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Sample records for random phage display

  1. ORFeome Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantow, Jonas; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael

    2018-01-01

    ORFeome phage display allows the efficient functional screening of entire proteomes or even metaproteomes to identify immunogenic proteins. For this purpose, randomly fragmented, whole genomes or metagenomes are cloned into a phage-display vector allowing positive selection for open reading frames (ORF) to improve the library quality. These libraries display all possible proteins encoded by a pathogen or a microbiome on the phage surface. Consequently, immunogenic proteins can be selected from these libraries using disease-related immunoglobulins from patient serum. ORFeome phage display in particular allows the identification of immunogenic proteins that are only expressed in the host-pathogen interaction but not in cultivation, as well as the detection of very low expressed and very small immunogens and immunogenic proteins of non-cultivable organisms. The identified immunogenic proteins are potential biomarkers for the development of diagnostic assays or vaccines. These articles will give an introduction to ORFeome phage-display technology and give detailed protocols to identify immunogenic proteins by phage display.

  2. Epitope mapping by random peptide phage display reveals essential residues for vaccinia extracellular enveloped virion spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A33 is a type II integral membrane protein expressed on the extracellular enveloped form of vaccinia virus (VACV. Passive transfer of A33-directed monoclonal antibodies or vaccination with an A33 subunit vaccine confers protection against lethal poxvirus challenge in animal models. Homologs of A33 are highly conserved among members of the Orthopoxvirus genus and are potential candidates for inclusion in vaccines or assays targeting extracellular enveloped virus activity. One monoclonal antibody directed against VACV A33, MAb-1G10, has been shown to target a conformation-dependent epitope. Interestingly, while it recognizes VACV A33 as well as the corresponding variola homolog, it does not bind to the monkeypox homolog. In this study, we utilized a random phage display library to investigate the epitope recognized by MAb-1G10 that is critical for facilitating cell-to-cell spread of the vaccinia virus. Results By screening with linear or conformational random phage libraries, we found that phages binding to MAb-1G10 display the consensus motif CEPLC, with a disulfide bond formed between two cysteine residues required for MAb-1G10 binding. Although the phage motif contained no linear sequences homologous to VACV A33, structure modeling and analysis suggested that residue D115 is important to form the minimal epitope core. A panel of point mutants expressing the ectodomain of A33 protein was generated and analyzed by either binding assays such as ELISA and immunoprecipitation or a functional assessment by blocking MAb-1G10 mediated comet inhibition in cell culture. Conclusions These results confirm L118 as a component of the MAb-1G10 binding epitope, and further identify D115 as an essential residue. By defining the minimum conformational structure, as well as the conformational arrangement of a short peptide sequence recognized by MAb-1G10, these results introduce the possibility of designing small molecule mimetics that may

  3. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advance in phage display technology for bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuyu; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Zhi; J Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-06-01

    Phage display technology has emerged as a powerful tool for target gene expression and target-specific ligand selection. It is widely used to screen peptides, proteins and antibodies with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency and low cost. A variety of targets, including ions, small molecules, inorganic materials, natural and biological polymers, nanostructures, cells, bacteria, and even tissues, have been demonstrated to generate specific binding ligands by phage display. Phages and target-specific ligands screened by phage display have been widely used as affinity reagents in therapeutics, diagnostics and biosensors. In this review, comparisons of different types of phage display systems are first presented. Particularly, microfluidic-based phage display, which enables screening with high throughput, high efficiency and integration, is highlighted. More importantly, we emphasize the advances in biosensors based on phages or phage-derived probes, including nonlytic phages, lytic phages, peptides or proteins screened by phage display, phage assemblies and phage-nanomaterial complexes. However, more efficient and higher throughput phage display methods are still needed to meet an explosion in demand for bioanalysis. Furthermore, screening of cyclic peptides and functional peptides will be the hotspot in bioanalysis. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly 12 (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH 2 ) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. K D and IC 50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH 2 ) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC 50  = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phage Display of the Serpin Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Randomized at Consecutive Residues in the Reactive Centre Loop and Biopanned with or without Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Benjamin M.; Matochko, Wadim L.; Gierczak, Richard F.; Bhakta, Varsha; Derda, Ratmir; Sheffield, William P.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API) in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2–P1) yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352–356 (P7–P3) was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7–P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection of

  7. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  8. Discovery of GPX4 inhibitory peptides from random peptide T7 phage display and subsequent structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Sogabe, Satoshi; Kamada, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Shin-Ichi; Kadotani, Akito; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-08

    The phospholipid hydroperoxidase glutathione peroxidase (GPX4) is an enzyme that reduces lipid hydroperoxides in lipid membranes. Recently, GPX4 has been investigated as a target molecule that induces iron-dependent cell death (ferroptosis) selectively in cancer cells that express mutant Ras. GPX4 inhibitors have the potential to become novel anti-cancer drugs. However, there are no druggable pockets for conventional small molecules on the molecular surface of GPX4. To generate GPX4 inhibitors, we examined the use of peptides as an alternative to small molecules. By screening peptide libraries displayed on T7 phages, and analyzing the X-ray crystal structures of the peptides, we successfully identified one peptide that binds to near Sec73 of catalytic site and two peptides that bind to another site on GPX4. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting GPX4 inhibitory peptides and their structural information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recognition of epoxy with phage displayed peptides.

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    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2013-07-01

    The development of a general approach for non-destructive chemical and biological functionalization of epoxy could expand opportunities for both fundamental studies and creating various device platforms. Epoxy shows unique electrical, mechanical, chemical and biological compatibility and has been widely used for fabricating a variety of devices. Phage display has emerged as a powerful method for selecting peptides that possess enhanced selectivity and binding affinity toward a variety of targets. In this letter, we demonstrate for the first time a powerful yet benign approach for identifying binding motifs to epoxy via comprehensively screened phage displayed peptides. Our results show that the epoxy can be selectively recognized with peptide-displaying phages. Further, along with the development of epoxy-based microstructures; recognition of the epoxy with phage displayed peptides can be specifically localized in these microstructures. We anticipate that these results could open up exciting opportunities in the use of peptide-recognized epoxy in fundamental biochemical recognition studies, as well as in applications ranging from analytical devices, hybrid materials, surface and interface, to cell biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  11. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  12. Keratinocyte specific markers isolated using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.B.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Ravn, P.

    2003-01-01

    Specific molecular markers for various normal and pathogenic cell states and cell types provide knowledge of basic biological systems and have a direct application in targeted therapy. We describe a proteomic method based on the combination of new and improved phage display antibody technologies...... display method was applied to analysis of human skin keratinocytes resulting in the isolation of a panel of antibodies. Fourteen of these antibodies were further characterized, half of which predominantly recognized keratinocytes in a screen of a range of different cell types. Three cognate keratinocyte...... antigens were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as laminin-5, plectin, and fibronectin. The combination of phage display technology with mass spectrometry methods for protein identification is a general and promising approach for proteomic analysis of cell surface complexity....

  13. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    when animal toxins are used as targets for phage display selection. Here, we report selected critical challenges from our own phage display experiments associated with biotinylation of antigens, clone picking, and the presence of amber codons within antibody fragment structures in some phage display...

  14. Trinucleotide cassettes increase diversity of T7 phage-displayed peptide library

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    McMahon James B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid sequence diversity is introduced into a phage-displayed peptide library by randomizing library oligonucleotide DNA. We recently evaluated the diversity of peptide libraries displayed on T7 lytic phage and M13 filamentous phage and showed that T7 phage can display a more diverse amino acid sequence repertoire due to differing processes of viral morphogenesis. Methods In this study, we evaluated and compared the diversity of a 12-mer T7 phage-displayed peptide library randomized using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes with a T7 and an M13 12-mer phage-displayed peptide library constructed using the degenerate codon randomization method. Results We herein demonstrate that the combination of trinucleotide cassette amino acid codon randomization and T7 phage display construction methods resulted in a significant enhancement to the functional diversity of a 12-mer peptide library. This novel library exhibited superior amino acid uniformity and order-of-magnitude increases in amino acid sequence diversity as compared to degenerate codon randomized peptide libraries. Comparative analyses of the biophysical characteristics of the 12-mer peptide libraries revealed the trinucleotide cassette-randomized library to be a unique resource. Conclusion The combination of T7 phage display and trinucleotide cassette randomization resulted in a novel resource for the potential isolation of binding peptides for new and previously studied molecular targets.

  15. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  16. Identification of bacterial adhesins through phage display.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Tung Ching Ching

    2012-01-01

    A leptospirose é uma zoonose de importância mundial causada por bactérias do gênero Leptospira. No Brasil, a maioria dos casos é causada por L. interrogans sorovar Copenhageni. O objetivo destre trabalho foi identificar adesinas de leptospira pela técnica de Phage display. Bibliotecas com fragmentos genômicos resultaram na idendificação de ligantes de leptospira com afinidade por tecidos de hamster. Uma varredura dessas bibliotecas contra heparan sulfato proteoglicano (HSPG) identificou como ...

  17. Evolution of phage display technology: from discovery to application.

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    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Veisi, Kamal; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Akbari, Bahman

    2017-03-01

    Phage display technology as a selection-based system is an attractive method for evolution of new biological drugs. Unique ability of phage libraries for displaying proteins on bacteriophage surfaces enable them to make a major contribution in diverse fields of researches related to the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. One of the great challenges facing researchers is the modification of phage display technology and the development of new applications. This article reviews the molecular basis of phage display library, and summarizes the novel and specific applications of this technique in the field of biological drugs development including therapeutic antibodies, peptides, vaccines, and catalytic antibodies.

  18. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

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    Qin Yong-Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The West Nile virus (WNV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex.

  19. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop specific single chain variable fragments (scFv) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) via phage display technology. Methods: Purified viruses were initially applied for iterative panning rounds of scFv phage display libraries. The binding ability of the selected scFv antibody fragments against the ...

  20. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

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    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

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    Michael Hust

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  2. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  3. Phage display creates innovative applications to combat hepatitis B virus

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    Tan, Wen Siang; Ho, Kok Lian

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has killed countless lives in human history. The invention of HBV vaccines in the 20th century has reduced significantly the rate of the viral infection. However, currently there is no effective treatment for chronic HBV carriers. Newly emerging vaccine escape mutants and drug resistant strains have complicated the viral eradication program. The entire world is now facing a new threat of HBV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. Could phage display provide solutions to these life-threatening problems? This article reviews critically and comprehensively the innovative and potential applications of phage display in the development of vaccines, therapeutic agents, diagnostic reagents, as well as gene and drug delivery systems to combat HBV. The application of phage display in epitope mapping of HBV antigens is also discussed in detail. Although this review mainly focuses on HBV, the innovative applications of phage display could also be extended to other infectious diseases. PMID:25206271

  4. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

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    Östman Sofia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease (CD is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of

  5. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lohse, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies are thus warranted, and phage display technology may be a promising avenue for bringing antivenoms into the modern era of biologics. Although phage display technology represents a robust and high-throughput approach for the discovery of antibody-based antitoxins, several pitfalls may present themselves when animal toxins are used as targets for phage display selection. Here, we report selected critical challenges from our own phage display experiments associated with biotinylation of antigens, clone picking, and the presence of amber codons within antibody fragment structures in some phage display libraries. These challenges may be detrimental to the outcome of phage display experiments, and we aim to help other researchers avoiding these pitfalls by presenting their solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Filamentous bacteriophage: biology, phage display and nanotechnology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakonjac, Jasna; Bennett, Nicholas J; Spagnuolo, Julian; Gagic, Dragana; Russel, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage, long and thin filaments that are secreted from the host cells without killing them, have been an antithesis to the standard view of head-and-tail bacterial killing machines. Episomally replicating filamentous phage Ff of Escherichia coli provide the majority of information about the principles and mechanisms of filamentous phage infection, episomal replication and assembly. Chromosomally- integrated "temperate" filamentous phage have complex replication and integration, which are currently under active investigation. The latter are directly or indirectly implicated in diseases caused by bacterial pathogens Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria meningitidis. In the first half of the review, both the Ff and temperate phage are described and compared. A large section of the review is devoted to an overview of phage display technology and its applications in nanotechnology.

  7. Mimtags: the use of phage display technology to produce novel protein-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nayyar; Dhanapala, Pathum; Sadli, Nadia; Barrow, Colin J; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-03-01

    In recent times the use of protein-specific probes in the field of proteomics has undergone evolutionary changes leading to the discovery of new probing techniques. Protein-specific probes serve two main purposes: epitope mapping and detection assays. One such technique is the use of phage display in the random selection of peptide mimotopes (mimtags) that can tag epitopes of proteins, replacing the use of monoclonal antibodies in detection systems. In this study, phage display technology was used to screen a random peptide library with a biologically active purified human interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) to identify mimtag candidates that interacted with these proteins. Once identified, the mimtags were commercially synthesised, biotinylated and used for in vitro immunoassays. We have used phage display to identify M13 phage clones that demonstrated specific binding to IL-4R and IL-13 cytokine. A consensus in binding sequences was observed and phage clones characterised had identical peptide sequence motifs. Only one was synthesised for use in further immunoassays, demonstrating significant binding to either IL-4R or IL-13. We have successfully shown the use of phage display to identify and characterise mimtags that specifically bind to their target epitope. Thus, this new method of probing proteins can be used in the future as a novel tool for immunoassay and detection technique, which is cheaper and more rapidly produced and therefore a better alternative to the use of monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  9. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  10. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  11. Selection of phage-displayed peptides for the detection of imidacloprid in water and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Shelver, Weilin L; Li, Qing X; Li, Ji; Xu, Ting

    2015-09-15

    Imidacloprid is the most widely used neonicotinoid insecticide in the world and shows widespread environment and human exposures. A phage clone designated L7-1 that selectively binds to imidacloprid was selected from a commercial phage display library containing linear 7-mer randomized amino acid residues. Using the clone L7-1, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for imidacloprid was developed. The half-maximum signal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD) of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid were 96 and 2.3 ng ml(-1), respectively. This phage ELISA showed relatively low cross-reactivity with all of the tested compounds structurally similar to imidacloprid, less than 2% with the exception of 6-chloronicotinic acid, a metabolite of imidacloprid that showed 11.5%. The average recoveries of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid in water and soil samples were in the ranges of 74.6 to 86.3% and 72.5 to 93.6%, respectively. The results of the competitive phage ELISA for imidacloprid in the fortified samples agreed well with those of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The simple phage-displayed peptide technology has been proven to be a convenient and efficient method for the development of an alternative format of ELISA for small molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Phage display peptide library for screening the peptides that specifically bind to osteoblasts cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyue; Zhou, Yuqin; Du, Mingliang; Qian, Haiyan; Li, Quanli

    2015-07-01

    To explore the experimental methods that the phage peptide library technology screening human osteoblast specificity polypeptide, which will provide the basis of the experiment of the Ti surface biolization modification. Human calvarial osteoblasts were used as the target cells for whole-cell biopanning from a 12-mer peptide phage-display library. Cell eluent and cell lysis buffer were cultivate and count respectively after washing. Then the target cells were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence detection to authenticate the positive phage clones by human gingival fibroblast as the absorber cells. The positive phage clones were deduced by DNA sequencing. After four rounds of screening, twenty-two positive phage clones were found out from randomly selected phage monoclonals, whose single-strand DNA were extracted and sequenced. Amino acid sequence of the highest frequency peptide was MGWSWWPETWPM. The specific peptide against human osteoblasts can be obtained from a phage-display peptide library for use as a new research approach and experimental basis of the biolization modification of the titanium surface.

  13. Identification of a protective B-cell epitope of the Staphylococcus aureus GapC protein by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyao; Zhai, Lu; Yu, Wei; Wei, Yuhua; Wang, Lizi; Liu, Shuo; Li, Wanyu; Li, Xiaoting; Yu, Simiao; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jing; Feng, Zhenyue; Yu, Liquan; Cui, Yudong

    2018-01-01

    The impact of epidemic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on public health is increasing. Because of the abuse of antibiotics, the antibiotic resistance of S. aureus is increasing. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new immunotherapies and immunoprophylaxes. Previous studies showed that the GapC protein of S. aureus, which is a surface protein with high glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, transferrin binding activity, and other biological activities, is highly conserved. GapC induces an effective humoral immune response in vivo. However, the B-cell epitopes of S. aureus GapC have not been well identified. Here we used the bioinformatics tools to analyze the sequence of GapC, and we generated protective anti-GapC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A protective mAb (1F4) showed strong specificity to GapC and the ability to induce macrophages to phagocytose S. aureus. We screened the motif 272GYTEDEIVSSD282, which was recognized by mAb 1F4, using a phage display system. Then, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify key amino acids in the motif. Residues G272 D276 E277 I278 and V279 formed the core of the 272GYTEDEIVSSD282 motif. In addition, we showed that this epitope peptide induced a protective humoral immune response against S. aureus infection in immunized mice. Our results will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines against S. aureus infection.

  14. Humoral immune responses against gonadotropin releasing hormone elicited by immunization with phage-peptide constructs obtained via phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, Alexandre; Cochran, Anna; Schemera, Bettina; Kutzler, Michelle; Donovan, Caitlin; Petrenko, Valery; Bartol, Frank; Samoylova, Tatiana

    2015-12-20

    Phage display is based on genetic engineering of phage coat proteins resulting in fusion peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles. The technology is widely used for generation of phages with novel characteristics for numerous applications in biomedicine and far beyond. The focus of this study was on development of phage-peptide constructs that stimulate production of antibodies against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Phage-peptide constructs that elicit production of neutralizing GnRH antibodies can be used for anti-fertility and anti-cancer applications. Phage-GnRH constructs were generated via selection from a phage display library using several types of GnRH antibodies as selection targets. Such phage constructs were characterized for sequence similarities to GnRH peptide and frequency of their occurrence in the selection rounds. Five of the constructs with suitable characteristics were tested in mice as a single dose 5×10(11) virions (vir) vaccine and were found to be able to stimulate production of GnRH-specific antibodies, but not to suppress testosterone (indirect indicator of GnRH antibody neutralizing properties). Next, one of the constructs was tested at a higher dose of 2×10(12) vir per mouse in combination with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based adjuvant. This resulted in multifold increase in GnRH antibody production and significant reduction of serum testosterone, indicating that antibodies produced in response to the phage-GnRH immunization possess neutralizing properties. To achieve optimal immune responses for desired applications, phage-GnRH constructs can be modified with respect to flanking sequences of GnRH-like peptides displayed on phage. Anticipated therapeutic effects also might be attained using optimized phage doses, a combination of several constructs in a single treatment, or application of adjuvants and advanced phage delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in phage display technology for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidfar, Kobra; Daneshpour, Maryam

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, several library-based methods have been developed to discover ligands with strong binding affinities for their targets. These methods mimic the natural evolution for screening and identifying ligand-target interactions with specific functional properties. Phage display technology is a well-established method that has been applied to many technological challenges including novel drug discovery. This review describes the recent advances in the use of phage display technology for discovering novel bioactive compounds. Furthermore, it discusses the application of this technology to produce proteins and peptides as well as minimize the use of antibodies, such as antigen-binding fragment, single-chain fragment variable or single-domain antibody fragments like VHHs. Advances in screening, manufacturing and humanization technologies demonstrate that phage display derived products can play a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The effects of this technology are inevitable in the development pipeline for bringing therapeutics into the market, and this number is expected to rise significantly in the future as new advances continue to take place in display methods. Furthermore, a widespread application of this methodology is predicted in different medical technological areas, including biosensing, monitoring, molecular imaging, gene therapy, vaccine development and nanotechnology.

  16. Diversity of the antibody response to tetanus toxoid: comparison of hybridoma library to phage display library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sorouri

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are important tools in research and since the 1990s have been an important therapeutic class targeting a wide variety of diseases. Earlier methods of mAb production relied exclusively on the lengthy process of making hybridomas. The advent of phage display technology introduced an alternative approach for mAb production. A potential concern with this approach is its complete dependence on an in vitro selection process, which may result in selection of V(H-V(L pairs normally eliminated during the in vivo selection process. The diversity of V(H-V(L pairs selected from phage display libraries relative to an endogenous response is unknown. To address these questions, we constructed a panel of hybridomas and a phage display library using the spleen of a single tetanus toxoid-immunized mouse and compared the diversity of the immune response generated using each technique. Surprisingly, the tetanus toxoid-specific antibodies produced by the hybridoma library exhibited a higher degree of V(H-V(L genetic diversity than their phage display-derived counterparts. Furthermore, the overlap among the V-genes from each library was very limited. Consistent with the notion that accumulation of many small DNA changes lead to increased antigen specificity and affinity, the phage clones displayed substantial micro-heterogeneity. Contrary to previous reports, we found that antigen specificity against tetanus toxoid is encoded by both V(κ and V(H genes. Finally, the phage-derived tetanus-specific clones had a lower binding affinity than the hybridomas, a phenomenon thought to be the result of random pairing of the V-genes.

  17. A novel helper phage for HaloTag-mediated co-display of enzyme and substrate on phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delespaul, Wouter; Peeters, Yves; Herdewijn, Piet; Robben, Johan

    2015-05-01

    Phage display is an established technique for the molecular evolution of peptides and proteins. For the selection of enzymes based on catalytic activity however, simultaneous coupling of an enzyme and its substrate to the phage surface is required. To facilitate this process of co-display, we developed a new helper phage displaying HaloTag, a modified haloalkane dehalogenase that binds specifically and covalently to functionalized haloalkane ligands. The display of functional HaloTag was demonstrated by capture on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, after coupling a biotinylated haloalkane ligand, or after on-phage extension of a DNA oligonucleotide primer with a biotinylated nucleotide by phi29 DNA polymerase. We also achieved co-display of HaloTag and phi29 DNA polymerase, thereby opening perspectives for the molecular evolution of this enzyme (and others) towards new substrate specificities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chaperone-assisted thermostability engineering of a soluble T cell receptor using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Kristin S; Kristinsson, Solveig G; Justesen, Sune

    2013-01-01

    We here report a novel phage display selection strategy enabling fast and easy selection of thermostabilized proteins. The approach is illustrated with stabilization of an aggregation-prone soluble single chain T cell receptor (scTCR) characteristic of the murine MOPC315 myeloma model. Random......-specific reactivity of the TCR. This FkpA-assisted thermostabilization strategy extends the utility of recombinant TCRs and furthermore, may be of general use for efficient evolution of proteins....

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi adhesins identified using in vivo phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonara, Styliani; Chafel, Rebecca M; LaFrance, Michelle; Coburn, Jenifer

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, disseminates from the site of deposition by Ixodes ticks to cause systemic infection. Dissemination occurs through the circulation and through tissue matrices, but the B. burgdorferi molecules that mediate interactions with the endothelium in vivo have not yet been identified. In vivo selection of filamentous phage expressing B. burgdorferi protein fragments on the phage surface identified several new candidate adhesins, and verified the activity of one adhesin that had been previously characterized in vitro. P66, a B. burgdorferi ligand for beta(3)-chain integrins, OspC, a protein that is essential for the establishment of infection in mammals, and Vls, a protein that undergoes antigenic variation in the mammal, were all selected for binding to the murine endothelium in vivo. Additional B. burgdorferi proteins for which no functions have been identified, including all four members of the OspF family and BmpD, were identified as candidate adhesins. The use of in vivo phage display is one approach to the identification of adhesins in pathogenic bacteria that are not easily grown in the laboratory, or for which genetic manipulations are not straightforward.

  20. MIMOX: a web tool for phage display based epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Wataru

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display is widely used in basic research such as the exploration of protein-protein interaction sites and networks, and applied research such as the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics. It has also become a promising method for epitope mapping. Research on new algorithms that assist and automate phage display based epitope mapping has attracted many groups. Most of the existing tools have not been implemented as an online service until now however, making it less convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate them. Results We present MIMOX, a free web tool that helps to map the native epitope of an antibody based on one or more user supplied mimotopes and the antigen structure. MIMOX was coded in Perl using modules from the Bioperl project. It has two sections. In the first section, MIMOX provides a simple interface for ClustalW to align a set of mimotopes. It also provides a simple statistical method to derive the consensus sequence and embeds JalView as a Java applet to view and manage the alignment. In the second section, MIMOX can map a single mimotope or a consensus sequence of a set of mimotopes, on to the corresponding antigen structure and search for all of the clusters of residues that could represent the native epitope. NACCESS is used to evaluate the surface accessibility of the candidate clusters; and Jmol is embedded to view them interactively in their 3D context. Initial case studies show that MIMOX can reproduce mappings from existing tools such as FINDMAP and 3DEX, as well as providing novel, rational results. Conclusion A web-based tool called MIMOX has been developed for phage display based epitope mapping. As a publicly available online service in this area, it is convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate, complementing other existing programs. MIMOX is freely available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~hjian/mimox.

  1. Cost-effective HRMA pre-sequence typing of clone libraries; application to phage display selection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pepers, Barry A; Schut, Menno H; Vossen, Rolf Ham; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Roon-Mom, Willeke Mc

    2009-01-01

    Methodologies like phage display selection, in vitro mutagenesis and the determination of allelic expression differences include steps where large numbers of clones need to be compared and characterised...

  2. Peptide Phage Display as a Tool for Drug Discovery: Targeting Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Bratkovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein’s activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  3. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.).

  4. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  5. Construction of Synthetic Antibody Phage-Display Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic antibody libraries provide a vast resource of renewable antibody reagents that can rival or exceed those of natural antibodies and can be rapidly isolated through controlled in vitro selections. Use of highly optimized human frameworks enables the incorporation of defined diversity at positions that are most likely to contribute to antigen recognition. This protocol describes the construction of synthetic antibody libraries based on a single engineered human autonomous variable heavy domain scaffold with diversity in all three complementarity-determining regions. The resulting libraries can be used to generate recombinant domain antibodies for a wide range of protein antigens using phage display. Furthermore, analogous methods can be used to construct antibody libraries based on larger antibody fragments or second-generation libraries aimed to fine-tune antibody characteristics including affinity, specificity, and manufacturability. The procedures rely on standard reagents and equipment available in most molecular biology laboratories.

  6. New perspective for phage display as an efficient and versatile technology of functional proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Caberoy, Nora B

    2010-01-01

    Phage display with antibody libraries has been widely used with versatile applications. However, phage display with cDNA libraries is rare and inefficient. Because of uncontrollable reading frames and stop codons in cDNA repertoires, high percentage of phage clones identified from conventional cDNA libraries are non-open reading frames (non-ORFs) encoding unnatural short peptides with minimal implications in protein networks. Consequently, phage display has not been used as a technology of functional proteomics to elucidate protein-protein interactions like yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry-based technologies. Several strategies, including C-terminal display and ORF cDNA libraries, have been explored to circumvent the technical problem. The accumulative endeavors eventually led to the efficient elucidation of a large number of tubby- and phosphatidylserine-binding proteins in recent studies by ORF phage display with minimal reading frame issue. ORF phage display inherits all the versatile applications of antibody phage display, but enables efficient identification of real endogenous proteins with efficiency, sensitivity, and accuracy comparable to other technologies of functional proteomics. Its ELISA-like procedure can be conveniently adapted by individual laboratories or fully automated for high-throughput screening. Thus, ORF phage display is an efficient, sensitive, versatile, and convenient technology of functional proteomics for elucidation of global and pathway-specific protein-protein interactions, disease mechanisms, or therapeutic targets.

  7. DeltaPhage—a novel helper phage for high-valence pIX phagemid display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilssen, Nicolay R.; Frigstad, Terje; Pollmann, Sylvie; Roos, Norbert; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger; Løset, Geir Å.

    2012-01-01

    Phage display has been instrumental in discovery of novel binding peptides and folded domains for the past two decades. We recently reported a novel pIX phagemid display system that is characterized by a strong preference for phagemid packaging combined with low display levels, two key features that support highly efficient affinity selection. However, high diversity in selected repertoires are intimately coupled to high display levels during initial selection rounds. To incorporate this additional feature into the pIX display system, we have developed a novel helper phage termed DeltaPhage that allows for high-valence display on pIX. This was obtained by inserting two amber mutations close to the pIX start codon, but after the pVII translational stop, conditionally inactivating the helper phage encoded pIX. Until now, the general notion has been that display on pIX is dependent on wild-type complementation, making high-valence display unachievable. However, we found that DeltaPhage does facilitate high-valence pIX display when used with a non-suppressor host. Here, we report a side-by-side comparison with pIII display, and we find that this novel helper phage complements existing pIX phagemid display systems to allow both low and high-valence display, making pIX display a complete and efficient alternative to existing pIII phagemid display systems. PMID:22539265

  8. Identification and characterization of a phage display-derived peptide for orthopoxvirus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lilija; Michel, Janine; Vogt, Guido; Döllinger, Jörg; Stern, Daniel; Piesker, Janett; Nitsche, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Fast and reliable diagnostic assays are required for a resilient detection of clinical infections or biothreat-relevant pathogens. While PCR has proven to be the gold standard for nucleic acid detection, the identification of pathogen particles is still challenging and depends on the availability of well-characterized, chemically stable, and selective recognition molecules. Here, we report the screening of a phage display random peptide library for vaccinia virus-binding peptides. The identified peptide was extensively characterized using peptide-probe ELISA, surface plasmon resonance, nLC-MS/MS, Western Blot, peptide-based immunofluorescence assay, and electron microscopy. Following identification, the phage-free, synthetic peptide, designated αVACVpep05, was shown to bind to vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. We can demonstrate that the highly conserved orthopoxvirus surface protein D8 is the interaction partner of αVACVpep05, thus enabling the peptide to bind to other orthopoxviruses, including cowpox virus and monkeypox virus, viruses that cause clinically relevant zoonotic infections in humans. The process of phage display-mediated peptide identification has been optimized intensively, and we provide recommendations for the identification of peptides suitable for the detection of further pathogens. The peptide described here was critically characterized and seems to be a promising reagent for the development of diagnostic platforms for orthopoxviruses. We believe that our results will help to promote the development of alternative, nonantibody-based synthetic detection molecules for further pathogens.

  9. Probing Tumor Microenvironment With In Vivo Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    technology. A, Peptides found in the “Phage pool alone” group are listed in a descending order of frequency. Note that CISQERGESC (CIS) and CIFSGEGESC ( CIF ...expressing CISQERGESC (CIS: 0.6% of the recovered phage clones) and 202 phages expressing a relevant peptide CIFSGEGESC ( CIF : 0.2%) (Table 1A). The...term ended showed that CIS and CIF , which have very similar amino acid sequences, bind to cultured hb6011 CAFs especially to filopodia and fibrous

  10. Chromato-panning: an efficient new mode of identifying suitable ligands from phage display libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottel Hans

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage Display technology is a well established technique for high throughput screening of affinity ligands. Here we describe a new compact chromato-panning procedure for selection of suitable binders from a phage peptide display library. Results Both phages and E. coli cells pass non-hindered through the interconnected pores of macroporous gel, so called cryogel. After coupling a ligand to a monolithic cryogel column, the phage library was applied on the column and non-bound phages were washed out. The selection of strong phage-binders was achieved already after the first panning cycle due to the efficient separation of phage-binders from phage-non-binders in chromatographic mode rather than in batch mode as in traditional biopanning procedures. E. coli cells were applied on the column for infection with the specifically bound phages. Conclusion Chromato-panning allows combining several steps of the panning procedure resulting in 4–8 fold decrease of total time needed for phage selection.

  11. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...... phages from libraries, and for selecting antigen binders by panning are presented. The latter protocol includes a procedure for trypsin elution of bound phage....

  12. Semi-Parametric Bayesian Inference for Phage Display Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Novelo, Luis G.; Müller, Peter; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail; Sun, Jessica; Pasqualini, Renata; Do, Kim-Anh

    2012-01-01

    Summary We discuss inference for a human phage display experiment with three stages. The data are tripeptide counts by tissue and stage. The primary aim of the experiment is to identify ligands that bind with high affinity to a given tissue. We formalize the research question as inference about the monotonicity of mean counts over stages. The inference goal is then to identify a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase over stages. We use a semi-parametric Dirichlet process mixture of Poisson model. The posterior distribution under this model allows the desired inference about the monotonicity of mean counts. However, the desired inference summary as a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase involves a massive multiplicity problem. We consider two alternative approaches to address this multiplicity issue. First we propose an approach based on the control of the posterior expected false discovery rate. We notice that the implied solution ignores the relative size of the increase. This motivates a second approach based on a utility function that includes explicit weights for the size of the increase. PMID:23339534

  13. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana eGagic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of phage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack the cellular protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to bait of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that have functions of interest for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis, through filamentous phage display library screening. Published literature also shows that phage display is suitable for secretome protein display as a tool for identification immunogenic peptides and can be used for discovery of vaccine candidates. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis can also be used for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea.

  14. Phage Display Technology in Biomaterials Engineering: Progress and Opportunities for Applications in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ivone M; Reis, Rui L; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-11-18

    The field of regenerative medicine has been gaining momentum steadily over the past few years. The emphasis in regenerative medicine is to use various in vitro and in vivo approaches that leverage the intrinsic healing mechanisms of the body to treat patients with disabling injuries and chronic diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, and degenerative disorders of the cardiovascular and central nervous system. Phage display has been successfully employed to identify peptide ligands for a wide variety of targets, ranging from relatively small molecules (enzymes, cell receptors) to inorganic, organic, and biological (tissues) materials. Over the past two decades, phage display technology has advanced tremendously and has become a powerful tool in the most varied fields of research, including biotechnology, materials science, cell biology, pharmacology, and diagnostics. The growing interest in and success of phage display libraries is largely due to its incredible versatility and practical use. This review discusses the potential of phage display technology in biomaterials engineering for applications in regenerative medicine.

  15. Efficient production of antibodies against a mammalian integral membrane protein by phage display

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hötzel, Isidro; Chiang, Vicki; Diao, Jingyu; Pantua, Homer; Maun, Henry R; Kapadia, Sharookh B

    2011-01-01

    The application of phage display technology to mammalian proteins with multiple transmembrane regions has had limited success due to the difficulty in generating these proteins in sufficient amounts and purity...

  16. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  17. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumyen, Achara; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8). The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21) were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins. PMID:23226940

  18. Screening and identification of a renal carcinoma specific peptide from a phage display peptide library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Xiangan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific peptide ligands to cell surface receptors have been extensively used in tumor research and clinical applications. Phage display technology is a powerful tool for the isolation of cell-specific peptide ligands. To screen and identify novel markers for renal cell carcinoma, we evaluated a peptide that had been identified by phage display technology. Methods A renal carcinoma cell line A498 and a normal renal cell line HK-2 were used to carry out subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the A498 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 100 fold. A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the renal carcinoma cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to the targeting cells and tissues was studied. Results Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, the Phage ZT-2 and synthetic peptide ZT-2 were shown to specifically bind to the tumor cell surfaces of A498 and incision specimens, but not to normal renal tissue samples. Conclusion A peptide ZT-2, which binds specifically to the renal carcinoma cell line A498 was selected from phage display peptide libraries. Therefore, it provides a potential tool for early diagnosis of renal carcinoma or targeted drug delivery in chemotherapy.

  19. Theranostic applications of phage display to control leishmaniasis: selection of biomarkers for serodiagnostics, vaccination, and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Antonio Ferraz Coelho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPhage display is a high-throughput subtractive proteomic technology used for the generation and screening of large peptide and antibody libraries. It is based on the selection of phage-fused surface-exposed peptides that recognize specific ligands and demonstrate desired functionality for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Phage display has provided unmatched tools for controlling viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic infections, and allowed identification of new therapeutic targets to treat cancer, metabolic diseases, and other chronic conditions. This review presents recent advancements in serodiagnostics and prevention of leishmaniasis -an important tropical parasitic disease- achieved using phage display for the identification of novel antigens with improved sensitivity and specificity. Our focus is on theranostics of visceral leishmaniasis with the aim to develop biomarker candidates exhibiting both diagnostic and therapeutic potential to fight this important, yet neglected, tropical disease.

  20. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  1. Biased selection of propagation-related TUPs from phage display peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Keshavarz, Reihaneh; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Bakhshinejad, Babak

    2017-08-01

    Phage display is rapidly advancing as a screening strategy in drug discovery and drug delivery. Phage-encoded combinatorial peptide libraries can be screened through the affinity selection procedure of biopanning to find pharmaceutically relevant cell-specific ligands. However, the unwanted enrichment of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) with no true affinity for the target presents an important barrier to the successful screening of phage display libraries. Propagation-related TUPs (Pr-TUPs) are an emerging but less-studied category of phage display-derived false-positive hits that are displayed on the surface of clones with faster propagation rates. Despite long regarded as an unbiased selection system, accumulating evidence suggests that biopanning may create biological bias toward selection of phage clones with certain displayed peptides. This bias can be dependent on or independent of the displayed sequence and may act as a major driving force for the isolation of fast-growing clones. Sequence-dependent bias is reflected by censorship or over-representation of some amino acids in the displayed peptide and sequence-independent bias is derived from either point mutations or rare recombination events occurring in the phage genome. It is of utmost interest to clean biopanning data by identifying and removing Pr-TUPs. Experimental and bioinformatic approaches can be exploited for Pr-TUP discovery. With no doubt, obtaining deeper insight into how Pr-TUPs emerge during biopanning and how they could be detected provides a basis for using cell-targeting peptides isolated from phage display screening in the development of disease-specific diagnostic and therapeutic platforms.

  2. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    isolated from Stage II invasive lobular breast cancer using human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The resulting phage pool bound to i6011...presence of an excess of soluble RGD as an inhibitor to reduce the frequency of peptides containing the integrin-binding RGD motif in the output

  3. Diversity of Phage-Displayed Libraries of Peptides during Panning and Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Jafari

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The amplification of phage-displayed libraries is an essential step in the selection of ligands from these libraries. The amplification of libraries, however, decreases their diversity and limits the number of binding clones that a screen can identify. While this decrease might not be a problem for screens against targets with a single binding site (e.g., proteins, it can severely hinder the identification of useful ligands for targets with multiple binding sites (e.g., cells. This review aims to characterize the loss in the diversity of libraries during amplification. Analysis of the peptide sequences obtained in several hundred screens of peptide libraries shows explicitly that there is a significant decrease in library diversity that occurs during the amplification of phage in bacteria. This loss during amplification is not unique to specific libraries: it is observed in many of the phage display systems we have surveyed. The loss in library diversity originates from competition among phage clones in a common pool of bacteria. Based on growth data from the literature and models of phage growth, we show that this competition originates from growth rate differences of only a few percent for different phage clones. We summarize the findings using a simple two-dimensional “phage phase diagram”, which describes how the collapse of libraries, due to panning and amplification, leads to the identification of only a subset of the available ligands. This review also highlights techniques that allow elimination of amplification-induced losses of diversity, and how these techniques can be used to improve phage-display selection and enable the identification of novel ligands.

  4. Phagekines: Screening Binding Properties and Biological Activity of Functional Cytokines Displayed on Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Gertrudis; Carmenate, Tania

    2018-01-01

    The current chapter focuses on the use of filamentous phages to display, modify, and characterize cytokines, which are proteins belonging to a versatile group of essential mediators involved in cell-cell communication. Cytokines exhibit a considerable diversity, both in functions and in structural features underlying their biological effects. A broad variety of cytokines have been successfully displayed on phages, allowing the high-throughput study of their binding properties and biological activities and the discovery of novel therapeutics through directed evolution. The technical singularities and some potential applications of cytokine phage display are illustrated here with the case of Interleukin-2, a prototypic member of the four-alpha-helix bundle cytokine family playing a pivotal role in the immune response and having a long history of therapeutic use.

  5. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits antibacterial activity against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpakala Sainath Rao

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug resistant strains to currently available antibiotics has resulted in the quest for novel antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are receiving attention as alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, we used phage-display random peptide library to identify peptides binding to the cell surface of E. coli. The peptide with sequence RLLFRKIRRLKR (EC5 bound to the cell surface of E. coli and exhibited certain features common to AMPs and was rich in Arginine and Lysine residues. Antimicrobial activity of the peptide was tested in vitro by growth inhibition assays and the bacterial membrane permeabilization assay. The peptide was highly active against gram-negative organisms and showed significant bactericidal activity against E. coli and P. aeruginosa resulting in a reduction of 5 log(10 CFU/ml. In homologous plasma and platelets, incubation of EC5 with the bacteria resulted in significant reduction of E. coli and P. aeruginosa, compared to the peptide-free controls. The peptide was non-hemolytic and non-cytotoxic when tested on eukaryotic cells in culture. EC5 was able to permeabilize the outer membrane of E. coli and P. aeruginosa causing rapid depolarization of cytoplasmic membrane resulting in killing of the cells at 5 minutes of exposure. The secondary structure of the peptide showed a α-helical conformation in the presence of aqueous environment. The bacterial lipid interaction with the peptide was also investigated using Molecular Dynamic Simulations. Thus this study demonstrates that peptides identified to bind to bacterial cell surface through phage-display screening may additionally aid in identifying and developing novel antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Construction of naïve camelids VHH repertoire in phage display-based library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Atef, Ahmed; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Edris, Sherif; Hajrah, Nahid; Alzohairy, Ahmed M; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Camelids have unique antibodies, namely HCAbs (VHH) or commercially named Nanobodies(®) (Nb) that are composed only of a heavy-chain homodimer. As libraries based on immunized camelids are time-consuming, costly and likely redundant for certain antigens, we describe the construction of a naïve camelid VHHs library from blood serum of non-immunized camelids with affinity in the subnanomolar range and suitable for standard immune applications. This approach is rapid and recovers VHH repertoire with the advantages of being more diverse, non-specific and devoid of subpopulations of specific antibodies, which allows the identification of binders for any potential antigen (or pathogen). RNAs from a number of camelids from Saudi Arabia were isolated and cDNAs of the diverse vhh gene were amplified; the resulting amplicons were cloned in the phage display pSEX81 vector. The size of the library was found to be within the required range (10(7)) suitable for subsequent applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Two hundred clones were randomly selected and the inserted gene library was either estimated for redundancy or sequenced and aligned to the reference camelid vhh gene (acc. No. ADE99145). Results indicated complete non-specificity of this small library in which no single event of redundancy was detected. These results indicate the efficacy of following this approach in order to yield a large and diverse enough gene library to secure the presence of the required version encoding the required antibodies for any target antigen. This work is a first step towards the construction of phage display-based biosensors useful in disease (e.g., TB or tuberculosis) diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Peptide substrate identification for yeast Hsp40 Ydj1 by screening the phage display library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jingzhi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a peptide substrate for molecular chaperone Hsp40 Ydj1 by utilizing the combination of phage display library screening and isothemol titration calirimetry (ITC. The initial peptide substrate screening for Hsp40 Ydj1 has been carried out by utilizing a 7-mer phage display library. The peptide sequences from the bio-panning were synthesized and object to the direct affinity measurement for Hsp40 Ydj1 by isothemol titration calirimetry studies. The peptide which has the measurable affinity with Ydj1 shows enriched hydrophobic residues in the middle of the substrate fragment. The peptide substrate specificity for molecular chaperone Hsp40 has been analyzed.

  8. [Study on phage display technology and target protein screening for active ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Qiu, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    Phage display technology refers to a high-throughput in vitro screening technology for extracting required peptides/ proteins from colonies with mass mutants. Due to its high efficiency, practicability and convenience, it has been widely applied in pharmaceutical research and development, as well as target protein screening for active ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines. Target protein is the binding site of drug molecules in vivo, and good targets are the basis of excellent pharmaceuticals. This article summarizes the advance in studies on the phage display technology and its application in targeted protein screening for active ingredients of Chinese materia medica.

  9. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Hansen, Christian Skjødt

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequenc......Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high......-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential...... display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds....

  10. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  11. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  12. Combination of phage and Gram-positive bacterial display of human antibody repertoires enables isolation of functional high affinity binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Volk, Anna-Luisa; Persson, Helena; Säll, Anna; Borrebaeck, Carl; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Surface display couples genotype with a surface exposed phenotype and thereby allows screening of gene-encoded protein libraries for desired characteristics. Of the various display systems available, phage display is by far the most popular, mainly thanks to its ability to harbour large size libraries. Here, we describe the first use of a Gram-positive bacterial host for display of a library of human antibody genes which, when combined with phage display, provides ease of use for screening, sorting and ranking by flow cytometry. We demonstrate the utility of this method by identifying low nanomolar affinity scFv fragments towards human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The ranking and performance of the scFv isolated by flow sorting in surface-immobilised form was retained when expressed as soluble scFv and analysed by biolayer interferometry, as well as after expression as full-length antibodies in mammalian cells. We also demonstrate the possibility of using Gram-positive bacterial display to directly improve the affinity of the identified binders via an affinity maturation step using random mutagenesis and flow sorting. This combined approach has the potential for a more complete scan of the antibody repertoire and for affinity maturation of human antibody formats. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterogeneous catalysis on the phage surface: Display of active human enteropeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparian, Marine E; Bobik, Tatyana V; Kim, Yana V; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2013-11-01

    Enteropeptidase (EC 3.4.21.9) plays a key role in mammalian digestion as the enzyme that physiologically activates trypsinogen by highly specific cleavage of the trypsinogen activation peptide following the recognition sequence D4K. The high specificity of enteropeptidase makes it a powerful tool in modern biotechnology. Here we describe the application of phage display technology to express active human enteropeptidase catalytic subunits (L-HEP) on M13 filamentous bacteriophage. The L-HEP/C122S gene was cloned in the g3p-based phagemid vector pHEN2m upstream of the sequence encoding the phage g3p protein and downstream of the signal peptide-encoding sequence. Heterogeneous catalysis of the synthetic peptide substrate (GDDDDK-β-naphthylamide) cleavage by phage-bound L-HEP was shown to have kinetic parameters similar to those of soluble enzyme, with the respective Km values of 19 μM and 20 μM and kcat of 115 and 92 s(-1). Fusion proteins containing a D4K cleavage site were cleaved with phage-bound L-HEP/C122S as well as by soluble L-HEP/C122S, and proteolysis was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor. Rapid large-scale phage production, one-step purification of phage-bound L-HEP, and easy removal of enzyme activity from reaction samples by PEG precipitation make our approach suitable for the efficient removal of various tag sequences fused to the target proteins. The functional phage display technology developed in this study can be instrumental in constructing libraries of mutants to analyze the effect of structural changes on the activity and specificity of the enzyme or generate its desired variants for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Real-time analysis of dual-display phage immobilization and autoantibody screening using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Kaushik; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Vermeeren, Veronique; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Wagner, Patrick; Somers, Veerle; Michiels, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, phage display technology has been used for the display of target-specific biomarkers, peptides, antibodies, etc. Phage display-based assays are mostly limited to the phage ELISA, which is notorious for its high background signal and laborious methodology. These problems have been recently overcome by designing a dual-display phage with two different end functionalities, namely, streptavidin (STV)-binding protein at one end and a rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantigenic target at the other end. Using this dual-display phage, a much higher sensitivity in screening specificities of autoantibodies in complex serum sample has been detected compared to single-display phage system on phage ELISA. Herein, we aimed to develop a novel, rapid, and sensitive dual-display phage to detect autoantibodies presence in serum samples using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring as a sensing platform. The vertical functionalization of the phage over the STV-modified surfaces resulted in clear frequency and dissipation shifts revealing a well-defined viscoelastic signature. Screening for autoantibodies using antihuman IgG-modified surfaces and the dual-display phage with STV magnetic bead complexes allowed to isolate the target entities from complex mixtures and to achieve a large response as compared to negative control samples. This novel dual-display strategy can be a potential alternative to the time consuming phage ELISA protocols for the qualitative analysis of serum autoantibodies and can be taken as a departure point to ultimately achieve a point of care diagnostic system.

  15. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell

  16. Isolation of llama antibody fragments for prevention of dandruff by phage display in shampoo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vaart, M. van der; Lutje Hulsik, D.; Vriend, G.; Haard, H. de; Spinelli, S.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.; Verrips, T.

    As part of research exploring the feasibility of using antibody fragments to inhibit the growth of organisms implicated in dandruff, we isolated antibody fragments that bind to a cell surface protein of Malassezia furfur in the presence of shampoo. We found that phage display of llama

  17. Identification of Novel Single Chain Fragment Variable Antibodies Against TNF-α Using Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is an inflammatory cytokine, involved in both physiological and pathological pathways. Because of central role of TNF-α in pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, in the current study, we aimed to identify novel scFv antibodies against TNF-α using phage display technology. Using libraries composed of phagemid displaying scFv antibodies, four rounds of biopanning against TNF-α were carried out, which led to identification of scFvs capable of binding to TNF-α. The scFv antibody with appropriate binding affinity towards TNF-α, was amplified and used in ELISA experiment. Titration of phage achieved from different rounds of biopanning showed an enrichment of specific anti-TNF-α phages during biopanning process. Using ELISA experiment, a binding constant (Kd) of 1.11 ± 0.32 nM was determined for the phage displaying J48 scFv antibody. The findings in the current work revealed that the identified novel scFv antibody displayed at the N-terminal of minor coat proteins of phagemid binds TNF-α with suitable affinity. However, the soluble form of the antibody is needed to be produced and evaluated in more details regarding its binding properties to TNF-α.

  18. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  19. [Research on utilization of phage display technology to screen chloramine ketone simulated surface point].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xuelan; Liu, Xiaoxing

    2010-09-01

    Utilize phage display technology to screen chloramine ketone simulated surface point, providing the basis for establishing drug-free ELISA test system. Use the anti chloramine ketone monoclonal antibody as the ligand, and screen the Ph.D. -7(TM) phage display peptide library to select the chloramine ketone simulated surface point. After 4 rounds of screening, select the phase, which can combine the chloramines ketone monoclonal antibody with different degrees, and further, determine the positive clone with competitive inhibition of the hydrochloric chloramine ketone by the indirect competitive ELISA method. It is discovered that all the 10 phages can combine the chloramine ketone monoclonal antibody with different degrees. Use the indirect competitive ELISA method to determine, the phenomenon that 5 positive clones, among them, have competitive inhibition with the hydrochloric chloramine ketone exists. The sequencing results of those 5 positive clones show that 4 different amino acid sequenced are obtained. Tentatively judge these 4 phages display the chloramine ketone simulated antigen surface points.

  20. Development of a renal collecting duct homing peptide using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    Homing peptides are useful for in vivo labeling and nonviral gene transfer to selective tissues and cell types. The aim of this project was to develop a renal collecting duct homing peptide. Using phage display, we identified a phage expressing a cyclic 7 amino acid peptide, which was internalized...... developed a peptide, which can be used to label the collecting duct cells in mice and rats; however, further development is needed in order to use the peptide as a vector for nonviral gene transfer in vivo....... in a collecting duct cell line. Moreover, the phage was internalized in the collecting duct cells after i.v. injection in mice. To test if the peptide could be used for nonviral gene transfer, we synthesized the identified peptide fused to a protamine fragment. The fusion peptide was able to bind plasmid GFP c...

  1. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  3. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  4. Combination of phage and Gram-positive bacterial display of human antibody repertoires enables isolation of functional high affinity binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Volk, Anna-Luisa; Persson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    nanomolar affinity scFv fragments towards human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The ranking and performance of the scFv isolated by flow sorting in surface-immobilised form was retained when expressed as soluble scFv and analysed by biolayer interferometry, as well as after expression as full...... libraries. Here, we describe the first use of a Gram-positive bacterial host for display of a library of human antibody genes which, when combined with phage display, provides ease of use for screening, sorting and ranking by flow cytometry. We demonstrate the utility of this method by identifying low......-length antibodies in mammalian cells. We also demonstrate the possibility of using Gram-positive bacterial display to directly improve the affinity of the identified binders via an affinity maturation step using random mutagenesis and flow sorting. This combined approach has the potential for a more complete scan...

  5. Processing and functional display of the 86 kDa heterodimeric penicillin G acylase on the surface of phage fd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, R.M D; van Duin, J; Quax, Wim

    1999-01-01

    The large heterodimeric penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis was displayed on the surface of phage fd. We fused the coding sequence (alpha subunit-internal peptide-beta subunit) to the gene of a phage coat protein. A modified g3p signal sequence was used to direct the polypeptide to the

  6. Mass Spectrometry Immuno Assay (MSIA™) Streptavidin Disposable Automation Research Tips (D.A.R.T's(®)) Antibody Phage Display Biopanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chai Fung; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2018-01-01

    Antibody phage display has been widely established as the method of choice to generate monoclonal antibodies with various efficacies post hybridoma technology. This technique is a popular method which takes precedence over ease of methodology, time- and cost-savings with comparable outcomes to conventional methods. Phage display technology manipulates the genome of M13 bacteriophage to display large diverse collection of antibodies that is capable of binding to various targets (nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and carbohydrates). This subsequently leads to the discovery of target-related antibody binders. There have been several different approaches adapted for antibody phage display over the years. This chapter focuses on the semi-automated phage display antibody biopanning method utilizing the MSIA™ streptavidin D.A.R.T's(®) system. The system employs the use of electronic multichannel pipettes with predefined programs to carry out the panning process. The method should also be adaptable to larger liquid handling instrumentations for higher throughput.

  7. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against......BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...... small subpopulations of breast cancer cells. Selections were performed against a subpopulation of breast cancer cells expressing CD271(+), as these previously have been indicated to be potential breast cancer stem cells. The selected antibody fragments were screened by phage ELISA on both breast cancer...

  8. Subtractive phage display technology identifies zebrafish marcksb that is required for gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Wu; Wei, Chang-Yong; Dai, He-Ping; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Sun, Yong-Hua

    2013-05-25

    In the present study, we used a phage display technique to screen differentially expressed proteins from zebrafish post-gastrula embryos. With a subtractive screening approach, 6 types of single-chain Fv fragments (scFvs) were screened out from an scFv antibody phage display library by biopanning against zebrafish embryonic homogenate. Four scFv fragments (scFv1, scFv3, scFv4 and scFv6) showed significantly stronger binding to the tailbud embryos than to the 30%-epiboly embryos. A T7 phage display cDNA library was constructed from zebrafish tailbud embryos and used to identify the antigens potentially recognized by scFv1, which showed the highest frequency and strongest binding against the tailbud embryos. We acquired 4 candidate epitopes using scFv1 and the corresponding genes showed significantly higher expression levels at tailbud stage than at 30%-epiboly. The most potent epitope of scFv1 was the clone scFv1-2, which showed strong homology to zebrafish myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate b (Marcksb). Western blot analysis confirmed the high expression of marcksb in the post-gastrula embryos, and the endogenous expression of Marcksb was interfered by injection of scFv1. Zebrafish marcksb showed dynamic expression patterns during embryonic development. Knockdown of marcksb strongly affected gastrulation movements. Moreover, we revealed that zebrafish marcksb is required for cell membrane protrusion and F-actin alignment. Thus, our study uncovered 4 types of scFvs binding to zebrafish post-gastrula embryos, and the epitope of scFv1 was found to be required for normal gastrulation of zebrafish. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to combine phage display technique with the embryonic and developmental study of vertebrates, and we were able to identify zebrafish marcksb that was required for gastrulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Putative phage-display epitopes of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus S1 protein and their anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyan; Ge, Xuying; Gao, Yu; Zarlenga, Dante S; Wang, Kexiong; Li, Xunliang; Qin, Zhaoheng; Yin, Xiangping; Liu, Jisheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxin

    2015-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a pathogen of swine that causes severe diarrhea and dehydration resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality in newborn piglets. Phage display is a technique with wide application, in particular, the identification of key antigen epitopes for the development of therapeutic and diagnostic reagents and vaccines. To identify antigen epitopes with specificity for PEDV, a monoclonal antibody (MAb-5E12) against the immunodominant region of the PEDV Spike protein (S1) was used as the target for biopanning a 12-mer phage display, random peptide library. After multiple rounds of biopanning and stringent washing, three phage-displayed peptides, designated L, W and H, were identified that recognize MAb-5E12. Sequence analysis showed that the one or more of the peptides exhibited partial sequence similarity to the native S1 sequence 'MQYVYTPTYYML' (designated peptide M) at position 201-212. In combination with software analysis for the prediction of B cell epitopes, aa 201-212 exhibited characteristics of a linear epitope on the PEDV S1 protein. In contrast to peptide M, a consensus motif 'PxxY' was identified on both peptides L and W, and on the S1 protein, but not on peptide H. Peptide M and the MAb-5E12-recognizing peptides L and W significantly inhibited the adsorption of PEDV on the cell surface as monitored through plaque-reduction assays. Furthermore, data from real-time PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays were consistent with the ability of peptides M, L and W to block viral protein expression and thereby function as antiviral agents for PEDV.

  10. Identification of Specific Hydroxyapatite {001} Binding Heptapeptide by Phage Display and Its Nucleation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent developments of molecular biomimetics that combine genetic engineering and nanotechnology, peptides can be genetically engineered to bind specifically to inorganic components and execute the task of collagen matrix proteins. In this study, using biogenous tooth enamel as binding substrate, we identified a new heptapeptide (enamel high-affinity binding peptide, EHBP from linear 7-mer peptide phage display library. Through the output/input affinity test, it was found that EHBP has the highest affinity to enamel with an output/input ratio of 14.814 × 10−7, while a random peptide (RP displayed much lower output/input ratio of 0.00035 × 10−7. This binding affinity was also verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis. It was found that EHBP absorbing onto the enamel surface exhibits highest normalized fluorescence intensity (5.6 ± 1.2, comparing to the intensity of EHBP to enamel longitudinal section (1.5 ± 0.9 (p < 0.05 as well as to the intensity of a low-affinity binding peptide (ELBP to enamel (1.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Attenuated total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD studies further confirmed that crystallized hydroxyapatite were precipitated in the mineralization solution containing EHBP. To better understand the nucleation effect of EHBP, EHBP was further investigated on its interaction with calcium phosphate clusters through in vitro mineralization model. The calcium and phosphate ion consumption as well as zeta potential survey revealed that EHBP might previously adsorb to phosphate (PO43− groups and then initiate the precipitation of calcium and phosphate groups. This study not only proved the electrostatic interaction of phosphate group and the genetically engineering solid-binding peptide, but also provided a novel nucleation motif for potential applications in guided hard tissue biomineralization and

  11. Challenges in Optimizing a Prostate Carcinoma Binding Peptide, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Debus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of peptides identified through the phage display technology to clinical applications is difficult. Major drawbacks are the metabolic degradation and label instability. The aim of our work is the optimization of DUP-1, a peptide which was identified by phage display to specifically target human prostate carcinoma. To investigate the influence of chelate conjugation, DOTA was coupled to DUP-1 and labeling was performed with 111In. To improve serum stability cyclization of DUP-1 and targeted D-amino acid substitution were carried out. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the binding site and based on the results peptide fragments were chemically synthesized. The properties of modified ligands were investigated in in vitro binding and competition assays. In vivo biodistribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying human prostate tumors subcutaneously. DOTA conjugation resulted in different cellular binding kinetics, rapid in vivo renal clearance and increased tumor-to-organ ratios. Cyclization and D-amino acid substitution increased the metabolic stability but led to binding affinity decrease. Fragment investigation indicated that the sequence NRAQDY might be significant for target-binding. Our results demonstrate challenges in optimizing peptides, identified through phage display libraries, and show that careful investigation of modified derivatives is necessary in order to improve their characteristics.

  12. Improvements to the Kunkel mutagenesis protocol for constructing primary and secondary phage-display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renhua; Fang, Pete; Kay, Brian K

    2012-09-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is routinely performed in protein engineering experiments. One method, termed Kunkel mutagenesis, is frequently used for constructing libraries of peptide or protein variants in M13 bacteriophage, followed by affinity selection of phage particles. To make this method more efficient, the following two modifications were introduced: culture was incubated at 25°C for phage replication, which yielded two- to sevenfold more single-stranded DNA template compared to growth at 37°C, and restriction endonuclease recognition sites were used to remove non-recombinants. With both of the improvements, we could construct primary libraries of high complexity and that were 99-100% recombinant. Finally, with a third modification to the standard protocol of Kunkel mutagenesis, two secondary (mutagenic) libraries of a fibronectin type III (FN3) monobody were constructed with DNA segments that were amplified by error-prone and asymmetric PCR. Two advantages of this modification are that it bypasses the lengthy steps of restriction enzyme digestion and ligation, and that the pool of phage clones, recovered after affinity selection, can be used directly to generate a secondary library. Screening one of the two mutagenic libraries yielded variants that bound two- to fourfold tighter to human Pak1 kinase than the starting clone. The protocols described in this study should accelerate the discovery of phage-displayed recombinant affinity reagents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automated panning and screening procedure on microplates for antibody generation from phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Laura; Takkinen, Kristiina; Söderlund, Hans; Pulli, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Antibody phage display technology is well established and widely used for selecting specific antibodies against desired targets. Using conventional manual methods, it is laborious to perform multiple selections with different antigens simultaneously. Furthermore, manual screening of the positive clones requires much effort. The authors describe optimized and automated procedures of these processes using a magnetic bead processor for the selection and a robotic station for the screening step. Both steps are performed in a 96-well microplate format. In addition, adopting the antibody phage display technology to automated platform polyethylene glycol precipitation of the enriched phage pool was unnecessary. For screening, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol suitable for a robotic station was developed. This system was set up using human gamma-globulin as a model antigen to select antibodies from a VTT naive human single-chain antibody (scFv) library. In total, 161 gamma-globulin-selected clones were screened, and according to fingerprinting analysis, 9 of the 13 analyzed clones were different. The system was further tested using testosterone bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-estradiol-BSA as antigens with the same library. In total, 1536 clones were screened from 4 rounds of selection with both antigens, and 29 different testosterone-BSA and 23 beta-estradiol-BSA binding clones were found and verified by sequencing. This automated antibody phage display procedure increases the throughput of generating wide panels of target-binding antibody candidates and allows the selection and screening of antibodies against several different targets in parallel with high efficiency.

  14. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against......BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...

  15. Identification of a novel CD40 ligand for targeted imaging of inflammatory plaques by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haixiang; Segers, Filip; Sliedregt-Bol, Karen; Bot, Ilze; Woltman, Andrea M; Boross, Peter; Verbeek, Sjef; Overkleeft, Herman; van der Marel, Gijs A; van Kooten, Cees; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L

    2013-10-01

    The CD40/CD40L dyad is deemed to play a central role in several inflammatory processes, including atherosclerosis. As CD40 is overexpressed in atherosclerotic lesions, it constitutes a promising candidate for targeted imaging approaches. Here we describe the design of a novel, selective peptide ligand for CD40 by phage display. A synthetic peptide corresponding with the phage insert NP31 displayed nanomolar affinity for CD40. Affinity was further enhanced by mutimeric presentation of NP31. An essential 11-mer peptide motif was identified by truncation and alanine scan studies. Enriched phage selectively bound human CD40 and homed to inflammatory joints in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. NP31 ablated VEGF and IL-6 transcriptional activation and partially inhibited IL-6 production by CD40L-activated endothelial cells. Notably, NP31 did not only alter the biodistribution profile of a streptavidin scaffold but also markedly increased accumulation of the carrier in atherosclerotic aortic lesions of aged ApoE(-/-) mice in a CD40-dependent manner. This potent and selective peptide ligand has potential for targeted imaging and drug delivery approaches in CD40-dependent inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis.

  16. Production of Recombinant Human scFv Against Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain by Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Ehsan; Lakzaei, Mostafa; Rasaee, Mohhamad Javad; Aminian, Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    Tetanus, as a major cause of death in developing countries, is caused by tetanus neurotoxin. Recombinant antibodies against tetanus neurotoxin can be useful in tetanus management. Phage display of antibody fragments from immune human antibody libraries with single chain constructs combining the variable fragments (scFv) has been one of the most prominent technologies in antibody engineering. The aim of this study was the generation of a single chain fragment of variable region (scFv) library and selection of specific antibodies with high affinity against tetanus toxin. Immune human single chain fragment variable (HuscFv) antibody phagemid library was displayed on pIII of filamentous bacteriophage. Selection of scFv clones was performed against tetanus toxin antigens after three rounds of panning. The selected scFv clones were analyzed for inhibition of tetanus toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. After the third round of panning, over 35 HuscFv phages specific for tetanus toxin were isolated from this library of which 15 clones were found to bind specifically to tetanus toxin. The selected HuscFv phages expressed as a soluble HuscFv peptide and some clones showed positive signals against tetanus toxin. We found that six HuscFv clones inhibit toxin binding to ganglioside GT1b. These selected antibodies can be used in the management of tetanus.

  17. Using phage display technology to obtain Crybodies active against non-target insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Flores, Tania; Romero-Bosquet, María Dolores; Gantiva-Díaz, Diana Marcela; Luque-Navas, María José; Berry, Colin; Osuna, Antonio; Vílchez, Susana

    2017-11-02

    The insecticidal Cry toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are increasingly important in the biological control of insect pests and vectors of human disease. Markets for Bt products and transgenic plants expressing their toxins are driven by their specificity, safety and the move away from chemical control agents. However, the high specificity of Cry toxins can also prove to be a limitation when there is no known Cry toxin active against a particular target. Novel activities can be discovered by screening natural Bt isolates or through modifications of the Cry proteins. Here we demonstrate the use of λ-phage displaying Cry1Aa13 toxin variants modified in domain II loop 2 (Crybodies) to select retargeted toxins. Through biopanning using gut tissue from larvae of the non-target insect Aedes aegypti, we isolated a number of phage for further testing. Two of the overexpressed Cry toxin variants showed significant activity against A. aegypti larvae while another induced mortality at the pupal stage. We present the first report of the use of phage display to identify novel activities toward insects from distant taxonomic Orders and establish this technology based on the use of Crybodies as a powerful tool for developing tailor-made insecticides against new target insects.

  18. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  19. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  1. The mimic epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis screened by phage display peptide library have serodiagnostic potential for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Deng, Xiangying; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Lanhua; You, Xiaolong; Dai, Pei; Wan, Kanglin; Zeng, Yanhua

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an obligate pathogenic bacterial species in the family of Mycobacteriaceae and attracts excessive immune responses which cause pathology of the lungs in active tuberculosis. The lack of more sensitive and effective diagnosis reagents advocates a further recognition for the fast diagnostic and immunological measures for tuberculosis. Here, two 12-mer peptides with core sequences of SVSVGMKPSPRP (CS1) and TMGFTAPRFPHY (CS2) were screened from a phage display random peptide library using the purified mixed tuberculosis-positive serum as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay verified that positive phages exhibited strong binding affinity to mixed tuberculosis-positive serum. BLAST analysis showed that the two sequences may be mimotopes of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis The diagnostic potential for two synthetic mimotope peptides CS1 and CS2 was evaluated using different panels of serum samples (n = 181) by ELISA, and the diagnostic parameters were calculated. CS1 and CS2 achieved sensitivity of 89.41% and 85.88%, and specificities were 90.63% and 87.50%, respectively. We hypothesized that the diagnostic based on CS1 and CS2 may become a promising strategy to enhance the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection due to higher specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, CS1 and CS2 may possess potentials to provide an experimental basis for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Re-engineering of the PAM1 phage display monoclonal antibody to produce a soluble, versatile anti-homogalacturonan scFv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfield, I. W.; Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Møller, I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibody phage display is an increasingly important alternative method for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and involves the expression of antibody fragments (scFvs) at the surface of bacteriophage particles. We have previously used this technique to generate a phage mAb (PAM1phage)...

  3. Deep sequencing of phage-displayed peptide libraries reveals sequence motif that detects norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M; Huang, Wanzhi; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Norovirus infections are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis and result in about 21 million new cases and $2 billion in costs per year in the United States. Existing diagnostics have limited feasibility for point-of-care applications, so there is a clear need for more reliable, rapid, and simple-to-use diagnostic tools in order to contain outbreaks and prevent inappropriate treatments. In this study, a combination of phage display technology, deep sequencing and computational analysis was used to identify 12-mer peptides with specific binding to norovirus genotype GI.1 virus-like particles (VLPs). After biopanning, phage populations were sequenced and analyzed to identify a consensus peptide motif-YRSWXP. Two 12-mer peptides containing this sequence, NV-O-R5-3 and NV-O-R5-6, were further characterized to evaluate the motif's functional ability to detect VLPs and virus. Results indicated that these peptides effectively detect GI.1 VLPs in solid-phase peptide arrays, ELISAs and dot blots. Further, their specificity for the S-domain of the major capsid protein enables them to detect a wide range of GI and GII norovirus genotypes. Both peptides were able to detect virus in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Overall, the work reported here demonstrates the application of phage display coupled with next generation sequencing and computational analysis to uncover peptides with specific binding ability to a target protein for diagnostic applications. Further, the reagents characterized here can be integrated into existing diagnostic formats to detect clinically relevant genotypes of norovirus in stool. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Deep sequencing of phage-displayed peptide libraries reveals sequence motif that detects norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M.; Huang, Wanzhi; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis and result in about 21 million new cases and $2 billion in costs per year in the United States. Existing diagnostics have limited feasibility for point-of-care applications, so there is a clear need for more reliable, rapid, and simple-to-use diagnostic tools in order to contain outbreaks and prevent inappropriate treatments. In this study, a combination of phage display technology, deep sequencing and computational analysis was used to identify 12-mer peptides with specific binding to norovirus genotype GI.1 virus-like particles (VLPs). After biopanning, phage populations were sequenced and analyzed to identify a consensus peptide motif—YRSWXP. Two 12-mer peptides containing this sequence, NV-O-R5-3 and NV-O-R5-6, were further characterized to evaluate the motif's functional ability to detect VLPs and virus. Results indicated that these peptides effectively detect GI.1 VLPs in solid-phase peptide arrays, ELISAs and dot blots. Further, their specificity for the S-domain of the major capsid protein enables them to detect a wide range of GI and GII norovirus genotypes. Both peptides were able to detect virus in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Overall, the work reported here demonstrates the application of phage display coupled with next generation sequencing and computational analysis to uncover peptides with specific binding ability to a target protein for diagnostic applications. Further, the reagents characterized here can be integrated into existing diagnostic formats to detect clinically relevant genotypes of norovirus in stool. PMID:28035012

  5. Antibody library display on a mammalian virus vector: combining the advantages of both phage and yeast display into one technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing a vaccinia virus based library technology, we previously developed an antibody discovery platform that enabled efficient selection of fully functional IgG antibodies from highly diverse immunoglobulin gene libraries expressed on the surface of mammalian cells. Recently, we have further modified this platform to enable efficient expression of a library of fully human antibodies on the surface of vaccinia virus; an enveloped mammalian virus. Similar in concept to phage display, conditions are utilized under which each vaccinia virion expresses a single antibody specificity on its surface. Various panning and magnetic bead based methods have been developed to allow screening of a library of vaccinia- MAb virions and selection of recombinant vaccinia virus encoding specific antibodies. Upon infection of mammalian cells the antibody is not only incorporated into newly produced virus, it is also displayed on the surface of the host cell. Similar to methods utilized in yeast display, the cells displaying vaccinia encoded antibody can also be selected using a combination of magnetic beads and cell sorting, and the virus encoding the specific antibody heavy and light chains readily recovered and analyzed. This technology allows for rapid high throughput selection of vaccinia-MAb virions in a cell free panning system, followed by cell based screening for high specificity and fine selection of optimal antibodies.

  6. Accelerating phage-display library selection by reversible and site-specific biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akiko; Wojcik, John; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Reichel, Annett; Piehler, Jacob; Koide, Shohei

    2009-11-01

    Immobilization of a target molecule to a solid support is an indispensable step in phage display library sorting. Here we describe an immobilization method that addresses shortcomings of existing strategies. Our method is based on the use of a polyhistidine-tagged (His-tagged) target molecule and (BT)tris-NTA, a high-affinity capture reagent for His-tags that also contains a biotin moiety. (BT)tris-NTA provides a stable and reversible linkage between a His-tag and a streptavidin-coated solid support. Because His-tags are the de facto standard for recombinant protein purification, this method dramatically simplifies target preparation for phage display library sorting. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this method by selecting high-affinity binding proteins based on the fibronectin type III (FN3) scaffold to two His-tagged protein targets, yeast small ubiquitin-like modifier and maltose-binding protein. Notably, a significant number of FN3 clones binding either targets selected using the new immobilization method exhibited only very weak binding when the same target was immobilized by coating on a polystyrene surface. This suggests that the His-tag-mediated immobilization exposes epitopes that are masked by commonly used passive adsorption methods. Together, these results establish a method with the potential to streamline and enhance many binding-protein engineering experiments.

  7. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  8. Isolation of Llama Antibody Fragments for Prevention of Dandruff by Phage Display in Shampoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolk, Edward; van der Vaart, Marcel; Lutje Hulsik, David; Vriend, Gert; de Haard, Hans; Spinelli, Silvia; Cambillau, Christian; Frenken, Leon; Verrips, Theo

    2005-01-01

    As part of research exploring the feasibility of using antibody fragments to inhibit the growth of organisms implicated in dandruff, we isolated antibody fragments that bind to a cell surface protein of Malassezia furfur in the presence of shampoo. We found that phage display of llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) can be extended to very harsh conditions, such as the presence of shampoo containing nonionic and anionic surfactants. We selected several VHHs that bind to the cell wall protein Malf1 of M. furfur, a fungus implicated in causing dandruff. In addition to high stability in the presence of shampoo, these VHHs are also stable under other denaturing conditions, such as high urea concentrations. Many of the stable VHHs were found to contain arginine at position 44. Replacement of the native amino acid at position 44 with arginine in the most stable VHH that lacked this arginine resulted in a dramatic further increase in the stability. The combination of the unique properties of VHHs together with applied phage display and protein engineering is a powerful method for obtaining highly stable VHHs that can be used in a wide range of applications. PMID:15640220

  9. Generation of human antibody fragments against Streptococcus mutans using a phage display chain shuffling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common oral diseases and dental caries can be prevented effectively by passive immunization. In humans, passive immunotherapy may require the use of humanized or human antibodies to prevent adverse immune responses against murine epitopes. Therefore we generated human single chain and diabody antibody derivatives based on the binding characteristics of the murine monoclonal antibody Guy's 13. The murine form of this antibody has been used successfully to prevent Streptococcus mutans colonization and the development of dental caries in non-human primates, and to prevent bacterial colonization in human clinical trials. Results The antibody derivatives were generated using a chain-shuffling approach based on human antibody variable gene phage-display libraries. Like the parent antibody, these derivatives bound specifically to SAI/II, the surface adhesin of the oral pathogen S. mutans. Conclusions Humanization of murine antibodies can be easily achieved using phage display libraries. The human antibody fragments bind the antigen as well as the causative agent of dental caries. In addition the human diabody derivative is capable of aggregating S. mutans in vitro, making it a useful candidate passive immunotherapeutic agent for oral diseases.

  10. Identification of Novel Single-Domain Antibodies against FGF7 Using Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Behzad; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2017-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins. FGF7 is of stromal origin and produces a paracrine effect on epithelial cells. In the current investigation, we aimed to identify new single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) against FGF7 using phage display technology. The vector harboring the codon-optimized DNA sequence for FGF7 protein was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS, and then the protein was expressed at the optimized condition. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, and in vitro scratch assay experiments were used to confirm the proper folding and functionality of the purified FGF7 protein. The purity of the produced FGF7 was 92%, with production yield of 3.5 mg/L of culture. Panning against the purified FGF7 was performed, and the identified single-domain antibodies showed significant affinity. Further investigation on one of the selected sdAb displaying phage clones showed concentration-dependent binding to FGF7. The selected sdAb can be used for developing novel tumor-suppressing agents where inhibition of FGF7 is required.

  11. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display identifies peptides that bind mycobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngubane, NAC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available buffer and sonicated in a sonicator water bath (50 kHz) for 10 minutes. The eluent was then neutralised with 15 ml of 1 M Tris-HCl, pH 9. In the following rounds of biopanning an average of 261011 plaque-forming units (PFU) was used. Five rounds...), indicating that this peptide was highly selected for in as early as the third round of selection. Identification of highly selected phage clones Ten plaques were selected using the traditional random cloning picking from the final round of biopanning...

  12. Wide screening of phage-displayed libraries identifies immune targets in planta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rioja

    Full Text Available Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2 × 10(7 different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes

  13. Wide screening of phage-displayed libraries identifies immune targets in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C; Charlton, Keith A; Pieterse, Corné M J; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2 × 10(7) different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  14. Wide Screening of Phage-Displayed Libraries Identifies Immune Targets in Planta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C.; Charlton, Keith A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2×107 different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  15. Prokaryotic expression, purification, and production of glutathione S-transferase-tagged neural stem cell specific peptides from phage display screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Zhao, Wenxiu; Ma, Lan

    2013-02-01

    Combining stem cell with phage display to discover novel biomarkers is a new field in stem cell studies. Novel peptides obtained through phage display panning have been functionally identified and involved into initial applications as cell culture support or cell label. In the present study, we designed a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged peptide complex to construct an easy and efficient prokaryotic expression and purification platform for peptides obtained from phage display panning. The purified GST-peptide protein could specifically bind to neural stem (NS) cells and could be flexibly used for GST pull down assay or NS cell labeling in future studies. The results of the present study would be useful for cell labeling and future investigations of special receptors on stem cell surface.

  16. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias-Neto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i the counting of transducing units and (ii the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU, with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6 ligand sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall

  17. Improved Soluble ScFv ELISA Screening Approach for Antibody Discovery Using Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidkia, Mohammad R; Sepehri, Maryam; Khajeh, Shirin; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-09-01

    Phage display technology (PDT) is a powerful tool for the isolation of recombinant antibody (Ab) fragments. Using PDT, target molecule-specific phage-Ab clones are enriched through the "biopanning" process. The individual specific binders are screened by the monoclonal scFv enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that may associate with inevitable false-negative results. Thus, in this study, three strategies were investigated for optimization of the scFvs screening using Tomlinson I and J libraries, including (1) optimizing the expression of functional scFvs, (2) improving the sensitivity of ELISA, and (3) preparing different samples containing scFvs. The expression of all scFv Abs was significantly enhanced when scFv clones were cultivated in the terrific broth (TB) medium at the optimum temperature of 30 °C. The protein A-conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was found to be a well-suited reagent for the detection of Ag-bound scFvs in comparison with either anti-c-myc Ab or the mixing procedure. Based on our findings, it seems there is no universal media supplement for an improved expression of all scFvs derived from both Tomlinson I and J libraries. We thus propose that expression of scFv fragments in a microplate scale is largely dependent on a variety of parameters, in particular the scFv clones and relevant sequences.

  18. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

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    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  19. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    ...), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts...

  20. Dual-functioning peptides discovered by phage display increase the magnitude and specificity of BMSC attachment to mineralized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraju, Harsha; Miller, Sharon J; Kohn, David H

    2017-07-01

    Design of biomaterials for cell-based therapies requires presentation of specific physical and chemical cues to cells, analogous to cues provided by native extracellular matrices (ECM). We previously identified a peptide sequence with high affinity towards apatite (VTKHLNQISQSY, VTK) using phage display. The aims of this study were to identify a human MSC-specific peptide sequence through phage display, combine it with the apatite-specific sequence, and verify the specificity of the combined dual-functioning peptide to both apatite and human bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, a combinatorial phage display identified the cell binding sequence (DPIYALSWSGMA, DPI) which was combined with the mineral binding sequence to generate the dual peptide DPI-VTK. DPI-VTK demonstrated significantly greater binding affinity (1/KD) to apatite surfaces compared to VTK, phosphorylated VTK (VTKphos), DPI-VTKphos, RGD-VTK, and peptide-free apatite surfaces (p display can identify non-obvious cell and material specific peptides to increase human MSC adhesion strength to specific biomaterial surfaces and subsequently increase cell proliferation and differentiation. These new peptides expand biomaterial design methodology for cell-based regeneration of bone defects. This strategy of combining cell and material binding phage display derived peptides is broadly applicable to a variety of systems requiring targeted adhesion of specific cell populations, and may be generalized to the engineering of any adhesion surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation of Osteosarcoma-Associated Human Antibodies from a Combinatorial Fab Phage Display Library

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    Carmela Dantas-Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma, a highly malignant disease, is the most common primary bone tumor and is frequently found in children and adolescents. In order to isolate antibodies against osteosarcoma antigens, a combinatorial osteosarcoma Fab library displayed on the surface of phages was used. After three rounds of selection on the surface of tumor cells, several osteosarcoma-reactive Fabs were detected. From these Fabs, five were better characterized, and despite having differences in their VH (heavy chain variable domain and Vκ (kappa chain variable domain regions, they all bound to a protein with the same molecular mass. Further analysis by cell ELISA and immunocytochemistry suggested that the Fabs recognize a membrane-associated tumor antigen expressed in higher amounts in neoplasic cells than in normal tissue. These results suggest that the human Fabs selected in this work are a valuable tool for the study of this neoplasia.

  2. Isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus specific bovine antibody fragments from phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Joo; Lebreton, Françoise; Kaiser, Claude; Crucière, Catherine; Rémond, Michelle

    2004-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important veterinary pathogen which can cause widespread epidemics. Due to the high antigenic variability of FMDV, it is important to undertake mutation analysis under immunological pressure. To study the bovine antibody response at a molecular level, phage display technology was used to produce bovine anti-FMDV Fabs. CH1-VH chains with FMDV specific binding could be isolated after selection from a library made from vaccinated cattle. Though their involvement in the bovine immune response remains to be ascertained, it is planned to express the five different selected VH domains in bacterial or insect systems as sequence homologies with integrin beta6 chain could shed light on the basis of FMDV type receptor specificities.

  3. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  4. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Connor

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  5. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  6. Construction of Naive and Immune Human Fab Phage-Display Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Noorsharmimi; Lim, Theam Soon

    2018-01-01

    This protocol describes the processes involved in the generation of human antibody libraries in Fab format. The antibody repertoire is derived from peripheral blood mononucleocytes focusing on different immunoglobulin isotypes. A two-step cloning process was used to generate a diverse human Fab library for subsequent selection by phage display. The method can be applied for the generation of both naive and immune antibody libraries. The naive repertoire allows for the library to be applied for the generation of human monoclonal antibodies against a broad range of target antigens making it a useful resource for antibody generation. However, the immune repertoire will be focused against target antigens from a particular disease. The protocol will focus on the generation of the library including the panning process.

  7. New Phage Display-Isolated Heptapeptide Recognizing the Regulatory Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Human Tumour Protein p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abid, Sihem; Sahnoun, Mouna; Yacoubi-Hadj Amor, Ines; Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Hassairi, Hajer; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja; Gargouri, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The transcription factor tumor protein p53 (P53) controls a variety of genes most involved in cell cycle and is at the origin of apoptosis when DNA is irreparably damaged. We planned to select novel tumor protein p53-interacting peptides through the screening of hepta-peptide phage-display libraries. For this aim, human tumor suppressor protein p53 was expressed in Escherichia coli as Glutathione S-transferase fusion and purified by affinity chromatography. The phage library was then screened on this immobilized protein target. After three rounds of panning, phages were sequenced and shown to contain a consensus sequence NPNSAQG. Thereafter, either free p53 liberated from the fusion protein through thrombin treatment or Histidine-tagged p53 were recognized efficiently by the selected phage. To locate the p53-binding epitope of the selected hepta-peptide, three long peptides parts of the three known domains of the protein were synthesized and screened by the selected phage/peptide. Thus, the Carboxy-terminal p53 region was shown to be the target of the isolated phage as well as by its derived Fluorescein isothiocyanate-peptide. Molecular docking showed Lysine 386 as an important residue potentially engaged in this interaction. The selected hepta-peptide is a novel p53-interacting peptide, not described by other studies, and could be used as therapeutic tool in the future.

  8. Generation and selection of immunized Fab phage display library against human B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongmei; Yang, Xiaochun; Dong, Ningzheng; Xie, Xiaofang; Bai, Xia; Shi, Yizhen

    2007-07-01

    The approval of using monoclonal antibodies as a targeted therapy in the management of patients with B cell lymphoma has led to new treatment options for this group of patients. Production of monoclonal antibodies by the traditional hybridoma technology is costly, and the resulting murine antibodies often have the disadvantage of triggering human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. Therefore recombinant Fab antibodies generated by the phage display technology can be a suitable alternative in managing B cell lymphoma. In this study, we extracted total RNA from spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with human B lymphoma cells, and used RT-PCR to amplify cDNAs coding for the kappa light chains and Fd fragments of heavy chains. After appropriate restriction digests, these cDNA fragments were successively inserted into the phagemid vector pComb3H-SS to construct an immunized Fab phage display library. The diversity of the constructed library was approximately 1.94x10(7). Following five rounds of biopanning, soluble Fab antibodies were produced from positive clones identified by ELISA. From eight positive clones, FabC06, FabC21, FabC43 and FabC59 were selected for sequence analysis. At the level of amino acid sequences, the variable heavy domains (V(H)) and variable light domains (V(L)) were found to share 88-92% and 89-94% homology with sequences coded by the corresponding murine germline genes respectively. Furthermore, reactivity with membrane proteins of the B cell lymphoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. These immunized Fab antibodies may provide a valuable tool for further study of B cell lymphoma and could also contribute to the improvement of disease therapy.

  9. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy.Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR.In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney.These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  10. Labeling and distribution of linear peptides identified using in vivo phage display selection for tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, Stephen J. E-mail: sj9@ornl.gov; Mirzadeh, Saed; Hurst, Gregory B.; Foote, Linda J.; Lankford, Trish K.; Glowienka, Kirsten A.; Chappell, Lara L.; Kelso, Julie R.; Davern, Sandra M.; Safavy, Ahmad; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2000-11-01

    To develop targeting molecules to be used for vascular targeting of short half-lived {alpha}-emitters for radioimmunotherapy, linear peptide phage display libraries were selected in vivo for binding to IC-12 rat tracheal tumors growing in severe combined immune deficient mice. After three rounds of selection, 15 phage clones were analyzed for DNA sequence, and the deduced translation products of cDNA inserts were compared. Three consensus sequences were chosen from three separate experimental selection series and peptides of these sequences with added -gly-gly-tyr were obtained. Peptides were radiolabeled on tyrosine with {sup 125}I and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice was determined. The radioiodinated peptides were stable in vitro and when injected in tumor-bearing mice {approx}3.0 %ID/g accumulated in the tumor; however, much of the {sup 125}I was found in the gastrointestinal tract and thyroid, indicative of dehalogenation of the labeled peptide. Radiolabeling peptide 2 with N-succinimidyl-3-{sup 125}I-iodobenzoate resulted in faster excretion, which in turn resulted in lower levels in tumor and other organs, especially thyroid and gastrointestinal tract. Peptide 2 was derivatized with the bifunctional isothiocyanates of cyclohexyl-B diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) or CHX-A'' DTPA by direct conjugation or with a hydroxylamine derivative of 1B4M-DTPA (2-(p-[O-(carboxamylmethyl)hydroxylamine]benzyl)-6 -methyl-diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid ) coupled at the N-terminus. The primary molecular species in the conjugated products were shown by mass spectrometry to have one DTPA per peptide. Peptide chelate conjugates were radiolabeled with {sup 213}Bi and the products tested for biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice. The data show that chelation of {sup 213}Bi to peptides was accomplished by both the direct method of DTPA attachment and by the method using the linker at the N-terminus. Only small

  11. Subtractive phage display selection from canine visceral leishmaniasis identifies novel epitopes that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens with potential serodiagnosis applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lourena E; Lima, Mayara I S; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Martins, Vivian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Paula S; Lopes, Eliane G P; Lage, Daniela P; Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Andrade, Pedro H R; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Goulart, Luiz R; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a zoonotic disease that is endemic to Brazil, where dogs are the main domestic parasite reservoirs, and the percentages of infected dogs living in regions where canine VL (CVL) is endemic have ranged from 10% to 62%. Despite technological advances, some problems have been reported with CVL serodiagnosis. The present study describes a sequential subtractive selection through phage display technology from polyclonal antibodies of negative and positive sera that resulted in the identification of potential bacteriophage-fused peptides that were highly sensitive and specific to antibodies of CVL. A negative selection was performed in which phage clones were adhered to purified IgGs from healthy and Trypanosoma cruzi-infected dogs to eliminate cross-reactive phages. The remaining supernatant nonadhered phages were submitted to positive selection against IgG from the blood serum of dogs that were infected with Leishmania infantum. Phage clones that adhered to purified IgGs from the CVL-infected serum samples were selected. Eighteen clones were identified and their reactivities tested by a phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) against the serum samples from infected dogs (n = 31) compared to those from vaccinated dogs (n = 21), experimentally infected dogs with cross-reactive parasites (n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 17). Eight clones presented sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, and they showed no cross-reactivity with T. cruzi- or Ehrlichia canis-infected dogs or with dogs vaccinated with two different commercial CVL vaccines in Brazil. Our study identified eight mimotopes of L. infantum antigens with 100% accuracy for CVL serodiagnosis. The use of these mimotopes by phage-ELISA proved to be an excellent assay that was reproducible, simple, fast, and inexpensive, and it can be applied in CVL-monitoring programs.

  12. Identification of the specificity of isolated phage display single-chain antibodies using yeast two-hybrid screens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for the identification of the antigen recognised by an scFv isolated from an antibody phage display library using selection against a complex mixture of proteins (e.g. intact cells, purified cell surface membranes, and tissue sections). The method takes advantage of a yeast ...

  13. Characterization and genome sequencing of two Propionibacterium acnes phages displaying pseudolysogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Mattias

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram positive rod inhabiting the human skin that also infects orthopaedic implants and is associated with acne vulgaris. Previously, one lytic bacteriophage, PA6, from P. acnes has been sequenced and partially characterized. We recently isolated several inducible phages from P. acnes classified as Siphoviruses based on morphology and partial genome sequencing. Results In this study we sequenced the inducible P. acnes phages PAD20 and PAS50, isolated from deep infection and from skin, respectively. The genomes of PAD20 and PAS50 are 29,074 and 29,017 bp, respectively, compared with the 29,739 bp of PA6. The phage genomes have 87.3-88.7% nucleotide sequence identity. The genes are divided into clusters with different levels of similarity between the phages. PAD20 and PAS50 share four genes encoding identical amino acid sequences. Some deletions and insertions in the genomes have occurred, resulting in lack of genes, frame shifts, and possible regulatory differences. No obvious virulence factor gene candidates were found. The phages are inducible, but bacteria can be cured of phages by serial colony isolations and lose their phages during stationary phase, but are still sensitive to new phage infections. Construction of a phylogenetic tree based on more than 459 phage genomes, suggested that P. acnes phages represent a new lineage of Siphoviruses. Conclusions The investigated P. acnes Siphovirus genomes share a high degree of homology to other P. acnes phages sequenced, but not to genomes of other phages isolated from Propionibacteria. The phage genomes are not integrated in the bacterial genome, but instead, most likely have a pseudolysogenic life cycle.

  14. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  15. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... for absorption of the Fab phages. Soluble Fab fragments produced from the cloned material showed identical performance to the parental antibody in agglutination assays. Gel filtration confirmed that the Fab fragment consists of a kappa-Fd heterodimer. The successful use of intact cells for selection of specific...

  16. Invert biopanning: A novel method for efficient and rapid isolation of scFvs by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Veisi, Kamal; Tanomand, Asghar; Akbari, Bahman

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique for development of novel high affinity antibodies against almost any antigen. However, removing false positive clones in screening process remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient and rapid method for isolation of high affinity scFvs by removing NSBs without losing rare specific clones. Therefore, a novel two rounds strategy called invert biopanning was developed for isolating high affinity scFvs against EGFRvIII antigen from human scFv library. The efficiency of invert biopanning method (procedure III) was analyzed by comparing with results of conventional biopanning methods (procedures I and II). According to the results of polyclonal ELISA, the second round of procedure III displayed highest binding affinity against EGFRvIII peptide accompanied by lowest NSB comparing to other two procedures. Several positive clones were identified among output phages of procedure III by monoclonal phage ELISA which displayed high affinity to EGFRvIII antigen. In conclusion, results of our study indicate that invert biopanning is an efficient method for avoiding NSBs and conservation of rare specific clones during screening of a scFv phage library. Novel anti EGFRvIII scFv isolated could be a promising candidate for potential use in treatment of EGFRvIII expressing cancers. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists using phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kanematsu-Yamaki, Yoko; Kamada, Yusuke; Oka, Masahiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Miwa, Masanori; Asami, Taiji; Inooka, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    ActRIIB (activin receptor type-2B) is an activin receptor subtype constitutively expressed in the whole body, playing a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. For its various physiological activities, ActRIIB interacts with activin and multiple other ligands including myostatin (MSTN), growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9). Notably, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between ActRIIB and MSTN negatively controls muscular development. Therefore, this PPI has been targeted for effective treatment of muscle degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we report the identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists by phage display technology. Our peptides bound to the extracellular domain of ActRIIB, inhibited PPIs between ActRIIB expressed on the cell surface and its ligands, and subsequently suppressed activation of Smad that serves as the downstream signal of the ActRIIB pathway. Interestingly, these peptidic antagonists displayed different ligand selectivities; the AR2mini peptide inhibited multiple ligands (activin A, MSTN, GDF11, and BMP9), AR9 inhibited MSTN and GDF11, while AR8 selectively inhibited MSTN. This is the first report of artificial peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists possessing ligand-selectivity.

  18. Enrichment of an in vivo phage display repertoire by subtraction for easy identification of pathology biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karina Vargas Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion. This physical subtraction discarded from a complex repertoire the non-specific selected ligands. STRATEGY 1 Three rounds of in vivo phage peptide selection in EAE female Lewis rats ("EAE repertoire" vs controls ("HEALTHY repertoire". 2 DNA subtraction of the most common sequences between «HEALTHY» and «EAE» phage repertoires to obtain a third EAE specific «SUBTRACTION » phage repertoire. 3 Massive sequencing of the three repertoires and bioinformatic analysis to identify the peptides sequences with high EAE specificity. 4 Biological tests of potential EAE specific phage clones with CNS tissues from EAE and Healthy control rats. 5 Biological tests of the EAE specific peptide and phage clones on the BBB in vitro model (hCMEC/D3 cells under inflammatory conditions (IL-1β stimulation. 6 Target separation and identification by cross-link between the selected phage clones and hMEC/D3 endothelial cells targets under IL-1β stimulation vs controls.

  19. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage phi 15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage phi 15 forms plaques surrounded by grow...

  20. Phage-displayed peptides as capture antigens in an innovative assay for Taenia saginata-infected cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, Rafaela L; Capelli-Peixoto, Janaína; Yamanaka, Isabel B; de Almeida, Rodrigo P M; Muzzi, João Carlos D; Borges, Mariangela; Costa, Alvimar J; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Alvarenga, Larissa M; de Moura, Juliana

    2014-11-01

    Bovine cysticercosis is detected during the routine post mortem examination of carcasses by visual inspection (knife and eye method). However, the sensitivity of this procedure is several times lower than immunoassays, even when it is performed by qualified professionals. In the present study, a new generation capture antigens were screened from a phage display peptide library using antibodies from Taenia saginata-infected animals. Eight phage clones were selected, and one, Tsag 3 (VHTSIRPRCQPRAITPR), produced similar results to the T. saginata metacestode crude antigen (TsCa) when used as a capture antigen in an ELISA. The phage-displayed peptides competed with TsCa for binding sites, reducing the reactivity by approximately 30 %. Alanine scanning indicated that proline, arginine, and serine are important residues for antibody binding. Tsag 1 (HFYQITWLPNTFPAR), the most frequent affinity-selected clone, and Tsag 6 (YRWPSTPSASRQATL) shared similarity with highly conserved proteins from the Taeniidae family with known immunogenicity. Due to their epitopic or mimotopic properties, these affinity-selected phages could contribute to the rational design of an ante mortem immunodiagnosis method for bovine cysticercosis, as well as an epitope-based vaccine to interrupt the taeniosis/cysticercosis complex.

  1. Efficient one-cycle affinity selection of binding proteins or peptides specific for a small-molecule using a T7 phage display pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Takagi, Manami; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Manita, Daisuke; Ozawa, Hiroko; Iwakiri, Kanako; Takakusagi, Kaori; Miyano, Yuka; Nakazaki, Atsuo; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2008-11-15

    Here, we report an efficient one-cycle affinity selection using a natural-protein or random-peptide T7 phage pool for identification of binding proteins or peptides specific for small-molecules. The screening procedure involved a cuvette type 27-MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) apparatus with introduction of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for a specific small-molecule immobilization on the gold electrode surface of a sensor chip. Using this apparatus, we attempted an affinity selection of proteins or peptides against synthetic ligand for FK506-binding protein (SLF) or irinotecan (Iri, CPT-11). An affinity selection using SLF-SAM and a natural-protein T7 phage pool successfully detected FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12)-displaying T7 phage after an interaction time of only 10 min. Extensive exploration of time-consuming wash and/or elution conditions together with several rounds of selection was not required. Furthermore, in the selection using a 15-mer random-peptide T7 phage pool and subsequent analysis utilizing receptor ligand contact (RELIC) software, a subset of SLF-selected peptides clearly pinpointed several amino-acid residues within the binding site of FKBP12. Likewise, a subset of Iri-selected peptides pinpointed part of the positive amino-acid region of residues from the Iri-binding site of the well-known direct targets, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and carboxylesterase (CE). Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and general applicability for a wide range of small-molecules.

  2. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  3. ZP-binding peptides identified via phage display stimulate production of sperm antibodies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cox, Nancy R; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Griffin, Brenda; Baker, Henry J

    2010-07-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins play a central role in sperm-oocyte binding and fertilization. Sperm protein sequences that are involved in sperm-ZP recognition and have an important role in fertilization represent attractive targets for development of contraceptive vaccines, yet are currently unknown. To identify peptide sequences that recognize and bind to ZP proteins, we developed a novel selection procedure from phage display libraries that utilizes intact oocytes surrounded by ZP proteins. The major advantage of this procedure is that ZP proteins remain in their native conformation unlike a selection protocol previously published that utilized solubilized ZP on artificial solid support. Several peptides of 7 and 12 amino acids with binding specificity to canine ZP proteins were identified. Four of them (LNSFLRS, SSWYRGA, YLPIYTIPSMVY, and NNQSPILKLSIH) plus a control ZP-binding peptide (YLPVGGLRRIGG) from the literature were synthesized and tested for antigenic properties in dogs. NNQSPILKLSIH peptide stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies. These antibodies bind to the acrosomal region of the canine sperm cell, demonstrating ability to act as sperm antibodies. The identified ZP-binding peptides (mimicking sperm cell surface antigens) may be useful in the design of immunocontraceptive agents for dogs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phage Display: A Powerful Technology for the Generation of High-Specificity Affinity Reagents from Alternative Immune Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, William J J; Bloom, Laird; Grant, Joanne; Franklin, Edward; Shúilleabháin, Deirdre Ní; Cunningham, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are critical reagents in many fundamental biochemical methods such as affinity chromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), flow cytometry, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry techniques. As our understanding of the proteome becomes more complex, demand is rising for rapidly generated antibodies of higher specificity than ever before. It is therefore surprising that few investigators have moved beyond the classical methods of antibody production in their search for new reagents. Despite their long-standing efficacy, recombinant antibody generation technologies such as phage display are still largely the tools of biotechnology companies or research groups with a direct interest in protein engineering. In this chapter, we discuss the inherent limitations of classical polyclonal and monoclonal antibody generation and highlight an attractive alternative: generating high-specificity, high-affinity recombinant antibodies from alternative immune sources such as chickens, via phage display.

  5. The T7-related Pseudomonas putida phage φ15 displays virion-associated biofilm degradation properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (10(4 and 10(6 pfu and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy.

  6. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  7. A Protocol for Phage Display and Affinity Selection Using Recombinant Protein Baits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Schäfermeyer, Kim R; Downie, A. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Using recombinant phage as a scaffold to present various protein portions encoded by a directionally cloned cDNA library to immobilized bait molecules is an efficient means to discover interactions...

  8. Improved eIF4E binding peptides by phage display guided design: plasticity of interacting surfaces yield collective effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhuang Zhou

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4E is over-expressed in many types of cancer such as breast, head and neck, and lung. A consequence of increased levels of eIF4E is the preferential translation of pro-tumorigenic proteins (e.g. c-Myc and vascular endothelial growth factor and as a result is regarded as a potential therapeutic target. In this work a novel phage display peptide has been isolated against eIF4E. From the phage sequence two amino acids were delineated which improved binding when substituted into the eIF4G1 sequence. Neither of these substitutions were involved in direct interactions with eIF4E and acted either via optimization of the helical capping motif or restricting the conformational flexibility of the peptide. In contrast, substitutions of the remaining phage derived amino acids into the eIF4G1 sequence disrupted binding of the peptide to eIF4E. Interestingly when some of these disruptive substitutions were combined with key mutations from the phage peptide, they lead to improved affinities. Atomistic computer simulations revealed that the phage and the eIF4G1 derivative peptide sequences differ subtly in their interaction sites on eIF4E. This raises the issue, especially in the context of planar interaction sites such as those exhibited by eIF4E, that given the intricate plasticity of protein surfaces, the construction of structure-activity relationships should account for the possibility of significant movement in the spatial positioning of the peptide binding interface, including significant librational motions of the peptide.

  9. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero(®) anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes.

  10. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: A Review of Food-Related Protein-Protein Interactions Discovered by Biopanning over Diverse Baits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Kushwaha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions.

  11. Modular protein expression by RNA trans-splicing enables flexible expression of antibody formats in mammalian cells from a dual-host phage display vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yonglei; Tesar, Devin; Hötzel, Isidro

    2015-10-01

    A recently described dual-host phage display vector that allows expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in mammalian cells bypasses the need for subcloning of phage display clone inserts to mammalian vectors for IgG expression in large antibody discovery and optimization campaigns. However, antibody discovery and optimization campaigns usually need different antibody formats for screening, requiring reformatting of the clones in the dual-host phage display vector to an alternative vector. We developed a modular protein expression system mediated by RNA trans-splicing to enable the expression of different antibody formats from the same phage display vector. The heavy-chain region encoded by the phage display vector is directly and precisely fused to different downstream heavy-chain sequences encoded by complementing plasmids simply by joining exons in different pre-mRNAs by trans-splicing. The modular expression system can be used to efficiently express structurally correct IgG and Fab fragments or other antibody formats from the same phage display clone in mammalian cells without clone reformatting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Identification of peptide sequences that selectively bind to pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate-a surrogate of PETN, via phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, George; Rees, William; Caguiat, Jonathan; Asch, David; Fagan, Diana; Cortes, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    The present research investigates the identification of amino acid sequences that selectively bind to a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) explosive surrogate. Through the use of a phage display technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), a peptide library was tested against pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate (PETNH), a surrogate of PETN, to screen for those with amino acids having affinity toward the explosive. The results suggest that the library contains peptides selective to PETNH. Following three rounds of panning, clones were picked and tested for specificity toward PETNH. ELISA results from these samples show that each phage clone has some level of selectivity for binding to PETNH. The peptides from these clones have been sequenced and shown to contain certain common amino acid segments among them. This work represents a technological platform for identifying amino-acid sequences selective toward any bio-chem analyte of interest. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey T Brinton

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective-targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep, which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use.

  14. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  15. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  16. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  17. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a Novel Human scFv Against EGFR L2 Domain by Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Veisi, Kamal; Khosroshahi, Shiva Ahdi; Tanomand, Asghar

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor frequently overexpresses in tumors with epithelial origin. The L2 domain from extracellular part of EGFR is involved in ligand binding and the blockage of this domain prevents activation of related signaling pathways. This study was aimed to develop a novel human scFv against EGFR L2 domain as a promising target for cancer therapy. The L2 recombinant protein was purified and used for panning a human scFv phage library (Tomlinson I). In this study, a novel screening strategy was applied to select clones with high binding and enrichment of rare specific phage clones of the L2 protein. After five biopanning rounds several specific clones were isolated which among them one phage clone with high binding was purified for further analysis. The specific interaction of selected clone against target antigen was confirmed by ELISA and western blotting. Immunofluorescence staining showed that purified scFv binds to A431 cells surface, displaying EGFR surface receptor. In the present study, we isolated for the first time a novel human scFv against EGFR L2 domain. This study can be the groundwork for developing more effective diagnostic and therapeutic agents against EGFR overexpressing cancers using this novel human anti-L2 ScFv. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Development of a Novel Human Single Chain Antibody Against EGFRVIII Antigen by Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Akbari, Bahman; Ahdi Khosroshahi, Shiva

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: EGFRvIII as the most common mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor is resulting from deletion of exons 2-7 in the coding sequence and junction of exons 1 and 8 through a novel glycine residue. EGFRvIII is highly expressed in glioblastoma, carcinoma of the breast, ovary, and lung but not in normal cells. The aim of the present study was identification of a novel single chain antibody against EGFRvIII as a promising target for cancer therapy. Methods: In this study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to EGFRvIII protein was used for screening a naive human scFv phage library. A novel five-round selection strategy was used for enrichment of rare specific clones. Results: After five rounds of screening, six positive scFv clones against EGFRvIII were selected using monoclonal phage ELISA, among them, only three clones had expected size in PCR reaction. The specific interaction of two of the scFv clones with EGFRvIII was confirmed by indirect ELISA. One phage clone with higher affinity in scFv ELISA was purified for further analysis. The purity of the produced scFv antibody was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses. Conclusion: In the present study, a human anti- EGFRvIII scFv with high affinity was first identified from a scFv phage library. This study can be the groundwork for developing more effective diagnostic and therapeutic agents against EGFRvIII expressing cancers.

  1. A large semi-synthetic single-chain Fv phage display library based on chicken immunoglobulin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordaan Frances

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody fragments selected from large combinatorial libraries have numerous applications in diagnosis and therapy. Most existing antibody repertoires are derived from human immunoglobulin genes. Genes from other species can, however, also be used. Because of the way in which gene conversion introduces diversity, the naïve antibody repertoire of the chicken can easily be accessed using only two sets of primers. Results With in vitro diagnostic applications in mind, we have constructed a large library of recombinant filamentous bacteriophages displaying single chain antibody fragments derived from combinatorial pairings of chicken variable heavy and light chains. Synthetically randomised complementarity determining regions are included in some of the heavy chains. Single chain antibody fragments that recognise haptens, proteins and virus particles were selected from this repertoire. Affinities of three different antibody fragments were determined using surface plasmon resonance. Two were in the low nanomolar and one in the subnanomolar range. To illustrate the practical value of antibodies from the library, phage displayed single chain fragments were incorporated into ELISAs aimed at detecting African horsesickness and bluetongue virus particles. Virus antibodies were detected in a competitive ELISA. Conclusion The chicken-derived phage library described here is expected to be a versatile source of recombinant antibody fragments directed against a wide variety of antigens. It has the potential to provide monoclonal reagents with applications in research and diagnostics. For in vitro applications, naïve phage libraries based on avian donors may prove to be useful adjuncts to the selectable antibody repertoires that already exist.

  2. Selection of an affinity-matured antibody against a defined epitope by phage display of an immune antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jick; Jang, Myeong Hee; Ahn, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin Hong; Lim, Ji Hye; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Lim, Nam-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Soo; Park, Mi-Ju; Park, Insoo; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study, we generated a murine hepatitis B virus (HBV)-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb), KR127, that binds to an epitope (amino acids 37-45, NSNNPDWDF) of the preS1 antigen. Furthermore, an epitope tag, S1 (NANNPDWDF), was developed for protein tagging. The aim of the present study was to develop a high-affinity antibody to the same preS1 epitope. Mice were immunized with the N-terminal domain of human thrombopoietin fused to the S1 tag (nTPO-S1), and a phage-displayed chimeric Fab library was constructed and screened by panning against nTPO-S1. A high-affinity antibody (3-34) was selected that binds to the preS1 antigen. The IgG molecules of 3-34 showed approximately nine-fold higher affinity (K(D) 1.2 nM) for preS1 compared with KR127 (K(D) 10.4 nM), competed with KR127 for binding to the epitope, and bound to HBV particles. This study provides a simple and efficient way to develop a high-affinity antibody to a defined epitope by phage display of an immune antibody library.

  3. Reliable cloning of functional antibody variable domains from hybridomas and spleen cell repertoires employing a reengineered phage display system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, A; Bornhauser, S; Burmester, J; Honegger, A; Willuda, J; Bosshard, H R; Plückthun, A

    1997-02-14

    A prerequisite for the use of recombinant antibody technologies starting from hybridomas or immune repertoires is the reliable cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes. For this purpose, a standard phage display system was optimized for robustness, vector stability, tight control of scFv-delta geneIII expression, primer usage for PCR amplification of variable region genes, scFv assembly strategy and subsequent directional cloning using a single rare cutting restriction enzyme. This integrated cloning, screening and selection system allowed us to rapidly obtain antigen binding scFvs derived from spleen-cell repertoires of mice immunized with ampicillin as well as from all hybridoma cell lines tested to date. As representative examples, cloning of monoclonal antibodies against a his tag, leucine zippers, the tumor marker EGP-2 and the insecticide DDT is presented. Several hybridomas whose genes could not be cloned in previous experimental setups, but were successfully obtained with the present system, expressed high amounts of aberrant heavy and light chain mRNAs, which were amplified by PCR and greatly exceeded the amount of binding antibody sequences. These contaminating variable region genes were successfully eliminated by employing the optimized phage display system, thus avoiding time consuming sequencing of non-binding scFv genes. To maximize soluble expression of functional scFvs subsequent to cloning, a compatible vector series to simplify modification, detection, multimerization and rapid purification of recombinant antibody fragments was constructed.

  4. Production of recombinant scFv against p24 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Fourozandeh, Mehdi; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Phage display has a fundamental role in protein isolation and engineering. Isolated proteins produced with this method can be modified for specific binding and affinity. P24 is the most produced protein during human immune deficiency virus (HIV) replication; especially in the early steps of HIV-1 infection, its evaluation may have diagnostic values. To test the HIV-1 infection, p24 antigen assay appears to be a very promising alternative to RNA assays. In this study, we have generated a recombinant mouse single chain antibody fragment against p24 of the HIV-1 with the use of phage display technology. After isolation of antibody variable-region (V) gene of B cells extracted from the spleen of an immunized mouse, a library of single chain Fv fragments (scFv) was constructed. The library was used in a series of bio-panning processes against recombinant p24 protein expressed from Escherichia coli. The isolated scFv antibody specifically recognizes the HIV-1 capsid protein p24. The affinity constant of the isolated scFv antibody (MF85) was found to be 2×10(-9) M. Our studies showed that the MF85 scFV antibody has similar properties as that of monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma technology.

  5. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To identify the main amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the polystyrene surface PolySorp. Methods and Results: Using a combination of phage display and competitive elution revealed that 12-mer peptides of phages from competitive panning with S....... cerevisiae FLO11 wild-type (TBR1) cells had a higher consensus than those from competitive panning with S. cerevisiae flo11¿ mutant (TBR5) cells, suggesting that the wild-type cells interact with the plastic surface in a stronger and more similar way than the mutant cells. Tryptophan and proline were more...... abundant in the peptides of phages from competitive elution with FLO11 cells than in those from competitive elution with flo11¿ cells. Furthermore, two phages with hydrophobic peptides containing 1 or 2 tryptophan, and 3 or 5 proline, residues inhibited the adhesion of FLO11 cells to PolySorp more than...

  6. Targeting cytokines: production and characterization of anti-TNF-α scFvs by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Nouri, Mohammad; Zolbanin, Jafar Majidi; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Baradaran, Behzad; Barar, Jaleh; Coukos, George; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    The antibody display technology (ADT) such as phage display (PD) has substantially improved the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Ab fragments through bypassing several limitations associated with the traditional approach of hybridoma technology. In the current study, we capitalized on the PD technology to produce high affinity single chain variable fragment (scFv) against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α), which is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine and plays important role in various inflammatory diseases and malignancies. To pursue production of scFv antibody fragments against human TNF- α, we performed five rounds of biopanning using stepwise decreased amount of TNF-α (1 to 0.1 μ g), a semi-synthetic phage antibody library (Tomlinson I + J) and TG1 cells. Antibody clones were isolated and selected through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening. The selected scFv antibody fragments were further characterized by means of ELISA, PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and Western blot analyses as well as fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Based upon binding affinity to TNF-α , 15 clones were selected out of 50 positive clones enriched from PD in vitro selection. The selected scFvs displayed high specificity and binding affinity with Kd values at nm range to human TNF-α . The immunofluorescence analysis revealed significant binding of the selected scFv antibody fragments to the Raji B lymphoblasts. The effectiveness of the selected scFv fragments was further validated by flow cytometry analysis in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mouse fibroblast L929 cells. Based upon these findings, we propose the selected fully human anti-TNF-α scFv antibody fragments as potential immunotherapy agents that may be translated into preclinical/clinical applications.

  7. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...... of peptides obtained after screening phage-displayed peptide libraries with purified 96/3 identified a consensus binding sequence of Asn-x-Glu-x-x-(aromatic)-x-x-Gly. The predicted surface on a three-dimensional homology model of the tyrosine phosphatase domain of IA-2 was analyzed for clusters of Asn, Glu...

  8. Generation and validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 clone set for protein expression and phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichun Gao

    Full Text Available A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85% have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST-tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis, and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Phage display on anti-infective target DXS led to an acceptor-substrate competitive peptidic inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcozzi, Alessio; Masini, Tiziana; Zhu, Di; Pesce, Diego; Illarionov, Boris; Fischer, Markus; Herrmann, Andreas; Hirsch, Anna Katharina Herta

    2017-11-08

    Enzymes of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors are validated drug targets. By performing phage display on 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), which catalyzes the first step of this pathway, we discovered several peptide hits and recognized false positive hits. The enriched peptide binder P12 emerged as substrate (d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate) competitive against Deinococcus radiodurans DXS. The result indicates possible overlapping of cofactor- and acceptor-substrate-binding pockets, and provides inspiration for the design of inhibitors of DXS with a unique and novel mechanism. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology.

  11. Phage display allows identification of zona pellucida-binding peptides with species-specific properties: novel approach for development of contraceptive vaccines for wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Schemera, Bettina; Breiteneicher, Adam H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-12-31

    Multiple phage-peptide constructs, where the peptides mimic sperm epitopes that bind to zona pellucida (ZP) proteins, were generated via selection from a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP-binding phage clones with potential species-specific properties, an important feature for wildlife oral vaccines as the goal is to control overpopulation of a target species while not affecting non-target species' reproduction. Six phage-peptide antigens were injected intramuscularly into pigs and corresponding immune responses evaluated. Administration of the antigens into pigs stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies, which were shown to act as anti-sperm antibodies. Potentially, such anti-sperm antibodies could interfere with sperm delivery or function in the male or female genital tract, leading to contraceptive effects. Staining of semen samples collected from different mammalian species, including pig, cat, dog, bull, and mouse, with anti-sera from pigs immunized with ZP-binding phage allowed identification of phage-peptide constructs with different levels of species specificity. Based on the intensity of the immune responses and specificity of these responses in different species, two of the antigens with fusion peptide sequences GEGGYGSHD and GQQGLNGDS were recognized as the most promising candidates for development of contraceptive vaccines for wild pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  13. Application of phage display in selecting Tomato spotted wilt virus - specific single-chain antibodies (scFvs) for sensitive diagnosis in ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.A.; Prins, M.; Twisk, van C.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Kerschbaumer, R.J.; Kormelink, R.; Goldbach, R.W.; Schots, A.

    2000-01-01

    A panel of recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs) against structural proteins of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was retrieved from a human combinatorial scFv antibody library using the novel phage display technique. After subcloning the encoding DNA sequences in the expression vector pSKAP/S,

  14. A universal phage display system for the seamless construction of Fab libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Renae S; Valadon, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The construction of Fab phage libraries requires the cloning of domains from both the light and the heavy chain of antibodies. Despite the advent of powerful strategies such as splicing-by-overlap extension PCR, obtaining high quality libraries with excellent coverage remains challenging. Here, we explored the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for the seamless cloning of Fab libraries. We analyzed human, murine and rabbit germline antibody repertoires and identified combinations of restriction enzymes that exhibit very few or no recognition sites in the antibody sequences. We describe three phagemid vectors, pUP-22Hb, pUP-22Mc and pUP-22Rc, which were employed for cloning the Fab repertoire of these hosts using BsmBI and SapI (human) or SapI alone (mouse and rabbit). Using human serum albumin as a model immunization, we built a mouse/human chimeric Fab library and a mouse Fab library in a single step ligation and successfully panned multiple cognate antibodies. The overall process is highly scalable and faster than PCR-based techniques, with a Fab insertion success rate of around 80%. By using carefully chosen overhangs on each end of the antibody domains, this approach paves the way to the universal, sequence- and vector-independent cloning and reformatting of antibody libraries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effective Optimization of Antibody Affinity by Phage Display Integrated with High-Throughput DNA Synthesis and Sequencing Technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Hu

    Full Text Available Phage display technology has been widely used for antibody affinity maturation for decades. The limited library sequence diversity together with excessive redundancy and labour-consuming procedure for candidate identification are two major obstacles to widespread adoption of this technology. We hereby describe a novel library generation and screening approach to address the problems. The approach started with the targeted diversification of multiple complementarity determining regions (CDRs of a humanized anti-ErbB2 antibody, HuA21, with a small perturbation mutagenesis strategy. A combination of three degenerate codons, NWG, NWC, and NSG, were chosen for amino acid saturation mutagenesis without introducing cysteine and stop residues. In total, 7,749 degenerate oligonucleotides were synthesized on two microchips and released to construct five single-chain antibody fragment (scFv gene libraries with 4 x 10(6 DNA sequences. Deep sequencing of the unselected and selected phage libraries using the Illumina platform allowed for an in-depth evaluation of the enrichment landscapes in CDR sequences and amino acid substitutions. Potent candidates were identified according to their high frequencies using NGS analysis, by-passing the need for the primary screening of target-binding clones. Furthermore, a subsequent library by recombination of the 10 most abundant variants from four CDRs was constructed and screened, and a mutant with 158-fold increased affinity (Kd = 25.5 pM was obtained. These results suggest the potential application of the developed methodology for optimizing the binding properties of other antibodies and biomolecules.

  16. A high-throughput platform for population reformatting and mammalian expression of phage display libraries to enable functional screening as full-length IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Douthwaite, Julie A; Chen, Yan; Kemp, Ben; Kidd, Sara; Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer; Smith, Alison; Goode, Kate; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Lowe, David; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Chowdhury, Partha S

    Phage display antibody libraries are a rich resource for discovery of potential therapeutic antibodies. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries are the most common format due to the efficient display of scFv by phage particles and the ease by which soluble scFv antibodies can be expressed for high-throughput screening. Typically, a cascade of screening and triaging activities are performed, beginning with the assessment of large numbers of E. coli-expressed scFv, and progressing through additional assays with individual reformatting of the most promising scFv to full-length IgG. However, use of high-throughput screening of scFv for the discovery of full-length IgG is not ideal because of the differences between these molecules. Furthermore, the reformatting step represents a bottle neck in the process because each antibody has to be handled individually to preserve the unique VH and VL pairing. These problems could be resolved if populations of scFv could be reformatted to full-length IgG before screening without disrupting the variable region pairing. Here, we describe a novel strategy that allows the reformatting of diverse populations of scFv from phage selections to full-length IgG in a batch format. The reformatting process maintains the diversity and variable region pairing with high fidelity, and the resulted IgG pool enables high-throughput expression of IgG in mammalian cells and cell-based functional screening. The improved process led to the discovery of potent candidates that are comparable or better than those obtained by traditional methods. This strategy should also be readily applicable to Fab-based phage libraries. Our approach, Screening in Product Format (SiPF), represents a substantial improvement in the field of antibody discovery using phage display.

  17. The use of genomic signature distance between bacteriophages and their hosts displays evolutionary relationships and phage growth cycle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regeard Christophe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage classification is mainly based on morphological traits and genome characteristics combined with host information and in some cases on phage growth lifestyle. A lack of molecular tools can impede more precise studies on phylogenetic relationships or even a taxonomic classification. The use of methods to analyze genome sequences without the requirement for homology has allowed advances in classification. Results Here, we proposed to use genome sequence signature to characterize bacteriophages and to compare them to their host genome signature in order to obtain host-phage relationships and information on their lifestyle. We analyze the host-phage relationships in the four most representative groups of Caudoviridae, the dsDNA group of phages. We demonstrate that the use of phage genomic signature and its comparison with that of the host allows a grouping of phages and is also able to predict the host-phage relationships (lytic vs. temperate. Conclusions We can thus condense, in relatively simple figures, this phage information dispersed over many publications.

  18. Isolation of soluble scFv antibody fragments specific for small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, using phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou El-Magd, Rabab M; Vozza, Nicolas F; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wishart, David S

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of single chain antibody fragment (scFv) clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically bind a small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, was performed using iterative affinity selection procedures. L-Carnitine has been described as a conditionally essential nutrient for humans. Abnormally high concentrations of L-Carnitine in urine are related to many health disorders including diabetes mellitus type 2 and lung cancer. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to L-Carnitine in the presence of key bioselecting component materials and closely related L-Carnitine derivatives. In addition, the affinity results were confirmed using biophysical fluorescence quenching for tyrosine residues in the V segment. Small-scale production of the soluble fragment yielded 1.3mg/L using immunopure-immobilized protein A affinity column. Circular Dichroism data revealed that the antibody fragment (Ab) represents a folded protein that mainly consists of β-sheets. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific L-Carnitine binding capability with potential applications in metabolomic devices for companion diagnostics and personalized medicine applications. It may also be used in any other biomedical application where detection of the L-Carnitine level is important. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of Two Murine Antibodies against Neospora caninum Using Phage Display Technology and Application on the Detection of N. caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinhua; Otsuki, Takahiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ike, Kazunori; Park, Enoch Y.

    2013-01-01

    Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1) and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection. PMID:23308179

  20. Development of two murine antibodies against Neospora caninum using phage display technology and application on the detection of N. caninum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1 and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection.

  1. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  2. Cancer Cell-Specific Oligopeptides Selected by an Integrated Microfluidic System from a Phage Display Library for Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Weng, Chen-Hsun; Che, Yu-Jui; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of female mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, there are currently few high-specificity candidate oligopeptide targeting agents that can be used for early diagnosis of this cancer. It has been suggested that cancer-specific oligopeptides could be screened from a phage display library. However, conventional methods are tedious, labor-intensive, and time consuming. Therefore, a novel, integrated microfluidic system was developed to automate the entire screening process for ovarian cancer cell-specific oligopeptides. An oligopeptide screened with microfluidic chip-based technique was demonstrated to have high affinity to ovarian cancer cells and demonstrated relatively low binding to other cancer cells, indicating a high specificity. Furthermore, the developed method consumed relatively low volumes of samples and reagents; only 70 μL of reactant was used within the whole experimental process. Each panning process was also significantly shortened to only 7.5 hours. Therefore, the screened oligopeptide could be used to isolate ovarian cancer cells in a rapid manner, thus greatly expediting the diagnosis and its application as oligopeptide targeting agent for theranostics of this cancer. PMID:25699101

  3. Development of a T7 Phage Display Library to Detect Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis by a Panel of Novel Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Talwar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease, diagnosed through tissue biopsy of involved organs in the absence of other causes such as tuberculosis (TB. No specific serologic test is available to diagnose and differentiate sarcoidosis from TB. Using a high throughput method, we developed a T7 phage display cDNA library derived from mRNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells and leukocytes of sarcoidosis patients. This complex cDNA library was biopanned to obtain 1152 potential sarcoidosis antigens and a microarray was constructed to immunoscreen two different sets of sera from healthy controls and sarcoidosis. Meta-analysis identified 259 discriminating sarcoidosis antigens, and multivariate analysis identified 32 antigens with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 83% to classify sarcoidosis from healthy controls. Additionally, interrogating the same microarray platform with sera from subjects with TB, we identified 50 clones that distinguish between TB, sarcoidosis and healthy controls. The top 10 sarcoidosis and TB specific clones were sequenced and homologies were searched in the public database revealing unique epitopes and mimotopes in each group. Here, we show for the first time that immunoscreenings of a library derived from sarcoidosis tissue differentiates between sarcoidosis and tuberculosis antigens. These novel biomarkers can improve diagnosis of sarcoidosis and TB, and may aid to develop or evaluate a TB vaccine.

  4. Development of two murine antibodies against Neospora caninum using phage display technology and application on the detection of N. caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinhua; Otsuki, Takahiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ike, Kazunori; Park, Enoch Y

    2013-01-01

    Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1) and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection.

  5. Modular Construction of Large Non-Immune Human Antibody Phage-Display Libraries from Variable Heavy and Light Chain Gene Cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and antibody-derived therapeutics have emerged as a rapidly growing class of biological drugs for the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity, infection, and neurological diseases. To support the development of human antibodies, various display techniques based on antibody gene repertoires have been constructed over the last two decades. In particular, scFv-antibody phage display has been extensively utilized to select lead antibodies against a variety of target antigens. To construct a scFv phage display that enables efficient antibody discovery, and optimization, it is desirable to develop a system that allows modular assembly of highly diverse variable heavy chain and light chain (Vκ and Vλ) repertoires. Here, we describe modular construction of large non-immune human antibody phage-display libraries built on variable gene cassettes from heavy chain and light chain repertoires (Vκ- and Vλ-light can be made into independent cassettes). We describe utility of such libraries in antibody discovery and optimization through chain shuffling.

  6. Selection of a breast cancer subpopulation-specific antibody using phage display on tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla J

    2015-01-01

    on cryostat sections of human breast cancer tissue. This method allows for selection of recombinant antibodies binding to antigens specifically expressed in a small part of the tissue section. In this case, a CD271(+) subpopulation of breast cancer cells was targeted, and these may be potential breast cancer...... it is possible to better target cellular heterogeneity in proteomic studies. The identification of novel biomarkers is relevant for our understanding and intervention in human diseases. The selection of the breast cancer-specific antibody fragment LH 7 may reveal novel subpopulation-specific biomarkers, which......Breast cancer tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations. These populations display a high variance in morphology, growth and metastatic propensity. They respond differently to therapeutic interventions, and some may be more prone to cause recurrence. Studying individual subpopulations...

  7. Discovery of short linear motif-mediated interactions through phage display of intrinsically disordered regions of the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Norman E; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Jeon, Jouhyun; Nim, Satra; Krystkowiak, Izabella; Blikstad, Cecilia; Dong, Debbie; Markova, Natalia; Kim, Philip M; Ivarsson, Ylva

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsically disordered regions of eukaryotic proteomes are enriched in short linear motifs (SLiMs), which are of crucial relevance for cellular signaling and protein regulation; many mediate interactions by providing binding sites for peptide-binding domains. The vast majority of SLiMs remain to be discovered highlighting the need for experimental methods for their large-scale identification. We present a novel proteomic peptide phage display (ProP-PD) library that displays peptides representing the disordered regions of the human proteome, allowing direct large-scale interrogation of most potential binding SLiMs in the proteome. The performance of the ProP-PD library was validated through selections against SLiM-binding bait domains with distinct folds and binding preferences. The vast majority of identified binding peptides contained sequences that matched the known SLiM-binding specificities of the bait proteins. For SHANK1 PDZ, we establish a novel consensus TxF motif for its non-C-terminal ligands. The binding peptides mostly represented novel target proteins, however, several previously validated protein-protein interactions (PPIs) were also discovered. We determined the affinities between the VHS domain of GGA1 and three identified ligands to 40-130 μm through isothermal titration calorimetry, and confirmed interactions through coimmunoprecipitation using full-length proteins. Taken together, we outline a general pipeline for the design and construction of ProP-PD libraries and the analysis of ProP-PD-derived, SLiM-based PPIs. We demonstrated the methods potential to identify low affinity motif-mediated interactions for modular domains with distinct binding preferences. The approach is a highly useful complement to the current toolbox of methods for PPI discovery. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Interrogation of side chain biases for oligomannose recognition by antibody 2G12 via structure-guided phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yi; Lai, Jonathan R

    2017-10-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are essential reagents for deciphering gene or protein function and have been a fruitful source of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. However, developing anticarbohydrate antibodies to target glycans for those purposes has been less successful because the molecular basis for glycan-mAb interactions is poorly understood relative to protein- or peptide-binding mAbs. Here, we report our investigation on glycan-mAb interactions by using the unique architectural scaffold of 2G12, an antibody that targets oligomannoses on the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120, as the template for engineering highly specific mAbs to target glycans. We first analyzed 24 different X-ray structures of antiglycan mAbs from the Protein Data Bank to determine side chain amino acid distributions in of glycan-mAb interactions. We identified Tyr, Arg, Asn, Ser, Asp, and His as the six most prevalent residues in the glycan-mAb contacts. We then utilized this information to construct two phage display libraries ("Lib1" and "Lib2") in which positions on the heavy chain variable domains of 2G12 were allowed to vary in restricted manner among Tyr, Asp, Ser, His, Asn, Thr, Ala and Pro to interrogate the minimal physicochemical requirements for oligomannose recognition. We analyzed the sequences of 39 variants from Lib1 and 14 variants from Lib2 following selection against gp120, the results showed that there is a high degree of malleability within the 2G12 for glycan recognitions. We further characterized five unique phage clones from both libraries that exhibited a gp120-specific binding profile. Expression of two of these variants as soluble mAbs indicated that, while specificity of gp120-binding was retained, the affinity of these mutants was significantly reduced relative to WT 2G12. Nonetheless, the results indicate these is some malleability in the identity of contact residues and provide a novel insight into the nature of glycan-antibody interactions and how they may differ

  9. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-06-01

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K d ,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  10. Selection of recombinant antibodies by phage display technology and application for detection of allergenic Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Silvia; López-Calleja, Inés María; Alcocer, Marcos; González, Isabel; Martín, Rosario; García, Teresa

    2013-10-30

    Current immunological methods for detection of Brazil nut allergens in foods are based on polyclonal antibodies raised in animals. Phage display technology allows the procurement of high-affinity antibodies avoiding animal immunization steps and therefore attaining the principle of replacement supported by animal welfare guidelines. In this study, we screened Tomlinson I and J libraries for specific binders against Brazil nut by employing a Brazil nut protein extract and a purified Brazil nut 2S globulin, and we successfully isolated a phage single chain variable fragment (named BE95) that specifically recognizes Brazil nut proteins. The selected phage scFv was further used as affinity probe to develop an indirect phage-ELISA for detection of Brazil nut in experimental binary mixtures and in commercial food products, with a limit of detection of 5 mg g(-1). This study describes for the first time the isolation of recombinant antibody fragments specific for an allergenic tree nut protein from a naïve library and paves the way to develop new immunoassays for food analysis based on probes that can be produced in vitro when required and do not rely on animal immunization.

  11. Phage display-based on-slide selection of tumor-specific antibodies on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haaf, Andre; Pscherer, Sibylle; Fries, Katharina; Barth, Stefan; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Tur, Mehmet Kemal

    2015-08-01

    Phage display is an effective method for the generation of target-specific human antibodies. Standard phage display panning use purified proteins, antigen-transfected cells or tumor cell lines as target structure to generate specific antibodies. However, recombinant proteins can be difficult to express and purify in their native conformation and suitable cell lines are not always available. Additionally the antigen expression profile may change during cultivation and thus differ from the malignant cells in patient. Here we describe a method for the selection of specific antibodies from phage display libraries by panning against formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue biopsies immobilized on glass slides, using small cell lung cancer (SCLC) as a case study. The human Tomlinson single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage libraries I and J were panned against SCLC FFPE tissue slides for positive selection and healthy lung tissue for subtraction. The specificity of the selected scFv antibodies was confirmed in vitro by ELISA on immobilized SCLC cell membranes, by flow cytometry using the SCLC cell lines NCI-H69, NCI-H82 and DMS 273, and ex vivo against tissue microarrays containing 35 different SCLC samples and 20 types of normal organs. We monitored the internalization of three selected scFv antibodies and fused them with Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') to produce immunotoxins whose cytotoxicity was confirmed by cell viability and apoptosis assays on different SCLC cell lines, achieving IC50 values of up to 23nM. The selection of SCLC-specific scFv antibodies by panning against FFPE tissue slides circumvents the challenges of using purified antigens or cell lines for antibody selection. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Unique biological properties of catalytic domain directed human anti-CAIX antibodies discovered through phage-display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC, but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule.

  13. Joining the in vitro immunization of alpaca lymphocytes and phage display: rapid and cost effective pipeline for sdAb synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comor, Lubos; Dolinska, Saskia; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Bencurova, Elena; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Potocnakova, Lenka; Kanova, Evelina; Bhide, Mangesh

    2017-01-23

    Camelids possess unique functional heavy chain antibodies, which can be produced and modified in vitro as a single domain antibody (sdAb or nanobody) with full antigen binding ability. Production of sdAb in conventional manner requires active immunization of Camelidae animal, which is laborious, time consuming, costly and in many cases not feasible (e.g. in case of highly toxic or infectious antigens). In this study, we describe an alternative pipeline that includes in vitro stimulation of naïve alpaca B-lymphocytes by antigen of interest (in this case endothelial cell binding domain of OspA of Borrelia) in the presence of recombinant alpaca interleukins 2 and 4, construction of sdAb phage library, selection of antigen specific sdAb expressed on phages (biopanning) and confirmation of binding ability of sdAb to the antigen. By joining the in vitro immunization and the phage display ten unique phage clones carrying sdAb were selected. Out of ten, seven sdAb showed strong antigen binding ability in phage ELISA. Furthermore, two soluble forms of sdAb were produced and their differential antigen binding affinity was measured with bio-layer interferometry. A proposed pipeline has potential to reduce the cost substantially required for maintenance of camelid herd for active immunization. Furthermore, in vitro immunization can be achieved within a week to enrich mRNA copies encoding antigen-specific sdAbs in B cell. This rapid and cost effective pipeline can help researchers to develop efficiently sdAb for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  14. A novel method for in Situ detection of hydrolyzable casein fragments in a cheese matrix by antibody phage display technique and CLSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    was successfully developed for the detection of scFvs binding to different alpha(s1)-casein fragments inside a cheese matrix by CLSM. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated immunofluorescent labeling method for in situ analysis of proteolysis phenomena in the cheese matrix. Additionally, this technique......A novel method to monitor in situ hydrolyzable casein fragments during cheese ripening by using immunofluorescent labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was developed. Monoclonal single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) were generated by antibody phage display toward...

  15. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  16. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A

    2014-01-01

    of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide-protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, non......Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use...

  17. The selection performance of an antibody library displayed on filamentous phage coat proteins p9, p3 and truncated p3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Tuomas; Syrjänpää, Markku; Sanmark, Hanna; Seppä, Titta; Akter, Sultana; Khan, Liton Md Ferdhos; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2014-09-19

    Filamentous phage display has become an ordinary tool to engineer antibody fragments. Several capsid proteins have been applied for displaying antibodies, of which gene III (p3) protein is used the most followed by experiments with gene IX (p9) protein. Despite the popularity, there are no library scale studies to objectively compare differences in the selection performance of the libraries, when displayed via different capsid proteins. In this study, an identical antibody repertoire was displayed as Fab fragments on p9, p3 and truncated p3 (p3Δ). In addition, the library clones were displayed as ScFv fragments on p3Δ and the Fab-p3 display valency was modulated by hyperphage and VCS-M13 superinfections. The selection performances of the libraries were followed in repeated parallel panning reactions against streptavidin (STR) and digoxigenin (DIG). Selection was successful with all display formats, but the enrichment of specific clones from Fab-p9 library was clearly less efficient than from the other libraries. The most diverse outputs were obtained from p3Δ display and the highest affinity anti-DIG antibodies from the ScFv repertoire. Unfortunately, the number of retrieved specific clones was too low for explicit analysis of the differences in the number of obtained unique clones from each library. However, severe reduction in sequence diversity was observed in p3-Fab libraries prior to panning, which in turn, materialized as a low number of unique specific clones. Oligovalent display by hyperphage resulted in a higher number of unique clones, but the same highest affinity anti-DIG Fab was recovered also by VCS-M13 superinfection. The compromised enrichment of the target-specific clones from the Fab repertoire as a fusion to p9 capsid protein in our experiments, the significant loss of functional diversity in Fab-p3 library after single phage packing cycle and the retrieval of higher affinity anti-digoxigenin clones as ScFv molecules than as Fab molecules from

  18. Generation of a Highly Reactive Chicken-Derived Single-Chain Variable Fragment against Fusarium verticillioides by Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Quan Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides is the primary causal agent of Fusarium ear and kernel rot in maize, producing fumonisin mycotoxins that are toxic to humans and domestic animals. Rapid detection and monitoring of fumonisin-producing fungi are pivotally important for the prevention of mycotoxins from entering into food/feed products. Chicken-derived single-chain variable fragments (scFvs against cell wall-bound proteins from F. verticillioides were isolated from an immunocompetent phage display library. Comparative phage enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs and sequencing analyses identified four different scFv antibodies with high sensitivity. Soluble antibody ELISAs identified two highly sensitive scFv antibodies, FvCA3 and FvCA4, with the latter being slightly more sensitive. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the FvCA4 may hold a better overall structure with CDRH3, CDRL1 and CDRL3 centered in the core region of antibody surface compared with that of other scFvs. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that the binding of FvCA4 antibody was localized to the cell walls of conidiospores and hyphae of F. verticillioides, confirming the specificity of this antibody for a surface target. This scFv antibody was able to detect the fungal mycelium as low as 10−2 μg/mL and contaminating mycelium at a quantity of 10−2 mg/g maize. This is the first report that scFv antibodies derived from phage display have a wide application for rapid and accurate detection and monitoring of fumonisin-producing pathogens in agricultural samples.

  19. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. High-content analysis of antibody phage-display library selection outputs identifies tumor selective macropinocytosis-dependent rapidly internalizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D; Bidlingmaier, Scott M; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364-2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly active

  1. High-content Analysis of Antibody Phage-display Library Selection Outputs Identifies Tumor Selective Macropinocytosis-dependent Rapidly Internalizing Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364–2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly

  2. VERO stable cell lines expressing full-length human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 and 3: platforms for subtractive phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Valadan, Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Cross-talk between human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (HER2 and HER3) may potentially contribute to therapeutic resistance in human breast cancer. Subtractive phage display allows highly specific selection for antibody fragments directed against cells surface HER2 and HER3. The strategies to select conformation- and activation-specific antibodies against HER2 and HER3 require tightly regulated HER2 and HER3 expressing cells that allow controlled activation/inactivation of these receptors during panning procedures. To achieve this, first, we found that the VERO cell line is an appropriate cell line for heterogeneous expression of HER2 and HER3, and then we established a panel of VERO stable cell lines expressing high levels of HER2 and HER3 alone and in combination. We also showed that HER2 and HER3 expressed in VERO cells were biologically active and could form heterodimer following neuregulin1 treatment. The cell line established here not only provided platforms for phage display-based methods but also could be used in any HER-related studies.

  3. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage-typing in the analysis of a hospital outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, U.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Dessau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis from 81 patients from Herlev Hospital or from Copenhagen County were analysed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage-typing. Fourteen polymorphic markers from five decamer primers unambiguously placed...... that RAPD is useful as a tool in investigations of microbial outbreaks in its own right, or to supplement phage-typing and PFGE of Salmonella Enteritidis....

  4. Combining EL4-B5-based B-cell stimulation and phage display technology for the successful isolation of human anti-Scl-70 autoantibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Malte; Weiss, Etienne; Engel, Alfred M

    2003-07-01

    Scl-70 is the major antigen recognised by autoantibodies in the sera of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The autoantibodies that specifically react with Scl-70 are highly characteristic of the disease and represent valuable markers for the diagnosis of SSc. We describe a novel strategy for cloning autoantibody fragments starting with a small blood sample from an SSc patient. B cells isolated from the collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro using the EL4-B5 system. Anti-Scl-70 IgG-producing cells were pooled for RNA preparation followed by the generation of phagemid libraries of approximately 10(7) independent single-chain Fvs (scFvs). The screening of these libraries by phage display allowed us to isolate four anti-Scl-70 scFvs following three rounds of biopanning. About 10 times more starting blood material was needed to generate scFv libraries of similar size from PBMCs of an SSc patient and only two anti-Scl-70 scFvs were isolated after three rounds of phage selection. Together, this work shows that functional autoantibody fragments can be advantageously cloned after in vitro expansion of B cells. The isolated anti-Scl-70 autoantibody fragments represent useful tools for calibrating SSc diagnostic assays.

  5. Selection of phage-displayed human antibody fragments specific for CD1b presenting the Mycobacterium tuberculosis glycolipid Ac2SGL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Frank; Sarmiento, María E; Reyes, Fatima; Kim, Louise; Huggett, Jim; Lepore, Marco; Otero, Oscar; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Rook, Graham; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro; Acosta, Armando

    2016-06-01

    The development of new tools capable of targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected cells have potential applications in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of tuberculosis. In Mtb-infected cells, CD1b molecules present Mtb lipids to the immune system (Mtb lipid-CD1b complexes). Because of the lack of CD1b polymorphism, specific Mtb lipid-CD1b complexes could be considered as universal Mtb infection markers. 2-Stearoyl-3-hydroxyphthioceranoyl-2'-sulfate-α-α'-d-trehalose (Ac2SGL) is specific for Mtb, and is not present in other mycobacterial species. The CD1b-Ac2SGL complexes are expressed on the surface of human cells infected with Mtb. The aim of this study was to generate ligands capable of binding these CD1b-Ac2SGL complexes. A synthetic human scFv phage antibody library was used to select phage-displayed antibody fragments that recognized CD1b-Ac2SGL using CD1b-transfected THP-1 cells loaded with Ac2SGL. One clone, D11-a single, light-variable domain (kappa) antibody (dAbκ11)-showed high relative binding to the Ac2SGL-CD1b complex. A ligand recognizing the Ac2SGL-CD1b complex was obtained, which is a potential candidate to be further tested for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182-188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 68Ga-labeled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin Michaelsen; Kyneb, Majbritt Hauge; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and deep-sited infections, often associated with the formation of biofilms. Early diagnosis and initiated therapy is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. Imaging techniques are helpful...... combining anatomical with functional data in order to describe and characterize site, extent and activity of the disease. The purpose of the study was to identify and (68)Ga-label peptides with affinity for S. aureus biofilm and evaluate their potential as bacteria-specific positron emission tomography (PET......) imaging agents. METHODS: Phage-displayed dodecapeptides were selected using an in vitro grown S. aureus biofilm as target. One cyclic (A8) and two linear (A9, A11) dodecapeptides were custom synthesized with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated via a lysine linker...

  8. Phage display derived human monoclonal antibodies isolated by binding to the surface of live primary breast cancer cells recognize GRP78

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Charlotte G; Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    of novel targets and human antibodies against them. We have isolated single-chain human mAbs from a large naïve antibody phage display library by panning on a single-cell suspension of freshly isolated live cancer cells from a human breast cancer specimen, and these antibodies were shown to specifically......Clinical trials using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against cell-surface markers have yielded encouraging therapeutic results in several cancer types. Generally, however, anticancer antibodies are only efficient against a subpopulation of cancers, and there is a strong need for identification...... bound strongly to several cancers, including 45% breast carcinomas, 35% lung cancers, and 86% melanomas, but showed no or weak binding to normal tissues. A yeast two-hybrid screen of a large human testis cDNA library identified the glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa (GRP78) as the antigen recognized...

  9. Utilization of Multi-Immunization and Multiple Selection Strategies for Isolation of Hapten-Specific Antibodies from Recombinant Antibody Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullila, Antti; Nevanen, Tarja K.

    2017-01-01

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool for the development of novel recombinant antibodies. In this work, we optimized and streamlined the recombinant antibody discovery process for haptens as an example. A multi-immunization approach was used in order to avoid the need for construction of multiple antibody libraries. Selection methods were developed to utilize the full potential of the recombinant antibody library by applying four different elution conditions simultaneously. High-throughput immunoassays were used to analyse the binding properties of the individual antibody clones. Different carrier proteins were used in the immunization, selection, and screening phases to avoid enrichment of the antibodies for the carrier protein epitopes. Novel recombinant antibodies against mycophenolic acid and ochratoxin A, with affinities up to 39 nM and 34 nM, respectively, were isolated from a multi-immunized fragment antigen-binding (Fab) library. PMID:28561803

  10. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M

    2008-01-01

    class I molecule might have a very similar binding motif at the C-terminus compared with a known mouse class I molecule H2-Kb which has L, or I, V, M at p8. Previous work showed that Atlantic Salmon carrying the allele SasaUBA*0301 are resistant to infectious Salmon aneamia virus......The structure of the peptide-binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I has been analyzed extensively in human and mouse. For fish, there are no crystallographic models of MHC molecules, neither are there data on the peptide-binding specificity. In this study, we describe...... for the first time the identification of a fish class I peptide-MHC ligand binding motif. Phage display technology using both 7mer and 12mer libraries enabled us to identify peptide ligands with unique specificity that interacts with the recombinant Salmon MHC class I molecule. The recombinant proteins, beta(2...

  11. Uso de Peptídeo Sintético selecionado por Phage Display para o Imunodiagnóstico da Leishmaniose Visceral Canina

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Monerat Toledo Machado

    2005-01-01

    Neste trabalho foram selecionados três antígenos através da técnica de Phage Display para o imunodiagnóstico da Leishmaniose Visceral Canina. Estes antígenos tiveram os DNAs extraídos e seqüenciados. O clone que apresentou a maior reatividade frente ao pool de soros de cães com leishmaniose visceral foi sintetizado através da síntese química em membrana de celulose e na sua forma solúvel, purificado e sua massa confirmada através de espectrometria de massa. Este peptídeo (TTDDDKLKKTLTYRS) foi...

  12. An elaborate landscape of the human antibody repertoire against enterovirus 71 infection is revealed by phage display screening and deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Ren, Xianwen; Yang, Jian; Dong, Jie; Xue, Ying; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Jin, Qi

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), primarily in the Asia-Pacific area, that are often associated with complications of severe to fatal neurological symptoms. There are currently no anti-viral therapies or vaccines available for the treatment of EV71 infection. Illustrating human antibody responses neutralizing EV71 infection could potentially provide valuable information for the development of effective therapies and vaccines. Here, we constructed a comprehensive phage display library based on peripheral blood of eight EV71-infected donors and identified 27 EV71-specific human antibodies, of which four have neutralizing activity in in vitro experiments. Deep sequencing analysis of the antibody heavy chains at the transcript level of another three independent EV71-infected donors and three controls demonstrates that heavy chains of the EV71-specific antibodies are conserved among EV71-infected individuals but absent in controls, suggesting convergent evolution of human antibodies against EV71.

  13. Isolation of serotype-specific antibodies against dengue virus non-structural protein 1 using phage display and application in a multiplexed serotyping assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebaneilwe Lebani

    Full Text Available The multidimensional nature of dengue virus (DENV infections, which can be caused by four distinct serotypes of the virus, complicates the sensitivity of assays designed for the diagnosis of infection. Different viral markers can be optimally detected at different stages of infection. Of particular clinical importance is the early identification of infection, which is pivotal for disease management and the development of blood screening assays. Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is an early surrogate marker of infection and its detection in serum coincides with detectable viraemia. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies that bind to NS1 for each of the four DENV serotypes. This was achieved using phage display and a subtractive biopanning strategy to direct the antibody selection towards serotype-specific epitopes. This antibody isolation strategy has advantages over immunisation techniques where it is difficult to avoid antibody responses to cross-reactive, immunodominant epitopes. Serotype specificity to recombinant antigen for each of the antibodies was confirmed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Confirmation of binding to native DENV NS1 was achieved using ELISA and immunofluorescence assay on DENV infected Vero cells. No cross-reactivity with Zika or Kunjin viruses was observed. A previously isolated pan-reactive antibody that binds to an immunodominant epitope was able to pair with each of the serotype-specific antibodies in a sandwich ELISA, indicating that the serotype specific antibodies bind to epitopes which are all spatially distinct from the immunodominant epitope. These antibodies were suitable for use in a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and serotyping of DENV NS1 in human serum. This work demonstrates that phage display coupled with novel biopanning strategies is a valuable in vitro methodology for isolation of binders that can

  14. Use of Phage Display technology in development of canine visceral leishmaniasis vaccine using synthetic peptide trapped in sphingomyelin/cholesterol liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo Andrez; Nguyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-02-28

    Leishmania parasites can cause visceral or cutaneous disease and are found in subtropical and tropical regions of the Old and New World. The pathology of the infection is determined by both host immune factors and species/strain differences of the parasite. Dogs represent the major reservoir of Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) and vaccines are considered the most cost-effective control tools for canine disease. Selection of immunodominant peptides was performed by Phage Display to identify sequences recognized by L. infantum naturally infected animals. Sera from Leishmania infected animals were used in the biopanning to selection of specific peptides. Serum samples from T. cruzi infected and healthy animals were used as control. After selection, synthetic peptides were produced in membrane (spot-synthesis) in soluble form and blotting and ELISA were performed for validation of serum reactivity. Selected peptide was formulated with aluminum hydroxide and liposomes and immunization was performed in BALB/c mice. Protection was determined by qPCR after challenge infection with virulent L. infantum. We reported the selection of Peptide 5 through Phage Display technique and demonstrate its ability to promote a state of immunity against L. infantum infection in murine model after immunization using liposomes as vaccine carrier. Our results demonstrate that immunization with Peptide 5 when formulated with aluminum hydroxide and liposomes is immunogenic and elicited significant protection associated with the induction of mixed Th1/Th2 immune response against L. infantum infection. Peptide 5 is a promising vaccine candidate and the findings obtained in the present study encourage canine trials to confirm the effectiveness of a vaccine against CVL.

  15. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  16. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zu-Quan [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Li, He-Ping [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Jing-Bo [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Tao [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wu, Ai-Bo [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-products, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1000 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Liao, Yu-Cai, E-mail: ycliao06@yahoo.com.cn [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); National Center of Plant Gene Research, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-02-18

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding

  17. Antibody-Based Protective Immunity against Helminth Infections: Antibody Phage Display Derived Antibodies against BmR1 Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anizah Rahumatullah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasite infections are significantly impacting global health, with more than two billion infections worldwide with a high morbidity rate. The complex life cycle of the nematodes has made host immune response studies against these parasites extremely difficult. In this study, we utilized two phage antibody libraries; the immune and naïve library were used to identify single chain fragment variable (scFv clones against a specific filarial antigen (BmR1. The V-gene analysis of isolated scFv clones will help shed light on preferential VDJ gene segment usage against the filarial BmR1 antigen in healthy and infected states. The immune library showed the usage of both lambda and kappa light chains. However, the naïve library showed preferential use of the lambda family with different amino acid distributions. The binding characteristics of the scFv clones identified from this work were analyzed by immunoassay and immunoaffinity pull down of BmR1. The work highlights the antibody gene usage pattern of a naïve and immune antibody library against the same antigen as well as the robust nature of the enriched antibodies for downstream applications.

  18. Selection of single chain antibody fragments binding to the extracellular domain of 4-1BB receptor by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Salman; Yousefi, Mehdi; Safaie Qamsari, Elmira; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Younesi, Vahid; Dorostkar, Ruhollah; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Sharifzadeh, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    The 4-1BB is a surface glycoprotein that pertains to the tumor necrosis factor-receptor family. There is compelling evidence suggesting important roles for 4-1BB in the immune response, including cell activation and proliferation and also cytokine induction. Because of encouraging results of different agonistic monoclonal antibodies against 4-1BB in the treatment of cancer, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, 4-1BB has been suggested as an attractive target for immunotherapy. In this study, single chain variable fragment phage display libraries, Tomlinson I+J, were screened against specific synthetic oligopeptides (peptides I and II) designed from 4-1BB extracellular domain. Five rounds of panning led to selection of four 4-1BB specific single chain variable fragments (PI.12, PI.42, PII.16, and PII.29) which showed specific reaction to relevant peptides in phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The selected clones were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami 2, and their expression was confirmed by western blot analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments indicated that these antibodies were able to specifically recognize 4-1BB without any cross-reactivity with other antigens. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated an acceptable specific binding of the single chain variable fragments to 4-1BB expressed on CCRF-CEM cells, while no binding was observed with an irrelevant antibody. Anti-4-1BB single chain variable fragments enhanced surface CD69 expression and interleukin-2 production in stimulated CCRF-CEM cells which confirmed the agonistic effect of the selected single chain variable fragments. The data from this study have provided a rationale for further experiments involving the biological functions of anti-4-1BB single chain variable fragments in future studies.

  19. Serine and proline-rich ligands enriched via phage-display technology show preferential binding to BCR/ABL expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, Karen; Shankland, Iva; Mowla, Shaheen; Njikan, Samuel; Jaymacker, Jai; Novitzky, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Despite the use of targeted therapy, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) currently remains incurable with drug therapy, with patients requiring life-long treatment. Developing either a vaccine to prevent the disease or another novel drug to specifically target and eradicate the CML cell will require the identification of CML-associated cell-surface markers and molecules that can bind specifically to the cell surface. In an attempt to discover peptides that bind specifically to cells in the early chronic phase of the disease, we used phage-display technology to identify heptapeptides that bind specifically to the surface of BCR/ABL-expressing fibroblasts. An in vitro system using NIH3T3 stably transfected with pGD210 (BCR/ABL) was used as a model for the chronic phase of the disease. The cells were panned using a linear heptapeptide phage library (Ph.D 7.0) in a negative/positive panning strategy with NIH3T3 containing only the plasmid vector as the wild type control. We identified four novel peptides that were enriched through this technique. These peptides contained either multiple proline residues or serine/threonine-proline pairs and showed a confirmed binding preference for BCR/ABL+ fibroblasts. The peptide Y-R-A-P-W-P-P also showed a binding affinity for granulocytes from untreated CML patients. We have identified several novel peptides that can be used in future studies to identify specific CML cell-surface antigens or provide a novel drug-delivery mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Identification of a panel of tumor-associated antigens from breast carcinoma cell lines, solid tumors and testis cDNA libraries displayed on lambda phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfriglia Maurizio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated antigens recognized by humoral effectors of the immune system are a very attractive target for human cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to molecular definition of immunogenic tumor proteins based on their reactivity with autologous patient sera (SEREX. Methods Several high complexity phage-displayed cDNA libraries from breast carcinomas, human testis and breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 were constructed. The cDNAs were expressed in the libraries as fusion to bacteriophage lambda protein D. Lambda-displayed libraries were efficiently screened with sera from patients with breast cancer. Results A panel of 21 clones representing 18 different antigens, including eight proteins of unknown function, was identified. Three of these antigens (T7-1, T11-3 and T11-9 were found to be overexpressed in tumors as compared to normal breast. A serological analysis of the 21 different antigens revealed a strong cancer-related profile for at least five clones (T6-2, T6-7, T7-1, T9-21 and T9-27. Conclusions Preliminary results indicate that patient serum reactivity against five of the antigens is associated with tumor disease. The novel T7-1 antigen, which is overexpressed in breast tumors and recognized specifically by breast cancer patient sera, is potentially useful in cancer diagnosis.

  1. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

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    Peter Durand Skottrup

    Full Text Available Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18 by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15, shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48. Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  2. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  3. Identification of epitopes on nonstructural protein 7 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus recognized by monoclonal antibodies using phage-display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Liu, Rongchang; Zhang, Weidong; Sun, Lingshuang; Ning, Zhangyong; Ji, Fangxiao; Cui, Jin; Zhang, Guihong

    2017-08-01

    Nonstructural protein 7 (nsp7) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is considered to be a suitable reagent for the development of serological diagnostic assays. It can be expressed as a soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, and its antibody response may continue up to 202 days post-infection. Furthermore, the region encoded by nsp7 is highly homologous among various strains within the genotype, and the results of nsp7-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed high agreement with previous Idexx ELISA results. All these evidences suggest the existence of important epitopes on nsp7, though the characteristics of these epitopes remain unclear. In the present study, we prepared three monoclonal antibodies against nsp7 protein and used them to screen the epitope-distribution characteristics of PRRSV nsp7 protein by phage-display technology. We identified a linear epitope NAWGDEDRLN at amino acids 153-162 type II PRRSV nsp7β subunit. This newly defined epitope showed excellent reactivity with PRSSV-positive serum samples. These results further our understanding of the antigenic structure of nsp7 protein, and provide efficient reagents for PRRSV serological tests.

  4. Antigen discovery in chronic human inflammatory central nervous system disease: panning phage-displayed antigen libraries identifies the targets of central nervous system-derived IgG in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, M P; Owens, G P; Carlson, S; Maybach, A L; Gilden, D H

    2001-11-15

    The presence of increased IgG in the brains of humans with infectious and inflammatory CNS diseases of unknown etiology such as multiple sclerosis may be a clue to the cause of disease. For example, the intrathecally synthesized oligoclonal bands in diseases such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) or cryptococcal meningitis have been shown to represent Ab directed against the causative agents, measles virus (MV), or Cryptococcus neoformans, respectively. Using SSPE as a model system, we developed a strategy to identify the antigenic targets of the intrathecal disease-relevant IgG in chronic human inflammatory and demyelinating diseases of the CNS. Libraries of cDNA Ags were displayed on the surface of T7Select bacteriophage and biopanned on IgG extracted from the brain of an SSPE patient, or on a monospecific recombinant Fab identified from SSPE brain. After three or six rounds of biopanning on either Ab, positive phage-displayed Ags reacting with IgG were enriched to 35-77% of all panned clones. Sequence analysis of the positive clones identified fragments of the nucleocapsid protein of MV, the cause of SSPE. The sensitivity of the system was determined by diluting the positive clones from this SSPE phage-displayed library at a ratio of 10(-6) into another phage-displayed library that did not contain any detectable MV Ags; after six rounds of panning, the positive clones comprised 34% of all phage and were also shown to be MV nucleocapsid specific. This strategy will be useful to identify potentially rare Ags in diseases of unknown cause.

  5. A peptide isolated from phage display libraries is a structural and functional mimic of an RGD-binding site on integrins

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Many integrins recognize short RGD-containing amino acid sequences and such peptide sequences can be identified from phage libraries by panning with an integrin. Here, in a reverse strategy, we have used such libraries to isolate minimal receptor sequences that bind to fibronectin and RGD-containing fibronectin fragments in affinity panning. A predominant cyclic motif, *CWDDG/LWLC*, was obtained (the asterisks denote a potential disulfide bond). Studies using the purified phage and the corres...

  6. Phage display—A powerful technique for immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Justyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    One of the most effective molecular diversity techniques is phage display. This technology is based on a direct linkage between phage phenotype and its encapsulated genotype, which leads to presentation of molecule libraries on the phage surface. Phage display is utilized in studying protein-ligand interactions, receptor binding sites and in improving or modifying the affinity of proteins for their binding partners. Generating monoclonal antibodies and improving their affinity, cloning antibodies from unstable hybridoma cells and identifying epitopes, mimotopes and functional or accessible sites from antigens are also important advantages of this technology. Techniques originating from phage display have been applied to transfusion medicine, neurological disorders, mapping vascular addresses and tissue homing of peptides. Phages have been applicable to immunization therapies, which may lead to development of new tools used for treating autoimmune and cancer diseases. This review describes the phage display technology and presents the recent advancements in therapeutic applications of phage display. PMID:22906939

  7. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

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    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  8. Displays

    OpenAIRE

    Schauer, A.

    1983-01-01

    A short review is given on new display technologies such as plasma, liquid crystals, light emitting diodes, electroluminescence and electrochromism. It is stated that thin or thick film or hybrid techniques are essential for all the different types of display. Comparing the performance data of displays the advantages, disadvantages, appropriate applications and future developments are described. Finally the display market and its growth are discussed briefly.

  9. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

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    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  10. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

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    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  11. A novel Fc-engineered human ICAM-1/CD54 antibody with potent anti-myeloma activity developed by cellular panning of phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausz, Katja; Cieker, Michael; Kellner, Christian; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valerius, Thomas; Burger, Renate; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2017-09-29

    To identify antibodies suitable for multiple myeloma (MM) immunotherapy, a cellular screening approach was developed using plasma cell lines JK-6L and INA-6 and human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv) phage libraries. Isolated phage antibodies were screened for myeloma cell surface reactivity. Due to its binding characteristics, phage PIII-15 was selected to generate the scFv-Fc fusion protein TP15-Fc with an Fc domain optimized for FcγRIIIa binding. Various MM cell lines and patient-derived CD138-positive malignant plasma cells, but not granulocytes, B or T lymphocytes from healthy donors were recognized by TP15-Fc. Human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1/CD54) was identified as target antigen by using transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of note, no cross-reactivity of TP15-Fc with mouse ICAM-1 transfected cells was detected. TP15-Fc was capable to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against different human plasma cell lines and patients' myeloma cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and purified NK cells. Importantly, TP15-Fc showed potent in vivo efficacy and completely prevented growth of human INA-6.Tu1 plasma cells in a xenograft SCID/beige mouse model. Thus, the novel ADCC-optimized TP15-Fc exerts potent anti-myeloma activity and has promising characteristics to be further evaluated for MM immunotherapy.

  12. RAPID: A random access picture digitizer, display, and memory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimovsky, Y.; Rayfield, M.; Eskenazi, R.

    1976-01-01

    RAPID is a system capable of providing convenient digital analysis of video data in real-time. It has two modes of operation. The first allows for continuous digitization of an EIA RS-170 video signal. Each frame in the video signal is digitized and written in 1/30 of a second into RAPID's internal memory. The second mode leaves the content of the internal memory independent of the current input video. In both modes of operation the image contained in the memory is used to generate an EIA RS-170 composite video output signal representing the digitized image in the memory so that it can be displayed on a monitor.

  13. Oligonucleotide-assisted cleavage and ligation: a novel directional DNA cloning technology to capture cDNAs. Application in the construction of a human immune antibody phage-display library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonbroodt, Sonia; Frans, Nicolas; DeSouza, Mark; Eren, Rachel; Priel, Smadar; Brosh, Naama; Ben-Porath, Judith; Zauberman, Arie; Ilan, Ehud; Dagan, Shlomo; Cohen, Edward H.; Hoogenboom, Hennie R.; Ladner, Robert Charles; Hoet, René M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oligonucleotide-assisted cleavage and ligation (ONCL), a novel approach to the capture of gene repertoires, in the construction of a phage-display immune antibody library is described. ONCL begins with rapid amplification of cDNA ends to amplify all members equally. A single, specific cut near 5′ and/or 3′ end of each gene fragment (in single stranded form) is facilitated by hybridization with an appropriate oligonucleotide adapter. Directional cloning of targeted DNA is accomplished by ligation of a partially duplex DNA molecule (containing suitable restriction sites) and amplification with primers in constant regions. To demonstrate utility and reliability of ONCL, a human antibody repertoire was cloned from IgG mRNA extracted from human B-lymphocytes engrafted in Trimera mice. These mice were transplanted with peripheral blood lymphocytes from Candida albicans infected individuals and subsequently immunized with C.albicans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). DNA sequencing showed that ONCL resulted in efficient capture of gene repertoires. Indeed, full representation of all VH families/segments was observed showing that ONCL did not introduce cloning biases for or against any VH family. We validated the efficiency of ONCL by creating a functional Fab phage-display library with a size of 3.3 × 1010 and by selecting five unique Fabs against GAPDH antigen. PMID:15905471

  14. Phage Display Approaches for the Isolation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Dengue Virus Envelope Domain III from Human and Mouse Derived Libraries

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    Subhash G. Vasudevan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Domain III of the dengue virus envelope protein (EDIII, aa295-395 has an immunoglobulin fold and is the proposed receptor-binding domain of the virus. Previous studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies against EDIII can be neutralizing and have therapeutic potential. Here, cloned Fab-phage libraries of human and mouse origin were screened for DENV specific antibodies. Firstly, bacterially expressed EDIII or whole virus particles were used as bait in biopanning against a large naïve human Fab-phage library ( > 10 billion independent clones. Multiple panning strategies were employed, and in excess of 1000 clones were screened, but all of the antibodies identified bound the envelope in regions outside EDIII suggesting EDIII antibodies are virtually absent from the naïve human repertoire. Next, a chimeric Fab-phage library was constructed from a panel of EDIII specific mouse hybridomas by pooling the VH and VL chain sequences from the hybridomas and cloning these into the pComb3X phagemid vector with human CH and CL encoding sequences. Biopanning against EDIII identified a unique antibody (C9 that cross-reacts with EDIII from DENV1-3 and, in the IgG format, binds and neutralizes DENV2 in cell-based assays. Sequence analysis and saturation mutagenesis of complementary determining regions (CDR in the C9 light chain suggest an antigen recognition model in which the LCDR3 is a key determinant of EDIII specificity, while modifications in LCDR1 and LCDR2 affect DENV serotype cross-reactivity. Overall, this study supports the current prevailing opinion that neutralizing anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies can be readily generated in murine systems, but in humans the anti-DENV immune response is directed away from domain III.

  15. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

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    Grasso Felicia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells.

  16. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

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    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  17. Infective and inactivated filamentous phage as carriers for immunogenic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Norris, Mandy D; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Cochran, Anna M; Wolfe, Karen G; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-07-01

    The focus of this study is on development of vaccines using filamentous phage as a delivery vector for immunogenic peptides. The use of phage as a carrier for immunogenic peptides provides significant benefits such as high immunogenicity, low production costs, and high stability of phage preparations. However, introduction of live recombinant phage into the environment might represent a potential ecological problem. This, for example, may occur when vaccines are used in oral or nasal formulations in field conditions for wild and feral animals. To address this issue, comparative studies of antigenic properties of live and inactivated (non-viable) phage were accomplished. Inactivated phage, if released, will not propagate and will degrade as any other protein. In these experiments, a model phage clone that was previously selected from a phage display library and shown to stimulate production of anti-sperm antibodies with contraceptive properties was used. Multiple methods of phage inactivation were tested, including drying, freezing, autoclaving, heating, and UV irradiation. Under studied conditions, heating at 76°C for 3h, UV irradiation, and autoclaving resulted in complete phage inactivation. Phage samples treated by heat and UV were characterized by spectrophotometry and electron microscopy. To test antigenicity, live and inactivated phage preparations were injected into mice and antibody responses assayed by ELISA. It was found that phage killed by heat causes little to no immune responses, probably due to destruction of phage particles. In contrast, UV-inactivated phage stimulated production of IgG serum antibodies at the levels comparable to live phage. Thus, vaccines formulated to include UV-inactivated filamentous phage might represent environmentally safe alternatives to live phage vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of a nanomolar scFv inhibiting the endopeptidase activity of botulinum toxin A, by single-round panning of an immune phage-displayed library of macaque origin

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    Chahboun Siham

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A, mainly represented by subtype A1, is the most toxic substance known. It causes naturally-occurring food poisoning, and is among the biological agents at the highest risk of being weaponized. Several antibodies neutralizing BoNT/A by targeting its heavy chain (BoNT/A-H have been isolated in the past. For the first time however, an IgG (4LCA recently isolated by hybridoma technology and targeting the BoNT/A light chain (BoNT/A-L, was shown to inhibit BoNT/A endopeptidase activity and protect in vivo against BoNT/A. In the present study, a phage-displayed library was constructed from a macaque (Macaca fascicularis hyper-immunized with BoNTA/L in order to isolate scFvs inhibiting BoNT/A endopeptidase activity for clinical use. Results Diversity of the scFvs constituting the library was limited due to the frequent presence, within the genes intended to be part of the library, of restriction sites utilized for its construction. After screening with several rounds of increasing stringency, as is usual with phage technology, the library got overwhelmed by phagemids encoding incomplete scFvs. The screening was successfully re-performed with a single round of high stringency. In particular, one of the isolated scFvs, 2H8, bound BoNT/A1 with a 3.3 nM affinity and effectively inhibited BoNT/A1 endopeptidase activity. The sequence encoding 2H8 was 88% identical to human germline genes and its average G-score was -0.72, quantifying the high human-like quality of 2H8. Conclusions The presence of restrictions sites within many of the sequences that were to be part of the library did not prevent the isolation of an scFv, 2H8, by an adapted panning strategy. ScFv 2H8 inhibited toxin endopeptidase activity in vitro and possessed human-like quality required for clinical development. More generally, the construction and screening of phage-displayed libraries built from hyper-immunized non-human primates is an

  19. The Magistral Phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Verbeken, Gilbert; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Huys, Isabelle; De Vos, Daniel; Ameloot, Charlotte; Fauconnier, Alan

    2018-02-06

    Since time immemorial, phages-the viral parasites of bacteria-have been protecting Earth's biosphere against bacterial overgrowth. Today, phages could help address the antibiotic resistance crisis that affects all of society. The greatest hurdle to the introduction of phage therapy in Western medicine is the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework. Belgium is now implementing a pragmatic phage therapy framework that centers on the magistral preparation (compounding pharmacy in the US) of tailor-made phage medicines.

  20. Prokaryotic expression of MLAA-34 and generation of a novel human ScFv against MLAA-34 by phage display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Pengyu; He, Aili; Yang, Yun; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Wanggang

    2017-01-01

    MLAA-34 is a newly identified monocytic leukemia-associated antigen that is overexpressed in acute monocytic leukemia specifically, thus providing a novel target for the therapy of acute monocytic leukemia. In this study, we first expressed MLAA-34 protein in Escherichia coli (E.coli) BL21 (DE3) cells and purified it by nickel ion affinity chromatography with high purity (>90%). Then, MLAA-34 was used as antigen for biopanning anti-MLAA-34 single chain antibody fragment (ScFv) from a fully human ScFv library, and a high affinity ScFv named MA1 was selected by phage-ELISA. Finally, after expression of MA1, we found that MA1 can specifically bind with U937 MLAA-34 positive cells, and the binding affinity of MA1 was at the nanomolar level. Furthermore, inhibition of U937 cell proliferation indicated that the novel antibody MA1 has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent for acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:28388565

  1. Prokaryotic expression of MLAA-34 and generation of a novel human ScFv against MLAA-34 by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Pengyu; He, Aili; Yang, Yun; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Wanggang

    2017-06-13

    MLAA-34 is a newly identified monocytic leukemia-associated antigen that is overexpressed in acute monocytic leukemia specifically, thus providing a novel target for the therapy of acute monocytic leukemia. In this study, we first expressed MLAA-34 protein in Escherichia coli (E.coli) BL21 (DE3) cells and purified it by nickel ion affinity chromatography with high purity (>90%). Then, MLAA-34 was used as antigen for biopanning anti-MLAA-34 single chain antibody fragment (ScFv) from a fully human ScFv library, and a high affinity ScFv named MA1 was selected by phage-ELISA. Finally, after expression of MA1, we found that MA1 can specifically bind with U937 MLAA-34 positive cells, and the binding affinity of MA1 was at the nanomolar level. Furthermore, inhibition of U937 cell proliferation indicated that the novel antibody MA1 has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent for acute monocytic leukemia.

  2. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel candidate HPV vaccine: MS2 phage VLP displaying a tandem HPV L2 peptide offers similar protection in mice to Gardasil-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lukai; Peabody, Julianne; Pang, Yuk-Ying Susana; Schiller, John; Chackerian, Bryce; Tumban, Ebenezer

    2017-11-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause approximately 5% of cancer cases worldwide. Fortunately, three prophylactic vaccines have been approved to protect against HPV infections. Gardasil-9, the most recent HPV vaccine, is predicted to offer protection against the HPV types that cause ∼90% of cervical cancer, 86% of HPV-associated penile cancers, and ∼93% of HPV-associated head & neck cancers. As an alternative to Gardasil-9, we developed and tested a novel candidate vaccine targeting conserved epitopes in the HPV minor capsid protein, L2. We displayed a tandem HPV31/16L2 peptide (amino acid 17-31) or consensus peptides from HPV L2 (amino acid 69-86 or 108-122) on the surface of bacteriophage MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the MS2 VLPs displaying the tandem peptide or immunized with a mixture of VLPs (displaying the tandem peptide and consensus peptide 69-86) elicited high titer antibodies against individual L2 epitopes. Moreover, vaccinated mice were protected from cervicovaginal infection with HPV pseudoviruses 16, 31, 45, 58 and sera from immunized mice neutralized HPV pseudoviruses 18 and 33 at levels similar to mice immunized with Gardasil-9. These results suggest that immunization with a tandem, L2 peptide or a low valency mixture of L2 peptide-displaying VLPs can provide broad protection against multiple HPV types. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  5. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Adding a Pictorial Display to Enhance Recall of Cancer Patient Histories: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolch, Gary; Ghosh, Sunita; Boyington, Curtiss; Watanabe, Sharon M; Fainsinger, Robin; Burton-Macleod, Sarah; Thai, Vincent; Thai, JoAnn; Fassbender, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Current health care delivery models have increased the need for safe and concise patient handover. Handover interventions in the literature have focused on the use of structured tools but have not evaluated their ability to facilitate retention of patient information. In this study, mock pictorial displays were generated in an attempt to create a snapshot of each patient's medical and social circumstances. These pictorial displays contained the patient's photograph and other disease- and treatment-related images. The objective of this randomized trial was to assess the ability of these snapshots to enhance delayed information recall by care providers. Participating physicians were given four advanced cancer patient histories to review, two at a time over two weeks. Pictorial image displays, referred to as the Electronic Whiteboard (EWB) were added, in a randomized manner to half of the textual histories. The impact of the EWB on information recall was tested in immediate and delayed time frames. Overall, patient information recall declined significantly over time, with or without the EWB. Still, this trial demonstrates significantly higher test scores after 24 hours with the addition of pictures to textual patient information, compared with textual information alone (P = 0.0002). A more modest improvement was seen with the addition of the EWB for questionnaires administered immediately after history review (P = 0.008). Most participants agreed that the EWB was a useful enhancement and that seeing a patient's photograph improved their ability to retain information. Most studies examining the institution of handover protocols in the health care setting have failed to harness the power of pictures and other representative images. This study demonstrates the ability of pictorial displays to improve both immediate and delayed recall of patient histories without increasing review time. These types of displays may be amenable to generation by software programs and

  7. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...

  8. The Magistral Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Pirnay

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, phages—the viral parasites of bacteria—have been protecting Earth’s biosphere against bacterial overgrowth. Today, phages could help address the antibiotic resistance crisis that affects all of society. The greatest hurdle to the introduction of phage therapy in Western medicine is the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework. Belgium is now implementing a pragmatic phage therapy framework that centers on the magistral preparation (compounding pharmacy in the US of tailor-made phage medicines.

  9. Novel Zn2+-chelating peptides selected from a fimbria-displayed random peptide library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    H adhesin. FimH is a component of the fimbrial organelle that can accommodate and display a diverse range of peptide sequences on the E. coli cell surface. In this study we have constructed a random peptide library in FimH. The library, consisting of similar to 40 million individual clones, was screened...... for peptide sequences that conferred on recombinant cells the ability to bind Zn2+. By serial selection, sequences that exhibited various degrees of binding affinity and specificity toward Zn2+ were enriched. None of the isolated sequences showed similarity to known Zn2+-binding proteins, indicating...

  10. How to Successfully Screen Random Adeno-Associated Virus Display Peptide Libraries In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körbelin, Jakob; Trepel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a very promising gene therapy vector. To enable tissue-directed gene expression, many artificially generated AAV variants have been established, often isolated from large pools of mutated capsids. Random peptide libraries displayed on AAV capsids have been used successfully to select vectors targeted to a given target cell or tissue in vitro and in vivo. However, the published methodology for screening of AAV libraries to isolate vectors with selective tissue tropism after intravenous administration in vivo has not been described in sufficient detail to address all critical steps. A step-by-step protocol is provided here.

  11. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S....... thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had...... shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus...

  12. Phage Display of Engineered Binding Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levisson, M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Winkel, I.N.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather

  13. Phage therapy: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, S. G.; Tulyakova, E. N.; Moiseeva, I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, bacteriophages are known to have become an effective alternative to antibiotic drugs. The article describes the current and potential applications of bacteriophages and phage endolysins. Also of interest is the devastating effect of phages on biofilms. The development of phage resistance is touched upon as well. Furthermore, the authors discuss the issue of laying down the rules of rational phage therapy.

  14. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  15. Attaching quantum dots to HER2 specific phage antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Huyen La, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Huan Le, Quang; Thuan Tong, Kim; Liem Nguyen, Quang; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2010-06-01

    This work presents the results of the attachment of Qdot 655 ITKTM amino (PEG) quantum dots (QDs) (Invitrogen) and CdTe QDs (provided by Institute of Materials Science, VAST) to HER2 (Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2) specific phage antibodies (Abs) (provided by Institute of Biotechnology, VAST) in solution. The QDs were attached to the phage display specific HER2 Abs to form a complex QD-Ab. The QDs and complex QD-Ab were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence images show the QDs conjugated to the phage. Due to the QDs attaching to the surface, the phage dimensions were amplified, so its shape could be observed by optical microscopy. The complex QD-Ab was stable and lasted for a month. The results illustrate the value of the HER2 phage-QD complex as a cancer detection platform.

  16. Bicistronic DNA display for in vitro selection of Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Takeshi; Doi, Nobuhide; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    In vitro display methods are superior tools for obtaining monoclonal antibodies. Although totally in vitro display methods, such as ribosome display and mRNA display, have the advantages of larger library sizes and quicker selection procedures compared with phage display, their applications have been limited to single-chain Fvs due to the requirement for linking of the mRNA and the nascent protein on the ribosome. Here we describe a different type of totally in vitro method, DNA display, that is applicable to heterodimeric Fab fragments: in vitro compartmentalization in water-in-oil emulsions allows the linking of an oligomeric protein and its encoding DNA with multiple ORFs. Since previously used emulsions impaired the synthesis of functional Fab fragments, we modified conditions for preparing emulsions, and identified conditions under which it was possible to enrich Fab fragments 10(6)-fold per three rounds of affinity selection. Furthermore, we confirmed that genes encoding stable Fab fragments could be selected from a Fab fragment library with a randomized hydrophobic core in the constant region by applying heat treatment as a selection pressure. Since this method has all advantages of both phage display and totally in vitro display, it represents a new option for many applications using display methods.

  17. A Randomized Trial of Displaying Paid Price Information on Imaging Study and Procedure Ordering Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Alyna T; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Hatfield, Laura A; Koplan, Kate E; Petty, Carter R; Sinaiko, Anna D; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sequist, Thomas D

    2017-04-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated how price transparency lowers the test-ordering rates of trainees in hospitals, and physician-targeted price transparency efforts have been viewed as a promising cost-controlling strategy. To examine the effect of displaying paid-price information on test-ordering rates for common imaging studies and procedures within an accountable care organization (ACO). Block randomized controlled trial for 1 year. A total of 1205 fully licensed clinicians (728 primary care, 477 specialists). Starting January 2014, clinicians in the Control arm received no price display; those in the intervention arms received Single or Paired Internal/External Median Prices in the test-ordering screen of their electronic health record. Internal prices were the amounts paid by insurers for the ACO's services; external paid prices were the amounts paid by insurers for the same services when delivered by unaffiliated providers. Ordering rates (orders per 100 face-to-face encounters with adult patients): overall, designated to be completed internally within the ACO, considered "inappropriate" (e.g., MRI for simple headache), and thought to be "appropriate" (e.g., screening colonoscopy). We found no significant difference in overall ordering rates across the Control, Single Median Price, or Paired Internal/External Median Prices study arms. For every 100 encounters, clinicians in the Control arm ordered 15.0 (SD 31.1) tests, those in the Single Median Price arm ordered 15.0 (SD 16.2) tests, and those in the Paired Prices arms ordered 15.7 (SD 20.5) tests (one-way ANOVA p-value 0.88). There was no difference in ordering rates for tests designated to be completed internally or considered to be inappropriate or appropriate. Displaying paid-price information did not alter how frequently primary care and specialist clinicians ordered imaging studies and procedures within an ACO. Those with a particular interest in removing waste from the health care system may want to

  18. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  19. Cupping for treating neck pain in video display terminal (VDT) users: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hun; Kang, Jung Won; Kim, Kun Hyung; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Joo-Hee; Lee, Seunghoon; Shin, Mi-Suk; Jung, So-Young; Kim, Ae-Ran; Park, Hyo-Ju; Hong, Kwon Eui

    2012-01-01

    This was a randomized controlled pilot trial to evaluate the effectiveness of cupping therapy for neck pain in video display terminal (VDT) workers. Forty VDT workers with moderate to severe neck pain were recruited from May, 2011 to February, 2012. Participants were randomly allocated into one of the two interventions: 6 sessions of wet and dry cupping or heating pad application. The participants were offered an exercise program to perform during the participation period. A 0 to 100 numeric rating scale (NRS) for neck pain, measure yourself medical outcome profile 2 score (MYMOP2 score), cervical spine range of motion (C-spine ROM), neck disability index (NDI), the EuroQol health index (EQ-5D), short form stress response inventory (SRI-SF) and fatigue severity scale (FSS) were assessed at several points during a 7-week period. Compared with a heating pad, cupping was more effective in improving pain (adjusted NRS difference: -1.29 [95% CI -1.61, -0.97] at 3 weeks (p=0.025) and -1.16 [-1.48, -0.84] at 7 weeks (p=0.005)), neck function (adjusted NDI difference: -0.79 [-1.11, -0.47] at 3 (p=0.0039) and 7 weeks (pcupping and 0.91 [0.86, 0.91] with heating pad treatment, p=0.0054). Four participants reported mild adverse events of cupping. Two weeks of cupping therapy and an exercise program may be effective in reducing pain and improving neck function in VDT workers.

  20. Age and Individual Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined age group and individual differences in controlled force exertion by emulating sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 222 right-handed female adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength by the dominant hand to changing demand values displayed as either a sinusoidal or a quasi-random…

  1. Stumbling across the same phage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis; Rørbo, Nanna Iben; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías

    2017-01-01

    Nineteen Vibrio anguillarum-specific temperate bacteriophages isolated across Europe and Chile from aquaculture and environmental sites were genome sequenced and analyzed for host range, morphology and life cycle characteristics. The phages were classified as Siphoviridae with genome sizes between...... 46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3) in six of the phage genomes...... was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly...

  2. Mimotopes for lupus-derived anti-DNA and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies selected from random peptide phage display libraries: facts and follies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.C.; Sun, Y.J.; Jacobs, C.W.M.; Putterman, C.; Monestier, M.; Muller, S.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Autoantibodies against chromatin are the most characteristic serological feature in SLE patients. Anti-dsDNA and nucleosome-specific antibodies are associated with glomerulonephritis, the most serious manifestation of SLE. Identification of peptides mimicking conformational epitopes (so-called

  3. Ribosome display for improved biotherapeutic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Achim; Hosse, Ralf J; Power, Barbara E

    2006-02-01

    Ribosome display presents an innovative in vitro technology for the rapid isolation and evolution of high-affinity peptides or proteins. Displayed proteins are bound to and recovered from target molecules in multiple rounds of selection in order to enrich for specific binding proteins. No transformation step is necessary, which could lead to a loss of library diversity. A cycle of display and selection can be performed in one day, enabling the existing gene repertoire to be rapidly scanned. Proteins isolated from the panning rounds can be further modified through random or directed molecular evolution for affinity maturation, as well as selected for characteristics such as protein stability, folding and functional activity. Recently, the field of display technologies has become more prominent due to the generation of new scaffolds for ribosome display, isolation of high-affinity human antibodies by phage display, and their implementation in the discovery of novel protein-protein interactions. Applications for this technology extend into the broad field of antibody engineering, proteomics, and synthetic enzymes for diagnostics and therapeutics in cancer, autoimmune and infectious diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory disorders. This review highlights the role of ribosome display in drug discovery, discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system, and attempts to predict the future impact of ribosome display technology on the development of novel engineered biopharmaceutical products for biological therapies.

  4. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute

    2017-01-01

    shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus...... the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires...

  5. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  6. Biodiversity and biogeography of phages in modern stromatolites and thrombolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnues, Christelle; Rodriguez-Brito, Beltran; Rayhawk, Steve; Kelley, Scott; Tran, Tuong; Haynes, Matthew; Liu, Hong; Furlan, Mike; Wegley, Linda; Chau, Betty; Ruan, Yijun; Hall, Dana; Angly, Florent E; Edwards, Robert A; Li, Linlin; Thurber, Rebecca Vega; Reid, R Pamela; Siefert, Janet; Souza, Valeria; Valentine, David L; Swan, Brandon K; Breitbart, Mya; Rohwer, Forest

    2008-03-20

    Viruses, and more particularly phages (viruses that infect bacteria), represent one of the most abundant living entities in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The biogeography of phages has only recently been investigated and so far reveals a cosmopolitan distribution of phage genetic material (or genotypes). Here we address this cosmopolitan distribution through the analysis of phage communities in modern microbialites, the living representatives of one of the most ancient life forms on Earth. On the basis of a comparative metagenomic analysis of viral communities associated with marine (Highborne Cay, Bahamas) and freshwater (Pozas Azules II and Rio Mesquites, Mexico) microbialites, we show that some phage genotypes are geographically restricted. The high percentage of unknown sequences recovered from the three metagenomes (>97%), the low percentage similarities with sequences from other environmental viral (n = 42) and microbial (n = 36) metagenomes, and the absence of viral genotypes shared among microbialites indicate that viruses are genetically unique in these environments. Identifiable sequences in the Highborne Cay metagenome were dominated by single-stranded DNA microphages that were not detected in any other samples examined, including sea water, fresh water, sediment, terrestrial, extreme, metazoan-associated and marine microbial mats. Finally, a marine signature was present in the phage community of the Pozas Azules II microbialites, even though this environment has not been in contact with the ocean for tens of millions of years. Taken together, these results prove that viruses in modern microbialites display biogeographical variability and suggest that they may be derived from an ancient community.

  7. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  8. Novel random peptide libraries displayed on AAV serotype 9 for selection of endothelial cell-directed gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, K; Michelfelder, S; Korff, T; Hecker, M; Trepel, M; Katus, H A; Kleinschmidt, J A; Müller, O J

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated the potential of random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV)2 to select for AAV2 vectors with improved efficiency for cell type-directed gene transfer. AAV9, however, may have advantages over AAV2 because of a lower prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in humans and more efficient gene transfer in vivo. Here we provide evidence that random peptide libraries can be displayed on AAV9 and can be utilized to select for AAV9 capsids redirected to the cell type of interest. We generated an AAV9 peptide display library, which ensures that the displayed peptides correspond to the packaged genomes and performed four consecutive selection rounds on human coronary artery endothelial cells in vitro. This screening yielded AAV9 library capsids with distinct peptide motifs enabling up to 40-fold improved transduction efficiencies compared with wild-type (wt) AAV9 vectors. Incorporating sequences selected from AAV9 libraries into AAV2 capsids could not increase transduction as efficiently as in the AAV9 context. To analyze the potential on endothelial cells in the intact natural vascular context, human umbilical veins were incubated with the selected AAV in situ and endothelial cells were isolated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed a 200-fold improved transduction efficiency compared with wt AAV9 vectors. Furthermore, AAV9 vectors with targeting sequences selected from AAV9 libraries revealed an increased transduction efficiency in the presence of human intravenous immunoglobulins, suggesting a reduced immunogenicity. We conclude that our novel AAV9 peptide library is functional and can be used to select for vectors for future preclinical and clinical gene transfer applications.

  9. Selection of phage antibodies to surface epitopes of Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, K C; Li, Y; Vaughan, T J; Williams, A J; Cockburn, W; Whitelam, G C

    1999-08-31

    Antibodies specific for surface-exposed epitopes on germlings of the plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, were isolated from a diverse phage library displaying single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments. The library was subpanned against external soluble components released from mycelia, sporangia and germlings and a discrete population of phage antibodies isolated. Binding of monoclonal phage antibodies was demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and diversity was established by BstNI restriction enzyme digest patterns. Antibodies were subcloned as fusions at the C-terminus of maltose binding protein (MBP) and expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. These antibody fusion proteins bound to P. infestans germlings and to mycelial homogenates from various Phytophthora species. The binding activities to mycelial homogenates of fungal species not belonging to the order Peronosporales were substantially lower. Several phage-displayed scFvs were used in conjunction with fluorescently labelled antiphage antibody to visualise the distribution of their cognate epitopes on the surface of the germlings. The combination of procedures developed here with Phytophthora demonstrates the potential of phage antibody technology in isolating antibodies to cell surface and external soluble components of pathogens, some of which may play a role in host/pathogen interactions.

  10. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. Results The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Conclusions Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  11. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun; Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-05-01

    The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V2O5 precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V2O5 precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V2O5 precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/VxOx composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V2O5 composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of a mineralizing aid, such as the two cysteine-constrained peptides on the phage surface, and has potential for use in nanotechnology applications.

  12. Impact of Laboratory Charge Display Within the Electronic Health Record Across an Entire Academic Medical Center: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert L; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Milne, Caroline K; Vargo, Daniel J; Hussong, Jerry W; Hoidal, John R; Markewitz, Boaz A; Walker, Brandon S; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2017-11-20

    To determine the impact of systemwide charge display on laboratory utilization. This was a randomized controlled trial with a baseline period and an intervention period. Tests were randomized to a control arm or an active arm. The maximum allowable Medicare reimbursement rate was displayed for tests in the active arm during the intervention period. Total volume of tests in the active arm was compared with those in the control arm. Residents were surveyed before and after the intervention to assess charge awareness. Charge display had no effect on order behavior. This result held for patient type (inpatient vs outpatient) and for insurance category (commercial, government, self-pay). Residents overestimated the charges of tests both before and after the intervention. Many residents failed to notice the charge display in the computerized order entry system. The impact of charge display depends on context. Charge display is not always effective.

  13. [Biology of two lysogenic phages from Bacillus thuringiensis MZ1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei; Sun, Fan; Song, Shao-yun; Shi, Wei; Pang, Yi

    2007-02-01

    A Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) fermentative strain MZ1 (subsp. kurstaki) , from a company in Meixian County of Guangdong Province, produce toxins during sporulation and are extensively used in the field to control pest insects (Lepidoptera) in China. But some unknown or random factors that inhibited or stopped B. t growth in the fermentation can be regarded as reflecting the exist of lysogenic phage. Therefore, strain MZI and its lysogenic phages were studied in this paper. With indicator strain ZK1, two kind of phage plaques, one with about 3mm diameter and the other with about 1mm diameter, can be observed after strain MZ1 cultured in plates or flasks was induced by mitomycin C. Then, two lysogenic phages, namely MZTP01 and MZTP02, were isolated and characterized in biology. They belonged to family Siphoviridae, which had icosahedral heads (MZTP01 :82nm x 85nm; MZTP02: 75nm x 55nm) and long tails (MZTP01: 220nm x 18nm; MZTP02: 183nm x 12nm) without flexibility. Host range examination showed that six and seven (including indicator strain ZKl) out of 113 B. t strains saved in our laboratory were sensitive to MZTP01 and MZTP02, respectively. MZTP01 was more stable than MZTP02 against pH value, ultraviolet and heat treatment, but contrary against organic solvents. For MZTP01 and MZTP02, K values in the neutralization reactions were 45 and 326, respectively. Both phages had no relationship in their antigenicity. Burst size of phage MZTP02 was 175, two times more than that of MZTP01. Latent time of MZTP02 was 40min, one times shorter than that of MZTP01. It was suggested that both phages DNA be linear dsDNA through the typical absorption curves, reaction with diphenylamine, DNase sensitivity and acridine orange staining. And this was in good accord with the previous findings that all tailed phages being dsDNA moleculars. The genomic DNA and their restriction maps showed that both molecular weights should be between 9.4 - 23kb. Both phage genomic DNAs were digested by

  14. Randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms in dogs are reproducible and display Mendelian transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothuizen, J; Van Wolferen, M

    1994-02-01

    Many inherited diseases occur in pure-bred dogs, but diagnosis at the level of DNA is impossible because the canine genome is largely unknown. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) provides many polymorphisms, but the reproducibility and Mendelian inheritance are not beyond doubt. An optimized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for canine DNA with respect to the annealing temperature and the concentrations of MgCl2, template DNA and primers. RAPD amplification products were in the range of 100-1500 base pairs. With six primers, 21 different reactions with different electrophoretic patterns were obtained, yielding 9-29 products per reaction. In DNA from dogs of 16 different breeds, 14% of the products were polymorphic; when only beagles were included the rate of polymorphism was 10%. All of the reaction products were completely reproducible in 16 DNA samples. Mendelian transmission was analysed in six beagle families (42 dogs). The segregation of polymorphic amplification products in 21 reactions performed on DNA from all beagles was nearly complete; in only two of the 630 reactions was there a product that could not be traced back to either of the parents. The reproducibility and Mendelian behaviour of polymorphisms generated by RAPD in dogs makes this tool very suitable for development of DNA markers of canine inherited diseases.

  15. Phages in the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have re-emerged as powerful regulators of bacterial populations in natural ecosystems. Phages invade the human body, just as they do other natural environments, to such an extent that they are the most numerous group in the human virome. This was only revealed in recent metagenomic studies, despite the fact that the presence of phages in the human body was reported decades ago. The influence of the presence of phages in humans has yet to be evaluated; but as in marine environments, a clear role in the regulation of bacterial populations could be envisaged, that might have an impact on human health. Moreover, phages are excellent vehicles of genetic transfer, and they contribute to the evolution of bacterial cells in the human body by spreading and acquiring DNA horizontally. The abundance of phages in the human body does not pass unnoticed and the immune system reacts to them, although it is not clear to what extent. Finally, the presence of phages in human samples, which most of the time is not considered, can influence and bias microbiological and molecular results; and, in view of the evidences, some studies suggest that more attention needs to be paid to their interference.

  16. Longitudinal monitoring of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria phages in seafood processing environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Benjakul, Soottawat; Kim Vu, Hue Thi; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2017-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen commonly found in environments of seafood processing, thus presenting a challenge for eradication from seafood processing facilities. Monitoring the prevalence and subtype diversity of L. monocytogenes together with phages that are specific to Listeria spp. ("Listeria phages") will provide knowledge on the bacteria-phage ecology in food processing plants. In this work, a total of 595 samples were collected from raw material, finished seafood products and environmental samples from different sites of a seafood processing plant during 17 sampling visits in 1.5 years of study. L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. (non-monocytogenes) were found in 22 (3.7%) and 43 (7.2%) samples, respectively, whereas 29 Listeria phages were isolated from 9 (1.5%) phage-positive samples. DNA fingerprint analysis of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed 11 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles, with two subtypes were frequently observed over time. Our data reveal a presence of Listeria phages within the same seafood processing environments where a diverse set of L. monocytogenes subtypes was also found. Although serotype 4b was observed at lower frequency, data indicate that isolates from this seafood processing plant belonged to both epidemiologically important serotypes 1/2a and 4b, which may suggest a potential public health risk. Phages (all showed a unique genome size of 65 ± 2 kb) were classified into 9 host range groups, representing both broad- and narrow-host range. While most L. monocytogenes isolates from this facility were susceptible to phages, five isolates showed resistance to 12-20 phages. Variations in phage host range among Listeria phages isolated from food processing plant may affect a presence of a diverse set of L. monocytogenes isolates derived from the same processing environment in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CRISPR-Cas-Mediated Phage Resistance Enhances Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bridget N J; Staals, Raymond H J; Fineran, Peter C

    2018-02-13

    A powerful contributor to prokaryotic evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through transformation, conjugation, and transduction, which can be advantageous, neutral, or detrimental to fitness. Bacteria and archaea control HGT and phage infection through CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) adaptive immunity. Although the benefits of resisting phage infection are evident, this can come at a cost of inhibiting the acquisition of other beneficial genes through HGT. Despite the ability of CRISPR-Cas to limit HGT through conjugation and transformation, its role in transduction is largely overlooked. Transduction is the phage-mediated transfer of bacterial DNA between cells and arguably has the greatest impact on HGT. We demonstrate that in Pectobacterium atrosepticum , CRISPR-Cas can inhibit the transduction of plasmids and chromosomal loci. In addition, we detected phage-mediated transfer of a large plant pathogenicity genomic island and show that CRISPR-Cas can inhibit its transduction. Despite these inhibitory effects of CRISPR-Cas on transduction, its more common role in phage resistance promotes rather than diminishes HGT via transduction by protecting bacteria from phage infection. This protective effect can also increase transduction of phage-sensitive members of mixed populations. CRISPR-Cas systems themselves display evidence of HGT, but little is known about their lateral dissemination between bacteria and whether transduction can contribute. We show that, through transduction, bacteria can acquire an entire chromosomal CRISPR-Cas system, including cas genes and phage-targeting spacers. We propose that the positive effect of CRISPR-Cas phage immunity on enhancing transduction surpasses the rarer cases where gene flow by transduction is restricted. IMPORTANCE The generation of genetic diversity through acquisition of DNA is a powerful contributor to microbial evolution and occurs through

  18. Phage Genome Annotation Using the RAST Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Katelyn; Aziz, Ramy Karam; Pusch, Gordon D; Overbeek, Ross; Dutilh, Bas E; Edwards, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Phages are complex biomolecular machineries that have to survive in a bacterial world. Phage genomes show many adaptations to their lifestyle such as shorter genes, reduced capacity for redundant DNA sequences, and the inclusion of tRNAs in their genomes. In addition, phages are not free-living, they require a host for replication and survival. These unique adaptations provide challenges for the bioinformatics analysis of phage genomes. In particular, ORF calling, genome annotation, noncoding RNA (ncRNA) identification, and the identification of transposons and insertions are all complicated in phage genome analysis. We provide a road map through the phage genome annotation pipeline, and discuss the challenges and solutions for phage genome annotation as we have implemented in the rapid annotation using subsystems (RAST) pipeline.

  19. Binding mechanism and electrochemical properties of M13 phage-sulfur composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexian Dong

    Full Text Available Self-assembly of nanostructured materials has been proven a powerful technique in material design and synthesis. By phage display screening, M13 phage was found to strongly bind sulfur particles. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the strong sulfur-binding ability of M13 phage derives from newly generated S-O and C-S bonds. Using this phage assembled sulfur composite in a lithium battery, the first discharge capacity reached 1117 mAh g(-1, which is more than twice that of the sulfur only cathode. Besides, the negative polysulfide shuttle effect in a lithium-sulfur battery was significantly suppressed.

  20. TfR Binding Peptide Screened by Phage Display Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSA) at 5 mg/ml in. 0.1 M NaHCO3 was added and incubated for 1 h at 4 °C. The BSA ..... In vitro and in vivo evaluation of actively targetable nanoparticles for paclitaxel delivery. Int J Pharm. 2005; 288: 361-368. 12 Li X, Ding L, Xu Y, Wang Y, ...

  1. TfR Binding Peptide Screened by Phage Display Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gain entry via the endocytic pathway. Conclusion: BP9 can bind to TfR and inhibit the proliferation of the tumour cells over-expressing TfR. The DNA sequence coding for BP9 was able to target the macromolecule to combine with TfR. BP9 may possess potential applications in cancer therapy. Keywords: Peptide, hTfR ...

  2. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop specific single chain variable fragments (scFv) against infectious bursal disease ... application of vitamins as well as antibiotics can .... D in. 4. 0. 5 n m. Clone number. 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94. Figure 1: Indirect ELISA analysis for ...

  3. Early events in autoimmunity studied by antibody phage display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, D.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, which affect approximately 2-3% of the world population, are characterized by the occurrence of high titres of autoantibodies. Some of these autoantibodies are disease-specific and their presence is often a valuable diagnostic, and sometimes prognostic, tool for clinicians. For

  4. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies...

  5. Bacteriophages displaying anticancer peptides in combined antibacterial and anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Nasulewicz-Goldeman, Anna; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Novel anticancer strategies have employed bacteriophages as drug carriers and display platforms for anticancer agents; however, bacteriophage-based platforms maintain their natural antibacterial activity. This study provides the assessment of combined anticancer (engineered) and antibacterial (natural) phage activity in therapies. An in vivo BALB/c mouse model of 4T1 tumor growth accompanied by surgical wound infection was applied. The wounds were located in the areas of tumors. Bacteriophages (T4) were modified with anticancer Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) peptides by phage display and injected intraperitoneally. Tumor growth was decreased in mice treated with YIGSR-displaying phages. The acuteness of wounds, bacterial load and inflammatory markers in phages-treated mice were markedly decreased. Thus, engineered bacteriophages combine antibacterial and anticancer activity.

  6. In vitro affinity screening of protein and peptide binders by megavalent bead surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamante, Letizia; Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro; Schaerli, Yolanda; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-10-01

    The advent of protein display systems has provided access to tailor-made protein binders by directed evolution. We introduce a new in vitro display system, bead surface display (BeSD), in which a gene is mounted on a bead via strong non-covalent (streptavidin/biotin) interactions and the corresponding protein is displayed via a covalent thioether bond on the DNA. In contrast to previous monovalent or low-copy bead display systems, multiple copies of the DNA and the protein or peptide of interest are displayed in defined quantities (up to 10(6) of each), so that flow cytometry can be used to obtain a measure of binding affinity. The utility of the BeSD in directed evolution is validated by library selections of randomized peptide sequences for binding to the anti-hemagglutinin (HA) antibody that proceed with enrichments in excess of 10(3) and lead to the isolation of high-affinity HA-tags within one round of flow cytometric screening. On-bead K(d) measurements suggest that the selected tags have affinities in the low nanomolar range. In contrast to other display systems (such as ribosome, mRNA and phage display) that are limited to affinity panning selections, BeSD possesses the ability to screen and rank binders by their affinity in vitro, a feature that hitherto has been exclusive to in vivo multivalent cell display systems (such as yeast display).

  7. Affinity selection of Nipah and Hendra virus-related vaccine candidates from a complex random peptide library displayed on bacteriophage virus-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce; Ashley, Carlee; Carnes, Eric; Negrete, Oscar

    2017-01-24

    The invention relates to virus-like particles of bacteriophage MS2 (MS2 VLPs) displaying peptide epitopes or peptide mimics of epitopes of Nipah Virus envelope glycoprotein that elicit an immune response against Nipah Virus upon vaccination of humans or animals. Affinity selection on Nipah Virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using random sequence peptide libraries on MS2 VLPs selected peptides with sequence similarity to peptide sequences found within the envelope glycoprotein of Nipah itself, thus identifying the epitopes the antibodies recognize. The selected peptide sequences themselves are not necessarily identical in all respects to a sequence within Nipah Virus glycoprotein, and therefore may be referred to as epitope mimics VLPs displaying these epitope mimics can serve as vaccine. On the other hand, display of the corresponding wild-type sequence derived from Nipah Virus and corresponding to the epitope mapped by affinity selection, may also be used as a vaccine.

  8. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  9. Genomics of phages with therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zschach, Henrike

    for alternatives, phage therapy once again takes center stage. Phage therapy holds the promise of substantial benefits both from the economic as well as the public health perspective but also holds distinct challenges. The aim of this PhD was to address how bioinformatics tools, specifically genomics......D. Chapters 1 - 3 deal with phages, their use in therapy and the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Following that, Chapter 4 and 5 provide an overview of Next Generation Sequencing as well as commonly employed genomics tools, while Chapter 6 details basics of Machine Learning. The second part...... to each other as well as to databases of available phage genomes. It revealed a great diversity in the sequences, many of which were distant from all known phages. The phage content of the different sample locations exhibited a rather stable genomic distance that was not influenced by whether...

  10. Salmonella typhimurium phage typing for pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabsch, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Phage typing provides a rapid, accurate, and cheap method of investigating Salmonella strains for epidemiological use. Salmonella strains within a particular serovar may be differentiated into a number of phage types by their pattern of susceptibility to lysis by a set of phages with different specificity. Characterization based on the pattern of phage lysis of wild strains isolated from different patients, carriers, or other sources is valuable in epidemiological study. The phages must have well-defined propagation strains that allow reproducible discrimination between different Salmonella Typhimurium strains. Different schemes have been developed for this serovar in different countries. The Felix/Callow (England) and Lilleengen typing systems (Sweden) used for laboratory-based epidemiological analysis were helpful for control of salmonellosis. More recently, the extended phage-typing system of Anderson (England) that distinguishes more than 300 definitive phage types (DTs) has been used worldwide in Europe, the United States, and Australia. The use of this method for decades show us that some phage types (DT204 in the 1970s and DT104 in the 1990s) have a broad host range and are distributed worldwide, other phage types such as DT2 or DT99 are frequently associated with disease in pigeons, indicative of a narrow host range.

  11. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    originating from other countries. Although phages were isolated from porcine skin strains exclusively, the system produced phage types in S. hyicus strains of bovine origin. Ten strains of S. aureus and S. chromogenes were not typable by these phages. Strains belonging to one phage type (A/B/C/W) were...... strains isolated from Danish pig herds, the phages were able to type 92% of the strains, producing 16 different phage types. Reproducibility of the phage typing system after subculture of the strains and using fresh phage stock was 96%. Typability ranged from 52 to 80% when typing porcine strains...

  12. [Development of platform technology using molecular display].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji

    2009-11-01

    Techniques for immobilizing proteins on surface of virus or microorganisms, namely molecular display technologies, have played important roles in helping the elucidation of protein-protein interactions in cells and to develop research on drug discovery. Phage display system is well-established and sophisticated; consequently, bioactive low-molecular-weight ligands and proteins significant in pharmaceutical industry have been found. In addition to the development of novel functional proteins by phage display using results from experiments in genomics and proteomics, ribosome display or yeast display systems have been developed as complementary methods. We can select the appropriate method on the basis of the objective. Molecular display using yeast has advantages in production of desired proteins from combinatorial library by flow cytometry. Firstly, principle, development procedure, and latest research in this field are introduced. Thereafter, results of molecular display using yeast for antibodies and their related proteins are presented. Furthermore, display of receptor coupled with intracellular signal transduction -a novel type of molecular display on yeast cell surface- has been created in recent years. The role and potential of molecular display technologies employing yeast cells in drug discovery are discussed.

  13. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell

    2016-01-01

    and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related...

  14. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  15. Phage Therapy - Everything Old is New Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropinski, Andrew M

    2006-09-01

    The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages) proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation) and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success). Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy - a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe - because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  16. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Kropinski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success. Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy -- a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe -- because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  17. The effect of alternative graphical displays used to present the benefits of antibiotics for sore throat on decisions about whether to seek treatment: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L L Carling

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted an Internet-based randomized trial comparing four graphical displays of the benefits of antibiotics for people with sore throat who must decide whether to go to the doctor to seek treatment. Our objective was to determine which display resulted in choices most consistent with participants' values. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was the first of a series of televised trials undertaken in cooperation with the Norwegian Broadcasting Company. We recruited adult volunteers in Norway through a nationally televised weekly health program. Participants went to our Web site and rated the relative importance of the consequences of treatment using visual analogue scales (VAS. They viewed the graphical display (or no information to which they were randomized and were asked to decide whether to go to the doctor for an antibiotic prescription. We compared four presentations: face icons (happy/sad or a bar graph showing the proportion of people with symptoms on day three with and without treatment, a bar graph of the average duration of symptoms, and a bar graph of proportion with symptoms on both days three and seven. Before completing the study, all participants were shown all the displays and detailed patient information about the treatment of sore throat and were asked to decide again. We calculated a relative importance score (RIS by subtracting the VAS scores for the undesirable consequences of antibiotics from the VAS score for the benefit of symptom relief. We used logistic regression to determine the association between participants' RIS and their choice. 1,760 participants completed the study. There were statistically significant differences in the likelihood of choosing to go to the doctor in relation to different values (RIS. Of the four presentations, the bar graph of duration of symptoms resulted in decisions that were most consistent with the more fully informed second decision. Most participants also preferred this

  18. [Therapeutic effect of phages on extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-induced sepsis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L Y; Yang, Z C; Gong, Y L; Huang, G T; Yin, S P; Jiang, B; Peng, Y Z

    2016-09-20

    To study the therapeutic effect of phages on extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-induced sepsis in mice. (1) Sixty BALB/c mice were divided into blank control group, sepsis control group, antibiotics treatment group, phage treatment group, and phage control group according to the random number table, with 12 mice in each group. Mice in blank control group were intraperitoneally (the same injection position below) injected with 1 mL normal saline. Mice in sepsis control group, antibiotics treatment group, and phage treatment group were injected with 1 mL extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (the strain was isolated from the blood of a severely burned patient hospitalized in our unit) in the concentration of 5×10(7) colony-forming unit/mL to reproduce sepsis model. Two hours later, mice in sepsis control group, antibiotics treatment group, and phage treatment group were injected with 1 mL saline, 1 mg/mL imipenem/cilastatin, and 1×10(8) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/mL phages screened based on above-mentioned Acinetobacter baumannii (the same phages below) respectively. Mice in phage control group were injected with 1 mL phages in the titer of 1×10(8) PFU/mL. The injection was performed continuously for 7 days in each living mouse, and the survival situation of mice was observed each day to calculate the survival ratio in one week. (2) Another 60 BALB/c mice were grouped and treated as in experiment (1), and the injection was performed continuously for 5 days in each living mouse. On experiment day 2, 4, and 6, 3 mice from each group were selected (if the number of survived mouse in any group was less than 3 at sample collecting, all the survived mice were selected), and blood was drawn to determine white blood cell count (WBC, with 3 samples at each time point in each group). On experiment day 2, blood was drawn from the mice that had their blood taken earlier for bacterial culture, and lung, liver, kidney, and spleen tissue was collected

  19. Phage-host interplay: examples from tailed phages and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya eChaturongakul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex interactions between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts play significant roles in shaping the structure of environmental microbial communities, not only by genetic transduction but also by modification of bacterial gene expression patterns. Survival of phages solely depends on their ability to infect their bacterial hosts, most importantly during phage entry. Successful dynamic adaptation of bacteriophages when facing selective pressures, such as host adaptation and resistance, dictates their abundance and diversification. Co-evolution of the phage tail fibers and bacterial receptors determine bacterial host ranges, mechanisms of phage entry and other infection parameters. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the physical interactions between tailed bacteriophages and bacterial pathogens (e.g., Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the influences of the phage on host gene expression. Understanding these interactions can offer insights into phage-host dynamics and suggest novel strategies for the design of bacterial pathogen biological controls.

  20. Auditory Display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    volume. The conference's topics include auditory exploration of data via sonification and audification; real time monitoring of multivariate date; sound in immersive interfaces and teleoperation; perceptual issues in auditory display; sound in generalized computer interfaces; technologies supporting...... auditory display creation; data handling for auditory display systems; applications of auditory display....

  1. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  2. Escherichia coli surface display for the selection of nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salema, Valencio; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2017-11-01

    Nanobodies (Nbs) are the smallest functional antibody fragments known in nature and have multiple applications in biomedicine or environmental monitoring. Nbs are derived from the variable segment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies, known as VHH. For selection, libraries of VHH gene segments from naïve, immunized animals or of synthetic origin have been traditionally cloned in E. coli phage display or yeast display systems, and clones binding the target antigen recovered, usually from plastic surfaces with the immobilized antigen (phage display) or using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS; yeast display). This review briefly describes these conventional approaches and focuses on the distinct properties of an E. coli display system developed in our laboratory, which combines the benefits of both phage display and yeast display systems. We demonstrate that E. coli display using an N-terminal domain of intimin is an effective platform for the surface display of VHH libraries enabling selection of high-affinity Nbs by magnetic cell sorting and direct selection on live mammalian cells displaying the target antigen on their surface. Flow cytometry analysis of E. coli bacteria displaying the Nbs on their surface allows monitoring of the selection process, facilitates screening, characterization of antigen-binding clones, specificity, ligand competition and estimation of the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ). © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  4. Phage Life Cycles Behind Bacterial Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Tomasz; Latka, Agnieszka; Roszniowski, Bartosz; Valvano, Miguel A; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-11-24

    Bacteriophages (phages or bacterial viruses) are the most abundant biological entities in our planet; their influence reaches far beyond the microorganisms they parasitize. Phages are present in every environment and shape up every bacterial population in both active and passive ways. They participate in the circulation of organic matter and drive the evolution of microorganisms by horizontal gene transfer at unprecedented scales. The mass flow of genetic information in the microbial world influences the biosphere and poses challenges for science and medicine. The genetic flow, however, depends on the fate of the viral DNA injected into the bacterial cell. The archetypal notion of phages only engaging in predatorprey relationships is slowly fading. Because of their varied development cycles, environmental conditions, and the diversity of microorganisms they parasitize, phages form a dense and highly complex web of dependencies, which has important consequences for life on Earth. The sophisticated phage-bacteria interplay includes both aggressive action (bacterial lysis) and "diplomatic negotiations" (prophage domestication). Here, we review the most important mechanisms of interactions between phages and bacteria and their evolutionary consequences influencing their biodiversity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  6. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  7. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event. PMID:26826235

  8. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  9. Evidence for Metaviromic Islands in Marine phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Megumi Mizuno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic islands have been defined as genomic regions in prokaryotic genomes that under-recruit from metagenomes where most of the same genome recruits at close to 100% identity over most of its length. The presence of metagenomic islands in prokaryotes has been associated to the diversity of concurrent lineages that vary at this level to disperse the predatory pressure of phages that, reciprocally, maintain high clonal diversity in the population and improve ecosystem performance. This was proposed as a Constant-Diversity (C-D model. Here we have investigated the regions of phage genomes under-recruiting in a metavirome constructed with a sample from the same habitat where they were retrieved. Some of the genes found to under-recruit are involved in host recognition as would be expected from the C-D model. Furthermore, the recruitment of intragenic regions known to be involved in molecular recognition also had a significant under-recruitment compared to the rest of the gene. However, other genes apparently disconnected from the recognition process under-recruited often, specifically the terminases involved in packaging of the phage genome in the capsid and a few others. In addition, some highly related phage genomes (at nucleotide sequence level had no metaviromic islands. We speculate that the latter might be generalist phages with broad infection range that do not require clone specific lineages.

  10. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  11. Sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garbe, Julia; Bunk, Boyke; Rohde, Manfred; Schobert, Max

    2011-01-01

    .... Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection...

  12. The Significance of Mutualistic Phages for Bacterial Ecology and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Nancy; Pratama, Akbar Adjie; Elsas, Jan Dirk van

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria and phages have traditionally been viewed as 'antagonists'. However, temperate phages can transfer genes, which can broaden their bacterial hosts' metabolic repertoire, confer or enhance virulence, or eliminate competing organisms, and so enhance bacterial fitness. Recent evidence shows that phages can also promote biofilm formation leading to population-level benefits for their bacterial hosts. Here, we provide a perspective on the ecological and evolutionary consequences for the bacteria interacting with phages, when phage and host interests are aligned. Furthermore, we examine the question whether bacterial hosts can lower immune barriers to phage infection, thereby facilitating infection by beneficial phages. Taking recent evidence together, we suggest that in many cases temperate phages are to be considered as being mutualistic as well as parasitic, at the same time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  14. Successful expansion but not complete restriction of tropism of adeno-associated virus by in vivo biopanning of random virus display peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Michelfelder

    Full Text Available Targeting viral vectors to certain tissues in vivo has been a major challenge in gene therapy. Cell type-directed vector capsids can be selected from random peptide libraries displayed on viral capsids in vitro but so far this system could not easily be translated to in vivo applications. Using a novel, PCR-based amplification protocol for peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV, we selected vectors for optimized transduction of primary tumor cells in vitro. However, these vectors were not suitable for transduction of the same target cells under in vivo conditions. We therefore performed selections of AAV peptide libraries in vivo in living animals after intravenous administration using tumor and lung tissue as prototype targets. Analysis of peptide sequences of AAV clones after several rounds of selection yielded distinct sequence motifs for both tissues. The selected clones indeed conferred gene expression in the target tissue while gene expression was undetectable in animals injected with control vectors. However, all of the vectors selected for tumor transduction also transduced heart tissue and the vectors selected for lung transduction also transduced a number of other tissues, particularly and invariably the heart. This suggests that modification of the heparin binding motif by target-binding peptide insertion is necessary but not sufficient to achieve tissue-specific transgene expression. While the approach presented here does not yield vectors whose expression is confined to one target tissue, it is a useful tool for in vivo tissue transduction when expression in tissues other than the primary target is uncritical.

  15. pH-Dependent Lytic Peptides Discovered by Phage-Display†

    OpenAIRE

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Weber, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Lipid membranes compartmentalize eukaryotic cells and separate the cell interior from the extracellular milieu. So far, studies of peptide and protein interactions with membranes have largely been limited to naturally occurring peptides or to sequences designed on the basis of structural information and biophysical parameters. To expand on these studies, utilizing a system with minimal assumptions, we used phage-display technology to identify 12 amino-acid-long peptides that bind to liposomes...

  16. Genomic Diversity of Phages Infecting Probiotic Strains of Lactobacillus paracasei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Geneviève M.; Capra, María L.; Quiberoni, Andrea; Tremblay, Denise M.; Labrie, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Strains of the Lactobacillus casei group have been extensively studied because some are used as probiotics in foods. Conversely, their phages have received much less attention. We analyzed the complete genome sequences of five L. paracasei temperate phages: CL1, CL2, iLp84, iLp1308, and iA2. Only phage iA2 could not replicate in an indicator strain. The genome lengths ranged from 34,155 bp (iA2) to 39,474 bp (CL1). Phages iA2 and iLp1308 (34,176 bp) possess the smallest genomes reported, thus far, for phages of the L. casei group. The GC contents of the five phage genomes ranged from 44.8 to 45.6%. As observed with many other phages, their genomes were organized as follows: genes coding for DNA packaging, morphogenesis, lysis, lysogeny, and replication. Phages CL1, CL2, and iLp1308 are highly related to each other. Phage iLp84 was also related to these three phages, but the similarities were limited to gene products involved in DNA packaging and structural proteins. Genomic fragments of phages CL1, CL2, iLp1308, and iLp84 were found in several genomes of L. casei strains. Prophage iA2 is unrelated to these four phages, but almost all of its genome was found in at least four L. casei strains. Overall, these phages are distinct from previously characterized Lactobacillus phages. Our results highlight the diversity of L. casei phages and indicate frequent DNA exchanges between phages and their hosts. PMID:26475105

  17. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  18. A NEW RECOMBINANT ADENO-ASSOCIATED VIRUS (AAV)-BASED RANDOM PEPTIDE DISPLAY LIBRARY SYSTEM: INFECTION-DEFECTIVE AAV1.9-3 AS A NOVEL DETARGETED PLATFORM FOR VECTOR EVOLUTION*

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Kei; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Directed evolution through genetic engineering of viral capsids followed by selection has emerged as a powerful means to create novel recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors with desired tropism and enhanced properties. One of the most effective approaches uses rAAV-based random peptide display libraries. Here we report a novel system based on an infection-defective rAAV1.9-3 as a platform for random peptide display, and show that biopanning of the libraries in vitro effectively ide...

  19. A NEW RECOMBINANT ADENO-ASSOCIATED VIRUS (AAV)-BASED RANDOM PEPTIDE DISPLAY LIBRARY SYSTEM: INFECTION-DEFECTIVE AAV1.9-3 AS A NOVEL DETARGETED PLATFORM FOR VECTOR EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kei; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    Directed evolution through genetic engineering of viral capsids followed by selection has emerged as a powerful means to create novel recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors with desired tropism and enhanced properties. One of the most effective approaches uses rAAV-based random peptide display libraries. Here we report a novel system based on an infection-defective rAAV1.9-3 as a platform for random peptide display, and show that biopanning of the libraries in vitro effectively identifies the peptides that restore and enhance rAAV transduction. rAAV1.9-3 has a genetically engineered AAV1 capsid with amino acids 445-568 being replaced with those of AAV9, and has been identified as a variant exhibiting significantly impaired infectivity and delayed blood clearance when infused into mice. In this study, we generated rAAV1.9-3 variant libraries in which 7- or 12-mer random peptides were expressed at the capsid amino acid position 590. Three rounds of positive selection for primary human dermal fibroblasts successfully identified new rAAV-peptide variants that transduce them more efficiently than the prototype rAAV2. Thus our study demonstrates that an infection-defective rAAV variant serves as a novel detargeted platform for random peptide display libraries. We also describe a brief review of recent progress in rAAV-based random peptide display library approaches.

  20. A NEW RECOMBINANT ADENO-ASSOCIATED VIRUS (AAV)-BASED RANDOM PEPTIDE DISPLAY LIBRARY SYSTEM: INFECTION-DEFECTIVE AAV1.9-3 AS A NOVEL DETARGETED PLATFORM FOR VECTOR EVOLUTION*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kei; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Directed evolution through genetic engineering of viral capsids followed by selection has emerged as a powerful means to create novel recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors with desired tropism and enhanced properties. One of the most effective approaches uses rAAV-based random peptide display libraries. Here we report a novel system based on an infection-defective rAAV1.9-3 as a platform for random peptide display, and show that biopanning of the libraries in vitro effectively identifies the peptides that restore and enhance rAAV transduction. rAAV1.9-3 has a genetically engineered AAV1 capsid with amino acids 445–568 being replaced with those of AAV9, and has been identified as a variant exhibiting significantly impaired infectivity and delayed blood clearance when infused into mice. In this study, we generated rAAV1.9-3 variant libraries in which 7- or 12-mer random peptides were expressed at the capsid amino acid position 590. Three rounds of positive selection for primary human dermal fibroblasts successfully identified new rAAV-peptide variants that transduce them more efficiently than the prototype rAAV2. Thus our study demonstrates that an infection-defective rAAV variant serves as a novel detargeted platform for random peptide display libraries. We also describe a brief review of recent progress in rAAV-based random peptide display library approaches. PMID:21603583

  1. A method for generation phage cocktail with great therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophage could be an alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy against multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, the emergence of resistant variants after phage treatment limited its therapeutic application. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, an approach, named "Step-by-Step" (SBS, has been established. This method takes advantage of the occurrence of phage-resistant bacteria variants and ensures that phages lytic for wild-type strain and its phage-resistant variants are selected. A phage cocktail lytic for Klebsiella pneumoniae was established by the SBS method. This phage cocktail consisted of three phages (GH-K1, GH-K2 and GH-K3 which have different but overlapping host strains. Several phage-resistant variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated after different phages treatments. The virulence of these variants was much weaker [minimal lethal doses (MLD>1.3×10(9 cfu/mouse] than that of wild-type K7 countpart (MLD = 2.5×10(3 cfu/mouse. Compared with any single phage, the phage cocktail significantly reduced the mutation frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae and effectively rescued Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in a murine K7 strain challenge model. The minimal protective dose (MPD of the phage cocktail which was sufficient to protect bacteremic mice from lethal K7 infection was only 3.0×10(4 pfu, significantly smaller (p<0.01 than that of single monophage. Moreover, a delayed administration of this phage cocktail was still effective in protection against K7 challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data showed that the phage cocktail was more effective in reducing bacterial mutation frequency and in the rescue of murine bacteremia than monophage suggesting that phage cocktail established by SBS method has great therapeutic potential for multidrug-resistant bacteria infection.

  2. PHAGE AMPLIFICATION TECHNOLOGY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Health Organization recognizes the need for new, affordable, rapid and highly sensitive diagnostics for use in developing countries. Phage amplification technology employs a specific mycobacteriophage which infects a live TB bacillus if represent in a sample. These replicate and lyse the cells to release progeny ...

  3. Anatomy of a lactococcal phage tail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mc Grath, S; Neve, H; Seegers, JFML; Eijlander, R; Vegge, CS; Brondsted, L; Heller, KJ; Fitzgerald, GF; Vogensen, FK; van Sinderen, D

    Bacteriophages of the Siphoviridae family utilize a long noncontractile tail to recognize, adsorb to, and inject DNA into their bacterial host. The tail anatomy of the archetypal Siphoviridae X has been well studied, in contrast to phages infecting gram-positive bacteria. This report outlines a

  4. Optimization of lytic phage manufacturing in bioreactor using monolithic supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Franc; Ciringer, Mateja; Jančar, Janez; Raspor, Peter; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2011-08-01

    A process for manufacturing large quantities of lytic bacteriophages was developed. Determination of cultivation termination was found to be essential to achieve high phage quantity and purity. When optimal cultivation termination is missed, phage fraction was found to be highly contaminated with deoxyribonucleic acid released from Escherichia coli cells. Besides, an already established method for monitoring of phage cultivation based on optical density, where its peak indicates point when maximal phage titer is achieved, a new indirect chromatographic method using methacrylate monoliths is proposed for on-line estimation of phage titer. It is based on the measurement of released E. coli deoxyribonucleic acid and shows high correlation with phage titer obtained from plaque assay. Its main advantage is that the information is obtained within few minutes. In addition, the same method can also be used to determine purity of a final phage fraction. Two strategies to obtain highly pure phage fractions are proposed: an immediate purification of phage lysate using monolithic columns or an addition of EDTA before chromatographic purification. The developed protocol was shown to give phage purity above 90% and it is completed within one working day including cultivation and phage titer in the final formulation using developed chromatographic method. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  7. Stumbling across the Same Phage: Comparative Genomics of Widespread Temperate Phages Infecting the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos G. Kalatzis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen Vibrio anguillarum-specific temperate bacteriophages isolated across Europe and Chile from aquaculture and environmental sites were genome sequenced and analyzed for host range, morphology and life cycle characteristics. The phages were classified as Siphoviridae with genome sizes between 46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3 in six of the phage genomes. Identification of specific genes, such as N6-adenine methyltransferase and lambda like repressor, as well as the presence of a tRNAArg, suggested a both mutualistic and parasitic interaction between phages and hosts. During short term phage exposure experiments, 28% of a V. anguillarum host population was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly available sequenced Vibrios. The observed distribution of these specific temperate Vibriophages across large geographical scales may be explained by efficient dispersal of phages and bacteria in the marine environment combined with a mutualistic interaction between temperate phages and their hosts which selects for co-existence rather than arms race dynamics.

  8. Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Danish J; Sokolov, Ilya J; Vinner, Gurinder K; Mancuso, Francesco; Cinquerrui, Salvatore; Vladisavljevic, Goran T; Clokie, Martha R J; Garton, Natalie J; Stapley, Andrew G F; Kirpichnikova, Anna

    2017-05-14

    Against a backdrop of global antibiotic resistance and increasing awareness of the importance of the human microbiota, there has been resurgent interest in the potential use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes, known as phage therapy. A number of phage therapy phase I and II clinical trials have concluded, and shown phages don't present significant adverse safety concerns. These clinical trials used simple phage suspensions without any formulation and phage stability was of secondary concern. Phages have a limited stability in solution, and undergo a significant drop in phage titre during processing and storage which is unacceptable if phages are to become regulated pharmaceuticals, where stable dosage and well defined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are de rigueur. Animal studies have shown that the efficacy of phage therapy outcomes depend on the phage concentration (i.e. the dose) delivered at the site of infection, and their ability to target and kill bacteria, arresting bacterial growth and clearing the infection. In addition, in vitro and animal studies have shown the importance of using phage cocktails rather than single phage preparations to achieve better therapy outcomes. The in vivo reduction of phage concentration due to interactions with host antibodies or other clearance mechanisms may necessitate repeated dosing of phages, or sustained release approaches. Modelling of phage-bacterium population dynamics reinforces these points. Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the effect of formulation on phage therapy outcomes, given the need for phage cocktails, where each phage within a cocktail may require significantly different formulation to retain a high enough infective dose. This review firstly looks at the clinical needs and challenges (informed through a review of key animal studies evaluating phage therapy) associated with treatment of acute and chronic infections and the drivers for phage encapsulation. An important driver

  9. The influence of graphic display format on the interpretations of quantitative risk information among adults with lower education and literacy: a randomized experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Kirsten J; Dixon, Ann; Hayen, Andrew; Jansen, Jesse; Smith, Sian; Simpson, Judy M

    2012-01-01

    To test optimal graphic risk communication formats for presenting small probabilities using graphics with a denominator of 1000 to adults with lower education and literacy. A randomized experimental study, which took place in adult basic education classes in Sydney, Australia. The participants were 120 adults with lower education and literacy. An experimental computer-based manipulation compared 1) pictographs in 2 forms, shaded "blocks" and unshaded "dots"; and 2) bar charts across different orientations (horizontal/vertical) and numerator size (small 95%) and not tested further. For the verbatim task, optimal graph type depended on the numerator size. For small numerators, pictographs resulted in fewer errors than bar charts (blocks: odds ratio [OR] = 0.047, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.023-0.098; dots: OR = 0.049, 95% CI = 0.024-0.099). For medium and large numerators, bar charts were more accurate (e.g., medium dots: OR = 4.29, 95% CI = 2.9-6.35). Pictographs were generally processed faster for small numerators (e.g., blocks: 14.9 seconds v. bars: 16.2 seconds) and bar charts for medium or large numerators (e.g., large blocks: 41.6 seconds v. 26.7 seconds). Vertical formats were processed slightly faster than horizontal graphs with no difference in accuracy. Most participants preferred bar charts (64%); however, there was no relationship with performance. For adults with low education and literacy, pictographs are likely to be the best format to use when displaying small numerators (100/1000).

  10. Hesperidin displays relevant role in the nutrigenomic effect of orange juice on blood leukocytes in human volunteers: a randomized controlled cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Milenkovic

    Full Text Available We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice.Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation.This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086.

  11. Hesperidin Displays Relevant Role in the Nutrigenomic Effect of Orange Juice on Blood Leukocytes in Human Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Dragan; Deval, Christiane; Dubray, Claude; Mazur, Andrzej; Morand, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation. Conclusions This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086 PMID:22110589

  12. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    T to repress ompK expression. It was demonstrated that QS controls the choice of anti-phage defense strategies in the V. anguillarum strain PF430-3, suggesting the presence of dynamic, temporary adaptations to phage infection pressure, while still securing the ability to produce a functional OmpK receptor...... of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13....... In conclusion, this thesis provides a first insight into the dynamic vibriophage-host interactions, indicating the complexity of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis, regarding the evolution of anti-phage defense mechanisms, gene regulation, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, as well as pathogenesis...

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of the Acinetobacter baumannii phage AB1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peizhen; Chen, Biaobang; Song, Zhijian; Song, Yulong; Yang, Yanmei; Ma, Ping; Wang, Huifeng; Ying, Jun; Ren, Ping; Yang, Lei; Gao, Guohui; Jin, Shouguang; Bao, Qiyu; Yang, Hongjiang

    2012-10-10

    As one of the pathogens of hospital-acquired infections, Acinetobacter baumannii poses great challenges to the public health. A. baumannii phage could be an effective way to fight multi-resistant A. baumannii. Here, we completed the whole genome sequencing of the complete genome of A. baumannii phage AB1, which consists of 45,159 bp and is a double-stranded DNA molecule with an average GC content of 37.7%. The genome encodes one tRNA gene and 85 open reading frames (ORFs) and the average size of the ORF is 531 bp in length. Among 85 ORFs, only 14 have been identified to share significant sequence similarities to the genes with known functions, while 28 are similar in sequence to the genes with function-unknown genes in the database and 43 ORFs are uniquely present in the phage AB1 genome. Fourteen function-assigned genes with putative functions include five phage structure proteins, an RNA polymerase, a big sub-unit and a small sub-unit of a terminase, a methylase and a recombinase and the proteins involved in DNA replication and so on. Multiple sequence alignment was conducted among those homologous proteins and the phylogenetic trees were reconstructed to analyze the evolutionary courses of these essential genes. From comparative genomics analysis, it turned out clearly that the frame of the phage genome mainly consisted of genes from Xanthomonas phages, Burkholderia ambifaria phages and Enterobacteria phages and while it comprises genes of its host A. baumannii only sporadically. The mosaic feature of the phage genome suggested that the horizontal gene transfer occurred among the phage genomes and between the phages and the host bacterium genomes. Analyzing the genome sequences of the phages should lay sound foundation to investigate how phages adapt to the environment and infect their hosts, and even help to facilitate the development of biological agents to deal with pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Library-based display technologies: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Asier; Comor, Lubos; Horvatić, Anita; Kuleš, Josipa; Guillemin, Nicolas; Mrljak, Vladimir; Bhide, Mangesh

    2016-07-19

    Over the past two decades, library-based display technologies have been staggeringly optimized since their appearance in order to mimic the process of natural molecular evolution. Display technologies are essential for the isolation of specific high-affinity binding molecules (proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids and others) for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune, neurodegenerative, inflammatory pathologies etc. Applications extend to other fields such as antibody and enzyme engineering, cell-free protein synthesis and the discovery of protein-protein interactions. Phage display technology is the most established of these methods but more recent fully in vitro alternatives, such as ribosome display, mRNA display, cis-activity based (CIS) display and covalent antibody display (CAD), as well as aptamer display and in vitro compartmentalization, offer advantages over phage in library size, speed and the display of unnatural amino acids and nucleotides. Altogether, they have produced several molecules currently approved or in diverse stages of clinical or preclinical testing and have provided researchers with tools to address some of the disadvantages of peptides and nucleotides such as their low affinity, low stability, high immunogenicity and difficulty to cross membranes. In this review we assess the fundamental technological features and point out some recent advances and applications of display technologies.

  15. Development of a phage chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay with high sensitivity for the determination of imidaclothiz in agricultural and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan; Hua, Xiude; Sun, Nana; Yang, Jiachuan; Deng, Jiaqi; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Minghua

    2017-12-31

    In this study, we isolated six phage-displayed peptides by biopanning phage-displayed peptide libraries on an immobilized anti-imidaclothiz monoclonal antibody. After analyzing the relative sensitivity of the individual phage-displayed peptides, we subsequently developed and optimized both a phage enzyme immunoassay (P-ELISA) and a phage chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (P-CLEIA) to improve the sensitivity and linear range of imidaclothiz assays. The P-CLEIA (50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of 0.86ngmL-1, linear range of 0.13-5.84ngmL-1) was more sensitive and had a wider linear range compared to the P-ELISA (IC50 of 1.45ngmL-1, linear range of 0.55-3.82ngmL-1). Besides, the sensitivities of the P-ELISA and P-CLEIA were increased by >4-fold and 8-fold, respectively as compared to homologous immunoassays developed using the same monoclonal antibody. Neither method had significant cross-reactivity with the analogues of imidaclothiz except for imidacloprid. Recoveries of the P-ELISA and P-CLEIA for imidaclothiz in paddy water, soil, cabbage, rice, apple, pakchoi, pear and tomato samples were 72.3-101.3% and 73.9-102.6%, respectively. The P-ELISA and P-CLEIA detected imidaclothiz in the authentic samples, and showed good correlation with results obtained from high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Delivering phage therapy per os: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Susan; Gorski, Andrzej; Dabrowska, Krystyna

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract pose a serious public health concern. High levels of antibiotic drug resistance, along with the potential for antibiotics to precipitate disease or alter the gut microbiome has prompted research into alternative treatment methods. Evidence suggests that bacteriophage therapy delivered per os may be well-suited to target such infections. Areas covered: Herein, we discuss the specific advantages and challenges of using orally administered phage therapy. Our literature review encompasses recent works using phages to target various clinically-relevant bacteria in vivo. We also provide insights into methods that aim to overcome the barriers to effective phage transit through the harsh gastrointestinal environment. Expert commentary: Evidence from a number of in vivo animal studies suggests that targeting bacterial infections using phages delivered orally holds potential. Efficacious oral phage therapy depends on the delivery of sufficient phage titers to the infection site, which may be hindered by the host's gastrointestinal tract and immune response.

  17. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2016 Andrade-Domínguez and Kolter.

  20. Satellite phage TLCφ enables toxigenic conversion by CTX phage through dif site alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Faizule; Kamruzzaman, M; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2010-10-21

    Bacterial chromosomes often carry integrated genetic elements (for example plasmids, transposons, prophages and islands) whose precise function and contribution to the evolutionary fitness of the host bacterium are unknown. The CTXφ prophage, which encodes cholera toxin in Vibrio cholerae, is known to be adjacent to a chromosomally integrated element of unknown function termed the toxin-linked cryptic (TLC). Here we report the characterization of a TLC-related element that corresponds to the genome of a satellite filamentous phage (TLC-Knφ1), which uses the morphogenesis genes of another filamentous phage (fs2φ) to form infectious TLC-Knφ1 phage particles. The TLC-Knφ1 phage genome carries a sequence similar to the dif recombination sequence, which functions in chromosome dimer resolution using XerC and XerD recombinases. The dif sequence is also exploited by lysogenic filamentous phages (for example CTXφ) for chromosomal integration of their genomes. Bacterial cells defective in the dimer resolution often show an aberrant filamentous cell morphology. We found that acquisition and chromosomal integration of the TLC-Knφ1 genome restored a perfect dif site and normal morphology to V. cholerae wild-type and mutant strains with dif(-) filamentation phenotypes. Furthermore, lysogeny of a dif(-) non-toxigenic V. cholerae with TLC-Knφ1 promoted its subsequent toxigenic conversion through integration of CTXφ into the restored dif site. These results reveal a remarkable level of cooperative interactions between multiple filamentous phages in the emergence of the bacterial pathogen that causes cholera.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  2. [lambda] Phage Nanobioparticle Expressing Apoptin Efficiently Suppress Human Breast Carcinoma Tumor Growth In Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Seifalian, Alexander; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed; Ghaderi, Narmin; Issazadeh, Khosro; Amirmozafari, Nour; Verdi, Javad

    2013-01-01

      Using phages is a novel field of cancer therapy and phage nanobioparticles (NBPs) such as λ phage could be modified to deliver and express genetic cassettes into eukaryotic cells safely in contrast with animal viruses...

  3. λ Phage nanobioparticle expressing apoptin efficiently suppress human breast carcinoma tumor growth in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Ghaderi, Narmin; Issazadeh, Khosro; Amirmozafari, Nour; Verdi, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Using phages is a novel field of cancer therapy and phage nanobioparticles (NBPs) such as λ phage could be modified to deliver and express genetic cassettes into eukaryotic cells safely in contrast with animal viruses...

  4. Three novel Pseudomonas phages isolated from composting provide insights into the evolution and diversity of tailed phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amgarten, Deyvid; Martins, Layla Farage; Lombardi, Karen Cristina; Antunes, Luciana Principal; de Souza, Ana Paula Silva; Nicastro, Gianlucca Gonçalves; Kitajima, Elliott Watanabe; Quaggio, Ronaldo Bento; Upton, Chris; Setubal, João Carlos; da Silva, Aline Maria

    2017-05-04

    Among viruses, bacteriophages are a group of special interest due to their capacity of infecting bacteria that are important for biotechnology and human health. Composting is a microbial-driven process in which complex organic matter is converted into humus-like substances. In thermophilic composting, the degradation activity is carried out primarily by bacteria and little is known about the presence and role of bacteriophages in this process. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as host, we isolated three new phages from a composting operation at the Sao Paulo Zoo Park (Brazil). One of the isolated phages is similar to Pseudomonas phage Ab18 and belongs to the Siphoviridae YuA-like viral genus. The other two isolated phages are similar to each other and present genomes sharing low similarity with phage genomes in public databases; we therefore hypothesize that they belong to a new genus in the Podoviridae family. Detailed genomic descriptions and comparisons of the three phages are presented, as well as two new clusters of phage genomes in the Viral Orthologous Clusters database of large DNA viruses. We found sequences encoding homing endonucleases that disrupt a putative ribonucleotide reductase gene and an RNA polymerase subunit 2 gene in two of the phages. These findings provide insights about the evolution of two-subunits RNA polymerases and the possible role of homing endonucleases in this process. Infection tests on 30 different strains of bacteria reveal a narrow host range for the three phages, restricted to P. aeruginosa PA14 and three other P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Biofilm dissolution assays suggest that these phages could be promising antimicrobial agents against P. aeruginosa PA14 infections. Analyses on composting metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data indicate association between abundance variations in both phage and host populations in the environment. The results about the newly discovered and described phages contribute to the understanding of

  5. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  6. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying; Wu, Dandan; Liu, Pengming; Wu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs). It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  7. Antibacterial properties of Acinetobacter baumannii phage Abp1 endolysin (PlyAB1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangtao; Shen, Xiaodong; Gong, Yali; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Peng, Yizhi

    2014-12-12

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as one of the most important hospital-acquired pathogens in the world, because of its resistance to almost all available antibiotic drugs. Endolysins from phages are attracting increasing interest as potential antimicrobial agents, especially for drug-resistant bacteria. We previously isolated and characterized Abp1, a virulent phage targeting the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain, AB1. To evaluate the antimicrobial potential of endolysin from the Abp1 phage, the endolysin gene plyAB1 was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the lytic activity of the recombinant protein (PlyAB1) was tested by turbidity assessment and bacteria counting assays. PlyAB1 exhibits a marked lytic activity against A. baumannii AB1, as shown by a decrease in the number of live bacteria following treatment with the enzyme. Moreover, PlyAB1 displayed a highly specific lytic effect against all of the 48 hospital-derived pandrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates that were tested. These isolates were shown to belong to different ST clones by multilocus sequence typing. The results presented here show that PlyAB1 has potential as an antibiotic against drug-resistant A. baumannii.

  8. Structural investigations of the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage G39P helicase inhibitor loading protein

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S

    2002-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis SPPI phage encoded protein G39P is a loader and inhibitor of the phage G40P replicative helicase involved in the initiation of phage DNA replication. The 2.4A crystal structure of a C-terminal truncated variant of G39P was solved using multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion exploiting the anomalous signal of seleno- methionine substituted protein. Inspection of the electron density maps revealed the asymmetric unit contained three independent G39P monomers, composed of 3 alpha-helices and their connecting loops. However, the model only accounted for the first 67 residues of the protein, as there was no interpretable electron density for residues 68 to 112. A preliminary NMR investigation revealed the C-terminal region of the protein had rapid internal motion and formed no well-defined stable fold that involved immobilized side chains. This is consistent with the X-ray analysis that displayed no electron density for these residues. A detailed comparison of NMR spectra from the C-termina...

  9. Inhibition of phage infection in capsule-producing Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... Lactic cultures that produce capsular polysaccharides are widely used in the dairy industry. However, little information is available on their phage-cell interactions. Concanavalin A (Con A), lysozyme, and saccharides were investigated for their ability to modify phage-cell interactions in such a manner as to.

  10. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  11. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  12. Challenges in predicting the evolutionary maintenance of a phage transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerer, Matthew; Molineux, Ian J; Ally, Dilara; Tyerman, Jabus; Cecchini, Nicole; Bull, James J

    2014-01-01

    In prior work, a phage engineered with a biofilm-degrading enzyme (dispersin B) cleared artificial, short-term biofilms more fully than the phage lacking the enzyme. An unresolved question is whether the transgene will be lost or maintained during phage growth - its loss would limit the utility of the engineering. Broadly supported evolutionary theory suggests that transgenes will be lost through a 'tragedy of the commons' mechanism unless the ecology of growth in biofilms meets specific requirements. We test that theory here. Functional properties of the transgenic phage were identified. Consistent with the previous study, the dispersin phage was superior to unmodified phage at clearing short term biofilms grown in broth, shown here to be an effect attributable to free enzyme. However, the dispersin phage was only marginally better than control phages on short term biofilms in minimal media and was no better than control phages in clearing long term biofilms. There was little empirical support for the tragedy of the commons framework despite a strong theoretical foundation for its supposed relevance. The framework requires that the transgene imposes an intrinsic cost, yet the transgene was intrinsically neutral or beneficial when expressed from one part of the phage genome. Expressed from a different part of the genome, the transgene did behave as if intrinsically costly, but its maintenance did not benefit from spatially structured growth per se - violating the tragedy framework. Overall, the transgene was beneficial under many conditions, but no insight to its maintenance was attributable to the established evolutionary framework. The failure likely resides in system details that would be used to parameterize the models. Our study cautions against naive applications of evolutionary theory to synthetic biology, even qualitatively.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  14. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... temperatures below 15°C and typically with fry mortality rates of 50-60%. Several attempts of vaccine development against RTFS have been made, but according to my knowledge no commercial vaccine is yet available. Bacterial chemotherapy is still the most effective and used treatment of RTFS today. However......, the dispersal and survival of a F. psychrophilum phage in vivo in juvenile rainbow trout after administration by three different methods was examined. Following phage administration by bath and oral intubation into the stomach, phages could be detected in the intestine, spleen, brain and kidney for 24 h before...

  15. Universal Numeric Segmented Display

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Sharmeen, Rezwana; S. M. Kamruzzaman

    2010-01-01

    Segmentation display plays a vital role to display numerals. But in today's world matrix display is also used in displaying numerals. Because numerals has lots of curve edges which is better supported by matrix display. But as matrix display is costly and complex to implement and also needs more memory, segment display is generally used to display numerals. But as there is yet no proposed compact display architecture to display multiple language numerals at a time, this paper proposes uniform...

  16. Safety and efficacy of phage therapy via the intravenous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Peter; Smithyman, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Increasing development of antimicrobial resistance is driving a resurgence in interest in phage therapy: the use of bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. As the lytic action of bacteriophages is unaffected by the antibiotic resistance status of their bacterial target, it is thought that phage therapy may have considerable potential in the treatment of a wide range of topical and localized infections. As yet this interest has not extended to intravenous (IV) use, which is surprising given that the historical record shows that phages are likely to be safe and effective when delivered by this route. Starting almost 100 years ago, phages were administered intravenously in treatment of systemic infections including typhoid, and Staphylococcal bacteremia. There was extensive IV use of phages in the 1940s to treat typhoid, reportedly with outstanding efficacy and safety. The safety of IV phage administration is also underpinned by the detailed work of Ochs and colleagues in Seattle who have over four decades' experience with IV injection into human subjects of large doses of highly purified coliphage PhiX174. Though these subjects included a large number of immune-deficient children, no serious side effects were observed over this extended time period. The large and continuing global health problems of typhoid and Staphylococcus aureus are exacerbated by the increasing antibiotic resistance of these pathogens. We contend that these infections are excellent candidates for use of IV phage therapy. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  18. Color speckle in laser displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  19. Behaviour of temperate phage Mu in Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberon, M; Gama, M J; Richelle, J; Martuscelli, J

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a convenient system for genetic analysis of Salmonella typhi exploiting the properties of the mutator phage Mu. In spite of the fact that wild-type Salmonella typhi strains do not allow Mu to form plaques on them, we have shown that these strains are actually sensitive to the phage. It proved possible to use Mu to induce mutations and to promote intra- and interspecific genetic transfer, without having to introduce the phage into the bacteria by means other than infection. Furthermore, we isolated Salmonella typhi derivatives on which Mu formed plaques, and studied the behaviour of Mu in these and wild-type strains.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  1. Age-Related Corresponding Relationships of Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computer-Generated Sinusoidal and Quasi-Random Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-group corresponding relationships of the controlled force exertion based on sinusoidal and quasi-random waveforms in 175 right-handed male adults aged 20 to 86 years. The subjects were divided into 3 groups based on age-level: 53 young (mean age 24.6, SD = 3.3 years), 71 middle aged (mean age 44.3, SD = 8.7 years), and 51…

  2. Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tai Wan; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage). The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices. These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  3. Utilization of specific and non-specific peptide interactions with inorganic nanomaterials on the surface of bacteriophage M13: Methodologies towards phage supported bi-functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kendra Nicole

    Many types of organisms create a variety of nano and micro scale materials from precursors available in their surrounding environments by a process called biomineralization. As scientists begin to understand how these organisms utilize specific and non-specific interactions with a variety of biopolymers such as chitin, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids with these precursors to create inorganic/organic composite materials, they have begun to wonder about the synthesis of other types of non-biologically templated synthetic techniques that might be possible. Bioengineered organisms and biopolymers have begun to be used for these types of studies. A variety of selection techniques exist for discovering biopolymers with an affinity for a target material, however, one of the most notable is a technique called peptide phage display. This is a technique that utilizes a commercially available randomized peptide library attached at the tip of the filamentous bacteriophage M13. In this dissertation capabilities of bacteriophage M13 are explored in regard to the creation of bi-functional nano materials by exploiting both specific peptide interactions as well as non-specific peptide interactions on the surface of the organism. Chapter 2 focuses on utilizing the specific peptide interactions of the randomized library at pIII in order to discover peptides with high binding affinity for a variety of nanomaterials. Selection studies called biopanning are performed on a variety of nanomaterials such as CaMoO4, allotropes of Ni, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4, and Rh and Pt with the fcc type crystal structure. Similarities and differences between peptides discovered for these materials are discussed. Chapter 3 focuses on utilizing the non-specific peptide interactions on the long axis of M13 called pVIII. The pVIII region consists of 2700 copies of the same 50 amino acid protein which as a negatively charged domain which is exposed to solution. The pVIII region therefore provides the surface of

  4. [Inventory building of phages against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from wounds of patients with severe burn and related characteristic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z C; Deng, L Y; Gong, Y L; Yin, S P; Jiang, B; Huang, G T; Peng, Y Z; Hu, F Q

    2016-09-20

    To build inventory of phages against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU and analyze related characteristics. In 2014 and 2015, 131 strains of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii were isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU from one hospital in Chongqing. In 2015, 98 strains of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii were isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU from 6 hospitals in Guangdong province. Above-mentioned 229 strains were collected for conducting experiments as follows: (1) Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of strains isolated from Chongqing and Guangdong province was analyzed. (2) Sewage co-culture method was applied for isolation of phages with above-mentioned strains and sewage from Chongqing and Guangdong province. Numbers of isolated phages and times of successful isolation and unsuccessful isolation were recorded. (3) The most prevalent subtypes of strains from Chongqing and Guangdong province in 2015 were collected, and their phages respectively underwent cross infection with all strains from Chongqing and those from Guangdong province. The lysis ability of phage was observed when phage underwent cross infection with the same subtype of strain or not the same, and the lytic ratio was calculated. (4) Fluid of phage in one type was randomly selected and equally divided into 3 parts, and its titer was determined by double dilution method. Then each part of phage fluid was subdivided into 3 small parts, which were cultured with LB fluid medium and respectively stored under the condition of -20 ℃, 4 ℃, and room temperature. After being stored for 1 month and 2 months, the titer of phage was determined for evaluating stability of phage. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, and one-way analysis of variance. (1) The major type of strains from Chongqing in 2014 was ST368 (45%, 31/69), and major types of strains from Chongqing

  5. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  6. “French Phage Network”—Second Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Kaltz, Oliver; Froissart, Rémy; Gandon, Sylvain; Ginet, Nicolas; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    The study of bacteriophages (viruses of bacteria) includes a variety of approaches, such as structural biology, genetics, ecology, and evolution, with increasingly important implications for therapeutic and industrial uses. Researchers working with phages in France have recently established a network to facilitate the exchange on complementary approaches, but also to engage new collaborations. Here, we provide a summary of the topics presented during the second meeting of the French Phage Network that took place in Marseille in November 2016. PMID:28430166

  7. Stochastic cellular fate decision making by multiple infecting lambda phage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Robb

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage lambda is a classic system for the study of cellular decision making. Both experiments and mathematical models have demonstrated the importance of viral concentration in the lysis-lysogeny decision outcome in lambda phage. However, a recent experimental study using single cell and single phage resolution reported that cells with the same viral concentrations but different numbers of infecting phage (multiplicity of infection can have markedly different rates of lysogeny. Thus the decision depends on not only viral concentration, but also directly on the number of infecting phage. Here, we attempt to provide a mechanistic explanation of these results using a simple stochastic model of the lambda phage genetic network. Several potential factors including intrinsic gene expression noise, spatial dynamics and cell-cycle effects are investigated. We find that interplay between the level of intrinsic noise and viral protein decision threshold is a major factor that produces dependence on multiplicity of infection. However, simulations suggest spatial segregation of phage particles does not play a significant role. Cellular image processing is used to re-analyse the original time-lapse movies from the recent study and it is found that higher numbers of infecting phage reduce the cell elongation rate. This could also contribute to the observed phenomena as cellular growth rate can affect transcription rates. Our model further predicts that rate of lysogeny is dependent on bacterial growth rate, which can be experimentally tested. Our study provides new insight on the mechanisms of individual phage decision making. More generally, our results are relevant for the understanding of gene-dosage compensation in cellular systems.

  8. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  9. The Legacy of 20th Century Phage Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Allan M

    2010-09-01

    The Golden Age of Phage Research, where phage was the favored material for attacking many basic questions in molecular biology, lasted from about 1940 to 1970. The era was initiated by Ellis and Delbrück, whose analysis defined the relevant parameters to measure in studying phage growth, and depended on the fact that the contents of a plaque can comprise descendants of a single infecting particle. It ended around 1970 because definitive methods had then become available for answering the same questions in other systems. Some of the accomplishments of phage research were the demonstration by Hershey and Chase that the genetic material of phage T2 is largely composed of DNA, the construction of linkage maps of T2 and T4 by Hershey and Rotman and their extension to very short molecular distances by Benzer, and the isolation of conditionally lethal mutants in T4 by Epstein et al. and in λ by Campbell. The dissection of the phage life cycle into causal chains was explored by Edgar and Wood for T4 assembly and later in the regulation of lysogeny by Kaiser, extended to the molecular level by Ptashne and others. Restriction/modification was discovered in λ by Bertani and Weigle, and the biochemical mechanism was elucidated by Arber and by Smith.

  10. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  11. Inexpensive anti-cysticercosis vaccine: S3Pvac expressed in heat inactivated M13 filamentous phage proves effective against naturally acquired Taenia solium porcine cysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Julio; Martínez, José Juan; Manoutcharian, Karen; Hernández, Marisela; Fleury, Agnes; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Blancas, Abel; Toledo, Andrea; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Maza, Victor; Quet, Fabrice; Bonnabau, Henri; de Aluja, Aline S; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2008-06-02

    In search of reducing vaccine production costs', a recombinant M13 phage version of the anti-cysticercosis tripeptide vaccine (S3Pvac) was developed. The efficacy of S3Pvac-Phage vs. placebo was evaluated in a randomized trial that included 1,047 rural pigs in 16 villages of Central Mexico. Three to five months after vaccination 530 pigs were examined by tongue inspection. At 5-27 months of age, 331 pigs (197 vaccinated/134 controls) were inspected at necropsy. Vaccination reduced 70% the frequency of tongue cysticercosis and, based on necropsy, 54% of muscle-cysticercosis and by 87% the number of cysticerci.

  12. Genome organisation of the Acinetobacter lytic phage ZZ1 and comparison with other T4-like Acinetobacter phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Li, Zhen-Jiang; Wang, Shu-Wei; Wang, Shan-Mei; Chen, Song-Jian; Huang, De-Hai; Zhang, Gai; Li, Ya-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Jin; Zhao, Guo-Qiang

    2014-09-14

    Phage ZZ1, which efficiently infects pathogenic Acinetobacter baumannii strains, is the fifth completely sequenced T4-like Acinetobacter phage to date. To gain a better understanding of the genetic characteristics of ZZ1, bioinformatics and comparative genomic analyses of the T4 phages were performed. The 166,687-bp double-stranded DNA genome of ZZ1 has the lowest GC content (34.4%) of the sequenced T4-like Acinetobacter phages. A total of 256 protein-coding genes and 8 tRNA genes were predicted. Forty-three percent of the predicted ZZ1 proteins share up to 73% amino acid identity with T4 proteins, and the homologous genes generally retained the same order and transcriptional direction. Beyond the conserved structural and DNA replication modules, T4 and ZZ1 have diverged substantially by the acquisition and deletion of large blocks of unrelated genes, especially in the first halves of their genomes. In addition, ZZ1 and the four other T4-like Acinetobacter phage genomes (Acj9, Acj61, 133, and Ac42) share a well-organised and highly conserved core genome, particularly in the regions encoding DNA replication and virion structural proteins. Of the ZZ1 proteins, 70, 64, 61, and 56% share up to 86, 85, 81, and 83% amino acid identity with Acj9, Acj61, 133, and Ac42 proteins, respectively. ZZ1 has a different number and types of tRNAs than the other 4 Acinetobacter phages, although some of the ZZ1-encoded tRNAs share high sequence similarity with the tRNAs from these phages. Over half of ZZ1-encoded tRNAs (5 out of 8) are related to optimal codon usage for ZZ1 proteins. However, this correlation was not present in any of the other 4 Acinetobacter phages. The comparative genomic analysis of these phages provided some new insights into the evolution and diversity of Acinetobacter phages, which might elucidate the evolutionary origin and host-specific adaptation of these phages.

  13. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2016-01-01

    concentration (MOI = 0.3–4) was crucial for efficient viral lysis, resulting in a 104–105-fold reduction of phage-sensitive cells (both single phages and phage cocktails), which was maintained throughout the incubation (>10 days). Following cell lysis, regrowth of phage-resistant strains was examined...... and resistant strains were isolated for further characterization. The application of a mathematical model allowed simulation of phage-host interactions and resistance development, confirming indications from strain isolations that phage-sensitive strains dominated the regrowing population (>99.8 %) at low MOI...... and phage-resistant strains (>87.8 %) dominated at high MOI. A cross-infectivity test covering 68 isolated strains and 22 phages resulted in 23 different host susceptibility patterns, with 20 of the isolates being resistant to all the applied phages. Eleven isolated strains with different susceptibility...

  14. Comparative Omics and Trait Analyses of Marine Pseudoalteromonas Phages Advance the Phage OTU Concept

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    Melissa B. Duhaime

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses influence the ecology and evolutionary trajectory of microbial communities. Yet our understanding of their roles in ecosystems is limited by the paucity of model systems available for hypothesis generation and testing. Further, virology is limited by the lack of a broadly accepted conceptual framework to classify viral diversity into evolutionary and ecologically cohesive units. Here, we introduce genomes, structural proteomes, and quantitative host range data for eight Pseudoalteromonas phages isolated from Helgoland (North Sea, Germany and use these data to advance a genome-based viral operational taxonomic unit (OTU definition. These viruses represent five new genera and inform 498 unaffiliated or unannotated protein clusters (PCs from global virus metagenomes. In a comparison of previously sequenced Pseudoalteromonas phage isolates (n = 7 and predicted prophages (n = 31, the eight phages are unique. They share a genus with only one other isolate, Pseudoalteromonas podophage RIO-1 (East Sea, South Korea and two Pseudoalteromonas prophages. Mass-spectrometry of purified viral particles identified 12–20 structural proteins per phage. When combined with 3-D structural predictions, these data led to the functional characterization of five previously unidentified major capsid proteins. Protein functional predictions revealed mechanisms for hijacking host metabolism and resources. Further, they uncovered a hybrid sipho-myovirus that encodes genes for Mu-like infection rarely described in ocean systems. Finally, we used these data to evaluate a recently introduced definition for virus populations that requires members of the same population to have >95% average nucleotide identity across at least 80% of their genes. Using physiological traits and genomics, we proposed a conceptual model for a viral OTU definition that captures evolutionarily cohesive and ecologically distinct units. In this trait-based framework, sensitive hosts are

  15. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

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    Yan D Niu

    Full Text Available The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7, but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126, "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20, Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1, "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49. The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06 (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291, Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96 and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23 (between 2005 and 2011 indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type

  16. From phage display to plant expression: Fulfilling prerequisites for chicken oral immunotherapy against coccidiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The frequency and spectrum of infections with pathogens harbouring resistance to antibiotics and other drugs has dramatically increased over the last years. One of the main causes is the extensive use of antibiotics and other drugs in human and veterinary medicine. Parasites, such as Eimeria causing

  17. Protection against Influenza A Virus Challenge with M2e-Displaying Filamentous Escherichia coli Phages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Lei; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Bossche, Veronique; Roose, Kenny; Youssef, Sameh A; de Bruin, Alain|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are responsible for annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that cause severe illness and mortality in all age groups worldwide. Matrix protein 2 (M2) of influenza A virus is a tetrameric type III membrane protein that functions as a proton-selective channel. The

  18. Modular and aggregation resistant Vh antibodies from a phage display library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Niels Anton; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Lykkemark, Simon

    2012-01-01

    ). The antibody scaffold has been codon optimised to improve expression, and the CDR’s have been created using trinucleotide synthesis. These methods give a strict control over the randomisations, and the ability to design a library with minimal aggregation propensity. To facilitate further manipulation, unique...... restriction sites have been silently inserted around each CDR. The resulting library has an estimated diversity of 8 x 10^7....

  19. Identification and in vitro characterization of phage-displayed VHHs targeting VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farajpour, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potential target for cancer treatment because of its role in angiogenesis and its overexpression in most human cancers. Currently, anti-VEGF antibodies have been shown to be promising tools for therapeutic applications. However, large size, poor tumo...

  20. Wide screening of phage-displayed libraries identifies immune targets in planta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C; Charlton, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular ......Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub...... to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants...

  1. Discovery of Peptidic Anti-cobratoxins by Next Generation Phage Display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lynagh, Timothy; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl

    Antivenoms are still being produced by animal immunization protocols and are therefore associated with high immunogenicity for human recipients. Here we report the first step towards discovery of synthetic antitoxins that could be used for development of a fully synthetic antivenom against...

  2. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis-related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance-related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will be developed by combining these technologies.

  3. Rapid Development of New Protein Biosensors Utilizing Peptides Obtained via Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Inc., Albany, New York, United States of America ¤b Current address: Department of Herbal Pharmaceutical Engineering, Daegu Haany University...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Columbia University,Department of Chemical Engineering,116th Street and

  4. Selection by phage display of a mustard chymotrypsin inhibitor toxic to pea aphid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceci, L.R.; Volpicella, M.; Conti, S.; Gallerani, R.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The mustard trypsin inhibitor, MTI-2, is a potent inhibitor of trypsin with no activity towards chymotrypsin. MTI-2 is toxic for lepidopteran insects, but has low activity against aphids. In an attempt to improve the activity of the inhibitor towards aphids, a library of inhibitor variants was

  5. The long-term effects of phage concentration on the inhibition of planktonic bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley-Morse, Thomas O; Zhang, Lucy; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1920s there has been an interest in using bacteriophages (phages) for the control of bacterial pathogens. While there are many factors that have limited the success of phage bio-control, one particular problem is the variability of outcomes between phages and bacteria. Specifically, there is a significant need for a better understanding of how initial phage concentrations affect long-term bacterial inhibition. In work reported herein three phages were isolated for Escherichia coli K12, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, as well as Bacillus cereus and bio-control experiments were performed with phage concentrations ranging from 10(5) to 10(8) plaque forming units per mL over the course of 72 h. For four of the nine phages isolated there was a linear relationship between inhibition and phage concentration, suggesting the effect of phage concentration is important at longer time scales. For three of the isolated phages, phage concentrations had no effect on bacterial inhibition suggesting that even at the lowest concentration the method of action was saturated and lower concentrations might still be effective. Additionally, a cocktail was created and was compared to the previously isolated phages. There was no statistical difference between the cocktail and the best performing phage highlighting the importance of selecting the appropriate phages for treatment. These results suggest that, for certain phages, there is a strong relationship between phage concentration and long-term bacterial growth inhibition and the initial phage concentration is an important indicator of the long-term outcome.

  6. Lactococcal 936-type phages and dairy fermentation problems: from detection to evolution and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The so-called 936-type phages are the most frequently encountered lactococcal phage species in dairy fermentations, where they cause slow or even failed fermentations with concomitant economic losses. Several dairy phage population studies, performed in different geographical locations, have detailed their dominance in dairy phage populations, while various phage-resistance mechanisms have been assessed in a bid to protect against this virulent phage group. The impact of thermal and chemical treatments on 936 phages is an important aspect for dairy technologists and has been assessed in several studies, and has indicated that these phages have adapted to better resist such treatments. The abundance of 936 phage genome sequences has permitted a focused view on genomic content and regions of variation, and the role of such variable regions in the evolution of these phages. Here, we present an overview on detection and global prevalence of the 936 phages, together with their tolerance to industrial treatments and anti-phage strategies. Furthermore, we present a comprehensive review on the comparative genomic analyses of members of this fascinating phage species.

  7. Lactococcal 936-type phages and dairy fermentation problems: from detection to evolution and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Murphy, James; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-01-01

    The so-called 936-type phages are the most frequently encountered lactococcal phage species in dairy fermentations, where they cause slow or even failed fermentations with concomitant economic losses. Several dairy phage population studies, performed in different geographical locations, have detailed their dominance in dairy phage populations, while various phage-resistance mechanisms have been assessed in a bid to protect against this virulent phage group. The impact of thermal and chemical treatments on 936 phages is an important aspect for dairy technologists and has been assessed in several studies, and has indicated that these phages have adapted to better resist such treatments. The abundance of 936 phage genome sequences has permitted a focused view on genomic content and regions of variation, and the role of such variable regions in the evolution of these phages. Here, we present an overview on detection and global prevalence of the 936 phages, together with their tolerance to industrial treatments and anti-phage strategies. Furthermore, we present a comprehensive review on the comparative genomic analyses of members of this fascinating phage species.

  8. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  9. Impact of a Single Phage and a Phage Cocktail Application in Broilers on Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Development of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Samuel; Kittler, Sophie; Klein, Günter; Glünder, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is currently the most frequent foodborne zoonosis in many countries. One main source is poultry. The aim of this study was to enhance the knowledge about the potential of bacteriophages in reducing colonization of broilers with Campylobacter , as there are only a few in vivo studies published. Commercial broilers were inoculated with 104 CFU/bird of a Campylobacter jejuni field strain. Groups of 88 birds each were subsequently treated with a single phage or a four-phage cocktail (107 PFU/bird in CaCO3 buffered SM-Buffer). Control birds received the solvent only. Afterwards, subgroups of eleven birds each were examined for their loads with phages and Campylobacter on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 after phage application. The susceptibility of the Campylobacter population to phage infection was determined using ten isolates per bird. In total 4180 re-isolates were examined. The study demonstrated that the deployed phages persisted over the whole investigation period. The Campylobacter load was permanently reduced by the phage-cocktail as well as by the single phage. The reduction was significant between one and four weeks after treatment and reached a maximum of log10 2.8 CFU/g cecal contents. Phage resistance rates of initially up to 43% in the single phage treated group and 24% in the cocktail treated group later stabilized at low levels. The occurrence of phage resistance influenced but did not override the Campylobacter reducing effect. Regarding the reduction potential, the cocktail treatment had only a small advantage over the singe phage treatment directly after phage administration. However, the cocktail moderated and delayed the emergence of phage resistance. PMID:24205254

  10. Phage therapy is effective against infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans in a murine footpad model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Trigo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected, necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Currently, there is no vaccine against M. ulcerans infection. Although the World Health Organization recommends a combination of rifampicin and streptomycin for the treatment of BU, clinical management of advanced stages is still based on the surgical resection of infected skin. The use of bacteriophages for the control of bacterial infections has been considered as an alternative or to be used in association with antibiotherapy. Additionally, the mycobacteriophage D29 has previously been shown to display lytic activity against M. ulcerans isolates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans infection to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of treatment with mycobacteriophage D29. Analyses of macroscopic lesions, bacterial burdens, histology and cytokine production were performed in both M. ulcerans-infected footpads and draining lymph nodes (DLN. We have demonstrated that a single subcutaneous injection of the mycobacteriophage D29, administered 33 days after bacterial challenge, was sufficient to decrease pathology and to prevent ulceration. This protection resulted in a significant reduction of M. ulcerans numbers accompanied by an increase of cytokine levels (including IFN-γ, both in footpads and DLN. Additionally, mycobacteriophage D29 treatment induced a cellular infiltrate of a lymphocytic/macrophagic profile. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations demonstrate the potential of phage therapy against M. ulcerans infection, paving the way for future studies aiming at the development of novel phage-related therapeutic approaches against BU.

  11. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio

    2014-01-01

    in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme...

  12. Nongenetic individuality in the host-phage interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Pearl

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacteria can exhibit a range of phenotypes, even in homogeneous environmental conditions. Such nongenetic individuality has been observed in a wide range of biological processes, including differentiation and stress response. A striking example is the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, whereby a small fraction of drug-sensitive bacteria can persist under extensive antibiotic treatments. We have previously shown that persistent bacteria enter a phenotypic state, identified by slow growth or dormancy, which protects them from the lethal action of antibiotics. Here, we studied the effect of persistence on the interaction between Escherichia coli and phage lambda. We used long-term time-lapse microscopy to follow the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP under the phage lytic promoter, as well as cellular fate, in single infected bacteria. Intriguingly, we found that, whereas persistent bacteria are protected from prophage induction, they are not protected from lytic infection. Quantitative analysis of gene expression reveals that the expression of lytic genes is suppressed in persistent bacteria. However, when persistent bacteria switch to normal growth, the infecting phage resumes the process of gene expression, ultimately causing cell lysis. Using mathematical models for these two host-phage interactions, we found that the bacteria's nongenetic individuality can significantly affect the population dynamics, and might be relevant for understanding the coevolution of bacterial hosts and phages.

  13. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... be specific to the receptors used by phages, awareness of its mechanisms may identify ways of improving the choice of phages for therapy. Phenotypic resistance can also explain several enigmas in the ecology of phage-bacterial dynamics. Phenotypic resistance does not preclude the evolution of genetic...... but still attain high densities in their presence - because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe...

  14. Sequence tolerance of the phage lambda PRM promoter: implications for evolution of gene regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Christine B; Short, Megan D; Little, John W

    2004-12-01

    Much of the gene regulatory circuitry of phage lambda centers on a complex region called the O(R) region. This approximately 100-bp region is densely packed with regulatory sites, including two promoters and three repressor-binding sites. The dense packing of this region is likely to impose severe constraints on its ability to change during evolution, raising the question of how the specific arrangement of sites and their exact sequences could evolve to their present form. Here we ask whether the sequence of a cis-acting site can be widely varied while retaining its function; if it can, evolution could proceed by a larger number of paths. To help address this question, we developed a lambda cloning vector that allowed us to clone fragments spanning the O(R) region. By using this vector, we carried out intensive mutagenesis of the P(RM) promoter, which drives expression of CI repressor and is activated by CI itself. We made a pool of fragments in which 8 of the 12 positions in the -35 and -10 regions were randomized and cloned this pool into the vector, making a pool of P(RM) variant phage. About 10% of the P(RM) variants were able to lysogenize, suggesting that the lambda regulatory circuitry is compatible with a wide range of P(RM) sequences. Analysis of several of these phages indicated a range of behaviors in prophage induction. Several isolates had induction properties similar to those of the wild type, and their promoters resembled the wild type in their responses to CI. We term this property of different sequences allowing roughly equivalent function "sequence tolerance " and discuss its role in the evolution of gene regulatory circuitry.

  15. A multiplex real-time PCR for the detection and differentiation of Campylobacter phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A; Rau, Jörg; Hertwig, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are important food-borne pathogens that are widespread in animal husbandry. To combat Campylobacter along the food chain, the application of lytic phages has been shown to be a promising tool. Campylobacter phages are currently classified into three groups, of which group II and group III phages are the most common. Members of each group are closely related, whereas the two groups share only little DNA similarity. Moreover, while group III phages are specific for C. jejuni, group II phages additionally infect C. coli. Phage cocktails intended to be used for applications should be composed of various phages that differ in their host range and growth kinetics. The isolation of phages is generally performed by plaque assays. This approach has the limitation that phages are merely identified by their lytic activity on certain indicator strains and that relatively high numbers of phages must be present in a tested sample. Therefore, a more sensitive molecular detection system would be beneficial, which allows a pre-screening of samples and the quick detection and discrimination of group II and group III phages. New phages can then be isolated by use of indicator strains that may be different from those typically applied. On the basis of available Campylobacter phage genome sequences, we developed a multiplex PCR system for group II and group III phages selecting the tail tube gene and the gene for the base plate wedge, respectively, as target. Phages of both groups could be identified with primers deduced from the putative tail fiber gene. Efficient release of phage DNA from capsids was achieved by an extended heat treatment or digestion of phage particles with proteinase K/SDS yielding a detection limit of 1 pfu/ml. Individual detection of group II phages, group III phages and of both groups was studied with artificially contaminated chicken skin. To recover phages that had strongly adhered to the skin, stomaching was the most efficient

  16. Influence of environmental factors on phage-bacteria interaction and on the efficacy and infectivity of phage P100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Fister

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control L. monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after two weeks at 4 °C. However, thereafter re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered.

  17. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat) gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80). Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host. The recombinant phage

  18. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempashanaiah Nanjundappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80. Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host

  19. PhageTerm: a tool for fast and accurate determination of phage termini and packaging mechanism using next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Julian R; Depardieu, Florence; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Bikard, David; Monot, Marc

    2017-08-15

    The worrying rise of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is leading to a renewed interest in bacteriophages as a treatment option. Novel sequencing technologies enable description of an increasing number of phage genomes, a critical piece of information to understand their life cycle, phage-host interactions, and evolution. In this work, we demonstrate how it is possible to recover more information from sequencing data than just the phage genome. We developed a theoretical and statistical framework to determine DNA termini and phage packaging mechanisms using NGS data. Our method relies on the detection of biases in the number of reads, which are observable at natural DNA termini compared with the rest of the phage genome. We implemented our method with the creation of the software PhageTerm and validated it using a set of phages with well-established packaging mechanisms representative of the termini diversity, i.e. 5'cos (Lambda), 3'cos (HK97), pac (P1), headful without a pac site (T4), DTR (T7) and host fragment (Mu). In addition, we determined the termini of nine Clostridium difficile phages and six phages whose sequences were retrieved from the Sequence Read Archive. PhageTerm is freely available (https://sourceforge.net/projects/phageterm), as a Galaxy ToolShed and on a Galaxy-based server (https://galaxy.pasteur.fr).

  20. Upregulation of Mrps18a in breast cancer identified by selecting phage antibody libraries on breast tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Meldgaard, Theresa; Melchjorsen, Connie Jenning

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: We identified the mitochondrial ribosomal protein s18a (Mrps18a) as a protein which is upregulated in breast cancer. However, Mrps18a was not homogeneously upregulated in all cancer cells, suggesting the existence of sub-populations within the tumor. The upregulation was not confined...... to cytokeratin 19 and cytokeratin 14 double positive cells. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates how phage display can be applied towards the discovery of proteins which exhibit changes in their expression patterns. We identified the mitochondrial protein Mrps18a as being upregulated in human breast cancer cells...

  1. A fast method for large-scale isolation of phages from hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Adsorption of phage to its host bacteria was performed with 0.1. MOI, then the bacteria was cultured at 37°C, at 200 rpm. An aliquot of 1 μl of culture medium was collected at the indicated time and the phage titer was measured by serial dilution. Identification of the phage genome and morphology.

  2. Multidimensional metrics for estimating phage abundance, distribution, gene density, and sequence coverage in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Karam Aziz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phages are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and play major ecological roles, yet the current sequenced phage genomes do not adequately represent their diversity, and little is known about the abundance and distribution of these sequenced genomes in nature. Although the study of phage ecology has benefited tremendously from the emergence of metagenomic sequencing, a systematic survey of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems is still lacking, and fundamental questions about phage biology, lifestyle, and ecology remain unanswered. To address these questions and improve comparative analysis of phages in different metagenomes, we screened a core set of publicly available metagenomic samples for sequences related to completely sequenced phages using the web tool, Phage Eco-Locator. We then adopted and deployed an array of mathematical and statistical metrics for a multidimensional estimation of the abundance and distribution of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems. Experiments using those metrics individually showed their usefulness in emphasizing the pervasive, yet uneven, distribution of known phage sequences in environmental metagenomes. Using these metrics in combination allowed us to resolve phage genomes into clusters that correlated with their genotypes and taxonomic classes as well as their ecological properties. We propose adding this set of metrics to current metaviromic analysis pipelines, where they can provide insight regarding phage mosaicism, habitat specificity, and evolution.

  3. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...

  4. Clear Plaque Mutants of Lactococcal Phage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Kilstrup, Mogens; Vogensen, Finn K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for obtaining turbid plaques of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and its derivative TP901-BC1034. We have further used the method to isolate clear plaque mutants of this phage. Analysis of 8 such mutants that were unable to lysogenize the host included whole genome...... protein involved in the DNA binding. The conclusion is that cI is the only gene involved in clear plaque formation i.e. the CI protein is the determining factor for the lysogenic pathway and its maintenance in the lactococcal phage TP901-1....

  5. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  6. Development of SERS substrate using phage-based magnetic template for triplex assay in sepsis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; Shin, Yesol; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-11-15

    Development of a new substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one area of interest for the improvement of SERS performance. Herein, we introduce a new method for developing new mesoporous SERS substrates using M13 phages that display cysteine-rich peptides on the pVIII major units, which is an alternative for thiol donor using chemical modifications. Together with the SERS substrate development, and the use of the SERS technique for sepsis diagnostics is a new approach in clinical settings. The substrates were characterized and magnetized with magnetic immuno colloids made of gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles and specific antibodies. Conventionally, the SERS-tags are prepared by using gold nanoparticles and are modified with Raman dyes to immobilize specific antibodies to capture the biomarkers in the serum samples. However, in this method the SERS-tags are bound to the mesoporous substrate via antibody/antigen interactions to form clusters or layer-by-layer assemblies of SERS-tags for Raman signal enhancement. The SERS spectra showed distinct peaks for tags corresponding to three typical sepsis-specific biomarkers for diagnostics with the limit of detection values of 27 pM, 103 pM, and 78 pM for C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), respectively. With such an approach, SERS can be used for clinical purposes and can be improved by phage display modification rather than chemical alternatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantifying the significance of phage attack on starter cultures: a mechanistic model for population dynamics of phage and their hosts isolated from fermenting sauerkraut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgal, P; Breidt, F; Lubkin, S R; Sandeep, K P

    2006-06-01

    We investigated the possibility of using starter cultures in sauerkraut fermentation and thereby reducing the quantity of salt used in the process. This, in turn, would reduce the amount of waste salt that would enter in our water resources. Phage, naturally present in sauerkraut fermentation, could potentially affect the starter cultures introduced. Thus, a mechanistic mathematical model was developed to quantify the growth kinetics of the phage and starter cultures. The model was validated by independent experiments with two Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains isolated from sauerkraut and their corresponding phage. Model simulations and experimental evidence showed the presence of phage-resistant cell populations in starter cultures which replaced phage-sensitive cells, even when the initial phage density (P(0)) and multiplicity of infection (MOI) were low (P(0) temperature and pH, should be considered to make the model applicable to commercial fermentations.

  8. Lactococcal Abortive Infection Protein AbiV Interacts Directly with the Phage Protein SaV and Prevents Translation of Phage Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Brandt Borup; Samson, J.E.; Labrie, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    RNAs and proteins suggested that AbiV blocks the activation of late gene transcription, probably by a general inhibition of translation. Using size exclusion chromatography coupled with on-line static light scattering and refractometry, as well as fluorescence quenching experiments, we also demonstrated that both......AbiV is an abortive infection protein that inhibits the lytic cycle of several virulent phages infecting Lactococcus lactis, while a mutation in the phage gene sav confers insensitivity to AbiV. In this study, we have further characterized the effects of the bacterial AbiV and its interaction...... with the phage p2 protein SaV. First, we showed that during phage infection of lactococcal AbiV(+) cells, AbiV rapidly inhibited protein synthesis. Among early phage transcripts, sav gene transcription was slightly inhibited while the SaV protein could not be detected. Analyses of other phage p2 m...

  9. Lambda-Display: A Powerful Tool for Antigen Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gargano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1985, phage display technology has been successfully used in projects aimed at deciphering biological processes and isolating molecules of practical value in several applications. Bacteriophage lambda, representing a classical molecular cloning and expression system has also been exploited for generating large combinatorial libraries of small peptides and protein domains exposed on its capsid. More recently, lambda display has been consistently and successfully employed for domain mapping, antigen discovery and protein interaction studies or, more generally, in functional genomics. We show here the results obtained by the use of large libraries of cDNA and genomic DNA for the molecular dissection of the human B-cell response against complex pathogens, including protozoan parasites, bacteria and viruses. Moreover, by reviewing the experimental work performed in recent investigations we illustrate the potential of lambda display in the diagnostics field and for identifying antigens useful as targets for vaccine development.

  10. Phage-host interaction in Lactococcus and Leuconostoc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr

    , bacteriophages infecting Leuconostoc species were characterized. A large group of Leuconostoc phages was characterized regarding the morphology, host range variation and genetic relatedness. A classification system for dairy Leuconostoc phages was proposed. dditionally, a PCR test for the dairy Leuconostoc...... phages was developed and tested. The complete genomic DNA sequences of nine Leuconostoc phages were determined. The genomic sequences were analyzed with a focus on the gene content, gene organization and comparative genomics. Sequenced phages of Leuconostoc could be classified into two groups, which...

  11. Inhibition of phage infection in capsule-producing Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... Prazak A, Murano E, Mercado I, Acuff G (2002). Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes during production and post harvest processing on cabbage. J. Food Prot. 65: 1728-1734. Quiberoni A, Stiefel J, Reinheimer J (2000). Characterization of phage receptors in Streptococcus thermophilus using purified cell ...

  12. What Can Phages Tell Us about Host-Pathogen Coevolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Dennehy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcomes of host-parasite interactions depend on the coevolutionary forces acting upon them, but because every host-parasite relation is enmeshed in a web of biotic and abiotic interactions across a heterogeneous landscape, host-parasite coevolution has proven difficult to study. Simple laboratory phage-bacteria microcosms can ameliorate this difficulty by allowing controlled, well-replicated experiments with a limited number of interactors. Genetic, population, and life history data obtained from these studies permit a closer examination of the fundamental correlates of host-parasite coevolution. In this paper, I describe the results of phage-bacteria coevolutionary studies and their implications for the study of host-parasite coevolution. Recent experimental studies have confirmed phage-host coevolutionary dynamics in the laboratory and have shown that coevolution can increase parasite virulence, specialization, adaptation, and diversity. Genetically, coevolution frequently proceeds in a manner best described by the Gene for Gene model, typified by arms race dynamics, but certain contexts can result in Red Queen dynamics according to the Matching Alleles model. Although some features appear to apply only to phage-bacteria systems, other results are broadly generalizable and apply to all instances of antagonistic coevolution. With laboratory host-parasite coevolutionary studies, we can better understand the perplexing array of interactions that characterize organismal diversity in the wild.

  13. Strain diversity and phage resistance in complex dairy starter cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spus, M.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Smid, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The compositional stability of the complex Gouda cheese starter culture Ur is thought to be influenced by diversity in phage resistance of highly related strains that co-exist together with bacteriophages. To analyze the role of bacteriophages in maintaining culture diversity at the level of genetic

  14. Kullback Leibler divergence in complete bacterial and phage genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sajia; Aziz, Ramy K; Kashef, Mona T; Ibrahim, Eslam S; Bailey, Barbara; Edwards, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid content of the proteins encoded by a genome may predict the coding potential of that genome and may reflect lifestyle restrictions of the organism. Here, we calculated the Kullback-Leibler divergence from the mean amino acid content as a metric to compare the amino acid composition for a large set of bacterial and phage genome sequences. Using these data, we demonstrate that (i) there is a significant difference between amino acid utilization in different phylogenetic groups of bacteria and phages; (ii) many of the bacteria with the most skewed amino acid utilization profiles, or the bacteria that host phages with the most skewed profiles, are endosymbionts or parasites; (iii) the skews in the distribution are not restricted to certain metabolic processes but are common across all bacterial genomic subsystems; (iv) amino acid utilization profiles strongly correlate with GC content in bacterial genomes but very weakly correlate with the G+C percent in phage genomes. These findings might be exploited to distinguish coding from non-coding sequences in large data sets, such as metagenomic sequence libraries, to help in prioritizing subsequent analyses.

  15. Characterization of constitutive and putative differentially expressed mRNAs by means of expressed sequence tags, differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR from the sand fly vector Lutzomyia longipalpis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Ramalho-Ortigão

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular studies of insect disease vectors are of paramount importance for understanding parasite-vector relationship. Advances in this area have led to important findings regarding changes in vectors' physiology upon blood feeding and parasite infection. Mechanisms for interfering with the vectorial capacity of insects responsible for the transmission of diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease and dengue fever are being devised with the ultimate goal of developing transgenic insects. A primary necessity for this goal is information on gene expression and control in the target insect. Our group is investigating molecular aspects of the interaction between Leishmania parasites and Lutzomyia sand flies. As an initial step in our studies we have used random sequencing of cDNA clones from two expression libraries made from head/thorax and abdomen of sugar fed L. longipalpis for the identification of expressed sequence tags (EST. We applied differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR to characterize differentially expressed mRNA from sugar and blood fed insects, and, in one case, from a L. (V. braziliensis-infected L. longipalpis. We identified 37 cDNAs that have shown homology to known sequences from GeneBank. Of these, 32 cDNAs code for constitutive proteins such as zinc finger protein, glutamine synthetase, G binding protein, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Three are putative differentially expressed cDNAs from blood fed and Leishmania-infected midgut, a chitinase, a V-ATPase and a MAP kinase. Finally, two sequences are homologous to Drosophila melanogaster gene products recently discovered through the Drosophila genome initiative.

  16. Handbook of display technology

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Joseph A

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive review of technical and commercial aspects of display technology. It provides design engineers with the information needed to select proper technology for new products. The book focuses on flat, thin displays such as light-emitting diodes, plasma display panels, and liquid crystal displays, but it also includes material on cathode ray tubes. Displays include a large number of products from televisions, auto dashboards, radios, and household appliances, to gasoline pumps, heart monitors, microwave ovens, and more.For more information on display tech

  17. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    and bacterium was most prevalent in the kidney and spleen, with only minor occurrence in the brain. The experiment showed that injected phages were rapidly spread in the internal organs of the fish, also in the absence of bacteria. Parallel examination of the regulation of bacteriophage infectivity...... in controlled laboratory experiments at various environmental conditions showed that pH had only minor effects on long-term (3 months) phage infectivity within a pH range of 4.5 to 7.5, whereas phage infectivity was immediately lost at pH 3. In the absence of host cells, phage infectivity decreased by a factor...

  18. A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J O'Hara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae-specific bacteriophages are common features of the microbial community during cholera infection in humans. Phages impose strong selective pressure that favors the expansion of phage-resistant strains over their vulnerable counterparts. The mechanisms allowing virulent V. cholerae strains to defend against the ubiquitous threat of predatory phages have not been established. Here, we show that V. cholerae PLEs (phage-inducible chromosomal island-like elements are widespread genomic islands dedicated to phage defense. Analysis of V. cholerae isolates spanning a 60-year collection period identified five unique PLEs. Remarkably, we found that all PLEs (regardless of geographic or temporal origin respond to infection by a myovirus called ICP1, the most prominent V. cholerae phage found in cholera patient stool samples from Bangladesh. We found that PLE activity reduces phage genome replication and accelerates cell lysis following ICP1 infection, killing infected host cells and preventing the production of progeny phage. PLEs are mobilized by ICP1 infection and can spread to neighboring cells such that protection from phage predation can be horizontally acquired. Our results reveal that PLEs are a persistent feature of the V. cholerae mobilome that are adapted to providing protection from a single predatory phage and advance our understanding of how phages influence pathogen evolution.

  19. A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Brendan J.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae-specific bacteriophages are common features of the microbial community during cholera infection in humans. Phages impose strong selective pressure that favors the expansion of phage-resistant strains over their vulnerable counterparts. The mechanisms allowing virulent V. cholerae strains to defend against the ubiquitous threat of predatory phages have not been established. Here, we show that V. cholerae PLEs (phage-inducible chromosomal island-like elements) are widespread genomic islands dedicated to phage defense. Analysis of V. cholerae isolates spanning a 60-year collection period identified five unique PLEs. Remarkably, we found that all PLEs (regardless of geographic or temporal origin) respond to infection by a myovirus called ICP1, the most prominent V. cholerae phage found in cholera patient stool samples from Bangladesh. We found that PLE activity reduces phage genome replication and accelerates cell lysis following ICP1 infection, killing infected host cells and preventing the production of progeny phage. PLEs are mobilized by ICP1 infection and can spread to neighboring cells such that protection from phage predation can be horizontally acquired. Our results reveal that PLEs are a persistent feature of the V. cholerae mobilome that are adapted to providing protection from a single predatory phage and advance our understanding of how phages influence pathogen evolution. PMID:28594826

  20. Significance of phage-host interactions for biocontrol of Campylobacter jejuni in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athina, Zampara; Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Elsser-Gravesen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Poultry meat is the main source of Campylobacter jejuni foodborne disease. Currently, no effective control measures prevent C. jejuni from contaminating poultry meat. However, post-harvest phage treatment is a promising biocontrol strategy that has not yet been explored. Here we identified phages....... A thorough understanding of phage-host interactions is prerequisite to further advance phage application as a post-harvest biocontrol strategy against C. jejuni....... most effective phages (F356 showing 0.49 and F357 showing 0.55 log reductions, respectively) led to a 0.73 log reduction of C. jejuni on artificially contaminated chicken skin. Our study shows that poly-phage treatment at 5 °C can be more effective against C. jejuni compared to single phage application...

  1. Lunar Sample Display Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA provides a number of lunar samples for display at museums, planetariums, and scientific expositions around the world. Lunar displays are open to the public....

  2. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  3. Effect of Exopolysaccharides on Phage-Host Interactions in Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Hélène; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Moineau, Sylvain

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we report that Lactococcus lactis strains producing exopolysaccharides (EPS) are sensitive to virulent phages. Eight distinct lytic phages (Q61 to Q68) specifically infecting Eps+ strains were isolated in 47 buttermilk samples obtained from 13 North American factories. The eight phages were classified within the 936 species by the multiplex PCR method, indicating that these phages are not fundamentally distinct from those infecting Eps− L. lactis strains. The host range of these phages was determined with 19 Lactococcus strains, including 7 Eps+ and 12 Eps− cultures. Three phages (Q62, Q63, and Q64) attacked only the Eps+ strain SMQ-419, whereas the five other phages (Q61, Q65, Q66, Q67, and Q68) infected only the Eps+ strain SMQ-420. The five other Eps+ strains (H414, MLT2, MLT3, SMQ-461, and SMQ-575) as well as the 12 Eps− strains were insensitive to these phages. The monosaccharide composition of the polymer produced by the seven Eps+ strains was determined. The EPS produced by strains MLT3, SMQ-419, and SMQ-575 contained glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. The EPS fabricated by H414 contained only galactose. The EPS made by MLT2, SMQ-420, and SMQ-461 contained glucose and galactose. These findings indicate that the sugar composition of the EPS has no effect on phage sensitivity. The plasmid encoding the eps operon was cured from the two phage-sensitive strains. The cured derivatives were still phage sensitive, which indicates that EPS are not necessary for phage infection. Phage adsorption assays showed that the production of EPS does not confer a significant phage resistance phenotype. PMID:12200288

  4. PhiSiGns: an online tool to identify signature genes in phages and design PCR primers for examining phage diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwivedi Bhakti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages (viruses that infect bacteria have gained significant attention because of their abundance, diversity and important ecological roles. However, the lack of a universal gene shared by all phages presents a challenge for phage identification and characterization, especially in environmental samples where it is difficult to culture phage-host systems. Homologous conserved genes (or "signature genes" present in groups of closely-related phages can be used to explore phage diversity and define evolutionary relationships amongst these phages. Bioinformatic approaches are needed to identify candidate signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify those genes from environmental samples; however, there is currently no existing computational tool that biologists can use for this purpose. Results Here we present PhiSiGns, a web-based and standalone application that performs a pairwise comparison of each gene present in user-selected phage genomes, identifies signature genes, generates alignments of these genes, and designs potential PCR primer pairs. PhiSiGns is available at (http://www.phantome.org/phisigns/; http://phisigns.sourceforge.net/ with a link to the source code. Here we describe the specifications of PhiSiGns and demonstrate its application with a case study. Conclusions PhiSiGns provides phage biologists with a user-friendly tool to identify signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify related genes from uncultured phages in environmental samples. This bioinformatics tool will facilitate the development of novel signature genes for use as molecular markers in studies of phage diversity, phylogeny, and evolution.

  5. Characterization of JG024, a pseudomonas aeruginosa PB1-like broad host range phage under simulated infection conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes lung infections in patients suffering from the genetic disorder Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Once a chronic lung infection is established, P. aeruginosa cannot be eradicated by antibiotic treatment. Phage therapy is an alternative to treat these chronic P. aeruginosa infections. However, little is known about the factors which influence phage infection of P. aeruginosa under infection conditions and suitable broad host range phages. Results We isolated and characterized a phage, named JG024, which infects a broad range of clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains. Sequencing of the phage genome revealed that the phage JG024 is highly related to the ubiquitous and conserved PB1-like phages. The receptor of phage JG024 was determined as lipopolysaccharide. We used an artificial sputum medium to study phage infection under conditions similar to a chronic lung infection. Alginate production was identified as a factor reducing phage infectivity. Conclusions Phage JG024 is a suitable broad host range phage which could be used in phage therapy. Phage infection experiments under simulated chronic lung infection conditions showed that alginate production reduces phage infection efficiency.

  6. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration.

  7. Comparative genomic and morphological analyses of Listeria phages isolated from farm environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Thomas; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk C

    2014-08-01

    The genus Listeria is ubiquitous in the environment and includes the globally important food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. While the genomic diversity of Listeria has been well studied, considerably less is known about the genomic and morphological diversity of Listeria bacteriophages. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 14 Listeria phages isolated mostly from New York dairy farm environments as well as one related Enterococcus faecalis phage to obtain information on genome characteristics and diversity. We also examined 12 of the phages by electron microscopy to characterize their morphology. These Listeria phages, based on gene orthology and morphology, together with previously sequenced Listeria phages could be classified into five orthoclusters, including one novel orthocluster. One orthocluster (orthocluster I) consists of large genome (~135-kb) myoviruses belonging to the genus “Twort-like viruses,” three orthoclusters (orthoclusters II to IV) contain small-genome (36- to 43-kb) siphoviruses with icosahedral heads, and the novel orthocluster V contains medium-sized-genome (~66-kb) siphoviruses with elongated heads. A novel orthocluster (orthocluster VI) of E. faecalis phages, with medium-sized genomes (~56 kb), was identified, which grouped together and shares morphological features with the novel Listeria phage orthocluster V. This new group of phages (i.e., orthoclusters V and VI) is composed of putative lytic phages that may prove to be useful in phage-based applications for biocontrol, detection, and therapeutic purposes.

  8. Phage Encoded H-NS: A Potential Achilles Heel in the Bacterial Defence System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skennerton, Connor T.; Angly, Florent E.; Breitbart, Mya; Bragg, Lauren; He, Shaomei; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between phage and their microbial hosts is difficult to elucidate in complex natural ecosystems. Engineered systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), offer stable, lower complexity communities for studying phage-host interactions. Here, metagenomic data from an EBPR reactor dominated by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (CAP), led to the recovery of three complete and six partial phage genomes. Heat-stable nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein, a global transcriptional repressor in bacteria, was identified in one of the complete phage genomes (EPV1), and was most similar to a homolog in CAP. We infer that EPV1 is a CAP-specific phage and has the potential to repress up to 6% of host genes based on the presence of putative H-NS binding sites in the CAP genome. These genes include CRISPR associated proteins and a Type III restriction-modification system, which are key host defense mechanisms against phage infection. Further, EPV1 was the only member of the phage community found in an EBPR microbial metagenome collected seven months prior. We propose that EPV1 laterally acquired H-NS from CAP providing it with a means to reduce bacterial defenses, a selective advantage over other phage in the EBPR system. Phage encoded H-NS could constitute a previously unrecognized weapon in the phage-host arms race. PMID:21625595

  9. Phage encoded H-NS: a potential achilles heel in the bacterial defence system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor T Skennerton

    Full Text Available The relationship between phage and their microbial hosts is difficult to elucidate in complex natural ecosystems. Engineered systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR, offer stable, lower complexity communities for studying phage-host interactions. Here, metagenomic data from an EBPR reactor dominated by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (CAP, led to the recovery of three complete and six partial phage genomes. Heat-stable nucleoid structuring (H-NS protein, a global transcriptional repressor in bacteria, was identified in one of the complete phage genomes (EPV1, and was most similar to a homolog in CAP. We infer that EPV1 is a CAP-specific phage and has the potential to repress up to 6% of host genes based on the presence of putative H-NS binding sites in the CAP genome. These genes include CRISPR associated proteins and a Type III restriction-modification system, which are key host defense mechanisms against phage infection. Further, EPV1 was the only member of the phage community found in an EBPR microbial metagenome collected seven months prior. We propose that EPV1 laterally acquired H-NS from CAP providing it with a means to reduce bacterial defenses, a selective advantage over other phage in the EBPR system. Phage encoded H-NS could constitute a previously unrecognized weapon in the phage-host arms race.

  10. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  11. Combinatorial synthesis and screening of cancer cell-specific nanomedicines targeted via phage fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Gillespie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Active tumor targeting of nanomedicines has recently shown significant improvements in the therapeutic activity of currently existing drug delivery systems, such as liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx/Lipodox. Previously, we have shown that isolated pVIII major coat proteins of the fd tet filamentous phage vector, containing cancer cell-specific peptide fusions at their N terminus, can be used as active targeting ligands in a liposomal doxorubicin delivery system in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show a novel major coat protein isolation procedure in 2-propanol that allows spontaneous incorporation of the hydrophobic protein core into preformed liposomal doxorubicin with minimal damage or drug loss while still retaining the targeting ligand exposed for cell-specific targeting. Using a panel of 12 structurally unique ligands with specificity towards breast, lung, and/or pancreatic cancer, we showed the feasibility of pVIII major coat proteins to significantly increase the throughput of targeting ligand screening in a common nanomedicine core. Phage protein-modified Lipodox samples showed an average doxorubicin recovery of 82.8% across all samples with 100% of protein incorporation in the correct orientation (N-terminus exposed. Following cytotoxicity screening in a doxorubicin-sensitive breast cancer line (MCF-7, three major groups of ligands were identified. Ligands showing the most improved cytotoxicity included: DMPGTVLP, ANGRPSMT, VNGRAEAP, and ANDVYLD showing a 25-fold improvement (p < 0.05 in toxicity. Similarly DGQYLGSQ, ETYNQPYL, and GSSEQLYL ligands with specificity towards a doxorubicin-insensitive pancreatic cancer line (PANC-1 showed significant increases in toxicity (2-fold; p < 0.05. Thus, we demonstrated proof-of-concept that pVIII major coat proteins can be screened in significantly higher throughput to identify novel ligands displaying improved therapeutic activity in a desired cancer phenotype.

  12. Combinatorial synthesis and screening of cancer cell-specific nanomedicines targeted via phage fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, James W.; Gross, Amanda L.; Puzyrev, Anatoliy T.; Bedi, Deepa; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    Active tumor targeting of nanomedicines has recently shown significant improvements in the therapeutic activity of currently existing drug delivery systems, such as liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx/Lipodox). Previously, we have shown that isolated pVIII major coat proteins of the fd-tet filamentous phage vector, containing cancer cell-specific peptide fusions at their N-terminus, can be used as active targeting ligands in a liposomal doxorubicin delivery system in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show a novel major coat protein isolation procedure in 2-propanol that allows spontaneous incorporation of the hydrophobic protein core into preformed liposomal doxorubicin with minimal damage or drug loss while still retaining the targeting ligand exposed for cell-specific targeting. Using a panel of 12 structurally unique ligands with specificity toward breast, lung, and/or pancreatic cancer, we showed the feasibility of pVIII major coat proteins to significantly increase the throughput of targeting ligand screening in a common nanomedicine core. Phage protein-modified Lipodox samples showed an average doxorubicin recovery of 82.8% across all samples with 100% of protein incorporation in the correct orientation (N-terminus exposed). Following cytotoxicity screening in a doxorubicin-sensitive breast cancer line (MCF-7), three major groups of ligands were identified. Ligands showing the most improved cytotoxicity included: DMPGTVLP, ANGRPSMT, VNGRAEAP, and ANDVYLD showing a 25-fold improvement (p < 0.05) in toxicity. Similarly DGQYLGSQ, ETYNQPYL, and GSSEQLYL ligands with specificity toward a doxorubicin-insensitive pancreatic cancer line (PANC-1) showed significant increases in toxicity (2-fold; p < 0.05). Thus, we demonstrated proof-of-concept that pVIII major coat proteins can be screened in significantly higher throughput to identify novel ligands displaying improved therapeutic activity in a desired cancer phenotype. PMID:26157433

  13. Displaying gray shades in liquid crystal displays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These transistors act as a switch to charge and hold the desired voltage across a pixel. Passive matrix LCDs are easy to fabricate and cost less as compared to the active matrix LCDs. Current trend demands gray scale and colour capa- bilities even for the displays in mobile phones. Passive matrix LCDs will be preferred as.

  14. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bradde, Serena; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a "winner-take-all" scenario, leading to a specialized spacer ...

  15. Zinc binding to lambda phage DNA studied by voltammetric techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Jurandir R. de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Binding of zinc to lambda phage DNA was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. These methods rely on the direct monitoring of reduction and oxidation current of zinc in the absence and presence of this virion DNA. Titration graphs of Zn2+ with DNA were obtained in the concentration ranges from 3.57 x 10-12 to 3.92 x 10-11 mol L-1 and 6.97 x 10-12 to 5.56 x 10-11 mol L-1. These data were used to calculate the dissociation constant of the complex and the stoichiometry. The mechanism of this reaction was studied by cyclic voltammetry through curves I (oxidation current of Zn2+ versus v½ (square root of scan rate. These curves showed that the oxidation-reduction process of Zn2+ was not controlled by diffusion in the presence of lambda phage DNA.

  16. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  17. OLED displays and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Koden, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have emerged as the leading technology for the new display and lighting market. OLEDs are solid-state devices composed of thin films of organic molecules that create light with the application of electricity. OLEDs can provide brighter, crisper displays on electronic devices and use less power than conventional light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or liquid crystal displays (LCDs) used today. This book covers both the fundamentals and practical applications of flat and flexible OLEDs.

  18. Displaying Data As Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  19. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  20. Intragenus generalized transduction in Staphylococcus spp. by a novel giant phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Jumpei; Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Gamoh, Keiji; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Daibata, Masanori; Ujihara, Takako; Misawa, Naoaki; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriophage (phage)-mediated generalized transduction is expected to contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant staphylococcal clones in various environments. In this study, novel phage S6 was isolated from sewage and used to test generalized transduction in human- and animal-derived staphylococci. Phage S6 was a novel type of giant myophage, which possessed a DNA genome that contained uracil instead of thymine, and it could infect all of the tested staphylococcal species. The phage S6 appeared to be similar to the transducing phage PBS1, which infects Bacillus spp. Moreover, phage S6 facilitated the transduction of a plasmid in Staphylococcus aureus and from S. aureus to non-aureus staphylococcal species, as well as vice versa. Transduction of methicillin resistance also occurred in S. aureus. This is the first report of successful intragenus generalized transduction among staphylococci.

  1. The phage-host arms race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Adi [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics; Sorek, Rotem [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics

    2010-10-26

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. In this paper, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. Finally, the commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel forms of these mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  2. Isolation of Dermatophilus congolensis phage from the 'lumpy wool' of sheep in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, K M; Kurtböke, D I; Lindsay, D R

    1995-04-01

    A lytic phage with species-specific activity was isolated from wool samples infected with the actinomycete Dermatophilus congolensis, the agent of 'lumpy wool', collected from properties in Western Australia. The physiochemical properties, plaque morphology, host range and particle morphology of the phage isolated were characterized. The isolated phage reduced the cell numbers of Dermatophilus congolensis on infected wool samples in vitro. It may therefore have potential as a biocontrol agent of dermatophilosis.

  3. In vitro management of hospital Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using indigenous T7-like lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tamboli, Nilofer; Thorat, Kiran; Kulkarni, Rajendra; Ackermann, Hans; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen capable of forming biofilm and contaminating medical settings, is responsible for 65% mortality in the hospitals all over the world. This study was undertaken to isolate lytic phages against biofilm forming Ps. aeruginosa hospital isolates and to use them for in vitro management of biofilms in the microtiter plate. Multidrug resistant strains of Ps. aeruginosa were isolated from the hospital environment in and around Pimpri-Chinchwad, Maharashtra by standard microbiological methods. Lytic phages against these strains were isolated from the Pavana river water by double agar layer plaque assay method. A wide host range phage bacterial virus Ps. aeruginosa phage (BVPaP-3) was selected. Electron microscopy revealed that BVPaP-3 phage is a T7-like phage and is a relative of phage species gh-1. A phage at MOI-0.001 could prevent biofilm formation by Ps. aeruginosa hospital strain-6(HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. It could also disperse pre-formed biofilms of all hospital isolates (HS1-HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. Dispersion of biofilm was studied by monitoring log percent reduction in cfu and log percent increase in pfu of respective bacterium and phage on the peg as well as in the well. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that phage BVPaP-3 indeed causes biofilm reduction and bacterial cell killing. Laboratory studies prove that BVPaP-3 is a highly efficient phage in preventing and dispersing biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa. Phage BVPaP-3 can be used as biological disinfectant to control biofilm problem in medical devices.

  4. Development of expanded host range phage active on biofilms of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Abigail C.; Trautner, Barbara W.; Liao, Kershena S.; Ramig, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phage therapy is a promising treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections but is limited by the narrow host range of phage. To overcome this limitation, we developed a host range expansion (HRE) protocol that expands the host range of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-specific phage by cycles of co-incubation of phage with multiple P. aeruginosa strains. Application of the HRE protocol to a mixture of 4 phages, using 16 P. aeruginosa strains for development, resulted in undefined phage mixtures with greatly expanded host range. Individual phage clones derived from the undefined mixture had expanded host ranges but no individual clone could lyse all of the strains covered by the undefined mixture from which it was isolated. Reconstituting host range-characterized clones into cocktails produced defined cocktails with predictable and broad host ranges. The undefined mixture from the 30th cycle of the mixed-phage HRE (4ϕC30) showed a dose-dependent ability to prevent biofilm formation by, and to reduce a pre-existing biofilm of, 3 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that produced high amounts of biofilm. A defined cocktail reconstituted from 3 host range-characterized clones had activity on high biofilm-formers susceptible to the phage. Phage therapy was superior to antibiotic therapy (levofloxacin) in a strain of P. aeruginosa that was resistant to levofloxacin. The HRE protocol establishes a rapid approach to create libraries of phage clones and phage cocktails with broad host range, defined composition and anti-biofilm activity. PMID:27144083

  5. Helmet-Mounted Displays (HMD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Helmet-Mounted Display labis responsible for monocular HMD day display evaluations; monocular HMD night vision performance processes; binocular HMD day display...

  6. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  7. Jet printing flexible displays

    OpenAIRE

    Street, R. A.; Wong, W S; Ready, S. E.; Chabinyc, M.L; Arias, A.C.; Limb, S.; Salleo, A; Lujan, R.

    2006-01-01

    Jet printing is an interesting patterning technique for electronic devices because it requires no physical mask, has digital control of ejection, and provides good layer-to-layer registration. It also has the potential to reduce display manufacturing costs and enable roll-to-roll processing. The technique is illustrated with examples of prototype printed displays using amorphous silicon and polymer semiconductors.

  8. Standardizing visual display quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besuijen, J.; Spenkelink, G.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The current ISO 9241–3 standard for visual display quality and the proposed user performance tests are reviewed. The standard is found to be more engineering than ergonomic and problems with system configuration, software applications, display settings, user behaviour, wear and physical environment

  9. Tales of diversity: Genomic and morphological characteristics of forty-six Arthrobacter phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Klyczek

    Full Text Available The vast bacteriophage population harbors an immense reservoir of genetic information. Almost 2000 phage genomes have been sequenced from phages infecting hosts in the phylum Actinobacteria, and analysis of these genomes reveals substantial diversity, pervasive mosaicism, and novel mechanisms for phage replication and lysogeny. Here, we describe the isolation and genomic characterization of 46 phages from environmental samples at various geographic locations in the U.S. infecting a single Arthrobacter sp. strain. These phages include representatives of all three virion morphologies, and Jasmine is the first sequenced podovirus of an actinobacterial host. The phages also span considerable sequence diversity, and can be grouped into 10 clusters according to their nucleotide diversity, and two singletons each with no close relatives. However, the clusters/singletons appear to be genomically well separated from each other, and relatively few genes are shared between clusters. Genome size varies from among the smallest of siphoviral phages (15,319 bp to over 70 kbp, and G+C contents range from 45-68%, compared to 63.4% for the host genome. Although temperate phages are common among other actinobacterial hosts, these Arthrobacter phages are primarily lytic, and only the singleton Galaxy is likely temperate.

  10. Activation and Transfer of the Chromosomal Phage Resistance Mechanism AbiV in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, J.; Moineau, S.; Hammer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    AbiV is a chromosomally encoded phage resistance mechanism that is silent in the wild-type phage-sensitive strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363. Spontaneous phage-resistant mutants of L. lactis MG1363 were analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR and shown to express AbiV. This expression...... was related to a reorganization in the upstream region of abiV. Transfer of abiV between two lactococcal strains, most likely by conjugation, was also demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural transfer of a chromosomally encoded phage resistance mechanism....

  11. Surface topological differences of phage infected uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains, revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Bassamah; Jamil, Nusrat; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an advance microscopic technique that provides three dimensional structures of cell surfaces with high resolution. In the present study AFM was used for comparative analysis of surface topology of phage infected and uninfected Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cells. Two UPEC strains NE and HN were isolated from urine samples of Urinary tract infection patients and their specific narrow host range lytic phages 3S and HNΦ were isolated from the sewage of different areas. On the basis of one step growth curve both phages characterized as short latent period phages with latency period of about 30 min. On AFM analysis significant difference in topology of healthy and infected cells were observed. It was hypothesized that progeny of both lytic phages released out from their respective host cells in different manner. The image of 3S infected UPEC host cells (NE) revealed multiple internal projections which showed progeny phages released out from host cells through these multiple sites. Whereas images of HNΦ infected HN host cells showed central depression which illustrated that new phages released out through single exit point from the middle of cell. These results are significant to extend future studies on isolated phages as an effective tool for phage therapy.

  12. Phage Therapy Is Effective in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Equine Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Takaaki; Iwano, Hidetomo; Hiyashimizu, Yutaro; Matsubara, Kazuki; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Nagahata, Hajime; Niwa, Hidekazu; Katayama, Yoshinari; Kinoshita, Yuta; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Tanji, Yasunori; Yokota, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial keratitis of the horse is mainly caused by staphylococci, streptococci, and pseudomonads. Of these bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa sometimes causes rapid corneal corruption and, in some cases, blindness. Antimicrobial resistance can make treatment very difficult. Therefore, new strategies to control bacterial infection are required. A bacteriophage (phage) is a virus that specifically infects and kills bacteria. Since phage often can lyse antibiotic-resistant bacteria because the killing mechanism is different, we examined the use of phage to treat horse bacterial keratitis. We isolated Myoviridae or Podoviridae phages, which together have a broad host range. They adsorb efficiently to host bacteria; more than 80% of the ΦR18 phage were adsorbed to host cells after 30 s. In our keratitis mouse model, the administration of phage within 3 h also could kill bacteria and suppress keratitis. A phage multiplicity of infection of 100 times the host bacterial number could kill host bacteria effectively. A cocktail of two phages suppressed bacteria in the keratitis model mouse. These data demonstrated that the phages in this study could completely prevent the keratitis caused by P. aeruginosa in a keratitis mouse model. Furthermore, these results suggest that phage may be a more effective prophylaxis for horse keratitis than the current preventive use of antibiotics. Such treatment may reduce the use of antibiotics and therefore antibiotic resistance. Further studies are required to assess phage therapy as a candidate for treatment of horse keratitis. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging all over the world. Bacteriophages have great potential for resolution of this problem. A bacteriophage, or phage, is a virus that infects bacteria specifically. As a novel therapeutic strategy against racehorse keratitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we propose the application of phages for treatment. Phages isolated in this work had in vitro effectiveness for a broad

  13. Novel phage-based bio-processing of pathogenic Escherichia coli and its biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, S A A; Abdulamir, A S; Abu Bakar, F

    2012-01-01

    To explore new approaches of phage-based bio-process of specifically pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria in food products within a short period. One hundred and forty highly lytic designed coliphages were used. Escherichia coli naturally contaminated and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli experimentally inoculated samples of lettuce, cabbage, meat, and egg were used. In addition, experimentally produced biofilms of E. coli were tested. A phage concentration of 10(3) PFU/ml was used for food products immersion, and for spraying of food products, 10(5) PFU/ml of a phage cocktail was used by applying a 20-s optimal dipping time in a phage cocktail. Food samples were cut into pieces and were either sprayed with or held in a bag immersed in lambda buffer containing a cocktail of 140 phages. Phage bio-processing was successful in eliminating completely E. coli in all processed samples after 48 h storage at 4°C. Partial elimination of E. coli was observed in earlier storage periods (7 and 18 h) at 24° and 37°C. Moreover, E. coli biofilms were reduced >3 log cycles upon using the current phage bio-processing. The use of a phage cocktail of 140 highly lytic designed phages proved highly effective in suppressing E. coli contaminating food products. Proper decontamination/prevention methods of pathogenic E. coli achieved in this study can replace the current chemically less effective decontamination methods.

  14. On-demand isolation of bacteriophages against drug-resistant bacteria for personalized phage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari eMattila

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains was found to be very difficult.

  15. On-Demand Isolation of Bacteriophages Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria for Personalized Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains was found to be very difficult.

  16. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe.

  17. Phage morphology recapitulates phylogeny: the comparative genomics of a new group of myoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M Comeau

    Full Text Available Among dsDNA tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales, members of the Myoviridae family have the most sophisticated virion design that includes a complex contractile tail structure. The Myoviridae generally have larger genomes than the other phage families. Relatively few "dwarf" myoviruses, those with a genome size of less than 50 kb such as those of the Mu group, have been analyzed in extenso. Here we report on the genome sequencing and morphological characterization of a new group of such phages that infect a diverse range of Proteobacteria, namely Aeromonas salmonicida phage 56, Vibrio cholerae phages 138 and CP-T1, Bdellovibrio phage φ1422, and Pectobacterium carotovorum phage ZF40. This group of dwarf myoviruses shares an identical virion morphology, characterized by usually short contractile tails, and have genome sizes of approximately 45 kb. Although their genome sequences are variable in their lysogeny, replication, and host adaption modules, presumably reflecting differing lifestyles and hosts, their structural and morphogenesis modules have been evolutionarily constrained by their virion morphology. Comparative genomic analysis reveals that these phages, along with related prophage genomes, form a new coherent group within the Myoviridae. The results presented in this communication support the hypothesis that the diversity of phages may be more structured than generally believed and that the innumerable phages in the biosphere all belong to discrete lineages or families.

  18. Identification of operator sites of the CI repressor of phage TP901-1: evolutionary link to other phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.H.; Brøndsted, L.; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    The repressor encoded by the cI gene of the temperate Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris bacteriophage TP901-1 has been purified. Gel-retardation and footprinting analyses identified three palindromic operator sites (O-R, O-L, and O-D). The operator site O-R is located between the two divergent e...... of these repeats on the phage genomes correspond to those found in TP901-1, indicating that the same system of cooperative repression of early phage promoters has been inherited by modular evolution.......The repressor encoded by the cI gene of the temperate Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris bacteriophage TP901-1 has been purified. Gel-retardation and footprinting analyses identified three palindromic operator sites (O-R, O-L, and O-D). The operator site O-R is located between the two divergent...... forms of the repressor were observed, thus indicating that the repressor may bind simultaneously to all three operator sites. Inverted repeats with homology to the operator sites of TP901-1 were identified in phage genomes encoding repressors homologous to CI of TP901-1. Interestingly, the locations...

  19. Visual merchandising window display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opris (Cas. Stanila M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Window display plays a major part in the selling strategies; it does not only include the simple display of goods, nowadays it is a form of art, also having the purpose of sustaining the brand image. This article wants to reveal the tools that are essential in creating a fabulous window display. Being a window designer is not an easy job, you have to always think ahead trends, to have a sense of colour, to know how to use light to attract customers in the store after only one glance at the window. The big store window displays are theatre scenes: with expensive backgrounds, special effects and high fashion mannequins. The final role of the displays is to convince customers to enter the store and trigger the purchasing act which is the final goal of the retail activity.

  20. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  1. The dilemma of phage taxonomy illustrated by comparative genomics of Sfi21-like Siphoviridae in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proux, Caroline; van Sinderen, Douwe; Suarez, Juan; Garcia, Pilar; Ladero, Victor; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Desiere, Frank; Brüssow, Harald

    2002-11-01

    The complete genome sequences of two dairy phages, Streptococcus thermophilus phage 7201 and Lactobacillus casei phage A2, are reported. Comparative genomics reveals that both phages are members of the recently proposed Sfi21-like genus of Siphoviridae, a widely distributed phage type in low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria. Graded relatedness, the hallmark of evolving biological systems, was observed when different Sfi21-like phages were compared. Across the structural module, the graded relatedness was represented by a high level of DNA sequence similarity or protein sequence similarity, or a shared gene map in the absence of sequence relatedness. This varying range of relatedness was found within Sfi21-like phages from a single species as demonstrated by the different prophages harbored by Lactococcus lactis strain IL1403. A systematic dot plot analysis with 11 complete L. lactis phage genome sequences revealed a clear separation of all temperate phages from two classes of virulent phages. The temperate lactococcal phages share DNA sequence homology in a patchwise fashion over the nonstructural gene cluster. With respect to structural genes, four DNA homology groups could be defined within temperate L. lactis phages. Closely related structural modules for all four DNA homology groups were detected in phages from Streptococcus or Listeria, suggesting that they represent distinct evolutionary lineages that have not uniquely evolved in L. lactis. It seems reasonable to base phage taxonomy on data from comparative genomics. However, the peculiar modular nature of phage evolution creates ambiguities in the definition of phage taxa by comparative genomics. For example, depending on the module on which the classification is based, temperate lactococcal phages can be classified as a single phage species, as four distinct phage species, or as two if not three different phage genera. We propose to base phage taxonomy on comparative genomics of a single structural gene

  2. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong Wook; Kim, Chun Tae; Oh, Jin Woo [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  3. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang-Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook; Kim, Chuntae; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  4. Color Display Design Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    and G. M. Corso , "Color flcsearch for Visuz’l Displays, Technical Report No. ONH-CR2l3-102-3, July 1975, 108 pp. 45 1 Results of two code comparison...respective- ly. Since the display elements constitute routine or non-priority informatica , all display information would be coded green if the three-color...1963, with Amendment 1, 30 September 1971. U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC. 27. Christ, R.E. and G.M. Corso . "Color Research for Visual

  5. Small - Display Cartography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Flemming; Hvas, Anders; Münster-Swendsen, Jørgen

    This report comprises the work carried out in the work-package of small display cartography. The work-package has aimed at creating a general framework for the small-display cartography. A solid framework facilitates an increased use of spatial data in mobile devices - thus enabling, together...... Service Communication and finally, Part IV: Concluding remarks and topics for further research on small-display cartography. Part II includes a separate Appendix D consisting of a cartographic design specification. Part III includes a separate Appendix C consisting of a schema specification, a separate...

  6. Morphological characterization and biocontrol effects of Vibrio vulnificus phages against Vibriosis in the shrimp aquaculture environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Pappu; Ramasamy, Palaniappan

    2017-10-01

    The re-emerging field of phage therapy is the potential biocontrol agents for the transfer of virulence factor and to kill their bacterial hosts. In this study, the lytic Vibrio vulnificus phages were studied to provide a better understanding of phage-host interactions and development of phage therapy. Four new V. vulnificus phages were detected from shrimp aquaculture system, named VV1, VV2, VV3 and VV4. All lytic V. vulnificus phages are the Tectiviruses of the family Tectiviridae with typical double layered elongated icosahedral head and tailless morphology. Lytic V. vulnificus phages which infect other Vibrio isolates were further characterized by long term storage, enzymes treatment, organic solvents treatment, detergents treatment, pH stability, temperature stability, agar bioassay method and one-step growth experiment. The effects of chloroform, acetone, ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, ribonuclease (RNase), trypsin, protease, Triton-X100 treatments were not affected the growth of VV1, VV2, VV3 and VV4 phages. These phages (VV1-VV4) were inactivated completely with temperature (over 60 °C), pH (12), lysozyme and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatment. One-step growth experiments indicated that the latent period was at 3 h and burst size was at 37 °C. Agar bioassay method indicated that the percentage of inhibition was 75% (VV1) and 70% (VV2, VV3 & VV4), respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis of all V. vulnificus phages had similar protein patterns with molecular weight masses of 260, 249, 204, 148, 63, 59, 22 and 15 kDa. Hence, it could be concluded that V. vulnificus phage had a broad lytic spectrum and potential biocontrol of luminous Vibriosis in the shrimp aquaculture system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diversity and distribution of single-stranded DNA phages in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kimberly P; Parsons, Rachel; Symonds, Erin M; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of marine phages is highly biased toward double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phages; however, recent metagenomic surveys have also identified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages in the oceans. Here, we describe two complete ssDNA phage genomes that were reconstructed from a viral metagenome from 80 m depth at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site in the northwestern Sargasso Sea and examine their spatial and temporal distributions. Both genomes (SARssφ1 and SARssφ2) exhibited similarity to known phages of the Microviridae family in terms of size, GC content, genome organization and protein sequence. PCR amplification of the replication initiation protein (Rep) gene revealed narrow and distinct depth distributions for the newly described ssDNA phages within the upper 200 m of the water column at the BATS site. Comparison of Rep gene sequences obtained from the BATS site over time revealed changes in the diversity of ssDNA phages over monthly time scales, although some nearly identical sequences were recovered from samples collected 4 years apart. Examination of ssDNA phage diversity along transects through the North Atlantic Ocean revealed a positive correlation between genetic distance and geographic distance between sampling sites. Together, the data suggest fundamental differences between the distribution of these ssDNA phages and the distribution of known marine dsDNA phages, possibly because of differences in host range, host distribution, virion stability, or viral evolution mechanisms and rates. Future work needs to elucidate the host ranges for oceanic ssDNA phages and determine their ecological roles in the marine ecosystem.

  8. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  9. Analysis of high-throughput sequencing and annotation strategies for phage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Henn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial viruses (phages play a critical role in shaping microbial populations as they influence both host mortality and horizontal gene transfer. As such, they have a significant impact on local and global ecosystem function and human health. Despite their importance, little is known about the genomic diversity harbored in phages, as methods to capture complete phage genomes have been hampered by the lack of knowledge about the target genomes, and difficulties in generating sufficient quantities of genomic DNA for sequencing. Of the approximately 550 phage genomes currently available in the public domain, fewer than 5% are marine phage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To advance the study of phage biology through comparative genomic approaches we used marine cyanophage as a model system. We compared DNA preparation methodologies (DNA extraction directly from either phage lysates or CsCl purified phage particles, and sequencing strategies that utilize either Sanger sequencing of a linker amplification shotgun library (LASL or of a whole genome shotgun library (WGSL, or 454 pyrosequencing methods. We demonstrate that genomic DNA sample preparation directly from a phage lysate, combined with 454 pyrosequencing, is best suited for phage genome sequencing at scale, as this method is capable of capturing complete continuous genomes with high accuracy. In addition, we describe an automated annotation informatics pipeline that delivers high-quality annotation and yields few false positives and negatives in ORF calling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These DNA preparation, sequencing and annotation strategies enable a high-throughput approach to the burgeoning field of phage genomics.

  10. Phages of dairy Leuconostoc mesenteroides: genomics and factors influencing their adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujato, Silvina A; Mercanti, Diego J; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Moineau, Sylvain; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Quiberoni, Andrea del L

    2015-05-18

    Phages infecting Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains can be overlooked during milk fermentation because they do not slowdown the acidification process. However, they can negatively impact the flavor profile of the final product. Yet, the information about these phages is still scarce. In this work, we investigated diverse factors influencing the adsorption of seven virulent Ln. mesenteroides phages, isolated from blue cheese manufacture in Argentina, to their host cells. The addition of calcium ions was generally necessary to observe complete cell lysis and plaque formation for four of the seven phages, but adsorption was very high even in the absence of this cation for all phages. The temperature barely influenced the adsorption process as it was high within the temperature range tested (0 to 50 °C). Moreover, the kinetics of adsorption were similar on viable and non-viable cells, revealing that phage adsorption does not depend on physiological state of the bacterial cells. The adsorption rates were also high at pH values from 4 to 9 for all Ln. mesenteroides phages. We also analyzed the complete genome sequences of two of these phages. Complete nucleotide analysis of phages Ln-8 and Ln-9 showed dsDNA genomes with sizes of 28.5 and 28.9 kb, and the presence of 45 and 48 open reading frames (ORFs), respectively. These genomes were highly similar to those of previously characterized Φ1-A4 (USA, sauerkraut, fermentation) and ΦLN25 (England, whey), both virulent Ln. mesenteroides phages. A detailed understanding of these phages will lead to better control strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aggregation/dispersion transitions of T4 phage triggered by environmental ion availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szermer-Olearnik, Bożena; Drab, Marek; Mąkosa, Mateusz; Zembala, Maria; Barbasz, Jakub; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Boratyński, Janusz

    2017-04-24

    Bacteriophage survives in at least two extremes of ionic environments: bacterial host (high ionic-cytosol) and that of soil (low ionic-environmental water). The impact of ionic composition in the micro- and macro-environments has not so far been addressed in phage biology. Here, we discovered a novel mechanism of aggregation/disaggregation transitions by phage virions. When normal sodium levels in phage media (150 mM) were lowered to 10 mM, advanced imaging by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering all revealed formation of viral packages, each containing 20-100 virions. When ionic strength was returned from low to high, the aggregated state of phage reversed to a dispersed state, and the change in ionic strength did not substantially affect infectivity of the phage. By providing the direct evidence, that lowering of the sodium ion below the threshold of 20 mM causes rapid aggregation of phage while returning Na+ concentration to the values above this threshold causes dispersion of phage, we identified a biophysical mechanism of phage aggregation. Our results implicate operation of group behavior in phage and suggest a new kind of quorum sensing among its virions that is mediated by ions. Loss of ionic strength may act as a trigger in an evolutionary mechanism to improve the survival of bacteriophage by stimulating aggregation of phage when outside a bacterial host. Reversal of phage aggregation is also a promising breakthrough in biotechnological applications, since we demonstrated here the ability to retain viable virion aggregates on standard micro-filters.

  12. Map display design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  13. Compressive light field displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Gordon; Lanman, Douglas; Hirsch, Matthew; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Raskar, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Light fields are the multiview extension of stereo image pairs: a collection of images showing a 3D scene from slightly different perspectives. Depicting high-resolution light fields usually requires an excessively large display bandwidth; compressive light field displays are enabled by the codesign of optical elements and computational-processing algorithms. Rather than pursuing a direct "optical" solution (for example, adding one more pixel to support the emission of one additional light ray), compressive displays aim to create flexible optical systems that can synthesize a compressed target light field. In effect, each pixel emits a superposition of light rays. Through compression and tailored optical designs, fewer display pixels are necessary to emit a given light field than a direct optical solution would require.

  14. Flexible displays, rigid designs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbæk, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Rapid technological progress has enabled a wide range of flexible displays for computing devices, but the user experience--which we're only beginning to understand--will be the key driver for successful designs....

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Displays

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Displays that are effective as of July 1, 2016....

  16. Advanced aerosense display interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    1998-09-01

    High-resolution display technologies are being developed to meet the ever-increasing demand for realistic detail. The requirement for evermore visual information exceeds the capacity of fielded aerospace display interfaces. In this paper we begin an exploration of display interfaces and evolving aerospace requirements. Current and evolving standards for avionics, commercial, and flat panel displays are summarized and compared to near term goals for military and aerospace applications. Aerospace and military applications prior to 2005 up to UXGA and digital HDTV resolution can be met by using commercial interface standard developments. Advanced aerospace requirements require yet higher resolutions (2560 X 2048 color pixels, 5120 X 4096 color pixels at 85 Hz, etc.) and necessitate the initiation of discussion herein of an 'ultra digital interface standard (UDIS)' which includes 'smart interface' features such as large memory and blazingly fast resizing microcomputer. Interface capacity, IT, increased about 105 from 1973 to 1998; 102 more is needed for UDIS.

  17. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    with the drive capability of the present state-of-the- art microm.ziiaturized integi ated circuits. The impact of microminiaturizing the drive circuits...7 Advantages /Disadvantages of Prior Art .........- 8 Performance of the Liquid Crystal Matrix Display . . .. 8 Liquid Crystal...Holographic HUD Light Source ...................... .... 99 Design of a Special Purpose Mercury Art - Plo.?hcr La np . 104 V LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION FOR DISPLAY

  18. Military display performance parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  19. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage KPP21 belonging to family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses isolated in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehisa, Ryu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Kato, Shin-Ichiro; Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Yamaguchi, Kotoe; Miyata, Reina; Ujihara, Takako; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Daibata, Masanori; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) belonging to the family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses have been used as therapeutic agent in phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. P. aeruginosa phage KPP21 was isolated in Japan, and phylogenetically investigated the phages belonging to this viral genus. Morphological and genetic analyses confirmed that phage KPP21 belongs to the family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses based on putative DNA polymerase and major virion protein showed that P. aeruginosa phages belonging to the genus N4-like viruses are separated into two lineages and that phage KPP21 is in the same clade as phage LUZ7. © 2015 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Novel chitosan film embedded with liposome-encapsulated phage for biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haiying; Yuan, Lu; Lin, Lin

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, phages used for the reduction of pathogenic bacteria have fostered many attentions, but they are liable to lost bioactivity in food due to the presence of acidic compounds, enzymes and evaporite materials. To improve the stability of phages, a chitosan edible film containing liposome-encapsulated phage was engineered in the present study. The characteristics of liposome-encapsulated phage and the chitosan film containing liposome-encapsulated phage were investigated. The encapsulation efficiency of phages in liposome reached 57.66±0.12%. Besides, the desirable physical properties of chitosan film were obtained. The chitosan film embedded with liposome-encapsulated phage exhibited high antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157:H7, without the impact on the sensory properties of beef. Hence, chitosan film containing liposome-encapsulated phage could be a promising antibacterial packaging for beef preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SNP-PHAGE – High throughput SNP discovery pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cregan Perry B

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as defined here are single base sequence changes or short insertion/deletions between or within individuals of a given species. As a result of their abundance and the availability of high throughput analysis technologies SNP markers have begun to replace other traditional markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs and simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellite markers for fine mapping and association studies in several species. For SNP discovery from chromatogram data, several bioinformatics programs have to be combined to generate an analysis pipeline. Results have to be stored in a relational database to facilitate interrogation through queries or to generate data for further analyses such as determination of linkage disequilibrium and identification of common haplotypes. Although these tasks are routinely performed by several groups, an integrated open source SNP discovery pipeline that can be easily adapted by new groups interested in SNP marker development is currently unavailable. Results We developed SNP-PHAGE (SNP discovery Pipeline with additional features for identification of common haplotypes within a sequence tagged site (Haplotype Analysis and GenBank (-dbSNP submissions. This tool was applied for analyzing sequence traces from diverse soybean genotypes to discover over 10,000 SNPs. This package was developed on UNIX/Linux platform, written in Perl and uses a MySQL database. Scripts to generate a user-friendly web interface are also provided with common queries for preliminary data analysis. A machine learning tool developed by this group for increasing the efficiency of SNP discovery is integrated as a part of this package as an optional feature. The SNP-PHAGE package is being made available open source at http://bfgl.anri.barc.usda.gov/ML/snp-phage/. Conclusion SNP-PHAGE provides a bioinformatics

  2. Development of a Phage Cocktail to Control Proteus mirabilis Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luís D R; Veiga, Patrícia; Cerca, Nuno; Kropinski, Andrew M; Almeida, Carina; Azeredo, Joana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterium that causes catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) due to its ability to colonize and form crystalline biofilms on the catheters surface. CAUTIs are very difficult to treat, since biofilm structures are highly tolerant to antibiotics. Phages have been used widely to control a diversity of bacterial species, however, a limited number of phages for P. mirabilis have been isolated and studied. Here we report the isolation of two novel virulent phages, the podovirus vB_PmiP_5460 and the myovirus vB_PmiM_5461, which are able to target, respectively, 16 of the 26 and all the Proteus strains tested in this study. Both phages have been characterized thoroughly and sequencing data revealed no traces of genes associated with lysogeny. To further evaluate the phages' ability to prevent catheter's colonization by Proteus, the phages adherence to silicone surfaces was assessed. Further tests in phage-coated catheters using a dynamic biofilm model simulating CAUTIs, have shown a significant reduction of P. mirabilis biofilm formation up to 168 h of catheterization. These results highlight the potential usefulness of the two isolated phages for the prevention of surface colonization by this bacterium.

  3. Treatment of in vitro enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection using phage and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, C; Bolla, P A; de Urraza, P J

    2016-07-01

    To assay the combination of phage and probiotics against EHEC in vitro on infected Hep-2 cells. Phage and probiotics treatments on EHEC O157:H7-infected Hep-2 cells were assayed individually or combined. The effect of freeze-drying on phage and probiotic antimicrobial activity was also studied. While treatment with phage alone increased cell detachment caused by EHEC infection, the treatments with MM alone or in combination with phage proved to effectively diminish cell damage caused by EHEC infection. Combined treatment showed a decrease in apoptotic cell count of 57·3% and a reduction in EHEC adhesion to cell monolayer of 1·2 log CFU. The simultaneous use of phage and probiotics showed no antagonistic effect, and freeze-drying did not affect their antipathogenic activity. The combination of phage and probiotics has great potential for reducing the number of pathogens adhered to epithelial cells during EHEC O157:H7 infection and attenuating the cytotoxic effect derived from it. Further in vivo assays are needed for assessing the actual effectiveness of the treatment. This study presents a freeze-dried formulation of phage and probiotics capable of controlling EHEC infections and reducing epithelial cell damage in vitro. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Phage inactivation of foodborne Shigella on ready-to-eat spiced chicken.