, although passive therapy was more effective in increasing PPT in these patients compared with the control group.

  8. Cerebral mechanism of puncturing at He-Mu point combination for functional dyspepsia: study protocol for a randomized controlled parallel trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is widely used to treat functional dyspepsia with satisfactory outcomes. Combination of the He and Mu acupoints is commonly used and has a synergistic effect on functional dyspepsia; however, its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, a randomized controlled parallel clinical trial is currently underway at Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China. This trial is designed to explore the efficacy of and central responses to the He-Mu point combination in patients with functional dyspepsia using functional magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 105 patients with functional dyspepsia will be allocated into 3 groups: the low-He point group (puncturing at Zusanli (ST36, Mu point group (puncturing at Zhongwan (CV12, and He-Mu point combination group (puncturing at ST36 and CV12. Every participant will receive 20 sessions of manual acupuncture for 4 weeks. The needles will be inserted perpendicularly to a depth of 1 to 2 cun. The angle of rotation and twisting will range from 90 to 180 degrees, while lifting and thrusting will range from 0.3 to 0.5 cm. The various manipulations will be performed 60 to 90 times per minute. The needles will remain in place for 30 minutes, during which manipulation will be applied every 10 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging will be performed before and after 20 sessions of acupuncture. The primary outcome is symptom improvement according to the Chinese version of the Nepean Dyspepsia Index. Secondary outcomes include the Leeds dyspepsia questionnaire, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and visual analogue scale scores before and after 10 and 20 sessions of acupuncture. Needle sensation and adverse events will be used to assess the therapeutic effects. This study will promote more widespread awareness of the benefits of acupoint combination in the clinical setting and provide a further explanation of the

  9. Diffusive spreading in nature, technology and society

    CERN Document Server

    Caro, Jürgen; Kärger, Jörg; Vogl, Gero

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with randomly moving objects and their spreading. The objects considered are particles like atoms and molecules, just as living beings like humans, animals, plants, bacteria and even abstract entities like ideas, rumors, information, innovations and linguistic features. The book explores and communicates the laws behind these movements and reports about astonishing similarities and very specific features typical of the given object under considerations. Leading scientists in disciplines as different as archeology, epidemics, linguistics and sociology, in contact with their colleagues from engineering, natural sciences and mathematics, introduce into the phenomena of spreading as relevant for their fields. An introductory chapter on “Spreading Fundamentals” provides a common basis for all these considerations, with a minimum of mathematics, selected and presented for enjoying rather than frustrating the reader.

  10. Effectiveness of water physical therapy on pain, pressure pain sensitivity, and myofascial trigger points in breast cancer survivors: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; López-Barajas, Isabel B; Del-Moral-Ávila, Rosario; de la-Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of an 8-week water physical therapy program on cervical and shoulder pain, pressure sensitivity, and the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in breast cancer survivors. Randomized, controlled trial. To date, no study has investigated effects of water therapy in breast cancer. Sixty-six breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned into two groups: WATER group, who received a water exercise program or CONTROL group who received the usual care treatment for breast cancer. The WATER therapy program consisted of 24 sessions (3 times/week over 8 weeks) of low-intensity exercises in a warm pool (32°C). Each session included 10-minute warm-up period; 35 minutes of aerobic, low-intensity endurance, and core stability training; and a 15-minute cool-down period (stretching and relaxation).  Neck and shoulder pain (visual analog scale, 0-100 mm), pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joints, deltoid muscles, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscles, and the presence of TrPs in cervical-shoulder muscles were assessed at baseline and after the 8-week program by an assessor blinded to treatment allocation. The WATER group demonstrated a between-group improvement for neck pain of -31 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]-49 to -22, P  0.05). Finally, patients in the WATER program showed a greater reduction of active TrPs as compared with the CONTROL group (P < 0.05).  An 8-week water therapy program was effective for improving neck and shoulder/axillary pain, and reducing the presence of TrPs in breast cancer survivors as compared with usual care; however, no significant changes in widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia were found. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Efficacy of Deep Dry Needling on Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in Older Adults With Nonspecific Shoulder Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Lobo, César; Pacheco-da-Costa, Soraya; Hita-Herranz, Edgar

    Nonspecific shoulder pain has a high prevalence in older adults and causes functional alterations. Furthermore, there are difficulties in establishing a clinical diagnosis, effective treatments are lacking, and little evidence has been found regarding the use of invasive physical therapy techniques in this age group. To determine the efficacy of a single physical therapy intervention with deep dry needling (DDN) on latent and active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain. This pilot study is a single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial that included 20 participants, aged 65 years and older, who were diagnosed with nonspecific shoulder pain. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the area. Participants were recruited at their homes or at a care center and were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n = 10), which received a session of DDN on 1 active and 1 latent MTrP of the infraspinatus muscle, or a control group (n = 10), which received a session of DDN on only 1 active MTrP. A blind examiner assessed the pain intensity, pain pressure threshold on the anterior deltoid, and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles and grip strength before, immediately after, and 1 week after the intervention. Statistically significant differences (P latent MTrP, in conjunction with 1 active MTrP, in the infraspinatus muscle may increase the PPT of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle area immediately following and 1 week after the intervention in older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain.

  12. Estimation of wave directional spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    One of the useful measures of waves directional spreading at a given location is the directional spreading parameter. This paper presents a new approach to arrive at its characteristic value using the computational technique of Artificial Neural...

  13. Economic evaluation of chemotherapy with mitoxantrone plus prednisone for symptomatic hormone-resistant prostate cancer: based on a Canadian randomized trial with palliative end points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, D J; Krahn, M D; Neogi, T; Panzarella, T; Smith, T J; Warde, P; Willan, A R; Ernst, S; Moore, M J; Neville, A; Tannock, I F

    1998-06-01

    To evaluate the economic consequences of the use of chemotherapy in patients with symptomatic hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC) in the context of a previously published Canadian open-label, phase III, randomized trial with palliative end points. The trial randomized 161 patients to initial treatment with mitoxantrone and prednisone (M + P) or to prednisone alone (P) and showed better palliation with M + P. There was no significant difference in survival. A detailed retrospective chart review was performed of resources used from randomization until death of 114 of 161 patients enrolled at the three largest centers: these included hospital admissions, outpatient visits, investigations, therapies (which included all chemotherapy and radiation), and palliative care. Cancer center and community hospital costs were calculated by using the hotel approximation method and case costing from the Ontario Case Cost Project, respectively. Cost-utility analysis was performed by transforming the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 global quality-of-life item measured every 3 weeks on trial to an estimate of utility, and extending the last known value through to death or last follow-up. The mean total cost until death or last follow-up by intention-to-treat was M + P CDN $27,300; P CDN $29,000. The 95% confidence intervals on the observed cost difference ranged from a saving of $9,200 for M + P (with palliative benefit) to an increased cost of $5,800 for M + P. The major proportion of cost (M + P 53% v P 66%; CDN $14,500 v $19,100) was for inpatient care. Initial M + P was consistently less expensive in whichever time period was used to compare costs. Cost-utility analysis showed M + P to be the preferred strategy with an upper 95% confidence interval for the incremental cost-utility ratio of CDN $19,700 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A treatment that reduces symptoms and improves quality of life has the potential to reduce

  14. Myofascial trigger point-focused head and neck massage for recurrent tension-type headache: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraska, Albert F.; Stenerson, Lea; Butryn, Nathan; Krutsch, Jason P.; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Mann, J. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are focal disruptions in skeletal muscle that can refer pain to the head and reproduce the pain patterns of tension-type headache (TTH). The present study applied massage focused on MTrPs of subjects with TTH in a placebo-controlled, clinical trial to assess efficacy on reducing headache pain. Methods Fifty-six subjects with TTH were randomized to receive 12 massage or placebo (detuned ultrasound) sessions over six weeks, or to wait-list. Trigger point release (TPR) massage focused on MTrPs in cervical musculature. Headache pain (frequency, intensity and duration) was recorded in a daily headache diary. Additional outcome measures included self-report of perceived clinical change in headache pain and pressure-pain threshold (PPT) at MTrPs in the upper trapezius and sub-occipital muscles. Results From diary recordings, group differences across time were detected in headache frequency (p=0.026), but not for intensity or duration. Post hoc analysis indicated headache frequency decreased from baseline for both massage (p<0.0003) and placebo (p=0.013), but no difference was detected between massage and placebo. Subject report of perceived clinical change was a greater reduction in headache pain for massage than placebo or wait-list groups (p=0.002). PPT improved in all muscles tested for massage only (all p's<0.002). Discussion Two findings from this study are apparent: 1) MTrPs are important components in the treatment of TTH, and 2) TTH, like other chronic conditions, is responsive to placebo. Clinical trials on headache that do not include a placebo group are at risk for overestimating the specific contribution from the active intervention. PMID:25329141

  15. Change in the P300 index - a pilot randomized controlled trial of low-frequency electrical stimulation of acupuncture points in middle-aged men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kwon, O Sang; Cho, Seong Jin; Lee, Sanghun; Kang, Seok-Yun; Ryu, Yeon Hee

    2017-05-03

    The P300 is a major index used to evaluate improvements in brain function. Although a few studies have reported evaluating the effectiveness of manual acupuncture or electro-acupuncture by monitoring the P300, research in this field is not yet very active. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of periodic low-frequency electrical stimulation applied to BL62 and KI6 on brain activity by analyzing the P300. The study was conducted as a randomized double-blind test of 55 subjects in their 50s, including 26 males and 29 females. Each subject received 12 sessions of stimulation over a one-month period. In each session, low-frequency electrical stimulation at an average of 24 μA and 2 Hz was applied to the acupuncture points BL62 and KI6, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured before the first session and after the last session of the electrical stimulation. The results of a chi-square test indicated that the double-blind test was conducted correctly. Compared to the Sham group, all the subjects in the Real stimulation group showed a tendency toward a decreasing P300 latency and increasing P300 amplitude after all 12 sessions of stimulation. In the women, the amplitude significantly increased at Fz, Fcz, Cz, Cpz, and Pz. With this experiment, the low-frequency electrical stimulation of two acupuncture points (BL62 and K16) was confirmed to have a positive influence on the prevention of natural cerebral aging. This study was registered at the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) of the National Research Institute of Health ( https://cris.nih.go.kr/cris/search/search_result_st01_en.jsp? , Registration Number: KCT0001940). The date of registration was June 9, 2016.

  16. The spread of inequality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S Rogers

    Full Text Available The causes of socioeconomic inequality have been debated since the time of Plato. Many reasons for the development of stratification have been proposed, from the need for hierarchical control over large-scale irrigation systems to the accumulation of small differences in wealth over time via inheritance processes. However, none of these explains how unequal societies came to completely displace egalitarian cultural norms over time. Our study models demographic consequences associated with the unequal distribution of resources in stratified societies. Agent-based simulation results show that in constant environments, unequal access to resources can be demographically destabilizing, resulting in the outward migration and spread of such societies even when population size is relatively small. In variable environments, stratified societies spread more and are also better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes. The predictions of our simulation are provided modest support by a range of existing empirical studies. In short, the fact that stratified societies today vastly outnumber egalitarian societies may not be due to the transformation of egalitarian norms and structures, but may instead reflect the more rapid migration of stratified societies and consequent conquest or displacement of egalitarian societies over time.

  17. The Spread of Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Deborah S.; Deshpande, Omkar; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2011-01-01

    The causes of socioeconomic inequality have been debated since the time of Plato. Many reasons for the development of stratification have been proposed, from the need for hierarchical control over large-scale irrigation systems to the accumulation of small differences in wealth over time via inheritance processes. However, none of these explains how unequal societies came to completely displace egalitarian cultural norms over time. Our study models demographic consequences associated with the unequal distribution of resources in stratified societies. Agent-based simulation results show that in constant environments, unequal access to resources can be demographically destabilizing, resulting in the outward migration and spread of such societies even when population size is relatively small. In variable environments, stratified societies spread more and are also better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes. The predictions of our simulation are provided modest support by a range of existing empirical studies. In short, the fact that stratified societies today vastly outnumber egalitarian societies may not be due to the transformation of egalitarian norms and structures, but may instead reflect the more rapid migration of stratified societies and consequent conquest or displacement of egalitarian societies over time. PMID:21957457

  18. Turbulent wedge spreading dynamics and control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Goldstein, David; Brown, Garry

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent wedges are encountered in some routes to transition in wall bounded flows, particularly those involving surface roughness. They are characterized by strongly turbulent regions that are formed downstream of large disturbances, and spread into the non-turbulent flow. Altering the wedge spreading mechanism is a possible drag reduction strategy. Following recent studies of Goldstein, Chu and Brown (Flow Turbul. Combust. 98(1), 2017) and Kuester and White (Exp. Fluids 57(4), 2016), we explore the relation between the base flow vorticity field and turbulent wedge spreading using immersed boundary direct numerical simulations. The lateral spreading rate of the wedges are similar for high Reynolds number boundary layers and Couette flow, but differences emerge in wall normal propagation of turbulence. We also attempt to utilize the surface texture based strategy suggested by Strand and Goldstein (J. Fluid Mech. 668, 2011) to reduce the spreading of isolated turbulent spots, for turbulent wedge control. The effects of height, spacing and orientation of fins on the dynamics of wedge evolution are studied. The results are interpreted from a vorticity dynamics point of view. Supported by AFOSR # FA9550-15-1-0345.

  19. Preoperative Valsava leak point pressure may not predict outcome of mid-urethral slings: analysis from a randomized controlled trial of retropubic versus transobturator mid-urethral slings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Costantini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that preoperative Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP predicts long-term outcome of mid-urethra slings for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and forty-five patients with SUI were prospectively randomized to two mid-urethra sling treatments: Tension free vaginal tape (TVT or transobturator tape (TOT. They were followed-up at 3, 6, 12 months post-operatively and then annually for the primary outcome variable, i.e. dry or wet and secondary outcome variables such as scores on the urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6 and the impact of incontinence on quality of life (IIQ-7 questionnaire as well as patient satisfaction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS. Preoperative VLPP was correlated with primary and secondary outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean follow-ups were 32 + 12 months (range 12-55 for TVT and 31 + 15 months (range 12-61 for TOT. When patients were analyzed according to VLPP stratification, 95 (65.5% patients showed a VLPP > 60 cm H2O and 50 (34.5% patients had a VLPP 60 cm H2O and 72% for those with VLPP 60 cm H2O (82 % vs. 68.9% p of 60 cm H2O, preoperative VLPP was not linked to outcome after TVT or TOT procedures.

  20. Manual Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Using a Saddle Point Model Predictive Control Algorithm: Results of a Crossover Randomized Overnight Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Isabelle; Penet, Maxime; Paillard, Anaïs; Carpentier, Marc; Esvant, Annabelle; Lefebvre, Marie-Anne; Poirier, Jean-Yves

    2017-09-01

    The purpose was to assess the efficacy of a new closed-loop algorithm (Saddle Point Model Predictive Control, SP-MPC) in achieving nocturnal normoglycemia while reducing the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this randomized crossover study, 10 adult patients (mean hemoglobin A1c 7.35 ± 1.04%) were assigned to be treated overnight by open loop using sensor-augmented pump therapy (open-loop SAP) or manual closed-loop delivery. During closed loop, insulin doses were calculated using the SP-MPC algorithm and administered as manual boluses every 15 minutes from 9:00 pm to 8:00 am. Patients consumed a self-selected meal (65-125 g of carbohydrates) at 7:00 pm accompanied by their usual prandial bolus. Blood glucose was measured every 30 minutes. The primary endpoints were the time spent in target (70-145 mg/dl) and time spent below 70 mg/dl from 11:00 pm to 8:00 am. Time spent in target did not differ between closed-loop and open-loop SAP. The number of hypoglycemic events (145 mg/dl was significantly lower during closed-loop than during open-loop SAP ( P = .03) as well as HBGI ( P = .02). This pilot study suggests that the use of the SP-MPC algorithm may improve mean overnight glucose control and reduce the number of hypoglycemic events as compared to SAP therapy.

  1. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos Bobos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67 completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p<0.05. However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p<0.05 in the tested muscles’ PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold.

  2. DIFFUSION MODEL OF CREAMY- AND VEGETABLE SPREADS MIXING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary .A mathematical model of the process of mixing cream- and vegetable spread was developed. In modeling the diffusion understanding of the nature of the process were used, allowing escape from the apparatus geometry. After turning on the mixer the mixing process begins. Its duration can be determined by the behavior of the tracer particles introduced into the agitated medium in a predetermined quantity through the free liquid surface within a short period of time. If tracer particles have the same density with the surrounding bulk liquid phase, then the path of movement of the particles and the fluid are identical. The degree of homogeneity of the composition can be stirred calculated by the coefficient of variation, which is identified by the local concentrations of tracer particles in the volume of stirred medium. The task of a one-dimensional particle transport in the plane layer of the mixed liquid is solved for their calculation. The calculated ratios obtained allow us to calculate the particle concentration at any point in the volume being mixed at random times. Based on the experiment effective mixing coefficients are identified and relations for their assessment, depending on the Reynolds number of the mixer in the range studied variations of process are offered. Using the time dependence of the variation coefficient characterizing the homogenity of the system being mixed, it is possible to determine the duration of mixing to obtain the product with the desired uniformity and homogeneity of the product under the definition of a predetermined duration of the mixing process. The variation coefficient %, indicating a sufficiently good uniformity of the spread composition was found for the spread №1, being mixed with a stirrer rotating at a speed of n=150 rev / min, and the dimensionless length of the process Fo =0,0935 for obtaining estimated relations. Using the proposed calculation algorithm one can estimate the homogeneity of the

  3. Innovation spread: lessons from HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina; Berg, David; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Efficient spreading of evidence-based innovations among complex health systems remains an elusive goal despite extensive study in the social sciences. Biology provides a model of successful spread in viruses, which have evolved to spread with maximum efficiency using minimal resources. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) spread and identify five steps that are also common to a recent example of spread in complex health systems: reduction in door-to-balloon times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We then describe a new model we have developed, called AIDED, which is based on mixed-methods research but informed by the conceptual framework of HIV spread among cells. The AIDED model contains five components: Assess, Innovate, Develop, Engage and Devolve, and can describe any one of the following: the spread of HIV among cells, the spread of practices to reduce door-to-balloon time for patients with STEMI and the spread of certain family health innovations in low- and middle-income countries. We suggest that by looking to the biological sciences for a model of spread that has been honed by evolution, we may have identified fundamental steps that are necessary and sufficient for efficient, low-cost spread of health innovations among complex health systems.

  4. Effectiveness of myofascial trigger point manual therapy combined with a self-stretching protocol for the management of plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renan-Ordine, Rômulo; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; de Souza, Daiana Priscila Rodrigues; Cleland, Joshua A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2011-02-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial. To investigate the effects of trigger point (TrP) manual therapy combined with a self-stretching program for the management of patients with plantar heel pain. Previous studies have reported that stretching of the calf musculature and the plantar fascia are effective management strategies for plantar heel pain. However, it is not known if the inclusion of soft tissue therapy can further improve the outcomes in this population. Sixty patients, 15 men and 45 women (mean ± SD age, 44 ± 10 years) with a clinical diagnosis of plantar heel pain were randomly divided into 2 groups: a self-stretching (Str) group who received a stretching protocol, and a self-stretching and soft tissue TrP manual therapy (Str-ST) group who received TrP manual interventions (TrP pressure release and neuromuscular approach) in addition to the same self-stretching protocol. The primary outcomes were physical function and bodily pain domains of the quality of life SF-36 questionnaire. Additionally, pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the affected gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and over the calcaneus, by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation. Outcomes of interest were captured at baseline and at a 1-month follow-up (end of treatment period). Mixed-model ANOVAs were used to examine the effects of the interventions on each outcome, with group as the between-subjects variable and time as the within-subjects variable. The primary analysis was the group-by-time interaction. The 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant group-by-time interaction for the main outcomes of the study: physical function (P = .001) and bodily pain (P = .005); patients receiving a combination of self-stretching and TrP tissue intervention experienced a greater improvement in physical function and a greater reduction in pain, as compared to those receiving the self-stretching protocol. The mixed ANOVA also revealed significant

  5. Efficacy of Deep Dry Needling on Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in Older Adults With Nonspecific Shoulder Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-da-Costa, Soraya; Hita-Herranz, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific shoulder pain has a high prevalence in older adults and causes functional alterations. Furthermore, there are difficulties in establishing a clinical diagnosis, effective treatments are lacking, and little evidence has been found regarding the use of invasive physical therapy techniques in this age group. Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a single physical therapy intervention with deep dry needling (DDN) on latent and active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain. Methods: This pilot study is a single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial that included 20 participants, aged 65 years and older, who were diagnosed with nonspecific shoulder pain. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the area. Participants were recruited at their homes or at a care center and were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n = 10), which received a session of DDN on 1 active and 1 latent MTrP of the infraspinatus muscle, or a control group (n = 10), which received a session of DDN on only 1 active MTrP. A blind examiner assessed the pain intensity, pain pressure threshold on the anterior deltoid, and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles and grip strength before, immediately after, and 1 week after the intervention. Results: Statistically significant differences (P pain thresholds (PPTs) of the extensor carpi radialis brevis were found in the experimental group in both posttreatment assessments. Moreover, the effect size values (d Cohen) varied from small for grip strength (0.017-0.36) to moderate for the pain intensity (0.46-0.78) and PPT in the anterior deltoid (0.49-0.66) and to large for the PPT in the extensor carpi radialis brevis (1.06-1.58). Conclusions: A single physical therapy intervention with DDN on 1 latent MTrP, in conjunction with 1 active MTrP, in the infraspinatus muscle may increase the PPT of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle area

  6. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  7. Evaluation of low-level laser at auriculotherapy points to reduce postoperative pain in inferior third molar surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Filho, Hélio; Sotto-Ramos, Juliane; Pinto, Erika Horácio; Cabral, Marcia Regina; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Silva, Daniela Fátima Teixeira; Pavani, Christine; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini

    2016-09-02

    A comfortable postoperative return to daily activities has increased the need to control inflammation after third molar surgery. Anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics are not exempt from adverse effects such as allergies and chronic gastritis, and they are not without cost. The association between low-level laser and auricular acupuncture can be an alternative when conventional drugs are contraindicated. Among its advantages, we can mention the low risk of side effects, low cost and simplicity of application. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of low-level laser at auriculotherapy points in reducing postoperative pain in lower third molar surgery. Ninety bilateral, symmetrical lower third molar surgeries will be performed in 45 healthy patients. Each patient will be their own control, through a split-mouth crossover study. One side of the mouth will be randomly chosen and, immediately after surgery, will be treated with low-level laser. After 21 days, the contralateral side will be operated on with low-level laser simulation used postoperatively. This regimen (laser application or not) will be repeated at 24 and 48 h after surgery. All patients will be requested to take analgesics (acetaminophen) if they have pain, i.e. in case of pain. Neither the surgeon nor the patients will know the assigned treatment. The primary variable will be postoperative pain assessed using a Visual Analog Scale, and the secondary variables will be trismus, edema, local temperature, dysphagia, presence of infection and painkiller ingestion. These variables will be assessed at baseline, 24 h, 48 h and 7 days after surgery. Blood samples for systemic inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8) analysis will be assessed at baseline and 24 h after surgery. Some authors believe that using a wavelength of 633 to 670 nm is a good option for laser therapy in the field of acupuncture. This wavelength can penetrate biological tissue to a depth of about 3 mm. However

  8. Generalized image deconvolution by exploiting spatially variant point spread functions

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangyun; Lee, KyeoReh; Shin, Seungwoo; Park, YongKeun

    2017-01-01

    An optical imaging system forms an object image by recollecting light scattered by the object. However, intact optical information of the object delivered through the imaging system is deteriorated by imperfect optical elements and unwanted defects. Image deconvolution, also known as inverse filtering, has been widely exploited as a recovery technique because of its practical feasibility, and operates by assuming the linear shift-invariant property of the imaging system. However, shift invari...

  9. Computation of the lateral and axial point spread functions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. A M Hamed1 2. Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University Cairo, Egypt; Physics Department, Faculty of Education at Sur, P.O. Box 484, Code Postal 411, Sultanate of Oman ...

  10. Computation of the lateral and axial point spread functions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, a novel aperture based on Tolardo concept composed of a central clear disc surrounded by a series of black and white (B/W) concentric annuli of equal transmittance is presented. Different apodized apertures of different number of B/W annuli are suggested in order to improve further the ...

  11. What Point-of-Use Water Treatment Products Do Consumers Use? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial among the Urban Poor in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, Jill; Najnin, Nusrat; Mahmud, Minhaj; Albert, Jeff; Islam, M. Sirajul; Luby, Stephen; Unicomb, Leanne; Levine, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that household point-of-use (POU) water treatment products can reduce the enormous burden of water-borne illness. Nevertheless, adoption among the global poor is very low, and little evidence exists on why. Methods We gave 600 households in poor communities in Dhaka, Bangladesh randomly-ordered two-month free trials of four water treatment products: dilute liquid chlorine (sodium hypochlorite solution, marketed locally as Water Guard), sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets (branded as Aquatabs), a combined flocculant-disinfectant powdered mixture (the PUR Purifier of Water), and a silver-coated ceramic siphon filter. Consumers also received education on the dangers of untreated drinking water. We measured which products consumers used with self-reports, observation (for the filter), and chlorine tests (for the other products). We also measured drinking water's contamination with E. coli (compared to 200 control households). Findings Households reported highest usage of the filter, although no product had even 30% usage. E. coli concentrations in stored drinking water were generally lowest when households had Water Guard. Households that self-reported product usage had large reductions in E. coli concentrations with any product as compared to controls. Conclusion Traditional arguments for the low adoption of POU products focus on affordability, consumers' lack of information about germs and the dangers of unsafe water, and specific products not meshing with a household's preferences. In this study we provided free trials, repeated informational messages explaining the dangers of untreated water, and a variety of product designs. The low usage of all products despite such efforts makes clear that important barriers exist beyond cost, information, and variation among these four product designs. Without a better understanding of the choices and aspirations of the target end-users, household-based water treatment is unlikely to reduce

  12. Immediate effect of ultrasound and ischemic compression techniques for the treatment of trapezius latent myofascial trigger points in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, F Javier Montañez; Martín, Daniel Pecos; Masanet, Rosana Arnau; Botella, Ana Camps; Soler, Lorena Borja; Morell, Francisco Bosch

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine immediate effects of ischemic compression (IC) and ultrasound (US) for the treatment of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the trapezius muscle. Sixty-six volunteers, all CEU-Cardenal Herrera University, Valencia, Spain, personnel, participated in this study. Subjects were healthy individuals, diagnosed with latent MTrPs in the trapezius muscle. Subjects were randomly placed into 3 groups: G1, which received IC treatment for MTrPs; G2, which received US; and G3 (control), which received sham US. The following data were recorded before and after each treatment: active range of motion (AROM) of cervical rachis measured with a cervical range of motion instrument, basal electrical activity (BEA) of muscle trapezius measured with surface electromyography, and pressure tolerance of MTrP measured with visual analogue scale assessing local pain evoked by the application of 2.5 kg/cm(2) of pressure using a pressure analog algometer. The results showed an immediate decrease in BEA of the trapezius muscle and a reduction of MTrP sensitivity after treatment with both therapeutic modalities. In the case of IC, an improvement of AROM of cervical rachis was also been obtained. In this group of participants, both treatments were shown to have an immediate effect on latent MTrPs. The results show a relation among AROM of cervical rachis, BEA of the trapezius muscle, and MTrP sensitivity of the trapezius muscle gaining short-term positive effects with use of IC.

  13. What point-of-use water treatment products do consumers use? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial among the urban poor in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Luoto

    Full Text Available There is evidence that household point-of-use (POU water treatment products can reduce the enormous burden of water-borne illness. Nevertheless, adoption among the global poor is very low, and little evidence exists on why.We gave 600 households in poor communities in Dhaka, Bangladesh randomly-ordered two-month free trials of four water treatment products: dilute liquid chlorine (sodium hypochlorite solution, marketed locally as Water Guard, sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets (branded as Aquatabs, a combined flocculant-disinfectant powdered mixture (the PUR Purifier of Water, and a silver-coated ceramic siphon filter. Consumers also received education on the dangers of untreated drinking water. We measured which products consumers used with self-reports, observation (for the filter, and chlorine tests (for the other products. We also measured drinking water's contamination with E. coli (compared to 200 control households.Households reported highest usage of the filter, although no product had even 30% usage. E. coli concentrations in stored drinking water were generally lowest when households had Water Guard. Households that self-reported product usage had large reductions in E. coli concentrations with any product as compared to controls.Traditional arguments for the low adoption of POU products focus on affordability, consumers' lack of information about germs and the dangers of unsafe water, and specific products not meshing with a household's preferences. In this study we provided free trials, repeated informational messages explaining the dangers of untreated water, and a variety of product designs. The low usage of all products despite such efforts makes clear that important barriers exist beyond cost, information, and variation among these four product designs. Without a better understanding of the choices and aspirations of the target end-users, household-based water treatment is unlikely to reduce morbidity and mortality substantially

  14. What point-of-use water treatment products do consumers use? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial among the urban poor in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, Jill; Najnin, Nusrat; Mahmud, Minhaj; Albert, Jeff; Islam, M Sirajul; Luby, Stephen; Unicomb, Leanne; Levine, David I

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that household point-of-use (POU) water treatment products can reduce the enormous burden of water-borne illness. Nevertheless, adoption among the global poor is very low, and little evidence exists on why. We gave 600 households in poor communities in Dhaka, Bangladesh randomly-ordered two-month free trials of four water treatment products: dilute liquid chlorine (sodium hypochlorite solution, marketed locally as Water Guard), sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets (branded as Aquatabs), a combined flocculant-disinfectant powdered mixture (the PUR Purifier of Water), and a silver-coated ceramic siphon filter. Consumers also received education on the dangers of untreated drinking water. We measured which products consumers used with self-reports, observation (for the filter), and chlorine tests (for the other products). We also measured drinking water's contamination with E. coli (compared to 200 control households). Households reported highest usage of the filter, although no product had even 30% usage. E. coli concentrations in stored drinking water were generally lowest when households had Water Guard. Households that self-reported product usage had large reductions in E. coli concentrations with any product as compared to controls. Traditional arguments for the low adoption of POU products focus on affordability, consumers' lack of information about germs and the dangers of unsafe water, and specific products not meshing with a household's preferences. In this study we provided free trials, repeated informational messages explaining the dangers of untreated water, and a variety of product designs. The low usage of all products despite such efforts makes clear that important barriers exist beyond cost, information, and variation among these four product designs. Without a better understanding of the choices and aspirations of the target end-users, household-based water treatment is unlikely to reduce morbidity and mortality substantially in urban

  15. Additional effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation and trigger-point injection for treatment of myofascial pain syndrome: a pilot study with randomized, single-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Jung, Sung-Jin; Lee, Chang Han; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2014-09-01

    Chronic pain caused by myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) results in generalized and debilitating conditions. Trigger-point injection (TPI) is the mainstay of MPS management to reduce acute and localized pain. Other adjunctive intervention to modulate the central pain pathway might be helpful if they are combined with TPI. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), which is a form of neurostimulation, has been reported to be safe and effective in treating chronic pain by changing cortical excitability. To determine whether there is an additional effect of tDCS and TPI to reduce pain in patients with MPS. Twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed MPS of shoulder girdle muscles. Patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 3 groups (2 active and 1 sham stimulation groups) and received TPI. Immediately after TPI, tDCS (2 mA for 20 minutes on 5 consecutive days) was administered. For the active stimulation groups, tDCS was applied over 2 different locations (primary motor cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Pain Threshold Test, and short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire were measured before and immediately after stimulation for 5 consecutive days. The mean VAS values were decreased in all three groups after 5 days. There was a significant change between before and after stimulation only in the DLPFC group. The significant change in the mean VAS value was shown from after the second stimulation session (p=0.031), and this remained significant until the last stimulation session (p=0.027). This study suggests that tDCS over DLPFC may have additional effects with TPI to reduce pain in patients with MPS. tDCS over DLPFC can be used to reverse central pain pathway by modulating cortical plasticity.

  16. Friction massage versus kinesiotaping for short-term management of latent trigger points in the upper trapezius: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamadi, Marzieh; Piroozi, Soraya; Rashidi, Iman; Hosseinifard, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Background Latent trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle may disrupt muscle movement patterns and cause problems such as cramping and decreased muscle strength. Because latent trigger points may spontaneously become active trigger points, they should be addressed and treated to prevent further problems. In this study we compared the short-term effect of kinesiotaping versus friction massage on latent trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Methods Fifty-eight male students enrolle...

  17. Lensless imaging based on coherent backscattering in random media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied lensless imaging due to coherent backscattering in random media both theoretically and experimentally. The point spread function of the lensless imaging system was derived. Parameters such as the volume fraction of the scatterer in the random scattering medium, the diameter of the scatterer, the distance between the object to be imaged and the surface of the random scattering medium were optimized to improve the image contrast and resolution. Moreover, for complicated objects, high contrast and quality images were achieved through the high-order intensity correlation measurement on the image plane, which may propel this imaging technique to practical applications.

  18. First steps in random walks from tools to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klafter, J

    2011-01-01

    The name ""random walk"" for a problem of a displacement of a point in a sequence of independent random steps was coined by Karl Pearson in 1905 in a question posed to readers of ""Nature"". The same year, a similar problem was formulated by Albert Einstein in one of his Annus Mirabilis works. Even earlier such a problem was posed by Louis Bachelier in his thesis devoted to the theory of financial speculations in 1900. Nowadays the theory of random walks has proved useful in physics andchemistry (diffusion, reactions, mixing in flows), economics, biology (from animal spread to motion of subcel

  19. Plasmatocyte spreading peptide induces spreading of plasmatocytes but represses spreading of granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, M R; Clark, K D

    1999-11-01

    In most Lepidoptera, plasmatocytes and granulocytes are the two hemocyte classes capable of adhering to foreign targets. Previously, we identified plasmatocyte spreading peptide (PSP1) from the moth Pseudoplusia includens and reported that it induced plasmatocytes to rapidly spread on foreign surfaces. Here we examine whether the response of plasmatocytes to PSP1 was influenced by cell density or culture conditions, and whether PSP1 affected the adhesive state of granulocytes. Plasmatocyte spreading rates were clearly affected by cell density in the absence of PSP1 but spreading was density independent in the presence of PSP1. PSP1 also induced plasmatocytes in agarose-coated culture wells to form homotypic aggregations rather than spread on the surface of culture wells. In contrast, granulocytes rapidly spread in a density independent manner in the absence of PSP1, but were dose-dependently inhibited from spreading by the addition of peptide. An anti-PSP1 polyclonal antibody neutralized the spreading activity of synthetic PSP1. This antibody also neutralized the plasmatocyte spreading activity of granulocyte-conditioned medium, and significantly delayed plasmatocyte spreading when cells were cultured at a high density in unconditioned medium. These results suggested that the spreading activity derived from granulocytes is due in part to PSP1. Pretreatment of plasmatocytes with trypsin had no effect on PSP1-induced aggregation but PSP1-induced aggregations were readily dissociated by trypsin. This suggested that PSP1 is not an adhesion factor but induces adhesion by stimulating a change in the cell surface of plasmatocytes. Synthetic PSP1 also induced aggregation of plasmatocytes from other Lepidoptera indicating that regulation of hemocyte activity by PSP1-related peptides may be widespread. Arch. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal...... firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical......, monopolar recordings here provided unequivocal evidence of spreading convulsions in patients. Hence, practically all major pathological cortical network events in animals have now been observed in people. Early spreading depolarizations may indicate a risk for late post-haemorrhagic seizures....

  1. Effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wamontree, Phanida; Kanchanakhan, Naowarat; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Jeensawek, Apichon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen on reducing upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients who were diagnosed as having upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points were randomly allocated to either a massage group using a Wilai massage stickTM or a medication group taking ibuprofen for 5 days. Both groups were advised to per...

  2. Spreading gossip in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Pedro G.; da Silva, Luciano R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-09-01

    We study a simple model of information propagation in social networks, where two quantities are introduced: the spread factor, which measures the average maximal reachability of the neighbors of a given node that interchange information among each other, and the spreading time needed for the information to reach such a fraction of nodes. When the information refers to a particular node at which both quantities are measured, the model can be taken as a model for gossip propagation. In this context, we apply the model to real empirical networks of social acquaintances and compare the underlying spreading dynamics with different types of scale-free and small-world networks. We find that the number of friendship connections strongly influences the probability of being gossiped. Finally, we discuss how the spread factor is able to be applied to other situations.

  3. Spread effects - methodology; Spredningseffekter - metodegrunnlag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Diffusion of technology, environmental effects and rebound effects are the principal effects from the funding of renewable energy and energy economising. It is difficult to estimate the impact of the spread effects both prior to the measures are implemented and after the measures are carried out. Statistical methods can be used to estimate the spread effects, but they are insecure and always need to be complemented with qualitative and subjective evaluations. It is more adequate to evaluate potential spread effects from market and market data surveillance for a selection of technologies and parties. Based on this information qualitative indicators for spread effects can be constructed and used both ex ante and ex post (ml)

  4. Prevent the Spread of Norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Prevent the Spread of Norovirus Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... This leads to cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Norovirus Is the Most Common Cause of Gastroenteritis in ...

  5. Spread, estimators and nuisance parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, Edwin R. van den; Klaassen, Chris A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A general spread inequality for arbitrary estimators of a one-dimensional parameter is given. This finite-sample inequality yields bounds on the distribution of estimators in the presence of finite- or infinite-dimensional nuisance parameters.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of gastroc-soleus trigger points in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moghtaderi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The combination of ESWT for both plantar fasciitis and gastroc-soleus trigger points in treating patients with plantar fasciitis is more effective than utilizing it solely for plantar fasciitis.

  7. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture ...

  8. Random point mutations with major effects on protein-coding genes are the driving force behind premature aging in mtDNA mutator mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgar, D.; Shabalina, I.; Camara, Y.; Wredenberg, A.; Calvaruso, M.A.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Nedergaard, J.; Cannon, B.; Larsson, N.G.; Trifunovic, A.

    2009-01-01

    The mtDNA mutator mice have high levels of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA causing a progressive respiratory chain dysfunction and a premature aging phenotype. We have now performed molecular analyses to determine the mechanism whereby these mtDNA mutations impair respiratory chain

  9. Adjacent, distal, or combination of point-selective effects of acupuncture on temporomandibular joint disorders: A randomized, single-blind, assessor-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Kang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that point-selective effects among adjacent, distal, or a combination of acupoints are hardly associated with pain intensity or palpation index in participants with TMDs. Larger sample size trials are required to overcome the shortcomings of the study.

  10. How does spreading depression spread? Physiology and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; ten Haken, Bernard; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Dahlem, P.

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a wave phenomenon in gray matter tissue. Locally, it is characterized by massive redistribution of ions across cell membranes. As a consequence, there is sustained membrane depolarization and tissue polarization that depress any normal electrical activity. Despite these

  11. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  12. Effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamontree, Phanida; Kanchanakhan, Naowarat; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Jeensawek, Apichon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen on reducing upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients who were diagnosed as having upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points were randomly allocated to either a massage group using a Wilai massage stickTM or a medication group taking ibuprofen for 5 days. Both groups were advised to perform the same daily stretching exercise program. Pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, tissue hardness, and cervical range of motion were assessed at baseline, immediately after the first treatment session, and on the fifth day after the last treatment session. [Results] The massage group had significant improvement in all parameters at all assessment time points. Similar changes were observed in the medication group except for the pressure pain threshold and tissue hardness. The adjusted post-test mean values for each assessment time point were significantly better in the massage group than in the medication group. [Conclusion] Tradition Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM provides better results than taking ibuprofen for patients who have upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. It could be an alternative treatment for this patient population. PMID:26696724

  13. Effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) versus ibuprofen in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamontree, Phanida; Kanchanakhan, Naowarat; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Jeensawek, Apichon

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) versus ibuprofen on reducing upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients who were diagnosed as having upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points were randomly allocated to either a massage group using a Wilai massage stick(TM) or a medication group taking ibuprofen for 5 days. Both groups were advised to perform the same daily stretching exercise program. Pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, tissue hardness, and cervical range of motion were assessed at baseline, immediately after the first treatment session, and on the fifth day after the last treatment session. [Results] The massage group had significant improvement in all parameters at all assessment time points. Similar changes were observed in the medication group except for the pressure pain threshold and tissue hardness. The adjusted post-test mean values for each assessment time point were significantly better in the massage group than in the medication group. [Conclusion] Tradition Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) provides better results than taking ibuprofen for patients who have upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. It could be an alternative treatment for this patient population.

  14. Axonal and Transynaptic Spread of Prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Harold

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural transmission of prion diseases depends upon the spread of prions from the nervous system to excretory or secretory tissues, but the mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. Here, we examined the temporal and spatial movement of prions from the brain stem along cranial nerves into skeletal muscle as a model of axonal transport and transynaptic spread. The disease-specific isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc, was observed in nerve fibers of the tongue approximately 2 weeks prior to PrPSc deposition in skeletal muscle. Initially, PrPSc deposits had a small punctate pattern on the edge of muscle cells that colocalized with synaptophysin, a marker for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), in >50% of the cells. At later time points PrPSc was widely distributed in muscle cells, but PrPSc deposition at the NMJ, suggesting additional prion replication and dissemination within muscle cells. In contrast to the NMJ, PrPSc was not associated with synaptophysin in nerve fibers but was found to colocalize with LAMP-1 and cathepsin D during early stages of axonal spread. We propose that PrPSc-bound endosomes can lead to membrane recycling in which PrPSc is directed to the synapse, where it either moves across the NMJ into the postsynaptic muscle cell or induces PrPSc formation on muscle cells across the NMJ. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative diseases in which prion dissemination to excretory or secretory tissues is necessary for natural disease transmission. Despite the importance of this pathway, the cellular mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. This study demonstrates anterograde spread of prions within nerve fibers prior to infection of peripheral synapses (i.e., neuromuscular junction) and infection of peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle cells). Within nerve fibers prions were associated with the endosomal-lysosomal pathway prior to entry into

  15. Dual polarized, heat spreading rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Larry W. (Inventor); Khan, Abdur R. (Inventor); Smith, R. Peter (Inventor); Smith, Hugh K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An aperture coupled patch splits energy from two different polarization components to different locations to spread heat. In addition, there is no physical electrical connection between the slot, patch and circuitry. The circuitry is located under a ground plane which shields against harmonic radiation back to the RF source.

  16. Estimation of directional wave spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    that for monsoon condition, the JONSWAP spectra is suitable as the sea state was developing and young. Directional spreading function with sech super(2) (beta theta) distribution found more suitable to the present data since the data seems to have less influence...

  17. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  18. Dry needling on the infraspinatus latent and active myofascial trigger points in older adults with nonspecific shoulder pain: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Lobo, César ; Pacheco da Costa, Soraya; Martínez Martínez, Jorge; Rodríguez Sanz, David; Cuesta Álvaro, Pedro; López López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a prevalent condition in older adults. Some authors associate non-specific shoulder pain with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle. Dry needling is recommended to relieve the MTrP pain of shoulders in the short-term (< 9 days). Active MTrPs dry needling improves shoulder pain and the irritability of the satellite MTrPs in the referred pain area. Nociceptive activity at a latent MTrP may influence motor activity and the sensitivity of MTrPs in distant ...

  19. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points - a randomized intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Aagaard, Per

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes....... METHODS: Seventy-seven female office workers (25-46yrs) with and without neck/shoulder pain were observed with respect to self-reported pain (NRS-101), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), maximum voluntary contraction (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFD) at baseline (pre-intervention), immediately post......-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and...

  20. Modeling Epidemics Spreading on Social Contact Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Chonggang; Fang, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Social contact networks and the way people interact with each other are the key factors that impact on epidemics spreading. However, it is challenging to model the behavior of epidemics based on social contact networks due to their high dynamics. Traditional models such as susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model ignore the crowding or protection effect and thus has some unrealistic assumption. In this paper, we consider the crowding or protection effect and develop a novel model called improved SIR model. Then, we use both deterministic and stochastic models to characterize the dynamics of epidemics on social contact networks. The results from both simulations and real data set conclude that the epidemics are more likely to outbreak on social contact networks with higher average degree. We also present some potential immunization strategies, such as random set immunization, dominating set immunization, and high degree set immunization to further prove the conclusion.

  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  2. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads......, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases...... breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases....

  3. New PN Even Balanced Sequences for Spread-Spectrum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inácio JAL

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of pseudonoise even balanced (PN-EB binary spreading sequences is derived from existing classical odd-length families of maximum-length sequences, such as those proposed by Gold, by appending or inserting one extra-zero element (chip to the original sequences. The incentive to generate large families of PN-EB spreading sequences is motivated by analyzing the spreading effect of these sequences from a natural sampling point of view. From this analysis a new definition for PG is established, from which it becomes clear that very high processing gains (PGs can be achieved in band-limited direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS applications by using spreading sequences with zero mean, given that certain conditions regarding spectral aliasing are met. To obtain large families of even balanced (i.e., equal number of ones and zeros sequences, two design criteria are proposed, namely the ranging criterion (RC and the generating ranging criterion (GRC. PN-EB sequences in the polynomial range are derived using these criteria, and it is shown that they exhibit secondary autocorrelation and cross-correlation peaks comparable to the sequences they are derived from. The methods proposed not only facilitate the generation of large numbers of new PN-EB spreading sequences required for CDMA applications, but simultaneously offer high processing gains and good despreading characteristics in multiuser SS scenarios with band-limited noise and interference spectra. Simulation results are presented to confirm the respective claims made.

  4. Physically Protected Spread Spectrum Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    useful for the design of future efficient game theoretic FH satellite and mobile communications systems when a coherent FH modulation is employed under...of future efficient game theoretic FH satellite and mobile communications systems when a coherent FH modulation is employed under severe fading as...multiple-access (DS- CDMA ) spread spectrum (SS) waveform:  To investigate a novel, unique, simple, and anti-interference approach for SS systems so

  5. Efficacy of Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling in the Prevention of Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4–5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented. PMID:23606888

  6. Effects of the high-power pain threshold ultrasound technique in the elderly with latent myofascial trigger points: a double-blind randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin; Yang, Hong-Ryeol; Lee, Jae-Woo; Yoon, Bum-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The high-power pain threshold ultrasound (HPPTUS) technique has been introduced as a novel treatment method in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The aim of the current study was to compare the therapeutic effects of HPPTUS with those of the conventional ultrasound technique in elderly patients with latent MTrPs on the upper trapezius muscles of at least 1 side. Forty-one participants received 8 treatment sessions with conventional ultrasound (n=19) or with the HPPTUS technique (n=22) for 4 consecutive weeks. Outcome variables included visual analog scale (VAS) scores, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and range of motion (ROM). The data were analyzed using repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) measurements. The VAS scores recorded 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after HPPTUS were significantly lower than the baseline scores in both groups. The ROM (after 3 and 4 weeks) and PPT (after 4 weeks) values also significantly increased from their baseline values in both groups. On comparing the techniques, there were no significant differences in the VAS (p=0.296), PPT (p=0.768), and ROM (p=0.822) values, although both techniques showed therapeutic effects for 4 weeks (p active MTrPs is not superior to the conventional ultrasound technique in the treatment of the elderly patients with the latent MTrPs.

  7. Efficacy of myofascial trigger point dry needling in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4-5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented.

  8. Understanding control of network spreading from network controllability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng Gang; Ma, Xiaoke

    2017-09-01

    How to control the spread of an epidemic or information is a great challenge for us. A dynamic network-based system’s structural controllability provides a new way to control spreading with the minimum input of external signals, and the dynamic system is controllable if the signals can drive it from any initial state to any desired final state in finite time. Therefore, we are motivated to develop a new framework by introducing spreading networks (SNs) to describe the spreading pathways from a global view, and we try to understand the control of the spreading by the structural controllability of the SNs. The SNs are transformed from original networks, in which each node is considered as a single spreading origin. The weights of directed links pointing at its direct contacts in the SNs denote the spreading abilities, which can be determined by a new probability function. Furthermore, we also investigate the impact of the dynamics of network structures on the framework. The results show that sparse homogeneous networks with a higher transmission probability tend to trigger a larger scale of diffusion, which is easier to control. We can also see that an epidemic or information is inclined to diffuse easily on the networks with strong community strengths and heterogeneous community sizes. From the structural controllability of the SNs, we observe that driver nodes for the control of the spread tend not to be the nodes located within the core of original networks or those with high-degree. In addition, the scale of diffusion, the number of driver nodes and positions of nodes are highly associated with the degree distribution of the original networks.

  9. Information Spread of Emergency Events: Path Searching on Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan

    2014-01-01

    Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning. PMID:24600323

  10. Information spread of emergency events: path searching on social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weihui; Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan; Dai, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning.

  11. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points- a randomized intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Aagaard, Per; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2012-11-25

    In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes. Seventy-seven female office workers (25-46yrs) with and without neck/shoulder pain were observed with respect to self-reported pain (NRS-101), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), maximum voluntary contraction (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFD) at baseline (pre-intervention), immediately post-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and/or post-needling soreness had developed. Muscle contractile characteristics did not differ between groups at baseline. Forty-six individuals developed muscle soreness (39 from mechanical testing and seven from needling). No inter-group differences were observed post-intervention for Fmax or RFD for the four sub-groups. Over the observation period, symptomatic participants reported less pain from both SDN (p= 0.003) and DDN (p=0.011). However, PPT levels were reduced for all participants (p=0.029). Those reporting DOMS experienced significant decreases in PPT, irrespective of symptom state or intervention (p=0.001). In selected female neck/shoulder pain sufferers, maximum voluntary contraction and rapid force generation of the upper Trapezius was not influenced by clinically relevant self-reported pain or the presence of diagnostically relevant MFTrPs. Dry needling, deep or superficial, did not affect measured functional outcomes over the 48-hour observation period. DOMS affected participants uniformly irrespective of pain, MFTrP status or intervention type and therefore is like to act as a

  12. Heart Rate Variability and Hemodynamic Change in the Superior Mesenteric Artery by Acupuncture Stimulation of Lower Limb Points: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We investigated the relationship between superior mesenteric artery blood flow volume (SMA BFV and autonomic nerve activity in acupuncture stimulation of lower limb points through heart rate variability (HRV evaluations. Methods. Twenty-six healthy volunteers underwent crossover applications of bilateral manual acupuncture stimulation at ST36 or LR3 or no stimulation. Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, SMA BFV, and HRV at rest and 30 min after the intervention were analyzed. Results. SMA BFV showed a significant increase after ST36 stimulation (0% to 14.1% ± 23.4%, P=0.007; very low frequency (VLF, high frequency (HF, low frequency (LF, and LF/HF were significantly greater than those at rest (0% to 479.4% ± 1185.6%, P=0.045; 0% to 78.9% ± 197.6%, P=0.048; 0% to 123.9% ± 217.1%, P=0.006; 0% to 71.5% ± 171.1%, P=0.039. Changes in HF and LF also differed significantly from those resulting from LR3 stimulation (HF: 78.9% ± 197.6% versus −18.2% ± 35.8%, P=0.015; LF: 123.9% ± 217.1% versus 10.6% ± 70.6%, P=0.013. Conclusion. Increased vagus nerve activity after ST36 stimulation resulted in increased SMA BFV. This partly explains the mechanism of acupuncture-induced BFV changes.

  13. The Effect of Acupressure at the 3rd Point of liver Channel on Quality of Life of Female Students with Primary Dysmenorrhea in Tehran Teacher Training Center in 2008: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Dysmenorrhea affects women’s quality of life; moreover it results in physical, mental, social and economical problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure at the third point of liver channel (liv3 on quality of life in female students of Tehran Teaching Training (Tarbiat Moallem Center with primary dysmenorrhea.Methods: This single-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 194 female students of Nasibeh Tarbiat Moallem center in Tehran who had had inclusion criteria. In the first cycle, the severity and duration of pain and quality of life were determined. Therefore, the participants were randomly assigned to either experimental or control group. In the second, third and fourth cycles, acupressure at liv3 and placebo point during 3-7 days before menstruation for 20 minute were carried out. In the fourth cycle, participants completed SF-36 questionnaire after menstruation again. Data-gathering Instruments used in this study included wrong-Baker faces pain scale,Beck-21 questionarre, SF-36 questionnaire, clock, Acuhealth tens pro 900 set, force guage. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 and x2 test, Man Whitney U, independent and paired test. P values were set as 0.05(p0.05 but there was a significant difference in mean quality of life dimension between two groups in the fourth cycle (p0.05. Moreover, there was no significant difference between two cycles in Role Emotional functioning and social functioning dimensions in experimental group (p>0.05.Conclusion: with regard to the results of this study, acupressure at liv3 point is suggested as useful, effective, cheap and available treatment for primary dysmenorrhea.

  14. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  15. Spread Spectrum Modulation by Using Asymmetric-Carrier Random PWM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, Laszlo; Lungeanu, Florin; Sera, Dezso

    2012-01-01

    is very effective and is independent from the modulation index. The flat motor current spectrum generates an acoustical noise close to the white noise, which improves the acoustical performance of the drive. The new carrier wave is easy to implement digitally, without employing any external circuits...

  16. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  18. From margarine to butter: predictors of changing bread spread in an 11-year population follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prättälä, Ritva; Levälahti, Esko; Lallukka, Tea; Männistö, Satu; Paalanen, Laura; Raulio, Susanna; Roos, Eva; Suominen, Sakari; Mäki-Opas, Tomi

    2016-06-01

    Finland is known for a sharp decrease in the intake of saturated fat and cardiovascular mortality. Since 2000, however, the consumption of butter-containing spreads - an important source of saturated fats - has increased. We examined social and health-related predictors of the increase among Finnish men and women. An 11-year population follow-up. A representative random sample of adult Finns, invited to a health survey in 2000. Altogether 5414 persons aged 30-64 years at baseline in 2000 were re-invited in 2011. Of men 1529 (59 %) and of women 1853 (66 %) answered the questions on bread spreads at both time points. Respondents reported the use of bread spreads by choosing one of the following alternatives: no fat, soft margarine, butter-vegetable oil mixture and butter, which were later categorized into margarine/no spread and butter/butter-vegetable oil mixture (= butter). The predictors included gender, age, marital status, education, employment status, place of residence, health behaviours, BMI and health. Multinomial regression models were fitted. Of the 2582 baseline margarine/no spread users, 24.6% shifted to butter. Only a few of the baseline sociodemographic or health-related determinants predicted the change. Finnish women were more likely to change to butter than men. Living with a spouse predicted the change among men. The change from margarine to butter between 2000 and 2011 seemed not to be a matter of compliance with official nutrition recommendations. Further longitudinal studies on social, behavioural and motivational predictors of dietary changes are needed.

  19. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  20. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line.

  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  2. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  3. Epidemic spread on weighted networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Kamp

    Full Text Available The contact structure between hosts shapes disease spread. Most network-based models used in epidemiology tend to ignore heterogeneity in the weighting of contacts between two individuals. However, this assumption is known to be at odds with the data for many networks (e.g. sexual contact networks and to have a critical influence on epidemics' behavior. One of the reasons why models usually ignore heterogeneity in transmission is that we currently lack tools to analyze weighted networks, such that most studies rely on numerical simulations. Here, we present a novel framework to estimate key epidemiological variables, such as the rate of early epidemic expansion (r0 and the basic reproductive ratio (R0, from joint probability distributions of number of partners (contacts and number of interaction events through which contacts are weighted. These distributions are much easier to infer than the exact shape of the network, which makes the approach widely applicable. The framework also allows for a derivation of the full time course of epidemic prevalence and contact behaviour, which we validate with numerical simulations on networks. Overall, incorporating more realistic contact networks into epidemiological models can improve our understanding of the emergence and spread of infectious diseases.

  4. Spreading Astronomy Education Through Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, P.

    2006-08-01

    Although Astronomy has been an important vehicle for effectively passing a wide range of scientific knowledge, teaching the basic skills of scientific reasoning, and for communicating the excitement of science to the public, its inclusion in the teaching curricula of most institutions of higher learning in Africa is rare. This is partly due to the fact that astronomy appears to be only good at fascinating people but not providing paid jobs. It is also due to the lack of trained instructors, teaching materials, and a clear vision of the role of astronomy and basic space science within the broader context of education in the physical and applied sciences. In this paper we survey some of the problems bedeviling the spread of astronomy in Africa and discuss some interdisciplinary traditional weather indicators. These indicators have been used over the years to monitor the appearance of constellations. For example, orions are closely intertwined with cultures of some ethnic African societies and could be incorporated in the standard astronomy curriculum as away of making the subject more `home grown' and to be able to reach out to the wider populace in popularizing astronomy and basic sciences. We also discuss some of the other measures that ought to be taken to effectively create an enabling environment for sustainable teaching and spread of astronomy through Africa.

  5. The Spread of Nezara viridula (Hemiptera:Pentatomidae Species from its First Occurrence in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Grozea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lately in horticultural agroecosystems from Romania joined several insect species autochthonous. Among these is a species of bugs known as southern green stink bugs or Nezara viridula L. (Insecta: Hemiptera: Pentatomidae. Unlike other new entrants this bug species has a diversified polifagism being present in many plants but obvious damage produce only tomato fruit. The causes are unknown. Can be found in gardens, green spaces and parks. Often is observed in vegetable gardens where populations comprise all stages (egg, larva/nymph, adult. Although it has African origins of a warm area is interesting installation and survival in temperate zones like those in Europe. Presence in Europe appears to be more random which excludes primarily spread through the neighborhood. By observations made in west of Romania, during 2010-2015 we wanted to watch the evolution of the insect from the first point of occurrence (Timișoara, 2010. Also, were monitored tomato crops and ornamentals in gardens and green spaces from 5 counties. Only in four monitored counties it was observed this species. Most adults and larvae were registered in Timis county (5-6 adults or 7-8 larvae/tomato plant and 10 -11 adults or 15-20 larvae/ornamental shrub. In our country the insect has proven to be capable of a rapid spread in a relatively short time interval including surrounding counties.

  6. Short-term changes in neck pain, widespread pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion after the application of trigger point dry needling in patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuto-Vázquez, María J; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2014-04-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To determine the effects of trigger point dry needling (TrPDN) on neck pain, widespread pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute mechanical neck pain and active trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. TrPDN seems to be effective for decreasing pain in individuals with upper-quadrant pain syndromes. Potential effects of TrPDN for decreasing pain and sensitization in individuals with acute mechanical neck pain are needed. Methods Seventeen patients (53% female) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: a single session of TrPDN or no intervention (waiting list). Pressure pain thresholds over the C5-6 zygapophyseal joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle; neck pain intensity; and cervical spine range-of-motion data were collected at baseline (pretreatment) and 10 minutes and 1 week after the intervention by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation of the patient. Mixed-model analyses of variance were used to examine the effects of treatment on each outcome variable. Patients treated with 1 session of TrPDN experienced greater decreases in neck pain, greater increases in pressure pain threshold, and higher increases in cervical range of motion than those who did not receive an intervention at both 10 minutes and 1 week after the intervention (Pneck pain intensity and widespread pressure pain sensitivity, and also increase active cervical range of motion, in patients with acute mechanical neck pain. Changes in pain, pressure pain threshold, and cervical range of motion surpassed their respective minimal detectable change values, supporting clinically relevant treatment effects. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b-.

  7. Quantifier spreading: children misled by ostensive cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin É. Kiss

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper calls attention to a methodological problem of acquisition experiments. It shows that the economy of the stimulus employed in child language experiments may lend an increased ostensive effect to the message communicated to the child. Thus, when the visual stimulus in a sentence-picture matching task is a minimal model abstracting away from the details of the situation, children often regard all the elements of the stimulus as ostensive clues to be represented in the corresponding sentence. The use of such minimal stimuli is mistaken when the experiment aims to test whether or not a certain element of the stimulus is relevant for the linguistic representation or interpretation. The paper illustrates this point by an experiment involving quantifier spreading. It is claimed that children find a universally quantified sentence like 'Every girl is riding a bicycle 'to be a false description of a picture showing three girls riding bicycles and a solo bicycle because they are misled to believe that all the elements in the visual stimulus are relevant, hence all of them are to be represented by the corresponding linguistic description. When the iconic drawings were replaced by photos taken in a natural environment rich in accidental details, the occurrence of quantifier spreading was radically reduced. It is shown that an extra object in the visual stimulus can lead to the rejection of the sentence also in the case of sentences involving no quantification, which gives further support to the claim that the source of the problem is not (or not only the grammatical or cognitive difficulty of quantification but the unintended ostensive effect of the extra object.  This article is part of the special collection: Acquisition of Quantification

  8. Rumor spreading in gaming social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yichao; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2011-01-01

    So far, the focus on rumor spreading are mainly on some simple backgrounds, in other words, only taking consideration of the overall topological influences on its dynamical behavior. However, in the prospect of the individuality, personal strategies in the social networks play a more non-trivial role in the real social networks. To fill this gap, we will investigate the rumor spreading in gaming social networks. Our analysis is supported by the results of numerical simulations. We observe that the original rumor is still the most well known edition in case that the content is modified by the defectors. However, the portion decays with the stimulus generally. For the case that defectors keep silence in the spreading process, the scale of spreading decays with stimulus generally, suggesting the rumor can hardly spread in a community of defectors. This highlights the key role that stimulus plays in rumor spreading and the necessity to study information spreading in competitive circumstances.

  9. Randomized comparison of new dual-antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, prasugrel) and triple-antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol) using P2Y12 point-of-care assay in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Hyun; Jin, Han-Young; Choi, Kyu-Nam; Do, Ungjeong; Kim, Hyung Jun; Chung, Sang-Ryul; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Jang, Jae-Sik; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2013-09-20

    Both new dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT; aspirin and prasugrel) and triple antiplatelet therapy (TAT; aspirin, clopidogrel and cilostazol) are more potent than classic DAT (aspirin and clopidogrel). We compared the antiplatelet efficacy between new DAT and TAT in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary coronary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Forty patients who were eligible for primary PCI were prospectively randomized to DAT group (n=20) or TAT group (n=20) immediately after hospital arrival. The primary end point was P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) determined with the VerifyNow P2Y12 point-of-care assay at the time of discharge. PRU value at discharge was significantly lower in patients receiving DAT compared with that of TAT (84.5 ± 44.7 vs. 128.4 ± 74.9, p=0.032). Percent platelet inhibition was significantly higher for DAT compared with TAT at discharge (72.1 ± 12.2 vs. 57.5 ± 23.5, p=0.020). Inter-patient variability of PRU values at discharge was significantly smaller in patient taking DAT compared with TAT (p=0.026). A new DAT is more potent antiplatelet therapy than TAT in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Screen-and-treat program by point-of-care of Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis in preventing preterm birth (AuTop trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretelle, Florence; Fenollar, Florence; Baumstarck, Karine; Fortanier, Cécile; Cocallemen, Jean François; Serazin, Valérie; Raoult, Didier; Auquier, Pascal; Loubière, Sandrine

    2015-10-19

    International recommendations in favor of screening for vaginal infection in pregnancy are based on heterogeneous criteria. In most developed countries, the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is only recommended for women with high-risk of preterm birth. The Nugent score is currently used, but molecular quantification tools have recently been reported with a high sensitivity and specificity. Their value for reducing preterm birth rates and related complications remains unexplored. This trial was designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of a systematic screen-and-treat program based on a point-of-care technique for rapid molecular diagnosis, immediately followed by an appropriate antibiotic treatment, to detect the presence of abnormal vaginal flora (specifically, Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis) before 20 weeks of gestation in pregnant women in France. We hypothesized that this program would translate into significant reductions in both the rate of preterm births and the medical costs associated with preterm birth. A multicenter, open-label randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted in which 20 French obstetrics and gynecology centers will recruit eligible pregnant women at less than 20 weeks gestation with singleton pregnancy and with a low-risk factor for preterm birth. Interventions will include a) an experimental group that will receive a systematic rapid screen-and-treat program from a point-of-care analysis using a molecular quantification method and b) a control group that will receive usual care management. Randomization will be in a 1:1 allocation ratio. The primary endpoint that will be assessed over a period of 12 months will be the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) expressed as cost per avoided preterm birth before 37 weeks. Secondary endpoints will include ICER per avoided preterm birth before 24, 28 and 32 weeks, obstetrical outcomes, neonatal outcomes, rates of treatment failure and recurrence episodes for positive women

  11. The Tipping Point in School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jeff; Hill, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Once changes or innovations reach the tipping point, they spread throughout an organization and become entrenched as part of the culture, becoming "just the way we do things around here." These authors see the tipping point at play with systemic improvement in two urban school districts with which they have worked. Here, they describe…

  12. Modelling power-law spread of infectious diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Short-time human travel behaviour can be well described by a power law with respect to distance. We incorporate this information in space-time models for infectious disease surveillance data to better capture the dynamics of disease spread. Two previously established model classes are extended, which both decompose disease risk additively into endemic and epidemic components: a space-time point process model for individual point-referenced data, and a multivariate time series model for aggregated count data. In both frameworks, the power-law spread is embedded into the epidemic component and its decay parameter is estimated simultaneously with all other unknown parameters using (penalised) likelihood inference. The performance of the new approach is investigated by a re-analysis of individual cases of invasive meningococcal disease in Germany (2002-2008), and count data on influenza in 140 administrative districts of Southern Germany (2001-2008). In both applications, the power-law formulations substantially ...

  13. The Effect of Acupressure at the 3rd Point of liver Channel on Quality of Life of Female Students with Primary Dysmenorrhea in Tehran Teacher Training Center in 2008: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    f Bazarganipour

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Dysmenorrhea affects women’s quality of life; moreover it results in physical, mental, social and economical problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure at the third point of liver channel (liv3 on quality of life in female students of Tehran Teaching Training (Tarbiat Moallem Center with primary dysmenorrhea. Methods: This single-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 194 female students of Nasibeh Tarbiat Moallem center in Tehran who had had inclusion criteria. In the first cycle, the severity and duration of pain and quality of life were determined. Therefore, the participants were randomly assigned to either experimental or control group. In the second, third and fourth cycles, acupressure at liv3 and placebo point during 3-7 days before menstruation for 20 minute were carried out. In the fourth cycle, participants completed SF-36 questionnaire after menstruation again. Data-gathering Instruments used in this study included wrong-Baker faces pain scale,Beck-21 questionarre, SF-36 questionnaire, clock, Acuhealth tens pro 900 set, force guage. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 and x2 test, Man Whitney U, independent and paired test. P values were set as 0.05(p<0.05. Results: There was no significant difference in mean quality of life dimension between two groups in the first cycle (p>0.05 but there was a significant difference in mean quality of life dimension between two groups in the fourth cycle (p<0.05. The comparison between the first and the fourth cycle in two group showed a significant difference in all dimension (p<0.05 but there was not any significant difference between two cycles in Role Emotional functioning dimension in experimental group (p>0.05. Moreover, there was no significant difference between two cycles in Role Emotional functioning and social functioning dimensions

  14. Efficacy and tolerability balance of oxycodone/naloxone and tapentadol in chronic low back pain with a neuropathic component: a blinded end point analysis of randomly selected routine data from 12-week prospective open-label observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueberall MA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Ueberall,1 Gerhard H H Mueller-Schwefe2 1Institute of Neurological Sciences, Nuernberg, Germany; 2Interdisciplinary Center for Pain and Palliative Care Medicine, Goeppingen, Germany Objective: To evaluate the benefit–risk profile (BRP of oxycodone/naloxone (OXN and tapentadol (TAP in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP with a neuropathic component (NC in routine clinical practice. Methods: This was a blinded end point analysis of randomly selected 12-week routine/open-label data of the German Pain Registry on adult patients with cLBP-NC who initiated an index treatment in compliance with the current German prescribing information between 1st January and 31st October 2015 (OXN/TAP, n=128/133. Primary end point was defined as a composite of three efficacy components (≥30% improvement of pain, pain-related disability, and quality of life each at the end of observation vs baseline and three tolerability components (normal bowel function, absence of either central nervous system side effects, and treatment-emergent adverse event [TEAE]-related treatment discontinuation during the observation period adopted to reflect BRP assessments under real-life conditions. Results: Demographic as well as baseline and pretreatment characteristics were comparable for the randomly selected data sets of both index groups without any indicators for critical selection biases. Treatment with OXN resulted formally in a BRP noninferior to that of TAP and showed a significantly higher primary end point response vs TAP (39.8% vs 25.6%, odds ratio: 1.93; P=0.014, due to superior analgesic effects. Between-group differences increased with stricter response definitions for all three efficacy components in favor of OXN: ≥30%/≥50%/≥70% response rates for OXN vs TAP were seen for pain intensity in 85.2%/67.2%/39.1% vs 83.5%/54.1%/15.8% (P= ns/0.031/<0.001, for pain-related disability in 78.1%/64.8%/43.8% vs 66.9%/50.4%/24.8% (P=0.043/0.018/0.001, and for

  15. Random triangles

    OpenAIRE

    Matula, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    The author summarizes some previous results concerning random triangles. He describes the Gaussian triangle and random triangles whose vertices lie in a unit n-dimensional ball, in a rectangle or in a general bounded convex set. In the second part, the author deals with an inscribed triangle in a triangle - let ABC be an equilateral triangle and let M, N, O be three points, each laying on one side of the ABC. We call MNO inscribed triangle (in an equi- laterral triangle). The median triangle ...

  16. Epidemic Modelling by Ripple-Spreading Network and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical analysis and modelling is central to infectious disease epidemiology. This paper, inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, proposes a novel ripple-spreading network model for the study of infectious disease transmission. The new epidemic model naturally has good potential for capturing many spatial and temporal features observed in the outbreak of plagues. In particular, using a stochastic ripple-spreading process simulates the effect of random contacts and movements of individuals on the probability of infection well, which is usually a challenging issue in epidemic modeling. Some ripple-spreading related parameters such as threshold and amplifying factor of nodes are ideal to describe the importance of individuals’ physical fitness and immunity. The new model is rich in parameters to incorporate many real factors such as public health service and policies, and it is highly flexible to modifications. A genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of the model by referring to historic data of an epidemic. The well-tuned model can then be used for analyzing and forecasting purposes. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by simulation results.

  17. New PN Even Balanced Sequences for Spread-Spectrum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inácio J. A. L.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of pseudonoise even balanced (PN-EB binary spreading sequences is derived from existing classical odd-length families of maximum-length sequences, such as those proposed by Gold, by appending or inserting one extra-zero element (chip to the original sequences. The incentive to generate large families of PN-EB spreading sequences is motivated by analyzing the spreading effect of these sequences from a natural sampling point of view. From this analysis a new definition for PG is established, from which it becomes clear that very high processing gains (PGs can be achieved in band-limited direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS applications by using spreading sequences with zero mean, given that certain conditions regarding spectral aliasing are met. To obtain large families of even balanced (i.e., equal number of ones and zeros sequences, two design criteria are proposed, namely the ranging criterion (RC and the generating ranging criterion (GRC. PN-EB sequences in the polynomial range 3 ≤ n ≤ 6 are derived using these criteria, and it is shown that they exhibit secondary autocorrelation and cross-correlation peaks comparable to the sequences they are derived from. The methods proposed not only facilitate the generation of large numbers of new PN-EB spreading sequences required for CDMA applications, but simultaneously offer high processing gains and good despreading characteristics in multiuser SS scenarios with band-limited noise and interference spectra. Simulation results are presented to confirm the respective claims made.

  18. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinghong; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  19. Point of care susceptibility testing in primary care - does it lead to a more appropriate prescription of antibiotics in patients with uncomplicated urinary tract infections? Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Sørensen, Tina Møller; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Siersma, Volkert; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-08-21

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection in primary care and is the second leading reason for prescription of antibiotics in Denmark. The diagnosis is often based on symptoms and urine dip-stick, which has limited validity, causing the risk of unnecessary antibiotic prescription. Additionally, with increasing antibiotic resistance, the risk of choosing an antibiotic to which an infecting pathogen is resistant is rising. Combined point-of-care-tests (POCT) for urine culture and susceptibility testing have been developed and validated for primary care, and performing such a test in all patients with suspected UTI in primary care seems rational in order to reduce the use of inappropriate antibiotics. However, the clinical effect of the culture and susceptibility test has not yet been investigated. This study aims to investigate whether POCT urine culture and susceptibility testing decreases the inappropriate use of antibiotics and leads to faster patient recovery. Randomized controlled open label trial of two diagnostic approaches. 750 patients with symptoms of uncomplicated UTI, consecutively contacting their general practitioner (GP), randomized to either POCT urine culture and susceptibility testing and targeted treatment or POCT urine culture without susceptibility testing and empirical treatment. Treatment is started when the POCT is read. The two groups are compared with regard to appropriate choice of antibiotics, clinical remission, and microbiological cure rates. The results of this study may provide important evidence to recommend POCT culture and susceptibility testing in all patients with suspected uncomplicated UTI. This could become an additional strategy to fight antibiotic resistance. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02323087 .

  20. Mass media influence spreading in social networks with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candia, Julián; Mazzitello, Karina I.

    2008-07-01

    We study an extension of Axelrod's model for social influence, in which cultural drift is represented as random perturbations, while mass media are introduced by means of an external field. In this scenario, we investigate how the modular structure of social networks affects the propagation of mass media messages across a society. The community structure of social networks is represented by coupled random networks, in which two random graphs are connected by intercommunity links. Considering inhomogeneous mass media fields, we study the conditions for successful message spreading and find a novel phase diagram in the multidimensional parameter space. These findings show that social modularity effects are of paramount importance for designing successful, cost-effective advertising campaigns.

  1. Two-dimensional ultrasound and ultrasound elastography imaging of trigger points in women with myofascial pain syndrome treated by acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Cristina Emöke Erika; Aranha, Maria Fernanda Montans; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2015-04-01

    Chronic pain has been often associated with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), which is determined by myofascial trigger points (MTrP). New features have been tested for MTrP diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate two-dimensional ultrasonography (2D US) and ultrasound elastography (UE) images and elastograms of upper trapezius MTrP during electroacupuncture (EA) and acupuncture (AC) treatment. 24 women participated, aged between 20 and 40 years (M ± SD = 27.33 ± 5.05) with a body mass index ranging from 18.03 to 27.59 kg/m2 (22.59 ± 3.11), a regular menstrual cycle, at least one active MTrP at both right (RTPz) and left trapezius (LTPz) and local or referred pain for up to six months. Subjects were randomized into EA and AC treatment groups and the control sham AC (SHAM) group. Intensity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale; MTrP mean area and strain ratio (SR) by 2D US and UE. A significant decrease of intensity in general, RTPz, and LTPz pain was observed in the EA group (p = 0.027; p pain in the AC group (p < 0.001). Decreased MTrP area in RTPz and LTPz were observed in AC (p < 0.001) and EA groups (RTPz, p = 0.003; LTPz, p = 0.005). Post-treatment SR in RTPz and LTPz was lower than pre-treatment in both treatment groups. 2D US and UE effectively characterized MTrP and surrounding tissue, pointing to the possibility of objective confirmation of subjective EA and AC treatment effects. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Term structure of sovereign spreads: a contingent claim model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Rocha

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a simple structural model to estimate the termstructure and the implied default probability of a selected group of emerging countries, which account for 54% of the JPMorgan EMBIG index on average for the period 2000-2005. The real exchange rate dynamic, modeled as a pure diffusion process, is assumed to trigger default. The calibrated model generates sovereign spread curves consistent to market data. The results suggest that the market is systematically overpricing spreads for Brazil in 100 basis points, whereas for Mexico, Russia and Turkey the model is able to reproduce the market behavior.Este trabalho propõe um modelo estrutural para estimar a estrutura a termo e a probabilidade implícita de default de países emergentes que representam, em média, 54% do índice EMBIG do JPMorgan no período de 2000-2005. A taxa de câmbio real, modelada como um processo de difusão simples, é considerada como indicativa de default. O modelo calibrado gera a estrutura a termo dos spreads consistente com dados de mercado, indicando que o mercado sistematicamente sobre-estima os spreads para o Brasil em 100 pontos base na média, enquanto para México, Rússia e Turquia reproduz o comportamento do mercado.

  3. Spreading tendencies of multiflora rose in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosene, W.

    1950-01-01

    In 1948-49 studies were made on the spreading of multiflora rose at the sites of three old plantings in Alabama and Georgia. The age of these plantings varied from 14-40 years. Roses were invading surrounding land at each site. Observations indicated that seeds are carried by water and birds. Seedlings were numerous in drainageways leading from old shrubs. Birds had deposited seed under trees, in thickets, and along hedgerows. Seedlings growing under a single tree varied in number from a few to 50. Two rose bushes were found under a tree a mile from the probable point of origin. Seedlings were spreading in unimproved pastures by growing in thickets where they were protected from grazing and mowing. Plants were not found in cultivated fields. Spreading was similar near all three locations in like plant communities. Competition from trees affected multiflora more than that of any other type of vegetation. Plants thrive in pine woodlands with an open canopy, but growth is weak in a thick hardwood stand. Control will be necessary if multiflora rose is to be kept from spreading in idle land and unimproved pastures.

  4. Sensory evaluation of commercial fat spreads based on oilseeds and walnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Etelka B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this study was on the sensory evaluation of commercial oilseeds spreads, as the most significant characteristic of this type of product from the consumers’ point of view. Sensory analysis was conducted by five experts using a quantitative descriptive and sensory profile test, applying a scoring method according to the standard procedure. Five different spreads were evaluated: sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, peanut, and walnut. Oil content and amounts of separated oil on the surface were determined for each spread. The results have shown that the color of spreads was very different, depending on the oilseed: gray for sunflower, brown for walnut, yellowish-brown for peanut butter, ivory for sesame and profoundly dark green for pumpkin seeds spread. The flavor and odor of the spreads were characteristic for the raw materials used; however, the sunflower and walnut spreads had a slight rancid flavor. Generally, the spreadability of all spreads was good, but their mouth feel was not acceptable. During the consumption, all of them were sticking immensely to the roof of the mouth, which made the swallowing harder. The highest total score of 16.20 points (max. 20 was obtained for the peanut butter, while the lowest (10.38 was achieved by the sunflower butter. Oil separation (various degrees was noticed in all spreads, which negatively influenced the appearance and entire sensorial quality of the products. The quantity of separated oil depended on the age and total amount of oil in the spreads, and was between 1.13% in the peanut butter and 12.15% in the walnut spread in reference to the net weight of the product. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31014: Development of the new functional confectionery products based on oil crops

  5. Olive oil in food spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids is a commonly applied reaction to food industries. The process may imply the movement of double bonds in their positions on the fatty acid carbon chain, producing positional and geometrical isomers ( trans fatty acids. Through hydrogenation, unsaturated oils are converted to margarines and vegetable shortenings. The presence of trans fatty acids in foods is undesirable, as trans fatty acids raise the plasma levels of total and low-density lipoproteins (LDL, while decrease the plasma level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL, among other effects. The use of olive oil to prepare fat spread opens new insights into the commercial development of healthy novel foods with a positive image in terms of consumer appeal.La hidrogenación química de los ácidos grasos insaturados es una reacción que se utiliza con frecuencia en la industria alimentaria. El proceso implica el movimiento de los dobles enlaces en la cadena hidrocarbonada de los ácidos grasos, y la aparición de isómeros posicionales y geométricos (ácidos grasos trans . La ingesta inadecuada de alimentos que pueden contener cantidades significativas de ácidos grasos trans se asocia con el aumento en sangre de colesterol total y LDL, y la disminución de HDL, entre otros efectos. Por lo tanto, el uso de aceite de oliva en la preparación de grasas para untar constituye un importante avance en el desarrollo comercial de nuevos alimentos saludables con una imagen positiva para el consumidor.

  6. An analysis of noise reduction in variable reluctance motors using pulse position randomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Melissa C.

    1994-05-01

    The design and implementation of a control system to introduce randomization into the control of a variable reluctance motor (VRM) is presented. The goal is to reduce noise generated by radial vibrations of the stator. Motor phase commutation angles are dithered by 1 or 2 mechanical degrees to investigate the effect of randomization on acoustic noise. VRM commutation points are varied using a uniform probability density function and a 4 state Markov chain among other methods. The theory of VRM and inverter operation and a derivation of the major source of acoustic noise are developed. The experimental results show the effects of randomization. Uniform dithering and Markov chain dithering both tend to spread the noise spectrum, reducing peak noise components. No clear evidence is found to determine which is the optimum randomization scheme. The benefit of commutation angle randomization in reducing VRM loudness as perceived by humans is found to be questionable.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Single Botulinum Toxin Type A (Botox®) Injection for Relief of Upper Trapezius Myofascial Trigger Point: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwanchuay, Photsawee; Petchnumsin, Thavatchai; Yiemsiri, Pichet; Pasuk, Nakkamol; Srikanok, Wannarat; Hathaiareerug, Chanasak

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum toxin injection has been applied for pain relief in various chronic pain syndromes. Recently, systematic review studies reported inconclusive effects of Botulinum toxin in myofascial pain management. The present study aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of Botulinum toxin type A (BTxA) (Botox®) injection for pain reduction in myofascial trigger point (MTrP) of the upper trapezius muscle. Thirty-three patients with 48 MTrP on the upper trapezius muscles over three months with moderate to severe pain intensity diagnosed at physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient department were recruited between December 2011 and March 2012. Eligible patients were blinded and randomly injected with single 0.2 ml (20 IU) of BTxA for 24 MTrP and 0.2 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution for 24 MTrP at the most tender trigger point on the upper trapezius muscle. All patients were advised for stretching exercise and ergonomic adaptation throughout the study. At 3- and 6-week after injections, visual analogue scale (VAS), the pressure pain threshold (PPT), and reported adverse effects were measured. Both BTxA and control groups demonstrated statistically significant differences in VAS reduction and increased PPT after 3 weeks and 6 weeks compared with before treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in VAS reduction from baseline between the two groups at 3- and 6-week after treatment. A statistically significant difference in improvement of PPT from baseline and 6-week after BTxA injection compared with 0.9% NaCl group was shown (1.0 ± 0.9 and 0.5 ± 0.7, p = 0.036). There was mild degree side-effects that spontaneous resolved within one week in both groups without significant difference in percentage. No severe adverse effects were reported during the study. The efficacy in VAS reduction of a single 20 IU of Botulinum toxin type A (Botox®) injection was not different from 0.9% NaCl for myofascial trigger point at the upper trapezius muscle. However

  8. Short-term vitamin D3 supplementation lowers plasma renin activity in patients with stable chronic heart failure: an open-label, blinded end point, randomized prospective trial (VitD-CHF trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroten, Nicolas F; Ruifrok, Willem P T; Kleijn, Lennaert; Dokter, Martin M; Silljé, Herman H; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kema, Ido P; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2013-08-01

    Many chronic heart failure (CHF) patients have low vitamin D (VitD) and high plasma renin activity (PRA), which are both associated with poor prognosis. Vitamin D may inhibit renin transcription and lower PRA. We investigated whether vitamin D3 (VitD3) supplementation lowers PRA in CHF patients. We conducted a single-center, open-label, blinded end point trial in 101 stable CHF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Patients were randomized to 6 weeks of 2,000 IU oral VitD3 daily or control. At baseline, mean age was 64 ± 10 years, 93% male, left ventricular ejection fraction 35% ± 8%, and 56% had VitD deficiency. The geometric mean (95% CI) of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 increased from 48 nmol/L (43-54) at baseline to 80 nmol/L (75-87) after 6 weeks in the VitD3 treatment group and decreased from 47 nmol/L (42-53) to 44 nmol/L (39-49) in the control group (P CHF patients had VitD deficiency and high PRA levels. Six weeks of supplementation with 2,000 IU VitD3 increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels and decreased PRA and plasma renin concentration. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure breathing increases the spread of sensory blockade after low-thoracic epidural injection of lidocaine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Giele, J.L.P.

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting the distribution of sensory blockade after epidural injection of local anesthetics remain incompletely clarified. To evaluate if increasing intrathoracic pressure affects the spread of thoracic epidural anesthesia, we randomized 20 patients who received an epidural catheter at the

  10. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Tang, Ming-Jer; Huang, Jong-Shin; Su, Fong-Chin

    2010-12-21

    Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs). Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT) and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT). The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area), cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then declined as

  11. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs. Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT. The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area, cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then

  12. Age, spreading rates, and spreading asymmetry of the world's ocean crust

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The authors present four companion digital models of the age, age uncertainty, spreading rates and spreading asymmetries of the world's ocean basins as geographic...

  13. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-12-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process.

  14. Modelling unidirectional liquid spreading on slanted microposts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Blow, Matthew L.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2013-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann algorithm is used to simulate the slow spreading of drops on a surface patterned with slanted micro-posts. Gibb's pinning of the interface on the sides or top of the posts leads to unidirectional spreading over a wide range of contact angles and inclination angles of the posts...

  15. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschut, Liesbeth I; Addink, Elisabeth A; Heesterbeek, Hans; Heier, Lise; Laudisoit, Anne; Begon, Mike; Davis, Stephen; Dubyanskiy, Vladimir M; Burdelov, Leonid A; de Jong, Steven M

    2013-10-31

    Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed - the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) - to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and barriers showed a mostly NWSE

  16. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Methods Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed – the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) – to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. Results The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and

  17. SPREAD: spatial phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, Filip; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe

    2011-10-15

    SPREAD is a user-friendly, cross-platform application to analyze and visualize Bayesian phylogeographic reconstructions incorporating spatial-temporal diffusion. The software maps phylogenies annotated with both discrete and continuous spatial information and can export high-dimensional posterior summaries to keyhole markup language (KML) for animation of the spatial diffusion through time in virtual globe software. In addition, SPREAD implements Bayes factor calculation to evaluate the support for hypotheses of historical diffusion among pairs of discrete locations based on Bayesian stochastic search variable selection estimates. SPREAD takes advantage of multicore architectures to process large joint posterior distributions of phylogenies and their spatial diffusion and produces visualizations as compelling and interpretable statistical summaries for the different spatial projections. SPREAD is licensed under the GNU Lesser GPL and its source code is freely available as a GitHub repository: https://github.com/phylogeography/SPREAD CONTACT: filip.bielejec@rega.kuleuven.be.

  18. Spread and Liquidity Issues: A markets comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strašek Sebastjan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The financial crises are closely connected with spread changes and liquidity issues. After defining and addressing spread considerations, we research in this paper the topic of liquidity issues in times of economic crisis. We analyse the liquidity effects as recorded on spreads of securities from different markets. We stipulate that higher international risk aversion in times of financial crises coincides with widening security spreads. The paper then introduces liquidity as a risk factor into the standard value-at-risk framework, using GARCH methodology. The comparison of results of these models suggests that the size of the tested markets does not have a strong effect on the models. Thus, we find that spread analysis is an appropriate tool for analysing liquidity issues during a financial crisis.

  19. SEIR Model of Rumor Spreading in Online Social Network with Varying Total Population Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suyalatu; Deng, Yan-Bin; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2017-10-01

    Based on the infectious disease model with disease latency, this paper proposes a new model for the rumor spreading process in online social network. In this paper what we establish an SEIR rumor spreading model to describe the online social network with varying total number of users and user deactivation rate. We calculate the exact equilibrium points and reproduction number for this model. Furthermore, we perform the rumor spreading process in the online social network with increasing population size based on the original real world Facebook network. The simulation results indicate that the SEIR model of rumor spreading in online social network with changing total number of users can accurately reveal the inherent characteristics of rumor spreading process in online social network. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275017 and 11173028

  20. Modeling the underlying dynamics of the spread of crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters--patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars--we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy.

  1. Modeling the Underlying Dynamics of the Spread of Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P.; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters—patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars—we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy. PMID:24694545

  2. Alleyway Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen; Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    topografier. Alleyway Points består af en række eksperimenter, som søger at udforske denne sammenvævning af disse to parallelle domæner gennem en pendulering imellem det fysiske og det digitale. En gyde danner rammen om disse forsøg, hvor den etablerede punktsky i sig selv bliver anskuet som en digital......Forskelligartede former for fotogrammetri og 3D-scanning muliggør indfangelse af den fysiske verden i det digitale domæne. Dette har vist sig instrumentelt i et utal af forskellige henseender. Når virkeligheden bliver digitaliseret, bliver den frigjort fra sine materielle forpligtigelser: der er...... dialog og pendulering mellem de to domæner, hvor grænsen mellem, hvad der kan anskues som det virkelige og repræsentionen deraf, bliver gradvis mere utydelig. Dette adskiller sig fra to dominerende diskurser inden for arbejdsgange mellem det virkelige og det digitale, der ofte er ensrettede bevægelser...

  3. Performance Spread of Re-entrant System Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2001-01-01

    way to assess the relevance of bad performance structures could then be to simulate a number of scenarios based on a variety of priority policies, different number of machines and job-classes, and let the structure of the job-routes and process times be chosen randomly within the system's realistic...... and even spreads indicate a situation where the priority policy has a clear tendency often to induce severe virtual bottlenecks into the system at hand, resulting in poor performance. The findings, in summary, are as follows. Almost every priority scheme examined in this simulation study showed...

  4. A Synchronisation Method For Informed Spread-Spectrum Audiowatermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Yves Fulchiron

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Under perfect synchronisation conditions, watermarking schemes employing asymmetric spread-spectrum techniques are suitable for copy-protection of audio signals. This paper proposes to combine the use of a robust psychoacoustic projection for the extraction of a watermark feature vector along with non-linear detection functions optimised with side-information. The new proposed scheme benefits from an increased level of security through the use of asymmetric detectors. We apply this scheme to real audio signals and experimental results show an increased robustness to desynchronisation attacks such as random cropping.

  5. Spreading widths of giant resonances in spherical nuclei: Damped transient response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Åberg, S.; Arsenyev, N. N.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2017-06-01

    We propose a general approach to describe spreading widths of monopole, dipole, and quadrupole giant resonances in heavy and superheavy spherical nuclei. Our approach is based on the ideas of the random matrix distribution of the coupling between one-phonon and two-phonon states generated in the random-phase approximation. We use the Skyrme interaction SLy4 as our model Hamiltonian to create a single-particle spectrum and to analyze excited states of the doubly magic nuclei 132Sn, 208Pb, and 310126. Our results demonstrate that the approach enables to us to describe a gross structure of the spreading widths of the giant resonances considered.

  6. Promoting information spreading by using contact memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Shu, Panpan; Gao, Hui; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2017-04-01

    Promoting information spreading is a booming research topic in network science community. However, the existing studies about promoting information spreading seldom took into account the human memory, which plays an important role in the spreading dynamics. In this letter we propose a non-Markovian information spreading model on complex networks, in which every informed node contacts a neighbor by using the memory of neighbor's accumulated contact numbers in the past. We systematically study the information spreading dynamics on uncorrelated configuration networks and a group of 22 real-world networks, and find an effective contact strategy of promoting information spreading, i.e., the informed nodes preferentially contact neighbors with a small number of accumulated contacts. According to the effective contact strategy, the high-degree nodes are more likely to be chosen as the contacted neighbors in the early stage of the spreading, while in the late stage of the dynamics, the nodes with small degrees are preferentially contacted. We also propose a mean-field theory to describe our model, which qualitatively agrees well with the stochastic simulations on both artificial and real-world networks.

  7. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  8. Migraine Strikes as Neuronal Excitability Reaches a Tipping Point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Berg, van den A.; Ferrari, B.

    2013-01-01

    Self-propagating waves of cerebral neuronal firing, known as spreading depolarisations, are believed to be at the roots of migraine attacks. We propose that the start of spreading depolarisations corresponds to a critical transition that occurs when dynamic brain networks approach a tipping point.

  9. Migraine strikes as neuronal excitability reaches a tipping point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, Marten; van den Berg, Albert; Ferrari, Michel D.

    2013-01-01

    Self-propagating waves of cerebral neuronal firing, known as spreading depolarisations, are believed to be at the roots of migraine attacks. We propose that the start of spreading depolarisations corresponds to a critical transition that occurs when dynamic brain networks approach a tipping point.

  10. Properties of residuals for spatial point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, A.; Møller, Jesper; Pakes, A.G.

    For any point process in $R^d$ that has a Papangelou conditional intensity $lambda$, we define a random measure of ‘innovations’ which has mean zero. When the point process model parameters are estimated from data, there is an analogous random measure of ‘residuals’. We analyse properties...

  11. Properties of residuals for spatial point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, A.; Møller, Jesper; Pakes, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    For any point process in Rd that has a Papangelou conditional intensity λ, we define a random measure of ‘innovations' which has mean zero. When the point process model parameters are estimated from data, there is an analogous random measure of ‘residuals'. We analyse properties of the innovation...

  12. Sensory evaluation of commercial fat spreads based on oilseeds and walnut

    OpenAIRE

    Dimić Etelka B.; Vujasinović Vesna B.; Radočaj Olga F.; Borić Bojan D.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this study was on the sensory evaluation of commercial oilseeds spreads, as the most significant characteristic of this type of product from the consumers’ point of view. Sensory analysis was conducted by five experts using a quantitative descriptive and sensory profile test, applying a scoring method according to the standard procedure. Five different spreads were evaluated: sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, peanut, and walnut. Oil content and ...

  13. Are the Intraday Effects of Central Bank Intervention on Exchange Rate Spreads Asymmetric and State Dependent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatum, Rasmus; Pedersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    This paper investigates the intraday effects of unannounced foreign exchange intervention on bid-ask exchange rate spreads using official intraday intervention data provided by the Danish central bank. Our starting point is a simple theoretical model of the bid-ask spread which we use to formulate...... testable hypotheses regarding how unannounced intervention purchases and intervention sales influence the market asymmetrically. To test these hypotheses we estimate weighted least squares (WLS) time-series models of the intraday bid-ask spread. Our main result is that intervention purchases and sales both...

  14. Credit Spreads Across the Business Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Stenbo

    This paper studies how corporate bond spreads vary with the business cycle. I show that both level and slope of empirical credit spread curves are correlated with the state of the economy, and I link this to variation in idiosyncratic jump risk. I develop a structural credit risk model...... that accounts for both business cycle and jump risk, and show by estimation that the model captures the counter-cyclical level and pro-cyclical slope of empirical credit spread curves. In addition, I provide a new procedure for estimation of idiosyncratic jump risk, which is consistent with observed shocks...

  15. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  16. Can Suicide Tries Spread Among Soldiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167432.html Can Suicide Tries Spread Among Soldiers? Increased risk seen within ... if another member of their unit has attempted suicide in the previous year. In fact, the researchers ...

  17. Epidemic spreading with information-driven vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Tang, Ming; Liu, Zonghua

    2012-09-01

    Epidemic spreading has been well studied in the past decade, where the main concentration is focused on the influence of network topology but little attention is paid to the individual's crisis awareness. We here study how the crisis awareness, i.e., personal self-protection, influences the epidemic spreading by presenting a susceptible-infected-recovered model with information-driven vaccination. We introduce two parameters to quantitatively characterize the crisis awareness. One is the information creation rate λ and the other is the information sensitivity η. We find that the epidemic spreading can be significantly suppressed in both the homogeneous and heterogeneous networks when both λ and η are relatively large. More interesting is that the needed vaccine will be significantly reduced when the information is well spread, which is a good news for the poor countries and regions with limited resources.

  18. Emergence of Blind Areas in Information Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zi-Ke; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chuang

    2013-01-01

    Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely \\emph{Information Blind Areas} where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterog...

  19. Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167531.html Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study Research with ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists have some interesting news about Zika: You're unlikely to get the virus from ...

  20. Spreading of charged micro-droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Iaia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the spreading of a charged microdroplet on a flat dielectric surface whose spreading is driven by surface tension and electrostatic repulsion. This leads to a third order nonlinear partial differential equation that gives the evolution of the height profile. Assuming the droplets are circular we are able to prove existence of solutions with infinite contact angle and in many cases we are able to prove nonexistence of solutions with finite contact angle.

  1. Irregularities and Forecast Studies of Equatorial Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-13

    document in the published literature . The result implies that the aeronomy of the postsunset equatorial ionosphere is sufficiently well understood for...of equatorial spread F in the Peruvian sector, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 38153827, doi:10.1002/2014JA019889. ◦ Hysell, D. L., M. A. Milla...L. Condori, and J. W. Meriwether (2014), Data-driven numer- ical simulations of equatorial spread F in the Peruvian sector: 2. Autumnal equinox, J

  2. VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION INHIBITS CORTICAL SPREADING DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng,Yi; Sadhegian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura, and a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its anti-migraine effect. Vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either non-invasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the vagus nerve unilaterally. Systemic physiology was monito...

  3. Optimizing spread dynamics on graphs by message passing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, F.; Braunstein, A.; Dall'Asta, L.; Zecchina, R.

    2013-09-01

    Cascade processes are responsible for many important phenomena in natural and social sciences. Simple models of irreversible dynamics on graphs, in which nodes activate depending on the state of their neighbors, have been successfully applied to describe cascades in a large variety of contexts. Over the past decades, much effort has been devoted to understanding the typical behavior of the cascades arising from initial conditions extracted at random from some given ensemble. However, the problem of optimizing the trajectory of the system, i.e. of identifying appropriate initial conditions to maximize (or minimize) the final number of active nodes, is still considered to be practically intractable, with the only exception being models that satisfy a sort of diminishing returns property called submodularity. Submodular models can be approximately solved by means of greedy strategies, but by definition they lack cooperative characteristics which are fundamental in many real systems. Here we introduce an efficient algorithm based on statistical physics for the optimization of trajectories in cascade processes on graphs. We show that for a wide class of irreversible dynamics, even in the absence of submodularity, the spread optimization problem can be solved efficiently on large networks. Analytic and algorithmic results on random graphs are complemented by the solution of the spread maximization problem on a real-world network (the Epinions consumer reviews network).

  4. Gossip spread in social network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Gossip almost inevitably arises in real social networks. In this article we investigate the relationship between the number of friends of a person and limits on how far gossip about that person can spread in the network. How far gossip travels in a network depends on two sets of factors: (a) factors determining gossip transmission from one person to the next and (b) factors determining network topology. For a simple model where gossip is spread among people who know the victim it is known that a standard scale-free network model produces a non-monotonic relationship between number of friends and expected relative spread of gossip, a pattern that is also observed in real networks (Lind et al., 2007). Here, we study gossip spread in two social network models (Toivonen et al., 2006; Vázquez, 2003) by exploring the parameter space of both models and fitting them to a real Facebook data set. Both models can produce the non-monotonic relationship of real networks more accurately than a standard scale-free model while also exhibiting more realistic variability in gossip spread. Of the two models, the one given in Vázquez (2003) best captures both the expected values and variability of gossip spread.

  5. Dynamical Model about Rumor Spreading with Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaxia Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumor is a kind of social remark, that is untrue, and not be confirmed, and spreads on a large scale in a short time. Usually, it can induce a cloud of pressure, anxiety, and panic. Traditionally, it is propagated by word of mouth. Nowadays, with the emergence of the internet, rumors can be spread by instant messengers, emails, or publishing. With this new pattern of spreading, an ISRW dynamical model considering the medium as a subclass is established. Beside the dynamical analysis of the model, we mainly explore the mechanism of spreading of individuals-to-individuals and medium-to-individual. By numerical simulation, we find that if we want to control the rumor spreading, it will not only need to control the rate of change of the spreader subclass, but also need to control the change of the information about rumor in medium which has larger influence. Moreover, to control the effusion of rumor is more important than deleting existing information about rumor. On the one hand, government should enhance the management of internet. On the other hand, relevant legal institutions for punishing the rumor creator and spreader on internet who can be tracked should be established. Using this way, involved authorities can propose efficient measures to control the rumor spreading to keep the stabilization of society and development of economy.

  6. Anbar Awakens: The Tipping Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Army Combined Arms Center,Army & Marine CounterInsurgency Center (COIN),Fort Leavenworth,KS,66027 8. PERFORMING ...radical change, or a “tipping point,” to occur: mavens, salespersons , and connectors. in brief, mavens have the goods, salespersons spread the word, and

  7. Detecting the influence of spreading in social networks with excitable sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Sen; Tang, Shaoting; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    Detecting spreading outbreaks in social networks with sensors is of great significance in applications. Inspired by the formation mechanism of humans' physical sensations to external stimuli, we propose a new method to detect the influence of spreading by constructing excitable sensor networks. Exploiting the amplifying effect of excitable sensor networks, our method can better detect small-scale spreading processes. At the same time, it can also distinguish large-scale diffusion instances due to the self-inhibition effect of excitable elements. Through simulations of diverse spreading dynamics on typical real-world social networks (Facebook, coauthor, and email social networks), we find that the excitable sensor networks are capable of detecting and ranking spreading processes in a much wider range of influence than other commonly used sensor placement methods, such as random, targeted, acquaintance and distance strategies. In addition, we validate the efficacy of our method with diffusion data from a real-world online social system, Twitter. We find that our method can detect more spreading topics in practice. Our approach provides a new direction in spreading detection and should be useful for designing effective detection methods.

  8. Detecting the influence of spreading in social networks with excitable sensor networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Pei

    Full Text Available Detecting spreading outbreaks in social networks with sensors is of great significance in applications. Inspired by the formation mechanism of humans' physical sensations to external stimuli, we propose a new method to detect the influence of spreading by constructing excitable sensor networks. Exploiting the amplifying effect of excitable sensor networks, our method can better detect small-scale spreading processes. At the same time, it can also distinguish large-scale diffusion instances due to the self-inhibition effect of excitable elements. Through simulations of diverse spreading dynamics on typical real-world social networks (Facebook, coauthor, and email social networks, we find that the excitable sensor networks are capable of detecting and ranking spreading processes in a much wider range of influence than other commonly used sensor placement methods, such as random, targeted, acquaintance and distance strategies. In addition, we validate the efficacy of our method with diffusion data from a real-world online social system, Twitter. We find that our method can detect more spreading topics in practice. Our approach provides a new direction in spreading detection and should be useful for designing effective detection methods.

  9. A Method to Assign Spread Codes Based on Passive RFID Communication for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensors Using Spread Spectrum Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Takahashi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research has been conducted on systems that collect real-world information by using numerous energy harvesting wireless sensors. The sensors need to be tiny, cheap, and consume ultra-low energy. However, such sensors have some functional limits, including being restricted to wireless communication transmission. Therefore, when more than one sensor simultaneously transmits information in these systems, the receiver may not be able to demodulate if the sensors cannot accommodate multiple access. To solve this problem, a number of proposals have been made based on spread spectrum technologies for resistance to interference. In this paper, we point out some problems regarding the application of such sensors, and explain the assumption of spread codes assignment based on passive radio frequency identification (RFID communication. During the spread codes assignment, the system cannot work. Hence, efficient assignment method is more appropriate. We consider two assignment methods and assessed them in terms of total assignment time through an experiment. The results show the total assignment time in case of Electronic Product Code (EPC Global Class-1 Generation-2 which is an international standard for wireless protocols and the relationship between the ratio of the time taken by the read/write command and the ratio of total assignment time by the two methods. This implies that more efficient methods are obtained by considering the time ratio of read/write command.

  10. High-temperature spreading kinetics of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, N.

    2005-05-15

    In this PhD work a drop transfer setup combined with high speed photography has been used to analyze the spreading of Ag on polished polycrystalline Mo and single crystalline Mo (110) and (100) substrates. The objective of this work was to unveil the basic phenomena controlling spreading in metal-metal systems. The observed spreading kinetics were compared with current theories of low and high temperature spreading such as a molecular kinetic model and a fluid flow model. Analyses of the data reveal that the molecular model does describe the fastest velocity data well for all the investigated systems. Therefore, the energy which is dissipated during the spreading process is a dissipation at the triple line rather than dissipation due to the viscosity in the liquid. A comparison of the determined free activation energy for wetting of {delta}G95{approx}145kJ/mol with literature values allows the statement that the rate determining step seems to be a surface diffusion of the Ag atoms along the triple line. In order to investigate possible ridge formation, due to local atomic diffusion of atoms of the substrate at the triple during the spreading process, grooving experiments of the polycrystalline Mo were performed to calculate the surface diffusities that will control ridge evolution. The analyses of this work showed that a ridge formation at the fastest reported wetting velocities was not possible if there is no initial perturbation for a ridge. If there was an initial perturbation for a ridge the ridge had to be much smaller than 1 nm in order to be able to move with the liquid font. Therefore ridge formation does not influence the spreading kinetics for the studied system and the chosen conditions. SEM, AFM and TEM investigations of the triple line showed that ridge formation does also not occur at the end of the wetting experiment when the drop is close to equilibrium and the wetting velocity is slow. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy Assessment Points for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 1543 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the summer of 2005 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  12. Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Jacobs, R.G.J.M.; Deckere, E. de; Berg, H. van den; Bree, A. de; Put, N.M.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 fortified spreads on the blood concentrations of these vitamins and homocysteine. Design and setting: A 6-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial carried out in a clinical research center. Subjects: One

  13. Free energy analysis of cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Eóin; Deshpande, Vikram S; McGarry, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    In this study we present a steady-state adaptation of the thermodynamically motivated stress fiber (SF) model of Vigliotti et al. (2015). We implement this steady-state formulation in a non-local finite element setting where we also consider global conservation of the total number of cytoskeletal proteins within the cell, global conservation of the number of binding integrins on the cell membrane, and adhesion limiting ligand density on the substrate surface. We present a number of simulations of cell spreading in which we consider a limited subset of the possible deformed spread-states assumed by the cell in order to examine the hypothesis that free energy minimization drives the process of cell spreading. Simulations suggest that cell spreading can be viewed as a competition between (i) decreasing cytoskeletal free energy due to strain induced assembly of cytoskeletal proteins into contractile SFs, and (ii) increasing elastic free energy due to stretching of the mechanically passive components of the cell. The computed minimum free energy spread area is shown to be lower for a cell on a compliant substrate than on a rigid substrate. Furthermore, a low substrate ligand density is found to limit cell spreading. The predicted dependence of cell spread area on substrate stiffness and ligand density is in agreement with the experiments of Engler et al. (2003). We also simulate the experiments of Théry et al. (2006), whereby initially circular cells deform and adhere to "V-shaped" and "Y-shaped" ligand patches. Analysis of a number of different spread states reveals that deformed configurations with the lowest free energy exhibit a SF distribution that corresponds to experimental observations, i.e. a high concentration of highly aligned SFs occurs along free edges, with lower SF concentrations in the interior of the cell. In summary, the results of this study suggest that cell spreading is driven by free energy minimization based on a competition between decreasing

  14. Delaying the international spread of pandemic influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ben S; Pitman, Richard J; Edmunds, W John; Gay, Nigel J

    2006-06-01

    The recent emergence of hypervirulent subtypes of avian influenza has underlined the potentially devastating effects of pandemic influenza. Were such a virus to acquire the ability to spread efficiently between humans, control would almost certainly be hampered by limited vaccine supplies unless global spread could be substantially delayed. Moreover, the large increases that have occurred in international air travel might be expected to lead to more rapid global dissemination than in previous pandemics. To evaluate the potential of local control measures and travel restrictions to impede global dissemination, we developed stochastic models of the international spread of influenza based on extensions of coupled epidemic transmission models. These models have been shown to be capable of accurately forecasting local and global spread of epidemic and pandemic influenza. We show that under most scenarios restrictions on air travel are likely to be of surprisingly little value in delaying epidemics, unless almost all travel ceases very soon after epidemics are detected. Interventions to reduce local transmission of influenza are likely to be more effective at reducing the rate of global spread and less vulnerable to implementation delays than air travel restrictions. Nevertheless, under the most plausible scenarios, achievable delays are small compared with the time needed to accumulate substantial vaccine stocks.

  15. Post-Tanner spreading of nematic droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechkov, S; Oshanin, G [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Cazabat, A M, E-mail: mechkov@lptmc.jussieu.f, E-mail: anne-marie.cazabat@lps.ens.f, E-mail: oshanin@lptmc.jussieu.f [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-11-18

    The quasistationary spreading of a circular liquid drop on a solid substrate typically obeys the so-called Tanner law, with the instantaneous base radius R(t) growing with time as Rapproxt{sup 1/10}-an effect of the dominant role of capillary forces for a small-sized droplet. However, for droplets of nematic liquid crystals, a faster spreading law sets in at long times, so that Rapproxt{sup a}lpha with alpha significantly larger than the Tanner exponent 1/10. In the framework of the thin film model (or lubrication approximation), we describe this 'acceleration' as a transition to a qualitatively different spreading regime driven by a strong substrate-liquid interaction specific to nematics (antagonistic anchoring at the interfaces). The numerical solution of the thin film equation agrees well with the available experimental data for nematics, even though the non-Newtonian rheology has yet to be taken into account. Thus we complement the theory of spreading with a post-Tanner stage, noting that the spreading process can be expected to cross over from the usual capillarity-dominated stage to a regime where the whole reservoir becomes a diffusive film in the sense of Derjaguin.

  16. Skeletal forelimb measurements and hoof spread in relation to asymmetry in the bilateral forelimb of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G H; McDonald, K; O'Connell, M J

    2009-03-01

    Research has highlighted a high frequency of skeletal asymmetries in horses. In addition, research into hoof asymmetries has shown that within a bilateral pair, the hoof with the smaller angle is often subjected to greater loading. There has been limited attention paid to understanding compensatory mechanisms for skeletal asymmetries in the horse; the dynamic structure of the hoof could potentially be acting in a compensatory capacity. To investigate the relationship between morphometry of forelimb segments and hoof spread and their incidence of asymmetry. Ten bilateral measurements of the hoof and forelimb were taken from 34 leisure horses. The relationship between hoof spread and forelimb segment measurements were analysed using a generalised linear model (GLM). In relation to left hoof spread, the GLM identified significant negative relationships with left side measurements (third metacarpal length, elbow height), and significant positive relationships with right side measurements (fetlock height, third metacarpal length, elbow height). In relation to right hoof spread, the GLM identified significant negative relationship with left elbow height, and significant positive relationships with right side measurements (fetlock height, point of shoulder). The difference between the number of horses larger to the left or to the right was found to be significant for point of shoulder height (chi2 = 4.8, P equine limb. The fact that measurements of hoof spread were significantly associated with limb segment measurements could possibly indicate that an interaction exists. Any asymmetry in hoof spread measurements may suggest unequal loading of the limbs, which in turn may contribute to injuries and reduced performance.

  17. Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging System Using Spread Spectrum and MEMS Technology for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Segers

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Indoor localization of persons and objects poses a great engineering challenge. Previously developed localization systems demonstrate the use of wideband techniques in ultrasound ranging systems. Direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum ultrasound signals have been proven to achieve a high level of accuracy. A novel ranging method using the frequency hopping spread spectrum with finite impulse response filtering will be investigated and compared against the direct sequence spread spectrum. In the first setup, distances are estimated in a single-access environment, while in the second setup, two senders and one receiver are used. During the experiments, the micro-electromechanical systems are used as ultrasonic sensors, while the senders were implemented using field programmable gate arrays. Results show that in a single-access environment, the direct sequence spread spectrum method offers slightly better accuracy and precision performance compared to the frequency hopping spread spectrum. When two senders are used, measurements point out that the frequency hopping spread spectrum is more robust to near-far effects than the direct sequence spread spectrum.

  18. Modeling the potential of different countries for pandemic spread over the global air network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhe; Lv, Baolei; Xu, Bing

    2017-04-01

    Air network plays an important role in the spread of global epidemics due to its superior speed and range. Understanding the disease transmission pattern via network is the foundation for the prevention and control of future pandemics. In this study, we measured the potential of different countries for the pandemic spread by using a disease transmission model which integrated inter-country air traffic flow and geographic distance. The model was verified on the spread pattern of 2003 SARS, 2009 H1N1 influenza and 2014 Ebola by setting starting point at China, Mexico and Guinea respectively. Results showed that the model well reproduced the spread direction during the early stage as the time course were in good agreement with the reported arrival dates. Then the model was used to simulate the potential risk of each country in spreading the disease as the origin country. We observed that countries in North America, Europe and East Asia had the highest risk of transmission considering their high degree in the air network. We also found that for most starting countries, United States, United Kingdom, Germany and France would become the most-important spreading cores. Compared with empirical Susceptible-Infectious-Recover model, this model could respond much faster to the disease spread with no need for empirical disease transmission parameters.

  19. Extended oil spill spreading with Langmuir circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simecek-Beatty, Debra; Lehr, William J

    2017-09-15

    When spilled in the ocean, most crude oils quickly spread into a thin film that ruptures into smaller slicks distributed over a larger area. Observers have also reported the film tearing apart into streaks that eventually merge forming fewer but longer bands of floating oil. Understanding this process is important to model oil spill transport. First, slick area is calculated using a spreading model. Next, Langmuir circulation models are used to approximate the merging of oiled bands. Calculations are performed on Troll blended and Alaska North Slope crude oils and results compared with measurements from the 1990s North Sea field experiments. Langmuir circulation increases the oil area but decreases the surface coverage of oil. This work modifies existing oil spreading formulas by providing a surface area correction due to the effects of Langmuir circulation. The model's simplicity is advantageous in situations with limited data, such as emergency oil spill response. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Seasonal variations of equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Krishna Murthy

    Full Text Available The occurrence of spread-F at Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E, dip 0.5°N has been investigated on a seasonal basis in sunspot maximum and minimum years in terms of the growth rate of irregularities by the generalized collisional Rayleigh-Taylor (GRT instability mechanism which includes the gravitational and cross-field instability terms. The occurrence statistics of spread-F at Trivandrum have been obtained using quarter hourly ionograms. The nocturnal variations of the growth rate of irregularities by the GRT mechanism have been estimated for different seasons in sunspot maximum and minimum years at Trivandrum using h'F values and vertical drift velocities obtained from ionograms. It is found that the seasonal variation of spread-F occurrence at Trivandrum can, in general, be accounted for on the basis of the GRT mechanism.

  1. Seasonal variations of equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. V. Subbarao

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of spread-F at Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E, dip 0.5°N has been investigated on a seasonal basis in sunspot maximum and minimum years in terms of the growth rate of irregularities by the generalized collisional Rayleigh-Taylor (GRT instability mechanism which includes the gravitational and cross-field instability terms. The occurrence statistics of spread-F at Trivandrum have been obtained using quarter hourly ionograms. The nocturnal variations of the growth rate of irregularities by the GRT mechanism have been estimated for different seasons in sunspot maximum and minimum years at Trivandrum using h'F values and vertical drift velocities obtained from ionograms. It is found that the seasonal variation of spread-F occurrence at Trivandrum can, in general, be accounted for on the basis of the GRT mechanism.

  2. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saeedian, M; Jafari, G R; Kertesz, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences peoples willingness to contact others: A friendly contact may be turned to unfriendly to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected (SI) disease spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heiders theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte-Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find loc...

  3. Effect of synthetic material on angle dependency of flame spread behavior over combined fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azahari, B. R. Mohd; Suzuki, M.; Masuda, W.; Hamidon, B. S.; Azwan, B. S.; Nizam, B. M. Akmal; Faisal, H. Mohd; Amir, B. K.

    2017-04-01

    Experiment has been conducted to study the flame spread behaviour over combined fabric of cotton/polyester and cotton/nylon. Samples are ignited from the top edge and spread to the downward direction. Experiment is conducted for several weft trade angles from 0° to 90°. For ϑ = 0°, a significant difference is seen between these two combined fabrics in the shape of burning front. However, the shape of the burning front is the same for both fabrics at ϑ = 90°. It is seen that the shrinking behaviour is different between polyester and nylon thread. The flame spread rate is measured, which is obtained from the position of the most preceding point of the burning front at each time, at different weft thread angle for both fabrics. It is found that both fabrics have similar angle dependency; the flame spread rate decreases as the angle increases.

  4. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. 319.762 Section 319.762 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat...

  5. The spread of gossip in American schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, P. G.; da Silva, L. R.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2007-06-01

    Gossip is defined as a rumor which specifically targets one individual and essentially only propagates within its friendship connections. How fast and how far a gossip can spread is for the first time assessed quantitatively in this study. For that purpose we introduce the "spread factor" and study it on empirical networks of school friendships as well as on various models for social connections. We discover that there exists an ideal number of friendship connections an individual should have to minimize the danger of gossip propagation.

  6. Harry Hess and sea-floor spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Allwardt, Alan O.

    1999-01-01

    Harry Hess's hypothesis of sea-floor spreading brought together his long-standing interests in island arcs, oceanic topography, and the oceanic crust. The one unique feature of Hess's hypothesis was the origin of the oceanic crust as a hydration rind on the top of the mantle -- an idea that was not well received, even by the early converts to sea-floor spreading. Hess never changed his mind on this issue, and his stubbornness illuminates the logic of his discovery. Published and archival reco...

  7. Compressive Sensing for Spread Spectrum Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    to a decrease in the two design parameters. This paper investigates the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) in a general Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) receiver. We show that when using spread spectrum codes in the signal domain, the CS measurement matrix may be simplified. This measurement scheme, named...... Compressive Spread Spectrum (CSS), allows for a simple, effective receiver design. Furthermore, we numerically evaluate the proposed receiver in terms of bit error rate under different signal to noise ratio conditions and compare it with other receiver structures. These numerical experiments show that though...

  8. A novel electronic algorithm using host biomarker point-of-care tests for the management of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children (e-POCT): A randomized, controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Kristina; Kagoro, Frank; Samaka, Josephine; Masimba, John; Said, Zamzam; Temba, Hosiana; Mlaganile, Tarsis; Sangu, Willy; Rambaud-Althaus, Clotilde; Gervaix, Alain; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2017-10-01

    The management of childhood infections remains inadequate in resource-limited countries, resulting in high mortality and irrational use of antimicrobials. Current disease management tools, such as the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) algorithm, rely solely on clinical signs and have not made use of available point-of-care tests (POCTs) that can help to identify children with severe infections and children in need of antibiotic treatment. e-POCT is a novel electronic algorithm based on current evidence; it guides clinicians through the entire consultation and recommends treatment based on a few clinical signs and POCT results, some performed in all patients (malaria rapid diagnostic test, hemoglobin, oximeter) and others in selected subgroups only (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, glucometer). The objective of this trial was to determine whether the clinical outcome of febrile children managed by the e-POCT tool was non-inferior to that of febrile children managed by a validated electronic algorithm derived from IMCI (ALMANACH), while reducing the proportion with antibiotic prescription. We performed a randomized (at patient level, blocks of 4), controlled non-inferiority study among children aged 2-59 months presenting with acute febrile illness to 9 outpatient clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. In parallel, routine care was documented in 2 health centers. The primary outcome was the proportion of clinical failures (development of severe symptoms, clinical pneumonia on/after day 3, or persistent symptoms at day 7) by day 7 of follow-up. Non-inferiority would be declared if the proportion of clinical failures with e-POCT was no worse than the proportion of clinical failures with ALMANACH, within statistical variability, by a margin of 3%. The secondary outcomes included the proportion with antibiotics prescribed on day 0, primary referrals, and severe adverse events by day 30 (secondary hospitalizations and deaths). We enrolled 3,192 patients

  9. A novel electronic algorithm using host biomarker point-of-care tests for the management of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children (e-POCT: A randomized, controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Keitel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The management of childhood infections remains inadequate in resource-limited countries, resulting in high mortality and irrational use of antimicrobials. Current disease management tools, such as the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI algorithm, rely solely on clinical signs and have not made use of available point-of-care tests (POCTs that can help to identify children with severe infections and children in need of antibiotic treatment. e-POCT is a novel electronic algorithm based on current evidence; it guides clinicians through the entire consultation and recommends treatment based on a few clinical signs and POCT results, some performed in all patients (malaria rapid diagnostic test, hemoglobin, oximeter and others in selected subgroups only (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, glucometer. The objective of this trial was to determine whether the clinical outcome of febrile children managed by the e-POCT tool was non-inferior to that of febrile children managed by a validated electronic algorithm derived from IMCI (ALMANACH, while reducing the proportion with antibiotic prescription.We performed a randomized (at patient level, blocks of 4, controlled non-inferiority study among children aged 2-59 months presenting with acute febrile illness to 9 outpatient clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. In parallel, routine care was documented in 2 health centers. The primary outcome was the proportion of clinical failures (development of severe symptoms, clinical pneumonia on/after day 3, or persistent symptoms at day 7 by day 7 of follow-up. Non-inferiority would be declared if the proportion of clinical failures with e-POCT was no worse than the proportion of clinical failures with ALMANACH, within statistical variability, by a margin of 3%. The secondary outcomes included the proportion with antibiotics prescribed on day 0, primary referrals, and severe adverse events by day 30 (secondary hospitalizations and deaths. We enrolled 3

  10. Topological data analysis of contagion maps for examining spreading processes on networks

    KAUST Repository

    Taylor, Dane

    2015-07-21

    Social and biological contagions are influenced by the spatial embeddedness of networks. Historically, many epidemics spread as a wave across part of the Earth\\'s surface; however, in modern contagions long-range edges - for example, due to airline transportation or communication media - allow clusters of a contagion to appear in distant locations. Here we study the spread of contagions on networks through a methodology grounded in topological data analysis and nonlinear dimension reduction. We construct \\'contagion maps\\' that use multiple contagions on a network to map the nodes as a point cloud. By analysing the topology, geometry and dimensionality of manifold structure in such point clouds, we reveal insights to aid in the modelling, forecast and control of spreading processes. Our approach highlights contagion maps also as a viable tool for inferring low-dimensional structure in networks.

  11. Lognormal infection times of online information spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doerr, C.; Blenn, N.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-01-01

    The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual

  12. A model to forecast peak spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    As traffic congestion increases, the K-factor, defined as the proportion of the 24-hour traffic volume that occurs during the peak hour, may decrease. This behavioral response is known as peak spreading: as congestion grows during the peak travel tim...

  13. Restricted spread of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.; Joosten, N.N.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peters, D.

    2003-01-01

    Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and population development of its vector Frankliniella occidentalis were studied on the pepper accessions CPRO-1 and Pikante Reuzen, which are resistant and susceptible to thrips, respectively. Viruliferous thrips were released on plants of each accession

  14. Natural Spread of Plant Viruses by Birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, D.; Engels, C.; Sarra, S.

    2012-01-01

    Observations made in Mali strongly suggest that Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) is spread by weaverbirds (Quelea quelea) below and around baobab trees (Adansonia digitata) in which they nest. Rice leaves in bird nests appeared to be infected. In Spain, an infection of Southern bean mosaic virus

  15. Spread of Rare Fungus from Vancouver Island

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-12-20

    Cryptococcus gattii, a rare fungus normally found in the tropics, has infected people and animals on Vancouver Island, Canada. Dr. David Warnock, Director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC, discusses public health concerns about further spread of this organism.  Created: 12/20/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 12/29/2006.

  16. Spread of Tylodelphys mashonense (digenea: diplostomidae) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the fact that Tylodelphys mashonense, parasites of the cranial cavity of the catfish Clarias gariepinus, are ubiquitous in freshwater systems, little is known on their spread. As such, we examined a total of 152 piscivorous birds, belonging to 6 species; 43 great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo, 33 grey heron Ardea ...

  17. Introduction, establishment and spread of the Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... native fishes and predation on fish larvae. Pseudocrenilabrus philander in the Baakens River therefore satisfies all criteria for an invasive species in this river and was categorised as invasive using a unified framework for biological invasions. Keywords: abundance, cichlid, electrofishing, establishment, invasion, spread ...

  18. Damage spreading on networks: Clustering effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The damage spreading of the Ising model on three kinds of networks is studied with Glauber dynamics. One of the networks is generated by evolving the hexagonal lattice with the star-triangle transformation. Another kind of network is constructed by connecting the midpoints of the edges of the topological hexagonal lattice.

  19. Temporally variable dispersal and demography can accelerate the spread of invading species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Stephen P; Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze how temporal variability in local demography and dispersal combine to affect the rate of spread of an invading species. Our model combines state-structured local demography (specified by an integral or matrix projection model) with general dispersal distributions that may depend on the state of the individual or its parent. It allows very general patterns of stationary temporal variation in both local demography and in the frequency and distribution of dispersal distances. We show that expressions for the asymptotic spread rate and its sensitivity to parameters, which have been derived previously for less general models, continue to hold. Using these results we show that random temporal variability in dispersal can accelerate population spread. Demographic variability can further accelerate spread if it is positively correlated with dispersal variability, for example if high-fecundity years are also years in which juveniles tend to settle further away from their parents. A simple model for the growth and spread of patches of an invasive plant (perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium) illustrates these effects and shows that they can have substantial impacts on the predicted speed of an invasion wave. Temporal variability in dispersal has received very little attention in both the theoretical and empirical literature on invasive species spread. Our results suggest that this needs to change.

  20. A measurement instrument for spread of quality improvement in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Slaghuis (Sarah); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); R.A. Bal (Roland); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Objective. The aim of this study was to develop and test a measurement instrument for spread of quality improvement in healthcare. The instrument distinguishes: (i) spread of work practices and their results and (ii) spread practices and effectiveness. Relations between spread

  1. Invasion and spreading of Cabomba caroliniana revealed by RAPD markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaofeng; Ding, Bingyang; Gao, Shuqin; Jiang, Weimei

    2005-12-01

    Applying randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), the genetic variation of Cabomba caroliniana Gray (cabomba or fanwort), a new alien plant in China, was analyzed in this paper. Total 143 bands, including 47 polymorphic bands, were amplified from 23 primers in 20 samples. The sampling distance was large, but its genetic diversity was low. The main results were that: (1) Cabomba, which grew and dispersed mainly in fragment, was an abundant and dominant species in freshwater, and its main dispersal mechanism was vegetative reproduction (2) Cabomba was originally introduced into China as an aquarium submerged plant. Somehow, those discarded cabomba became invasive species in the areas of Hangzhou, Shanghai, and Meicheng, and other places. (3) Although the level of genetic diversity in cabomba was low, their rapid dispersion and propagation could seriously harm to local aquatic community. Therefore, specific measure should be used to control cabomba from uncontrolled spreading and damage to local vegetation communities.

  2. Epidemic spreading on complex networks with community structures

    CERN Document Server

    Stegehuis, Clara; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S H

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks display a community structure. We study two random graph models that create a network with similar community structure as a given network. One model preserves the exact community structure of the original network, while the other model only preserves the set of communities and the vertex degrees. These models show that community structure is an important determinant of the behavior of percolation processes on networks, such as information diffusion or virus spreading: the community structure can both \\textit{enforce} as well as \\textit{inhibit} diffusion processes. Our models further show that it is the mesoscopic set of communities that matters. The exact internal structures of communities barely influence the behavior of percolation processes across networks. This insensitivity is likely due to the relative denseness of the communities.

  3. Polygonal plot method for estimating the canopy-spread cover of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An optical method for measuring canopy-spread cover of shrubs is described by means of an illustrated example. Boundaries of plots are hypothetical lines joining the centres of wholly visible shrubs or groups of shrubs surrounding the observation point. Plots are subdivided into triangular subplots to allow calculation of ...

  4. Natural spread of Citrus tristeza virus in lemon varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Figueroa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural spread of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV was monitored in different lemon varieties derived from shoot tip grafted (STG selections proven to be free of CTV before planting. The trial was planted in November, 2007, with a randomized four-block design with four replications. This experiment was originally established to compare selected clones with their duplicates recovered by STG. The selected clones were originally nucellar clones kept in the germplasm bank in the field for 30 to 40 years, so the plants were naturally infected with CTV. The lemon varieties tested were two lines of both Frost Eureka and Limoneira 8A Lisbon and one line of Feminello Santa Teresa and Genoa EEAT. Plants were grafted on Poncirus trifoliata Flying Dragon, except for Eureka lemon, which was grafted on 79 AC [Citrus reshni x (C. paradisi x P. Trifoliata]. Direct immunoprinting-ELISA with 3DF1+3CA5 monoclonal antibodies (Plant Print Diagnostics, Valencia was used to determine the presence of CTV in field samples. Each sample was composed of four young shoots collected from the four sides of each tree. Two diagnoses were performed, one in September 2009 and another in September 2010. STG trees showed significant differences in CTV infection among them. The variety most infected with CTV was Limoneria 8 A and the least infected was Feminello Santa Teresa. Infected plants were found in a random distribution in the plot. All selected lemon trees were CTV positive. CTV spread will be monitored until 100% of all varieties show positive.

  5. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  6. Population Movement and Virus Spreading: HEV Spreading in a Pilgrimage City, Mashhad in Northeast Iran; an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Miri, Rahele; Hedayatimoghadam, Mohamadreza; Shamsian, Aliakbar; Bidkhori, Hamidreza; Fathimoghadam, Fahad; Rezaee, Seyyed Abdorrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infection is a significant public health concern and responsible for large outbreaks of acute hepatitis in poor sanitary and living conditions. Objectives To investigate the impact of population movements on virus spreading, a large-scale population-based survey was performed in a pilgrimage- tourism area, the great Mashhad, capital city of Khorasan province. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 1582 randomly selected individuals from general population of Mashhad, north east of Iran, between May to September 2009. Serum samples were tested for total anti-HEV antibody using a specific enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit. Results The prevalence of HEV infection was 14.2% (225/1582) with a maximum of 25.5 % (14/55) in densely populated areas. The highest prevalence was observed in visitant areas (≥ 20%) near the holly shrine with crowded hotels and inns. The differences between these areas and other districts were statistically significant (P prevalence of HEV is related to populated district, which can reach to the highest rate in hotels and inns close to visitants. Traditional sanitation and water supplying systems are the second important factor for the virus transmission. Therefore, it can be concluded that such areas need efficient surveillance systems to prevent the spreading of infectious diseases. PMID:24171006

  7. On the Spreading of Partially Miscible Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rosanne, Maria; Vignes-Adler, Michèle; Velarde, Manuel G.

    2001-02-15

    As time proceeds, partially miscible liquids spread as a cap surrounded by a primary film according to power laws, t(n), for both the leading edge (front) and the central cap. The corresponding exponents depend on the thickness, H, of the liquid aqueous substrate and the deviation of concentration from its saturation value, DeltaC=C-C(sat). As long as H is thick enough, here H>/=5 mm, the exponents are n=1/2 and n=1/3 for the front and the central cap, respectively. For thinner layers, H approximately 2 mm, and moderate DeltaC, the spreading is drastically hindered and the measured values can go down to n=0.1, due to the additional friction imposed by the confinement of the convective cells generated by dissolution below the primary film which anchor on the solid surface beneath the liquid substrate. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Epidemic spreading on weighted complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ye [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Liu, Chuang, E-mail: liuchuang@hznu.edu.cn [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Zhang, Chu-Xu [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Zhang, Zi-Ke, E-mail: zhangzike@gmail.com [Institute of Information Economy, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Alibaba Research Center of Complexity Science, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China)

    2014-01-31

    Nowadays, the emergence of online services provides various multi-relation information to support the comprehensive understanding of the epidemic spreading process. In this Letter, we consider the edge weights to represent such multi-role relations. In addition, we perform detailed analysis of two representative metrics, outbreak threshold and epidemic prevalence, on SIS and SIR models. Both theoretical and simulation results find good agreements with each other. Furthermore, experiments show that, on fully mixed networks, the weight distribution on edges would not affect the epidemic results once the average weight of whole network is fixed. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of epidemic spreading on multi-relation and weighted networks.

  9. Connectivity disruption sparks explosive epidemic spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Böttcher, L; Goles, E; Helbing, D; Herrmann, H J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spread of an infection or other malfunction of cascading nature when a system component can recover only if it remains reachable from a functioning central component. We consider the susceptible-infected-susceptible model, typical of mathematical epidemiology, on a network. Infection spreads from infected to healthy nodes, with the addition that infected nodes can only recover when they remain connected to a predefined central node, through a path that contains only healthy nodes. In this system, clusters of infected nodes will absorb their noninfected interior because no path exists between the central node and encapsulated nodes. This gives rise to the simultaneous infection of multiple nodes. Interestingly, the system converges to only one of two stationary states: either the whole population is healthy or it becomes completely infected. This simultaneous cluster infection can give rise to discontinuous jumps of different sizes in the number of failed nodes. Larger jumps emerge at lower ...

  10. Lognormal infection times of online information spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doerr

    Full Text Available The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual participants. Experimental measurements support the lognormal shape of the individual contributing processes, and have resemblance to previously reported lognormal distributions of human behavior and contagious processes.

  11. Lognormal infection times of online information spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Christian; Blenn, Norbert; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-01-01

    The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual participants. Experimental measurements support the lognormal shape of the individual contributing processes, and have resemblance to previously reported lognormal distributions of human behavior and contagious processes.

  12. Lognormal Infection Times of Online Information Spread

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Doerr; Norbert Blenn; Piet Van Mieghem

    2013-01-01

    The infection times of individuals in online information spread such as the inter-arrival time of Twitter messages or the propagation time of news stories on a social media site can be explained through a convolution of lognormally distributed observation and reaction times of the individual participants. Experimental measurements support the lognormal shape of the individual contributing processes, and have resemblance to previously reported lognormal distributions of human behavior and cont...

  13. Spatial Spillovers in Emerging Market Spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Dell'Erba; Emanuele Baldacci; Tigran Poghosyan

    2011-01-01

    We use novel spatial econometrics techniques to explore spillovers in the sovereign bond market for 24 emerging economies during 1995-2010. The paper extends the previous literature focusing on spillover effects from advanced to emerging economies by analyzing transmission of shocks across emerging markets. After controlling for the impact of global factors, we find strong evidence of spillovers from both sovereign spreads and macroeconomic fundamentals in neighboring emerging economies. In a...

  14. Prediction of fire spread following nuclear explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig C. Chandler; Theodore G. Storey; Charles D. Tangren

    1963-01-01

    Mass fires are likely to follow a nuclear attack. Since it is important to the civil defense program to be able to predict rate, duration, and extent of spread of such fires, the Office of Civil Defense, U.S. Department of Defense, issued a joint contract to the Forest Service and to United Research Services, Inc., to study this field. We surveyed the literature,...

  15. Ethnicity and the spread of civil war

    OpenAIRE

    Bosker, Maarten; de Ree, Joppe

    2010-01-01

    Civil wars critically hinder a country's development process. This paper shows that civil wars can also have severe international consequences. Anecdotal evidence highlights that civil wars sometimes spill over international boundaries. Using a more rigorous econometric approach we provide evidence that conflict spillovers are indeed quantitatively very important. Also, they are context dependent. Ethnicity in particular plays a key role in the spread of civil war. Only ethnic civil wars spil...

  16. Spatial scaling relationships for spread of disease caused by a wind-dispersed plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Christopher C; Sackett, Kathryn E

    2012-03-09

    Spatial scale is of great importance to understanding the spread of organisms exhibiting long-distance dispersal (LDD). We tested whether epidemics spread in direct proportion to the size of the host population and size of the initial disease focus. This was done through analysis of a previous study of the effects of landscape heterogeneity variables on the spread of accelerating epidemics of wheat (Triticum aestivum) stripe rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. End-of-season disease gradients were constructed by estimating disease prevalence at regular distances from artificially inoculated foci of different sizes, in field plots of different dimensions. In one set of comparisons, all linear dimensions (plot width and length, focus width and length, and distance between observation points) differed by a factor of four. Disease spread was substantially greater in large plot/large focus treatments than in small plot/small focus treatments. However, when disease gradients were plotted using focus width as the unit distance, they were found to be highly similar, suggesting a proportional relationship between focus or plot size and disease spread. A similar relationship held when comparing same-size plots inoculated with different-sized foci, an indication that focus size is the driver of this proportionality. Our results suggest that power law dispersal of LDD organisms results in scale-invariant relationships, which are useful for better understanding spatial spread of biological invasions, extrapolating results from small-scale experiments to invasions spreading over larger scales, and predicting speed and pattern of spread as an invasion expands.

  17. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants’ decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31 000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the “tipping point” and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  18. Did ice-age bovids spread tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce M.; Martin, Larry D.

    2006-11-01

    Pathognomonic metacarpal undermining is a skeletal pathology that has been associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovids. Postcranial artiodactyl, perissodactyl, and carnivore skeletons were examined in major university and museum collections of North America and Europe for evidence of this and other pathology potentially attributable to tuberculosis. Among nonproboscidean mammals from pre-Holocene North America, bone lesions indicative of tuberculosis were restricted to immigrant bovids from Eurasia. No bone lesions compatible with diagnosis of tuberculosis were found in large samples of other pre-Holocene (164 Oligocene, 397 Miocene, and 1,041 Plio Pleistocene) North American mammals, including 114 antilocaprids. Given the unchanged frequency of bovid tubercular disease during the Pleistocene, it appears that most did not die from the disease but actually reached an accommodation with it (as did the mastodon) (Rothschild and Laub 2006). Thus, they were sufficiently long-lived to assure greater spread of the disease. The relationships of the proboscidean examples need further study, but present evidence suggests a Holarctic spread of tuberculosis during the Pleistocene, with bovids acting as vectors. While the role of other animals in the transmission of tuberculosis could be considered, the unique accommodation achieved by bovids and mastodons makes them the likely “culprits” in its spread.

  19. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Kertesz, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences people's willingness to contact others: A "friendly" contact may be turned to "unfriendly" to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected disease-spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heider's theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find local minima corresponding to the so-called jammed states. We study the effect of the ratio of initial friendly to unfriendly connections on the propagation of disease. The steady state can be balanced or a jammed state such that a coexistence occurs between susceptible and infected nodes in the system.

  20. Probabilistic pseudostatic analysis of pile in laterally spreading ground: Two layer soil profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Farag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Coupling the finite element model of pile under lateral spread with the Monte Carlo Simulation is frequently prohibited by excessive lengthily computations. In the present paper, a simplified pseudostatic method is integrated with an improved response surface scheme to evaluate the reliability of pile subjected to lateral spread. The pseudostatic model takes both geometric and soil nonlinearities into account, while, the response surface formulation takes; load, geometry, material and model uncertainties into consideration. First; the improved response surface scheme is suggested and validated with the help of a simple example. Then, the pseudostatic model of a full size pile under lateral spread is integrated with the improved response surface scheme in order to assess the pile reliability. In the considered example, for both operational and structural possible modes of failure, it has been found that the most influential random variables are lateral displacement, and pile radius, respectively.

  1. Point Spread Function of ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takayuki; Sato, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Iizuka, Ryo; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Okajima, Takashi; Mori, Hideyuki; hide

    2016-01-01

    ASTRO-H (Hitomi) satellite equips two Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs), one of which (SXT-S) is coupled to Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) while the other (SXT-I) is coupled to Soft X-ray Imager (SXI). Although SXTs are lightweight of approximately 42 kgmodule1 and have large on-axis effective area (EA) of approximately 450 cm(exp 2) at 4.5 keV module(sub 1) by themselves, their angular resolutions are moderate approximately 1.2 arcmin in half power diameter. The amount of contamination into the SXS FOV (3.05 times 3.05 arcmin(exp 2) from nearby sources was measured in the ground-based calibration at the beamline in Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. The contamination at 4.5 keV were measured with sources distant from the SXS center by one width of the FOV in perpendicular and diagonal directions, that is, 3 and 4.5 arcmin-off, respectively. The average EA of the contamination in the four directions with the 3 and 4.5 arcmin-off were measured to be 2 and 0.6% of the on-axis EA of 412 cm (exp) for the SXS FOV, respectively. The contamination from a source distant by two FOV widths in a diagonal direction, that is, 8.6 arcmin-off was measured to be 0.1% of the on-axis at 4.5 keV. The contamination amounts were also measured at 1.5 keV and 8.0 keV which indicated that the ratio of the contamination EA to that of on-axis hardly depended on the source energy. The off-axis SXT-I images from 4.5 to 27 arcmin were acquired at intervals of -4.5 arcmin for the SXI FOV of 38 times 38 arcmin(exp 2). The image shrinked as the off-axis angle increased. Above 13.5 arcmin of off-angle, a stray appeared around the image center in the off-axis direction. As for the on-axis image, a ring-shaped stray appeared at the edge of SXI of approximately 18 arcmin distant from the image center.

  2. Subduction, back-arc spreading and global mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Oconnell, R. J.; Raefsky, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the subducted lithosphere associated with Benioff zones provides the only direct evidence about the flow in the earth's interior associated with plate motions. It is the primary objective of the present investigation to study the relation between the orientation of subducting lithosphere and the flow patterns (both local and global) near subduction zones. Most of the calculations conducted are based on simple flow models for radially symmetric, Newtonian viscous spheres. The investigation is concerned with the possibility that a simple model of global mantle flow could account for some features of subduction zones. It is found that such a model can account for the orientation of the seismic zones, and, in addition, also for features related to back-arc spreading and perhaps the maximum earthquake size.

  3. Natural Human Mobility Patterns and Spatial Spread of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, Vitaly; Geisel, Theo; Brockmann, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a model for spatial epidemics explicitly taking into account bidirectional movements between base and destination locations on individual mobility networks. We provide a systematic analysis of generic dynamical features of the model on regular and complex metapopulation network topologies and show that significant dynamical differences exist to ordinary reaction-diffusion and effective force of infection models. On a lattice we calculate an expression for the velocity of the propagating epidemic front and find that, in contrast to the diffusive systems, our model predicts a saturation of the velocity with an increasing traveling rate. Furthermore, we show that a fully stochastic system exhibits a novel threshold for the attack ratio of an outbreak that is absent in diffusion and force of infection models. These insights not only capture natural features of human mobility relevant for the geographical epidemic spread, they may serve as a starting point for modeling important dynamical processes in human and animal epidemiology, population ecology, biology, and evolution.

  4. The cost of simplifying air travel when modeling disease spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Lessler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Air travel plays a key role in the spread of many pathogens. Modeling the long distance spread of infectious disease in these cases requires an air travel model. Highly detailed air transportation models can be over determined and computationally problematic. We compared the predictions of a simplified air transport model with those of a model of all routes and assessed the impact of differences on models of infectious disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using U.S. ticket data from 2007, we compared a simplified "pipe" model, in which individuals flow in and out of the air transport system based on the number of arrivals and departures from a given airport, to a fully saturated model where all routes are modeled individually. We also compared the pipe model to a "gravity" model where the probability of travel is scaled by physical distance; the gravity model did not differ significantly from the pipe model. The pipe model roughly approximated actual air travel, but tended to overestimate the number of trips between small airports and underestimate travel between major east and west coast airports. For most routes, the maximum number of false (or missed introductions of disease is small (<1 per day but for a few routes this rate is greatly underestimated by the pipe model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: If our interest is in large scale regional and national effects of disease, the simplified pipe model may be adequate. If we are interested in specific effects of interventions on particular air routes or the time for the disease to reach a particular location, a more complex point-to-point model will be more accurate. For many problems a hybrid model that independently models some frequently traveled routes may be the best choice. Regardless of the model used, the effect of simplifications and sensitivity to errors in parameter estimation should be analyzed.

  5. Spread and diversity of human populations in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevêdo, E S; Fortuna, C M; Silva, K M; Sousa, M G; Machado, M A; Lima, A M; Aguiar, M E; Abé, K; Eulálio, M C; Conceição, M M; Silva, M C; Santos, M G

    1982-05-01

    Data from surnames and racial subgroups were obtained in 60 localities to reconstruct the history of population spread and mixing over the state of Bahia, Brazil. Using the historically significant location of Cachoeira and Sao Felix as central points, the sampled localities were distributed along 7 main paved roads. 20% of the elementary school children were selected, but only the surnames of 12,872 boys were used in the analysis. The following parameters were estimated for each of the localities: black phenotype index (BPI), which is the proportion of 3 racial classifications determined by gene frequency analysis; black cultural index (BCI) determined by the frequency of devotional surnames; and indian cultural index (ICI) determined by the frequency of animal-plant surnames; and the isolated frequency of the surname Santos. The results of regression analysis indicate a negative association between BPI and BCI and the distance from Cachoeira-Sao Felix. Although not significant, ICI increases slightly with increased distance from Cachoeira-Sao Felix. The isolated frequency of the surname Santos is associated with the BCI but does not decrease significantly with distance from Cachoeira-Sao Felix. Construction of a map characterizing each of the 60 localities by its most representative racial admixture confirms the analysis and reveals the spread of blacks toward 4 cardinal points. A review of the historical background of the state explains the migration of blacks as related to the needs for slave labor during the development of gold mining and cocoa and sugar cultivation. The higher concentrations of indian admixtures farther from Cachoeira-Sao Felix reflects their retreat to survive the incoming foreign settlers. Given the strong link between the observed diversity in the population and major historical events, it is suggested that historical reconstruction of a population be an initial step before undertaking sampling for gene frequency analysis.

  6. From Conformational Spread to Allosteric and Cooperative models of E. coli flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzotta, Alberto; Celani, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli swims using flagella activated by rotary motors. The direction of rotation of the motors is indirectly regulated by the binding of a single messenger protein. The conformational spread model has been shown to accurately describe the equilibrium properties as well as the dynamics of the flagellar motor. In this paper we study this model from an analytic point of view. By exploiting the separation of timescales observed in experiments, we show how to reduce the conformational spread model to a coarse-grained, cooperative binding model. We show that this simplified model reproduces very well the dynamics of the motor switch.

  7. Spread of Ebola disease with susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, Afina; Widyaningsih, Purnami; Retno Sari Saputro, Dewi

    2017-06-01

    Ebola is a deadly infectious disease and has caused an epidemic on several countries in West Africa. Mathematical modeling to study the spread of Ebola disease has been developed, including through models susceptible infected removed (SIR) and susceptible exposed infected removed (SEIR). Furthermore, susceptible exposed infected isolated recovered (SEIIhR) model has been derived. The aims of this research are to derive SEIIhR model for Ebola disease, to determine the patterns of its spread, to determine the equilibrium point and stability of the equilibrium point using phase plane analysis, and also to apply the SEIIhR model on Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone in 2014. The SEIIhR model is a differential equation system. Pattern of ebola disease spread with SEIIhR model is solution of the differential equation system. The equilibrium point of SEIIhR model is unique and it is a disease-free equilibrium point that stable. Application of the model is based on the data Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. The free-disease equilibrium point (Se; Ee; Ie; Ihe; Re )=(5743865, 0, 0, 0, 0) is stable.

  8. Universal and efficient compressed sensing by spread spectrum and application to realistic Fourier imaging techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Puy, Gilles; Gribonval, Rémi; Wiaux, Yves

    2011-01-01

    We advocate a compressed sensing strategy that consists of multiplying the signal of interest by a wide bandwidth modulation before projection onto randomly selected vectors of an orthonormal basis. Firstly, in a digital setting with random modulation, considering a whole class of sensing bases including the Fourier basis, we prove that the technique is universal in the sense that the required number of measurements for accurate recovery is optimal and independent of the sparsity basis. This universality stems from a drastic decrease of coherence between the sparsity and the sensing bases, which for a Fourier sensing basis relates to a spread of the original signal spectrum by the modulation (hence the name "spread spectrum"). The approach is also efficient as sensing matrices with fast matrix multiplication algorithms can be used, in particular in the case of Fourier measurements. Secondly, these results are confirmed by a numerical analysis of the phase transition of the l1- minimization problem. Finally, w...

  9. A novel quantitative volumetric spreading index definition and assessment of astrocyte spreading in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Volkan Müjdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I

    2017-08-01

    A novel quantitative volumetric spreading index (VSI) is defined that depends on the total distance between object voxels and the contact surface plane in three-dimensional (3D) space. The VSI, which ranges from 0 to 1, is rotationally invariant around the z-axis. VSI can be used to quantify the degree of individual cell spreading, which is important for analysis of cell interactions with their environment. The VSIs of astrocytes cultured on a nanofibrillar surface and three different comparative planar surfaces have been calculated from confocal laser scanning microscope z-series images, and the effects of both culture surface and immunoreactivity on the degree of cell spreading were investigated. VSI calculations indicated a statistical correlation between increased reactivity, based on immunolabeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein, and decreased cell spreading. Further results provided a quantitative measure for the increased spreading of quiescent-like and reactive-like astrocytes on planar substrates functionalized with poly-l-lysine. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. Predictive Validation of an Influenza Spread Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Ayaz; Buckeridge, David L.; Leung, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Modeling plays a critical role in mitigating impacts of seasonal influenza epidemics. Complex simulation models are currently at the forefront of evaluating optimal mitigation strategies at multiple scales and levels of organization. Given their evaluative role, these models remain limited in their ability to predict and forecast future epidemics leading some researchers and public-health practitioners to question their usefulness. The objective of this study is to evaluate the predictive ability of an existing complex simulation model of influenza spread. Methods and Findings We used extensive data on past epidemics to demonstrate the process of predictive validation. This involved generalizing an individual-based model for influenza spread and fitting it to laboratory-confirmed influenza infection data from a single observed epidemic (1998–1999). Next, we used the fitted model and modified two of its parameters based on data on real-world perturbations (vaccination coverage by age group and strain type). Simulating epidemics under these changes allowed us to estimate the deviation/error between the expected epidemic curve under perturbation and observed epidemics taking place from 1999 to 2006. Our model was able to forecast absolute intensity and epidemic peak week several weeks earlier with reasonable reliability and depended on the method of forecasting-static or dynamic. Conclusions Good predictive ability of influenza epidemics is critical for implementing mitigation strategies in an effective and timely manner. Through the process of predictive validation applied to a current complex simulation model of influenza spread, we provided users of the model (e.g. public-health officials and policy-makers) with quantitative metrics and practical recommendations on mitigating impacts of seasonal influenza epidemics. This methodology may be applied to other models of communicable infectious diseases to test and potentially improve their predictive

  11. Vectorised Spreading Activation algorithm for centrality measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Troussov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spreading Activation is a family of graph-based algorithms widely used in areas such as information retrieval, epidemic models, and recommender systems. In this paper we introduce a novel Spreading Activation (SA method that we call Vectorised Spreading Activation (VSA. VSA algorithms, like “traditional” SA algorithms, iteratively propagate the activation from the initially activated set of nodes to the other nodes in a network through outward links. The level of the node’s activation could be used as a centrality measurement in accordance with dynamic model-based view of centrality that focuses on the outcomes for nodes in a network where something is flowing from node to node across the edges. Representing the activation by vectors allows the use of the information about various dimensionalities of the flow and the dynamic of the flow. In this capacity, VSA algorithms can model multitude of complex multidimensional network flows. We present the results of numerical simulations on small synthetic social networks and multi­dimensional network models of folksonomies which show that the results of VSA propagation are more sensitive to the positions of the initial seed and to the community structure of the network than the results produced by traditional SA algorithms. We tentatively conclude that the VSA methods could be instrumental to develop scalable and computationally efficient algorithms which could achieve synergy between computation of centrality indexes with detection of community structures in networks. Based on our preliminary results and on improvements made over previous studies, we foresee advances and applications in the current state of the art of this family of algorithms and their applications to centrality measurement.

  12. Reduce proton energy spread by target ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuan; Chen, Jiaer; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    It's shown that, with strong target ablation monoenergetic protons along the laser direction is available during the laser aluminum foil interaction, which is different from the classic TNSA theory. When the laser pre-pulse is too strong that the whole target is vaporized, the energetic electrons generated in the gas preplasma will play an important role for the ion acceleration because the sheath field will not be available. These electrons beam, which is highly directional, will setup triangle envelope acceleration field along the laser direction at the target rear, reducing the ion energy spread.

  13. Epidemic spreading with immunization on bipartite networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tanimoto, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite networks are composed of two types of nodes and there are no links between nodes of the same type. Thus the study of epidemic spread and control on such networks is relevant to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). When entire populations of two types cannot be immunized and the effect of immunization is not perfect, we have to consider the targeted immunization with immunization rates. We derive the epidemic thresholds of SIR and SIS models with immunization and illustrate the results with STDs on heterosexual contact networks.

  14. Preventing the spread of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicky

    Approximately 96,000 people are living with HIV in the UK, a quarter of whom are unaware they are infected. While in some parts of the world the number of people newly infected with HIV has fallen, in the UK in 2011 there was a rise in the number of men who have sex with men being diagnosed. HIV prevention strategies are a public health priority, while ongoing research into HIV testing in all clinical settings remains a priority. This article explores preventive measures that can be used to reduce the spread of HIV and offers advice on how nurses can contribute to these.

  15. Experiments on non-isothermal spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhard, P.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments are performed on axisymmetric spreading of viscous drops on glass plates. Two liquids are investigated: silicone oil (M-100) spreads to `infinity` and paraffin oil spreads to a finite-radius steady state. The experiments with silicone oil partly recover the behaviour of previous workers data; those experiments with paraffin oil provide new data. It is found that gravitational forces dominate at long enough times while at shorter times capillary forces dominate. When the plate is heated or cooled with respect to the ambient gas, thermocapillary forces generate flows that alter the spreading dynamics. Heating (cooling) the plate is found to retard (augment) the streading. Moreover, in case of partial wetting, the finally-approached drop radius is smaller (larger) for a heated (cooled) plate. These data are all new. All these observations are in excellent quantitative agreement with the related model predictions of Ehrhard and Davis (1991). A breakdown of the axisymmetric character of the flow is observed only for very long times and/or very thin liquid layers. (orig.). [Deutsch] Es werden Experimente zur Ausbreitung achsensymmetrischer, viskoser Fluessigkeitstropfen auf Glas vorgestellt. Zwei Fluessigkeiten werden betrachtet: Fuer Silikonoeltropfen (M-100) beobachten wir eine unbeschraenkte Ausbreitung, waehrend sich Paraffinoeltropfen gegen eine stationaere Endkontur entwickeln. Die Silikonoelexperimente bestaetigen teilweise die Ergebnisse frueherer Experimentatoren, die Paraffinoelexperimente liefern gaenzlich neue Daten. Wir finden, dass die Schwerkraft fuer lange Zeiten den Ausbreitungsprozess kontrolliert. Fuer kurze Zeiten spielen dagegen Kapillaritaetskraefte eine wichtigere Rolle. Wird die Glasplatte gegenueber der Umgebung zusaetzlich erwaermt oder gekuehlt, so treiben thermokapillare Kraefte eine Stroemung innerhalb des Tropfens. Die Dynamik der Ausbreitung wird dadurch massgeblich geaendert. Eine Erwaermung (Kuehlung) fuehrt zu einer

  16. Recording, analysis, and interpretation of spreading depolarizations in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Fabricius, Martin; Ayata, Cenk

    2017-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SD) are waves of abrupt, near-complete breakdown of neuronal transmembrane ion gradients, are the largest possible pathophysiologic disruption of viable cerebral gray matter, and are a crucial mechanism of lesion development. Spreading depolarizations are increasingly r...

  17. Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses B Z Z Z Z . Aside from being ... or Aedes albopictus ) can spread dengue, chikungunya, or Zika viruses. People become infected with dengue, chikungunya, or Zika ...

  18. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  19. Epidural spread of iohexol following the use of air or saline in the 'loss of resistance' test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Toshie; Nishimura, Ryohei; Nagahama, Shotaro; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yuka; Zhang, Di; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    To compare, using CT epidurography, the cranial distribution of contrast after epidural injection when saline or air is used for the loss of resistance (LOR) technique in identifying the epidural space. Prospective, randomized, cross-over experimental study. Nine healthy adult Beagle dogs. Under general anaesthesia, a spinal needle (22-gauge, 70 mm) was inserted through the lumbosacral space, and the position in the epidural space confirmed using the LOR technique employing either 0.3 mL per dog of saline or of air. Epidurography using CT was performed before and 5, 10 and 20 minutes after epidural injection of 0.2 mL kg(-1) of iohexol. The cranial distribution of iohexol was recorded as the number of vertebral segments reached from the seventh lumbar vertebrae. The median values in vertebral segments of the cranial distribution at 5, 10 and 20 minutes after epidural injection were 19.5, 20.5 and 21.0 respectively with the saline treatment, and 12.0, 15.0 and 16.0 respectively in the air treatment. At all time points spread of contrast was significantly less with the air treatment. All dogs after air treatment had some air bubbles in the epidural space, and in seven, the spinal cord was moderately compressed by the air. No neurological complications were observed after recovery. The use of air for the LOR technique is associated with significantly less spread, uneven cranial distribution of the contrast medium and compression of the spinal cord. It is recommended that saline, and not air, should be used to identify the epidural space by this method. © 2010 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2010 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  20. Random Raman lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Beier, Hope T; Rockwll, Benjamin A; Thomas, Robert J; Noojin, Gary D; Petrov, Georgi I; Golovan, Leonid A; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of light in a highly scattering medium is among the most fascinating optical effect that everyone experiences on an everyday basis and possesses a number of fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. Conventional wisdom suggests that non-linear effects do not play a significant role because the diffusive nature of scattering acts to spread the intensity, dramatically weakening these effects. We demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing on a Raman transition in a bulk three-dimensional random media. From a practical standpoint, Raman transitions allow for spectroscopic analysis of the chemical makeup of the sample. A random Raman laser could serve as a bright Raman source allowing for remote, chemically specific, identification of powders and aerosols. Fundamentally, the first demonstration of this new light source opens up an entire new field of study into non-linear light propagation in turbid media, with the most notable application related to non-invasive biomedical imaging.

  1. Random Walks and Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available These notes provide an elementary and self-contained introduction to branching random walks. Section 1 gives a brief overview of Galton–Watson trees, whereas Section 2 presents the classical law of large numbers for branching random walks. These two short sections are not exactly indispensable, but they introduce the idea of using size-biased trees, thus giving motivations and an avant-goût to the main part, Section 3, where branching random walks are studied from a deeper point of view, and are connected to the model of directed polymers on a tree. Tree-related random processes form a rich and exciting research subject. These notes cover only special topics. For a general account, we refer to the St-Flour lecture notes of Peres [47] and to the forthcoming book of Lyons and Peres [42], as well as to Duquesne and Le Gall [23] and Le Gall [37] for continuous random trees.

  2. 21 CFR 133.175 - Pasteurized cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized cheese spread. 133.175 Section 133.175... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.175 Pasteurized cheese spread. Pasteurized cheese spread is the food...

  3. A fundamental look at fire spread in California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise; Thomas Fletcher; Larry Baxter; Shankar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; Patrick Pagni; Rod Linn; Bret Butler

    2004-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service National Fire Plan funded a research program to study fire spread in live fuels of the southwestern United States. In the U.S. current operational fire spread models do not distinguish between live and dead fuels in a sophisticated manner because the study of live fuels has been limited. The program is experimentally examining fire spread at 3...

  4. Experiences Spreading Organic Solid Wastes on Forest Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.H. Wilhoit; L.J. Samuelson

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews experiences spreading organic solid wastes on forest land over the past six years. Presented are some of the first-ever reported results on tree growth responses from fertilizing pine trees with poultry litter, spreader distribution pattern results for spreading in a pine plantation stand, and a discussion of equipment-related experiences spreading...

  5. Cumulative effects in Xitsonga: High-tone spreading and depressor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depressor consonants in Xitsonga block high-tone spreading. These voiced obstruents and breathy voice consonants do phonetically lower pitch, but phonological blocking of H-tone spreading is not common. This paper reports new findings in which depressors allow H tone to spread into toneless words in Xitsonga, ...

  6. Do occlusal carious lesions spread laterally at the enamel-dentin junction? A histolopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, K R; Ricketts, D N; Kidd, E A

    1998-03-01

    It is conventionally taught that the carious lesion in dentin undermines the enamel due to lateral spread of the lesion at the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ). The aim of the present study was to challenge this hypothesis by testing an alternative hypothesis, that lateral spread is related to advanced lesions where the dentin is infected. Selected points in the groove-fossa system of 100 unrestored occlusal surfaces were examined and the teeth divided into five groups (scores 0-4) depending on the clinical appearance of the lesion. Teeth were sectioned through these sites and texture of the dentin was assessed by probing. Colour slides of the section face with the more extensive changes in the dentin were projected and the dimensions of the lesions at the EDJ were assessed by three examiners on two separate occasions. Inter- and intra-examiner reproducibility was assessed and found acceptable. Results showed that in 47 teeth demineralisation had not reached the EDJ. In the remaining teeth the presence or absence of lateral spread of the lesion at the EDJ was related to the clinical features of the lesion. Lateral spread was rarely found in lesions with an apparently intact enamel surface (scores 0-2). However, 32% of sites with microcavitation (score 3) and 63% of sites with obvious cavitation (score 4) showed lateral spread. Of those 31 sections which were judged to have soft dentin, 80% had lateral spread. In conclusion, the phenomenon of lateral spread of caries at the FDJ is related to advanced lesions with cavity formation where the dentin is soft and infected.

  7. A lattice model for influenza spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Liccardo

    Full Text Available We construct a stochastic SIR model for influenza spreading on a D-dimensional lattice, which represents the dynamic contact network of individuals. An age distributed population is placed on the lattice and moves on it. The displacement from a site to a nearest neighbor empty site, allows individuals to change the number and identities of their contacts. The dynamics on the lattice is governed by an attractive interaction between individuals belonging to the same age-class. The parameters, which regulate the pattern dynamics, are fixed fitting the data on the age-dependent daily contact numbers, furnished by the Polymod survey. A simple SIR transmission model with a nearest neighbors interaction and some very basic adaptive mobility restrictions complete the model. The model is validated against the age-distributed Italian epidemiological data for the influenza A(H1N1 during the [Formula: see text] season, with sensible predictions for the epidemiological parameters. For an appropriate topology of the lattice, we find that, whenever the accordance between the contact patterns of the model and the Polymod data is satisfactory, there is a good agreement between the numerical and the experimental epidemiological data. This result shows how rich is the information encoded in the average contact patterns of individuals, with respect to the analysis of the epidemic spreading of an infectious disease.

  8. SIS Epidemic Spreading with Heterogeneous Infection Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we aim to understand the influence of the heterogeneity of infection rates on the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic spreading. Specifically, we keep the recovery rates the same for all nodes and study the influence of the moments of the independently identically distributed (i.i.d.) infection rates on the average fraction $y_\\infty$ of infected nodes in the meta-stable state, which indicates the severity of the overall infection. Motivated by real-world datasets, we consider the log-normal and gamma distributions for the infection rates and we design as well a symmetric distribution so that we have a systematic view of the influence of various distributions. By continuous-time simulations on several types of networks, theoretical proofs and physical interpretations, we conclude that: 1) the heterogeneity of infection rates on average retards the virus spread, and 2) a larger even-order moment of the infection rates leads to a smaller average fraction of infected nodes, but the odd-...

  9. Principles of spread-spectrum communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Torrieri, Don

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a concise but lucid explanation of the fundamentals of spread-spectrum systems with an emphasis on theoretical principles. The choice of specific topics is tempered by the author’s judgment of their practical significance and interest to both researchers and system designers. The book contains many improved derivations of the classical theory and presents the latest research results that bring the reader to the frontier of the field. This third edition includes new coverage of topics such as CDMA networks, acquisition and synchronization in DS-CDMA cellular networks, hopsets for FH-CDMA ad hoc networks, implications of information theory, the central limit theorem, the power spectral density of FH/CPM complex envelopes, adaptive filters, and adaptive arrays.   ·         Focuses on the fundamentals of spread-spectrum communication systems and provides current examples of their applications ·         Includes problem sets at the end of each chapter to assist readers in co...

  10. Information spread in networks: Games, optimal control, and stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanafer, Ali

    This thesis focuses on designing efficient mechanisms for controlling information spread in networks. We consider two models for information spread. The first one is the well-known distributed averaging dynamics. The second model is a nonlinear one that describes virus spread in computer and biological networks. We seek to design optimal, robust, and stabilizing controllers under practical constraints. For distributed averaging networks, we study the interaction between a network designer and an adversary. We consider two types of attacks on the network. In Attack-I, the adversary strategically disconnects a set of links to prevent the nodes from reaching consensus. Meanwhile, the network designer assists the nodes in reaching consensus by changing the weights of a limited number of links in the network. We formulate two problems to describe this competition where the order in which the players act is reversed in the two problems. Although the canonical equations provided by the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (MP) seem to be intractable, we provide an alternative characterization for the optimal strategies that makes connection to potential theory. Further, we provide a sufficient condition for the existence of a saddle-point equilibrium (SPE) for the underlying zero-sum game. In Attack-II, the designer and the adversary are both capable of altering the measurements of all nodes in the network by injecting global signals. We impose two constraints on both players: a power constraint and an energy constraint. We assume that the available energy to each player is not sufficient to operate at maximum power throughout the horizon of the game. We show the existence of an SPE and derive the optimal strategies in closed form for this attack scenario. As an alternative to the "network designer vs. adversary" framework, we investigate the possibility of stabilizing unknown network diffusion processes using a distributed mechanism, where the uncertainty is due to an attack

  11. Visualization of Laterally Spreading Colorectal Tumors by Using Image-Enhanced Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tamai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laterally spreading tumors may sometimes evade detection by colonoscopy. This study aimed to evaluate the use of image-enhanced endoscopy for visualizing laterally spreading tumors of the nongranular type. We reviewed consecutive patients with 47 non-granular-type laterally spreading tumors that had been examined using white-light imaging, autofluorescence imaging, narrow-band imaging, and chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine. The quality of visualization was evaluated using a 5-point scale by less- and more-experienced endoscopists. Autofluorescence imaging provided significantly better visualization than white-light imaging for both less-experienced and experienced endoscopists. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed between the quality of visualization provided by white-light imaging and narrow-band imaging for less-experienced endoscopists. Autofluorescence imaging provides high-quality visualization of non-granular-type laterally spreading tumors on still images. Multicenter trials should be conducted to confirm the usefulness of autofluorescence imaging in detecting laterally spreading colorectal tumors.

  12. A logistic regression estimating function for spatial Gibbs point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, Adrian; Coeurjolly, Jean-François; Rubak, Ege

    We propose a computationally efficient logistic regression estimating function for spatial Gibbs point processes. The sample points for the logistic regression consist of the observed point pattern together with a random pattern of dummy points. The estimating function is closely related...

  13. Epidemic spread over networks with agent awareness and social distancing

    KAUST Repository

    Paarporn, Keith

    2016-04-20

    We study an SIS epidemic model over an arbitrary connected network topology when the agents receive personalized information about the current epidemic state. The agents utilize their available information to either reduce interactions with their neighbors (social distancing) when they believe the epidemic is currently prevalent or resume normal interactions when they believe there is low risk of becoming infected. The information is a weighted combination of three sources: 1) the average states of nodes in contact neighborhoods 2) the average states of nodes in an information network 3) a global broadcast of the average epidemic state of the network. A 2n-state Markov Chain is first considered to model the disease dynamics with awareness, from which a mean-field discrete-time n-state dynamical system is derived, where each state corresponds to an agent\\'s probability of being infected. The nonlinear model is a lower bound of its linearized version about the origin. Hence, global stability of the origin (the diseasefree equilibrium) in the linear model implies global stability in the nonlinear model. When the origin is not stable, we show the existence of a nontrivial fixed point in the awareness model, which obeys a strict partial order in relation to the nontrivial fixed point of the dynamics without distancing. In simulations, we define two performance metrics to understand the effectiveness agent awareness has in reducing the spread of an epidemic. © 2015 IEEE.

  14. Dielectric fluid directional spreading under the action of corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shangru; Liu, Jie; Hu, Qun; Jiang, Teng; Yang, Jinchu; Liu, Sheng; Zheng, Huai

    2018-01-01

    Liquid spreading is a very common nature phenomenon and of significant importance for a broad range of applications. In this study, a dielectric fluid directional spreading phenomenon is presented. Under the action of corona discharge, a dielectric fluid, here a typical silicone directionally spreads along conductive patterns on conductive/nonconductive substrates. Directional spreading behaviors of silicone were experimentally observed on different conductive patterns in detail. Spreading speeds were analyzed at different driving voltages, which induced the corona discharge. The presented phenomenon may be useful to inspire several techniques of manipulating liquid transportation and fabricating micropatterns.

  15. Spread of endosepsis in calimyrna fig orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailides, T J; Morgan, D P

    1998-07-01

    ABSTRACT Pollination of the edible fig (Ficus carica cv. Calimyrna) is mediated by a small symbiotic wasp, Blastophaga psenes, that inhabits the syconium cavity of the spring crop of fig pollinator trees (caprifigs). These fig wasps also carry propagules, mainly of Fusarium verticillioides (formerly F. moniliforme) and other Fusarium spp., which cause endosepsis, from pollinator figs to the edible Calimyrna figs in California. Spread of endosepsis was studied in one experimental and up to four commercial Calimyrna fig orchards from 1989 through 1995. The incidence of endosepsis in fruit collected from the tree canopy at either 2.0 m (high) height, from the north and south of the tree canopy, and from the outer (direct sunlight) and inner (shaded) canopy were similar. More wasps were captured in fig trees located 3.5 to 10 m east or west of the source than in trees 48 to 63 m from the source. In addition, significantly more wasps entered the syconia of trees closest (9 to 12.7 m) to the source than the syconia of the second or third trees (18 to 38.2 m) from the source. Endosepsis decreased with distance from the source, decreasing faster to the south than in other directions from the source. In addition, the disease-vectoring wasps decreased with increased distance from the source, which also described the disease spread from the contamination source for most directions, with a sharper decline south of the source. A 3-year study in three commercial Calimyrna orchards showed there is no secondary spread of fig endosepsis in the field. Although endosepsis can complete as many cycles (three to four) as its vector in fig pollinator trees, in Calimyrna figs it is considered a monocyclic disease. Because fig wasp pollinators prefer to stay close to the contamination source when receptive Calimyrna figs are available in close proximity, only disease sources (caprifigs trees) found among Calimyrna trees or at a distance less than 50 m from the borders of Calimyrna orchards

  16. Hydroclimatological And Anthropogenic Drivers For Cholera Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetto, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The nature of waterborne diseases, among which cholera has a prominent importance, calls for a better understanding of the link between epidemic spreading, water and climate. To this end, we have developed a framework which involves a network-based description of a river system, connected with local communities which act as nodes of the network. This has allowed us to produce consistent simulations of real case studies. More recent investigations comprise the evaluation of the spreading velocity of an epidemic wave by means of a reaction-diffusion modeling approach. In particular, we have found that both transport processes and epidemiological quantities, such as the basic reproduction number, have a crucial effect in controlling the spreading of the epidemics. We first developed a description of bacterial movement along the network driven by advection and diffusion; afterward, we have included the movement of human populations. This latter model allowed us to establish the conditions that can trigger epidemic waves that start from the coastal region, where bacteria are autochthonous, and travel inland. In particular, our findings suggest that even relatively low values of human diffusion can have the epidemic propagate upstream. The interaction between climate, hydrology and epidemic events is still much debated, since no clear correlation between climatologic and epidemiological phenomena has emerged so far. However, a spatial assessment of hydrological and epidemiological mechanisms could be crucial to understand the evolution of cholera outbreaks. In particular, a hotly debated topic is the understanding of the mechanisms that can generate patterns of cholera incidence that exhibit an intra-annual double peak, as frequently observed in endemic region such as Bangladesh. One of the possible explanations proposed in the literature is that spring droughts cause bacteria concentration in water to rise dramatically, triggering the first peak. On the other hand

  17. Receiver design for spread-spectrum communications with a small spread in underwater clustered multipath channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shengli; Wang, Zhaohui; Cheng, En

    2017-03-01

    This paper studies a direct-sequence spread-spectrum communication system with a small spreading factor (e.g., a single digit) in underwater acoustic multipath channels. Exploiting the channel characteristics that the propagation paths can be grouped into distinct clusters, a receiver with a set of parallel branches is proposed, where per-survivor processing (PSP) is applied on each branch to deal with the signal from one cluster while explicitly treating the signals from other clusters as structured interference. As such, it overcomes a major limitation of an existing PSP based receiver [Zhou, Morozov, and Preisig, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2746-2754 (2013)], avoiding exponential complexity increase when the spreading factor decreases. On the first branch, joint channel estimation and interference cancellation are performed based solely on the survivor paths. On the other branches, joint channel estimation and interference cancellation are carried out based on the survivor paths and the tentatively decoded data. The bit log-likelihood ratios from different branches are combined for channel decoding. Performance results based on simulations and collected data sets validate the superior performance of the proposed receiver over the conventional RAKE receiver, which is effective only when the spreading factor is large.

  18. Resource Allocation with Adaptive Spread Spectrum OFDM Using 2D Spreading for Power Line Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudais Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bit-loading techniques based on orthogonal frequency division mutiplexing (OFDM are frequently used over wireline channels. In the power line context, channel state information can reasonably be obtained at both transmitter and receiver sides, and adaptive loading can advantageously be carried out. In this paper, we propose to apply loading principles to an spread spectrum OFDM (SS-OFDM waveform which is a multicarrier system using 2D spreading in the time and frequency domains. The presented algorithm handles the subcarriers, spreading codes, bits and energies assignment in order to maximize the data rate and the range of the communication system. The optimization is realized at a target symbol error rate and under spectral mask constraint as usually imposed. The analytical study shows that the merging principle realized by the spreading code improves the rate and the range of the discrete multitone (DMT system in single and multiuser contexts. Simulations have been run over measured power line communication (PLC channel responses and highlight that the proposed system is all the more interesting than the received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is low.

  19. Overview and summary of the Spread F Experiment (SpreadFEx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Fritts

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We provide here an overview of, and a summary of results arising from, an extensive experimental campaign (the Spread F Experiment, or SpreadFEx performed from September to November 2005, with primary measurements in Brazil. The motivation was to define the potential role of neutral atmosphere dynamics, specifically gravity wave motions propagating upward from the lower atmosphere, in seeding Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI and plasma bubbles extending to higher altitudes. Campaign measurements focused on the Brazilian sector and included ground-based optical, radar, digisonde, and GPS measurements at a number of fixed and temporary sites. Related data on convection and plasma bubble structures were also collected by GOES 12, and the GUVI instrument aboard the TIMED satellite.

    Initial results of our SpreadFEx analyses are described separately by Fritts et al. (2009. Further analyses of these data provide additional evidence of 1 gravity wave (GW activity near the mesopause apparently linked to deep convection predominantly to the west of our measurement sites, 2 small-scale GWs largely confined to lower altitudes, 3 larger-scale GWs apparently penetrating to much higher altitudes, 4 substantial GW amplitudes implied by digisonde electron densities, and 5 apparent influences of these perturbations in the lower F-region on the formation of equatorial spread F, RTI, and plasma bubbles extending to much higher altitudes. Other efforts with SpreadFEx data have also yielded 6 the occurrence, locations, and scales of deep convection, 7 the spatial and temporal evolutions of plasma bubbles, 8 2-D (height-resolved structures in electron density fluctuations and equatorial spread F at lower altitudes and plasma bubbles above, and 9 the occurrence of substantial tidal perturbations to the large-scale wind and temperature fields extending to bottomside F-layer and higher altitudes. Collectively, our various SpreadFEx analyses suggest direct links

  20. Overview and summary of the Spread F Experiment (SpreadFEx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Fritts

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We provide here an overview of, and a summary of results arising from, an extensive experimental campaign (the Spread F Experiment, or SpreadFEx performed from September to November 2005, with primary measurements in Brazil. The motivation was to define the potential role of neutral atmosphere dynamics, specifically gravity wave motions propagating upward from the lower atmosphere, in seeding Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI and plasma bubbles extending to higher altitudes. Campaign measurements focused on the Brazilian sector and included ground-based optical, radar, digisonde, and GPS measurements at a number of fixed and temporary sites. Related data on convection and plasma bubble structures were also collected by GOES 12, and the GUVI instrument aboard the TIMED satellite. Initial results of our SpreadFEx analyses are described separately by Fritts et al. (2009. Further analyses of these data provide additional evidence of 1 gravity wave (GW activity near the mesopause apparently linked to deep convection predominantly to the west of our measurement sites, 2 small-scale GWs largely confined to lower altitudes, 3 larger-scale GWs apparently penetrating to much higher altitudes, 4 substantial GW amplitudes implied by digisonde electron densities, and 5 apparent influences of these perturbations in the lower F-region on the formation of equatorial spread F, RTI, and plasma bubbles extending to much higher altitudes. Other efforts with SpreadFEx data have also yielded 6 the occurrence, locations, and scales of deep convection, 7 the spatial and temporal evolutions of plasma bubbles, 8 2-D (height-resolved structures in electron density fluctuations and equatorial spread F at lower altitudes and plasma bubbles above, and 9 the occurrence of substantial tidal perturbations to the large-scale wind and temperature fields extending to bottomside F-layer and higher altitudes. Collectively, our various SpreadFEx analyses suggest direct links between

  1. Mutual Feedback Between Epidemic Spreading and Information Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xiu-Xiu; Zhou, Ge; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan; Zhu, Jonathan J H

    2015-01-01

    The impact that information diffusion has on epidemic spreading has recently attracted much attention. As a disease begins to spread in the population, information about the disease is transmitted to others, which in turn has an effect on the spread of disease. In this paper, using empirical results of the propagation of H7N9 and information about the disease, we clearly show that the spreading dynamics of the two-types of processes influence each other. We build a mathematical model in which both types of spreading dynamics are described using the SIS process in order to illustrate the influence of information diffusion on epidemic spreading. Both the simulation results and the pairwise analysis reveal that information diffusion can increase the threshold of an epidemic outbreak, decrease the final fraction of infected individuals and significantly decrease the rate at which the epidemic propagates. Additionally, we find that the multi-outbreak phenomena of epidemic spreading, along with the impact of inform...

  2. Avian Influenza spread and transmission dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Gourley, Stephen A.; Liu, Rongsong; Takekawa, John Y.; Wu, Jianhong; Chen, Dongmei; Moulin, Bernard; Wu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of type A of subtype H5N1 has been a serious threat to global public health. Understanding the roles of various (migratory, wild, poultry) bird species in the transmission of these viruses is critical for designing and implementing effective control and intervention measures. Developing appropriate models and mathematical techniques to understand these roles and to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation strategies have been a challenge. Recent development of the global health surveillance (especially satellite tracking and GIS techniques) and the mathematical theory of dynamical systems combined have gradually shown the promise of some cutting-edge methodologies and techniques in mathematical biology to meet this challenge.

  3. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose [Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of 'pins and needles' sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The 'numb-chin' syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  4. Spread of epidemic disease on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. E.

    2002-07-01

    The study of social networks, and in particular the spread of disease on networks, has attracted considerable recent attention in the physics community. In this paper, we show that a large class of standard epidemiological models, the so-called susceptible/infective/removed (SIR) models can be solved exactly on a wide variety of networks. In addition to the standard but unrealistic case of fixed infectiveness time and fixed and uncorrelated probability of transmission between all pairs of individuals, we solve cases in which times and probabilities are nonuniform and correlated. We also consider one simple case of an epidemic in a structured population, that of a sexually transmitted disease in a population divided into men and women. We confirm the correctness of our exact solutions with numerical simulations of SIR epidemics on networks.

  5. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinesio taping (KT may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT. The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS. Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT—p<0.001, KT—p<0.001, and sham—p<0.01. The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs.

  6. The Imperial Japanese Army as a Factor in Spreading Militarism and Fascism in Prewar Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Munderloh, Moritz

    2012-01-01

    Although a broad variety of aspects concerning militarism and fascism in Japan have been focal points of research, little attention has been given to the Imperial Japanese Army as an actor in spreading militarist and fascist ideology among the Japanese populace. Japan lacked a fascist mass movement centered in a fascist political party. Nonetheless, the majority of the populace supported the government’s policies, the Imperial Japanese Army's adventurism, and right wing terrorism. In order to...

  7. Impact of the topology of global macroeconomic network on the spreading of economic crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Yang, Jae-Suk; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Jaesung; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kim, In-mook

    2011-03-31

    Throughout economic history, the global economy has experienced recurring crises. The persistent recurrence of such economic crises calls for an understanding of their generic features rather than treating them as singular events. The global economic system is a highly complex system and can best be viewed in terms of a network of interacting macroeconomic agents. In this regard, from the perspective of collective network dynamics, here we explore how the topology of the global macroeconomic network affects the patterns of spreading of economic crises. Using a simple toy model of crisis spreading, we demonstrate that an individual country's role in crisis spreading is not only dependent on its gross macroeconomic capacities, but also on its local and global connectivity profile in the context of the world economic network. We find that on one hand clustering of weak links at the regional scale can significantly aggravate the spread of crises, but on the other hand the current network structure at the global scale harbors higher tolerance of extreme crises compared to more "globalized" random networks. These results suggest that there can be a potential hidden cost in the ongoing globalization movement towards establishing less-constrained, trans-regional economic links between countries, by increasing vulnerability of the global economic system to extreme crises.

  8. Impact of the Topology of Global Macroeconomic Network on the Spreading of Economic Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Yang, Jae-Suk; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Jaesung; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kim, In-mook

    2011-01-01

    Throughout economic history, the global economy has experienced recurring crises. The persistent recurrence of such economic crises calls for an understanding of their generic features rather than treating them as singular events. The global economic system is a highly complex system and can best be viewed in terms of a network of interacting macroeconomic agents. In this regard, from the perspective of collective network dynamics, here we explore how the topology of the global macroeconomic network affects the patterns of spreading of economic crises. Using a simple toy model of crisis spreading, we demonstrate that an individual country's role in crisis spreading is not only dependent on its gross macroeconomic capacities, but also on its local and global connectivity profile in the context of the world economic network. We find that on one hand clustering of weak links at the regional scale can significantly aggravate the spread of crises, but on the other hand the current network structure at the global scale harbors higher tolerance of extreme crises compared to more “globalized” random networks. These results suggest that there can be a potential hidden cost in the ongoing globalization movement towards establishing less-constrained, trans-regional economic links between countries, by increasing vulnerability of the global economic system to extreme crises. PMID:21483794

  9. Knowledge About Spread of HIV Infection Among Dentists Employed in Private and State Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilovic-Lagarija, Seila; Musa, Sanjin; Brankovic, Suada; Selimovic-Dragas, Mediha

    2014-04-01

    Lack of knowledge of how an infection is spread and how to control the infection in dental medicine indicates that there is possibility of more spreading and that dental medicine requires more education about this problem. Research conducted in period of May and July as a study of random selection from 271 workers in dental medicine from Canton Sarajevo: 147 dentists employed in public health care and 124 employed in private sector. Results show that dentists employed in private sector have more knowledge about HIV infection spread than those employed in public sector of dental medicine(t=-2,82, p=0,005). Research have shown that dentists who have less then 10 years of experience know more about HIV spread than dentist with more work experience (F=6,377, p=0,000). We think that is essential to work on expending knowledge on blood transmitted pathogens with all medical workers and especially those that are most exposed like dentists.

  10. PynPoint code for exoplanet imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Akeret, J.

    2015-04-01

    We announce the public release of PynPoint, a Python package that we have developed for analysing exoplanet data taken with the angular differential imaging observing technique. In particular, PynPoint is designed to model the point spread function of the central star and to subtract its flux contribution to reveal nearby faint companion planets. The current version of the package does this correction by using a principal component analysis method to build a basis set for modelling the point spread function of the observations. We demonstrate the performance of the package by reanalysing publicly available data on the exoplanet β Pictoris b, which consists of close to 24,000 individual image frames. We show that PynPoint is able to analyse this typical data in roughly 1.5 min on a Mac Pro, when the number of images is reduced by co-adding in sets of 5. The main computational work, the calculation of the Singular-Value-Decomposition, parallelises well as a result of a reliance on the SciPy and NumPy packages. For this calculation the peak memory load is 6 GB, which can be run comfortably on most workstations. A simpler calculation, by co-adding over 50, takes 3 s with a peak memory usage of 600 MB. This can be performed easily on a laptop. In developing the package we have modularised the code so that we will be able to extend functionality in future releases, through the inclusion of more modules, without it affecting the users application programming interface. We distribute the PynPoint package under GPLv3 licence through the central PyPI server, and the documentation is available online (http://pynpoint.ethz.ch).

  11. Effectiveness of hydrochlorothiazide in combination with telmisartan and olmesartan in adults with moderate hypertension not controlled with monotherapy: a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point (PROBE), parallel-arm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogari, Roberto; Zoppi, Annalisa; Mugellini, Amedeo; Preti, Paola; Destro, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Andrea; Derosa, Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    The potential combinations of antihypertensive agents are many, and making rational choices depends on the characteristics of each drug and on their complementary mechanisms of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 12.5 mg to olmesartan 20 mg or telmisartan 80 mg on blood pressure (BP) in patients with moderate hypertension. Consecutive outpatients at the Centro per l'Ipertensione e la Fisiopatologia Cardiovascolare, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, of both sexes aged 39 to 75 years were considered eligible for enrollment if they had a sitting diastolic BP (DBP) ->99 mm Hg and 90 mm Hg) received HCTZ 12.5 mg QD for 8 additional weeks. Clinical and ambulatory BPs were measured at the end of the washout period and at the end of both treatment periods. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded from spontaneous reports and direct inquiry from investigators. One hundred forty-five patients, all of whom were white, were recruited for the study. After the initial washout period, 13 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria and 6 refused to continue. A total of 126 white patients (69 men, 57 women; mean [SD] age, 60.2 [11.6] years) were randomized to receive monotherapy. Of these, 35 patients (56%) in the olmesartan group and 33 (52%) in the telmisartan group had previously received antihypertensive therapy. At the end of monotherapy, the 52 patients in the olmesartan group and the 49 patients in the telmisartan treatment group who were still in the study and had their BP inadequately controlled by treatment had HCTZ 12.5 mg QD added to their treatment regimen. Both combinations induced a greater ambulatory mean (SD) systolic BP (SBP) and DBP reduction than monothera- py (SBP: 145.3 [6.1] in the olmesartan group and 140.1 [6.4] in the telmisartan group, P < 0.05; DBP: 88.1 [5.1] in the olmesartan group and 84.9 [4.9] in the telmisartan group, P < 0.05). The mean (SD) reduction from baseline in the telmisartan

  12. The Points Of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Richard P.; Lillo-Martin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Signed languages display a variety of pointing signs that serve the functions of deictic and anaphoric pronouns, possessive and reflexive pronouns, demonstratives, locatives, determiners, body part labels, and verb agreement. We consider criteria for determining the linguistic status of pointing signs. Among those criteria are conventionality, indexicality, phonological compositionality, being subject to grammatical constraints, and marking the kinds of grammatical distinctions expected of pronouns. We conclude that first-person points meet all these proposed criteria, but that nonfirst person points are in part gestural. Lastly, we review evidence for the grammaticization over time of systems of pointing signs within signed languages. PMID:28603596

  13. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Eugene Stanley, H; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  14. Minimizing Energy Spread In The REX/HIE-ISOLDE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Yucemoz, Mert

    2017-01-01

    This report tries to minimize the energy spread of the beam at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE Linac using the last RF cavity as a buncher. Beams with very low energy spread are often required by the users of the facility In addition, one of the main reason to have minimum energy spread in longitudinal phase space is that higher beam energy spread translates in to a position spread after interacting with target. This causes an overlap in the position of different particles that makes it difficult to distinguish them. Hence, in order to find the operation settings for minimum energy spread at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE linac and to inspect the ongoing physics, several functions on Matlab were created that runs beam dynamics program called “TRACKV39” that provides some graphs and values as a result for analysis.

  15. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and intensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered on a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or the disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease speading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed...

  16. Spreading Optics in the primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; Gónzalez-Nuñez, Héctor; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; García-Sánchez, Ángel; Pallarés, David; Aymerich, María; Aragón, Ángel L.; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The USC-OSA is a student chapter located at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) whose objective is to bring optics and photonics knowledge closer to general public. In order to arouse kids' interest in Optics we developed an activity called Funny Light. This activity consisted on a visit of some USC-OSA members to a several local primary schools where we organized several optics experiments. In this work we present the optics demonstrations and the reaction of the 6 years-old students. The activities with greater acceptance include an explanation of light properties as polarization, refraction or reflection, and the workshop where they learnt how to build their own kaleidoscope and made a chromatic disk. Besides, they also participated in a demonstration and explanation of color properties and some optical illusions. We think that this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and experiment science in real life, as well as helping teachers to explain some complex properties and Physics phenomena of light. Given the broad acceptance of this activity, we are intending to make it a routine event of our student chapter repeating it every year.

  17. Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-09-18

    Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining.

  18. On the spreading of impacting drops

    CERN Document Server

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The energy budget and dissipation mechanisms during droplet impact on solid surfaces are studied numerically and theoretically. We find that for high impact velocities and negligible surface friction, about one half of the initial kinetic energy is transformed into surface energy, independent of the impact parameters and the detailed energy loss mechanism(s). We argue that this seemingly universal rule is related to the deformation mode of the droplet and is reminiscent of pipe flow undergoing a sudden expansion, for which the head loss can be calculated by multiplying the kinetic energy of the incoming flow by a geometrical factor. For impacts on a no-slip surface also dissipation in the shear boundary layer at the solid surface is important. In this case the head loss acts as a lower bound on the total dissipation for small viscosities. This new view on the impact problem allows for simple analytical estimates of the maximum spreading diameter of impacting drops as a function of the impact parameters and th...

  19. Estimating spread of violent behaviour with children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova E.N.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is to problems of violence (physical, psychological, sexual to children in the region of Nyzhniy Novgorod in the Russian Federation. It was used international tool for questionnaire ICAST-C. В исследовании приняли участие 227 children par- ticipated in this study (131 girls, 96 boys in the age of 11 to 18 years old. The results show that 78,4% of children have some experience of violence and abuse. 3/4 — in family, and 2/3 — at school. High level of psychological abuse at home was shown (more than 2/3 , at home it is more often than at school (54% versus 30%. Children suffer from physical abuse at home (49% versus 33% at school. Though they suffer from sexual abuse at school (27%. All kinds of abuse take place among girls as well as among boys. Except physical abuse at school where it is more usual among boys (45%, versus (33% girls. Girls suffer more at home. Teenagers suffer less, than youngsters. Emotional abuse is not spread widely (40% versus 60—75% in other groups. In general they suffer from sexual abuse not often, though it is usually at home (8,5% cases.

  20. Forecasting scintillation activity and equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David N.; Redmon, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    When transionospheric radio waves propagate through an irregular ionosphere with plasma depletions or "bubbles," they are subject to sporadic enhancement and fading, which is referred to as scintillation. Communication and navigation systems may be subject to these detrimental effects if the scintillation is strong enough. It is critical to have knowledge of the current ionospheric conditions so that system operators can distinguish between the natural radio environment and system-induced failures. In this paper we briefly describe the Forecasting Ionospheric Real-time Scintillation Tool UHF scintillation forecasting technique, which utilizes the observed characteristic parameter h'F from a ground-based, ionospheric sounder near the magnetic equator. The prereversal enhancement in vertical E × B drift velocity after sunset is the prime driver for creating plasma depletions and bubbles. In addition, there exists a "threshold" in the h'F value at 1930 LT, h'Fthr, such that, on any given evening, if h'F is significantly above h'Fthr, then scintillation activity is likely to occur, and if it is below h'Fthr, scintillation activity is unlikely to occur. We use this technique to explain the lack of scintillation activity prior to the Halloween storm in October 2003 in the Peruvian longitude sector. In addition, we have carried out a study which forecasts the occurrence or nonoccurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF), on a night-to-night basis, in five longitude sectors. The overall forecasting success is greater than 80% for each of the five longitude sectors.

  1. Insights into intercontinental spread of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dachao; Leung, Ross Ka Kit; Lee, Shui Shan; Kam, Kai Man

    2017-01-01

    The epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in South America has led to World Health Organization's declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. To further inform effective public health policy, an understanding of ZIKV's transmission mechanisms is crucial. To characterize the intercontinental transmission of ZIKV, we compiled and analyzed more than 250 gene sequences together with their sequence-related geographic and temporal information, sampled across 27 countries spanning from 1947 to 2016. After filtering and selecting appropriate sequences, extensive phylogenetic analyses were performed. Although phylogeographic reconstruction supported the transmission route of the virus in Africa, South-eastern Asia, Oceania and Latin America, we discovered that the Eastern Africa origin of ZIKV was disputable. On a molecular level, purifying selection was found to be largely responsible for the evolution of non-structural protein 5 and envelope protein E. Our dataset and ancestral sequences reconstruction analysis captured previously unidentified amino acid changes during evolution. Finally, based on the estimation of the time to the most recent common ancestors for the non-structural protein 5 gene, we hypothesized potential specific historic events that occurred in the 1940s and might have facilitated the spread of Zika virus from Africa to South-eastern Asia. Our findings provide new insights into the transmission characteristics of ZIKV, while further genetic and serologic studies are warranted to support the design of tailored prevention strategies.

  2. Insights into intercontinental spread of Zika virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachao Liang

    Full Text Available The epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV infection in South America has led to World Health Organization's declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. To further inform effective public health policy, an understanding of ZIKV's transmission mechanisms is crucial. To characterize the intercontinental transmission of ZIKV, we compiled and analyzed more than 250 gene sequences together with their sequence-related geographic and temporal information, sampled across 27 countries spanning from 1947 to 2016. After filtering and selecting appropriate sequences, extensive phylogenetic analyses were performed. Although phylogeographic reconstruction supported the transmission route of the virus in Africa, South-eastern Asia, Oceania and Latin America, we discovered that the Eastern Africa origin of ZIKV was disputable. On a molecular level, purifying selection was found to be largely responsible for the evolution of non-structural protein 5 and envelope protein E. Our dataset and ancestral sequences reconstruction analysis captured previously unidentified amino acid changes during evolution. Finally, based on the estimation of the time to the most recent common ancestors for the non-structural protein 5 gene, we hypothesized potential specific historic events that occurred in the 1940s and might have facilitated the spread of Zika virus from Africa to South-eastern Asia. Our findings provide new insights into the transmission characteristics of ZIKV, while further genetic and serologic studies are warranted to support the design of tailored prevention strategies.

  3. Spreading of persistent infections in heterogeneous populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, J.; Floría, L. M.; Moreno, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Up to now, the effects of having heterogeneous networks of contacts have been studied mostly for diseases which are not persistent in time, i.e., for diseases where the infectious period can be considered very small compared to the lifetime of an individual. Moreover, all these previous results have been obtained for closed populations, where the number of individuals does not change during the whole duration of the epidemics. Here, we go one step further and analyze, both analytically and numerically, a radically different kind of diseases: those that are persistent and can last for an individual’s lifetime. To be more specific, we particularize to the case of tuberculosis’ (TB) infection dynamics, where the infection remains latent for a period of time before showing up and spreading to other individuals. We introduce an epidemiological model for TB-like persistent infections taking into account the heterogeneity inherent to the population structure. This sort of dynamics introduces new analytical and numerical challenges that we are able to sort out. Our results show that also for persistent diseases the epidemic threshold depends on the ratio of the first two moments of the degree distribution so that it goes to zero in a class of scale-free networks when the system approaches the thermodynamic limit.

  4. Facing Two Rapidly Spreading Internet Worms

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The Internet is currently facing a growing number of computer infections due to two rapidly spreading worms. The "Conficker" and "Downadup" worms have infected an estimated 1.1 million PCs in a 24-hour period, bringing the total number of infected computers to 3.5 million [1]. Via a single USB stick, these worms were also responsible for the infection of about 40 laptops at the last EGEE conference in Istanbul. In order to reduce the impact of these worms on CERN Windows computers, the Computer Security Team has suggested several preventive measures described here. Disabling the Windows AutoRun and AutoPlay Features The Computer Security Team and the IT/IS group have decided to disable the "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" functionality on all centrally-managed Windows computers at CERN. When inserting CDs, DVDs or USB sticks into a PC, "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" are responsible for automatically playing music or films stored on these media, or ...

  5. K-Median: Random Sampling Procedure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. K-Median: Random Sampling Procedure. Sample a set of 1/ + 1 points from P. Let Q = first 1/ points, p = last point. Let T = Avg. 1-Median cost of P, c=1-Median. Let B1 = B(c,T/ 2), B2 = B(p, T). Let P' = points in B1.

  6. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  7. Digital Watermarks Using Discrete Wavelet Transformation and Spectrum Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryousuke Takai

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent tears, digital media makes rapid progress through the development of digital technology. Digital media normally assures fairly high quality, nevertheless can be easily reproduced in a perfect form. This perfect reproducibility takes and advantage from a certain point of view, while it produces an essential disadvantage, since digital media is frequently copied illegally. Thus the problem of the copyright protection becomes a very important issue. A solution of this problem is to embed digital watermarks that is not perceived clearly by usual people, but represents the proper right of original product. In our method, the images data in the frequency domain are transformed by the Discrete Wavelet Transform and analyzed by the multi resolution approximation, [1]. Further, the spectrum spreading is executed by using PN-sequences. Choi and Aizawa [7] embed watermarks by using block correlation of DCT coefficients. Thus, we apply Discrete Cosine Transformation, abbreviated to DCT, instead of the Fourier transformation in order to embed watermarks.If the value of this variance is high then we decide that the block has bigger magnitude for visual fluctuations. Henceforth, we may embed stronger watermarks, which gives resistance for images processing, such as attacks and/or compressions.

  8. Identifying node spreading influence for tunable clustering coefficient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Han, Jing-Ti; Zhao, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Identifying the node spreading influence is of significant for information and innovation diffusion. In this paper, we argue that the spreading process should be taken into account for identifying the node spreading influence and investigate the effect of the network structure, measured by the clustering coefficient, on the performance of spreading dynamics. Firstly, we generate a series of networks with tunable clustering coefficients. Then, taking into account the spreading process, we explore the performances among the Dynamics-sensitive (DS) index and the degree, between, closeness, eigenvector indices. Comparing with the Susceptible-Infective-Removed (SIR) model, the extensive results show that, for different spreading time steps and clustering coefficients, the DS centrality outperforms the performance, τ > 0 . 97, of degree, betweenness, closeness and eigenvector measures. Moreover, the accuracy of closeness and eigenvector centrality is similar and conducts better in networks with larger spreading rate β = 0 . 20 , τ > 0 . 93. As the clustering coefficient increases, all the performances decrease but DS centrality with least percent of 1.16 at most under β = 0 . 10, and Closeness with the largest percent of 9.75 under β = 0 . 05. This work suggests that the spreading influence not only depends on the network structure, more importantly, the spreading dynamic process also affect the performance greatly, which should be taken into account simultaneously.

  9. Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spread of the spiraling white fly Aleurodicus dispersus (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and its parasitoids Encarcia species (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) on horticultural plants in Northwest and Central Nigeria.

  10. Ice Control with Brine Spread with Nozzles on Highways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolet, Lars; Fonnesbech, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    that the salt will run from the high level of the road to the lower level”. In the test the salt moved 1 meter in 3 hours. The knowledge gained from the measurements in the county of Funen - brine spread with nozzles, spreading salt to high level of the road and using GPS controlled spreading – was implemented......During the years 1996-2006, the former county of Funen, Denmark, gradually replaced pre-wetted salt with brine spread with nozzles as anti-icing agent in all her ice control activities. The replacement related to 1000 kilometres of highways. Jeopardizing neither road safety nor traffic flow...

  11. Scaling of energy spreading in strongly nonlinear disordered lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulansky, Mario; Ahnert, Karsten; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2011-02-01

    To characterize a destruction of Anderson localization by nonlinearity, we study the spreading behavior of initially localized states in disordered, strongly nonlinear lattices. Due to chaotic nonlinear interaction of localized linear or nonlinear modes, energy spreads nearly subdiffusively. Based on a phenomenological description by virtue of a nonlinear diffusion equation, we establish a one-parameter scaling relation between the velocity of spreading and the density, which is confirmed numerically. From this scaling it follows that for very low densities the spreading slows down compared to the pure power law.

  12. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... between the studied provenances were less than 39%. Key words: Acacia Senegal, provenance variation, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker, salt tolerance, seed germination, seedling growth. INTRODUCTION. Salinity is the major factor limiting plants growth, widely spread and has more ...

  13. Effects of Magma Supply on Volcanic Morphology along the Hotspot-Influenced Galapagos Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Meyer, J. D.; Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between lava morphology and spreading rate, with a predominance of pillows at slow- spreading ridges and sheets at fast-spreading ridges, is well known although not well understood. New EM300 and DSL-120A sonar data collected along the GSC from {94.5°}-{89.5°} W in 2006 reveals that increasing magma supply decreases the tendency for eruptions to focus to point-source volcanic vents, and ultimately produces fissure-fed sheet flow eruptions. The change in spreading rate is insignificant over this area, thus the additional magma supply provided by the Galapagos hotspot is the main variable. The high- resolution sonar data images volcanic vents clearly so that their morphology may be analyzed. Approaching the focus of hotspot influence on the GSC at {91.5°}W from {95°}W, volcanic vents become progressively lower in relief and more elongate. Volcanic vent morphology consists primarily of individual cones from {95°}-{92.5°}W presumably produced by eruptions that focus quickly to point-source vents, although the average size of the cones decreases toward the east, as magma supply increases. Where the ridge topography changes from an axial valley to axial rise, the volcanic morphology also becomes dominated by axial volcanic ridges rather than cones. Finally, along the ridge segment farthest east we find that the volcanic vents are simply expressed as fissures. Although the volcanic vent morphology progressively changes, it is only along this last, easternmost segment at {91.5°}W that we find a significant abundance of sheet lava flows based on extensive visual coverage with Medea. Elsewhere, the ridge is composed almost exclusively of pillow lava flows. These results suggest that magma supply, rather than other variables, is responsible for the relationship between lava morphology and spreading rate. Unlike true fast-spreading ridges, each ridge segment on the GSC from {93°}- {91°}W contains a single large volcanic cone centered at the segment

  14. Potential wildlife sentinels for monitoring the endemic spread of human buruli ulcer in South-East australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Carson

    Full Text Available The last 20 years has seen a significant series of outbreaks of Buruli/Bairnsdale Ulcer (BU, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, in temperate south-eastern Australia (state of Victoria. Here, the prevailing view of M. ulcerans as an aquatic pathogen has been questioned by recent research identifying native wildlife as potential terrestrial reservoirs of infection; specifically, tree-dwelling common ringtail and brushtail possums. In that previous work, sampling of environmental possum faeces detected a high prevalence of M. ulcerans DNA in established endemic areas for human BU on the Bellarine Peninsula, compared with non-endemic areas. Here, we report research from an emergent BU focus recently identified on the Mornington Peninsula, confirming associations between human BU and the presence of the aetiological agent in possum faeces, detected by real-time PCR targeting M. ulcerans IS2404, IS2606 and KR. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA was detected in 20/216 (9.3% ground collected ringtail possum faecal samples and 4/6 (66.6% brushtail possum faecal samples. The distribution of the PCR positive possum faecal samples and human BU cases was highly focal: there was a significant non-random cluster of 16 M. ulcerans positive possum faecal sample points detected by spatial scan statistics (P<0.0001 within a circle of radius 0.42 km, within which were located the addresses of 6/12 human cases reported from the area to date; moreover, the highest sample PCR signal strength (equivalent to ≥10(6 organisms per gram of faeces was found in a sample point located within this cluster radius. Corresponding faecal samples collected from closely adjacent BU-free areas were predominantly negative. Possums may be useful sentinels to predict endemic spread of human BU in Victoria, for public health planning. Further research is needed to establish whether spatial associations represent evidence of direct or indirect transmission between possums and humans, and the

  15. Analysis of a collinear holographic storage system: introduction of pixel spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Ichimura, Shotaro; Fujimura, Ryushi; Kuroda, Kazuo; Tan, Xiaodi; Horimai, Hideyoshi

    2006-05-01

    Image formation in a collinear holographic storage system was analyzed. The wavefront from each pixel of a spatial light modulator was regarded as a plane wave in the recording medium, and its wave vector was determined by the position of the pixel. The hologram in the recording medium was treated as the summation of all gratings written by all combinations of two plane waves. The image of a data page was formed by diffraction of the reference waves by all gratings. The results of the simulation showed good agreement with experiment. We introduced the pixel spread function to describe the image formation characteristics. Analysis of the pixel spread function reveals that a radial-line pixel pattern for reference waves gave a sharper image than other reference pixel patterns. It is also shown that a random phase modulation applied to each reference pixel improved the image formation.

  16. A study of design approach of spreading schemes for viral marketing based on human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianmei; Zhuang, Dong; Xie, Weicong; Chen, Guangrong

    2013-12-01

    Before launching a real viral marketing campaign, it is needed to design a spreading scheme by simulations. Based on a categorization of spreading patterns in real world and models, we point out that the existing research (especially Yang et al. (2010) Ref. [16]) implicitly assume that if a user decides to post a received message (is activated), he/she will take the reposting action promptly (Prompt Action After Activation, or PAAA). After a careful analysis on a real dataset however, it is found that the observed time differences between action and activation exhibit a heavy-tailed distribution. A simulation model for heavy-tailed pattern is then proposed and performed. Similarities and differences of spreading processes between the heavy-tailed and PAAA patterns are analyzed. Consequently, a more practical design approach of spreading scheme for viral marketing on QQ platform is proposed. The design approach can be extended and applied to the contexts of non-heavy-tailed pattern, and viral marketing on other instant messaging platforms.

  17. Spatiotemporal analysis of the spread of meningococcal meningitis in kaduna metropolis, 2007 - 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaru, E. T.; Ludin, A. M. N.; Sabri, S.

    2014-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is an airborne disease that has been a threat to human life for over a century now. This study aims to describe the spatiotemporal spread of Meningococcal meningitis in the population residing in Kaduna metropolis. All the reported cases (suspected and confirmed) within the Kaduna metropolis from 2007 to 2011 were collected from files of the patients. Only patients who are resident in Kaduna metropolis were considered. For each year, the directional distribution, standard distance and the spatiotemporal pattern were explored. The analysis of the directional distribution shows the direction and the angle that the spread is more biased to at the different years. Standard distance shows the different areas of coverage for the spread of the disease for those five years which points to those areas that need more attention. The spatiotemporal results revealed that some specific neighbourhoods within the metropolis had the cases reoccurring within the five year period especially at the western and central parts of the metropolis. This indicates that much more attention is needed in those areas as regards preventive strategies by the policy makers and the stake holders. The spread of Meningococcal meningitis disease in Kaduna metropolis is much more dominant in some specific neighbourhood.

  18. Using the Gravity Model to Estimate the Spatial Spread of Vector-Borne Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Aerts

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The gravity models are commonly used spatial interaction models. They have been widely applied in a large set of domains dealing with interactions amongst spatial entities. The spread of vector-borne diseases is also related to the intensity of interaction between spatial entities, namely, the physical habitat of pathogens’ vectors and/or hosts, and urban areas, thus humans. This study implements the concept behind gravity models in the spatial spread of two vector-borne diseases, nephropathia epidemica and Lyme borreliosis, based on current knowledge on the transmission mechanism of these diseases. Two sources of information on vegetated systems were tested: the CORINE land cover map and MODIS NDVI. The size of vegetated areas near urban centers and a local indicator of occupation-related exposure were found significant predictors of disease risk. Both the land cover map and the space-borne dataset were suited yet not equivalent input sources to locate and measure vegetated areas of importance for disease spread. The overall results point at the compatibility of the gravity model concept and the spatial spread of vector-borne diseases.

  19. From the diabetic foot ulcer and beyond: how do foot infections spread in patients with diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose Luis; Pulido-Duque, Juan; Maynar, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    A diabetic foot infection is usually the result of a pre-existing foot ulceration and is the leading cause of lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetes. It is widely accepted that diabetic foot infections may be challenging to treat for several reasons. The devastating effects of hyperglycemia on host defense, ischemia, multi-drug resistant bacteria and spreading of infection through the foot may complicate the course of diabetic foot infections. Understanding the ways in which infections spread through the diabetic foot is a pivotal factor in order to decide the best approach for the patient's treatment. The ways in which infections spread can be explained by the anatomical division of the foot into compartments, the tendons included in the compartments, the initial location of the point of entry of the infection and the type of infection that the patient has. The aim of this paper is to further comment on the existed and proposed anatomical principles of the spread of infection through the foot in patients with diabetes. PMID:23050067

  20. Bubble spreading during the boiling crisis: modelling and experimenting in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Garrabos, Y; Lecoutre, C; Chatain, D

    2016-01-01

    Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid carrier. We discuss the boiling crisis, a transition between two regimes of boiling: nucleate and film boiling. The boiling crisis results in a sharp decrease in the heat transfer rate, which can cause a major accident in industrial heat exchangers. In this communication, we present a physical model of the boiling crisis based on the vapor recoil effect. Under the action of the vapor recoil the gas bubbles begin to spread over the heater thus forming a germ for the vapor film. The vapor recoil force not only causes its spreading, it also creates a strong adhesion to the heater that prevents the bubble departure, thus favoring the further spreading. Near the liquid-gas critical point, the bubble growth is very slow and allows the kinetics of the bubble spreading to be observed. Since the surface tension is very small in this regime, only microgravity conditions can preserve a convex bubble shape. In the experiments both in the Mir spa...

  1. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. From the diabetic foot ulcer and beyond: how do foot infections spread in patients with diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aragón-Sánchez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A diabetic foot infection is usually the result of a pre-existing foot ulceration and is the leading cause of lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetes. It is widely accepted that diabetic foot infections may be challenging to treat for several reasons. The devastating effects of hyperglycemia on host defense, ischemia, multi-drug resistant bacteria and spreading of infection through the foot may complicate the course of diabetic foot infections. Understanding the ways in which infections spread through the diabetic foot is a pivotal factor in order to decide the best approach for the patient's treatment. The ways in which infections spread can be explained by the anatomical division of the foot into compartments, the tendons included in the compartments, the initial location of the point of entry of the infection and the type of infection that the patient has. The aim of this paper is to further comment on the existed and proposed anatomical principles of the spread of infection through the foot in patients with diabetes.

  3. Random discrete Schroedinger operators from random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Jonathan [Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Forrester, Peter J [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia); Smilansky, Uzy [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2007-02-02

    We investigate random, discrete Schroedinger operators which arise naturally in the theory of random matrices, and depend parametrically on Dyson's Coulomb gas inverse temperature {beta}. They are similar to the class of 'critical' random Schroedinger operators with random potentials which diminish as vertical bar x vertical bar{sup -1/2}. We show that as a function of {beta} they undergo a transition from a regime of (power-law) localized eigenstates with a pure point spectrum for {beta} < 2 to a regime of extended states with a singular continuous spectrum for {beta} {>=} 2. (fast track communication)

  4. Accuracy Assessment Points for Capitol Reef National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 1,313 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the summer of 2005 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  5. Accuracy Assessment Points for Natural Bridges National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 288 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the fall of 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  6. Geodesics on Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchuan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel framework to compute geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds. Our framework consists of three parts, particle based approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces, Cartesian grid based approximate geodesics on point clouds, and geodesic correction. The first two parts can effectively generate approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds, respectively. By introducing the geodesic curvature flow, the third part produces smooth and accurate geodesic solutions. Differing from most of the existing methods, our algorithms can converge to a given tolerance. The presented computational framework is suitable for arbitrary implicit hypersurfaces or point clouds with high genus or high curvature.

  7. Lévy based Cox point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar; Prokesová, Michaela; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we introduce Lévy-driven Cox point processes (LCPs) as Cox point processes with driving intensity function Λ defined by a kernel smoothing of a Lévy basis (an independently scattered, infinitely divisible random measure). We also consider log Lévy-driven Cox point processes (LLCPs......) with Λ equal to the exponential of such a kernel smoothing. Special cases are shot noise Cox processes, log Gaussian Cox processes, and log shot noise Cox processes. We study the theoretical properties of Lévy-based Cox processes, including moment properties described by nth-order product densities......, mixing properties, specification of inhomogeneity, and spatio-temporal extensions...

  8. OCCURRENCE AND SPREAD OF OKRA LEAF CURL VIRUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Thé spread of okra leaf curl virus disease (OLCD) in two different ecological areas of Côte d'lvoire and the response of okra varieties and landrace cultivars to the disease were examined in 1986 and. 1991. Much disease spread occurred at Boueké in August, september and october. No linear relationship.

  9. Dynamics of a spreading thin film with gravitational counterflow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PhD thesis, Princeton University. Davis J M and Troian S M 2003 Influence of attractive van der waals interactions on the optimal excitations in thermocapillary driven spreading. Phys. Rev. E 67: 016,308. Davis J M and Troian S M 2004 Influence of boundary slip on the optimal excitations in thermocapillary driven spreading ...

  10. 12 CFR 619.9180 - Fixed interest spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed interest spread. 619.9180 Section 619.9180 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9180 Fixed interest spread. A percentage to be added to the cost of money to the bank or association as the means of...

  11. Human activity and the spread of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall J. Cushman; Michelle Cooper; Ross K. Meentemeyer; Shelly Benson

    2008-01-01

    Increasing numbers of studies are finding that humans can facilitate the spread of exotic plant species in protected wildlands. Hiking trails commonly serve as conduits for invaders and the number of exotic plant species occurring in protected areas is often correlated positively with visitation rates. Despite such evidence linking human activity to the spread of...

  12. An examination of fire spread thresholds in discontinuous fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Kara M. Yedinak

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on environmental factors like wind, slope, and fuel moisture content. To investigate threshold spread behaviours, we conducted a set...

  13. A Deadly Path: Bacterial Spread During Bubonic Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Miller, Virginia L

    2016-04-01

    Yersinia pestis causes bubonic plague, a fulminant disease where host immune responses are abrogated. Recently developed in vivo models of plague have resulted in new ideas regarding bacterial spread in the body. Deciphering bacterial spread is key to understanding Y. pestis and the immune responses it encounters during infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting the rate of spread of introduced animals and plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Bosch, van den F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper includes an estimate of what needs to be known for predicting the spreading rates of introduced animal and plant species. Existing models, although capturing the principal aspects of the spreading process, still prove to be too simple. Even in their initial state of development, they

  15. Determinants of Commercial Banks' Interest Rate Spread in Namibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the determinants of commercial banks interest rate spread in Namibia, using a panel data analysis of bank level dada. It applied the OLS technique to identify the bank-specific variables that have been influencing interest rate spread in Namibia over the period 2004 – 2011. The results of the study ...

  16. Spreading history of the Arabian Sea: Some new constraints

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A; Bhattacharya, G.C; Murty, G.P.S.; Desa, M.

    before the formation of All. The hiatus between these spreading spisodes, characterizEd. by a magnetic quiet zone., was much shorter (18 x 10 sup(6) yr) than previously believed. After spreading restarted, the younger phase continued at a very slow rate...

  17. Theory of flame spread above solids. [fuel exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirignano, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A theory for flame spread above a solid fuel is presented. The special case is considered whereby the oxidation is an exothermic surface reaction. The spreading rate is predicted as a function of the thermochemical properties, fuel-bed thickness, and convective velocity. Also, the theory predicts temperature, mass fraction, and heat flux as a function of position.

  18. Explosive spread F caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. P.; Freidberg, J. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning-produced electromagnetic effects may produce significant modifications in the ionospheric plasmas. An outstanding phenomenon investigated in this paper is the so-called explosive spread F, whose close link with lightning has been identified (Woodman and Kudeki, 1984). Parametric instability excited by the lightning-induced whistler waves is proposed as a potential source mechanism causing the explosive spread F.

  19. Mechanistic spatio-temporal point process models for marked point processes, with a view to forest stand data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Rubak, Ege Holger

    We show how a spatial point process, where to each point there is associated a random quantitative mark, can be identified with a spatio-temporal point process specified by a conditional intensity function. For instance, the points can be tree locations, the marks can express the size of trees, a...... likelihood based inference and tests for independence between the points and the marks.......We show how a spatial point process, where to each point there is associated a random quantitative mark, can be identified with a spatio-temporal point process specified by a conditional intensity function. For instance, the points can be tree locations, the marks can express the size of trees...

  20. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…

  1. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  2. Holographic Three point Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissi, Agnese

    gravitons and a point like graviton and its dual counterpart, namely two Schur polynomials and a single trace chiral primary. Secondly we compute the one loop correction to planar, non extremal three point functions of two heavy and one light operators, both from the gauge and string side in the Frolov...

  3. Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan; Davis, Lisa

    1999-01-01

    Presents a learning activity plan for teachers or librarians that helps students comprehend the author's craft element of "point of view." Focus is on first and third person point of view. Outlines student motivation methods, the procedure, extension/application activities, and assessment. Includes an activity worksheet. (AEF)

  4. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND ITS GLOBAL SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery during the 20th century, antimicrobial agents (antibiotics and related medicinal drugs have substantially reduced the threat posed by infectious diseases. The use of these “wonder drugs”, combined with improvements in sanitation, housing, and nutrition, and the advent of widespread immunization programmes, has led to a dramatic drop in deaths from diseases that were previously widespread, untreatable, and frequently fatal. Over the years, antimicrobials have saved the lives and eased the suffering of millions of people. By helping to bring many serious infectious diseases under control, these drugs hav also contributed to the major gains in life expectancy experienced during the latter part of the last century. These gains are now seriously jeopardized by another recent development: the emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to cheap and effective first-choice, or “first- line” drugs. The bacterial infections which contribute most to human disease are also those in which emerging microbial resistance is most evident: diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract infections, meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, and hospital-acquired infections. Some important examples include penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multi-resistant salmonellae, and multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of resistance to drugs commonly used to treat malaria is of particular concern, as is the emerging resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Treatment, resu.lting in prolonged illness and greater risk of death, Treatment failures also lead to longer periods of infectivity, which increase the numbers of infected people moving in the community and thus expose the general population to the risk of contracting a resistant strain of infection. When infections become resistant to first-line antimicrobials, treatment has to be switched

  5. Gene expression profiling of laterally spreading tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Takeshi; Arai, Makoto; Okimoto, Kenichiro; Oyamada, Arata; Saito, Keiko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Kishimoto, Takashi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-06-06

    Laterally spreading tumors (LSTs) are generally defined as lesions >10 mm in diameter, are characterized by lateral expansion along the luminal wall with a low vertical axis. In contrast to other forms of tumor, LSTs are generally considered to have a superficial growth pattern and the potential for malignancy. We focused on this morphological character of LSTs, and analyzed the gene expression profile of LSTs. The expression of 168 genes in 41 colorectal tumor samples (17 LST-adenoma, 12 LST-carcinoma, 12 Ip [pedunculated type of the Paris classification)-adenoma, all of which were 10 mm or more in diameter] was analyzed by PCR array. Based on the results, we investigated the expression levels of genes up-regulated in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma, by hierarchical and K-means clustering. To confirm the results of the array analysis, using an additional 60 samples (38 LST-adenoma, 22 Ip-adenoma), we determined the localization of the gene product by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of 129 genes differed in colorectal tumors from normal mucosa by PCR array analysis. As a result of K-means clustering, the expression levels of five genes, AKT1, BCL2L1, ERBB2, MTA2 and TNFRSF25, were found to be significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the BCL2L1 protein was significantly and meaningfully up-regulated in LST-adenoma compared to Ip-adenoma (p = 0.010). With respect to apoptosis status in LST-Adenoma, it assumes that BCL2L1 is anti-apoptotic protein, the samples such as BCL2L1 positive and TUNEL negative, or BCL2L1 negative and TUNEL positive are consistent with the assumption. 63.2 % LST-adenoma samples were consistent with the assumption. LSTs have an unusual profile of gene expression compared to other tumors and BCL2L1 might be concerned in the organization of LSTs.

  6. Epidemic spread in bipartite network by considering risk awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, She; Sun, Mei; Ampimah, Benjamin Chris; Han, Dun

    2018-02-01

    Human awareness plays an important role in the spread of infectious diseases and the control of propagation patterns. Exploring the interplay between human awareness and epidemic spreading is a topic that has been receiving increasing attention. Considering the fact, some well-known diseases only spread between different species we propose a theoretical analysis of the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic spread from the perspective of bipartite network and risk aversion. Using mean field theory, the epidemic threshold is calculated theoretically. Simulation results are consistent with the proposed analytic model. The results show that, the final infection density is negative linear with the value of individuals' risk awareness. Therefore, the epidemic spread could be effectively suppressed by improving individuals' risk awareness.

  7. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  8. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks, which will benefit the promotion of technical innovations, healthy behaviors, new products, etc. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and moderate correlation coefficients result in most efficient info...

  9. Wavelet Neural Network Model for Yield Spread Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdous Ahmad Shah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a hybrid method based on coupling discrete wavelet transforms (DWTs and artificial neural network (ANN for yield spread forecasting is proposed. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT using five different wavelet families is applied to decompose the five different yield spreads constructed at shorter end, longer end, and policy relevant area of the yield curve to eliminate noise from them. The wavelet coefficients are then used as inputs into Levenberg-Marquardt (LM ANN models to forecast the predictive power of each of these spreads for output growth. We find that the yield spreads constructed at the shorter end and policy relevant areas of the yield curve have a better predictive power to forecast the output growth, whereas the yield spreads, which are constructed at the longer end of the yield curve do not seem to have predictive information for output growth. These results provide the robustness to the earlier results.

  10. Flame spread over inclined electrical wires with AC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Seung J.

    2017-07-21

    Flame spread over polyethylene-insulated electrical wires was studied experimentally with applied alternating current (AC) by varying the inclination angle (θ), applied voltage (VAC), and frequency (fAC). For the baseline case with no electric field applied, the flame spread rate and the flame width of downwardly spreading flames (DSFs) decreased from the horizontal case for −20° ≤ θ < 0° and maintained near constant values for −90° ≤ θ < −20°, while the flame spread rate increased appreciably as the inclination angle of upwardly spreading flames (USFs) increased. When an AC electric field was applied, the behavior of flame spread rate in DSFs (USFs) could be classified into two (three) sub-regimes characterized by various functional dependences on VAC, fAC, and θ. In nearly all cases of DSFs, a globular molten polyethylene formed ahead of the spreading flame edge, occasionally dripping onto the ground. In these cases, an effective flame spread rate was defined to represent the burning rate by measuring the mass loss due to dripping. This effective spread rate was independent of AC frequency, while it decreased linearly with voltage and was independent of the inclination angle. In DSFs, when excessively high voltage and frequency were applied, the dripping led to flame extinction during propagation and the extinction frequency correlated well with applied voltage. In USFs, when high voltage and frequency were applied, multiple globular molten PEs formed at several locations, leading to ejections of multiple small flame segments from the main flame, thereby reducing the flame spread rate, which could be attributed to the electrospray phenomenon.

  11. An intraorganizational model for developing and spreading quality improvement innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Katherine C; Gainer, Lindsay A; Allen, Adrienne S; OʼSullivan, Tatum; Singer, Sara J

    Recent policy reforms encourage quality improvement (QI) innovations in primary care, but practitioners lack clear guidance regarding spread inside organizations. We designed this study to identify how large organizations can facilitate intraorganizational spread of QI innovations. We conducted ethnographic observation and interviews in a large, multispecialty, community-based medical group that implemented three QI innovations across 10 primary care sites using a new method for intraorganizational process development and spread. We compared quantitative outcomes achieved through the group's traditional versus new method, created a process model describing the steps in the new method, and identified barriers and facilitators at each step. The medical group achieved substantial improvement using its new method of intraorganizational process development and spread of QI innovations: standard work for rooming and depression screening, vaccine error rates and order compliance, and Pap smear error rates. Our model details nine critical steps for successful intraorganizational process development (set priorities, assess the current state, develop the new process, and measure and refine) and spread (develop support, disseminate information, facilitate peer-to-peer training, reinforce, and learn and adapt). Our results highlight the importance of utilizing preexisting organizational structures such as established communication channels, standardized roles, common workflows, formal authority, and performance measurement and feedback systems when developing and spreading QI processes inside an organization. In particular, we detail how formal process advocate positions in each site for each role can facilitate the spread of new processes. Successful intraorganizational spread is possible and sustainable. Developing and spreading new QI processes across sites inside an organization requires creating a shared understanding of the necessary process steps, considering the

  12. PLANNING QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCESSES IN A LARGE SCALE GEOGRAPHICALLY SPREAD HYBRID SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Святослав Аркадійович МУРАВЕЦЬКИЙ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been discussed key points of operational activates in a large scale geographically spread software development projects. A look taken at required QA processes structure in such project. There have been given up to date methods of integration quality assurance processes into software development processes. There have been reviewed existing groups of software development methodologies. Such as sequential, agile and based on RPINCE2. There have been given a condensed overview of quality assurance processes in each group. There have been given a review of common challenges that sequential and agile models are having in case of large geographically spread hybrid software development project. Recommendations were given in order to tackle those challenges.  The conclusions about the best methodology choice and appliance to the particular project have been made.

  13. The spatial spread of schistosomiasis: A multidimensional network model applied to Saint-Louis region, Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciddio, Manuela; Mari, Lorenzo; Sokolow, Susanne H.; De Leo, Giulio A.; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino

    2017-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic, water-related disease that is prevalent in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, causing severe and chronic consequences especially among children. Here we study the spatial spread of this disease within a network of connected villages in the endemic region of the Lower Basin of the Senegal River, in Senegal. The analysis is performed by means of a spatially explicit metapopulation model that couples local-scale eco-epidemiological dynamics with spatial mechanisms related to human mobility (estimated from anonymized mobile phone records), snail dispersal and hydrological transport of schistosome larvae along the main water bodies of the region. Results show that the model produces epidemiological patterns consistent with field observations, and point out the key role of spatial connectivity on the spread of the disease. These findings underline the importance of considering different transport pathways in order to elaborate disease control strategies that can be effective within a network of connected populations.

  14. Role of Antigen Spread and Distinctive Characteristics of Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, James L; Madan, Ravi A; Pachynski, Russell; Mulders, Peter; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Trager, James; Drake, Charles G

    2017-04-01

    Immunotherapy is an important breakthrough in cancer. US Food and Drug Administration-approved immunotherapies for cancer treatment (including, but not limited to, sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, and atezolizumab) substantially improve overall survival across multiple malignancies. One mechanism of action of these treatments is to induce an immune response against antigen-bearing tumor cells; the resultant cell death releases secondary (nontargeted) tumor antigens. Secondary antigens prime subsequent immune responses (antigen spread). Immunotherapy-induced antigen spread has been shown in clinical studies. For example, in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients, sipuleucel-T induced early immune responses to the immunizing antigen (PA2024) and/or the target antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase). Thereafter, most patients developed increased antibody responses to numerous secondary proteins, several of which are expressed in prostate cancer with functional relevance in cancer. The ipilimumab-induced antibody profile in melanoma patients shows that antigen spread also occurs with immune checkpoint blockade. In contrast to chemotherapy, immunotherapy often does not result in short-term changes in conventional disease progression end points (eg, progression-free survival, tumor size), which may be explained, in part, by the time taken for antigen spread to occur. Thus, immune-related response criteria need to be identified to better monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy. As immunotherapy antitumor effects take time to evolve, immunotherapy in patients with less advanced cancer may have greater clinical benefit vs those with more advanced disease. This concept is supported by prostate cancer clinical studies with sipuleucel-T, PSA-TRICOM, and ipilimumab. We discuss antigen spread with cancer immunotherapy and its implications for clinical outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  15. Channel Islands, Kelp Forest Monitoring, Survey, Random Point Contact

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset from the Channel Islands National Park's Kelp Forest Monitoring Program has estimates of substrate composition and percent cover of selected algal and...

  16. Interesting Interest Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2012-01-01

    Not all interest points are equally interesting. The most valuable interest points lead to optimal performance of the computer vision method in which they are employed. But a measure of this kind will be dependent on the chosen vision application. We propose a more general performance measure based...... position. The LED illumination provides the option for artificially relighting the scene from a range of light directions. This data set has given us the ability to systematically evaluate the performance of a number of interest point detectors. The highlights of the conclusions are that the fixed scale...

  17. Do acupuncture points exist?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Xiaohui; Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (State Key Laboratory), and Synchrotron Radiation Research Center of Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liu Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Dang, Ruishan [Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huang Yuying; He Wei [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ding Guanghong [Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2009-05-07

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian. (note)

  18. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  19. Random thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  20. A spreading technique for forming film in a captive bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, G; Walch, M; Van Eijk, M; Haagsman, H P

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the surface properties of lung surfactant are extensively studied in in vitro systems such as the captive-bubble surfactometer (CBS), the pulsating-bubble surfactometer, and the Wilhelmy balance. Among these systems, the CBS is advantageous when a leakproof system and high cycling rates are required. However, widespread application of the CBS to mechanistic studies of dynamic surfactant protein-phospholipid interactions of spread film and to comparative studies between spread and adsorbed film is hampered because spreading of film is difficult. In addition, when film is formed by adsorption, the amount of material required is fairly large. We have developed an easy spreading technique that allows routine formation of film by spreading of small amounts of surfactant components at the air-water interface of an air bubble in a CBS. The technique is reliable, precise, and accurate, and the biophysical activity of film formed by spreading is similar to that of film formed by adsorption. This method will be useful for mechanistic studies of surfactant components under dynamic conditions and for comparative studies of spread films and adsorbed films. PMID:9788918